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Sample records for mutant human amyloid

  1. Characterization of amyloid beta peptides from brain extracts of transgenic mice overexpressing the London mutant of human amyloid precursor protein.

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    Pype, Stefan; Moechars, Dieder; Dillen, Lieve; Mercken, Marc

    2003-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is marked by the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques in the brain of patients. To study plaque formation, we report on further quantitative and qualitative analysis of human and mouse amyloid beta peptides (Abeta) from brain extracts of transgenic mice overexpressing the London mutant of human amyloid precursor protein (APP). Using enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays (ELISAs) specific for either human or rodent Abeta, we found that the peptides from both species aggregated to form plaques. The ratios of deposited Abeta1-42/1-40 were in the order of 2-3 for human and 8-9 for mouse peptides, indicating preferential deposition of Abeta42. We also determined the identity and relative levels of other Abeta variants present in protein extracts from soluble and insoluble brain fractions. This was done by combined immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry (IP/MS). The most prominent peptides truncated either at the carboxyl- or the amino-terminus were Abeta1-38 and Abeta11-42, respectively, and the latter was strongly enriched in the extracts of deposited peptides. Taken together, our data indicate that plaques of APP-London transgenic mice consist of aggregates of multiple human and mouse Abeta variants, and the human variants that we identified were previously detected in brain extracts of AD patients.

  2. Human stefin B normal and patho-physiological role: molecular and cellular aspects of amyloid-type aggregation of certain EPM1 mutants.

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    Mira ePolajnar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsies are characterised by abnormal electrophysiological activity of the brain. Among various types of inherited epilepsies different epilepsy syndromes, among them progressive myoclonus epilepsies with features of ataxia and neurodegeneration, are counted. The progressive myoclonus epilepsy of type 1 (EPM1, also known as Unverricht-Lundborg disease presents with features of cerebellar atrophy and increased oxidative stress. It has been found that EPM1 is caused by mutations in human cystatin B gene (human stefin B. We first describe the role of protein aggregation in other neurodegenerative conditions. Protein aggregates appear intraneurally but are also excreted, such as is the case with senile plaques of amyloid- β (Aβ that accumulate in the brain parenchyma and vessel walls. A common characteristic of such diseases is the change of the protein conformation towards β secondary structure that accounts for the strong tendency of such proteins to aggregate and form amyloid fibrils. Second, we describe the patho-physiology of EPM1 and the normal and aberrant roles of stefin B in a mouse model of the disease. Furthermore, we discuss how the increased protein aggregation observed with some of the mutants of human stefin B may relate to the neurodegeneration that occurs in rare EPM1 patients. Our hypothesis (Ceru et al., 2005 states that some of the EPM1 mutants of human stefin B may undergo aggregation in neural cells, thus gaining additional toxic function (apart from loss of normal function. Our in vitro experiments thus far have confirmed that 4 mutants undergo increased aggregation relative to the wild-type protein. It has been shown that the R68X mutant forms amyloid-fibrils very rapidly, even at neutral pH and forms perinuclear inclusions, whereas the G4R mutant exhibits a prolonged lag phase, during which the toxic prefibrillar aggregates accumulate and are scattered more diffusely over the cytoplasm. Initial experiments on the G50E

  3. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

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    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  4. Differential interaction of Apolipoprotein-E isoforms with insulin receptors modulates brain insulin signaling in mutant human amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

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    Chan, Elizabeth S; Chen, Christopher; Cole, Gregory M; Wong, Boon-Seng

    2015-09-08

    It is unclear how human apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although Aβ levels can lead to insulin signaling impairment, these experiments were done in the absence of human ApoE. To examine ApoE role, we crossed the human ApoE-targeted replacement mice with mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) mice. In 26 week old mice with lower Aβ levels, the expression and phosphorylation of insulin signaling proteins remained comparable among APP, ApoE3xAPP and ApoE4xAPP mouse brains. When the mice aged to 78 weeks, these proteins were markedly reduced in APP and ApoE4xAPP mouse brains. While Aβ can bind to insulin receptor, how ApoE isoforms modulate this interaction remains unknown. Here, we showed that ApoE3 had greater association with insulin receptor as compared to ApoE4, regardless of Aβ42 concentration. In contrast, ApoE4 bound more Aβ42 with increasing peptide levels. Using primary hippocampal neurons, we showed that ApoE3 and ApoE4 neurons are equally sensitive to physiological levels of insulin. However, in the presence of Aβ42, insulin failed to elicit a downstream response only in ApoE4 hippocampal neurons. Taken together, our data show that ApoE genotypes can modulate this Aβ-mediated insulin signaling impairment.

  5. Why are Functional Amyloids Non-Toxic in Humans?

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    Matthew P. Jackson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloids were first identified in association with amyloidoses, human diseases in which proteins and peptides misfold into amyloid fibrils. Subsequent studies have identified an array of functional amyloid fibrils that perform physiological roles in humans. Given the potential for the production of toxic species in amyloid assembly reactions, it is remarkable that cells can produce these functional amyloids without suffering any obvious ill effect. Although the precise mechanisms are unclear, there are a number of ways in which amyloid toxicity may be prevented. These include regulating the level of the amyloidogenic peptides and proteins, minimising the production of prefibrillar oligomers in amyloid assembly reactions, sequestrating amyloids within membrane bound organelles, controlling amyloid assembly by other molecules, and disassembling the fibrils under physiological conditions. Crucially, a better understanding of how toxicity is avoided in the production of functional amyloids may provide insights into the prevention of amyloid toxicity in amyloidoses.

  6. Diagnostic radionuclide imaging of amyloid: biological targeting by circulating human serum amyloid P component

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    Hawkins, P.N.; Lavender, J.P.; Myers, M.J.; Pepys, M.B.

    1988-06-25

    The specific molecular affinity of the normal plasma protein, serum amyloid P component (SAP), for all known types of amyloid fibrils was used to develop a new general diagnostic method for in-vivo radionuclide imaging of amyloid deposits. After intravenous injection of /sup 123/I-labelled purified human SAP there was specific uptake into amyloid deposits in all affected patients, 7 with systematic AL amyloid, 5 with AA amyloid, and 2 with ..beta../sub 2/M amyloid, in contrast to the complete absence of any tissue localisation in 5 control subjects. Distinctive high-resolution scintigraphic images, even of minor deposits in the carpal regions, bone marrow, or adrenals, were obtained. This procedure should yield much information on the natural history and the management of amyloidosis, the presence of which has hitherto been confirmed only by biopsy. Clearance and metabolic studies indicated that, in the presence of extensive amyloidosis, the rate of synthesis of SAP was greatly increased despite maintenance of normal plasma levels. Futhermore, once localised to amyloid deposits the /sup 123/I-SAP persisted for long periods and was apparently protected from its normal rapid degradation. These findings shed new light on the pathophysiology of amyloid and may have implications for therapeutic strategies based upon specific molecular targeting with SAP.

  7. Human serum amyloid genes--molecular characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sack, G.H.; Lease, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three clones containing human genes for serum amyloid A protein (SAA) have been isolated and characterized. Each of two clones, GSAA 1 and 2 (of 12.8 and 15.9 kilobases, respectively), contains two exons, accouting for amino acids 12-58 and 58-103 of mature SAA; the extreme 5' termini and 5' untranslated regions have not yet been defined but are anticipated to be close based on studies of murine SAA genes. Initial amino acid sequence comparisons show 78/89 identical residues. At 4 of the 11 discrepant residues, the amino acid specified by the codon is the same as the corresponding residue in murine SAA. Identification of regions containing coding regions has permitted use of selected subclones for blot hybridization studies of larger human SAA chromosomal gene organization. The third clone, GSAA 3 also contains SAA coding information by DNA sequence analysis but has a different organization which has not yet been fully described. We have reported the isolation of clones of human DNA hybridizing with pRS48 - a plasmid containing a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone for murine serum amyloid A (SAA; 1, 2). We now present more detailed data confirming the identity and defining some of the organizational features of these clones

  8. Convergent mechanisms favor fast amyloid formation in two lambda 6a Ig light chain mutants.

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    Valdés-García, Gilberto; Millán-Pacheco, César; Pastor, Nina

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular deposition as amyloids of immunoglobulin light chains causes light chain amyloidosis. Among the light chain families, lambda 6a is one of the most frequent in light chain amyloidosis patients. Its germline protein, 6aJL2, and point mutants, R24G and P7S, are good models to study fibrillogenesis, because their stability and fibril formation characteristics have been described. Both mutations make the germline protein unstable and speed up its ability to aggregate. To date, there is no molecular mechanism that explains how these differences in amyloidogenesis can arise from a single mutation. To look into the structural and dynamical differences in the native state of these proteins, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Despite the structural similarity of the germline protein and the mutants, we found differences in their dynamical signatures that explain the mutants' increased tendency to form amyloids. The contact network alterations caused by the mutations, though different, converge in affecting two anti-aggregation motifs present in light chain variable domains, suggesting a different starting point for aggregation in lambda chains compared to kappa chains. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

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    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-07

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  10. Evidence for Novel β-Sheet Structures in Iowa Mutant β-Amyloid Fibrils†

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    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L.; Orgel, Joseph P. R. O.; Meredith, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of β-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer’s disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Aβ40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Aβ40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 × 10-3 min-1 and 1.07 × 10-4 min-1 for D23N-Aβ40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Aβ40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Aβ40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-β pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 Å and a broad reflection at 9.4 Å, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Aβ40 fibrils (10.4 Å). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Aβ40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel β-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Aβ40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel β-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through 13C-13C and 15N-13C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Aβ40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients. PMID:19358576

  11. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

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    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  12. Extracellular vesicles from human pancreatic islets suppress human islet amyloid polypeptide amyloid formation

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    Ribeiro, Diana; Horvath, Istvan; Heath, Nikki; Hicks, Ryan; Forslöw, Anna; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    Protein assembly into amyloid fibers underlies such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) also involves amyloid formation, although in the pancreas. Because there are no cures for amyloid diseases and T2D is on the rise due to an increasing prevalence of obesity, identifying involved mechanisms and control processes is of utmost importance. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can mediate physiological and pathological communication both loc...

  13. Kinetics of human serum amyloid A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Martin, M.E.; Solomon, N.

    1986-01-01

    In order to better understand the pathogenetic role of serum amyloid A (SAA) we studied the kinetics of 131 I radiolabelled pure SAA, extracted from 400 ml serum of a human volunteer. 50 microCi of 131 I SAA and 15 microCi 125 I labelled sodium iodide were administered i.v. on two occasions at 6 month intervals. Serum and plasma samples were collected at 10-20 min intervals x 10, then once daily x 10; lymphocytes were separated from monocytes and granulocytes. Counts per minute of 131 I and 125 I were measured in each sample in the serum, in serum precipitates resulting after addition of a rabbit anti-SAA antibody and of TCA and in various cell subpopulations as well as in the whole urine and TCA precipitated urine from each micturition. The 131 I disappearance curves from the plasma and serum precipitates were semilogarithmically plotted; cumulative 131 I cpm in plasma, cells and urine at various intervals were determined. Body scanning was performed at 2, 16, and 48 h. The results of the two experiments were very similar. The curve of 131 I SAA in plasma TCA precipitates indicated the existence of 4 compartments likely due to uptake of 131 I SAA by some plasma proteins, circulating cells and other tissues; later release from tissues started at 6 h. The 131 I SAA half-life time in these compartments was found to be 35, 170, 255, and 550 min, respectively. Tissue binding of 131 I was also suggested by a rising of the 125 I: 131 I ratio with time and by a 26% release of 131 I in the urine at 15 h which could not account for its plasma disappearance. Scanning, except for 131 I uptake in the spleen at 2 h likely due to blood activity, showed no organ concentration. 92% of the injected 131 I was found in the urine but only 6.2% of 131 I SAA was accounted for in urine precicipitates

  14. Human amyloid beta protein gene locus: HaeIII RFLP

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    Taylor, J E; Gonzalez-DeWhitt, P A; Fuller, F; Cordell, B; Frossard, P M [California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View (USA); Tinklenberg, J R; Davies, H D; Eng, L F; Yesavage, J A [Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (USA)

    1988-07-25

    A 2.2 kb EcoRI-EcoRI fragment from the 5{prime} end of the human amyloid beta protein cDNA was isolated from a human fibroblast cDNA library and subcloned into pGEM3. HaeIII (GGCC) detects 6 invariant bands at 0.5 kb, 1.0 kb, 1.1 kb, 1.3 kb, 1.4 kb and 1.6 kb and a two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 1.9 kb or 2.1 kb. Its frequency was studied in 50 North Americans. Human amyloid beta protein gene mapped to the long arm of chromosome 21 (21q11.2-21q21) by Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation was observed in two families (15 individuals).

  15. Studies of the aggregation of mutant proteins in vitro provide insights into the genetics of amyloid diseases.

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    Chiti, Fabrizio; Calamai, Martino; Taddei, Niccolo; Stefani, Massimo; Ramponi, Giampietro; Dobson, Christopher M

    2002-12-10

    Protein aggregation and the formation of highly insoluble amyloid structures is associated with a range of debilitating human conditions, which include Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Muscle acylphosphatase (AcP) has already provided significant insights into mutational changes that modulate amyloid formation. In the present paper, we have used this system to investigate the effects of mutations that modify the charge state of a protein without affecting significantly the hydrophobicity or secondary structural propensities of the polypeptide chain. A highly significant inverse correlation was found to exist between the rates of aggregation of the protein variants under denaturing conditions and their overall net charge. This result indicates that aggregation is generally favored by mutations that bring the net charge of the protein closer to neutrality. In light of this finding, we have analyzed natural mutations associated with familial forms of amyloid diseases that involve alteration of the net charge of the proteins or protein fragments associated with the diseases. Sixteen mutations have been identified for which the mechanism of action that causes the pathological condition is not yet known or fully understood. Remarkably, 14 of these 16 mutations cause the net charge of the corresponding peptide or protein that converts into amyloid deposits to be reduced. This result suggests that charge has been a key parameter in molecular evolution to ensure the avoidance of protein aggregation and identifies reduction of the net charge as an important determinant in at least some forms of protein deposition diseases.

  16. Multiple isoforms of the human pentraxin serum amyloid P component

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    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH

    1995-01-01

    Human serum amyloid P component (SAP) isolated from 20 healthy individuals was analyzed by anion exchange chromatography and isoelectric focusing (IEF) in order to investigate the existence of multiple forms of SAP and interindividual structural differences. Anion exchange chromatography showed one...... major and several minor subpopulations of SAP. IEF of all SAP isolates showed a previously unreported degree of heterogeneity with six isoelectric forms (pKi range 5.5-6.1) and with minor interindividual differences in respect of isoelectric points. Total enzymatic deglycosylation of SAP reduced...... the number of bands in IEF to two indicating the existence of two types of polypeptide chains....

  17. Amyloid structure exhibits polymorphism on multiple length scales in human brain tissue

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    Liu, Jiliang; Costantino, Isabel; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Hyman, Bradley; Frosch, Matthew; Gomez-Isla, Teresa; Makowski, Lee

    2016-09-15

    Although aggregation of Aβ amyloid fibrils into plaques in the brain is a hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the correlation between amyloid burden and severity of symptoms is weak. One possible reason is that amyloid fibrils are structurally polymorphic and different polymorphs may contribute differentially to disease. However, the occurrence and distribution of amyloid polymorphisms in human brain is poorly documented. Here we seek to fill this knowledge gap by using X-ray microdiffraction of histological sections of human tissue to map the abundance, orientation and structural heterogeneities of amyloid within individual plaques; among proximal plaques and in subjects with distinct clinical histories. A 5 µ x-ray beam was used to generate diffraction data with each pattern arising from a scattering volume of only ~ 450 µ3 , making possible collection of dozens to hundreds of diffraction patterns from a single amyloid plaque. X-ray scattering from these samples exhibited all the properties expected for scattering from amyloid. Amyloid distribution was mapped using the intensity of its signature 4.7 Å reflection which also provided information on the orientation of amyloid fibrils across plaques. Margins of plaques exhibited a greater degree of orientation than cores and orientation around blood vessels frequently appeared tangential. Variation in the structure of Aβ fibrils is reflected in the shape of the 4.7 Å peak which usually appears as a doublet. Variations in this peak correspond to differences between the structure of amyloid within cores of plaques and at their periphery. Examination of tissue from a mismatch case - an individual with high plaque burden but no overt signs of dementia at time of death - revealed a diversity of structure and spatial distribution of amyloid that is distinct from typical AD cases. We demonstrate the existence of structural polymorphisms among amyloid within and among plaques of a single individual and suggest

  18. Aspects of structural landscape of human islet amyloid polypeptide

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    He, Jianfeng, E-mail: hjf@bit.edu.cn; Dai, Jin, E-mail: daijing491@gmail.com [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: jinglichina@139.com [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Research, Yangtze River Pharmaceutical Group Beijing Haiyan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Beijing 102206 (China); Peng, Xubiao, E-mail: xubiaopeng@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fédération Denis Poisson, Université de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)

    2015-01-28

    The human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) co-operates with insulin to maintain glycemic balance. It also constitutes the amyloid plaques that aggregate in the pancreas of type-II diabetic patients. We have performed extensive in silico investigations to analyse the structural landscape of monomeric hIAPP, which is presumed to be intrinsically disordered. For this, we construct from first principles a highly predictive energy function that describes a monomeric hIAPP observed in a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, as a local energy minimum. We subject our theoretical model of hIAPP to repeated heating and cooling simulations, back and forth between a high temperature regime where the conformation resembles a random walker and a low temperature limit where no thermal motions prevail. We find that the final low temperature conformations display a high level of degeneracy, in a manner which is fully in line with the presumed intrinsically disordered character of hIAPP. In particular, we identify an isolated family of α-helical conformations that might cause the transition to amyloidosis, by nucleation.

  19. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  20. Amyloid β levels in human red blood cells.

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    Takehiro Kiko

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging, implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402.

  1. Direct visualization of HIV-enhancing endogenous amyloid fibrils in human semen

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    Usmani, Shariq M.; Zirafi, Onofrio; Müller, Janis; Sandi-Monroy, Nathallie; Yadav, Jay K.; Meier, Christoph; Weil, Tanja; Roan, Nadia R.; Greene, Warner C.; Walther, Paul; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Hammarström, Per; Wetzel, Ronald; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Gagsteiger, Friedrich; Fändrich, Marcus; Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring fragments of the abundant semen proteins prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and semenogelins form amyloid fibrils in vitro. These fibrils boost HIV infection and may play a key role in the spread of the AIDS pandemic. However, the presence of amyloid fibrils in semen remained to be demonstrated. Here, we use state of the art confocal and electron microscopy techniques for direct imaging of amyloid fibrils in human ejaculates. We detect amyloid aggregates in all semen samples and find that they partially consist of PAP fragments, interact with HIV particles and increase viral infectivity. Our results establish semen as a body fluid that naturally contains amyloid fibrils that are exploited by HIV to promote its sexual transmission. PMID:24691351

  2. Mutant APP and Amyloid beta-induced defective autophagy, mitophagy, mitochondrial structural and functional changes and synaptic damage in hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease.

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    Reddy, P Hemachandra; Yin, XiangLin; Manczak, Maria; Kumar, Subodh; Jangampalli Adi, Pradeepkiran; Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, Arubala P

    2018-04-25

    The purpose of our study was to determine the toxic effects of hippocampal mutant APP and amyloid beta (Aβ) in human mutant APP (mAPP) cDNA transfected with primary mouse hippocampal neurons (HT22). Hippocampal tissues are the best source of studying learning and memory functions in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy controls. However, investigating immortalized hippocampal neurons that express AD proteins provide an excellent opportunity for drug testing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting & immunofluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy, we assessed mRNA and protein levels of synaptic, autophagy, mitophagy, mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis, dendritic protein MAP2, and assessed mitochondrial number and length in mAPP-HT22 cells that express Swedish/Indiana mutations. Mitochondrial function was assessed by measuring the levels of hydrogen peroxide, lipid peroxidation, cytochrome c oxidase activity and mitochondrial ATP. Increased levels of mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial fission genes, Drp1 and Fis1 and decreased levels fusion (Mfn1, Mfn2 and Opa1) biogenesis (PGC1α, NRF1, NRF2 & TFAM), autophagy (ATG5 & LC3BI, LC3BII), mitophagy (PINK1 & TERT, BCL2 & BNIPBL), synaptic (synaptophysin & PSD95) and dendritic (MAP2) genes were found in mAPP-HT22 cells relative to WT-HT22 cells. Cell survival was significantly reduced mAPP-HT22 cells. GTPase-Dp1 enzymatic activity was increased in mAPP-HT22 cells. Transmission electron microscopy revealed significantly increased mitochondrial numbers and reduced mitochondrial length in mAPP-HT22 cells. These findings suggest that hippocampal accumulation of mutant APP and Aβ is responsible for abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and defective biogenesis, reduced MAP2, autophagy, mitophagy and synaptic proteins & reduced dendritic spines and mitochondrial structural and functional changes in mutant APP hippocampal cells. These observations strongly suggest that accumulation of mAPP and A

  3. Computational Modelling of the Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skeby, Katrine Kirkeby

    2014-01-01

    to interpret results correctly. Computational studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in particular have become important tools in the effort to understand biological mechanisms. The strength of these methods is the high resolution in time and space, and the ability to specifically design the system....... Using MD simulations we have investigated the binding of 13 different imaging agents to a fibril segment. Using clustering analysis and binding energy calculations we have identified a common binding mode for the 13 agents in the surface grooves of the fibril, which are present on all amyloid fibrils....... This information combined with specific knowledge about the AD amyloid fibril is the building block for the design of highly specific amyloid imaging agents. We have also used MD simulations to study the interaction between hIAPP and a phospholipid membrane. At neutral pH, we find that the attraction is mainly...

  4. Native human serum amyloid P component is a single pentamer

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    Sørensen, Inge Juul; Andersen, Ove; Nielsen, EH

    1995-01-01

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are members of the pentraxin protein family. SAP is the precursor protein to amyloid P component present in all forms of amyloidosis. The prevailing notion is that SAP in circulation has the form of a double pentameric molecule (decamer...... by rocket immunoelectrophoresis and electron microscopy. Thus, electron micrographs of purified SAP showed a predominance of decamers. However, the decamer form of SAP reversed to single pentamers when purified SAP was incorporated into SAP-depleted serum....

  5. Small heat shock proteins potentiate amyloid dissolution by protein disaggregases from yeast and humans.

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    Martin L Duennwald

    Full Text Available How small heat shock proteins (sHsps might empower proteostasis networks to control beneficial prions or disassemble pathological amyloid is unknown. Here, we establish that yeast sHsps, Hsp26 and Hsp42, inhibit prionogenesis by the [PSI+] prion protein, Sup35, via distinct and synergistic mechanisms. Hsp42 prevents conformational rearrangements within molten oligomers that enable de novo prionogenesis and collaborates with Hsp70 to attenuate self-templating. By contrast, Hsp26 inhibits self-templating upon binding assembled prions. sHsp binding destabilizes Sup35 prions and promotes their disaggregation by Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40. In yeast, Hsp26 or Hsp42 overexpression prevents [PSI+] induction, cures [PSI+], and potentiates [PSI+]-curing by Hsp104 overexpression. In vitro, sHsps enhance Hsp104-catalyzed disaggregation of pathological amyloid forms of α-synuclein and polyglutamine. Unexpectedly, in the absence of Hsp104, sHsps promote an unprecedented, gradual depolymerization of Sup35 prions by Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. This unanticipated amyloid-depolymerase activity is conserved from yeast to humans, which lack Hsp104 orthologues. A human sHsp, HspB5, stimulates depolymerization of α-synuclein amyloid by human Hsp110, Hsp70, and Hsp40. Thus, we elucidate a heretofore-unrecognized human amyloid-depolymerase system that could have applications in various neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. A Drosophila gene encoding a protein resembling the human β-amyloid protein precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, D.R.; Martin-Morris, L.; Luo, L.; White, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have isolated genomic and cDNA clones for a Drosophila gene resembling the human β-amyloid precursor protein (APP). This gene produces a nervous system-enriched 6.5-kilobase transcript. Sequencing of cDNAs derived from the 6.5-kilobase transcript predicts an 886-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide contains a putative transmembrane domain and exhibits strong sequence similarity to cytoplasmic and extracellular regions of the human β-amyloid precursor protein. There is a high probability that this Drosophila gene corresponds to the essential Drosophila locus vnd, a gene required for embryonic nervous system development

  7. Assemblies of amyloid-β30-36 hexamer and its G33V/L34T mutants by replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Qian

    Full Text Available The aggregation of amyloid-β peptides is associated with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, in which the 30-36 fragments play an important part as a fiber-forming hydrophobic region. The fibrillar structure of Aβ30-36 has been detected by means of X-ray diffraction, but its oligomeric structural determination, biophysical characterization, and pathological mechanism remain elusive. In this study, we have investigated the structures of Aβ30-36 hexamer as well as its G33V and L34T mutants in explicit water environment using replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD simulations. Our results show that the wild-type (WT Aβ30-36 hexamer has a preference to form β-barrel and bilayer β-sheet conformations, while the G33V or L34T mutation disrupts the β-barrel structures: the G33V mutant is homogenized to adopt β-sheet-rich bilayers, and the structures of L34T mutant on the contrary get more diverse. The hydrophobic interaction plays a critical role in the formation and stability of oligomeric assemblies among all the three systems. In addition, the substitution of G33 by V reduces the β-sheet content in the most populated conformations of Aβ30-36 oligomers through a steric effect. The L34T mutation disturbs the interpeptide hydrogen bonding network, and results in the increased coil content and morphological diversity. Our REMD runs provide structural details of WT and G33V/L34T mutant Aβ30-36 oligomers, and molecular insight into the aggregation mechanism, which will be helpful for designing novel inhibitors or amyloid-based materials.

  8. Amyloid Deposition in Transplanted Human Pancreatic Islets: A Conceivable Cause of Their Long-Term Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Andersson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the encouraging report of the Edmonton group, there was a rejuvenation of the islet transplantation field. After that, more pessimistic views spread when long-term results of the clinical outcome were published. A progressive loss of the β-cell function meant that almost all patients were back on insulin therapy after 5 years. More than 10 years ago, we demonstrated that amyloid deposits rapidly formed in human islets and in mouse islets transgenic for human IAPP when grafted into nude mice. It is, therefore, conceivable to consider amyloid formation as one potential candidate for the long-term failure. The present paper reviews attempts in our laboratories to elucidate the dynamics of and mechanisms behind the formation of amyloid in transplanted islets with special emphasis on the impact of long-term hyperglycemia.

  9. Comparison of the amyloid pore forming properties of rat and human Alzheimer’s beta-amyloid peptide 1-42: Calcium imaging data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Di Scala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The data here consists of calcium imaging of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells treated with the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4AM and then incubated with nanomolar concentrations of either human or rat Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide Aβ1-42. These data are both of a qualitative (fluorescence micrographs and semi-quantitative nature (estimation of intracellular calcium concentrations of cells probed by Aβ1-42 peptides vs. control untreated cells. Since rat Aβ1-42 differs from its human counterpart at only three amino acid positions, this comparative study is a good assessment of the specificity of the amyloid pore forming assay. The interpretation of this dataset is presented in the accompanying study “Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides” [1].

  10. Spatial constraints govern competition of mutant clones in human epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, M D; Lynch, C N S; Craythorne, E; Liakath-Ali, K; Mallipeddi, R; Barker, J N; Watt, F M

    2017-10-24

    Deep sequencing can detect somatic DNA mutations in tissues permitting inference of clonal relationships. This has been applied to human epidermis, where sun exposure leads to the accumulation of mutations and an increased risk of skin cancer. However, previous studies have yielded conflicting conclusions about the relative importance of positive selection and neutral drift in clonal evolution. Here, we sequenced larger areas of skin than previously, focusing on cancer-prone skin spanning five decades of life. The mutant clones identified were too large to be accounted for solely by neutral drift. Rather, using mathematical modelling and computational lattice-based simulations, we show that observed clone size distributions can be explained by a combination of neutral drift and stochastic nucleation of mutations at the boundary of expanding mutant clones that have a competitive advantage. These findings demonstrate that spatial context and cell competition cooperate to determine the fate of a mutant stem cell.

  11. Functional Amyloids in Reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewetson, Aveline; Do, Hoa Quynh; Myers, Caitlyn; Muthusubramanian, Archana; Sutton, Roger Bryan; Wylie, Benjamin J; Cornwall, Gail A

    2017-06-29

    Amyloids are traditionally considered pathological protein aggregates that play causative roles in neurodegenerative disease, diabetes and prionopathies. However, increasing evidence indicates that in many biological systems nonpathological amyloids are formed for functional purposes. In this review, we will specifically describe amyloids that carry out biological roles in sexual reproduction including the processes of gametogenesis, germline specification, sperm maturation and fertilization. Several of these functional amyloids are evolutionarily conserved across several taxa, including human, emphasizing the critical role amyloids perform in reproduction. Evidence will also be presented suggesting that, if altered, some functional amyloids may become pathological.

  12. Influence of Aluminium and EGCG on Fibrillation and Aggregation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Xue Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The abnormal fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP has been implicated in the development of type II diabetes. Aluminum is known to trigger the structural transformation of many amyloid proteins and induce the formation of toxic aggregate species. The (−-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is considered capable of binding both metal ions and amyloid proteins with inhibitory effect on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins. However, the effect of Al(III/EGCG complex on hIAPP fibrillation is unclear. In the present work, we sought to view insight into the structures and properties of Al(III and EGCG complex by using spectroscopic experiments and quantum chemical calculations and also investigated the influence of Al(III and EGCG on hIAPP fibrillation and aggregation as well as their combined interference on this process. Our studies demonstrated that Al(III could promote fibrillation and aggregation of hIAPP, while EGCG could inhibit the fibrillation of hIAPP and lead to the formation of hIAPP amorphous aggregates instead of the ordered fibrils. Furthermore, we proved that the Al(III/EGCG complex in molar ratio of 1 : 1 as Al(EGCG(H2O2 could inhibit the hIAPP fibrillation more effectively than EGCG alone. The results provide the invaluable reference for the new drug development to treat type II diabetes.

  13. Engineered aggregation inhibitor fusion for production of highly amyloidogenic human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirecka, Ewa Agnieszka; Gremer, Lothar; Schiefer, Stephanie; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Stoldt, Matthias; Willbold, Dieter; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is the major component of pancreatic amyloid deposits in type 2 diabetes. The structural conversion of IAPP from a monomeric state into amyloid assemblies is the subject of intense research. Recombinant production of IAPP is, however, difficult due to its extreme aggregation propensity. Here we describe a novel strategy for expression of IAPP in Escherichia coli, based on an engineered protein tag, which sequesters IAPP monomers and prevents IAPP aggregation. The IAPP-binding protein HI18 was selected by phage display from a β-wrapin library. Fusion of HI18 to IAPP enabled the soluble expression of the construct. IAPP was cleaved from the fusion construct and purified to homogeneity with a yield of 3mg of isotopically labeled peptide per liter of culture. In the monomeric state, IAPP was largely disordered as evidenced by far-UV CD and liquid-state NMR spectroscopy but competent to form amyloid fibrils according to atomic force microscopy. These results demonstrate the ability of the engineered β-wrapin HI18 for shielding the hydrophobic sequence of IAPP during expression and purification. Fusion of aggregation-inhibiting β-wrapins is a suitable approach for the recombinant production of aggregation-prone proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of human FE65, a ligand of Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein, by Sp1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yu, Hoi-Tin

    2010-03-01

    FE65 is a neuronal-enriched adaptor protein that binds to the Alzheimer\\'s disease amyloid precursor protein (APP). FE65 forms a transcriptionally active complex with the APP intracellular domain (AICD). The precise gene targets for this complex are unclear but several Alzheimer\\'s disease-linked genes have been proposed. Additionally, evidence suggests that FE65 influences APP metabolism. The mechanism by which FE65 expression is regulated is as yet unknown. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanism, we cloned a 1.6 kb fragment upstream of the human FE65 gene and found that it possesses particularly strong promoter activity in neurones. To delineate essential regions in the human FE65 promoter, a series of deletion mutants were generated. The minimal FE65 promoter was located between -100 and +5, which contains a functional Sp1 site. Overexpression of the transcription factor Sp1 potentiates the FE65 promoter activity. Conversely, suppression of the FE65 promoter was observed in cells either treated with an Sp1 inhibitor or in which Sp1 was knocked down. Furthermore, reduced levels of Sp1 resulted in downregulation of endogenous FE65 mRNA and protein. These findings reveal that Sp1 plays a crucial role in transcriptional control of the human FE65 gene.

  15. Yield of two mutant lines of soybean for human consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmeron E, J.; Mastache L, A. A.; Diaz V, G. E.; Valencia E, F.; Ranfla C, R.; Melendez P, M.; Cervantes S, T.; De la Cruz T, E.; Garcia A, J. M.; Falcon B, T.

    2009-01-01

    The present work has the objective of to evaluate the yield and the agronomic behavior of 2 mutant lines of soybean for human consumption, obtained by means of a process of recurrent irradiation of soybean seed ISAAEG-BM 2 with gammas of Co 60 and selection in the generation R 4 M 18 . For the variable yield significant statistical differences were not observed, but considering the rest of the evaluated agronomic characteristics the mutant lines L 6 and Bombona they were excellent with values of 3,934.6 and 3,806.8 Kg ha- 1 to 15% of grain humidity, they also possess excellent genetic characteristics result of the irradiations and selections of these new genetic materials. (Author)

  16. Time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering study of the early stage of amyloid formation of an apomyoglobin mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortore, Maria Grazia; Spinozzi, Francesco; Vilasi, Silvia; Sirangelo, Ivana; Irace, Gaetano; Shukla, Anuj; Narayanan, Theyencheri; Sinibaldi, Raffaele; Mariani, Paolo

    2011-12-01

    The description of the fibrillogenesis pathway and the identification of “on-pathway” or “off-pathway” intermediates are key issues in amyloid research as they are concerned with the mechanism for onset of certain diseases and with therapeutic treatments. Recent results on the fibril formation process revealed an unexpected complexity both in the number and in the types of species involved, but the early aggregation events are still largely unknown, mainly because of their experimental inaccessibility. To provide information on the early stage events of self-assembly of an amyloidogenic protein, during the so-called lag phase, stopped-flow time-resolved small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments were performed. Using a global fitting analysis, the structural and aggregation properties of the apomyoglobin W7FW14F mutant, which is monomeric and partly folded at acidic pH but forms amyloid fibrils after neutralization, were derived from the first few milliseconds onward. SAXS data indicated that the first aggregates appear in less than 20 ms after the pH jump to neutrality and further revealed the simultaneous presence of diverse species. In particular, worm-like unstructured monomers, very large assemblies, and elongated particles were detected, and their structural features and relative concentrations were derived as a function of time on the basis of our model. The final results show that, during the lag phase, early assembling occurs due to the presence of transient monomeric species very prone to association and through successive competing aggregation and rearrangement processes leading to coexisting on-pathway and off-pathway transient species.

  17. Serum Amyloid P Component (SAP) Interactome in Human Plasma Containing Physiological Calcium Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Pedersen, Kata Wolff; Marzeda, Anna Maria; Enghild, Jan J

    2017-02-14

    The pentraxin serum amyloid P component (SAP) is secreted by the liver and found in plasma at a concentration of approximately 30 mg/L. SAP is a 25 kDa homopentamer known to bind both protein and nonprotein ligands, all in a calcium-dependent manner. The function of SAP is unclear but likely involves the humoral innate immune system spanning the complement system, inflammation, and coagulation. Also, SAP is known to bind to the generic structure of amyloid deposits and possibly to protect them against proteolysis. In this study, we have characterized the SAP interactome in human plasma containing the physiological Ca 2+ concentration using SAP affinity pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation experiments followed by mass spectrometry analyses. The analyses resulted in the identification of 33 proteins, of which 24 were direct or indirect interaction partners not previously reported. The SAP interactome can be divided into categories that include apolipoproteins, the complement system, coagulation, and proteolytic regulation.

  18. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Binding to Catalase: A Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microplate Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G. N. Milton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-associated human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a 37-amino-acid peptide that forms fibrils in vitro and in vivo. Human IAPP fibrils are toxic in a similar manner to Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ and prion protein (PrP fibrils. Previous studies have shown that catalase binds to Aβ fibrils and appears to recognize a region containing the Gly-Ala-Ile-Ile sequence that is similar to the Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu sequence found in human IAPP residues 24-27. This study presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM—based analysis of fibril formation and the binding of human erythrocyte catalase to IAPP fibrils. The results show that human IAPP 1-37, 8-37, and 20-29 peptides form fibrils with diverse and polymorphic structures. All three forms of IAPP bound catalase, and complexes of IAPP 1-37 or 8-37 with catalase were identified by immunoassay. The binding of biotinylated IAPP to catalase was high affinity with a KD of 0.77nM, and could be inhibited by either human or rat IAPP 1-37 and 8-37 forms. Fibrils formed by the PrP 118-135 peptide with a Gly-Ala-Val-Val sequence also bound catalase. These results suggest that catalase recognizes a Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu—like sequence in amyloid fibril-forming peptides. For IAPP 1-37 and 8-37, the catalase binding was primarily directed towards fibrillar rather than ribbon-like structures, suggesting differences in the accessibility of the human IAPP 24-27 Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu region. This suggests that catalase may be able to discriminate between different structural forms of IAPP fibrils. The ability of catalase to bind IAPP, Aβ, and PrP fibrils demonstrates the presence of similar accessible structural motifs that may be targets for antiamyloid therapeutic development.

  19. Alterations in gene expression in mutant amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice lacking Niemann-Pick type C1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahua Maulik

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C (NPC disease, a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused mostly by mutation in NPC1 gene, is pathologically characterized by the accumulation of free cholesterol in brain and other tissues. This is accompanied by gliosis and loss of neurons in selected brain regions, including the cerebellum. Recent studies have shown that NPC disease exhibits intriguing parallels with Alzheimer's disease, including the presence of neurofibrillary tangles and increased levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP-derived β-amyloid (Aβ peptides in vulnerable brain neurons. To evaluate the role of Aβ in NPC disease, we determined the gene expression profile in selected brain regions of our recently developed bigenic ANPC mice, generated by crossing APP transgenic (Tg mice with heterozygous Npc1-deficient mice. The ANPC mice exhibited exacerbated neuronal and glial pathology compared to other genotypes [i.e., APP-Tg, double heterozygous (Dhet, Npc1-null and wild-type mice]. Analysis of expression profiles of 86 selected genes using real-time RT-PCR arrays showed a wide-spectrum of alterations in the four genotypes compared to wild-type controls. The changes observed in APP-Tg and Dhet mice are limited to only few genes involved mostly in the regulation of cholesterol metabolism, whereas Npc1-null and ANPC mice showed alterations in the expression profiles of a number of genes regulating cholesterol homeostasis, APP metabolism, vesicular trafficking and cell death mechanism in both hippocampus and cerebellum compared to wild-type mice. Intriguingly, ANPC and Npc1-null mice, with some exceptions, exhibited similar changes, although more genes were differentially expressed in the affected cerebellum than the relatively spared hippocampus. The altered gene profiles were found to match with the corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that lack of Npc1 protein can alter the expression profile of selected transcripts as well as proteins, and

  20. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  1. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Cohen-Hadad, Yaara; Aharoni, Shira; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Schonberger, Oshrat; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Zeligson, Sharon; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX) human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA) from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19), monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19) and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC) line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve.

  2. Establishment of Homozygote Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Parthenogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Epsztejn-Litman

    Full Text Available We report on the derivation of a diploid 46(XX human embryonic stem cell (HESC line that is homozygous for the common deletion associated with Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA from a pathenogenetic embryo. By characterizing the methylation status of three different imprinted loci (MEST, SNRPN and H19, monitoring the expression of two parentally imprinted genes (SNRPN and H19 and carrying out genome-wide SNP analysis, we provide evidence that this cell line was established from the activation of a mutant oocyte by diploidization of the entire genome. Therefore, our SMA parthenogenetic HESC (pHESC line provides a proof-of-principle for the establishment of diseased HESC lines without the need for gene manipulation. As mutant oocytes are easily obtained and readily available during preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD cycles, this approach should provide a powerful tool for disease modelling and is especially advantageous since it can be used to induce large or complex mutations in HESCs, including gross DNA alterations and chromosomal rearrangements, which are otherwise hard to achieve.

  3. Ligand and proton exchange dynamics in recombinant human myoglobin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambright, D G; Balasubramanian, S; Boxer, S G

    1989-05-05

    Site-specific mutants of human myoglobin have been prepared in which lysine 45 is replaced by arginine (K45R) and aspartate 60 by glutamate (D60E), in order to examine the influence of these residues and their interaction on the dynamics of the protein. These proteins were studied by a variety of methods, including one and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, exchange kinetics for the distal and proximal histidine NH protons as a function of pH in the met cyano forms, flash photolysis of the CO forms, and ligand replacement kinetics. The electronic absorption and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the CO forms of these proteins are virtually identical, indicating that the structure of the heme pocket is unaltered by these mutations. There are, however, substantial changes in the dynamics of both CO binding and proton exchange for the mutant K45R, whereas the mutant D60E exhibits behavior indistinguishable from the reference human myoglobin. K45R has a faster CO bimolecular recombination rate and slower CO off-rate relative to the reference. The kinetics for CO binding are independent of pH (6.5 to 10) as well as ionic strength (0 to 1 M-NaCl). The exchange rate for the distal histidine NH is substantially lower for K45R than the reference, whereas the proximal histidine NH exchange rate is unaltered. The exchange behavior of the human proteins is similar to that reported for a comparison of the exchange rates for myoglobins having lysine at position 45 with sperm whale myoglobin, which has arginine at this position. This indicates that the differences in exchange rates reflects largely the Lys----Arg substitution. The lack of a simple correlation for the CO kinetics with this substitution means that these are sensitive to other factors as well. Specific kinetic models, whereby substitution of arginine for lysine at position 45 can affect ligand binding dynamics, are outlined. These experiments demonstrate that a relatively

  4. NH exchange in point mutants of human ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahr, Nicole; Fiedler, Erik; Günther, Robert; Hofmann, Hans-Jörg; Berger, Stefan

    2011-08-01

    Several point mutants of human ubiquitin (Ub(T9V), Ub(F45W), Ub(F45G), and Ub(A46S)) were prepared by recombinant techniques. The NH exchange rate constants were measured by the NMR diffusion and the MEXICO methods and compared with those in the wild type to examine the influence of structural changes and to improve the understanding of this important reaction in studies of protein folding and denaturation. The observed changes follow qualitatively the polarity and steric alterations caused by the introduced amino acids. Attempts to reproduce quantitatively the observed changes by modeling studies and molecular dynamics simulations were not satisfactory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Human GLTP and mutant forms of ACD11 suppress cell death in the Arabidopsis acd11 mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nikolaj H T; McKinney, Lea V; Pike, Helen

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis acd11 mutant exhibits runaway, programmed cell death due to the loss of a putative sphingosine transfer protein (ACD11) with homology to mammalian GLTP. We demonstrate that transgenic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana of human GLTP partially suppressed the phenotype of the acd11...

  6. How ionic strength affects the conformational behavior of human and rat beta amyloids--a computational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Kříž

    Full Text Available Progressive cerebral deposition of amyloid beta occurs in Alzheimers disease and during the aging of certain mammals (human, monkey, dog, bear, cow, cat but not others (rat, mouse. It is possibly due to different amino acid sequences at positions 5, 10 and 13. To address this issue, we performed series of 100 ns long trajectories (each trajectory was run twice with different initial velocity distribution on amyloid beta (1-42 with the human and rat amino acid sequence in three different environments: water with only counter ions, water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.15 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration at steady state, and water with NaCl at a concentration of 0.30 M as a model of intracellular Na(+ concentration under stimulated conditions. We analyzed secondary structure stability, internal hydrogen bonds, and residual fluctuation. It was observed that the change in ionic strength affects the stability of internal hydrogen bonds. Increasing the ionic strength increases atomic fluctuation in the hydrophobic core of the human amyloid, and decreases the atomic fluctuation in the case of rat amyloid. The secondary structure analyses show a stable α-helix part between residues 10 and 20. However, C-terminus of investigated amyloids is much more flexible showing no stable secondary structure elements. Increasing ionic strength of the solvent leads to decreasing stability of the secondary structural elements. The difference in conformational behavior of the three amino acids at position 5, 10 and 13 for human and rat amyloids significantly changes the conformational behavior of the whole peptide.

  7. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  8. Analysis of a compartmental model of amyloid beta production, irreversible loss and exchange in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbert, Donald L; Patterson, Bruce W; Bateman, Randall J

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides, and in particular Aβ42, are found in senile plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease. A compartmental model of Aβ production, exchange and irreversible loss was recently developed to explain the kinetics of isotope-labeling of Aβ peptides collected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following infusion of stable isotope-labeled leucine in humans. The compartmental model allowed calculation of the rates of production, irreversible loss (or turnover) and short-term exchange of Aβ peptides. Exchange of Aβ42 was particularly pronounced in amyloid plaque-bearing participants. In the current work, we describe in much greater detail the characteristics of the compartmental model to two distinct audiences: physician-scientists and biokineticists. For physician-scientists, we describe through examples the types of questions the model can and cannot answer, as well as correct some misunderstandings of previous kinetic analyses applied to this type of isotope labeling data. For biokineticists, we perform a system identifiability analysis and a sensitivity analysis of the kinetic model to explore the global and local properties of the model. Combined, these analyses motivate simplifications from a more comprehensive physiological model to the final model that was previously presented. The analyses clearly demonstrate that the current dataset and compartmental model allow determination with confidence a single 'turnover' parameter, a single 'exchange' parameter and a single 'delay' parameter. When combined with CSF concentration data for the Aβ peptides, production rates may also be obtained. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    Full Text Available The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  10. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Distribution of precursor amyloid-β-protein messenger RNA in human cerebral cortex: relationship to neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, D.A.; Higgins, G.A.; Young, W.G.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Wilson, M.C.; Morrison, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) and neuritic plaques (NP), two neuropathological markers of Alzheimer disease, may both contain peptide fragments derived from the human amyloid β protein. However, the nature of the relationship between NFT and NP and the source of the amyloid β proteins found in each have remained unclear. The authors used in situ hybridization techniques to map the anatomical distribution of precursor amyloid-β-protein mRNA in the neocortex of brains from three subjects with no known neurologic disease and from five patients with Alzheimer disease. In brains from control subjects, positively hybridizing neurons were present in cortical regions and layers that contain a high density of neuropathological markers in Alzheimer disease, as well as in those loci that contain NP but few NFT. Quantitative analyses of in situ hybridization patterns within layers III and V of the superior frontal cortex revealed that the presence of high numbers of NFT in Alzheimer-diseased brains was associated with a decrease in the number of positively hybridizing neurons compared to controls and Alzheimer-diseased brains with few NFT. These findings suggest that the expression of precursor amyloid-β-protein mRNA may be a necessary but is clearly not a sufficient prerequisite for NFT formation. In addition, these results may indicate that the amyloid β protein, present in NP in a given region or layer of cortex, is not derived from the resident neuronal cell bodies that express the mRNA for the precursor protein

  12. Immunotherapy of Alzheimer's disease (AD): from murine models to anti-amyloid beta (Abeta) human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geylis, Valeria; Steinitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) protein is a key pathological feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In murine models of AD, both active and passive immunization against Abeta induce a marked reduction in amyloid brain burden and an improvement in cognitive functions. Preliminary results of a prematurely terminated clinical trial where AD patients were actively vaccinated with aggregated Abeta bear resemblance to those documented in murine models. Passive immunization of AD patients with anti-Abeta antibodies, in particular human antibodies, is a strategy that provides a more cautious management and control of any undesired side effects. Sera of all healthy adults contain anti-Abeta IgG autoimmune antibodies. Hence antigen-committed human B-cells are easily immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into anti-Abeta secreting cell lines. Two anti-Abeta human monoclonal antibodies which we recently prepared bind to the N-terminus of Abeta peptide and were shown to stain amyloid plaques in non-fixed brain sections from an AD patient. It is anticipated that specifically selected anti-Abeta human monoclonal antibodies could reduce and inhibit deposits of amyloid in brain while avoiding the cognitive decline that characterizes AD. In the future, this type of antibody may prove to be a promising immune therapy for the disease.

  13. A method for probing the mutational landscape of amyloid structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Charles W; Waldispühl, Jérôme; Lis, Mieszko; Halfmann, Randal; Devadas, Srinivas; Lindquist, Susan; Berger, Bonnie

    2011-07-01

    Proteins of all kinds can self-assemble into highly ordered β-sheet aggregates known as amyloid fibrils, important both biologically and clinically. However, the specific molecular structure of a fibril can vary dramatically depending on sequence and environmental conditions, and mutations can drastically alter amyloid function and pathogenicity. Experimental structure determination has proven extremely difficult with only a handful of NMR-based models proposed, suggesting a need for computational methods. We present AmyloidMutants, a statistical mechanics approach for de novo prediction and analysis of wild-type and mutant amyloid structures. Based on the premise of protein mutational landscapes, AmyloidMutants energetically quantifies the effects of sequence mutation on fibril conformation and stability. Tested on non-mutant, full-length amyloid structures with known chemical shift data, AmyloidMutants offers roughly 2-fold improvement in prediction accuracy over existing tools. Moreover, AmyloidMutants is the only method to predict complete super-secondary structures, enabling accurate discrimination of topologically dissimilar amyloid conformations that correspond to the same sequence locations. Applied to mutant prediction, AmyloidMutants identifies a global conformational switch between Aβ and its highly-toxic 'Iowa' mutant in agreement with a recent experimental model based on partial chemical shift data. Predictions on mutant, yeast-toxic strains of HET-s suggest similar alternate folds. When applied to HET-s and a HET-s mutant with core asparagines replaced by glutamines (both highly amyloidogenic chemically similar residues abundant in many amyloids), AmyloidMutants surprisingly predicts a greatly reduced capacity of the glutamine mutant to form amyloid. We confirm this finding by conducting mutagenesis experiments. Our tool is publically available on the web at http://amyloid.csail.mit.edu/. lindquist_admin@wi.mit.edu; bab@csail.mit.edu.

  14. Unwinding fibril formation of medin, the peptide of the most common form of human amyloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Annika; Soederberg, Linda; Westermark, Gunilla T.; Sletten, Knut; Engstroem, Ulla; Tjernberg, Lars O.; Naeslund, Jan; Westermark, Per

    2007-01-01

    Medin amyloid affects the medial layer of the thoracic aorta of most people above 50 years of age. The consequences of this amyloid are not completely known but the deposits may contribute to diseases such as thoracic aortic aneurysm and dissection or to the general diminished elasticity of blood vessels seen in elderly people. We show that the 50-amino acid residue peptide medin forms amyloid-like fibrils in vitro. With the use of Congo red staining, Thioflavin T fluorescence, electron microscopy, and a solid-phase binding assay on different synthetic peptides, we identified the last 18-19 amino acid residues to constitute the amyloid-promoting region of medin. We also demonstrate that the two C-terminal phenylalanines, previously suggested to be of importance for amyloid formation, are not required for medin amyloid formation

  15. Preventive immunization of aged and juvenile non-human primates to beta-amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kofler Julia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunization against beta-amyloid (Aβ is a promising approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, but the optimal timing for the vaccination remains to be determined. Preventive immunization approaches may be more efficacious and associated with fewer side-effects; however, there is only limited information available from primate models about the effects of preclinical vaccination on brain amyloid composition and the neuroinflammatory milieu. Methods Ten non-human primates (NHP of advanced age (18–26 years and eight 2-year-old juvenile NHPs were immunized at 0, 2, 6, 10 and 14 weeks with aggregated Aβ42 admixed with monophosphoryl lipid A as adjuvant, and monitored for up to 6 months. Anti-Aβ antibody levels and immune activation markers were assessed in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples before and at several time-points after immunization. Microglial activity was determined by [11C]PK11195 PET scans acquired before and after immunization, and by post-mortem immunohistochemical and real-time PCR evaluation. Aβ oligomer composition was assessed by immunoblot analysis in the frontal cortex of aged immunized and non-immunized control animals. Results All juvenile animals developed a strong and sustained serum anti-Aβ IgG antibody response, whereas only 80 % of aged animals developed detectable antibodies. The immune response in aged monkeys was more delayed and significantly weaker, and was also more variable between animals. Pre- and post-immunization [11C]PK11195 PET scans showed no evidence of vaccine-related microglial activation. Post-mortem brain tissue analysis indicated a low overall amyloid burden, but revealed a significant shift in oligomer size with an increase in the dimer:pentamer ratio in aged immunized animals compared with non-immunized controls (P  Conclusions Our results indicate that preventive Aβ immunization is a safe therapeutic approach lacking adverse CNS immune system

  16. Molecular and biochemical analyses of spontaneous and X-ray-induced mutants in human lymphoblastoid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liber, H L; Call, K M; Little, J B

    1987-05-01

    The authors have isolated a series of 14 spontaneously arising and 28 X-ray-induced mutants at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (hgprt) locus in human lymphoblastoid cells. Among the spontaneous mutants, 5/14 (36%) had detectable alterations in their restriction fragment pattern after hybridization with a human cDNA probe for hgprt. Of the 10 remaining mutants, 4 had partial HGPRT enzyme activity, which suggested that they contained point mutations. Among the 28 mutants induced by 150 rad of X-rays, 15 (54%) had deletions of part or all of the hgprt gene. Of the remaining 13 (18% overall) 5 had partial HGPRT enzyme activity, which suggested that they contained point mutations. These data imply that in this human cell system, X-rays induce both point mutants which have residual enzyme activity as well as mutations involving relatively large deletions of DNA. 48 reference, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  17. Chaperones ameliorate beta cell dysfunction associated with human islet amyloid polypeptide overexpression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Cadavez

    Full Text Available In type 2 diabetes, beta-cell dysfunction is thought to be due to several causes, one being the formation of toxic protein aggregates called islet amyloid, formed by accumulations of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP. The process of hIAPP misfolding and aggregation is one of the factors that may activate the unfolded protein response (UPR, perturbing endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis. Molecular chaperones have been described to be important in regulating ER response to ER stress. In the present work, we evaluate the role of chaperones in a stressed cellular model of hIAPP overexpression. A rat pancreatic beta-cell line expressing hIAPP exposed to thapsigargin or treated with high glucose and palmitic acid, both of which are known ER stress inducers, showed an increase in ER stress genes when compared to INS1E cells expressing rat IAPP or INS1E control cells. Treatment with molecular chaperone glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78, also known as BiP or protein disulfite isomerase (PDI, and chemical chaperones taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA or 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA, alleviated ER stress and increased insulin secretion in hIAPP-expressing cells. Our results suggest that the overexpression of hIAPP induces a stronger response of ER stress markers. Moreover, endogenous and chemical chaperones are able to ameliorate induced ER stress and increase insulin secretion, suggesting that improving chaperone capacity can play an important role in improving beta-cell function in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Minocycline does not affect amyloid beta phagocytosis by human microglial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Familian, Atoosa; Eikelenboom, Piet; Veerhuis, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Activated microglia accumulate in amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques containing amyloid associated factors SAP and C1q in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by promoting Abeta plaque formation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand,

  19. Functional analysis of mutant human carnitine acylcarnitine translocases in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJlst, L.; van Roermund, C. W.; Iacobazzi, V.; Oostheim, W.; Ruiter, J. P.; Williams, J. C.; Palmieri, F.; Wanders, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Long chain fatty acids are translocated as carnitine esters across the mitochondrial inner membrane by carnitine acylcarnitine translocase (CACT). We report functional studies on the mutant CACT proteins from a severe and a mild patient with CACT deficiency. CACT activities in fibroblasts of both

  20. Identification of Small Peptides in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid upon Amyloid-β Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Naoki; Yanagida, Kanta; Kodama, Takashi; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Takami, Mako; Oyama, Hiroshi; Kudo, Takashi; Ikeda, Manabu; Takeda, Masatoshi; Tagami, Shinji; Okochi, Masayasu

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) degradation in brains of Alzheimer disease patients is a crucial focus for the clarification of disease pathogenesis. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying Aβ degradation in the human brain remain unclear. This study aimed to quantify the levels of small C-terminal Aβ fragments generated upon Aβ degradation in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A fraction containing small peptides was isolated and purified from human CSF by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Degradation products of Aβ C termini were identified and measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The C-terminal fragments of Aβ in the conditioned medium of cultured cells transfected with the Swedish variant of βAPP (sw βAPP) were analyzed. These fragments in brains of PS1 I213T knock-in transgenic mice, overexpressing sw βAPP, were also analyzed. The peptide fragments GGVV and GVV, produced by the cleavage of Aβ40, were identified in human CSF as well as in the brains of the transgenic mice and in the conditioned medium of the cultured cells. Relative to Aβ40 levels, GGVV and GVV levels were 7.6 ± 0.81 and 1.5 ± 0.18%, respectively, in human CSF. Levels of the GGVV fragment did not increase by the introduction of genes encoding neprilysin and insulin-degrading enzyme to the cultured cells. Our results indicate that a substantial amount of Aβ40 in human brains is degraded via a neprilysin- or insulin-degrading enzyme-independent pathway. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Oxidation of the tryptophan 32 residue of human superoxide dismutase 1 caused by its bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity triggers the non-amyloid aggregation of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Fernando R; Iqbal, Asif; Linares, Edlaine; Silva, Daniel F; Lima, Filipe S; Cuccovia, Iolanda M; Augusto, Ohara

    2014-10-31

    The role of oxidative post-translational modifications of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathology is an attractive hypothesis to explore based on several lines of evidence. Among them, the remarkable stability of hSOD1(WT) and several of its ALS-associated mutants suggests that hSOD1 oxidation may precede its conversion to the unfolded and aggregated forms found in ALS patients. The bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 causes oxidation of its own solvent-exposed Trp(32) residue. The resulting products are apparently different from those produced in the absence of bicarbonate and are most likely specific for simian SOD1s, which contain the Trp(32) residue. The aims of this work were to examine whether the bicarbonate-dependent peroxidase activity of hSOD1 (hSOD1(WT) and hSOD1(G93A) mutant) triggers aggregation of the enzyme and to comprehend the role of the Trp(32) residue in the process. The results showed that Trp(32) residues of both enzymes are oxidized to a similar extent to hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radicals. These radicals decayed to hSOD1-N-formylkynurenine and hSOD1-kynurenine or to a hSOD1 covalent dimer cross-linked by a ditryptophan bond, causing hSOD1 unfolding, oligomerization, and non-amyloid aggregation. The latter process was inhibited by tempol, which recombines with the hSOD1-derived tryptophanyl radical, and did not occur in the absence of bicarbonate or with enzymes that lack the Trp(32) residue (bovine SOD1 and hSOD1(W32F) mutant). The results support a role for the oxidation products of the hSOD1-Trp(32) residue, particularly the covalent dimer, in triggering the non-amyloid aggregation of hSOD1. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Brownjohn

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation. : In this article, Livesey and colleagues perform a phenotypic drug screen in a human stem cell model of Alzheimer's disease. The anthelminthic avermectins are identified as a family of compounds that increase the production of short Aβ peptides over longer more toxic Aβ forms. The effect is analogous to existing γ-secretase modulators, but is independent of the core γ-secretase complex. Keywords: neural stem cells, Alzheimer's disease, phenotypic screening, iPSCs, human neurons, dementia, Down syndrome, amyloid beta, ivermectin, selamectin

  3. Analysis of Drug Effects on Primary Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells Activated by Serum Amyloid A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lakota

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. RA patients have a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases compared to the general population. Serum amyloid A (SAA is an acute-phase protein, upregulated in sera of RA patients. Aim. To determine the effects of medications on SAA-stimulated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC. Methods. HCAEC were preincubated for 2 h with medications from sterile ampules (dexamethasone, methotrexate, certolizumab pegol, and etanercept, dissolved in medium (captopril or DMSO (etoricoxib, rosiglitazone, meloxicam, fluvastatin, and diclofenac. Human recombinant apo-SAA was used to stimulate HCAEC at a final 1000 nM concentration for 24 hours. IL-6, IL-8, sVCAM-1, and PAI-1 were measured by ELISA. The number of viable cells was determined colorimetrically. Results. SAA-stimulated levels of released IL-6, IL-8, and sVCAM-1 from HCAEC were significantly attenuated by methotrexate, fluvastatin, and etoricoxib. Both certolizumab pegol and etanercept significantly decreased PAI-1 by an average of 43%. Rosiglitazone significantly inhibited sVCAM-1 by 58%. Conclusion. We observed marked influence of fluvastatin on lowering cytokine production in SAA-activated HCAEC. Methotrexate showed strong beneficial effects for lowering released Il-6, IL-8, and sVCAM-1. Interesting duality was observed for NSAIDs, with meloxicam exhibiting opposite-trend effects from diclofenac and etoricoxib. This represents unique insight into specific responsiveness of inflammatory-driven HCAEC relevant to atherosclerosis.

  4. Rapid and Quantitative Assay of Amyloid-Seeding Activity in Human Brains Affected with Prion Diseases.

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    Hanae Takatsuki

    Full Text Available The infectious agents of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are composed of amyloidogenic prion protein, PrPSc. Real-time quaking-induced conversion can amplify very small amounts of PrPSc seeds in tissues/body fluids of patients or animals. Using this in vitro PrP-amyloid amplification assay, we quantitated the seeding activity of affected human brains. End-point assay using serially diluted brain homogenates of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease patients demonstrated that 50% seeding dose (SD50 is reached approximately 10(10/g brain (values varies 10(8.79-10.63/g. A genetic case (GSS-P102L yielded a similar level of seeding activity in an autopsy brain sample. The range of PrPSc concentrations in the samples, determined by dot-blot assay, was 0.6-5.4 μg/g brain; therefore, we estimated that 1 SD50 unit was equivalent to 0.06-0.27 fg of PrPSc. The SD50 values of the affected brains dropped more than three orders of magnitude after autoclaving at 121°C. This new method for quantitation of human prion activity provides a new way to reduce the risk of iatrogenic prion transmission.

  5. Serum amyloid A is found on ApoB-containing lipoproteins in obese humans with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Anisa; Wilson, Patricia G; Hou, Tianfei; Brown, Aparna; King, Victoria L; Tannock, Lisa R

    2013-05-01

    In murine models of obesity/diabetes, there is an increase in plasma serum amyloid A (SAA) levels along with redistribution of SAA from high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles, namely, low-density lipoprotein and very low-density lipoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine if obesity is associated with similar SAA lipoprotein redistribution in humans. Three groups of obese individuals were recruited from a weight loss clinic: healthy obese (n = 14), metabolic syndrome (MetS) obese (n = 8), and obese with type 2 diabetes (n = 6). Plasma was separated into lipoprotein fractions by fast protein liquid chromatography, and SAA was measured in lipid fractions using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting. Only the obese diabetic group had SAA detectable in apoB-containing lipoproteins, and SAA reverted back to HDL with active weight loss. In human subjects, SAA is found in apoB-containing lipoprotein particles only in obese subjects with type 2 diabetes, but not in healthy obese or obese subjects with MetS. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  6. The physico-chemical, antigenic, and functional heterogeneity of human serum amyloid A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.E.; HUq, A.; Rosenthal, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study we attempted to develop a rapid method to isolate serum amyloid A isomers (SAA is.) and to determine whether this physicochemical heterogeneity corresponds to an antigenic and functional one. Pure human low molecular SAA (SAAL) was prepared from the serum of 6 patients (pts.) using standard techniques. Preparative isoelectric focusing in agarose/sephadex gels was used to separate SAAL is. Monoclonal antibodies (m. abs.) to SAAL and to AA were prepared by hybridization of P3XU-1 nonsecretory murine myeloma cells with murine spleen cells from Balb/c mice immunized with pooled SAAL and AA respectively. Four distinctly migrating SAAL isomers with PI's of 4.9, 5.8, 6.6, and 7.2 were isolated from 6 pts. while only three isomers were separated from the pt. with myasthenia gravis. Four m. abs. to SAAL, one to AA, six m. abs. to SAAL-2 is. and one to SAAL-1 is. were generated in murine ascitic fluid. Dishes coated with the four human SAA is., human AA, various mammalian and human proteins as well as with serum from 31 pts. with metastatic Ca. and 23 pts. with inflammatory diseases (ID) were reacted with the m. abs. The amount of binding was determined using 125 I labelled goat antimouse serum. The m. abs. to SAA were found specific for human SAA recognizing two different patterns in relationship to the intensity of binding to SAA is. One of them (7A2-43) had a greater affinity for SAA from pts with ID, while the other (5A6-5) reacted stronger with SAA from pts with metastatic Ca

  7. Two distinct β-sheet structures in Italian-mutant amyloid-beta fibrils : a potential link to different clinical phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubin, Ellen; Deroo, Stéphanie; Schierle, Gabriele Kaminksi; Kaminski, Clemens; Serpell, Louise; Subramaniam, Vinod; van Nuland, Nico; Broersen, Kerensa; Raussens, Vincent; Sarroukh, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Most Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases are late-onset and characterized by the aggregation and deposition of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide in extracellular plaques in the brain. However, a few rare and hereditary Aβ mutations, such as the Italian Glu22-to-Lys (E22K) mutation, guarantee the development

  8. Human tau increases amyloid β plaque size but not amyloid β-mediated synapse loss in a novel mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rosemary J; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Herrmann, Abigail G; Croft, Shaun; Kim, JeeSoo Monica; Petrova, Veselina; Ramos-Rodriguez, Juan Jose; Pitstick, Rose; Wegmann, Susanne; Garcia-Alloza, Monica; Carlson, George A; Hyman, Bradley T; Spires-Jones, Tara L

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of aggregates of amyloid beta (Aβ) in senile plaques and tau in neurofibrillary tangles, as well as marked neuron and synapse loss. Of these pathological changes, synapse loss correlates most strongly with cognitive decline. Synapse loss occurs prominently around plaques due to accumulations of oligomeric Aβ. Recent evidence suggests that tau may also play a role in synapse loss but the interactions of Aβ and tau in synapse loss remain to be determined. In this study, we generated a novel transgenic mouse line, the APP/PS1/rTg21221 line, by crossing APP/PS1 mice, which develop Aβ-plaques and synapse loss, with rTg21221 mice, which overexpress wild-type human tau. When compared to the APP/PS1 mice without human tau, the cross-sectional area of ThioS+ dense core plaques was increased by ~50%. Along with increased plaque size, we observed an increase in plaque-associated dystrophic neurites containing misfolded tau, but there was no exacerbation of neurite curvature or local neuron loss around plaques. Array tomography analysis similarly revealed no worsening of synapse loss around plaques, and no change in the accumulation of Aβ at synapses. Together, these results indicate that adding human wild-type tau exacerbates plaque pathology and neurite deformation but does not exacerbate plaque-associated synapse loss. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Molecular characterization of thymidine kinase mutants of human cells induced by densely ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kronenberg, A; Little, J B

    1989-04-01

    In order to characterize the nature of mutants induced by densely ionizing radiations at an autosomal locus, the authors have isolated a series of 99 thymidine kinase (tk) mutants of human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells iraadiated with either fast neutrons or accelerated argon ions. Individual muant clones were examined for alterations in their restriction fragment pattern after hybridization with a human cDNA probe for tk. A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) allowed identification of the active tk allele. Among the neutron-induced mutants, 34/52 exhibited loss of the previously active allele while 6/52 exhibited intragenic rearrangements. Among the argon-induced mutants 27/46 exhibited allele loses and 10/46 showed rearrangements within the tk locus. The remaining mutants had restriction patterns indistinguishable from the TK6 parent. Each of the mutant clones was further examined for structural alterations within the c-erbAl locus which has been localized to chromosome 17q11-q22, at some unknown distance from the human tk locus at chromosome 17q21-q22. A substantial proportion (54%) of tk mutants induced by densely ionizing radiation showed loss of the c-erb locus on the homologous chromosome, suggesting that the mutations involve large-scale genetic changes. (author). 51 refs.; 2 figs.; 6 tabs.

  10. Kinetic and structural characterization of amyloid-β peptide hydrolysis by human angiotensin-1-converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuth, Kate M; Masuyer, Geoffrey; Douglas, Ross G; Schwager, Sylva L; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D

    2016-03-01

    Angiotensin-1-converting enzyme (ACE), a zinc metallopeptidase, consists of two homologous catalytic domains (N and C) with different substrate specificities. Here we report kinetic parameters of five different forms of human ACE with various amyloid beta (Aβ) substrates together with high resolution crystal structures of the N-domain in complex with Aβ fragments. For the physiological Aβ(1-16) peptide, a novel ACE cleavage site was found at His14-Gln15. Furthermore, Aβ(1-16) was preferentially cleaved by the individual N-domain; however, the presence of an inactive C-domain in full-length somatic ACE (sACE) greatly reduced enzyme activity and affected apparent selectivity. Two fluorogenic substrates, Aβ(4-10)Q and Aβ(4-10)Y, underwent endoproteolytic cleavage at the Asp7-Ser8 bond with all ACE constructs showing greater catalytic efficiency for Aβ(4-10)Y. Surprisingly, in contrast to Aβ(1-16) and Aβ(4-10)Q, sACE showed positive domain cooperativity and the double C-domain (CC-sACE) construct no cooperativity towards Aβ(4-10)Y. The structures of the Aβ peptide-ACE complexes revealed a common mode of peptide binding for both domains which principally targets the C-terminal P2' position to the S2' pocket and recognizes the main chain of the P1' peptide. It is likely that N-domain selectivity for the amyloid peptide is conferred through the N-domain specific S2' residue Thr358. Additionally, the N-domain can accommodate larger substrates through movement of the N-terminal helices, as suggested by the disorder of the hinge region in the crystal structures. Our findings are important for the design of domain selective inhibitors as the differences in domain selectivity are more pronounced with the truncated domains compared to the more physiological full-length forms. The atomic coordinates and structure factors for N-domain ACE with Aβ peptides 4-10 (5AM8), 10-16 (5AM9), 1-16 (5AMA), 35-42 (5AMB) and (4-10)Y (5AMC) complexes have been deposited in the

  11. β-Amyloid accumulation in the human brain after one night of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wiers, Corinde E; Demiral, Sukru B; Guo, Min; Kim, Sung Won; Lindgren, Elsa; Ramirez, Veronica; Zehra, Amna; Freeman, Clara; Miller, Gregg; Manza, Peter; Srivastava, Tansha; De Santi, Susan; Tomasi, Dardo; Benveniste, Helene; Volkow, Nora D

    2018-04-24

    The effects of acute sleep deprivation on β-amyloid (Aβ) clearance in the human brain have not been documented. Here we used PET and 18 F-florbetaben to measure brain Aβ burden (ABB) in 20 healthy controls tested after a night of rested sleep (baseline) and after a night of sleep deprivation. We show that one night of sleep deprivation, relative to baseline, resulted in a significant increase in Aβ burden in the right hippocampus and thalamus. These increases were associated with mood worsening following sleep deprivation, but were not related to the genetic risk (APOE genotype) for Alzheimer's disease. Additionally, baseline ABB in a range of subcortical regions and the precuneus was inversely associated with reported night sleep hours. APOE genotyping was also linked to subcortical ABB, suggesting that different Alzheimer's disease risk factors might independently affect ABB in nearby brain regions. In summary, our findings show adverse effects of one-night sleep deprivation on brain ABB and expand on prior findings of higher Aβ accumulation with chronic less sleep. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  12. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency (less than 8 x 10(-6)). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTr) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTr mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages

  13. Induction of diphtheria toxin-resistant mutants in human cells by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocchi, P.; Ferreri, A.M.; Capucci, A.; Prodi, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stable spontaneous mutants resistant to the protein synthesis inhibitor diphtheria toxin (DT) have been selected in human cell line EUE at a very low frequency ( -6 ). U.v.-induced mutation has been quantitatively measured: treatment of cells with u.v. light increased the frequencies of diphtheria toxin resistant (DTsup(r)) mutants up to 1000-fold. The maximum recovery of DTsup(r) mutants was observed after a short expression period, for all u.v. doses tested, and was followed by a decrease in mutation frequency on subsequent passages. (author)

  14. Effect of Potent γ-Secretase Modulator in Human Neurons Derived From Multiple Presenilin 1–Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Mutant Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Waltz, Shannon; Woodruff, Grace; Ouyang, Joe; Israel, Mason A.; Herrera, Cheryl; Sarsoza, Floyd; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Koo, Edward H.; Ringman, John M.; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Wagner, Steven L.; Yuan, Shauna H.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Although considerable effort has been expended developing drug candidates for Alzheimer disease, none have yet succeeded owing to the lack of efficacy or to safety concerns. One potential shortcoming of current approaches to Alzheimer disease drug discovery and development is that they rely primarily on transformed cell lines and animal models that substantially overexpress wild-type or mutant proteins. It is possible that drug development failures thus far are caused in part by the limits of these approaches, which do not accurately reveal how drug candidates will behave in naive human neuronal cells. Objective To analyze purified neurons derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells from patients carrying 3 different presenilin 1 (PS1) mutations and nondemented control individuals in the absence of any overexpression. We tested the efficacy of γ-secretase inhibitor and γ-secretase modulator (GSM) in neurons derived from both normal control and 3 PS1 mutations (A246E, H163R, and M146L). Design, Setting, and Participants Adult human skin biopsies were obtained from volunteers at the Alzheimer Disease Research Center, University of California, San Diego. Cell cultures were treated with γ-secretase inhibitor or GSM. Comparisons of total β-amyloid (Aβ) and Aβ peptides 38, 40, and 42 in the media were made between vehicle- vs drug-treated cultures. Main Outcomes and Measures Soluble Aβ levels in the media were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results As predicted, mutant PS1 neurons exhibited an elevated Aβ42:Aβ40 ratio (P <.05) at the basal state as compared with the nondemented control neurons. Treatment with a potent non–nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory druglike GSM revealed a new biomarker signature that differs from all previous cell types and animals tested. This new signature was the same in both the mutant and control neurons and consisted of a reduction in Aβ42, Aβ40, and Aβ38 and in the Aβ42:Aβ40 ratio, with no

  15. Bisphenol A accelerates toxic amyloid formation of human islet amyloid polypeptide: a possible link between bisphenol A exposure and type 2 diabetes.

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    Hao Gong

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is a chemical compound widely used in manufacturing plastic products. Recent epidemiological studies suggest BPA exposure is positively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, however the mechanisms underlying this link remain unclear. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP is a hormone synthesized and secreted by the pancreatic β-cells. Misfolding of hIAPP into toxic oligomers and mature fibrils can disrupt cell membrane and lead to β-cell death, which is regarded as one of the causative factors of T2DM. To test whether there are any connections between BPA exposure and hIAPP misfolding, we investigated the effects of BPA on hIAPP aggregation using thioflavin-T based fluorescence, transmission electronic microscopy, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering, size-exclusion chromatography, fluorescence-dye leakage assay in an artificial micelle system and the generation of reactive oxygen species in INS-1 cells. We demonstrated that BPA not only dose-dependently promotes the aggregation of hIAPP and enhances the membrane disruption effects of hIAPP, but also promotes the extent of hIAPP aggregation related oxidative stress. Taken together, our results suggest that BPA exposure increased T2DM risk may involve the exacerbated toxic aggregation of hIAPP.

  16. Solid-State-NMR-Structure-Based Inhibitor Design to Achieve Selective Inhibition of the Parallel-in-Register β-Sheet versus Antiparallel Iowa Mutant β-Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qinghui; Qiang, Wei

    2017-06-08

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) spectroscopy has been widely applied to characterize the high-resolution structures of β-amyloid (Aβ) fibrils. While these structures provide crucial molecular insights on the deposition of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's diseases (AD), ssNMR structures have been rarely used so far as the basis for designing inhibitors. It remains a challenge because the ssNMR-based Aβ fibril structures were usually obtained with sparsely isotope-labeled peptides with limited experimental constraints, where the structural models, especially the side-chain coordinates, showed restricted precision. However, these structural models often possess a higher accuracy within the hydrophobic core regions with more well-defined experimental data, which provide potential targets for the molecular design. This work presents an ssNMR-based molecular design to achieve selective inhibition of a particular type of Aβ fibrillar structure, which was formed with the Iowa mutant of Aβ with parallel-in-register β-sheet hydrophobic core. The results show that short peptides that mimic the C-terminal β-strands of the fibril may have a preference in binding to the parallel Aβ fibrils rather than the antiparallel fibrils, mainly due to the differences in the high-resolution structures in the fibril elongation interfaces. The Iowa mutant Aβ fibrils are utilized in this work mainly as a model to demonstrate the feasibility of the strategy because it is relatively straightforward to distinguish the parallel and antiparallel fibril structures using ssNMR. Our results suggest that it is potentially feasible to design structure-selective inhibitors and/or diagnostic agents to Aβ fibrils using ssNMR-based structural models.

  17. Transcriptional dysregulation in NIPBL and cohesin mutant human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglan Liu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cohesin regulates sister chromatid cohesion during the mitotic cell cycle with Nipped-B-Like (NIPBL facilitating its loading and unloading. In addition to this canonical role, cohesin has also been demonstrated to play a critical role in regulation of gene expression in nondividing cells. Heterozygous mutations in the cohesin regulator NIPBL or cohesin structural components SMC1A and SMC3 result in the multisystem developmental disorder Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS. Genome-wide assessment of transcription in 16 mutant cell lines from severely affected CdLS probands has identified a unique profile of dysregulated gene expression that was validated in an additional 101 samples and correlates with phenotypic severity. This profile could serve as a diagnostic and classification tool. Cohesin binding analysis demonstrates a preference for intergenic regions suggesting a cis-regulatory function mimicking that of a boundary/insulator interacting protein. However, the binding sites are enriched within the promoter regions of the dysregulated genes and are significantly decreased in CdLS proband, indicating an alternative role of cohesin as a transcription factor.

  18. Insulin inhibits amyloid beta-induced cell death in cultured human brain pericytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Annemieke A M; Otte-Höller, Irene; de Boer, Roelie; Bosch, Remko R; ten Donkelaar, Hans J; de Waal, Robert M W; Verbeek, Marcel M; Kremer, Berry

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) deposition in the cerebral arterial and capillary walls is one of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type. In vitro, Abeta1-40, carrying the "Dutch" mutation (DAbeta1-40), induced reproducible degeneration of

  19. Loss of metal ions, disulfide reduction and mutations related to familial ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates from superoxide dismutase.

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    Zeynep A Oztug Durer

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are one of the causes of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS. Fibrillar inclusions containing SOD1 and SOD1 inclusions that bind the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin S have been found in neurons of transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1. Therefore, the formation of amyloid fibrils from human SOD1 was investigated. When agitated at acidic pH in the presence of low concentrations of guanidine or acetonitrile, metalated SOD1 formed fibrillar material which bound both thioflavin T and Congo red and had circular dichroism and infrared spectra characteristic of amyloid. While metalated SOD1 did not form amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH, either removing metals from SOD1 with its intramolecular disulfide bond intact or reducing the intramolecular disulfide bond of metalated SOD1 was sufficient to promote formation of these aggregates. SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates both with and without intermolecular disulfide bonds, depending on the incubation conditions, and a mutant SOD1 lacking free sulfhydryl groups (AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH under reducing conditions. ALS mutations enhanced the ability of disulfide-reduced SOD1 to form amyloid-like aggregates, and apo-AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at pH 7 only when an ALS mutation was also present. These results indicate that some mutations related to ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates by facilitating the loss of metals and/or by making the intramolecular disulfide bond more susceptible to reduction, thus allowing the conversion of SOD1 to a form that aggregates to form resembling amyloid. Furthermore, the occurrence of amyloid-like aggregates per se does not depend on forming intermolecular disulfide bonds, and multiple forms of such aggregates can be produced from SOD1.

  20. Knockin mouse with mutant Gα11 mimics human inherited hypocalcemia and is rescued by pharmacologic inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roszko, Kelly L; Bi, Ruiye; Gorvin, Caroline M

    2017-01-01

    in patients with autosomal-dominant hypocalcemia type 2 (ADH2), an inherited disorder of hypocalcemia, low parathyroid hormone (PTH), and hyperphosphatemia. We have generated knockin mice harboring the point mutation GNA11 c.C178T (p.Arg60Cys) identified in ADH2 patients. The mutant mice faithfully replicated...... human ADH2. They also exhibited low bone mineral density and increased skin pigmentation. Treatment with NPS 2143, a negative allosteric modulator of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR), increased PTH and calcium concentrations in WT and mutant mice, suggesting that the gain-of-function effect of GNA11...

  1. The amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP) gene maps to the long arm of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasco, W.; Tanzi, R.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Brook, J.D. (Center for Medical Genetics, Nottingham (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-01

    We have recently isolated a cDNA from a mouse brain library that encodes a protein whose predicted amino acid sequence is 42% identical and 64% similar to that of the amyloid [beta] protein precursor (APP; 16). This 653-amino-acid amyloid precursor-like protein (APLP) is similar to APP in overall structure as well as amino acid sequence. The amino acid homologies are particularly strong in three distinct regions of the proteins where the identities are 47, 54, and 56% (16). All three of these regions are also conserved in the Drosophila APP-like gene, APPL (11). Notably, 12 cysteine residues and a N -glyco-sylation site are conserved in the extracellular portion of APLP and APP, and a clathrin-binding domain is conserved in the cytoplasmic domain. The cytoplasmic domain is also conserved in a partial CDNA reported to encode an APP-like gene in rat testes (17), These data suggest that APLP and APP are members of a highly conserved gene family. A panel of DNAs from 31 human-rodent somatic cell lines of known karyotype was digested with EcoR1. These DNAs were then probed with the human APLP cDNA clone and the hybridization pattern was consistent with the assignment of the APLP locus to chromosome 19. 17 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Acidic pH retards the fibrillization of human islet amyloid polypeptide due to electrostatic repulsion of histidines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Xu, Weixin; Mu, Yuguang; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major constituent of amyloid deposits in pancreatic islets of type-II diabetes. IAPP is secreted together with insulin from the acidic secretory granules at a low pH of approximately 5.5 to the extracellular environment at a neutral pH. The increased accumulation of extracellular hIAPP in diabetes indicates that changes in pH may promote amyloid formation. To gain insights and underlying mechanisms of the pH effect on hIAPP fibrillogenesis, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent model were performed to study the structural properties of five hIAPP protofibrillar oligomers, under acidic and neutral pH, respectively. In consistent with experimental findings, simulation results show that acidic pH is not conducive to the structural stability of these oligomers. This provides a direct evidence for a recent experiment [L. Khemtemourian, E. Domenech, J. P. F. Doux, M. C. Koorengevel, and J. A. Killian, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 15598 (2011)], 10.1021/ja205007j, which suggests that acidic pH inhibits the fibril formation of hIAPP. In addition, a complementary coarse-grained simulation shows the repulsive electrostatic interactions among charged His18 residues slow down the dimerization process of hIAPP by twofold. Besides, our all-atom simulations reveal acidic pH mainly affects the local structure around residue His18 by destroying the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, due to the repulsive interactions between protonated interchain His18 residues at acidic pH. It is also disclosed that the local interactions nearby His18 operating between adjacent β-strands trigger the structural transition, which gives hints to the experimental findings that the rate of hIAPP fibril formation and the morphologies of the fibrillar structures are strongly pH-dependent.

  3. The contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on amyloid fibril formation.

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    Qian Ma

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be considered biologically relevant failures of cellular quality control mechanisms. It is known that in vivo human Tau protein, human prion protein, and human copper, zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1 have the tendency to form fibril deposits in a variety of tissues and they are associated with different neurodegenerative diseases, while rabbit prion protein and hen egg white lysozyme do not readily form fibrils and are unlikely to cause neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we have investigated the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation of different proteins.As revealed by assays based on thioflavin T binding and turbidity, human Tau fragments, when phosphorylated by glycogen synthase kinase-3β, do not form filaments in the absence of a crowding agent but do form fibrils in the presence of a crowding agent, and the presence of a strong crowding agent dramatically promotes amyloid fibril formation of human prion protein and its two pathogenic mutants E196K and D178N. Such an enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on fibril formation is also observed for a pathological human SOD1 mutant A4V. On the other hand, rabbit prion protein and hen lysozyme do not form amyloid fibrils when a crowding agent at 300 g/l is used but do form fibrils in the absence of a crowding agent. Furthermore, aggregation of these two proteins is remarkably inhibited by Ficoll 70 and dextran 70 at 200 g/l.We suggest that proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are more likely to form amyloid fibrils under crowded conditions than in dilute solutions. By contrast, some of the proteins that are not neurodegenerative disease-associated are unlikely to misfold in crowded physiological environments. A possible explanation for the contrasting effect of macromolecular crowding on these two sets of proteins (amyloidogenic proteins and non-amyloidogenic proteins has been

  4. orco mutant mosquitoes lose strong preference for humans and are not repelled by volatile DEET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGennaro, Matthew; McBride, Carolyn S; Seeholzer, Laura; Nakagawa, Takao; Dennis, Emily J; Goldman, Chloe; Jasinskiene, Nijole; James, Anthony A; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2013-06-27

    Female mosquitoes of some species are generalists and will blood-feed on a variety of vertebrate hosts, whereas others display marked host preference. Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti have evolved a strong preference for humans, making them dangerously efficient vectors of malaria and Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Specific host odours probably drive this strong preference because other attractive cues, including body heat and exhaled carbon dioxide (CO2), are common to all warm-blooded hosts. Insects sense odours via several chemosensory receptor families, including the odorant receptors (ORs), membrane proteins that form heteromeric odour-gated ion channels comprising a variable ligand-selective subunit and an obligate co-receptor called Orco (ref. 6). Here we use zinc-finger nucleases to generate targeted mutations in the orco gene of A. aegypti to examine the contribution of Orco and the odorant receptor pathway to mosquito host selection and sensitivity to the insect repellent DEET (N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide). orco mutant olfactory sensory neurons have greatly reduced spontaneous activity and lack odour-evoked responses. Behaviourally, orco mutant mosquitoes have severely reduced attraction to honey, an odour cue related to floral nectar, and do not respond to human scent in the absence of CO2. However, in the presence of CO2, female orco mutant mosquitoes retain strong attraction to both human and animal hosts, but no longer strongly prefer humans. orco mutant females are attracted to human hosts even in the presence of DEET, but are repelled upon contact, indicating that olfactory- and contact-mediated effects of DEET are mechanistically distinct. We conclude that the odorant receptor pathway is crucial for an anthropophilic vector mosquito to discriminate human from non-human hosts and to be effectively repelled by volatile DEET.

  5. Methods to uncover an antibody epitope in the KPI domain of Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein for immunohistochemistry in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, E; Pearson, R C; Parkinson, D

    1999-11-15

    A novel polyclonal antibody (Ab993), specific for a KPI domain epitope of APP, was characterised for use in immunoprecipitation, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Conditioned medium from NTera2/D1 cells was used for immunoprecipitation and Western blots. Paraffin-embedded human brain sections were used for immunohistochemistry. The antibody recognised KPI-containing APP on Western blots after standard solubilisation but immunoprecipitation of soluble APP required reduction with 2-mercaptoethanol followed by alkylation of reduced sulphydryl bonds with sodium iodoacetate. Immunohistochemical staining of human brain sections was significantly enhanced by this pre-treatment. Microwaving of sections also increased immunolabelling, by a mechanism that was additive to reduction and alkylation. Incubation in 80% formic acid did not confer any enhancement of immunoreactivity. Ab993, applied with the methods reported here, is expected to be valuable in investigations of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease to determine the source of the beta-amyloid peptide.

  6. Quercetin protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells from fibrillar β-amyloid1–40-induced toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta-peptides (Aβ are known to undergo active transport across the blood-brain barrier, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy has been shown to be a prominent feature in the majority of Alzheimer׳s disease. Quercetin is a natural flavonoid molecule and has been demonstrated to have potent neuroprotective effects, but its protective effect on endothelial cells under Aβ-damaged condition is unclear. In the present study, the protective effects of quercetin on brain microvascular endothelial cells injured by fibrillar Aβ1–40 (fAβ1–40 were observed. The results show that fAβ1–40-induced cytotoxicity in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hBMECs can be relieved by quercetin treatment. Quercetin increases cell viability, reduces the release of lactate dehydrogenase, and relieves nuclear condensation. Quercetin also alleviates intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and increases superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, it strengthens the barrier integrity through the preservation of the transendothelial electrical resistance value, the relief of aggravated permeability, and the increase of characteristic enzyme levels after being exposed to fAβ1–40. In conclusion, quercetin protects hBMECs from fAβ1–40-induced toxicity.

  7. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Transgenic Mice: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Models for the Role of hIAPP in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. M. Höppener

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, a pancreatic islet protein of 37 amino acids, is the main component of islet amyloid, seen at autopsy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2. To investigate the roles of hIAPP and islet amyloid in DM2, we generated transgenic mice expressing hIAPP in their islet beta cells. In this study, we found that after a long-term, high-fat diet challenge islet amyloid was observed in only 4 of 19 hIAPP transgenic mice. hIAPP transgenic females exhibited severe glucose intolerance, which was associated with a downregulation of GLUT-2 mRNA expression. In isolated islets from hIAPP males cultured for 3 weeks on high-glucose medium, the percentage of amyloid containing islets increased from 5.5% to 70%. This ex vivo system will allow a more rapid, convenient, and specific study of factors influencing islet amyloidosis as well as of therapeutic strategies to interfere with this pathological process.

  8. Structural Characterization of Fibrils from Recombinant Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide by Solid-State NMR: The Central FGAILS Segment Is Part of the β-Sheet Core.

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    Franziska Weirich

    Full Text Available Amyloid deposits formed from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP are a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and are known to be cytotoxic to pancreatic β-cells. The molecular structure of the fibrillar form of IAPP is subject of intense research, and to date, different models exist. We present results of solid-state NMR experiments on fibrils of recombinantly expressed and uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled human IAPP in the non-amidated, free acid form. Complete sequential resonance assignments and resulting constraints on secondary structure are shown. A single set of chemical shifts is found for most residues, which is indicative of a high degree of homogeneity. The core region comprises three to four β-sheets. We find that the central 23-FGAILS-28 segment, which is of critical importance for amyloid formation, is part of the core region and forms a β-strand in our sample preparation. The eight N-terminal amino acid residues of IAPP, forming a ring-like structure due to a disulfide bridge between residues C2 and C7, appear to be well defined but with an increased degree of flexibility. This study supports the elucidation of the structural basis of IAPP amyloid formation and highlights the extent of amyloid fibril polymorphism.

  9. Structural Characterization of Fibrils from Recombinant Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide by Solid-State NMR: The Central FGAILS Segment Is Part of the β-Sheet Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, Franziska; Gremer, Lothar; Mirecka, Ewa A.; Schiefer, Stephanie; Hoyer, Wolfgang; Heise, Henrike

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid deposits formed from islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) are a hallmark of type 2 diabetes mellitus and are known to be cytotoxic to pancreatic β-cells. The molecular structure of the fibrillar form of IAPP is subject of intense research, and to date, different models exist. We present results of solid-state NMR experiments on fibrils of recombinantly expressed and uniformly 13C, 15N-labeled human IAPP in the non-amidated, free acid form. Complete sequential resonance assignments and resulting constraints on secondary structure are shown. A single set of chemical shifts is found for most residues, which is indicative of a high degree of homogeneity. The core region comprises three to four β-sheets. We find that the central 23-FGAILS-28 segment, which is of critical importance for amyloid formation, is part of the core region and forms a β-strand in our sample preparation. The eight N-terminal amino acid residues of IAPP, forming a ring-like structure due to a disulfide bridge between residues C2 and C7, appear to be well defined but with an increased degree of flexibility. This study supports the elucidation of the structural basis of IAPP amyloid formation and highlights the extent of amyloid fibril polymorphism. PMID:27607147

  10. Cell Transformation by PTP1B Truncated Mutants Found in Human Colon and Thyroid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Wenhan; Wang, Kemin; Huang, Jian; Zheng, Xinmin

    2016-01-01

    Expression of wild-type protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B may act either as a tumor suppressor by dysregulation of protein tyrosine kinases or a tumor promoter through Src dephosphorylation at Y527 in human breast cancer cells. To explore whether mutated PTP1B is involved in human carcinogenesis, we have sequenced PTP1B cDNAs from human tumors and found splice mutations in ~20% of colon and thyroid tumors. The PTP1BΔE6 mutant expressed in these two tumor types and another PTP1BΔE5 mutant expressed in colon tumor were studied in more detail. Although PTP1BΔE6 revealed no phosphatase activity compared with wild-type PTP1B and the PTP1BΔE5 mutant, its expression induced oncogenic transformation of rat fibroblasts without Src activation, indicating that it involved signaling pathways independent of Src. The transformed cells were tumourigenic in nude mice, suggesting that the PTP1BΔE6 affected other molecule(s) in the human tumors. These observations may provide a novel therapeutic target for colon and thyroid cancer.

  11. Human amyloid β peptide and tau co-expression impairs behavior and causes specific gene expression changes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyin; Saar, Valeria; Leung, Ka Lai; Chen, Liang; Wong, Garry

    2018-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques consisting of Amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) aggregates and neurofibrillary tangles formed by aggregation of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau. We generated a novel invertebrate model of AD by crossing Aβ1-42 (strain CL2355) with either pro-aggregating tau (strain BR5270) or anti-aggregating tau (strain BR5271) pan-neuronal expressing transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans. The lifespan and progeny viability of the double transgenic strains were significantly decreased compared with wild type N2 (P5E-21). RNA interference of 13 available top up-regulated genes in Aβ1-42+pro-aggregating tau animals revealed that F-box family genes and nep-4 could enhance life span deficits and chemotaxis deficits while Y39G8C.2 (TTBK2) could suppress these behaviors. Comparing the list of regulated genes from C. elegans to the top 60 genes related to human AD confirmed an overlap of 8 genes: patched homolog 1, PTCH1 (ptc-3), the Rab GTPase activating protein, TBC1D16 (tbc-16), the WD repeat and FYVE domain-containing protein 3, WDFY3 (wdfy-3), ADP-ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor 2, ARFGEF2 (agef-1), Early B-cell Factor, EBF1 (unc-3), d-amino-acid oxidase, DAO (daao-1), glutamate receptor, metabotropic 1, GRM1 (mgl-2), prolyl 4-hydroxylase subunit alpha 2, P4HA2 (dpy-18 and phy-2). Taken together, our C. elegans double transgenic model provides insight on the fundamental neurobiologic processes underlying human AD and recapitulates selected transcriptomic changes observed in human AD brains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. γ-Secretase modulators reduce endogenous amyloid β42 levels in human neural progenitor cells without altering neuronal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Avanzo, Carla; Sliwinski, Christopher; Wagner, Steven L.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Kim, Doo Yeon; Kovacs, Dora M.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble γ-secretase modulators (SGSMs) selectively decrease toxic amyloid β (Aβ) peptides (Aβ42). However, their effect on the physiologic functions of γ-secretase has not been tested in human model systems. γ-Secretase regulates fate determination of neural progenitor cells. Thus, we studied the impact of SGSMs on the neuronal differentiation of ReNcell VM (ReN) human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs). Quantitative PCR analysis showed that treatment of neurosphere-like ReN cell aggregate cultures with γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), but not SGSMs, induced a 2- to 4-fold increase in the expression of the neuronal markers Tuj1 and doublecortin. GSI treatment also induced neuronal marker protein expression, as shown by Western blot analysis. In the same conditions, SGSM treatment selectively reduced endogenous Aβ42 levels by ∼80%. Mechanistically, we found that Notch target gene expressions were selectively inhibited by a GSI, not by SGSM treatment. We can assert, for the first time, that SGSMs do not affect the neuronal differentiation of hNPCs while selectively decreasing endogenous Aβ42 levels in the same conditions. Our results suggest that our hNPC differentiation system can serve as a useful model to test the impact of GSIs and SGSMs on both endogenous Aβ levels and γ-secretase physiologic functions including endogenous Notch signaling.—D’Avanzo, C., Sliwinski, C., Wagner, S. L., Tanzi, R. E., Kim, D. Y., Kovacs, D. M. γ-Secretase modulators reduce endogenous amyloid β42 levels in human neural progenitor cells without altering neuronal differentiation. PMID:25903103

  13. Molecular architecture of human prion protein amyloid: a parallel, in-register beta-structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Nathan J; Sönnichsen, Frank D; McHaourab, Hassane; Surewicz, Witold K

    2007-11-27

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) represent a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are associated with conformational conversion of the normally monomeric and alpha-helical prion protein, PrP(C), to the beta-sheet-rich PrP(Sc). This latter conformer is believed to constitute the main component of the infectious TSE agent. In contrast to high-resolution data for the PrP(C) monomer, structures of the pathogenic PrP(Sc) or synthetic PrP(Sc)-like aggregates remain elusive. Here we have used site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy to probe the molecular architecture of the recombinant PrP amyloid, a misfolded form recently reported to induce transmissible disease in mice overexpressing an N-terminally truncated form of PrP(C). Our data show that, in contrast to earlier, largely theoretical models, the con formational conversion of PrP(C) involves major refolding of the C-terminal alpha-helical region. The core of the amyloid maps to C-terminal residues from approximately 160-220, and these residues form single-molecule layers that stack on top of one another with parallel, in-register alignment of beta-strands. This structural insight has important implications for understanding the molecular basis of prion propagation, as well as hereditary prion diseases, most of which are associated with point mutations in the region found to undergo a refolding to beta-structure.

  14. Crystal structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermakova, Inessa; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Issinger, Olaf-Georg

    2003-01-01

    structure of a C-terminal deletion mutant of human CK2alpha was solved and refined to 2.5A resolution. In the crystal the CK2alpha mutant exists as a monomer in agreement with the organization of the subunits in the CK2 holoenzyme. The refined structure shows the helix alphaC and the activation segment, two...

  15. Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera reverses β-amyloid1-42 induced toxicity in human neuronal cells: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

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    Kesava Rao Venkata Kurapati

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by progressive dysfunction of memory and higher cognitive functions with abnormal accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles throughout cortical and limbic brain regions. At present no curative treatment is available, and research focuses on drugs for slowing disease progression or providing prophylaxis. Withania somnifera (WS also known as 'ashwagandha' is used widely in Ayurvedic medicine as a nerve tonic and memory enhancer. However, there is a paucity of data on the potential neuroprotective effects of W.somnifera against β-Amyloid (1-42-induced neuropathogenesis. In the present study, we have tested the neuroprotective effects of methanol:Chloroform (3:1 extract of ashwagandha against β-amyloid induced toxicity and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B infection using a human neuronal SK-N-MC cell line. Our results showed that β-amyloid induced cytotoxic effects in SK-N-MC cells as shown by decreased cell growth when tested individually. Also, confocal microscopic analysis showed decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC cells compared to uninfected cells. However, when ashwagandha was added to β-amyloid treated and HIV-1 infected samples, the toxic effects were neutralized. Further, the MTT cell viability assays and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ levels supported these observations indicating the neuroprotective effect of WS root extract against β-amyloid and HIV-1Ba-L (clade B induced neuro-pathogenesis.

  16. Preclinical properties and human in vivo assessment of 123 I-ABC577 as a novel SPECT agent for imaging amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Yuki; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Onishi, Takako; Shoyama, Yoshinari; Barret, Olivier; Alagille, David; Jennings, Danna; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Tamagnan, Gilles; Tanaka, Akihiro; Shirakami, Yoshifumi

    2016-01-01

    with Alzheimer’s disease relative to healthy control subjects. Both healthy control subjects and patients with Alzheimer’s disease showed minimal 123 I-ABC577 retention in the white matter. These observations indicate that 123 I-ABC577 may be a useful single photon emission computed tomography imaging maker to identify amyloid-β in the human brain. The availability of an amyloid-β tracer for single photon emission computed tomography might increase the accessibility of diagnostic imaging for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:26490333

  17. Enhancement of P53-Mutant Human Colorectal Cancer Cells Radiosensitivity by Flavonoid Fisetin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenshu; Lee Yijang; Yu Yichu; Hsaio Chinghui

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate whether fisetin is a potential radiosensitizer for human colorectal cancer cells, which are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was examined by clonogenic survival assay, and DNA fragmentation was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The effects of treatments on cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were examined by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was performed to ascertain the protein levels of γ-H2AX, phospho-Chk2, active caspase-3, PARP cleavage, phospho-p38, phospho-AKT, and phospho-ERK1/2. Results: Fisetin pretreatment enhanced the radiosensitivity of p53-mutant HT-29 human colorectal cancer cells but not human keratocyte HaCaT cells; it also prolonged radiation-induced G 2 /M arrest, enhanced radiation-induced cell growth arrest in HT-29 cells, and suppressed radiation-induced phospho-H2AX (Ser-139) and phospho-Chk2 (Thr-68) in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Pretreatment with fisetin enhanced radiation-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in HT-29 cells. Fisetin pretreatment augmented radiation-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, which is involved in caspase-mediated apoptosis, and SB202190 significantly reduced apoptosis and radiosensitivity in fisetin-pretreated HT-29 cells. By contrast, both phospho-AKT and phospho-ERK1/2, which are involved in cell proliferation and antiapoptotic pathways, were suppressed after irradiation combined with fisetin pretreatment. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this study is the first to provide evidence that fisetin exerts a radiosensitizing effect in p53-mutant HT-29 cells. Fisetin could potentially be developed as a novel radiosensitizer against radioresistant human cancer cells.

  18. Apolipoproteins E and J interfere with amyloid-beta uptake by primary human astrocytes and microglia in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Nielsen, H.M.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Eikelenboom, P.; Veerhuis, R.

    2014-01-01

    Defective clearance of the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) from the brain is considered a strong promoter in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Astrocytes and microglia are important mediators of Aβ clearance and Aβ aggregation state and the presence of amyloid associated proteins (AAPs), such as

  19. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  20. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  1. Evidence for a central role of PrP helix 2 in the nucleation of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2018-02-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates associated with the pathogenesis of a wide variety of human diseases. The formation of such aggregates typically follows nucleation-dependent kinetics, wherein the assembly and structural conversion of amyloidogenic proteins into oligomeric aggregates (nuclei) is the rate-limiting step of the overall reaction. In this study, we sought to gain structural insights into the oligomeric nuclei of the human prion protein (PrP) by preparing a series of deletion mutants lacking 14-44 of the C-terminal 107 residues of PrP and examined the kinetics and thermodynamics of these mutants in amyloid formation. An analysis of the experimental data using the concepts of the Φ-value analysis indicated that the helix 2 region (residues 168-196) acquires an amyloid-like β-sheet during nucleation, whereas the other regions preserves a relatively disordered structure in the nuclei. This finding suggests that the helix 2 region serves as the nucleation site for the assembly of amyloid fibrils.-Honda, R., Kuwata, K. Evidence for a central role of PrP helix 2 in the nucleation of amyloid fibrils.

  2. Poliovirus mutants excreted by a chronically infected hypogammaglobulinemic patient establish persistent infections in human intestinal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labadie, Karine; Pelletier, Isabelle; Saulnier, Aure; Martin, Javier; Colbere-Garapin, Florence

    2004-01-01

    Immunodeficient patients whose gut is chronically infected by vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV) may excrete large amounts of virus for years. To investigate how poliovirus (PV) establishes chronic infections in the gut, we tested whether it is possible to establish persistent VDPV infections in human intestinal Caco-2 cells. Four type 3 VDPV mutants, representative of the viral evolution in the gut of a hypogammaglobulinemic patient over almost 2 years [J. Virol. 74 (2000) 3001], were used to infect both undifferentiated, dividing cells, and differentiated, polarized enterocytes. A VDPV mutant excreted 36 days postvaccination by the patient was lytic in both types of intestinal cell cultures, like the parental Sabin 3 (S3) strain. In contrast, three VDPVs excreted 136, 442, and 637 days postvaccination, established persistent infections both in undifferentiated cells and in enterocytes. Thus, viral determinants selected between day 36 and 136 conferred on VDPV mutants the capacity to infect intestinal cells persistently. The percentage of persistently VDPV-infected cultures was higher in enterocytes than in undifferentiated cells, implicating cellular determinants involved in the differentiation of enterocytes in persistent VDPV infections. The establishment of persistent infections in enterocytes was not due to poor replication of VDPVs in these cells, but was associated with reduced viral adsorption to the cell surface

  3. Overproduction, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of human Fe65-PTB2 in complex with the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzimanowski, Jens [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Beyreuther, Konrad [Center for Molecular Biology, University Heidelberg, INF282, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Sinning, Irmgard; Wild, Klemens, E-mail: klemens.wild@bzh.uni-heidelberg.de [Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center, INF328, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-05-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which releases the aggregation-prone amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and liberates the intracellular domain (AICD) that interacts with various adaptor proteins. The crystallized AICD–Fe65-PTB2 complex is of central importance for APP translocation, nuclear signalling, processing and Aβ generation. Alzheimer’s disease is associated with typical brain deposits (senile plaques) that mainly contain the neurotoxic amyloid β peptide. This peptide results from proteolytic processing of the type I transmembrane protein amyloid precursor protein (APP). During this proteolytic pathway the APP intracellular domain (AICD) is released into the cytosol, where it associates with various adaptor proteins. The interaction of the AICD with the C-terminal phosphotyrosine-binding domain of Fe65 (Fe65-PTB2) regulates APP translocation, signalling and processing. Human AICD and Fe65-PTB2 have been cloned, overproduced and purified in large amounts in Escherichia coli. A complex of Fe65-PTB2 with the C-terminal 32 amino acids of the AICD gave well diffracting hexagonal crystals and data have been collected to 2.1 Å resolution. Initial phases obtained by the molecular-replacement method are of good quality and revealed well defined electron density for the substrate peptide.

  4. Aggregation of Trp > Glu point mutants of human gamma-D crystallin provides a model for hereditary or UV-induced cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryany, Eugene; Takata, Takumi; Erickson, Erika; Schafheimer, Nathaniel; Wang, Yongting; King, Jonathan A

    2016-06-01

    Numerous mutations and covalent modifications of the highly abundant, long-lived crystallins of the eye lens cause their aggregation leading to progressive opacification of the lens, cataract. The nature and biochemical mechanisms of the aggregation process are poorly understood, as neither amyloid nor native-state polymers are commonly found in opaque lenses. The βγ-crystallin fold contains four highly conserved buried tryptophans, which can be oxidized to more hydrophilic products, such as kynurenine, upon UV-B irradiation. We mimicked this class of oxidative damage using Trp→Glu point mutants of human γD-crystallin. Such substitutions may represent a model of UV-induced photodamage-introduction of a charged group into the hydrophobic core generating "denaturation from within." The effects of Trp→Glu substitutions were highly position dependent. While each was destabilizing, only the two located in the bottom of the double Greek key fold-W42E and W130E-yielded robust aggregation of partially unfolded intermediates at 37°C and pH 7. The αB-crystallin chaperone suppressed aggregation of W130E, but not W42E, indicating distinct aggregation pathways from damage in the N-terminal vs C-terminal domain. The W130E aggregates had loosely fibrillar morphology, yet were nonamyloid, noncovalent, showed little surface hydrophobicity, and formed at least 20°C below the melting temperature of the native β-sheets. These features are most consistent with domain-swapped polymerization. Aggregation of partially destabilized crystallins under physiological conditions, as occurs in this class of point mutants, could provide a simple in vitro model system for drug discovery and optimization. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  5. Disturbed α-Cell Function in Mice with β-Cell Specific Overexpression of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Ahrén

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous administration of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been shown to inhibit both insulin and glucagon secretion. This study examined α-cell function in mice with β-cell specific overexpression of human IAPP (hIAPP after an oral protein gavage (75 mg whey protein/mouse. Baseline glucagon levels were higher in transgenic mice (41±4.0 pg/mL, n=6 than in wildtype animals (19±5.1 pg/mL, n=5, P=.015. In contrast, the glucagon response to protein was impaired in transgenic animals (21±2.7 pg/mL in transgenic mice versus 38±5.7 pg/mL in wildtype mice at 15 minutes; P=.027. Baseline insulin levels did not differ between the groups, while the insulin response, as the glucagon response, was impaired after protein challenge (P=.018. Glucose levels were not different between the groups and did not change significantly after protein gavage. Acetaminophen was given through gavage to the animals (2 mg/mouse to estimate gastric emptying. The plasma acetaminophen profile was similar in the two groups of mice. We conclude that disturbances in glucagon secretion exist in mice with β-cell specific overexpression of human IAPP, which are not secondary to changes in gastric emptying. The reduced glucagon response to protein challenge may reflect a direct inhibitory influence of hIAPP on glucagon secretion.

  6. Analysis of human HPRT- deletion mutants by the microarray-CGH (comparative genomic hybridization)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodaira, M.; Sasaki, K.; Tagawa, H.; Omine, H.; Kushiro, J.; Takahashi, N.; Katayama, H.

    2003-01-01

    We are trying to evaluate genetic effects of radiation on human using mutation frequency as an indicator. For the efficient detection of mutations, it is important to understand the mechanism and the characteristics of radiation-induced mutations. We have started the analysis of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) mutants induced by X-ray in order to clarify the deletion size and the mutation-distribution. We analyzed 39 human X-ray induced HPRT-deletion mutants by using the microarray-CGH. The array for this analysis contains 57 BAC clones covering as much as possible of the 4Mb of the 5' side and 10Mb of the 3' side of the HPRT gene based on the NCBI genome database. DNA from parent strain and each HPRT-mutant strain are labeled with Cy5 and Cy3 respectively, and were mixed and hybridized on the array. Fluorescent intensity ratio of the obtained spots was analyzed using software we developed to identify clones corresponding to the deletion region. The deletion in these strains ranged up to 3.5 Mb on the 5' side and 6 Mb on the 3' side of the HPRT gene. Deletions in 13 strains ended around BAC clones located at about 3 Mb on the 5' side. On the 3' side, deletions extended up to the specific clones located at 1.5 Mb in 11 strains. The mutations seem to be complex on the 3' end of deletion; some accompanied duplications with deletions and others could not be explained by one mutation event. We need to confirm these results, taking into account the experimental reproducibility and the accuracy of the published genetic map. The results of the research using the microarray-CGH help us to search the regions where deletions are easily induced and to identify the factors affecting the range of deletions

  7. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  8. Yield of two mutant lines of soybean for human consumption;Rendimiento de dos lineas mutantes de soya para consumo humano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmeron E, J.; Mastache L, A. A.; Diaz V, G. E.; Valencia E, F.; Ranfla C, R.; Melendez P, M. [Colegio Superior Agropecuario del Estado de Guerrero, Vicente Guerrero No. 81, Col. Centro, 40000 Iguala, Guerrero (Mexico); Cervantes S, T. [Instituto de Recursos Geneticos y Productividad, Colegio de Postgraduados, Carretera Mexico-Texcoco Km. 36.5, Montecillo, 56230 Texcoco, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); De la Cruz T, E.; Garcia A, J. M.; Falcon B, T., E-mail: csaegro@prodigy.net.m [ININ, Departamento de Biologia, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The present work has the objective of to evaluate the yield and the agronomic behavior of 2 mutant lines of soybean for human consumption, obtained by means of a process of recurrent irradiation of soybean seed ISAAEG-BM{sub 2} with gammas of Co{sup 60} and selection in the generation R{sub 4}M{sub 18}. For the variable yield significant statistical differences were not observed, but considering the rest of the evaluated agronomic characteristics the mutant lines L{sub 6} and Bombona they were excellent with values of 3,934.6 and 3,806.8 Kg ha-{sup 1} to 15% of grain humidity, they also possess excellent genetic characteristics result of the irradiations and selections of these new genetic materials. (Author)

  9. Glycerol restores the p53 function in human lingual cancer cells bearing mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Ichiro; Yane, Katsunari; Yuki, Kazue; Kanata, Hirokazu; Hosoi, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Hiroshi

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in p53, tumor suppressor gene, have recently been shown to have an impact on the clinical course of several human tumors, including head and neck cancers. The genetic status of the p53 gene has been focused on as the most important candidate among various cancer-related genes for prognosis-predictive assays of cancer therapy. We examined the restoration of radiation- or cisplatin (CDDP)-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in human lingual cancer cells. The results suggest that glycerol is effective in inducing a conformational change of p53 and restoring normal function of mutant p53, leading to enhanced radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity through the induction of apoptosis. We have also represented the same results in vivo as in vitro. Thus, this novel tool for enhancement of radiosensitivity or chemosensitivity in cancer cells bearing m p53 may be applicable for p53-targeted cancer therapy. (author)

  10. Correction of β-thalassemia mutant by base editor in human embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puping Liang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract β-Thalassemia is a global health issue, caused by mutations in the HBB gene. Among these mutations, HBB −28 (A>G mutations is one of the three most common mutations in China and Southeast Asia patients with β-thalassemia. Correcting this mutation in human embryos may prevent the disease being passed onto future generations and cure anemia. Here we report the first study using base editor (BE system to correct disease mutant in human embryos. Firstly, we produced a 293T cell line with an exogenous HBB −28 (A>G mutant fragment for gRNAs and targeting efficiency evaluation. Then we collected primary skin fibroblast cells from a β-thalassemia patient with HBB −28 (A>G homozygous mutation. Data showed that base editor could precisely correct HBB −28 (A>G mutation in the patient’s primary cells. To model homozygous mutation disease embryos, we constructed nuclear transfer embryos by fusing the lymphocyte or skin fibroblast cells with enucleated in vitro matured (IVM oocytes. Notably, the gene correction efficiency was over 23.0% in these embryos by base editor. Although these embryos were still mosaic, the percentage of repaired blastomeres was over 20.0%. In addition, we found that base editor variants, with narrowed deamination window, could promote G-to-A conversion at HBB −28 site precisely in human embryos. Collectively, this study demonstrated the feasibility of curing genetic disease in human somatic cells and embryos by base editor system.

  11. Microarray analysis on human neuroblastoma cells exposed to aluminum, β(1-42-amyloid or the β(1-42-amyloid aluminum complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Gatta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A typical pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD is the appearance in the brain of senile plaques made up of β-amyloid (Aβ and neurofibrillary tangles. AD is also associated with an abnormal accumulation of some metal ions, and we have recently shown that one of these, aluminum (Al, plays a relevant role in affecting Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity. METHODOLOGY: In this study, employing a microarray analysis of 35,129 genes, we investigated the effects induced by the exposure to the Aβ(1-42-Al (Aβ-Al complex on the gene expression profile of the neuronal-like cell line, SH-SY5Y. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The microarray assay indicated that, compared to Aβ or Al alone, exposure to Aβ-Al complex produced selective changes in gene expression. Some of the genes selectively over or underexpressed are directly related to AD. A further evaluation performed with Ingenuity Pathway analysis revealed that these genes are nodes of networks and pathways that are involved in the modulation of Ca(2+ homeostasis as well as in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Aβ-Al appears to be largely involved in the molecular machinery that regulates neuronal as well as synaptic dysfunction and loss. Aβ-Al seems critical in modulating key AD-related pathways such as glutamatergic transmission, Ca(2+ homeostasis, oxidative stress, inflammation, and neuronal apoptosis.

  12. Molecular analysis of human argininosuccinate lyase: Mutant characterization and alternative splicing of the coding region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, D.C.; McCloskey, D.A.; Simard, L.R.; McInnes, R.R.

    1990-01-01

    Argininosuccinic acid lyase (ASAL) deficiency is a clinically heterogeneous autosomal recessive urea cycle disorder. The authors previously established by complementation analysis that 29 ASAL-deficient patients have heterogeneous mutations in a single gene. To prove that the ASAL structural gene is the affected locus, they sequenced polymerase chain reaction-amplified ASAL cDNA of a representative mutant from the single complementation group. Fibroblast strain 944 from a late-onset patient who was the product of a consanguineous mating, had only a single base-pair change in the coding region, a C-283→ T transition at a CpG dinucleotide in exon 3. This substitution converts Arg-95 to Cys (R95C), occurs in a stretch of 13 residues that is identical in yeast and human ASAL, and was present in both of the patient's alleles but not in 14 other mutant or 10 normal alleles. They observed that amplified cDNA from mutant 944 and normal cells (liver, keratinocytes, lymphoblasts, and fibroblasts) contained, in addition to the expected 5' 513-base-pair band, a prominent 318-base-pair ASAL band formed by the splicing of exon 2 from the transcript. The short transcript maintains the ASAL reading frame but removes Lys-51, a residue that may be essential for catalysis, since it binds the argininosuccinate substrate. They conclude (i) that the identification of the R95C mutation in strain 944 demonstrates that virtually all ASAL deficiency results from defects in the ASAL structural gene and (ii) that minor alternative splicing of the coding region occurs at the ASAL locus

  13. Structure prediction and activity analysis of human heme oxygenase-1 and its mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhen-Wei; Zhou, Wen-Pu; Cui, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Shen, Qing-Xiang; Li, Yun-Zhu; Yu, Shan-Chang

    2004-08-15

    To predict wild human heme oxygenase-1 (whHO-1) and hHO-1 His25Ala mutant (delta hHO-1) structures, to clone and express them and analyze their activities. Swiss-PdbViewer and Antheprot 5.0 were used for the prediction of structure diversity and physical-chemical changes between wild and mutant hHO-1. hHO-1 His25Ala mutant cDNA was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis in two plasmids of E. coli DH5alpha. Expression products were purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation and Q-Sepharose Fast Flow column chromatography, and their activities were measured. rHO-1 had the structure of a helical fold with the heme sandwiched between heme-heme oxygenase-1 helices. Bond angle, dihedral angle and chemical bond in the active pocket changed after Ala25 was replaced by His25, but Ala25 was still contacting the surface and the electrostatic potential of the active pocket was negative. The mutated enzyme kept binding activity to heme. Two vectors pBHO-1 and pBHO-1(M) were constructed and expressed. Ammonium sulphate precipitation and column chromatography yielded 3.6-fold and 30-fold higher purities of whHO-1, respectively. The activity of delta hHO-1 was reduced 91.21% after mutation compared with whHO-1. Proximal His25 ligand is crucial for normal hHO-1 catalytic activity. delta hHO-1 is deactivated by mutation but keeps the same binding site as whHO-1. delta hHO-1 might be a potential inhibitor of whHO-1 for preventing neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

  14. Mutation induction in γ-irradiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells and molecular analysis of the HPRT- mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Keiji; Hei, Tom K.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined various radiobiological parameters using commercially-available primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells, which can be subcultured more than 20 population doublings, and have established the mutation system in order to characterize the molecular changes in γ-irradiated primary cells. The survival curve, obtained after irradiation of cells with 137 Cs γ-rays, indicates that the D 0 , D q , and n values are 1.34 Gy, 1.12 Gy, and 2.3, respectively. The induction of HPRT - mutation was dose-dependent and the mutant fraction increased in a non-linear fashion. Since the doubling number of NHBE cells is limited, DNA was extracted directly from the single mutant colonies and alteration in the HPRT gene locus was analyzed using multiplex PCR technique. Among spontaneous mutants, the proportion with total and partial deletions of the gene was 10.0% (2/20) and 60.0% (12/20), respectively, while 30.0% (6/20) did not have any detectable changes in the nine exons examined. On the other hand, the fraction of total deletion increased by more than 2-fold among mutants induced by γ-rays in that 26.3% (10/38) of them showed the total gene deletions. Twenty-five out of 38 γ-induced mutants (65.8%) had partial deletions and 3 mutants (7.9%) had no detectable alteration. The present results showed that γ-irradiation efficiently induced HPRT gene mutation in primary human epithelial cells and that most of the induced mutants suffered larger deletions compared to that observed in spontaneous mutants. This system provides a useful tool for determination of mutagenicity and understanding the molecular mechanisms of environmental carcinogens in primary human bronchial cells

  15. Kinetic and structural evidences on human prolidase pathological mutants suggest strategies for enzyme functional rescue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Besio

    Full Text Available Prolidase is the only human enzyme responsible for the digestion of iminodipeptides containing proline or hydroxyproline at their C-terminal end, being a key player in extracellular matrix remodeling. Prolidase deficiency (PD is an intractable loss of function disease, characterized by mutations in the prolidase gene. The exact causes of activity impairment in mutant prolidase are still unknown. We generated three recombinant prolidase forms, hRecProl-231delY, hRecProl-E412K and hRecProl-G448R, reproducing three mutations identified in homozygous PD patients. The enzymes showed very low catalytic efficiency, thermal instability and changes in protein conformation. No variation of Mn(II cofactor affinity was detected for hRecProl-E412K; a compromised ability to bind the cofactor was found in hRecProl-231delY and Mn(II was totally absent in hRecProl-G448R. Furthermore, local structure perturbations for all three mutants were predicted by in silico analysis. Our biochemical investigation of the three causative alleles identified in perturbed folding/instability, and in consequent partial prolidase degradation, the main reasons for enzyme inactivity. Based on the above considerations we were able to rescue part of the prolidase activity in patients' fibroblasts through the induction of Heath Shock Proteins expression, hinting at new promising avenues for PD treatment.

  16. Autoradiographic detection of diphtheria toxin resistant mutants in human diploid fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.S.; Singh, B.

    1985-01-01

    An autoradiographic procedure for the detection of diphtheria toxin (DT) resistant (Dip/sub R/) mutants in human diploid fibroblast (HDF) cells has been developed. The assay is based on the observation that when HDFs from confluent cultures are seeded in medium containing 0.01 flocculating units/ml or higher concentration of DT, protein synthesis in sensitive cells is severely inhibited by 4-6 hr. If at this or later time, a radiolabeled protein precursor (eg, 3 H-leucine) is added to the culture, it is almost exclusively incorporated into the resistant cells, which are then readily identified by autoradiography. These studies provide strong evidence that the labeled cells identified by autoradiography are bona fide Dip/sub R/ mutants. The detection of Dip/sub R/ cells by autoradiography is apparently not affected by the presence of the sensitive cells in the mixtures. The spontaneous frequency of Dip/sub R/ cells in HDFs has been found to be in the range of 1-5 x 10 -6 , and this increases in a dose dependent manner upon treatment with the mutagen ethyl methanesulfonate. These results indicate that the autoradiographic assay could be used for quantitative mutagenesis. Since the autoradiographic assay does not depend on cell division, it may prove useful in estimating the incidence of pre-existing mutations in cell populations that either do not divide or have very limited growth potential (eg, lymphocytes, muscle cells, neurons, senescent fibroblasts, etc.)

  17. Isolation of reovirus T3D mutants capable of infecting human tumor cells independent of junction adhesion molecule-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana J M van den Wollenberg

    Full Text Available Mammalian Reovirus is a double-stranded RNA virus with a distinctive preference to replicate in and lyse transformed cells. On that account, Reovirus type 3 Dearing (T3D is clinically evaluated as oncolytic agent. The therapeutic efficacy of this approach depends in part on the accessibility of the reovirus receptor Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A on the target cells. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of reovirus T3D mutants that can infect human tumor cells independent of JAM-A. The JAM-A-independent (jin mutants were isolated on human U118MG glioblastoma cells, which do not express JAM-A. All jin mutants harbour mutations in the S1 segments close to the region that encodes the sialic acid-binding pocket in the shaft of the spike protein. In addition, two of the jin mutants encode spike proteins with a Q336R substitution in their head domain. The jin mutants can productively infect a wide range of cell lines that resist wt reovirus T3D infection, including chicken LMH cells, hamster CHO cells, murine endothelioma cells, human U2OS and STA-ET2.1 cells, but not primary human fibroblasts. The jin-mutants rely on the presence of sialic-acid residues on the cell surface for productive infection, as is evident from wheat germ agglutinin (WGA inhibition experiments, and from the jin-reovirus resistance of CHO-Lec2 cells, which have a deficiency of sialic-acids on their glycoproteins. The jin mutants may be useful as oncolytic agents for use in tumors in which JAM-A is absent or inaccessible.

  18. Β-amyloid 1-42 oligomers impair function of human embryonic stem cell-derived forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linn Wicklund

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD patients is associated with a decline in the levels of growth factors, impairment of axonal transport and marked degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs. Neurogenesis persists in the adult human brain, and the stimulation of regenerative processes in the CNS is an attractive prospect for neuroreplacement therapy in neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. Currently, it is still not clear how the pathophysiological environment in the AD brain affects stem cell biology. Previous studies investigating the effects of the β-amyloid (Aβ peptide on neurogenesis have been inconclusive, since both neurogenic and neurotoxic effects on progenitor cell populations have been reported. In this study, we treated pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES cells with nerve growth factor (NGF as well as with fibrillar and oligomeric Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 (nM-µM concentrations and thereafter studied the differentiation in vitro during 28-35 days. The process applied real time quantitative PCR, immunocytochemistry as well as functional studies of intracellular calcium signaling. Treatment with NGF promoted the differentiation into functionally mature BFCNs. In comparison to untreated cells, oligomeric Aβ1-40 increased the number of functional neurons, whereas oligomeric Aβ1-42 suppressed the number of functional neurons. Interestingly, oligomeric Aβ exposure did not influence the number of hES cell-derived neurons compared with untreated cells, while in contrast fibrillar Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 induced gliogenesis. These findings indicate that Aβ1-42 oligomers may impair the function of stem cell-derived neurons. We propose that it may be possible for future AD therapies to promote the maturation of functional stem cell-derived neurons by altering the brain microenvironment with trophic support and by targeting different aggregation forms of Aβ.

  19. Intracellular transport and sorting of mutant human proinsulins that fail to form hexamers.

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    Quinn, D; Orci, L; Ravazzola, M; Moore, H P

    1991-06-01

    Human proinsulin and insulin oligomerize to form dimers and hexamers. It has been suggested that the ability of prohormones to self associate and form aggregates may be responsible for the sorting process at the trans-Golgi. To examine whether insulin oligomerization is required for proper sorting into regulated storage granules, we have constructed point mutations in human insulin B chain that have been previously shown to prevent formation of insulin hexamers (Brange, J., U. Ribel, J. F. Hansen, G. Dodson, M. T. Hansen, S. Havelund, S. G. Melberg, F. Norris, K. Norris, L. Snel, A. R. Sorensen, and H. O. Voight. 1988. Nature [Lond.]. 333:679-682). One mutant (B10His----Asp) allows formation of dimers but not hexamers and the other (B9Ser----Asp) prevents formation of both dimers and hexamers. The mutants were transfected into the mouse pituitary AtT-20 cells, and their ability to be sorted into regulated secretory granules was compared to wild-type insulin. We found that while B10His----Asp is sorted somewhat less efficiently than wild-type insulin as reported previously (Carroll, R. J., R. E. Hammer, S. J. Chan, H. H. Swift, A. H. Rubenstein, and D. F. Steiner. 1988. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 85:8943-8947; Gross, D. J., P. A. Halban, C. R. Kahn, G. C. Weir, and L. Villa-Kumaroff. 1989. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 86:4107-4111). B9Ser----Asp is targeted to granules as efficiently as wild-type insulin. These results indicate that self association of proinsulin into hexamers is not required for its targeting to the regulated secretory pathway.

  20. Protection of Human Podocytes from Shiga Toxin 2-Induced Phosphorylation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Apoptosis by Human Serum Amyloid P Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmar, Anne K.; Binder, Elisabeth; Greiner, Friederike R.; Liebau, Max C.; Kurschat, Christine E.; Jungraithmayr, Therese C.; Saleem, Moin A.; Schmitt, Claus-Peter; Feifel, Elisabeth; Orth-Höller, Dorothea; Kemper, Markus J.; Pepys, Mark; Würzner, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is mainly induced by Shiga toxin 2 (Stx2)-producing Escherichia coli. Proteinuria can occur in the early phase of the disease, and its persistence determines the renal prognosis. Stx2 may injure podocytes and induce proteinuria. Human serum amyloid P component (SAP), a member of the pentraxin family, has been shown to protect against Stx2-induced lethality in mice in vivo, presumably by specific binding to the toxin. We therefore tested the hypothesis that SAP can protect against Stx2-induced injury of human podocytes. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying podocyte injury in HUS-associated proteinuria, we assessed Stx2-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and apoptosis in immortalized human podocytes and evaluated the impact of SAP on Stx2-induced damage. Human podocytes express Stx2-binding globotriaosylceramide 3. Stx2 applied to cultured podocytes was internalized and then activated p38α MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), important signaling steps in cell differentiation and apoptosis. Stx2 also activated caspase 3, resulting in an increased level of apoptosis. Coincubation of podocytes with SAP and Stx2 mitigated the effects of Stx2 and induced upregulation of antiapoptotic Bcl2. These data suggest that podocytes are a target of Stx2 and that SAP protects podocytes against Stx2-induced injury. SAP may therefore be a useful therapeutic option. PMID:24566618

  1. Molecular Insight into Human Lysozyme and Its Ability to Form Amyloid Fibrils in High Concentrations of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate: A View from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

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    Majid Jafari

    Full Text Available Changes in the tertiary structure of proteins and the resultant fibrillary aggregation could result in fatal heredity diseases, such as lysozyme systemic amyloidosis. Human lysozyme is a globular protein with antimicrobial properties with tendencies to fibrillate and hence is known as a fibril-forming protein. Therefore, its behavior under different ambient conditions is of great importance. In this study, we conducted two 500000 ps molecular dynamics (MD simulations of human lysozyme in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS at two ambient temperatures. To achieve comparative results, we also performed two 500000 ps human lysozyme MD simulations in pure water as controls. The aim of this study was to provide further molecular insight into all interactions in the lysozyme-SDS complexes and to provide a perspective on the ability of human lysozyme to form amyloid fibrils in the presence of SDS surfactant molecules. SDS, which is an anionic detergent, contains a hydrophobic tail with 12 carbon atoms and a negatively charged head group. The SDS surfactant is known to be a stabilizer for helical structures above the critical micelle concentration (CMC [1]. During the 500000 ps MD simulations, the helical structures were maintained by the SDS surfactant above its CMC at 300 K, while at 370 K, human lysozyme lost most of its helices and gained β-sheets. Therefore, we suggest that future studies investigate the β-amyloid formation of human lysozyme at SDS concentrations above the CMC and at high temperatures.

  2. Structural characterization of V57D and V57P mutants of human cystatin C, an amyloidogenic protein

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    Orlikowska, Marta; Szymańska, Aneta [University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18/19, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Borek, Dominika; Otwinowski, Zbyszek [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-8816 (United States); Skowron, Piotr; Jankowska, Elżbieta, E-mail: elaj@chem.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18/19, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2013-04-01

    Val57 point mutants of human cystatin C, which were designed to assess the influence of changes in the properties of the L1 loop on the dimerization propensity, were structurally characterized. Wild-type human cystatin C (hCC wt) is a low-molecular-mass protein (120 amino-acid residues, 13 343 Da) that is found in all nucleated cells. Physiologically, it functions as a potent regulator of cysteine protease activity. While the biologically active hCC wt is a monomeric protein, all crystallization efforts to date have resulted in a three-dimensional domain-swapped dimeric structure. In the recently published structure of a mutated hCC, the monomeric fold was preserved by a stabilization of the conformationally constrained loop L1 caused by a single amino-acid substitution: Val57Asn. Additional hCC mutants were obtained in order to elucidate the relationship between the stability of the L1 loop and the propensity of human cystatin C to dimerize. In one mutant Val57 was substituted by an aspartic acid residue, which is favoured in β-turns, and in the second mutant proline, a residue known for broadening turns, was substituted for the same Val57. Here, 2.26 and 3.0 Å resolution crystal structures of the V57D andV57P mutants of hCC are reported and their dimeric architecture is discussed in terms of the stabilization and destabilization effects of the introduced mutations.

  3. Proteomic screening for amyloid proteins.

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    Anton A Nizhnikov

    Full Text Available Despite extensive study, progress in elucidation of biological functions of amyloids and their role in pathology is largely restrained due to the lack of universal and reliable biochemical methods for their discovery. All biochemical methods developed so far allowed only identification of glutamine/asparagine-rich amyloid-forming proteins or proteins comprising amyloids that form large deposits. In this article we present a proteomic approach which may enable identification of a broad range of amyloid-forming proteins independently of specific features of their sequences or levels of expression. This approach is based on the isolation of protein fractions enriched with amyloid aggregates via sedimentation by ultracentrifugation in the presence of strong ionic detergents, such as sarkosyl or SDS. Sedimented proteins are then separated either by 2D difference gel electrophoresis or by SDS-PAGE, if they are insoluble in the buffer used for 2D difference gel electrophoresis, after which they are identified by mass-spectrometry. We validated this approach by detection of known yeast prions and mammalian proteins with established capacity for amyloid formation and also revealed yeast proteins forming detergent-insoluble aggregates in the presence of human huntingtin with expanded polyglutamine domain. Notably, with one exception, all these proteins contained glutamine/asparagine-rich stretches suggesting that their aggregates arose due to polymerization cross-seeding by human huntingtin. Importantly, though the approach was developed in a yeast model, it can easily be applied to any organism thus representing an efficient and universal tool for screening for amyloid proteins.

  4. Microspectroscopy (μFTIR) reveals co-localization of lipid oxidation and amyloid plaques in human Alzheimer disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benseny-Cases, Núria; Klementieva, Oxana; Cotte, Marine; Ferrer, Isidre; Cladera, Josep

    2014-12-16

    Amyloid peptides are the main component of one of the characteristic pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD): senile plaques. According to the amyloid cascade hypothesis, amyloid peptides may play a central role in the sequence of events that leads to neurodegeneration. However, there are other factors, such as oxidative stress, that may be crucial for the development of the disease. In the present paper, we show that it is possible, by using Fourier tranform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, to co-localize amyloid deposits and lipid peroxidation in tissue slides from patients affected by Alzheimer's disease. Plaques and lipids can be analyzed in the same sample, making use of the characteristic infrared bands for peptide aggregation and lipid oxidation. The results show that, in samples from patients diagnosed with AD, the plaques and their immediate surroundings are always characterized by the presence of oxidized lipids. As for samples from non-AD individuals, those without amyloid plaques show a lower level of lipid oxidation than AD individuals. However, it is known that plaques can be detected in the brains of some non-AD individuals. Our results show that, in such cases, the lipid in the plaques and their surroundings display oxidation levels that are similar to those of tissues with no plaques. These results point to lipid oxidation as a possible key factor in the path that goes from showing the typical neurophatological hallmarks to suffering from dementia. In this process, the oxidative power of the amyloid peptide, possibly in the form of nonfibrillar aggregates, could play a central role.

  5. A human scFv antibody that targets and neutralizes high molecular weight pathogenic amyloid-β oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebollela, Adriano; Cline, Erika N; Popova, Izolda; Luo, Kevin; Sun, Xiaoxia; Ahn, Jay; Barcelos, Milena A; Bezerra, Vanessa N; Lyra E Silva, Natalia M; Patel, Jason; Pinheiro, Nathalia R; Qin, Lei A; Kamel, Josette M; Weng, Anthea; DiNunno, Nadia; Bebenek, Adrian M; Velasco, Pauline T; Viola, Kirsten L; Lacor, Pascale N; Ferreira, Sergio T; Klein, William L

    2017-07-03

    Brain accumulation of soluble oligomers of the amyloid-β peptide (AβOs) is increasingly considered a key early event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A variety of AβO species have been identified, both in vitro and in vivo, ranging from dimers to 24mers and higher order oligomers. However, there is no consensus in the literature regarding which AβO species are most germane to AD pathogenesis. Antibodies capable of specifically recognizing defined subpopulations of AβOs would be a valuable asset in the identification, isolation, and characterization of AD-relevant AβO species. Here, we report the characterization of a human single chain antibody fragment (scFv) denoted NUsc1, one of a number of scFvs we have identified that stringently distinguish AβOs from both monomeric and fibrillar Aβ. NUsc1 readily detected AβOs previously bound to dendrites in cultured hippocampal neurons. In addition, NUsc1 blocked AβO binding and reduced AβO-induced neuronal oxidative stress and tau hyperphosphorylation in cultured neurons. NUsc1 further distinguished brain extracts from AD-transgenic mice from wild type (WT) mice, and detected endogenous AβOs in fixed AD brain tissue and AD brain extracts. Biochemical analyses indicated that NUsc1 targets a subpopulation of AβOs with apparent molecular mass greater than 50 kDa. Results indicate that NUsc1 targets a particular AβO species relevant to AD pathogenesis, and suggest that NUsc1 may constitute an effective tool for AD diagnostics and therapeutics. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Conformations of islet amyloid polypeptide monomers in a membrane environment: implications for fibril formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojie Duan

    Full Text Available The amyloid fibrils formed by islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP are associated with type II diabetes. One of the proposed mechanisms of the toxicity of IAPP is that it causes membrane damage. The fatal mutation of S20G human IAPP was reported to lead to early onset of type II diabetes and high tendency of amyloid formation in vitro. Characterizing the structural features of the S20G mutant in its monomeric state is experimentally difficult because of its unusually fast aggregation rate. Computational work complements experimental studies. We performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations of the monomeric state of human variants in the membrane. Our simulations are validated by extensive comparisons with experimental data. We find that a helical disruption at His18 is common to both human variants. An L-shaped motif of S20G mutant is observed in one of the conformational families. This motif that bends at His18 resembles the overall topology of IAPP fibrils. The conformational preorganization into the fibril-like topology provides a possible explanation for the fast aggregation rate of S20G IAPP.

  7. Rescue of a pathogenic mutant human glucagon receptor by pharmacological chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Run; Chen, Chun-Rong; Liu, Xiaohong; Kodra, János T

    2012-10-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a homozygous inactivating P86S mutation of the glucagon receptor (GCGR) causes a novel human disease of hyperglucagonemia, pancreatic α-cell hyperplasia, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (Mahvash disease). The mechanisms for the decreased activity of the P86S mutant (P86S) are abnormal receptor localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and defective interaction with glucagon. To search for targeted therapies for Mahvash disease, we examined whether P86S can be trafficked to the plasma membrane by pharmacological chaperones and whether novel glucagon analogs restore effective receptor interaction. We used enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged P86S stably expressed in HEK 293 cells to allow fluorescence imaging and western blotting and molecular modeling to design novel glucagon analogs in which alanine 19 was replaced with serine or asparagine. Incubation at 27 °C largely restored normal plasma membrane localization and normal processing of P86S but osmotic chaperones had no effects. The ER stressors thapsigargin and curcumin partially rescued P86S. The lipophilic GCGR antagonist L-168,049 also partially rescued P86S, so did Cpd 13 and 15 to a smaller degree. The rescued P86S led to more glucagon-stimulated cAMP production and was internalized by glucagon. Compared with the native glucagon, the novel glucagon analogs failed to stimulate more cAMP production by P86S. We conclude that the mutant GCGR is partially rescued by several pharmacological chaperones and our data provide proof-of-principle evidence that Mahvash disease can be potentially treated with pharmacological chaperones. The novel glucagon analogs, however, failed to interact with P86S more effectively.

  8. Scalable production in human cells and biochemical characterization of full-length normal and mutant huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Huntingtin (Htt is a 350 kD intracellular protein, ubiquitously expressed and mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Huntington's disease (HD is caused by a CAG triplet amplification in exon 1 of the corresponding gene resulting in a polyglutamine (polyQ expansion at the N-terminus of Htt. Production of full-length Htt has been difficult in the past and so far a scalable system or process has not been established for recombinant production of Htt in human cells. The ability to produce Htt in milligram quantities would be a prerequisite for many biochemical and biophysical studies aiming in a better understanding of Htt function under physiological conditions and in case of mutation and disease. For scalable production of full-length normal (17Q and mutant (46Q and 128Q Htt we have established two different systems, the first based on doxycycline-inducible Htt expression in stable cell lines, the second on "gutless" adenovirus mediated gene transfer. Purified material has then been used for biochemical characterization of full-length Htt. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs were determined and several new phosphorylation sites were identified. Nearly all PTMs in full-length Htt localized to areas outside of predicted alpha-solenoid protein regions. In all detected N-terminal peptides methionine as the first amino acid was missing and the second, alanine, was found to be acetylated. Differences in secondary structure between normal and mutant Htt, a helix-rich protein, were not observed in our study. Purified Htt tends to form dimers and higher order oligomers, thus resembling the situation observed with N-terminal fragments, although the mechanism of oligomer formation may be different.

  9. A Phenotypic Screen for Functional Mutants of Human Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuru; Havel, Jocelyn; Beal, Peter A

    2015-11-20

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) are RNA-editing enzymes responsible for the conversion of adenosine to inosine at specific locations in cellular RNAs. ADAR1 and ADAR2 are two members of the family that have been shown to be catalytically active. Earlier, we reported a phenotypic screen for the study of human ADAR2 using budding yeast S. cerevisiae as the host system. While this screen has been successfully applied to the study of ADAR2, it failed with ADAR1. Here, we report a new reporter that uses a novel editing substrate and is suitable for the study of ADAR1. We screened plasmid libraries with randomized codons for two important residues in human ADAR1 (G1007 and E1008). The screening results combined with in vitro deamination assays led to the identification of mutants that are more active than the wild type protein. Furthermore, a screen of the ADAR1 E1008X library with a reporter construct bearing an A•G mismatch at the editing site suggests one role for the residue at position 1008 is to sense the identity of the base pairing partner for the editing site adenosine. This work has provided a starting point for future in vitro evolution studies of ADAR1 and led to new insight into ADAR's editing site selectivity.

  10. The antigen-binding fragment of human gamma immunoglobulin prevents amyloid β-peptide folding into β-sheet to form oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls-Comamala, Victòria; Guivernau, Biuse; Bonet, Jaume; Puig, Marta; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Palomer, Ernest; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Altafaj, Xavier; Tajes, Marta; Puig-Pijoan, Albert; Vicente, Rubén; Oliva, Baldomero; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) plays a leading role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) physiopathology. Even though monomeric forms of Aβ are harmless to cells, Aβ can aggregate into β-sheet oligomers and fibrils, which are both neurotoxic. Therefore, one of the main therapeutic approaches to cure or delay AD onset and progression is targeting Aβ aggregation. In the present study, we show that a pool of human gamma immunoglobulins (IgG) protected cortical neurons from the challenge with Aβ oligomers, as assayed by MTT reduction, caspase-3 activation and cytoskeleton integrity. In addition, we report the inhibitory effect of IgG on Aβ aggregation, as shown by Thioflavin T assay, size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy. Similar results were obtained with Palivizumab, a human anti-sincitial virus antibody. In order to dissect the important domains, we cleaved the pool of human IgG with papain to obtain Fab and Fc fragments. Using these cleaved fragments, we functionally identified Fab as the immunoglobulin fragment inhibiting Aβ aggregation, a result that was further confirmed by an in silico structural model. Interestingly, bioinformatic tools show a highly conserved structure able to bind amyloid in the Fab region. Overall, our data strongly support the inhibitory effect of human IgG on Aβ aggregation and its neuroprotective role. PMID:28467807

  11. MLKL forms disulfide bond-dependent amyloid-like polymers to induce necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuzhen; Liu, Hua; Johnston, Andrea; Hanna-Addams, Sarah; Reynoso, Eduardo; Xiang, Yougui; Wang, Zhigao

    2017-09-05

    Mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is essential for TNF-α-induced necroptosis. How MLKL promotes cell death is still under debate. Here we report that MLKL forms SDS-resistant, disulfide bond-dependent polymers during necroptosis in both human and mouse cells. MLKL polymers are independent of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 and 3 (RIPK1/RIPK3) fibers. Large MLKL polymers are more than 2 million Da and are resistant to proteinase K digestion. MLKL polymers are fibers 5 nm in diameter under electron microscopy. Furthermore, the recombinant N-terminal domain of MLKL forms amyloid-like fibers and binds Congo red dye. MLKL mutants that cannot form polymers also fail to induce necroptosis efficiently. Finally, the compound necrosulfonamide conjugates cysteine 86 of human MLKL and blocks MLKL polymer formation and subsequent cell death. These results demonstrate that disulfide bond-dependent, amyloid-like MLKL polymers are necessary and sufficient to induce necroptosis.

  12. Radio-sensitivity of the cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice transfected with human mutant SOD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wate, Reika; Ito, Hidefumi; Kusaka, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Sentaro; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Suetomi, Katsutoshi; Sato, Hiroshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi

    2005-01-01

    In order to clarify the possible involvement of oxidative damage induced by ionizing radiation in the onset and/or progression of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we studied radio-sensitivity in primary cells derived from ALS model mice expressing human mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). The primary mouse cells expressed both mouse and the mutant human SOD1. The cell survival of the transgenic mice (with mutant SOD1), determined by counting cell numbers at a scheduled time after X-irradiation, is very similar to that of cells from wild type animals. The induction and repair of DNA damage in the transgenic cells, measured by single cell gel electrophoresis and pulsed field gel electrophoresis, are also similar to those of wild type cells. These results indicate that the human mutant SOD1 gene does not seem to contribute to the alteration of radio-sensitivity, at least in the fibroblastic cells used here. Although it is necessary to consider the difference in cell types between fibroblastic and neuronal cells, the present results may suggest that ionizing radiation is not primarily responsible for the onset of familial ALS with the SOD1 mutation, and that the excess risks are probably not a concern for radiation diagnosis and therapy in familial ALS patients. (author)

  13. Restoration of tumor suppressor miR-34 inhibits human p53-mutant gastric cancer tumorspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Qing; Hao, Xinbao; Meng, Yang; Zhang, Min; DeSano, Jeffrey; Fan, Daiming; Xu, Liang

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), some of which function as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, are involved in carcinogenesis via regulating cell proliferation and/or cell death. MicroRNA miR-34 was recently found to be a direct target of p53, functioning downstream of the p53 pathway as a tumor suppressor. miR-34 targets Notch, HMGA2, and Bcl-2, genes involved in the self-renewal and survival of cancer stem cells. The role of miR-34 in gastric cancer has not been reported previously. In this study, we examined the effects of miR-34 restoration on p53-mutant human gastric cancer cells and potential target gene expression. Human gastric cancer cells were transfected with miR-34 mimics or infected with the lentiviral miR-34-MIF expression system, and validated by miR-34 reporter assay using Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter. Potential target gene expression was assessed by Western blot for proteins, and by quantitative real-time RT-PCR for mRNAs. The effects of miR-34 restoration were assessed by cell growth assay, cell cycle analysis, caspase-3 activation, and cytotoxicity assay, as well as by tumorsphere formation and growth. Human gastric cancer Kato III cells with miR-34 restoration reduced the expression of target genes Bcl-2, Notch, and HMGA2. Bcl-2 3'UTR reporter assay showed that the transfected miR-34s were functional and confirmed that Bcl-2 is a direct target of miR-34. Restoration of miR-34 chemosensitized Kato III cells with a high level of Bcl-2, but not MKN-45 cells with a low level of Bcl-2. miR-34 impaired cell growth, accumulated the cells in G1 phase, increased caspase-3 activation, and, more significantly, inhibited tumorsphere formation and growth. Our results demonstrate that in p53-deficient human gastric cancer cells, restoration of functional miR-34 inhibits cell growth and induces chemosensitization and apoptosis, indicating that miR-34 may restore p53 function. Restoration of miR-34 inhibits tumorsphere formation and growth, which is reported to be

  14. Feasibility of in vivo "1"8F-florbetaben PET/MR imaging of human carotid amyloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucerius, Jan; Barthel, Henryk; Tiepolt, Solveig; Werner, Peter; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama; Sluimer, Judith C.; Biessen, Erik A.L.; Wildberger, Joachim E.; Hesse, Swen; Gertz, Hermann-Josef; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides are involved in the inflammatory pathology of atherosclerosis. "1"8F-Florbetaben is a PET tracer for clinical imaging of cerebral Aβ plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to determine whether specific uptake of "1"8F-florbetaben in the carotid arteries can be identified using a fully integrated hybrid PET/MRI system and whether this uptake is associated with clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Carotid "1"8F-florbetaben uptake was quantified as the mean of the maximum target-to-background ratio (_m_e_a_nTBR_m_a_x) in 40 cognitively impaired subjects (age 68.2 ± 9.5 years) undergoing "1"8F-florbetaben PET/MRI to diagnose AD. Associations between carotid "1"8F-florbetaben uptake and several CVD risk factors were assessed by univariate analysis followed by a multivariate linear regression analysis. Furthermore, carotid "1"8F-florbetaben uptake was compared between patients with and without a positive cerebral Aβ PET scan. "1"8F-Florbetaben uptake was clearly visualized in the carotid arteries. Values of_m_e_a_nTBR_m_a_x corrected for the blood pool activity of the tracer showed specific "1"8F-florbetaben uptake in the carotid wall. Male gender was associated with carotid "1"8F-florbetaben uptake in the univariate analysis, and was found to be an independent predictor of "1"8F-florbetaben uptake in the multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient β = 0.407, p = 0.009). Carotid "1"8F-florbetaben_m_e_a_nTBR_m_a_x in patients with a positive cerebral Aβ scan did not differ from that in patients without cerebral Aβ deposits. Specific "1"8F-florbetaben uptake in human carotid arteries was detected. Male gender was identified as an independent clinical risk factor. Therefore, "1"8F-florbetaben PET/MRI might provide new insights into the pathophysiological process in atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  15. Feasibility of in vivo {sup 18}F-florbetaben PET/MR imaging of human carotid amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Nuclear Medicine/Radiology and Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Barthel, Henryk; Tiepolt, Solveig; Werner, Peter; Patt, Marianne; Sabri, Osama [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Sluimer, Judith C.; Biessen, Erik A.L. [Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Pathology, Experimental Vascular Pathology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wildberger, Joachim E. [Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); Hesse, Swen [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Leipzig (Germany); Leipzig University Medical Centre, Integrated Treatment and Research Centre (IFB) Adiposity Diseases, Leipzig (Germany); Gertz, Hermann-Josef [Leipzig University Medical Centre, Department of Psychiatry, Leipzig (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Department of Radiology/Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    Amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides are involved in the inflammatory pathology of atherosclerosis. {sup 18}F-Florbetaben is a PET tracer for clinical imaging of cerebral Aβ plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to determine whether specific uptake of {sup 18}F-florbetaben in the carotid arteries can be identified using a fully integrated hybrid PET/MRI system and whether this uptake is associated with clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Carotid {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake was quantified as the mean of the maximum target-to-background ratio ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) in 40 cognitively impaired subjects (age 68.2 ± 9.5 years) undergoing {sup 18}F-florbetaben PET/MRI to diagnose AD. Associations between carotid {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake and several CVD risk factors were assessed by univariate analysis followed by a multivariate linear regression analysis. Furthermore, carotid {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake was compared between patients with and without a positive cerebral Aβ PET scan. {sup 18}F-Florbetaben uptake was clearly visualized in the carotid arteries. Values of{sub mean}TBR{sub max} corrected for the blood pool activity of the tracer showed specific {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake in the carotid wall. Male gender was associated with carotid {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake in the univariate analysis, and was found to be an independent predictor of {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake in the multivariate regression analysis (standardized regression coefficient β = 0.407, p = 0.009). Carotid {sup 18}F-florbetaben{sub mean}TBR{sub max} in patients with a positive cerebral Aβ scan did not differ from that in patients without cerebral Aβ deposits. Specific {sup 18}F-florbetaben uptake in human carotid arteries was detected. Male gender was identified as an independent clinical risk factor. Therefore, {sup 18}F-florbetaben PET/MRI might provide new insights into the pathophysiological process in atherosclerosis. (orig.)

  16. Chiral recognition in amyloid fiber growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbeev, Vladimir; Grogg, Marcel; Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Schirer, Alicia; Hellwig, Petra; Jeschke, Gunnar; Hilvert, Donald

    2016-05-01

    Insoluble amyloid fibers represent a pathological signature of many human diseases. To treat such diseases, inhibition of amyloid formation has been proposed as a possible therapeutic strategy. d-Peptides, which possess high proteolytic stability and lessened immunogenicity, are attractive candidates in this context. However, a molecular understanding of chiral recognition phenomena for d-peptides and l-amyloids is currently incomplete. Here we report experiments on amyloid growth of individual enantiomers and their mixtures for two distinct polypeptide systems of different length and structural organization: a 44-residue covalently-linked dimer derived from a peptide corresponding to the [20-41]-fragment of human β2-microglobulin (β2m) and the 99-residue full-length protein. For the dimeric [20-41]β2m construct, a combination of electron paramagnetic resonance of nitroxide-labeled constructs and (13) C-isotope edited FT-IR spectroscopy of (13) C-labeled preparations was used to show that racemic mixtures precipitate as intact homochiral fibers, i.e. undergo spontaneous Pasteur-like resolution into a mixture of left- and right-handed amyloids. In the case of full-length β2m, the presence of the mirror-image d-protein affords morphologically distinct amyloids that are composed largely of enantiopure domains. Removal of the l-component from hybrid amyloids by proteolytic digestion results in their rapid transformation into characteristic long straight d-β2m amyloids. Furthermore, the full-length d-enantiomer of β2m was found to be an efficient inhibitor of l-β2m amyloid growth. This observation highlights the potential of longer d-polypeptides for future development into inhibitors of amyloid propagation. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Comparison of HPRT mutant frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes of smokers and non-smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivek Kumar, P.R.; Mary Mohankumar, N.; Chatterjee, Indranil; Jeevanram, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    The mutant frequency of hypoxanthine guanine phospho ribosyl transferase (HPRT) has been studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes of six non-smokers and six smokers. The mutant frequency was studied by following a Uniform Operating Protocol (UOP). The mean lymphocyte cloning efficiency of non-smokers and smokers was about 31 %. The mean mutant frequency obtained in smokers showed a marginal increase compared to that of non-smokers, but they were not significantly different (P= 0.1416). This paper discusses the methodology adopted and the results obtained with the preliminary finding. (author)

  18. Chemical Rescue of Enzymes: Proton Transfer in Mutants of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, C. Mark; Castillo, Norberto; Taraphder, Srabani; Tu, Chingkuang; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    In human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) the mutation of position 64 from histidine to alanine (H64A) disrupts the rate limiting proton transfer (PT) event, resulting in a reduction of the catalytic activity of the enzyme as compared to the wild-type. Potential of mean force (PMF) calculations utilizing the multistate empirical valence bond (MS-EVB) methodology for H64A HCA II give a PT free energy barrier significantly higher than that found in the wild-type enzyme. This high barrier, determined in the absence of exogenous buffer and assuming no additional ionizable residues in the PT pathway, indicates the likelihood of alternate enzyme pathways that utilize either ionizable enzyme residues (self-rescue) and/or exogenous buffers (chemical rescue). It has been shown experimentally that the catalytic activity of H64A HCA II can be chemically rescued to near wild type levels by the addition of the exogenous buffer 4-methylimidazole (4MI). Crystallographic studies have identified two 4MI binding sites, yet site specific mutations intended to disrupt 4MI binding have demonstrated these sites to be non-productive. In the present work MS-EVB simulations show that binding of 4MI near Thr199 in the H64A HCA II mutant, a binding site determined by NMR spectroscopy, results in a viable chemical rescue pathway. Additional viable rescue pathways are also identified where 4MI acts as a proton transport intermediary from the active site to ionizable residues on the rim of the active site, revealing a probable mode of action for the chemical rescue pathway PMID:21452838

  19. Efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into Chinese hamster cell mutants: interspecific transfer of the human genes encoding leucyl- and asparaginyl-tRNA synthetases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirullo, R.E.; Dana, S.; Wasmuth, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    A simple and efficient procedure for transferring specific human genes into mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell recipients has been developed that does not rely on using calcium phosphate-precipitated high-molecular-weight DNA. Interspecific cell hybrids between human leukocytes and temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster cell mutants with either a thermolabile leucyl-tRNA synthetase or a thermolabile asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase were used as the starting material in these experiments. These hybrids contain only one or a few human chromosomes and require expression of the appropriate human aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene to grow at 39 degrees C. Hybrids were exposed to very high doses of gamma-irradiation to extensively fragment the chromosomes and re-fused immediately to the original temperature-sensitive Chinese hamster mutant, and secondary hybrids were isolated at 39 degrees C. Secondary hybrids, which had retained small fragments of the human genome containing the selected gene, were subjected to another round of irradiation, refusion, and selection at 39 degrees C to reduce the amount of human DNA even further. Using this procedure, Chinese hamster cell lines have been constructed that express the human genes encoding either asparaginyl- or leucyl-tRNA synthetase, yet less than 0.1% of their DNA is derived from the human genome, as quantitated by a sensitive dot-blot nucleic acid hybridization procedure

  20. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2018-03-01

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. The Alzheimer Disease Protective Mutation A2T Modulates Kinetic and Thermodynamic Properties of Amyloid-β (Aβ) Aggregation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benilova, Iryna; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ungureanu, Andreea-Alexandra; Castillo Cano, Virginia; Snellinx, An; Ramakers, Meine; Bartic, Carmen; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; De Strooper, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Missense mutations in alanine 673 of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), which corresponds to the second alanine of the amyloid β (Aβ) sequence, have dramatic impact on the risk for Alzheimer disease; A2V is causative, and A2T is protective. Assuming a crucial role of amyloid-Aβ in neurodegeneration, we hypothesized that both A2V and A2T mutations cause distinct changes in Aβ properties that may at least partially explain these completely different phenotypes. Using human APP-overexpressing primary neurons, we observed significantly decreased Aβ production in the A2T mutant along with an enhanced Aβ generation in the A2V mutant confirming earlier data from non-neuronal cell lines. More importantly, thioflavin T fluorescence assays revealed that the mutations, while having little effect on Aβ42 peptide aggregation, dramatically change the properties of the Aβ40 pool with A2V accelerating and A2T delaying aggregation of the Aβ peptides. In line with the kinetic data, Aβ A2T demonstrated an increase in the solubility at equilibrium, an effect that was also observed in all mixtures of the A2T mutant with the wild type Aβ40. We propose that in addition to the reduced β-secretase cleavage of APP, the impaired propensity to aggregate may be part of the protective effect conferred by A2T substitution. The interpretation of the protective effect of this mutation is thus much more complicated than proposed previously. PMID:25253695

  2. Comparison of the crystal structure and function to wild-type and His25Ala mutant human heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Pu; Zhong, Wen-Wei; Zhang, Xue-Hong; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Zi-Li; Xia, Zhen-Wei

    2009-03-01

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme in heme metabolism. It regulates serum bilirubin level. Site-directed mutagenesis studies indicate that the proximal residue histidine 25 (His25) plays a key role in hHO-1 activity. A highly purified hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was generated and crystallized with a new expression system. The crystal structure of the mutant was determined by X-ray diffraction technology and molecular replacement at the resolution of 2.8 A, and the model of hHO-1 His25Ala mutant was refined. The final crystallographic and free R factors were 0.245 and 0.283, respectively. The standard bond length deviation was 0.007 A, and the standard bond angle deviation was 1.3 degrees . The mutation of His25 to Ala led to an empty pocket underneath the ferric ion in the heme, leading to loss of binding iron ligand. Although this did not cause an overall structural change, the enzymatic activity of the mutant hHO-1 was reduced by 90%. By supplementing imidazole, the HO-1 activity was restored approximately 90% to its normal level. These data suggest that Ala25 remains unchanged in the structure compared to His25, but the important catalytic function of hHO-1 is lost. Thus, it appears that His25 is a crucial residue for proper hHO-1 catalysis.

  3. Use of ade1 and ade2 mutations for development of a versatile red/white colour assay of amyloid-induced oxidative stress in saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathi, Vidhya; Girdhar, Amandeep; Prasad, Archana; Verma, Meenkshi; Taneja, Vibha; Patel, Basant K

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in adenine biosynthesis pathway genes ADE1 and ADE2 have been conventionally used to score for prion [PSI + ] in yeast. If ade1-14 mutant allele is present, which contains a premature stop codon, [psi - ] yeast appear red on YPD medium owing to accumulation of a red intermediate compound in vacuoles. In [PSI + ] yeast, partial inactivation of the translation termination factor, Sup35 protein, owing to its amyloid aggregation allows for read-through of the ade1-14 stop codon and the yeast appears white as the red intermediate pigment is not accumulated. The red colour development in ade1 and ade2 mutant yeast requires reduced-glutathione, which helps in transport of the intermediate metabolite P-ribosylaminoimidazole carboxylate into vacuoles, which develops the red colour. Here, we hypothesize that amyloid-induced oxidative stress would deplete reduced-glutathione levels and thus thwart the development of red colour in ade1 or ade2 yeast. Indeed, when we overexpressed amyloid-forming human proteins TDP-43, Aβ-42 and Poly-Gln-103 and the yeast prion protein Rnq1, the otherwise red ade1 yeast yielded some white colonies. Further, the white colour eventually reverted back to red upon turning off the amyloid protein's expression. Also, the aggregate-bearing yeast have increased oxidative stress and white phenotype yeast revert to red when grown on media with reducing agent. Furthermore, the red/white assay could also be emulated in ade2-1, ade2Δ, and ade1Δ mutant yeast and also in an ade1-14 mutant with erg6 gene deletion that increases cell-wall permeability. This model would be useful tool for drug-screening against general amyloid-induced oxidative stress and toxicity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Adsorption and Orientation of Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide (hIAPP Monomer at Anionic Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Membrane-Mediated Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanghong Wei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding and aggregation cause serious degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and type II diabetes. Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP is the major component of amyloid deposits found in the pancreas of type II diabetic patients. Increasing evidence suggests that β-cell death is related to the interaction of hIAPP with the cellular membrane, which accelerates peptide aggregation. In this study, as a first step towards understanding the membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation, we investigate the atomic details of the initial step of hIAPP-membrane interaction, including the adsorption orientation and conformation of hIAPP monomer at an anionic POPG lipid bilayer by performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We found that hIAPP monomer is quickly adsorbed to bilayer surface, and the adsorption is initiated from the N-terminal residues driven by strong electrostatic interactions of the positively-charged residues K1 and R11 with negatively-charged lipid headgroups. hIAPP binds parallel to the lipid bilayer surface as a stable helix through residues 7–22, consistent with previous experimental study. Remarkably, different simulations lead to the same binding orientation stabilized by electrostatic and H-bonding interactions, with residues R11, F15 and S19 oriented towards membrane and hydrophobic residues L12, A13, L16 and V17 exposed to solvent. Implications for membrane-mediated hIAPP aggregation are discussed.

  5. Xenopus pax6 mutants affect eye development and other organ systems, and have phenotypic similarities to human aniridia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Nakajima, Keisuke; Odeleye, Akinleye O; Zimmerman, Keith B; Fish, Margaret B; Yaoita, Yoshio; Chojnowski, Jena L; Lauderdale, James D; Netland, Peter A; Grainger, Robert M

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in the Pax6 gene cause ocular defects in both vertebrate and invertebrate animal species, and the disease aniridia in humans. Despite extensive experimentation on this gene in multiple species, including humans, we still do not understand the earliest effects on development mediated by this gene. This prompted us to develop pax6 mutant lines in Xenopus tropicalis taking advantage of the utility of the Xenopus system for examining early development and in addition to establish a model for studying the human disease aniridia in an accessible lower vertebrate. We have generated mutants in pax6 by using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nuclease (TALEN) constructs for gene editing in X. tropicalis. Embryos with putative null mutations show severe eye abnormalities and changes in brain development, as assessed by changes in morphology and gene expression. One gene that we found is downregulated very early in development in these pax6 mutants is myc, a gene involved in pluripotency and progenitor cell maintenance and likely a mediator of some key pax6 functions in the embryo. Changes in gene expression in the developing brain and pancreas reflect other important functions of pax6 during development. In mutations with partial loss of pax6 function eye development is initially relatively normal but froglets show an underdeveloped iris, similar to the classic phenotype (aniridia) seen in human patients with PAX6 mutations. Other eye abnormalities observed in these froglets, including cataracts and corneal defects, are also common in human aniridia. The frog model thus allows us to examine the earliest deficits in eye formation as a result of pax6 lesions, and provides a useful model for understanding the developmental basis for the aniridia phenotype seen in humans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional phenotypic rescue of Caenorhabditis elegans neuroligin-deficient mutants by the human and rat NLGN1 genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Calahorro

    Full Text Available Neuroligins are cell adhesion proteins that interact with neurexins at the synapse. This interaction may contribute to differentiation, plasticity and specificity of synapses. In humans, single mutations in neuroligin encoding genes lead to autism spectrum disorder and/or mental retardation. Caenorhabditis elegans mutants deficient in nlg-1, an orthologue of human neuroligin genes, have defects in different behaviors. Here we show that the expression of human NLGN1 or rat Nlgn1 cDNAs in C. elegans nlg-1 mutants rescues the fructose osmotic strength avoidance and gentle touch response phenotypes. Two specific point mutations in NLGN3 and NLGN4 genes, involved in autistic spectrum disorder, were further characterized in this experimental system. The R451C allele described in NLGN3, was analyzed with both human NLGN1 (R453C and worm NLG-1 (R437C proteins, and both were not functional in rescuing the osmotic avoidance behavior and the gentle touch response phenotype. The D396X allele described in NLGN4, which produces a truncated protein, was studied with human NLGN1 (D432X and they did not rescue any of the behavioral phenotypes analyzed. In addition, RNAi feeding experiments measuring gentle touch response in wild type strain and worms expressing SID-1 in neurons (which increases the response to dsRNA, both fed with bacteria expressing dsRNA for nlg-1, provided evidence for a postsynaptic in vivo function of neuroligins both in muscle cells and neurons, equivalent to that proposed in mammals. This finding was further confirmed generating transgenic nlg-1 deficient mutants expressing NLG-1 under pan-neuronal (nrx-1 or pan-muscular (myo-3 specific promoters. All these results suggest that the nematode could be used as an in vivo model for studying particular synaptic mechanisms with proteins orthologues of humans involved in pervasive developmental disorders.

  7. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  8. In Vitro Quantified Determination of β-Amyloid 42 Peptides, a Biomarker of Neuro-Degenerative Disorders, in PBS and Human Serum Using a Simple, Cost-Effective Thin Gold Film Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yifan; Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2017-07-20

    A simple in vitro biosensor for the detection of β-amyloid 42 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was fabricated and tested based on our platform sensor technology. The bio-recognition mechanism of this biosensor was based on the effect of the interaction between antibody and antigen of β-amyloid 42 to the redox couple probe of K₄Fe(CN)₆ and K₃Fe(CN)₆. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) served as the transduction mechanism measuring the current output derived from the redox coupling reaction. The biosensor was a three-electrode electrochemical system, and the working and counter electrodes were 50 nm thin gold film deposited by a sputtering technique. The reference electrode was a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl electrode. Laser ablation technique was used to define the size and structure of the biosensor. Cost-effective roll-to-roll manufacturing process was employed in the fabrication of the biosensor, making it simple and relatively inexpensive. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) was employed to covalently immobilize the thiol group on the gold working electrode. A carbodiimide conjugation approach using N -(3-dimethylaminopropyl)- N '-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N -hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) was undertaken for cross-linking antibody of β-amyloid 42 to the carboxylic groups on one end of the MPA. The antibody concentration of β-amyloid 42 used was 18.75 µg/mL. The concentration range of β-amyloid 42 in this study was from 0.0675 µg/mL to 0.5 µg/mL for both PBS and undiluted human serum. DPV measurements showed excellent response in this antigen concentration range. Interference study of this biosensor was carried out in the presence of Tau protein antigen. Excellent specificity of this β-amyloid 42 biosensor was demonstrated without interference from other species, such as T-tau protein.

  9. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  10. Nonequilibrium and generalized-ensemble molecular dynamics simulations for amyloid fibril

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Hisashi [Research Center for Computational Science, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Department of Structural Molecular Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Amyloids are insoluble and misfolded fibrous protein aggregates and associated with more than 20 serious human diseases. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of amyloid fibril assembly and disassembly.

  11. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  12. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils......, is a general hallmark. They also include the α1-antitrypsin deficiency, where disease-causing mutations in the serine protease inhibitor, α1-antitrypsin (α1AT), leads to accumulation of the aberrant protein in the liver of these patients. The native metastable structure of α1AT constitutes a molecular trap...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding...

  13. Hsp72 (HSPA1A Prevents Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Aggregation and Toxicity: A New Approach for Type 2 Diabetes Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola C Rosas

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is a growing public health concern and accounts for approximately 90% of all the cases of diabetes. Besides insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes is characterized by a deficit in β-cell mass as a result of misfolded human islet amyloid polypeptide (h-IAPP which forms toxic aggregates that destroy pancreatic β-cells. Heat shock proteins (HSP play an important role in combating the unwanted self-association of unfolded proteins. We hypothesized that Hsp72 (HSPA1A prevents h-IAPP aggregation and toxicity. In this study, we demonstrated that thermal stress significantly up-regulates the intracellular expression of Hsp72, and prevents h-IAPP toxicity against pancreatic β-cells. Moreover, Hsp72 (HSPA1A overexpression in pancreatic β-cells ameliorates h-IAPP toxicity. To test the hypothesis that Hsp72 (HSPA1A prevents aggregation and fibril formation, we established a novel C. elegans model that expresses the highly amyloidogenic human pro-IAPP (h-proIAPP that is implicated in amyloid formation and β-cell toxicity. We demonstrated that h-proIAPP expression in body-wall muscles, pharynx and neurons adversely affects C. elegans development. In addition, we demonstrated that h-proIAPP forms insoluble aggregates and that the co-expression of h-Hsp72 in our h-proIAPP C. elegans model, increases h-proIAPP solubility. Furthermore, treatment of transgenic h-proIAPP C. elegans with ADAPT-232, known to induce the expression and release of Hsp72 (HSPA1A, significantly improved the growth retardation phenotype of transgenic worms. Taken together, this study identifies Hsp72 (HSPA1A as a potential treatment to prevent β-cell mass decline in type 2 diabetic patients and establishes for the first time a novel in vivo model that can be used to select compounds that attenuate h-proIAPP aggregation and toxicity.

  14. Nuclear imaging of amyloid deposits based upon thioflavins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanming; Wu Chunying; Wei Jinjun

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the presence of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillar tangles in the brain. Direct assessment of local changes of amyloid deposits in vivo would greatly facilitate the diagnosis and therapeutic treatments of AD. The goal of this study is to develop small-molecule probes that can be used to follow amyloid deposition in vivo in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. Over the past years, we set out to develop a series of small molecules based on thioflavins as radiotracers for use in nuclear imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography. The potential of these amyloid-imaging agents for in vivo studies of amyloid deposition has been evaluated based on the following methods: 1) spectrophotometric binding. assays with synthetic amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils and AD brain homogenates; 2) fluorescent staining of brain tissue sections to evaluate specificity of binding to amyloid deposits; 3) fluorescent microscopy in mouse models to determine the brain permeability and characterize the binding specificity in vivo, and 4) PET studies in human subjects diagnosed with AD and age-matched control subjects. To date, we have identified some lead compounds as molecular probes with specificity towards amyloid deposits. The in vitro and in vivo binding properties of these compounds have been demonstrated in the following ways: 1) they selectively binds to Aβ fibrils; 2) they selectively stains amyloid deposits in AD brain tissue sections; 3) they readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier, selectively detects amyloid deposits in vivo iri living mice; and 4) One of these compounds, termed PIB, has been successfully used in PET studies in human subjects. In conclusion, amyloid-imaging probes have been developed that could be used to monitor amyloid load in vivo. Applications of the probes are under investigation for potential pathophysiology studies

  15. GFP-Mutant Human Tau Transgenic Mice Develop Tauopathy Following CNS Injections of Alzheimer's Brain-Derived Pathological Tau or Synthetic Mutant Human Tau Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Garrett S; Banks, Rachel A; Kim, Bumjin; Xu, Hong; Changolkar, Lakshmi; Leight, Susan N; Riddle, Dawn M; Li, Chi; Gathagan, Ronald J; Brown, Hannah J; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2017-11-22

    Neurodegenerative proteinopathies characterized by intracellular aggregates of tau proteins, termed tauopathies, include Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with tau pathology (FTLD-tau), and related disorders. Pathological tau proteins derived from human AD brains (AD-tau) act as proteopathic seeds that initiate the templated aggregation of soluble tau upon intracerebral injection into tau transgenic (Tg) and wild-type mice, thereby modeling human tau pathology. In this study, we found that aged Tg mice of both sexes expressing human tau proteins harboring a pathogenic P301L MAPT mutation labeled with green fluorescent protein (T40PL-GFP Tg mouse line) exhibited hyperphosphorylated tau mislocalized to the somatodentritic domain of neurons, but these mice did not develop de novo insoluble tau aggregates, which are characteristic of human AD and related tauopathies. However, intracerebral injections of either T40PL preformed fibrils (PFFs) or AD-tau seeds into T40PL-GFP mice induced abundant intraneuronal pathological inclusions of hyperphosphorylated T40PL-GFP. These injections of pathological tau resulted in the propagation of tau pathology from the injection site to neuroanatomically connected brain regions, and these tau inclusions consisted of both T40PL-GFP and WT endogenous mouse tau. Primary neurons cultured from the brains of neonatal T40PL-GFP mice provided an informative in vitro model for examining the uptake and localization of tau PFFs. These findings demonstrate the seeded aggregation of T40PL-GFP in vivo by synthetic PFFs and human AD-tau and the utility of this system to study the neuropathological spread of tau aggregates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The stereotypical spread of pathological tau protein aggregates have recently been attributed to the transmission of proteopathic seeds. Despite the extensive use of transgenic mouse models to investigate the propagation of tau pathology in vivo , details of the aggregation

  16. Production of a Marfan cellular phenotype by expressing a mutant human fibrillin allele on a normal human or murine genetic background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldadah, Z.A.; Dietz, H.C. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Brenn, T. [Stanford Univ. Medical Center, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan Syndrome (MFS) is a heritable disorder of connective tissue caused by defects in fibrillin (FBN1), a 350 kD glycoprotein and principal component of the extracellular microfibril. Previous correlations of mutant transcript level and disease severity suggested a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis. To address this hypothesis we assembled an expression construct containing the mutant allele from a patient with severe MFS. This mutation causes skipping of FBN1 exon 2 and a frame shift, leading to a premature termination codon in exon 4. The predicted peptide would thus consist of 55 wild type and 45 missense amino acids. The construct was stably transfected into cultured human and mouse fibroblasts, and several clonal cell populations were established. Human and mouse cells expressing the truncated peptide exhibited markedly diminished fibrillin deposition and disorganized microfibrillar architecture by immunofluorescence. Pulse-chase analysis of these cells demonstrated normal levels of fibrillin synthesis but substantially decreased fibrillin deposition into the extracellular matrix. These data illustrate that expression of a mutant FBN1 allele, on a background of two normal alleles, is sufficient to disrupt normal fibrillin aggregation and reproduce the MFS cellular phenotype. This provides confirmation of a dominant negative model of MFS pathogenesis and may offer mutant allele knockout as a strategy for gene therapy. In addition, these data underscore the importance of the FBN1 amino-terminus in normal multimer formation and suggest that expression of the human extreme 5{prime} FBN1 coding sequence may be sufficient, in isolation, to produce an animal model of MFS. Indeed, transgenic mice harboring this mutant allele have been produced, and phenotype analysis is currently in progress.

  17. Development of transgenic rats producing human β-amyloid precursor protein as a model for Alzheimer's disease: Transgene and endogenous APP genes are regulated tissue-specifically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Anthony WS

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that affects a large and growing number of elderly individuals. In addition to idiopathic disease, AD is also associated with autosomal dominant inheritance, which causes a familial form of AD (FAD. Some instances of FAD have been linked to mutations in the β-amyloid protein precursor (APP. Although there are numerous mouse AD models available, few rat AD models, which have several advantages over mice, have been generated. Results Fischer 344 rats expressing human APP driven by the ubiquitin-C promoter were generated via lentiviral vector infection of Fischer 344 zygotes. We generated two separate APP-transgenic rat lines, APP21 and APP31. Serum levels of human amyloid-beta (Aβ40 were 298 pg/ml for hemizygous and 486 pg/ml for homozygous APP21 animals. Serum Aβ42 levels in APP21 homozygous rats were 135 pg/ml. Immunohistochemistry in brain showed that the human APP transgene was expressed in neurons, but not in glial cells. These findings were consistent with independent examination of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP in the brains of eGFP-transgenic rats. APP21 and APP31 rats expressed 7.5- and 3-times more APP mRNA, respectively, than did wild-type rats. Northern blots showed that the human APP transgene, driven by the ubiquitin-C promoter, is expressed significantly more in brain, kidney and lung compared to heart and liver. A similar expression pattern was also seen for the endogenous rat APP. The unexpected similarity in the tissue-specific expression patterns of endogenous rat APP and transgenic human APP mRNAs suggests regulatory elements within the cDNA sequence of APP. Conclusion This manuscript describes the generation of APP-transgenic inbred Fischer 344 rats. These are the first human AD model rat lines generated by lentiviral infection. The APP21 rat line expresses high levels of human APP and could be a useful model for AD. Tissue

  18. Potent Sensitisation of Cancer Cells to Anticancer Drugs by a Quadruple Mutant of the Human Deoxycytidine Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiatou T Coulibaly

    Full Text Available Identifying enzymes that, once introduced in cancer cells, lead to an increased efficiency of treatment constitutes an important goal for biomedical applications. Using an original procedure whereby mutant genes are generated based on the use of conditional lentivector genome mobilisation, we recently described, for the first time, the identification of a human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK mutant (G12 that sensitises a panel of cancer cell lines to treatment with the dCK analogue gemcitabine. Here, starting from the G12 variant itself, we generated a new library and identified a mutant (M36 that triggers even greater sensitisation to gemcitabine than G12. With respect to G12, M36 presents an additional mutation located in the region that constitutes the interface of the dCK dimer. The simple presence of this mutation halves both the IC50 and the proportion of residual cells resistant to the treatment. Furthermore, the use of vectors with self-inactivating LTRs leads to an increased sensitivity to treatment, a result compatible with a relief of the transcriptional interference exerted by the U3 promoter on the internal promoter that drives the expression of M36. Importantly, a remarkable effect is also observed in treatments with the anticancer compound cytarabine (AraC, for which a 10,000 fold decrease in IC50 occurred. By triggering the sensitisation of various cancer cell types with poor prognosis to two commonly used anticancer compounds M36 is a promising candidate for suicide gene approaches.

  19. An Internal Disulfide Locks a Misfolded Aggregation-prone Intermediate in Cataract-linked Mutants of Human γD-Crystallin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryany, Eugene; Woodard, Jaie C; Adkar, Bharat V; Shabab, Mohammed; King, Jonathan A; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-09-02

    Considerable mechanistic insight has been gained into amyloid aggregation; however, a large number of non-amyloid protein aggregates are considered "amorphous," and in most cases, little is known about their mechanisms. Amorphous aggregation of γ-crystallins in the eye lens causes cataract, a widespread disease of aging. We combined simulations and experiments to study the mechanism of aggregation of two γD-crystallin mutants, W42R and W42Q: the former a congenital cataract mutation, and the latter a mimic of age-related oxidative damage. We found that formation of an internal disulfide was necessary and sufficient for aggregation under physiological conditions. Two-chain all-atom simulations predicted that one non-native disulfide in particular, between Cys(32) and Cys(41), was likely to stabilize an unfolding intermediate prone to intermolecular interactions. Mass spectrometry and mutagenesis experiments confirmed the presence of this bond in the aggregates and its necessity for oxidative aggregation under physiological conditions in vitro Mining the simulation data linked formation of this disulfide to extrusion of the N-terminal β-hairpin and rearrangement of the native β-sheet topology. Specific binding between the extruded hairpin and a distal β-sheet, in an intermolecular chain reaction similar to domain swapping, is the most probable mechanism of aggregate propagation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. An Internal Disulfide Locks a Misfolded Aggregation-prone Intermediate in Cataract-linked Mutants of Human γD-Crystallin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryany, Eugene; Woodard, Jaie C.; Adkar, Bharat V.; Shabab, Mohammed; King, Jonathan A.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable mechanistic insight has been gained into amyloid aggregation; however, a large number of non-amyloid protein aggregates are considered “amorphous,” and in most cases, little is known about their mechanisms. Amorphous aggregation of γ-crystallins in the eye lens causes cataract, a widespread disease of aging. We combined simulations and experiments to study the mechanism of aggregation of two γD-crystallin mutants, W42R and W42Q: the former a congenital cataract mutation, and the latter a mimic of age-related oxidative damage. We found that formation of an internal disulfide was necessary and sufficient for aggregation under physiological conditions. Two-chain all-atom simulations predicted that one non-native disulfide in particular, between Cys32 and Cys41, was likely to stabilize an unfolding intermediate prone to intermolecular interactions. Mass spectrometry and mutagenesis experiments confirmed the presence of this bond in the aggregates and its necessity for oxidative aggregation under physiological conditions in vitro. Mining the simulation data linked formation of this disulfide to extrusion of the N-terminal β-hairpin and rearrangement of the native β-sheet topology. Specific binding between the extruded hairpin and a distal β-sheet, in an intermolecular chain reaction similar to domain swapping, is the most probable mechanism of aggregate propagation. PMID:27417136

  1. Regiospecificity determinants of human heme oxygenase: differential NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent heme cleavage by the R183E mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; Lad, Latesh; Poulos, Thomas L; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2005-01-28

    The ability of the human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) R183E mutant to oxidize heme in reactions supported by either NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase or ascorbic acid has been compared. The NADPH-dependent reaction, like that of wild-type hHO-1, yields exclusively biliverdin IXalpha. In contrast, the R183E mutant with ascorbic acid as the reductant produces biliverdin IXalpha (79 +/- 4%), IXdelta (19 +/- 3%), and a trace of IXbeta. In the presence of superoxide dismutase and catalase, the yield of biliverdin IXdelta is decreased to 8 +/- 1% with a corresponding increase in biliverdin IXalpha. Spectroscopic analysis of the NADPH-dependent reaction shows that the R183E ferric biliverdin complex accumulates, because reduction of the iron, which is required for sequential iron and biliverdin release, is impaired. Reversal of the charge at position 183 makes reduction of the iron more difficult. The crystal structure of the R183E mutant, determined in the ferric and ferrous-NO bound forms, shows that the heme primarily adopts the same orientation as in wild-type hHO-1. The structure of the Fe(II).NO complex suggests that an altered active site hydrogen bonding network supports catalysis in the R183E mutant. Furthermore, Arg-183 contributes to the regiospecificity of the wild-type enzyme, but its contribution is not critical. The results indicate that the ascorbate-dependent reaction is subject to a lower degree of regiochemical control than the NADPH-dependent reaction. Ascorbate may be able to reduce the R183E ferric and ferrous dioxygen complexes in active site conformations that cannot be reduced by NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase.

  2. Mutant p53 protein in serum could be used as a molecular marker in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, G A; Mailo, D A; Corte, M M; Roncoroni, P; Nardi, H; Vincent, E; Martinez, D; Cafasso, M E; Frizza, A; Ponce, G; Vincent, E; Barutta, E; Lizarraga, P; Lizarraga, G; Monti, C; Paolillo, E; Vincent, R; Quatroquio, R; Grimi, C; Maturi, H; Aimale, M; Spinsanti, C; Montero, H; Santiago, J; Shulman, L; Rivadulla, M; Machiavelli, M; Salum, G; Cuevas, M A; Picolini, J; Gentili, A; Gentili, R; Mordoh, J

    2006-04-01

    p53 wild-type is a tumor suppressor gene involved in DNA gene transcription or DNA repair mechanisms. When damage to DNA is unrepairable, p53 induces programmed cell death (apoptosis). The mutant p53 gene is the most frequent molecular alteration in human cancer, including breast cancer. Here, we analyzed the genetic alterations in p53 oncogene expression in 55 patients with breast cancer at different stages and in 8 normal women. We measured by ELISA assay the serum levels of p53 mutant protein and p53 antibodies. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR using specific p53 primers as well as mutation detection by DNA sequencing were also evaluated in breast tumor tissue. Serological p53 antibody analysis detected 0/8 (0%), 0/4 (0%) and 9/55 (16.36%) positive cases in normal women, in patients with benign breast disease and in breast carcinoma, respectively. We found positive p53 mutant in the sera of 0/8 (0.0%) normal women, 0/4 (0%) with benign breast disease and 29/55 (52.72%) with breast carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry evaluation was positive in 29/55 (52.73%) with mammary carcinoma and 0/4 (0%) with benign breast disease. A very good correlation between p53 mutant protein detected in serum and p53 accumulation by immunohistochemistry (83.3% positive in both assays) was found in this study. These data suggest that detection of mutated p53 could be a useful serological marker for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Cyclopropane fatty acid synthase mutants of probiotic human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri are defective in TNF inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sara E; Whitehead, Kristi; Saulnier, Delphine; Thomas, Carissa M; Versalovic, James; Britton, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Although commensal microbes have been shown to modulate host immune responses, many of the bacterial factors that mediate immune regulation remain unidentified. Select strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri synthesize immunomodulins that potently inhibit production of the inflammatory cytokine TNF. In this study, genetic and genomic approaches were used to identify and investigate L. reuteri genes required or human TNF immunomodulatory activity. Analysis of membrane fatty acids from multiple L. reuteri strains cultured in MRS medium showed that only TNF inhibitory strains produced the cyclopropane fatty acid (CFA) lactobacillic acid. The enzyme cyclopropane fatty acid synthase is required for synthesis of CFAs such as lactobacillic acid, therefore the cfa gene was inactivated and supernatants from the cfa mutant strain were assayed for TNF inhibitory activity. We found that supernatants from the wild-type strain, but not the cfa mutant, suppressed TNF production by activated THP-1 human monocytoid cells Although this suggested a direct role for lactobacillic acid in immunomodulation, purified lactobacillic acid did not suppress TNF at physiologically relevant concentrations. We further analyzed TNF inhibitory and TNF non-inhibitory strains under different growth conditions and found that lactobacillic acid production did not correlate with TNF inhibition. These results indicate that cfa indirectly contributed to L. reuter immunomodulatory activity and suggest that other mechanisms, such as decreased membrane fluidity or altered expression of immunomodulins, result in the loss of TNF inhibitory activity. By increasing our understanding of immunomodulation by probiotic species, beneficial microbes can be rationally selected to alleviate intestinal inflammation.

  4. Amyloid β Is Not the Major Factor Accounting for Impaired Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis in Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein

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    Hongyu Pan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult hippocampal neurogenesis was impaired in several Alzheimer's disease models overexpressing mutant human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP. However, the effects of wild-type hAPP on adult neurogenesis and whether the impaired adult hippocampal neurogenesis was caused by amyloid β (Aβ or APP remained unclear. Here, we found that neurogenesis was impaired in the dentate gyrus (DG of adult mice overexpressing wild-type hAPP (hAPP-I5 compared with controls. However, the adult hippocampal neurogenesis was more severely impaired in hAPP-I5 than that in hAPP-J20 mice, which express similar levels of hAPP mRNA but much higher levels of Aβ. Furthermore, reducing Aβ levels did not affect the number of doublecortin-positive cells in the DG of hAPP-J20 mice. Our results suggested that hAPP was more likely an important factor inhibiting adult neurogenesis, and Aβ was not the major factor affecting neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus of hAPP mice.

  5. Chemical Methods to Knock Down the Amyloid Proteins

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    Na Gao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid proteins are closely related with amyloid diseases and do tremendous harm to human health. However, there is still a lack of effective strategies to treat these amyloid diseases, so it is important to develop novel methods. Accelerating the clearance of amyloid proteins is a favorable method for amyloid disease treatment. Recently, chemical methods for protein reduction have been developed and have attracted much attention. In this review, we focus on the latest progress of chemical methods that knock down amyloid proteins, including the proteolysis-targeting chimera (PROTAC strategy, the “recognition-cleavage” strategy, the chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA strategy, the selectively light-activatable organic and inorganic molecules strategy and other chemical strategies.

  6. Resveratrol Modulation of Protein Expression in parkin-Mutant Human Skin Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach

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    Daniele Vergara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry (MS analysis the effects of resveratrol treatment on skin primary fibroblasts from a healthy subject and from a parkin-mutant early onset Parkinson’s disease patient. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is the most frequently mutated gene in hereditary Parkinson’s disease. Functional alteration of parkin leads to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, resulting in the accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins accountable for the neurodegenerative process. The identification of proteins differentially expressed revealed that resveratrol treatment can act on deregulated specific biological process and molecular function such as cellular redox balance and protein homeostasis. In particular, resveratrol was highly effective at restoring the heat-shock protein network and the protein degradation systems. Moreover, resveratrol treatment led to a significant increase in GSH level, reduction of GSSG/GSH ratio, and decrease of reduced free thiol content in patient cells compared to normal fibroblasts. Thus, our findings provide an experimental evidence of the beneficial effects by which resveratrol could contribute to preserve the cellular homeostasis in parkin-mutant fibroblasts.

  7. Resveratrol Modulation of Protein Expression in parkin-Mutant Human Skin Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballo, Antonio; Signorile, Anna; Tanzarella, Paola; Pacelli, Consiglia; Di Paola, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis the effects of resveratrol treatment on skin primary fibroblasts from a healthy subject and from a parkin-mutant early onset Parkinson's disease patient. Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is the most frequently mutated gene in hereditary Parkinson's disease. Functional alteration of parkin leads to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, resulting in the accumulation of misfolded or aggregated proteins accountable for the neurodegenerative process. The identification of proteins differentially expressed revealed that resveratrol treatment can act on deregulated specific biological process and molecular function such as cellular redox balance and protein homeostasis. In particular, resveratrol was highly effective at restoring the heat-shock protein network and the protein degradation systems. Moreover, resveratrol treatment led to a significant increase in GSH level, reduction of GSSG/GSH ratio, and decrease of reduced free thiol content in patient cells compared to normal fibroblasts. Thus, our findings provide an experimental evidence of the beneficial effects by which resveratrol could contribute to preserve the cellular homeostasis in parkin-mutant fibroblasts. PMID:29138676

  8. Functional amyloid formation by Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oli, M. W.; Otoo, H. N.; Crowley, P. J.; Heim, K. P.; Nascimento, M. M.; Ramsook, C. B.; Lipke, P. N.

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is a common infectious disease associated with acidogenic and aciduric bacteria, including Streptococcus mutans. Organisms that cause cavities form recalcitrant biofilms, generate acids from dietary sugars and tolerate acid end products. It has recently been recognized that micro-organisms can produce functional amyloids that are integral to biofilm development. We now show that the S. mutans cell-surface-localized adhesin P1 (antigen I/II, PAc) is an amyloid-forming protein. This conclusion is based on the defining properties of amyloids, including binding by the amyloidophilic dyes Congo red (CR) and Thioflavin T (ThT), visualization of amyloid fibres by transmission electron microscopy and the green birefringent properties of CR-stained protein aggregates when viewed under cross-polarized light. We provide evidence that amyloid is present in human dental plaque and is produced by both laboratory strains and clinical isolates of S. mutans. We provide further evidence that amyloid formation is not limited to P1, since bacterial colonies without this adhesin demonstrate residual green birefringence. However, S. mutans lacking sortase, the transpeptidase enzyme that mediates the covalent linkage of its substrates to the cell-wall peptidoglycan, including P1 and five other proteins, is not birefringent when stained with CR and does not form biofilms. Biofilm formation is inhibited when S. mutans is cultured in the presence of known inhibitors of amyloid fibrillization, including CR, Thioflavin S and epigallocatechin-3-gallate, which also inhibited ThT uptake by S. mutans extracellular proteins. Taken together, these results indicate that S. mutans is an amyloid-forming organism and suggest that amyloidogenesis contributes to biofilm formation by this oral microbe. PMID:23082034

  9. Hyperactivity and learning deficits in transgenic mice bearing a human mutant thyroid hormone beta1 receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M P; Wong, R; Goldstein, G; Weintraub, B; Cheng, S Y; Crawley, J N

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a human syndrome mapped to the thyroid receptor beta (TRbeta) gene on chromosome 3, representing a mutation of the ligand-binding domain of the TRbeta gene. The syndrome is characterized by reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone and elevated serum levels of thyroid hormones. A common behavioral phenotype associated with RTH is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To test the hypothesis that RTH produces attention deficits and/or hyperactivity, transgenic mice expressing a mutant TRbeta gene were generated. The present experiment tested RTH transgenic mice from the PV kindred on behavioral tasks relevant to the primary features of ADHD: hyperactivity, sustained attention (vigilance), learning, and impulsivity. Male transgenic mice showed elevated locomotor activity in an open field compared to male wild-type littermate controls. Both male and female transgenic mice exhibited impaired learning of an autoshaping task, compared to wild-type controls. On a vigilance task in an operant chamber, there were no differences between transgenics and controls on the proportion of hits, response latency, or duration of stimulus tolerated. On an operant go/no-go task measuring sustained attention and impulsivity, there were no differences between controls and transgenics. These results indicate that transgenic mice bearing a mutant human TRbeta gene demonstrate several behavioral characteristics of ADHD and may serve a valuable heuristic role in elucidating possible candidate genes in converging pathways for other causes of ADHD.

  10. Hyperactivity and Learning Deficits in Transgenic Mice Bearing a Human Mutant Thyroid Hormone β1 Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Michael P.; Wong, Rosemary; Goldstein, Gregory; Weintraub, Bruce; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a human syndrome mapped to the thyroid receptor β (TRβ) gene on chromosome 3, representing a mutation of the ligandbinding domain of the TRβ gene. The syndrome is characterized by reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone and elevated serum levels of thyroid hormones. A common behavioral phenotype associated with RTH is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To test the hypothesis that RTH produces attention deficits and/or hyperactivity, transgenic mice expressing a mutant TRβ gene were generated. The present experiment tested RTH transgenic mice from the PV kindred on behavioral tasks relevant to the primary features of ADHD: hyperactivity, sustained attention (vigilance), learning, and impulsivity. Male transgenic mice showed elevated locomotor activity in an open field compared to male wild-type littermate controls. Both male and female transgenic mice exhibited impaired learning of an autoshaping task, compared to wild-type controls. On a vigilance task in an operant chamber, there were no differences between transgenics and controls on the proportion of hits, response latency, or duration of stimulus tolerated. On an operant go/no-go task measuring sustained attention and impulsivity, there were no differences between controls and transgenics. These results indicate that transgenic mice bearing a mutant human TRβ gene demonstrate several behavioral characteristics of ADHD and may serve a valuable heuristic role in elucidating possible candidate genes in converging pathways for other causes of ADHD. PMID:10454355

  11. A Dimeric Mutant of Human Pancreatic Ribonuclease with Selective Cytotoxicity toward Malignant Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Renata; di Gaetano, Sonia; de Lorenzo, Claudia; Grauso, Michela; Monaco, Carmen; Spalletti-Cernia, Daniela; Laccetti, Paolo; Cinatl, Jaroslav; Matousek, Josef; D'Alessio, Giuseppe

    1999-07-01

    Monomeric human pancreatic RNase, devoid of any biological activity other than its RNA degrading ability, was engineered into a dimeric protein with a cytotoxic action on mouse and human tumor cells, but lacking any appreciable toxicity on mouse and human normal cells. This dimeric variant of human pancreas RNase selectively sensitizes to apoptotic death cells derived from a human thyroid tumor. Because of its selectivity for tumor cells, and because of its human origin, this protein represents a potentially very attractive, novel tool for anticancer therapy.

  12. [Engineering of a System for the Production of Mutant Human Alpha-Fetoprotein in the Methylotrophic Yeast Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozkina, E V; Vavilova, E A; Zatsepin, S S; Klyachko, E V; Yagudin, T A; Chulkin, A M; Dudich, I V; Semenkova, L N; Churilova, I V; Benevolenskii, S V

    2016-01-01

    A system for the production of mutant recombinant human alpha-fetoprotein (rhAFPO) lacking the glycosylation site has been engineered in the yeast Pichia pastoris. A strain of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS 115/pPICZ?A/rhAFP0, which produces unglycosylated rhAFPO and secretes it to the culture medium, has been constructed. Optimization and scale-up of the fermentation technology have resulted in an increase in the rhAFP0 yield to 20 mg/L. A scheme of isolation and purification of biologically active rhAFP0 has been developed. The synthesized protein has the antitumor activity, which is analogous to the activity of natural human embryonic alpha-fetoprotein.

  13. The Relationship between Different Assays for Detection and Quantification of Amyloid Beta 42 in Human Cerebrospinal Fluid

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    Teresa A. Ellis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, which is characterized by a degeneration of neurons and their synapses, is one of the most common forms of dementia. CSF levels of amyloid 42 (A42 have been recognized as a strong candidate to serve as an AD biomarker. There are a number of commercial assays that are routinely employed for measuring A42; however, these assays give diverse ranges for the absolute levels of CSF A42. In order to employ CSF A42 as a biomarker across multiple laboratories, studies need to be performed to understand the relationship between the different platforms. We have analyzed CSF samples from both diseased and nondiseased subjects with two different widely used assay platforms. The results showed that different values for the levels of CSF A42 were reported, depending on the assay used. Nonetheless, both assays clearly demonstrated statistically significant differences in the levels of A42 in CSF from AD relative to age-matched controls (AMC. This paper provides essential data for establishing the relationship between these assays and provides an important step towards the validation of A42 as a biomarker for AD.

  14. An efficient deletion mutant packaging system for defective herpes simplex virus vectors: Potential applications to human gene therapy and neuronal physiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, A.I.; Keyomarsi, K.; Bryan, J.; Pardee, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have previously described a defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vector system that permits that introduction of virtually any gene into nonmitotic cells. pHSVlac, the prototype vector, stably expresses Escherichia coli β-galactosidase from a constitutive promoter in many human cell lines, in cultured rat neurons from throughout the nervous system, and in cells in the adult rat brain. HSV-1 vectors expressing other genes may prove useful for studying neuronal physiology or performing human gene therapy for neurological diseases, such as Parkinson disease or brain tumors. A HSV-1 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutant, ts K, has been used as helper virus; ts mutants revert to wild type. In contrast, HSV-1 deletion mutants essentially cannot revert to wild type; therefore, use of a deletion mutant as helper virus might permit human gene therapy with HSV-1 vectors. They now report an efficient packaging system for HSV-1 VECTORS USING A DELETION MUTANT, d30EBA, as helper virus; virus is grown on the complementing cell line M64A. pHSVlac virus prepared using the deletion mutant packaging system stably expresses β-galactosidase in cultured rat sympathetic neurons and glia. Both D30EBA and ts K contain a mutation in the IE3 gene of HSV-1 strain 17 and have the same phenotype; therefore, changing the helper virus from ts K to D30EBA does not alter the host range or other properties of the HSV-1 vector system

  15. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus I Tax Protein Sensitizes p53-Mutant Cells to DNA Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Valia T.; Green, Allison M.; Khurgel, Moshe; Semmes, Oliver J.; Kupfer, Gary M.

    2018-01-01

    Mutations in p53 are a common cause of resistance of cancers to standard chemotherapy and, thus, treatment failure. Reports have shown that Tax, a human T-cell leukemia virus type I encoded protein that has been associated with genomic instability and perturbation of transcription and cell cycle, sensitizes HeLa cells to UV treatment. The extent to which Tax can sensitize cells and the mechanism by which it exerts its effect are unknown. In this study, we show that Tax sensitizes p53-mutant cells to a broad range of DNA-damaging agents, including mitomycin C, a bifunctional alkylator, etoposide, a topoisomerase II drug, and UV light, but not ionizing radiation, a double-strand break agent, or vinblastine, a tubulin poison. Tax caused hypersensitivity in all p53-deleted cell lines and several, but not all, mutant-expressed p53–containing cell lines, while unexpectedly being protective in p53 wild-type (wt) cells. The effect observed in p53-deleted lines could be reversed for this by transfection of wt p53. We also show that Tax activates a p53-independent proapoptotic program through decreased expression of the retinoblastoma protein and subsequent increased E2F1 expression. The expression of several proapoptotic proteins was also induced by Tax, including Puma and Noxa, culminating in a substantial increase in Bax dimerization. Our results show that Tax can sensitize p53-mutant cells to DNA damage while protecting p53 wt cells, a side benefit that might result in reduced toxicity in normal cells. Such studies hold the promise of a novel adjunctive therapy that could make cancer chemotherapy more effective. PMID:18559532

  16. Formation of soluble amyloid oligomers and amyloid fibrils by the multifunctional protein vitronectin

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    Langen Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein vitronectin is present within the deposits associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, atherosclerosis, systemic amyloidoses, and glomerulonephritis. The extent to which vitronectin contributes to amyloid formation within these plaques, which contain misfolded, amyloidogenic proteins, and the role of vitronectin in the pathophysiology of the aforementioned diseases is currently unknown. The investigation of vitronectin aggregation is significant since the formation of oligomeric and fibrillar structures are common features of amyloid proteins. Results We observed vitronectin immunoreactivity in senile plaques of AD brain, which exhibited overlap with the amyloid fibril-specific OC antibody, suggesting that vitronectin is deposited at sites of amyloid formation. Of particular interest is the growing body of evidence indicating that soluble nonfibrillar oligomers may be responsible for the development and progression of amyloid diseases. In this study we demonstrate that both plasma-purified and recombinant human vitronectin readily form spherical oligomers and typical amyloid fibrils. Vitronectin oligomers are toxic to cultured neuroblastoma and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, possibly via a membrane-dependent mechanism, as they cause leakage of synthetic vesicles. Oligomer toxicity was attenuated in RPE cells by the anti-oligomer A11 antibody. Vitronectin fibrils contain a C-terminal protease-resistant fragment, which may approximate the core region of residues essential to amyloid formation. Conclusion These data reveal the propensity of vitronectin to behave as an amyloid protein and put forth the possibilities that accumulation of misfolded vitronectin may contribute to aggregate formation seen in age-related amyloid diseases.

  17. Melanosomal formation of PMEL core amyloid is driven by aromatic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hee, Jia Shee; Mitchell, Susan M; Liu, Xinran; Leonhardt, Ralf M

    2017-03-08

    PMEL is a pigment cell protein that forms physiological amyloid in melanosomes. Many amyloids and/or their oligomeric precursors are toxic, causing or contributing to severe, incurable diseases including Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Striking similarities in intracellular formation pathways between PMEL and various pathological amyloids including Aβ and PrP Sc suggest PMEL is an excellent model system to study endocytic amyloid. Learning how PMEL fibrils assemble without apparent toxicity may help developing novel therapies for amyloid diseases. Here we identify the critical PMEL domain that forms the melanosomal amyloid core (CAF). An unbiased alanine-scanning screen covering the entire region combined with quantitative electron microscopy analysis of the full set of mutants uncovers numerous essential residues. Many of these rely on aromaticity for function suggesting a role for π-stacking in melanosomal amyloid assembly. Various mutants are defective in amyloid nucleation. This extensive data set informs the first structural model of the CAF and provides insights into how the melanosomal amyloid core forms.

  18. Endogenous acute phase serum amyloid A lacks pro-inflammatory activity, contrasting the two recombinant variants that activate human neutrophils through different receptors

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    Karin eChristenson

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most notable among the acute phase proteins is serum amyloid A (SAA, levels of which can increase 1000-fold during infections, aseptic inflammation, and/or trauma. Chronically elevated SAA levels are associated with a wide variety of pathological conditions, including obesity and rheumatic diseases. Using a recombinant hybrid of the two human SAA isoforms (SAA1 and 2 that does not exist in vivo, numerous in vitro studies have given rise to the notion that acute phase SAA is a pro-inflammatory molecule with cytokine-like properties. It is however unclear whether endogenous acute phase SAA per se mediates pro-inflammatory effects. We tested this in samples from patients with inflammatory arthritis and in a transgenic mouse model that expresses human SAA1. Endogenous human SAA did not drive production of pro-inflammatory IL-8/KC in either of these settings. Human neutrophils derived from arthritis patients displayed no signs of activation, despite being exposed to severely elevated SAA levels in circulation, and SAA-rich sera also failed to activate cells in vitro. In contrast, two recombinant SAA variants (the hybrid SAA and SAA1 both activated human neutrophils, inducing L-selectin shedding, production of reactive oxygen species, and production of IL-8. The hybrid SAA was approximately 100-fold more potent than recombinant SAA1. Recombinant hybrid SAA and SAA1 activated neutrophils through different receptors, with recombinant SAA1 being a ligand for formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2. We conclude that even though recombinant SAAs can be valuable tools for studying neutrophil activation, they do not reflect the nature of the endogenous protein.

  19. Direct exposure of guinea pig CNS to human luteinizing hormone increases cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral beta amyloid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahjoepramono, Eka J; Wijaya, Linda K; Taddei, Kevin; Bates, Kristyn A; Howard, Matthew; Martins, Georgia; deRuyck, Karl; Matthews, Paul M; Verdile, Giuseppe; Martins, Ralph N

    2011-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) has been shown to alter the metabolism of beta amyloid (Aβ), a key protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. While LH and components required for LH receptor signalling are present in the brain, their role in the CNS remains unclear. In vitro, LH has been shown to facilitate neurosteroid production and alter Aβ metabolism. However, whether LH can directly modulate cerebral Aβ levels in vivo has not previously been studied. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic administration of LH to the guinea pig CNS on cerebral Aβ levels. Gonadectomised male animals were administered, via cortical placement, either placebo or LH slow-release pellets. At 14 and 28 days after treatment, animals were sacrificed. Brain, plasma and CSF were collected and Aβ levels measured via ELISA. Levels of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) and the neurosteroidogenic enzyme cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) were also assayed. An increase in CSF Aβ40 levels was observed 28 days following treatment. These CSF data also reflected changes in Aβ40 levels observed in brain homogenates. No change was observed in plasma Aβ40 levels but APP and its C-terminal fragments (APP-CTF) were significantly increased in response to LH exposure. Protein expression of P450scc was increased after 28 days of LH exposure, suggesting activation of the LH receptor. These data indicate that direct exposure of guinea pig CNS to LH results in altered brain Aβ levels, perhaps due to altered APP expression/metabolism. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. A Selective Bottleneck Shapes the Evolutionary Mutant Spectra of Enterovirus A71 during Viral Dissemination in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Huang, Yi-Hui; Tsai, Huey-Pin; Kuo, Pin-Hwa; Wang, Shih-Min; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2017-12-01

    RNA viruses accumulate mutations to rapidly adapt to environmental changes. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes various clinical manifestations with occasional severe neurological complications. However, the mechanism by which EV-A71 evolves within the human body is unclear. Utilizing deep sequencing and haplotype analyses of viruses from various tissues of an autopsy patient, we sought to define the evolutionary pathway by which enterovirus A71 evolves fitness for invading the central nervous system in humans. Broad mutant spectra with divergent mutations were observed at the initial infection sites in the respiratory and digestive systems. After viral invasion, we identified a haplotype switch and dominant haplotype, with glycine at VP1 residue 31 (VP1-31G) in viral particles disseminated into the integumentary and central nervous systems. In vitro viral growth and fitness analyses indicated that VP1-31G conferred growth and a fitness advantage in human neuronal cells, whereas VP1-31D conferred enhanced replication in human colorectal cells. A higher proportion of VP1-31G was also found among fatal cases, suggesting that it may facilitate central nervous system infection in humans. Our data provide the first glimpse of EV-A71 quasispecies from oral tissues to the central nervous system within humans, showing broad implications for the surveillance and pathogenesis of this reemerging viral pathogen. IMPORTANCE EV-A71 continues to be a worldwide burden to public health. Although EV-A71 is the major etiological agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease, it can also cause neurological pulmonary edema, encephalitis, and even death, especially in children. Understanding selection processes enabling dissemination and accurately estimating EV-A71 diversity during invasion in humans are critical for applications in viral pathogenesis and vaccine studies. Here, we define a selection bottleneck appearing in respiratory and digestive tissues. Glycine substitution at VP1 residue 31

  1. Functional and Biochemical Characterization of Three Recombinant Human Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Mutants: Zacatecas, Vanua-Lava and Viangchan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Serrano-Posada, Hugo; González-Valdez, Abigail; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Hernández-Ochoa, Beatriz; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Castillo-Rodríguez, Rosa Angélica; Cuevas-Cruz, Miguel; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in humans causes severe disease, varying from mostly asymptomatic individuals to patients showing neonatal jaundice, acute hemolysis episodes or chronic nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. In order to understand the effect of the mutations in G6PD gene function and its relation with G6PD deficiency severity, we report the construction, cloning and expression as well as the detailed kinetic and stability characterization of three purified clinical variants of G6PD that present in the Mexican population: G6PD Zacatecas (Class I), Vanua-Lava (Class II) and Viangchan (Class II). For all the G6PD mutants, we obtained low purification yield and altered kinetic parameters compared with Wild Type (WT). Our results show that the mutations, regardless of the distance from the active site where they are located, affect the catalytic properties and structural parameters and that these changes could be associated with the clinical presentation of the deficiency. Specifically, the structural characterization of the G6PD Zacatecas mutant suggests that the R257L mutation have a strong effect on the global stability of G6PD favoring an unstable active site. Using computational analysis, we offer a molecular explanation of the effects of these mutations on the active site. PMID:27213370

  2. Delayed expression of apoptosis in X-irradiated human leukemic MOLT-4 cells transfected with mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hisako; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    The effects of X-rays on cell survival, apoptosis, and long-term response in the development of cell death as measured by the dye exclusion test were studied in human leukemic MOLT-4 cells (p53 wild-type) stably transfected with a mutant p53 cDNA expression vector. Cell survival, as determined from colony-forming ability, was increased in an expression level dependent manner, but the increase was partial even with the highest-expressing clone (B3). This contrasts with the prior observation that cell death and apoptosis in B3 are completely inhibited at 24 h after irradiation with 1.8 Gy of X-rays. The examination of B3 cells incubated for longer than 24 h after X-irradiation showed a delay in the induction of cell death and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that the time required to reach the highest level of wild-type p53 protein in B3 was longer than the time in MOLT-4 and that the p53 may be stabilized by the phosphorylation at Ser-15. These results suggest that the introduction of mutant p53 into MOLT-4 merely delays the development of apoptosis, during which the cells could repair the damage induced by X-rays, and results in the partial increase in cell survival. (author)

  3. Towards Alzheimer's beta-amyloid vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, D; Solomon, B

    2001-01-01

    Beta-amyloid pathology, the main hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been linked to its conformational status and aggregation. We recently showed that site-directed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) towards the N-terminal region of the human beta-amyloid peptide bind to preformed beta-amyloid fibrils (Abeta), leading to disaggregation and inhibition of their neurotoxic effect. Here we report the development of a novel immunization procedure to raise effective anti-aggregating amyloid beta-protein (AbetaP) antibodies, using as antigen filamentous phages displaying the only EFRH peptide found to be the epitope of these antibodies. Due to the high antigenicity of the phage no adjuvant is required to obtain high affinity anti-aggregating IgG antibodies in animals model, that exhibit identity to human AbetaP. Such antibodies are able to sequester peripheral AbetaP, thus avoiding passage through the blood brain barrier (BBB) and, as recently shown in a transgenic mouse model, to cross the BBB and dissolve already formed beta-amyloid plaques. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use as a vaccine a self-anti-aggregating epitope displayed on a phage, and this may pave the way to treat abnormal accumulation-peptide diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease or other amyloidogenic diseases. Copyright 2001 The International Association for Biologicals.

  4. Amyloid-like protein inclusions in tobacco transgenic plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Villar-Piqué

    Full Text Available The formation of insoluble protein deposits in human tissues is linked to the onset of more than 40 different disorders, ranging from dementia to diabetes. In these diseases, the proteins usually self-assemble into ordered β-sheet enriched aggregates known as amyloid fibrils. Here we study the structure of the inclusions formed by maize transglutaminase (TGZ in the chloroplasts of tobacco transplastomic plants and demonstrate that they have an amyloid-like nature. Together with the evidence of amyloid structures in bacteria and fungi our data argue that amyloid formation is likely a ubiquitous process occurring across the different kingdoms of life. The discovery of amyloid conformations inside inclusions of genetically modified plants might have implications regarding their use for human applications.

  5. Expression and characterization of recombinant human factor V and a mutant lacking a major portion of the connecting region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, W.H.; Devore-Carter, D.; Ortel, T.L.

    1990-01-01

    Human coagulation factor V is a protein cofactor that is an essential component of the prothrombinase complex. A full-length factor V cDNA has been subcloned into the mammalian expression vector pDX and used to transfect COS cells. Approximately 95 ± 4% of the recombinant human factor V (rHFV) synthesized in COS cells is secreted into the culture medium. Factor V activity determined by fibrometer assay increased approximately 5-fold from 0.027 ± 0.012 to 0.124 ± 0.044 unit/mL following activation by the factor V activating enzyme from Russell's viper venom (RVV-V). A chromogenic assay specific for factor Va indicated that recombinant factor V had 3.8 ± 1.3% of the activity of the activated protein. The estimated specific activity of the recombinant factor Va was approximately 1,800 ± 500 units/mg, which is similar to the specific activity of purified plasma factor Va of 1,700-2,000 units/mg. Immunoprecipitation of [ 35 S]methionine-labeled rHFV revealed a single high molecular mass component. Treatment of rHFV with thrombin or RVV-V resulted in the formation of proteolytic products that were similar to those seen with plasma factor V. The authors have also expressed a mutant, rHFV-des-B 811-1441 , that lacks a large portion of the highly glycosylated connecting region that is present in factor V. This mutant constitutively expressed 38 ± 7% of the activity of the RVV-V-activated protein. These results suggest that one of the functions of the large connecting region in factor V is to inhibit constitutive procoagulant activity

  6. Quantitative kinetic analysis of PET amyloid imaging agents [11C]BF227 and [18F]FACT in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shidahara, Miho; Watabe, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Manabu; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Watanuki, Shoichi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arakawa, Yuma; Funaki, Yoshihito; Iwata, Ren; Gonda, Kohsuke; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Arai, Hiroyuki; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare two amyloid imaging agents, [ 11 C]BF227 and [ 18 F]FACT (derivative from [ 11 C]BF227) through quantitative pharmacokinetics analysis in human brain. Methods: Positron emission tomography studies were performed on six elderly healthy control (HC) subjects and seven probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients with [ 11 C]BF227 and 10 HC subjects and 10 probable AD patients with [ 18 F]FACT. Data from nine regions of interest were analyzed by several approaches, namely non-linear least-squared fitting methods with arterial input functions (one-tissue compartment model(1TCM), two-tissue compartment model (2TCM)), Logan plot, and linearized methods with reference region (Reference Logan plot (RefLogan), MRTM0, MRTM2). We also evaluated SUV and SUVR for both tracers. The parameters estimated by several approaches were compared between two tracers for detectability of differences between HC and AD patients. Results: For [ 11 C]BF227, there were no significant difference of V T (2TCM, 1TCM) and SUV in all regions (Student t-test; p < 0.05) and significant differences in the DVRs (Logan, RefLogan, and MRTM2) and SUVRs in six neocortical regions (p < 0.05) between the HC and AD groups. For [ 18 F]FACT, significant differences in DVRs (RefLogan, MRTM0, and MRTM2) were observed in more than four neocortical regions between the HC and AD groups (p < 0.05), and the significant differences were found in SUVRs for two neocortical regions (inferior frontal coretex and lateral temporal coretex). Our results showed that both tracers can clearly distinguish between HC and AD groups although the pharmacokinetics and distribution patterns in brain for two tracers were substantially different. Conclusion: This study revealed that although the PET amyloid imaging agents [ 11 C]BF227 and [ 18 F]FACT have similar chemical and biological properties, they have different pharmacokinetics, and caution must be paid for usage of the

  7. Effects of mycoplasma contamination on phenotypic expression of mitochondrial mutants in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersen, C J; Stanbridge, E J

    1981-04-01

    HeLa cells sensitive to the mitochondrial protein synthesis inhibitors erythromycin (ERY) and chloramphenicol (CAP) and HeLa variants resistant to the effects of these drugs were purposefully infected with drug-sensitive and -resistant mycoplasma strains. Mycoplasma hyorhinis and the ERY-resistant strain of Mycoplasma orale, MO-ERYr, did not influence the growth of HeLa and ERY-resistant ERY2301 cells in the presence or absence of ERY. M. hyorhinis also did not affect the growth of HeLa and CAP-resistant Cap-2 cells in the presence or absence of CAP. However, both HeLa and Cap-2 cells infected with the CAP-resistant strain of M. hyorhinis, MH-CAPr, were more sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of CAP. This may be due to the glucose dependence of the cells, which was compromised by the increased utilization of glucose by MH-CAPr in these infected cell cultures. In vitro protein synthesis by isolated mitochondria was significantly altered by mycoplasma infection of the various cell lines. A substantial number of mycoplasmas copurified with the mitochondria, resulting in up to a sevenfold increase in the incorporation of [3H]leucine into the trichloroacetic acid-insoluble material. More importantly, the apparent drug sensitivity or resistance of mitochondrial preparations from mycoplasma-infected cells reflected the drug sensitivity or resistance of the contaminating mycoplasmas. These results illustrate the hazards in interpreting mitochondrial protein synthesis data derived from mycoplasma-infected cell lines, particularly putative mitochondrially encoded mutants resistant to inhibitors of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  8. Serum Amyloid A Production Is Triggered by Sleep Deprivation in Mice and Humans: Is That the Link between Sleep Loss and Associated Comorbidities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Edson M.; Visniauskas, Bruna; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica L.; Chagas, Jair R.; Campa, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Serum amyloid A (SAA) was recently associated with metabolic endotoxemia, obesity and insulin resistance. Concurrently, insufficient sleep adversely affects metabolic health and is an independent predisposing factor for obesity and insulin resistance. In this study we investigated whether sleep loss modulates SAA production. The serum SAA concentration increased in C57BL/6 mice subjected to sleep restriction (SR) for 15 days or to paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) for 72 h. Sleep restriction also induced the upregulation of Saa1.1/Saa2.1 mRNA levels in the liver and Saa3 mRNA levels in adipose tissue. SAA levels returned to the basal range after 24 h in paradoxical sleep rebound (PSR). Metabolic endotoxemia was also a finding in SR. Increased plasma levels of SAA were also observed in healthy human volunteers subjected to two nights of total sleep deprivation (Total SD), returning to basal levels after one night of recovery. The observed increase in SAA levels may be part of the initial biochemical alterations caused by sleep deprivation, with potential to drive deleterious conditions such as metabolic endotoxemia and weight gain. PMID:28335560

  9. Serum amyloid A stimulates matrix-metalloproteinase-9 upregulation via formyl peptide receptor like-1-mediated signaling in human monocytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ha Young; Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Park, Kyoung Sun; Bae, Yun Hee; Yun, Jeanho; Park, Joo-In; Kwak, Jong-Young; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, we found that serum amyloid A (SAA) stimulated matrix-metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) upregulation at the transcription and translational levels in THP-1 cells. SAA stimulated the activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which was required for the MMP-9 upregulation by SAA. The signaling events induced by SAA included the activation of ERK and intracellular calcium rise, which were found to be required for MMP-9 upregulation. Formyl peptide receptor like 1 (FPRL1) was found to be involved in the upregulation of MMP-9 by SAA. Among several FPRL1 agonists, including Trp-Lys-Tyr-Met-Val-D-Met (WKYMVm), SAA selectively stimulated MMP-9 upregulation. With respect to the molecular mechanisms involved in the differential action of SAA and WKYMVm, we found that SAA could not competitively inhibit the binding of 125 I-labeled WKYMVm to FPRL1. Taken together, we suggest that SAA plays a role in the modulation of inflammatory and immune responses via FPRL1, by inducing MMP-9 upregulation in human monocytic cells

  10. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  11. β - amyloid imaging probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2007-01-01

    Imaging distribution of β - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the β -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral β - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging β - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for β - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for β - amyloid imaging agent

  12. In silico prediction of functional loss of cst3 gene in hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Choudhary

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The computational identification of missense mutation in CST3 (CYSTATIN 3 or CYSTATIN C gene has been done in the present study. The missense mutations in the CST3 gene will leads to hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy The initiation of the analysis was done with SIFT followed by POLYPHEN-2 and I-Mutant 2.0 using 24 variants of CST3 gene of Homo sapiens which were derived from dbSNP. The analysis showed that 5 variants (Y60C, C123Y, L19P, Y88C, L94Q were found to be less stable and damaging by SIFT, POLYPHEN-2 and I-MUTANT2.0. Furthermore the outputs of SNP & GO are collaborated with PHD-SNP (Predictor of Human Deleterious-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and PANTHER to predict 5 variants (Y60C, Y88C, C123Y, L19P, and L94Q having clinical impact in causing the disease. These findings will be certainly helpful for the present medical practitioners for the treatment of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

  13. Mutant human FUS Is ubiquitously mislocalized and generates persistent stress granules in primary cultured transgenic zebrafish cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Rae Acosta

    Full Text Available FUS mutations can occur in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS, a neurodegenerative disease with cytoplasmic FUS inclusion bodies in motor neurons. To investigate FUS pathology, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing GFP-tagged wild-type or fALS (R521C human FUS. Cell cultures were made from these zebrafish and the subcellular localization of human FUS and the generation of stress granule (SG inclusions examined in different cell types, including differentiated motor neurons. We demonstrate that mutant FUS is mislocalized from the nucleus to the cytosol to a similar extent in motor neurons and all other cell types. Both wild-type and R521C FUS localized to SGs in zebrafish cells, demonstrating an intrinsic ability of human FUS to accumulate in SGs irrespective of the presence of disease-associated mutations or specific cell type. However, elevation in relative cytosolic to nuclear FUS by the R521C mutation led to a significant increase in SG assembly and persistence within a sub population of vulnerable cells, although these cells were not selectively motor neurons.

  14. Correction of mutant Fanconi anemia gene by homologous recombination in human hematopoietic cells using adeno-associated virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiboonsukwong, Kittiphong; Ohbayashi, Fumi; Shiiba, Haruka; Aizawa, Emi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2009-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been shown to correct a variety of mutations in human cells by homologous recombination (HR) at high rates, which can overcome insertional mutagenesis and transgene silencing, two of the major hurdles in conventional gene addition therapy of inherited diseases. We examined an ability of AAV vectors to repair a mutation in human hematopoietic cells by HR. We infected a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (BCL) derived from a normal subject with an AAV, which disrupts the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase1 (HPRT1) locus, to measure the frequency of AAV-mediated HR in BCL cells. We subsequently constructed an AAV vector encoding the normal sequences from the Fanconi anemia group A (FANCA) locus to correct a mutation in the gene in BCL derived from a FANCA patient. Under optimal conditions, approximately 50% of BCL cells were transduced with an AAV serotype 2 (AAV-2) vector. In FANCA BCL cells, up to 0.016% of infected cells were gene-corrected by HR. AAV-mediated restoration of normal genotypic and phenotypic characteristics in FANCA-mutant cells was confirmed at the DNA, protein and functional levels. The results obtained in the present study indicate that AAV vectors may be applicable for gene correction therapy of inherited hematopoietic disorders.

  15. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg152 → Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W.; Berkner, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg 152 -Ile 153 . Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg 152 → Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M r ∼40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX

  16. Synthesis, purification, and characterization of an Arg sub 152 yields Glu site-directed mutant of recombinant human blood clotting factor VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildgoose, P.; Kisiel, W. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (USA)); Berkner, K.L. (ZymoGenetics, Inc., Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-04-03

    Coagulation factor VII circulates in blood as a single-chain zymogen of a serine protease and is converted to its activated two-chain form, factor VIIa, by cleavage of an internal peptide bond located at Arg{sub 152}-Ile{sub 153}. Previous studies using serine protease active-site inhibitors suggest that zymogen factor VII may possess sufficient proteolytic activity to initiate the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation. In order to assess the putative intrinsic proteolytic activity of single-chain factor VII, the authors have constructed a site-specific mutant of recombinant human factor VII in which arginine-152 has been replaced with a glutamic acid residue. Mutant factor VII was purified in a single step from culture supernatants of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with a plasmid containing the sequence for Arg{sub 152} {yields} Glu factor VII using a calcium-dependent, murine anti-factor VII monoclonal antibody column. The clotting activity of mutant factor VII was completely inhibited following incubation with dansyl-Glu-Gly-Arg chloromethyl ketone, suggesting that the apparent clotting activity of mutant factor VII was due to a contaminating serine protease. Immunoblots of mutant factor VII with human factor IXa revealed no cleavage, whereas incubation of mutant factor VII with human factor Xa resulted in cleavage of mutant factor VII and the formation of a lower molecular weight degradation product migrating at M{sup r}{approx}40 000. The results are consistent with the proposal that zymogen factor VII possesses no intrinsic proteolytic activity toward factor X or factor IX.

  17. Design and Characterization of a Human Monoclonal Antibody that Modulates Mutant Connexin 26 Hemichannels Implicated in Deafness and Skin Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mutations leading to changes in properties, regulation, or expression of connexin-made channels have been implicated in 28 distinct human hereditary diseases. Eight of these result from variants of connexin 26 (Cx26, a protein critically involved in cell-cell signaling in the inner ear and skin. Lack of non-toxic drugs with defined mechanisms of action poses a serious obstacle to therapeutic interventions for diseases caused by mutant connexins. In particular, molecules that specifically modulate connexin hemichannel function without affecting gap junction channels are considered of primary importance for the study of connexin hemichannel role in physiological as well as pathological conditions. Monoclonal antibodies developed in the last three decades have become the most important class of therapeutic biologicals. Recombinant methods permit rapid selection and improvement of monoclonal antibodies from libraries with large diversity.Methods: By screening a combinatorial library of human single-chain fragment variable (scFv antibodies expressed in phage, we identified a candidate that binds an extracellular epitope of Cx26. We characterized antibody action using a variety of biochemical and biophysical assays in HeLa cells, organotypic cultures of mouse cochlea and human keratinocyte-derived cells.Results: We determined that the antibody is a remarkably efficient, non-toxic, and completely reversible inhibitor of hemichannels formed by connexin 26 and does not affect direct cell-cell communication via gap junction channels. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the antibody efficiently inhibits hyperative mutant Cx26 hemichannels implicated in autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment accompanied by keratitis and hystrix-like ichthyosis-deafness (KID/HID syndrome. We solved the crystal structure of the antibody, identified residues that are critical for binding and used molecular dynamics to uncover its mechanism of action

  18. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  19. Development of (F-18)-Labeled Amyloid Imaging Agents for PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    The applicant proposes to design and synthesize a series of fluorine-18-labeled radiopharmaceuticals to be used as amyloid imaging agents for positron emission tomography (PET). The investigators will conduct comprehensive iterative in vitro and in vivo studies based upon well defined acceptance criteria in order to identify lead agents suitable for human studies. The long term goals are to apply the selected radiotracers as potential diagnostic agents of Alzheimer's disease (AD), as surrogate markers of amyloid in the brain to determine the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutic drugs, and as tools to help address basic scientific questions regarding the progression of the neuropathology of AD, such as testing the 'amyloid cascade hypothesis' which holds that amyloid accumulation is the primary cause of AD.

  20. Preparation of Amyloid Fibrils Seeded from Brain and Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherpelz, Kathryn P; Lu, Jun-Xia; Tycko, Robert; Meredith, Stephen C

    2016-01-01

    Seeding of amyloid fibrils into fresh solutions of the same peptide or protein in disaggregated form leads to the formation of replicate fibrils, with close structural similarity or identity to the original fibrillar seeds. Here we describe procedures for isolating fibrils composed mainly of β-amyloid (Aβ) from human brain and from leptomeninges, a source of cerebral blood vessels, for investigating Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. We also describe methods for seeding isotopically labeled, disaggregated Aβ peptide solutions for study using solid-state NMR and other techniques. These methods should be applicable to other types of amyloid fibrils, to Aβ fibrils from mice or other species, tissues other than brain, and to some non-fibrillar aggregates. These procedures allow for the examination of authentic amyloid fibrils and other protein aggregates from biological tissues without the need for labeling the tissue.

  1. Human COQ9 Rescues a coq9 Yeast Mutant by Enhancing Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis from 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid and Stabilizing the CoQ-Synthome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiwen H. He

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Coq9 is required for the stability of a mitochondrial multi-subunit complex, termed the CoQ-synthome, and the deamination step of Q intermediates that derive from para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA in yeast. In human, mutations in the COQ9 gene cause neonatal-onset primary Q10 deficiency. In this study, we determined whether expression of human COQ9 could complement yeast coq9 point or null mutants. We found that expression of human COQ9 rescues the growth of the temperature-sensitive yeast mutant, coq9-ts19, on a non-fermentable carbon source and increases the content of Q6, by enhancing Q biosynthesis from 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4HB. To study the mechanism for the rescue by human COQ9, we determined the steady-state levels of yeast Coq polypeptides in the mitochondria of the temperature-sensitive yeast coq9 mutant expressing human COQ9. We show that the expression of human COQ9 significantly increased steady-state levels of yeast Coq4, Coq6, Coq7, and Coq9 at permissive temperature. Human COQ9 polypeptide levels persisted at non-permissive temperature. A small amount of the human COQ9 co-purified with tagged Coq6, Coq6-CNAP, indicating that human COQ9 interacts with the yeast Q-biosynthetic complex. These findings suggest that human COQ9 rescues the yeast coq9 temperature-sensitive mutant by stabilizing the CoQ-synthome and increasing Q biosynthesis from 4HB. This finding provides a powerful approach to studying the function of human COQ9 using yeast as a model.

  2. An Fgf8 Mouse Mutant Phenocopies Human 22q11 Deletion Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Deborah U.; Fotheringham, Lori K.; Brewer, Judson A.; Muglia, Louis J.; Tristani-Firouzi, Martin; Capecchi, Mario R.; Moon, Anne M.

    2002-01-01

    Deletion of chromosome 22q11, the most common microdeletion detected in humans, is associated with a life-threatening array of birth defects. Although 90% of affected individuals share the same three megabase deletion, their phenotype is highly variable and includes craniofacial and cardiovascular anomalies, hypoplasia or aplasia of the thymus with associated deficiency of T cells, hypocalcemia with hypoplasia or aplasia of the parathyroids, and a variety of central nervous system abnormaliti...

  3. Differential Impact of LPG-and PG-Deficient Leishmania major Mutants on the Immune Response of Human Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Favila

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania major infection induces robust interleukin-12 (IL12 production in human dendritic cells (hDC, ultimately resulting in Th1-mediated immunity and clinical resolution. The surface of Leishmania parasites is covered in a dense glycocalyx consisting of primarily lipophosphoglycan (LPG and other phosphoglycan-containing molecules (PGs, making these glycoconjugates the likely pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPS responsible for IL12 induction.Here we explored the role of parasite glycoconjugates on the hDC IL12 response by generating L. major Friedlin V1 mutants defective in LPG alone, (FV1 lpg1-, or generally deficient for all PGs, (FV1 lpg2-. Infection with metacyclic, infective stage, L. major or purified LPG induced high levels of IL12B subunit gene transcripts in hDCs, which was abrogated with FV1 lpg1- infections. In contrast, hDC infections with FV1 lpg2- displayed increased IL12B expression, suggesting other PG-related/LPG2 dependent molecules may act to dampen the immune response. Global transcriptional profiling comparing WT, FV1 lpg1-, FV1 lpg2- infections revealed that FV1 lpg1- mutants entered hDCs in a silent fashion as indicated by repression of gene expression. Transcription factor binding site analysis suggests that LPG recognition by hDCs induces IL-12 in a signaling cascade resulting in Nuclear Factor κ B (NFκB and Interferon Regulatory Factor (IRF mediated transcription.These data suggest that L. major LPG is a major PAMP recognized by hDC to induce IL12-mediated protective immunity and that there is a complex interplay between PG-baring Leishmania surface glycoconjugates that result in modulation of host cellular IL12.

  4. Angiogenesis in Pituitary Adenomas: Human Studies and New Mutant Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of angiogenesis in pituitary tumor development has been questioned, as pituitary tumors have been usually found to be less vascularized than the normal pituitary tissue. Nevertheless, a significantly higher degree of vasculature has been shown in invasive or macropituitary prolactinomas when compared to noninvasive and microprolactinomas. Many growth factors and their receptors are involved in pituitary tumor development. For example, VEGF, FGF-2, FGFR1, and PTTG, which give a particular vascular phenotype, are modified in human and experimental pituitary adenomas of different histotypes. In particular, vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, the central mediator of angiogenesis in endocrine glands, was encountered in experimental and human pituitary tumors at different levels of expression and, in particular, was higher in dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas. Furthermore, several anti-VEGF techniques lowered tumor burden in human and experimental pituitary adenomas. Therefore, even though the role of angiogenesis in pituitary adenomas is contentious, VEGF, making permeable pituitary endothelia, might contribute to adequate temporal vascular supply and mechanisms other than endothelial cell proliferation. The study of angiogenic factor expression in aggressive prolactinomas with resistance to dopamine agonists will yield important data in the search of therapeutical alternatives.

  5. Angiogenesis in pituitary adenomas: human studies and new mutant mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristina, Carolina; Luque, Guillermina María; Demarchi, Gianina; Lopez Vicchi, Felicitas; Zubeldia-Brenner, Lautaro; Perez Millan, Maria Ines; Perrone, Sofia; Ornstein, Ana Maria; Lacau-Mengido, Isabel M; Berner, Silvia Inés; Becu-Villalobos, Damasia

    2014-01-01

    The role of angiogenesis in pituitary tumor development has been questioned, as pituitary tumors have been usually found to be less vascularized than the normal pituitary tissue. Nevertheless, a significantly higher degree of vasculature has been shown in invasive or macropituitary prolactinomas when compared to noninvasive and microprolactinomas. Many growth factors and their receptors are involved in pituitary tumor development. For example, VEGF, FGF-2, FGFR1, and PTTG, which give a particular vascular phenotype, are modified in human and experimental pituitary adenomas of different histotypes. In particular, vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF, the central mediator of angiogenesis in endocrine glands, was encountered in experimental and human pituitary tumors at different levels of expression and, in particular, was higher in dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas. Furthermore, several anti-VEGF techniques lowered tumor burden in human and experimental pituitary adenomas. Therefore, even though the role of angiogenesis in pituitary adenomas is contentious, VEGF, making permeable pituitary endothelia, might contribute to adequate temporal vascular supply and mechanisms other than endothelial cell proliferation. The study of angiogenic factor expression in aggressive prolactinomas with resistance to dopamine agonists will yield important data in the search of therapeutical alternatives.

  6. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Luyuan; Paz, Ana C.; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Johnson, Britt; Galoian, Karina; Rosenberg, Andrew; Hu, Guozhi; Tinoco, Gabriel; Bodamer, Olaf; Trent, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2) were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG) in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas. PMID:26368816

  7. Treatment with a Small Molecule Mutant IDH1 Inhibitor Suppresses Tumorigenic Activity and Decreases Production of the Oncometabolite 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Human Chondrosarcoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyuan Li

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcomas are malignant bone tumors that produce cartilaginous matrix. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase enzymes (IDH1/2 were recently described in several cancers including chondrosarcomas. The IDH1 inhibitor AGI-5198 abrogates the ability of mutant IDH1 to produce the oncometabolite D-2 hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG in gliomas. We sought to determine if treatment with AGI-5198 would similarly inhibit tumorigenic activity and D-2HG production in IDH1-mutant human chondrosarcoma cells. Two human chondrosarcoma cell lines, JJ012 and HT1080 with endogenous IDH1 mutations and a human chondrocyte cell line C28 with wild type IDH1 were employed in our study. Mutation analysis of IDH was performed by PCR-based DNA sequencing, and D-2HG was detected using tandem mass spectrometry. We confirmed that JJ012 and HT1080 harbor IDH1 R132G and R132C mutation, respectively, while C28 has no mutation. D-2HG was detectable in cell pellets and media of JJ012 and HT1080 cells, as well as plasma and urine from an IDH-mutant chondrosarcoma patient, which decreased after tumor resection. AGI-5198 treatment decreased D-2HG levels in JJ012 and HT1080 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and dramatically inhibited colony formation and migration, interrupted cell cycling, and induced apoptosis. In conclusion, our study demonstrates anti-tumor activity of a mutant IDH1 inhibitor in human chondrosarcoma cell lines, and suggests that D-2HG is a potential biomarker for IDH mutations in chondrosarcoma cells. Thus, clinical trials of mutant IDH inhibitors are warranted for patients with IDH-mutant chondrosarcomas.

  8. Immortalization of human neural stem cells with the c-myc mutant T58A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia De Filippis

    Full Text Available Human neural stem cells (hNSC represent an essential source of renewable brain cells for both experimental studies and cell replacement therapies. Their relatively slow rate of proliferation and physiological senescence in culture make their use cumbersome under some experimental and pre-clinical settings. The immortalization of hNSC with the v-myc gene (v-IhNSC has been shown to generate stem cells endowed with enhanced proliferative capacity, which greatly facilitates the study of hNSCs, both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the excellent safety properties displayed by v-IhNSCs--which do not transform in vitro and are not tumorigenic in vivo--the v-myc gene contains several mutations and recombination elements, whose role(s and effects remains to be elucidated, yielding unresolved safety concerns. To address this issue, we used a c-myc T58A retroviral vector to establish an immortal cell line (T-IhNSC from the same hNSCs used to generate the original v-IhNSCs and compared their characteristics with the latter, with hNSC and with hNSC immortalized using c-myc wt (c-IhNSC. T-IhNSCs displayed an enhanced self-renewal ability, with their proliferative capacity and clonogenic potential being remarkably comparable to those of v-IhNSC and higher than wild type hNSCs and c-IhNSCs. Upon growth factors removal, T-IhNSC promptly gave rise to well-differentiated neurons, astrocytes and most importantly, to a heretofore undocumented high percentage of human oligodendrocytes (up to 23%. Persistent growth-factor dependence, steady functional properties, lack of ability to generate colonies in soft-agar colony-forming assay and to establish tumors upon orthotopic transplantation, point to the fact that immortalization by c-myc T58A does not bring about tumorigenicity in hNSCs. Hence, this work describes a novel and continuous cell line of immortalized human multipotent neural stem cells, in which the immortalizing agent is represented by a single gene which, in

  9. Specific localization and imaging of amyloid deposits in vivo using 123I-labeled serum amyloid P component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, P.N.; Myers, M.J.; Epenetos, A.A.; Caspi, D.; Pepys, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Highly specific, high-resolution scintigraphic images of amyloid-laden organs in mice with experimentally induced amyloid A protein (AA) amyloidosis were obtained after intravenous injection of 123 I-labeled serum amyloid P component (SAP). Interestingly, a much higher proportion (up to 40%) of the injected dose of heterologous human SAP localized to amyloid and was retained there than was the case with isologous mouse SAP, indicating that human SAP binds more avidly to mouse AA fibrils than does mouse SAP. Specificity of SAP localization was established by the failure of the related proteins, human C-reactive protein and Limulus C-reactive protein, to deposit significantly in amyloid and by the absence of human SAP deposition in nonamyloidotic organs. However, only partial correlations were observed between the quantity of SAP localized and two independent estimates, histology and RIA for AA of the amount of amyloid in particular organs. It is not clear which of the three methods used reflects better the extent or clinical significance of the amyloid deposits but in vivo localization of radiolabeled SAP, detectable and quantifiable by gamma camera imaging, is apparently extremely sensitive. These findings establish the use of labeled SAP as a noninvasive in vivo diagnostic probe in experimental amyloidosis, potentially capable of revealing the natural history of the condition, and suggest that it may also be applicable generally as a specific targeting agent for diagnostic and even therapeutic purposes in clinical amyloidosis

  10. Altered depression-related behavior and neurochemical changes in serotonergic neurons in mutant R406W human tau transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Takashima, Akihiko; Watanabe, Takuya; Kawabe, Hideyuki; Matsuda, Tomomi; Mishima, Kenichi; Chidori, Shozo; Nishimura, Ryoji; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2005-10-12

    Mutant R406W human tau was originally identified in frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) and causes a hereditary tauopathy that clinically resembles Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the current study, we examined the performance of R406W transgenic (Tg) mice in the forced swimming test, a test with high predictivity of antidepressant efficacy in human depression, and found an enhancement of the immobility time. In contrast, the motor function and anxiety-related emotional response of R406W Tg mice were normal. Furthermore, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), fluvoxamine (100 mg/kg, p.o.), significantly reduced this enhancement of the immobility time, whereas a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, desipramine, had no effect. In an in vivo microdialysis study, R406W Tg mice exhibited a significantly decreased extracellular 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) level in the frontal cortex and also exhibited a tendency toward a decreased extracellular 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) level. Moreover, fluvoxamine, which reduced the enhancement of the immobility time, significantly increased the extracellular 5-HT level in R406W Tg mice. These results suggest that R406W Tg mice exhibit changes in depression-related behavior involving serotonergic neurons and provide an animal model for investigating AD with depression.

  11. A Genome-wide Gene-Expression Analysis and Database in Transgenic Mice during Development of Amyloid or Tau Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Matarin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available We provide microarray data comparing genome-wide differential expression and pathology throughout life in four lines of “amyloid” transgenic mice (mutant human APP, PSEN1, or APP/PSEN1 and “TAU” transgenic mice (mutant human MAPT gene. Microarray data were validated by qPCR and by comparison to human studies, including genome-wide association study (GWAS hits. Immune gene expression correlated tightly with plaques whereas synaptic genes correlated negatively with neurofibrillary tangles. Network analysis of immune gene modules revealed six hub genes in hippocampus of amyloid mice, four in common with cortex. The hippocampal network in TAU mice was similar except that Trem2 had hub status only in amyloid mice. The cortical network of TAU mice was entirely different with more hub genes and few in common with the other networks, suggesting reasons for specificity of cortical dysfunction in FTDP17. This Resource opens up many areas for investigation. All data are available and searchable at http://www.mouseac.org.

  12. Analyzing the 3D Structure of Human Carbonic Anhydrase II and Its Mutants Using Deep View and the Protein Data Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ship, Noam J.; Zamble, Deborah B.

    2005-01-01

    The self directed study of a 3D image of a biomolecule stresses the complex nature of the intra- and intermolecular interactions that come together to define its structure. This is made up of a series of in vitro experiments with a wild-type and mutants forms of human carbonic anhydrase II (hCAII) that examine the structure function relationship…

  13. Disease-modifying anti-Alzheimer's drugs: inhibitors of human cholinesterases interfering with β-amyloid aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, Simone; Butini, Stefania; Maramai, Samuele; Colombo, Raffaella; Verga, Laura; Lanni, Cristina; De Lorenzi, Ersilia; Lamponi, Stefania; Andreassi, Marco; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; Novellino, Ettore; Campiani, Giuseppe; Brindisi, Margherita; Gemma, Sandra

    2014-07-01

    We recently described multifunctional tools (2a-c) as potent inhibitors of human Cholinesterases (ChEs) also able to modulate events correlated with Aβ aggregation. We herein propose a thorough biological and computational analysis aiming at understanding their mechanism of action at the molecular level. We determined the inhibitory potency of 2a-c on Aβ1-42 self-aggregation, the interference of 2a with the toxic Aβ oligomeric species and with the postaggregation states by capillary electrophoresis analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The modulation of Aβ toxicity was assessed for 2a and 2b on human neuroblastoma cells. The key interactions of 2a with Aβ and with the Aβ-preformed fibrils were computationally analyzed. 2a-c toxicity profile was also assessed (human hepatocytes and mouse fibroblasts). Our prototypical pluripotent analogue 2a interferes with Aβ oligomerization process thus reducing Aβ oligomers-mediated toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells. 2a also disrupts preformed fibrils. Computational studies highlighted the bases governing the diversified activities of 2a. Converging analytical, biological, and in silico data explained the mechanism of action of 2a on Aβ1-42 oligomers formation and against Aβ-preformed fibrils. This evidence, combined with toxicity data, will orient the future design of safer analogues. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Resistance to organophosphorus agent toxicity in transgenic mice expressing the G117H mutant of human butyrylcholinesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuxia; Ticu Boeck, Andreea; Duysen, Ellen G.; Van Keuren, Margaret; Saunders, Thomas L.; Lockridge, Oksana

    2004-01-01

    Organophosphorus toxicants (OP) include chemical nerve agents and pesticides. The goal of this work was to find out whether an animal could be made resistant to OP toxicity by genetic engineering. The human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) mutant G117H was chosen for study because it has the unusual ability to hydrolyze OP as well as acetylcholine, and it is resistant to inhibition by OP. Human G117H BChE, under the control of the ROSA26 promoter, was expressed in all tissues of transgenic mice. A stable transgenic mouse line expressed 0.5 μg/ml of human G117H BChE in plasma as well as 2 μg/ml of wild-type mouse BChE. Intestine, kidneys, stomach, lungs, heart, spleen, liver, brain, and muscle expressed 0.6-0.15 μg/g of G117H BChE. Transgenic mice were normal in behavior and fertility. The LD50 dose of echothiophate for wild-type mice was 0.1 mg/kg sc. This dose caused severe cholinergic signs of toxicity and lethality in wild-type mice, but caused no deaths and only mild toxicity in transgenic animals. The mechanism of protection was investigated by measuring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and BChE activity. It was found that AChE and endogenous BChE were inhibited to the same extent in echothiophate-treated wild type and transgenic mice. This led to the hypothesis that protection against echothiophate toxicity was not explained by hydrolysis of echothiophate. In conclusion, the transgenic G117H BChE mouse demonstrates the factors required to achieve protection from OP toxicity in a vertebrate animal

  15. Construction, characterization, and complementation of a conditional-lethal DNA topoisomerase IIalpha mutant human cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Adam J; Porter, Andrew C G

    2004-12-01

    DNA Topoisomerase IIalpha (topoIIalpha) is a DNA decatenating enzyme, abundant constituent of mammalian mitotic chromosomes, and target of numerous antitumor drugs, but its exact role in chromosome structure and dynamics is unclear. In a powerful new approach to this important problem, with significant advantages over the use of topoII inhibitors or RNA interference, we have generated and characterized a human cell line (HTETOP) in which >99.5% topoIIalpha expression can be silenced in all cells by the addition of tetracycline. TopoIIalpha-depleted HTETOP cells enter mitosis and undergo chromosome condensation, albeit with delayed kinetics, but normal anaphases and cytokineses are completely prevented, and all cells die, some becoming polyploid in the process. Cells can be rescued by expression of topoIIalpha fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP), even when certain phosphorylation sites have been mutated, but not when the catalytic residue Y805 is mutated. Thus, in addition to validating GFP-tagged topoIIalpha as an indicator for endogenous topoIIalpha dynamics, our analyses provide new evidence that topoIIalpha plays a largely redundant role in chromosome condensation, but an essential catalytic role in chromosome segregation that cannot be complemented by topoIIbeta and does not require phosphorylation at serine residues 1106, 1247, 1354, or 1393.

  16. Human ApoE Isoforms Differentially Modulate Glucose and Amyloid Metabolic Pathways in Female Brain: Evidence of the Mechanism of Neuroprotection by ApoE2 and Implications for Alzheimer's Disease Prevention and Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Jeriel Thomas-Richard; Ibrahimi, Shaher; Zhao, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Three major genetic isoforms of apolipoprotein E (ApoE), ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4, exist in humans and lead to differences in susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study investigated the impact of human ApoE isoforms on brain metabolic pathways involved in glucose utilization and amyloid-β (Aβ) degradation, two major areas that are significantly perturbed in preclinical AD. Hippocampal RNA samples from middle-aged female mice with targeted human ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4 gene replacement were comparatively analyzed with a qRT-PCR custom array for the expression of 85 genes involved in insulin/insulin-like growth factor (Igf) signaling. Consistent with its protective role against AD, ApoE2 brain exhibited the most metabolically robust profile among the three ApoE genotypes. When compared to ApoE2 brain, both ApoE3 and ApoE4 brains exhibited markedly reduced levels of Igf1, insulin receptor substrates (Irs), and facilitated glucose transporter 4 (Glut4), indicating reduced glucose uptake. Additionally, ApoE4 brain exhibited significantly decreased Pparg and insulin-degrading enzyme (Ide), indicating further compromised glucose metabolism and Aβ dysregulation associated with ApoE4. Protein analysis showed significantly decreased Igf1, Irs, and Glut4 in ApoE3 brain, and Igf1, Irs, Glut4, Pparg, and Ide in ApoE4 brain compared to ApoE2 brain. These data provide the first documented evidence that human ApoE isoforms differentially affect brain insulin/Igf signaling and downstream glucose and amyloid metabolic pathways, illustrating a potential mechanism for their differential risk in AD. A therapeutic strategy that enhances brain insulin/Igf1 signaling activity to a more robust ApoE2-like phenotype favoring both energy production and amyloid homeostasis holds promise for AD prevention and early intervention.

  17. Measurement of in vivo HGPRT-deficient mutant cell frequency using a modified method for cloning human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakoda, Masayuki; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kobuke, Kyoko; Awa, A.A.

    1987-07-01

    Approximately 80 % of human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes could be cloned in the presence of crude Interleukin-2, phytohemagglutinin, and X-irradiated autologous lymphocytes and Raji B-cells. This modified cloning method was used to measure the in vivo frequency of HGPRT-deficient mutant T-lymphocytes. Repeated experiments using blood from the same individuals revealed that the frequency of mutant cells was almost constant for each individual even though the cloning efficiency of lymphocytes varied somewhat from experiment to experiment. Approximately 80 % of both wild-type unselected and 6-thioguanine-resistant colonies had helper/inducer and about 20 % had suppressor/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte markers. No difference was observed in the distribution of lymphocyte subsets between wild and mutant lymphocyte colonies. (author)

  18. Transformation and radiosensitivity of human diploid skin fibroblasts transfected with SV40 T-antigen mutants defective in RB and P53 binding domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LingNah Su; Little, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    A series of human diploid fibroblast cell clones were developed by DNA transfection with either wild-type SV40 T-antigen (SV40T) or T-antigen mutants defective in its various functional domains. Cell clones expressing the wild-type SV40 T were significantly radioresistant as compared with clones transfected with the neo gene only (D o 192 ± 13 vs 127 ± 19). This radioresistance persisted in post-crisis, immortalized cell lines. A series of mutants with point or deletion mutations within each functionally active domain of SV40 T were also examined for their ability to alter radiosensitivity and induce morphological transformation. Cell clones transfected with T-antigen mutants defective in nuclear localization or origin binding showed increased radioresistance similar to clones transfected with wild-type T-antigen, and expressed morphological changes characteristic of SV40 T-transfected cells. (author)

  19. Nanoparticles and amyloid systems: A fatal encounter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, Bernd [Leibniz Institute of Surface Modification, Chemical Department, Permoserstr. 15, D-04318 Leipzig, Germany and Wilhelm-Ostwald-Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Linnéstr. 3, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-10-06

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are used in many products of our daily life, however, there has been concern that they may also be harmful to human health. Recently NPs have been found to accelerate the fibrillation kinetics of amyloid systems. In the past this has been preliminarily attributed to a nucleation effect. Nanoparticle surfaces and interfaces appear to limit the degrees of freedom of amyloid systems (i.e., peptides and proteins) due to a phase space constraint such that rapid cross-beta structures are formed faster than without interface interactions and in turn fibril formation is enhanced significantly. Here we explore if lipid bilayers in the form of liposomes (140nm) also accelerate fibril formation for amyloid systems. We have investigated a fragment NNFGAIL of the Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) in contact with 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) liposomes in aqueous solution. We found that the lipid bilayer vesicles do accelerate fibril formation in time-resolved off-line detected atomic force microscopy experiments. Characteristic Thioflavine-T fluorescence on the same structures verify that the structures consist of aggregated peptides in a typical cross-β-structure arrangement.

  20. Constraints imposed by transmembrane domains affect enzymatic activity of membrane-associated human CD39/NTPDase1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musi, Elgilda; Islam, Naziba; Drosopoulos, Joan H F

    2007-05-01

    Human CD39/NTPDase1 is an endothelial cell membrane-associated nucleotidase. Its large extracellular domain rapidly metabolizes nucleotides, especially ADP released from activated platelets, inhibiting further platelet activation/recruitment. Previous studies using our recombinant soluble CD39 demonstrated the importance of residues S57, D54, and D213 for enzymatic/biological activity. We now report effects of S57A, D54A, and D213A mutations on full-length (FL)CD39 function. Enzymatic activity of alanine modified FLCD39s was less than wild-type, contrasting the enhanced activity of their soluble counterparts. Furthermore, conservative substitutions D54E and D213E led to enzymes with activities greater than the alanine modified FLCD39s, but less than wild-type. Reductions in mutant activities were primarily associated with reduced catalytic rates. Differences in enzymatic activity were not attributable to gross changes in the nucleotide binding pocket or the enzyme's ability to multimerize. Thus, composition of the active site of wild-type CD39 appears optimized for ADPase function in the context of the transmembrane domains.

  1. EPR analysis of cyanide complexes of wild-type human neuroglobin and mutants in comparison to horse heart myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Trandafir, Florin; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Moens, Luc; Dewilde, Sylvia

    2014-06-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) data reveal large differences between the ferric ((13)C-)cyanide complexes of wild-type human neuroglobin (NGB) and its H64Q and F28L point mutants and the cyanide complexes of mammalian myo- and haemoglobin. The point mutations, which involve residues comprising the distal haem pocket in NGB, induce smaller, but still significant changes, related to changes in the stabilization of the cyanide ligand. Furthermore, for the first time, the full (13)C hyperfine tensor of the cyanide carbon of cyanide-ligated horse heart myoglobin (hhMb) was determined using Davies ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance). Disagreement of these experimental data with earlier predictions based on (13)C NMR data and a theoretical model reveal significant flaws in the model assumptions. The same ENDOR procedure allowed also partial determination of the corresponding (13)C hyperfine tensor of cyanide-ligated NGB and H64QNGB. These (13)C parameters differ significantly from those of cyanide-ligated hhMb and challenge our current theoretical understanding of how the haem environment influences the magnetic parameters obtained by EPR and NMR in cyanide-ligated haem proteins. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by beta-amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, W E

    2010-05-01

    beta-Amyloid peptide (Abeta) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Abeta-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Abeta and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Abeta(1-42). Similar protective effects against Abeta(1-42) were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Abeta load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Abeta production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Abeta-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Abeta-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Abeta on brain function.

  3. Recombinant DNA specifying the human amyloid. beta. precursor protein (ABPP) encodes a 95-kDa polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mita, S; Sadlock, J; Herbert, J; Schon, E A

    1988-10-11

    Although the ABPP gene give rise to multiple mRNAs, the primary translation product of this gene is unknown. The longest published cDNA sequences predict a 770-aa polypeptide of 87 kDa. However, in immunoblots, ABPP migrated as a single species of >92 kDa in rat brain, and in human, as a species of 95-100 kDa in non-membrane bound form, as multiple species of 110-135 kDa in membrane-associated form and as a 130-kDa species in fibroblasts. The sizes of these larger species relative to the MW of ABPP predicted from the cDNA sequences have been attributed to postranslational modification. However, the authors have isolated a cDNA (lambdaHAP2) from a human fetal muscle lambdagt11 cDNA library encoding an 843-aa polypeptide with a deduced MW of 94,642. This cDNA contains both exons encoding an 843-aa polypeptide with a deduced MW of 94.642. This cDNA contains both exons encoding the protease inhibitor domains. Primer extension analysis indicates that the 5' terminus of this cDNA is 14 nt from a transcriptional start site. This cDNA, encoding the longest ABPP described to date, may explain some of the observations on the sizes of tissue-derived ABPP.

  4. Extracellular DNA facilitates the formation of functional amyloids in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Kelly; Ganesan, Mahesh; Payne, David E; Solomon, Michael J; Boles, Blaise R

    2016-01-01

    Persistent staphylococcal infections often involve surface-associated communities called biofilms. Staphylococcus aureus biofilm development is mediated by the co-ordinated production of the biofilm matrix, which can be composed of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA (eDNA) and proteins including amyloid fibers. The nature of the interactions between matrix components, and how these interactions contribute to the formation of matrix, remain unclear. Here we show that the presence of eDNA in S. aureus biofilms promotes the formation of amyloid fibers. Conditions or mutants that do not generate eDNA result in lack of amyloids during biofilm growth despite the amyloidogeneic subunits, phenol soluble modulin peptides, being produced. In vitro studies revealed that the presence of DNA promotes amyloid formation by PSM peptides. Thus, this work exposes a previously unacknowledged interaction between biofilm matrix components that furthers our understanding of functional amyloid formation and S. aureus biofilm biology. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The nicotinic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor agonist ssr180711 is unable to activate limbic neurons in mice overexpressing human amyloid-beta1-42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soderman, A.; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens; Hansen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that amyloid-beta1-42 (Abeta1-42) binds to the nicotinergic alpha7 acetylcholine receptor (alpha7 nAChR) and that the application of Abeta1-42 to cells inhibits the function of the alpha7 nAChR. The in vivo consequences of the pharmacological activation of the alp...

  6. Replication-dependent 65R→K reversion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase double mutant K65R + L74V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Prem L.; Nurpeisov, Viktoria; Lee, Kimberly; Skaggs, Sara; Di San Filippo, Christina Amat; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of the mechanisms of interaction among nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-selected mutations in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) coding sequence is essential for the design of newer drugs and for enhancing our vision of the structure function relationship among amino acids of the polymerase domain of HIV-1. Although several nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors select RT mutations K65R and L74V, the combination of 65R + 74V is rare in clinics. A novel NRTI (-)-β-D-dioxolane-guanosine (DXG) is known to select in vitro either the 65R or 74V mutant virus (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 44 (2000) 1783). These mutations were not selected together during repeated passaging of the HIV-1 in the presence of this drug. To analyze the impact of these RT mutations on viral replication, a double mutant containing K65R + L74V was created by site-directed mutagenesis in a pNL4-3 background. Replication kinetic assays revealed that the mutant K65R + L74V is unstable, and 65R→K reversion occurs during replication of virus in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells in the absence of selection pressure. Replication kinetic assays in MT-2 cells demonstrated that double mutant 65R + 74V is highly attenuated for replication and the initiation of reversion is related to the increase in RT activity. Additionally, the suppression of viral replication in the presence of DXG or under suboptimal human recombinant interleukin-2 leads to minimal or no 65R→K reversion. These observations provide evidence that 65R→K reversion in the double mutant 65R + 74V is dependent on a specific rate of viral replication in a pNL4-3 background. A similar phenomenon may occur in vivo, which may have implications for treatment management strategies

  7. Identification of key amino acid residues modulating intracellular and in vitro microcin E492 amyloid formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina eAguilera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcin E492 (MccE492 is a pore-forming bacteriocin produced and exported by Klebsiella pneumoniae RYC492. Besides its antibacterial activity, excreted MccE492 can form amyloid fibrils in vivo as well as in vitro. It has been proposed that bacterial amyloids can be functional playing a biological role, and in the particular case of MccE492 it would control the antibacterial activity. MccE492 amyloid fibril’s morphology and formation kinetics in vitro have been well characterized, however it is not known which amino acid residues determine its amyloidogenic propensity, nor if it forms intracellular amyloid inclusions as has been reported for other bacterial amyloids. In this work we found the conditions in which MccE492 forms intracellular amyloids in E. coli cells, that were visualized as round-shaped inclusion bodies recognized by two amyloidophillic probes, 2-4´-methylaminophenyl benzothiazole and thioflavin-S. We used this property to perform a flow cytometry-based assay to evaluate the aggregation propensity of MccE492 mutants, that were designed using an in silico prediction of putative aggregation hotspots. We established that the predicted amino acid residues 54-63, effectively act as a pro-amyloidogenic stretch. As in the case of other amyloidogenic proteins, this region presented two gatekeeper residues (P57 and P59, which disfavor both intracellular and in vitro MccE492 amyloid formation, preventing an uncontrolled aggregation. Mutants in each of these gatekeeper residues showed faster in vitro aggregation and bactericidal inactivation kinetics, and the two mutants were accumulated as dense amyloid inclusions in more than 80% of E. coli cells expressing these variants. In contrast, the MccE492 mutant lacking residues 54-63 showed a significantly lower intracellular aggregation propensity and slower in vitro polymerization kinetics. Electron microscopy analysis of the amyloids formed in vitro by these mutants revealed that, although

  8. Stable, metastable, and kinetically trapped amyloid aggregate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy D; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-12

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in a multitude of human disorders that range from Alzheimer's disease to type II diabetes. Compact oligomeric species, observed early during amyloid formation, are reported as the molecular entities responsible for the toxic effects of amyloid self-assembly. However, the relation between early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. We show that these different structures occupy well-defined regions in a peculiar phase diagram. Lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after they cross a salt and protein concentration-dependent threshold. We also determine a boundary for the onset of amyloid oligomer precipitation. The oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. These experimentally determined boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions that account for salt-modulated charge repulsion. The model also incorporates the metastable and kinetic character of oligomer phases. Similarities and differences of amyloid oligomer assembly to metastable liquid-liquid phase separation of proteins and to surfactant aggregation are discussed.

  9. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  10. Acute serum amyloid A induces migration, angiogenesis, and inflammation in synovial cells in vitro and in a human rheumatoid arthritis/SCID mouse chimera model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Connolly, Mary

    2010-06-01

    Serum amyloid A (A-SAA), an acute-phase protein with cytokine-like properties, is expressed at sites of inflammation. This study investigated the effects of A-SAA on chemokine-regulated migration and angiogenesis using rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cells and whole-tissue explants in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A-SAA levels were measured by real-time PCR and ELISA. IL-8 and MCP-1 expression was examined in RA synovial fibroblasts, human microvascular endothelial cells, and RA synovial explants by ELISA. Neutrophil transendothelial cell migration, cell adhesion, invasion, and migration were examined using transwell leukocyte\\/monocyte migration assays, invasion assays, and adhesion assays with or without anti-MCP-1\\/anti-IL-8. NF-kappaB was examined using a specific inhibitor and Western blotting. An RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model was used to examine the effects of A-SAA on cell migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis in vivo. High expression of A-SAA was demonstrated in RA patients (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced chemokine expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Blockade with anti-scavenger receptor class B member 1 and lipoxin A4 (A-SAA receptors) significantly reduced chemokine expression in RA synovial tissue explants (p < 0.05). A-SAA induced cell invasion, neutrophil-transendothelial cell migration, monocyte migration, and adhesion (all p < 0.05), effects that were blocked by anti-IL-8 or anti-MCP-1. A-SAA-induced chemokine expression was mediated through NF-kappaB in RA explants (p < 0.05). Finally, in the RA synovial\\/SCID mouse chimera model, we demonstrated for the first time in vivo that A-SAA directly induces monocyte migration from the murine circulation into RA synovial grafts, synovial cell proliferation, and angiogenesis (p < 0.05). A-SAA promotes cell migrational mechanisms and angiogenesis critical to RA pathogenesis.

  11. Differential regulation of amyloid precursor protein sorting with pathological mutations results in a distinct effect on amyloid-β production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chen; Wang, Jia-Yi; Wang, Kai-Chen; Liao, Jhih-Ying; Cheng, Irene H

    2014-11-01

    The deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, which is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three APP familial AD mutations (D678H, D678N, and H677R) located at the sixth and seventh amino acid of Aβ have distinct effect on Aβ aggregation, but their influence on the physiological and pathological roles of APP remain unclear. We found that the D678H mutation strongly enhances amyloidogenic cleavage of APP, thus increasing the production of Aβ. This enhancement of amyloidogenic cleavage is likely because of the acceleration of APPD678H sorting into the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. In contrast, the APPD678N and APPH677R mutants do not cause the same effects. Therefore, this study indicates a regulatory role of D678H in APP sorting and processing, and provides genetic evidence for the importance of APP sorting in AD pathogenesis. The internalization of amyloid precursor protein (APP) increases its opportunity to be processed by β-secretase and to produce Amyloid-β (Aβ) that causes Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report a pathogenic APPD678H mutant that enhances APP internalization into the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and thus promotes the β-secretase cleavage and Aβ production. This study provides genetic evidence for the importance of APP sorting in AD pathogenesis. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Rossom, Sofie; Op de Beeck, Ken; Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin; Schepers, Anne; Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina; Van Camp, Guy; Winderickx, Joris

    2012-01-01

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  13. The splicing mutant of the human tumor suppressor protein DFNA5 induces programmed cell death when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Rossom, Sofie [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Op de Beeck, Ken [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Franssens, Vanessa; Swinnen, Erwin [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Schepers, Anne [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Ghillebert, Ruben; Caldara, Marina [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium); Van Camp, Guy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Center of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Wilrijk-Antwerp (Belgium); Winderickx, Joris, E-mail: guy.vancamp@ua.ac.be, E-mail: joris.winderickx@bio.kuleuven.be [Department of Biology, Functional Biology, KU Leuven, Leuven-Heverlee (Belgium)

    2012-07-25

    DFNA5 was first identified as a gene responsible for autosomal dominant deafness. Different mutations were found, but they all resulted in exon 8 skipping during splicing and premature termination of the protein. Later, it became clear that the protein also has a tumor suppression function and that it can induce apoptosis. Epigenetic silencing of the DFNA5 gene is associated with different types of cancers, including gastric and colorectal cancers as well as breast tumors. We introduced the wild-type and mutant DFNA5 allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The expression of the wild-type protein was well tolerated by the yeast cells, although the protein was subject of degradation and often deposited in distinct foci when cells entered the diauxic shift. In contrast, cells had problems to cope with mutant DFNA5 and despite an apparent compensatory reduction in expression levels, the mutant protein still triggered a marked growth defect, which in part can be ascribed to its interaction with mitochondria. Consistently, cells with mutant DFNA5 displayed significantly increased levels of ROS and signs of programmed cell death. The latter occurred independently of the yeast caspase, Mca1, but involved the mitochondrial fission protein, Fis1, the voltage-dependent anion channel protein, Por1 and the mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocators, Aac1 and Aac3. Recent data proposed DFNA5 toxicity to be associated to a globular domain encoded by exon 2–6. We confirmed these data by showing that expression of solely this domain confers a strong growth phenotype. In addition, we identified a point mutant in this domain that completely abrogated its cytotoxicity in yeast as well as human Human Embryonic Kidney 293T cells (HEK293T). Combined, our data underscore that the yeast system offers a valuable tool to further dissect the apoptotic properties of DFNA5.

  14. Successful adjuvant-free vaccination of BALB/c mice with mutated amyloid β peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahi Monika M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent human clinical trial of an Alzheimer's disease (AD vaccine using amyloid beta (Aβ 1–42 plus QS-21 adjuvant produced some positive results, but was halted due to meningoencephalitis in some participants. The development of a vaccine with mutant Aβ peptides that avoids the use of an adjuvant may result in an effective and safer human vaccine. Results All peptides tested showed high antibody responses, were long-lasting, and demonstrated good memory response. Epitope mapping indicated that peptide mutation did not lead to epitope switching. Mutant peptides induced different inflammation responses as evidenced by cytokine profiles. Ig isotyping indicated that adjuvant-free vaccination with peptides drove an adequate Th2 response. All anti-sera from vaccinated mice cross-reacted with human Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mouse brain tissue. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that an adjuvant-free vaccine with different Aβ peptides can be an effective and safe vaccination approach against AD. This study represents the first report of adjuvant-free vaccines utilizing Aβ peptides carrying diverse mutations in the T-cell epitope. These largely positive results provide encouragement for the future of the development of human vaccinations for AD.

  15. Enhanced proteolysis of thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) encoded by mutant alleles in humans (TPMT∗3A, TPMT∗2): Mechanisms for the genetic polymorphism of TPMT activity

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Hung-Liang; Krynetski, Eugene Y.; Schuetz, Erin G.; Yanishevski, Yuri; Evans, William E.

    1997-01-01

    TPMT is a cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the S-methylation of aromatic and heterocyclic sulfhydryl compounds, including medications such as mercaptopurine and thioguanine. TPMT activity exhibits autosomal codominant genetic polymorphism, and patients inheriting TPMT deficiency are at high risk of potentially fatal hematopoietic toxicity. The most prevalent mutant alleles associated with TPMT deficiency in humans have been cloned and characterized (TPMT∗2 and TPMT∗3A), but the mechanisms for ...

  16. Genetic reconstitution of the human Adenovirus type 2 temperature-sensitive 1 mutant defective in endosomal escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastaldelli Michele

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Adenoviruses infect the upper and lower respiratory tracts, the urinary and digestive tracts, lymphoid systems and heart, and give rise to epidemic conjunctivitis. More than 51 human serotypes have been identified to-date, and classified into 6 species A-F. The species C Adenoviruses Ad2 and Ad5 (Ad2/5 cause upper and lower respiratory disease, but how viral structure relates to the selection of particular infectious uptake pathways is not known. An adenovirus mutant, Ad2-ts1 had been isolated upon chemical mutagenesis in the past, and shown to have unprocessed capsid proteins. Ad2-ts1 fails to package the viral protease L3/p23, and Ad2-ts1 virions do not efficiently escape from endosomes. It had been suggested that the C22187T point mutation leading to the substitution of the conserved proline 137 to leucine (P137L in the L3/p23 protease was at least in part responsible for this phenotype. To clarify if the C22187T mutation is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype, we sequenced the genes encoding the structural proteins of Ad2-ts1, and confirmed that the Ad2-ts1 DNA carries the point mutation C22187T. Introduction of C22187T to the wild-type Ad2 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (Ad2-BAC gave Ad2-BAC46 virions with the full Ad2-ts1 phenotype. Reversion of Ad2-BAC46 gave wild-type Ad2 particles indicating that P137L is necessary and sufficient for the Ad2-ts1 phenotype. The kinetics of Ad2-ts1 uptake into cells were comparable to Ad2 suggesting similar endocytic uptake mechanisms. Surprisingly, infectious Ad2 or Ad5 but not Ad2-ts1 uptake required CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid protein, which controls clathrin-mediated endocytosis and membrane transport between endosomes and the trans-Golgi-network. The data show that no other mutations than P137L in the viral protease are necessary to give rise to particles that are defective in capsid processing and endosomal escape. This provides a basis for

  17. Fetzima (levomilnacipran), a drug for major depressive disorder as a dual inhibitor for human serotonin transporters and beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Syed Mohd Danish; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Khan, Mahiuddin; Biswas, Deboshree; Hameed, Nida; Shakil, Shazi

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological management of Major Depressive Disorder includes the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors which targets serotonin transporters (SERT) to increase the synaptic concentrations of serotonin. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme-1 (BACE-1) is responsible for amyloid β plaque formation. Hence it is an interesting target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy. This study describes molecular interactions of a new Food and Drug Administration approved antidepressant drug named 'Fetzima' with BACE-1 and SERT. Fetzima is chemically known as levomilnacipran. The study has explored a possible link between the treatment of Depression and AD. 'Autodock 4.2' was used for docking study. The free energy of binding (ΔG) values for 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction and 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction were found to be -7.47 and -8.25 kcal/mol, respectively. Levomilnacipran was found to interact with S438, known to be the most important amino acid residue of serotonin binding site of SERT during 'levomilnacipran-SERT' interaction. In the case of 'levomilnacipran-BACE1' interaction, levomilnacipran interacted with two very crucial aspartic acid residues of BACE-1, namely, D32 and D228. These residues are accountable for the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein and the subsequent formation of amyloid β plaques in AD brain. Hence, Fetzima (levomilnacipran) might act as a potent dual inhibitor of SERT and BACE-1 and expected to form the basis of a future dual therapy against depression and AD. It is an established fact that development of AD is associated with Major Depressive Disorder. Therefore, the design of new BACE-1 inhibitors based on antidepressant drug scaffolds would be particularly beneficial.

  18. Imaging of amyloid deposition in human brain using positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]FACT: comparison with [{sup 11}C]PIB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hiroshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Biophysics Program, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Michie; Takano, Harumasa; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Ono, Maiko; Eguchi, Yoko; Higuchi, Makoto; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Molecular Imaging Center, Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan)

    2014-04-15

    The characteristic neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are deposition of amyloid senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The {sup 18}F-labeled amyloid tracer, [{sup 18}F]2-[(2-{(E)-2-[2-(dimethylamino)-1,3-thiazol-5-yl]vinyl}-1, 3-benzoxazol-6-yl)oxy ]-3-fluoropropan-1-ol (FACT), one of the benzoxazole derivatives, was recently developed. In the present study, deposition of amyloid senile plaques was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) with both [ {sup 11}C ]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [ {sup 18}F ]FACT in the same subjects, and the regional uptakes of both radiotracers were directly compared. Two PET scans, one of each with [ {sup 11}C ]PIB and [ {sup 18}F ]FACT, were performed sequentially on six normal control subjects, two mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and six AD patients. The standardized uptake value ratio of brain regions to the cerebellum was calculated with partial volume correction using magnetic resonance (MR) images to remove the effects of white matter accumulation. No significant differences in the cerebral cortical uptake were observed between normal control subjects and AD patients in [ {sup 18}F ]FACT studies without partial volume correction, while significant differences were observed in [ {sup 11}C ]PIB. After partial volume correction, the cerebral cortical uptake was significantly larger in AD patients than in normal control subjects for [ {sup 18}F ]FACT studies as well as [ {sup 11}C ]PIB. Relatively lower uptakes of [ {sup 11}C ]PIB in distribution were observed in the medial side of the temporal cortex and in the occipital cortex as compared with [ {sup 18}F ]FACT. Relatively higher uptake of [ {sup 11}C ]PIB in distribution was observed in the frontal and parietal cortices. Since [ {sup 18}F ]FACT might bind more preferentially to dense-cored amyloid deposition, regional differences in cerebral cortical uptake between [ {sup 11}C ]PIB and [ {sup 18}F ]FACT might be due to differences

  19. Imaging of amyloid deposition in human brain using positron emission tomography and [18F]FACT: comparison with [11C]PIB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Michie; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Takano, Harumasa; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Ono, Maiko; Eguchi, Yoko; Higuchi, Makoto; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2014-04-01

    The characteristic neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are deposition of amyloid senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The (18)F-labeled amyloid tracer, [(18)F]2-[(2-{(E)-2-[2-(dimethylamino)-1,3-thiazol-5-yl]vinyl}-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)oxy]-3-fluoropropan-1-ol (FACT), one of the benzoxazole derivatives, was recently developed. In the present study, deposition of amyloid senile plaques was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) with both [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [(18)F]FACT in the same subjects, and the regional uptakes of both radiotracers were directly compared. Two PET scans, one of each with [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FACT, were performed sequentially on six normal control subjects, two mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and six AD patients. The standardized uptake value ratio of brain regions to the cerebellum was calculated with partial volume correction using magnetic resonance (MR) images to remove the effects of white matter accumulation. No significant differences in the cerebral cortical uptake were observed between normal control subjects and AD patients in [(18)F]FACT studies without partial volume correction, while significant differences were observed in [(11)C]PIB. After partial volume correction, the cerebral cortical uptake was significantly larger in AD patients than in normal control subjects for [(18)F]FACT studies as well as [(11)C]PIB. Relatively lower uptakes of [(11)C]PIB in distribution were observed in the medial side of the temporal cortex and in the occipital cortex as compared with [(18)F]FACT. Relatively higher uptake of [(11)C]PIB in distribution was observed in the frontal and parietal cortices. Since [(18)F]FACT might bind more preferentially to dense-cored amyloid deposition, regional differences in cerebral cortical uptake between [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FACT might be due to differences in regional distribution between diffuse and dense-cored amyloid plaque shown in the

  20. Imaging of amyloid deposition in human brain using positron emission tomography and [18F]FACT: comparison with [11C]PIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Shinotoh, Hitoshi; Shimada, Hitoshi; Miyoshi, Michie; Takano, Harumasa; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Arakawa, Ryosuke; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Ono, Maiko; Eguchi, Yoko; Higuchi, Makoto; Fukumura, Toshimitsu; Suhara, Tetsuya; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Okamura, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic neuropathological changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are deposition of amyloid senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. The 18 F-labeled amyloid tracer, [ 18 F]2-[(2-{(E)-2-[2-(dimethylamino)-1,3-thiazol-5-yl]vinyl}-1, 3-benzoxazol-6-yl)oxy ]-3-fluoropropan-1-ol (FACT), one of the benzoxazole derivatives, was recently developed. In the present study, deposition of amyloid senile plaques was measured by positron emission tomography (PET) with both [ 11 C ]Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and [ 18 F ]FACT in the same subjects, and the regional uptakes of both radiotracers were directly compared. Two PET scans, one of each with [ 11 C ]PIB and [ 18 F ]FACT, were performed sequentially on six normal control subjects, two mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients, and six AD patients. The standardized uptake value ratio of brain regions to the cerebellum was calculated with partial volume correction using magnetic resonance (MR) images to remove the effects of white matter accumulation. No significant differences in the cerebral cortical uptake were observed between normal control subjects and AD patients in [ 18 F ]FACT studies without partial volume correction, while significant differences were observed in [ 11 C ]PIB. After partial volume correction, the cerebral cortical uptake was significantly larger in AD patients than in normal control subjects for [ 18 F ]FACT studies as well as [ 11 C ]PIB. Relatively lower uptakes of [ 11 C ]PIB in distribution were observed in the medial side of the temporal cortex and in the occipital cortex as compared with [ 18 F ]FACT. Relatively higher uptake of [ 11 C ]PIB in distribution was observed in the frontal and parietal cortices. Since [ 18 F ]FACT might bind more preferentially to dense-cored amyloid deposition, regional differences in cerebral cortical uptake between [ 11 C ]PIB and [ 18 F ]FACT might be due to differences in regional distribution between diffuse and dense-cored amyloid plaque shown in the

  1. Inhibitory Activities of Antioxidant Flavonoids from Tamarix gallica on Amyloid Aggregation Related to Alzheimer's and Type 2 Diabetes Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Hmidene, Asma; Hanaki, Mizuho; Murakami, Kazuma; Irie, Kazuhiro; Isoda, Hiroko; Shigemori, Hideyuki

    2017-01-01

    The prevention of amyloid aggregation is promising for the treatment of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). Ten antioxidant flavonoids isolated from the medicinal halophyte Tamarix gallica were tested for their amyloid aggregation inhibition potential. Glucuronosylated flavonoids show relatively strong inhibitory activity of Amyloid β (Aβ) and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) aggregation compared to their aglycone analogs. Structure-activity relationship of the flavonoids suggests that the catechol moiety is important for amyloid aggregation inhibition, while the methylation of the carboxyl group in the glucuronide moiety and of the hydroxyl group in the aglycone flavonoids decreased it.

  2. A Novel Form of Compensation in the Tg2576 Amyloid Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Attila; Katonai, Zoltán; Alpár, Alán; Wolf, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    One century after its first description, pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still poorly understood. Amyloid-related dendritic atrophy and membrane alterations of susceptible brain neurons in AD, and in animal models of AD are widely recognized. However, little effort has been made to study the potential effects of combined morphological and membrane alterations on signal transfer and synaptic integration in neurons that build up affected neural networks in AD. In this study spatial reconstructions and electrophysiological measurements of layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) overexpressing Tg2576 mice were used to build faithful segmental cable models of these neurons. Local synaptic activities were simulated in various points of the dendritic arbors and properties of subthreshold dendritic impulse propagation and predictors of synaptic input pattern recognition ability were quantified and compared in modeled WT and TG neurons. Despite the widespread dendritic degeneration and membrane alterations in mutant mouse neurons, surprisingly little, or no change was detected in steady-state and 50 Hz sinusoidal voltage transfers, current transfers, and local and propagation delays of PSPs traveling along dendrites of TG neurons. Synaptic input pattern recognition ability was also predicted to be unaltered in TG neurons in two different soma-dendritic membrane models investigated. Our simulations predict the way how subthreshold dendritic signaling and pattern recognition are preserved in TG neurons: amyloid-related membrane alterations compensate for the pathological effects that dendritic atrophy has on subthreshold dendritic signal transfer and integration in layer II/III somatosensory neurons of this hAPP mouse model for AD. Since neither propagation of single PSPs nor integration of multiple PSPs (pattern recognition) changes in TG neurons, we conclude that AD

  3. Exploring the influence of EGCG on the β-sheet-rich oligomers of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP1-37 and identifying its possible binding sites from molecular dynamics simulation.

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    Qianqian Wang

    Full Text Available EGCG possesses the ability of disaggregating the existing amyloid fibrils which were associated with many age-related degenerative diseases. However, the molecular mechanism of EGCG to disaggregate these fibrils is poorly known. In this work, to study the influence of EGCG on the full-length human islet amyloid polypeptide 1-37 (hIAPP1-37 oligomers, molecular dynamics simulations of hIAPP1-37 pentamer and decamer with EGCG were performed, respectively. The obtained results indicate that EGCG indeed destabilized the hIAPP1-37 oligomers. The nematic order parameter and secondary structure calculations coupled with the free-energy landscape indicate that EGCG broke the initial ordered pattern of two polymers, greatly reduced their β-sheet content and enlarged their conformational space. On this basis, three possible target sites were identified with the binding capacity order of S1>S2>S3. After a deeper analysis of each site, we found that S1 was the most possible site on which residues B-Ile26/Ala25, A-Phe23, B/C-Leu27 and E-Tyr37 played an important role for their binding. The proposal of this molecular mechanism can not only provide a prospective interaction figure between EGCG and β-sheet-rich fibrils of hIAPP1-37, but also is useful for further discovering other potential inhibitors.

  4. Effects of mutant human Ki-rasG12C gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-01-01

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras G12C allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 μg/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras G12C allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 μg/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 μg/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 μg/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras G12C expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models

  5. Dynamics of the Peripheral Membrane Protein P2 from Human Myelin Measured by Neutron Scattering--A Comparison between Wild-Type Protein and a Hinge Mutant.

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    Saara Laulumaa

    Full Text Available Myelin protein P2 is a fatty acid-binding structural component of the myelin sheath in the peripheral nervous system, and its function is related to its membrane binding capacity. Here, the link between P2 protein dynamics and structure and function was studied using elastic incoherent neutron scattering (EINS. The P38G mutation, at the hinge between the β barrel and the α-helical lid, increased the lipid stacking capacity of human P2 in vitro, and the mutated protein was also functional in cultured cells. The P38G mutation did not change the overall structure of the protein. For a deeper insight into P2 structure-function relationships, information on protein dynamics in the 10 ps to 1 ns time scale was obtained using EINS. Values of mean square displacements mainly from protein H atoms were extracted for wild-type P2 and the P38G mutant and compared. Our results show that at physiological temperatures, the P38G mutant is more dynamic than the wild-type P2 protein, especially on a slow 1-ns time scale. Molecular dynamics simulations confirmed the enhanced dynamics of the mutant variant, especially within the portal region in the presence of bound fatty acid. The increased softness of the hinge mutant of human myelin P2 protein is likely related to an enhanced flexibility of the portal region of this fatty acid-binding protein, as well as to its interactions with the lipid bilayer surface requiring conformational adaptations.

  6. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    We recently reported the identification of human calumenin, a novel Ca(2+) binding, transformation-sensitive and secreted protein [Vorum et al. (1998) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1386, 121-131; Vorum et al. (1999) Exp. Cell Res. 248, 473-481] belonging to the family of multiple EF-hand proteins...... with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...... in the immunological defense system and could be involved in the pathological process of amyloidosis that leads to formation of amyloid deposits seen in different types of tissues. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-14...

  7. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy

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    Mahmut Edip Gürol

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta-peptides (Ab in the walls of leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, and veins. Despite the fact that these pathological changes were first described in 1909, major advancement in our understanding of the clinicoradiological manifestations, neurobiology, and course of CAA has occurred only during the last 30 years. No significant associations have been shown between CAA and other systemic/visceral amyloidoses or vascular risk factors, including hypertension. CAA is well known as the most common cause of spontaneous and anticoagulant-related lobar parenchymal ICH in the elderly. It also causes lobar cerebral microbleeds (CMBs, small dot-like dark susceptibility artifacts visible with gradient recalled echo (GRE-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. CMBs are important markers of disease severity and predictors of CAA progression. Amyloid angiopathy is also a common cause of ischemic microvascular white matter disease (WMD and deep cerebral infarctions. Such WMD is defined as subcortical and periventricular white matter changes without obvious infarction, as well as a dark appearance on computerized tomography (CT and a bright appearance on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR-MRI. CAA-related vascular dysfunction, with its hemorrhagic and ischemic complications, is a recognized contributor to vascular cognitive impairment in the elderly, an independent effect that is synergistically increased by Alzheimer pathologies, such as plaques and tangles. A set of clinicoradiological criteria was established for the accurate diagnosis of CAA. According to the Boston Criteria, patients aged 55 years and older with multiple hemorrhages (on CT or GRE-MRI restricted to the lobar, cortical, or corticosubcortical regions (cerebellar hemorrhage allowed are diagnosed as probable CAA when no other etiology is found; a single hemorrhage in the same region is classified as possible

  8. Lack of evidence for protein AA reactivity in amyloid deposits of lattice corneal dystrophy and amyloid corneal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorevic, P D; Rodrigues, M M; Krachmer, J H; Green, C; Fujihara, S; Glenner, G G

    1984-08-15

    Amyloid fibrils occurring in primary and myeloma-associated (AL), secondary (AA), and certain neuropathic hereditary forms of systemic amyloidosis can be distinguished biochemically or immunohistologically as being composed of immunoglobulin light chain, protein AA, or prealbumin respectively. All types of systemic and several localized forms of amyloidosis contain amyloid P component (protein AP). We studied formalin-fixed tissue from eight cases of lattice corneal dystrophy by the immunoperoxidase method using antisera to proteins AA and AP, to normal serum prealbumin and prealbumin isolated from a case of hereditary amyloidosis, and to light-chain determinants; additional cases were examined by indirect immunofluorescence of fresh-frozen material. We found weak (1:10 dilution) staining with anti-AP, but no reactivity with other antisera. Congo red staining was resistant to pretreatment of sections with potassium permanganate, a characteristic of non-AA amyloid. Two-dimensional gels of solubilized proteins from frozen tissue from two cases of lattice corneal dystrophy resembled those obtained from normal human cornea. Western blots of two cases of polymorphous amyloid degeneration and solubilized protein from normal cornea did not react with radioactive iodine-labeled anti-AA or anti-AP with purified protein AP and unfixed protein AA amyloid tissue as controls. We were unable to corroborate the presence of protein AA in the amyloid deposits of lattice corneal dystrophy. Although staining with antiserum to protein AP was demonstrable, the molecular configuration of this protein in stromal deposits remains to be defined.

  9. Influence of hydrophobic Teflon particles on the structure of amyloid beta-peptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, C.E.; Norde, W.

    2003-01-01

    The amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) constitutes the major peptide component of the amyloid plaque deposits of Alzheimer's disease in humans. The Abeta changes from a nonpathogenic to a pathogenic conformation resulting in self-aggregation and deposition of the peptide. It has been established that

  10. Different Populations of Human Locus Ceruleus Neurons Contain Heavy Metals or Hyperphosphorylated Tau: Implications for Amyloid-β and Tau Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamphlett, Roger; Kum Jew, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    A marked loss of locus ceruleus (LC) neurons is a striking pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). LC neurons are particularly prone to taking up circulating toxicants such as heavy metals, and hyperphosphorylated tau (tau(HYP)) appears early in these neurons. In an attempt to find out if both heavy metals and tau(HYP) could be damaging LC neurons, we looked in the LC neurons of 21 sporadic AD patients and 43 non-demented controls for the heavy metals mercury, bismuth, and silver using autometallography, and for tau(HYP) using AT8 immunostaining. Heavy metals or tau(HYP) were usually seen in separate LC neurons, and rarely co-existed within the same neuron. The number of heavy metal-containing LC neurons did not correlate with the number containing tau(HYP). Heavy metals therefore appear to occupy a mostly different population of LC neurons to those containing tau(HYP), indicating that the LC in AD is vulnerable to two different assaults. Reduced brain noradrenaline from LC damage is linked to amyloid-β deposition, and tau(HYP) in the LC may seed neurofibrillary tangles in other neurons. A model is described, incorporating the present findings, that proposes that the LC plays a part in both the amyloid-β and tau pathologies of AD.

  11. Amyloid precursor protein expression is enhanced in human platelets from subjects with Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a real-time PCR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignini, Arianna; Morganti, Stefano; Salvolini, Eleonora; Sartini, Davide; Luzzi, Simona; Fiorini, Rosamaria; Provinciali, Leandro; Di Primio, Roberto; Mazzanti, Laura; Emanuelli, Monica

    2013-12-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) represent the most frequent causes of early-onset and late-onset degenerative dementia, respectively. A correct diagnosis entails the choice of appropriate therapies. In this view the present study aimed to identify biomarkers that could improve the differential diagnosis. We recently found an overexpression of platelet amyloid precursor protein (APP) in AD; furthermore, recent studies have suggested the presence of changes in APP processing in FTLD. In this context, we analyzed the mRNA expression level of Total APP (TOT) and APP containing a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (KPI) in platelets obtained from AD patients, subjects with FTLD, and healthy subjects. In addition, we evaluated the correlation between platelet APP mRNA expression levels and cognitive impairment.Differential gene expression measurements revealed a significant up-regulation of APP TOT and APP KPI in both AD and FTLD patients compared to the controls (being AD/Controls: 1.67 for APP TOT and 1.47 for APP KPI; FTLD/Controls: 1.62 for APP TOT and 1.51 for APP KPI; p < 0.05), although it is interesting to note that in FTLD patients this expression did not correlate with the severity of cognitive impairment.This could be related to a reduced beta-amyloid (Aβ) formation, caused by an alteration of secretase enzymatic activity, even though a post-transcriptional regulation of APP mRNAs in FTLD cannot be excluded.

  12. CARMA2sh and ULK2 control pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognition in human keratinocytes: psoriasis-linked CARMA2sh mutants escape ULK2 censorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudiero, Ivan; Mazzone, Pellegrino; D'Andrea, Luca E; Ferravante, Angela; Zotti, Tiziana; Telesio, Gianluca; De Rubis, Gabriele; Reale, Carla; Pizzulo, Maddalena; Muralitharan, Shanmugakonar; Vito, Pasquale; Stilo, Romania

    2017-02-23

    The molecular complexes formed by specific members of the family of CARMA proteins, the CARD domain-containing adapter molecule BCL10 and MALT1 (CBM complex) represent a central hub in regulating activation of the pleiotropic transcription factor NF-κB. Recently, missense mutations in CARMA2sh have been shown to cause psoriasis in a dominant manner and with high penetrancy. Here, we demonstrate that in human keratinocytes CARMA2sh plays an essential role in the signal transduction pathway that connects pathogen-associated molecular patterns recognition to NF-κB activation. We also find that the serine/threonine kinase ULK2 binds to and phosphorylates CARMA2sh, thereby inhibiting its capacity to activate NF-κB by promoting lysosomal degradation of BCL10, which is essential for CARMA2sh-mediated NF-κB signaling. Remarkably, CARMA2sh mutants associated with psoriasis escape ULK2 inhibition. Finally, we show that a peptide blocking CARD-mediated BCL10 interactions reduces the capacity of psoriasis-linked CARMA2sh mutants to activate NF-κB. Our work elucidates a fundamental signaling mechanism operating in human keratinocytes and opens to novel potential tools for the therapeutical treatment of human skin disorders.

  13. Interaction of amyloid inhibitor proteins with amyloid beta peptides: insight from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payel Das

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the detailed mechanism by which proteins such as human αB- crystallin and human lysozyme inhibit amyloid beta (Aβ peptide aggregation is crucial for designing treatment for Alzheimer's disease. Thus, unconstrained, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent have been performed to characterize the Aβ17-42 assembly in presence of the αB-crystallin core domain and of lysozyme. Simulations reveal that both inhibitor proteins compete with inter-peptide interaction by binding to the peptides during the early stage of aggregation, which is consistent with their inhibitory action reported in experiments. However, the Aβ binding dynamics appear different for each inhibitor. The binding between crystallin and the peptide monomer, dominated by electrostatics, is relatively weak and transient due to the heterogeneous amino acid distribution of the inhibitor surface. The crystallin-bound Aβ oligomers are relatively long-lived, as they form more extensive contact surface with the inhibitor protein. In contrast, a high local density of arginines from lysozyme allows strong binding with Aβ peptide monomers, resulting in stable complexes. Our findings not only illustrate, in atomic detail, how the amyloid inhibitory mechanism of human αB-crystallin, a natural chaperone, is different from that of human lysozyme, but also may aid de novo design of amyloid inhibitors.

  14. Diffuse glomerular nodular lesions in diabetic pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha, an inheritant diabetic gene in humans.

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    Satoshi Hara

    Full Text Available Glomerular nodular lesions, known as Kimmelstiel-Wilson nodules, are a pathological hallmark of progressive human diabetic nephropathy. We have induced severe diabetes in pigs carrying a dominant-negative mutant hepatocyte nuclear factor 1-alpha (HNF1α P291fsinsC, a maturity-onset diabetes of the young type-3 (MODY3 gene in humans. In this model, glomerular pathology revealed that formation of diffuse glomerular nodules commenced as young as 1 month of age and increased in size and incidence until the age of 10 months, the end of the study period. Immunohistochemistry showed that the nodules consisted of various collagen types (I, III, IV, V and VI with advanced glycation end-product (AGE and Nε-carboxymethyl-lysine (CML deposition, similar to those in human diabetic nodules, except for collagen type I. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β was also expressed exclusively in the nodules. The ultrastructure of the nodules comprised predominant interstitial-type collagen deposition arising from the mesangial matrices. Curiously, these nodules were found predominantly in the deep cortex. However, diabetic pigs failed to show any of the features characteristic of human diabetic nephropathy; e.g., proteinuria, glomerular basement membrane thickening, exudative lesions, mesangiolysis, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and vascular hyalinosis. The pigs showed only Armanni-Ebstein lesions, a characteristic tubular manifestation in human diabetes. RT-PCR analysis showed that glomeruli in wild-type pigs did not express endogenous HNF1α and HNF1β, indicating that mutant HNF1α did not directly contribute to glomerular nodular formation in diabetic pigs. In conclusion, pigs harboring the dominant-negative mutant human MODY3 gene showed reproducible and distinct glomerular nodules, possibly due to AGE- and CML-based collagen accumulation. Although the pathology differed in several respects from that of human glomerular nodular lesions, the

  15. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

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    Chi-cheng Chiu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP, a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  16. Stop-and-go kinetics in amyloid fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Fonslet, Jesper; Andersen, Christian Beyschau

    2010-01-01

    Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow in an intermi......Many human diseases are associated with protein aggregation and fibrillation. We present experiments on in vitro glucagon fibrillation using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, providing real-time measurements of single-fibril growth. We find that amyloid fibrils grow...

  17. A potential amyloid-imaging probe for Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Jiong; Wang Shizhen; Yuan Jiangang; Qiang Boqin

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To screen out the human single-chain fragment variable (scFv) against amyloid β peptide 40 from a human synthetic antibody library, sub-clone its gene into E. coli expression system, and express and purify it for amyloid peptide imaging research. The overload of amyloid β peptide and the appearance of senile plaques in the human brain tissue is one of the hallmark of the Alzheimer's disease, and in vivo imaging of amyloidβ peptide is valuable for the earlier diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods: Amyloid β peptide 40 was bound on the solid surface of Nunc plates as antigen and a human antibody library constructed with human antibody heavy and light chain variable gene and nucleotides sequence coded (Gly4Ser)3 linker and displayed on the protein surface of filamentous phage was used to screen the binding clones. After five rounds of bio-panning, the host E. coli TG1 was infected with eluted filamentous phage from the last turn of selection. 55 well-separated colonies were picked randomly from the plates and several specific positive clones were identified by ELISA testing, and their binding sites were determined by competitive ELISA with amyloid 13 peptide 40, 1-16, 25-35. The single-chain Fv antibody gene was sequenced and their amino acids sequence was deduced. The scFv antibody gene was sub-cloned into a protokayotic expression vector pET-22b(+) and transformed into bacteria strain BL21 to express the His6-tagged single-chain antibody and the whole cell culture was subjected to SDS-PAGE analysis. The antibody was expressed in inclusion bodies and purified with serial buffers and verified with western blotting and their activity was tested by ELISA against amyloid β peptide 40. Results: ELISA testing showed that 33 clones could bind amyloid β peptide 40 and 10 of these clones could be inhibited by amyloid β peptide 40 itself to below 50% of its original binding activities. Five clones could also be inhibited by amyloid β peptide 1-16. DNA

  18. Phenotype of transgenic mice carrying a very low copy number of the mutant human G93A superoxide dismutase-1 gene associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Jeffrey S Deitch

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of the motor neuron. While most cases of ALS are sporadic, 10% are familial (FALS with 20% of FALS caused by a mutation in the gene that codes for the enzyme Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1. There is variability in sporadic ALS as well as FALS where even within the same family some siblings with the same mutation do not manifest disease. A transgenic (Tg mouse model of FALS containing 25 copies of the mutant human SOD1 gene demonstrates motor neuron pathology and progressive weakness similar to ALS patients, leading to death at approximately 130 days. The onset of symptoms and survival of these transgenic mice are directly related to the number of copies of the mutant gene. We report the phenotype of a very low expressing (VLE G93A SOD1 Tg carrying only 4 copies of the mutant G93ASOD1 gene. While weakness can start at 9 months, only 74% of mice 18 months or older demonstrate disease. The VLE mice show decreased motor neurons compared to wild-type mice as well as increased cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43. In contrast to the standard G93A SOD1 Tg mouse which always develops motor weakness leading to death, not all VLE animals manifested clinical disease or shortened life span. In fact, approximately 20% of mice older than 24 months had no motor symptoms and only 18% of VLE mice older than 22 months reached end stage. Given the variable penetrance of clinical phenotype, prolonged survival, and protracted loss of motor neurons the VLE mouse provides a new tool that closely mimics human ALS. This tool will allow the study of pathologic events over time as well as the study of genetic and environmental modifiers that may not be causative, but can exacerbate or accelerate motor neuron disease.

  19. Synergistic activity of vorinostat combined with gefitinib but not with sorafenib in mutant KRAS human non-small cell lung cancers and hepatocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannot, Victor; Busser, Benoit; Vanwonterghem, Laetitia; Michallet, Sophie; Ferroudj, Sana; Cokol, Murat; Coll, Jean-Luc; Ozturk, Mehmet; Hurbin, Amandine

    2016-01-01

    Development of drug resistance limits the efficacy of targeted therapies. Alternative approaches using different combinations of therapeutic agents to inhibit several pathways could be a more effective strategy for treating cancer. The effects of the approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (gefitinib) or a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor (sorafenib) in combination with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat) on cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and signaling pathway activation in human lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma cells with wild-type EGFR and mutant KRAS were investigated. The effects of the synergistic drug combinations were also studied in human lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma cells in vivo. The combination of gefitinib and vorinostat synergistically reduced cell growth and strongly induced apoptosis through inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor/protein kinase B (IGF-1R/AKT)-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, the gefitinib and vorinostat combination strongly inhibited tumor growth in mice with lung adenocarcinoma or hepatocarcinoma tumor xenografts. In contrast, the combination of sorafenib and vorinostat did not inhibit cell proliferation compared to a single treatment and induced G 2 /M cell cycle arrest without apoptosis. The sorafenib and vorinostat combination sustained the IGF-1R-, AKT-, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. These results showed that there was synergistic cytotoxicity when vorinostat was combined with gefitinib for both lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma with mutant KRAS in vitro and in vivo but that the combination of vorinostat with sorafenib did not show any benefit. These findings highlight the important role of the IGF-1R/AKT pathway in the resistance to targeted therapies and support the use of histone deacetylase inhibitors in combination with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, especially for

  20. Wild-Type, but Not Mutant N296H, Human Tau Restores Aβ-Mediated Inhibition of LTP in Tau−/− mice

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    Mariana Vargas-Caballero

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Microtubule associated protein tau (MAPT is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and many forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD. We recently reported that Aβ-mediated inhibition of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP in mice requires tau. Here, we asked whether expression of human MAPT can restore Aβ-mediated inhibition on a mouse Tau−/− background and whether human tau with an FTD-causing mutation (N296H can interfere with Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. We used transgenic mouse lines each expressing the full human MAPT locus using bacterial artificial chromosome technology. These lines expressed all six human tau protein isoforms on a Tau−/− background. We found that the human wild-type MAPT H1 locus was able to restore Aβ42-mediated impairment of LTP. In contrast, Aβ42 did not reduce LTP in slices in two independently generated transgenic lines expressing tau protein with the mutation N296H associated with frontotemporal dementia (FTD. Basal phosphorylation of tau measured as the ratio of AT8/Tau5 immunoreactivity was significantly reduced in N296H mutant hippocampal slices. Our data show that human MAPT is able to restore Aβ42-mediated inhibition of LTP in Tau−/− mice. These results provide further evidence that tau protein is central to Aβ-induced LTP impairment and provide a valuable tool for further analysis of the links between Aβ, human tau and impairment of synaptic function.

  1. GMP-compliant automated synthesis of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 (Florbetapir F 18) for imaging {beta}-amyloid plaques in human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, C.-H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Weng, C.-C. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, I.-T. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Ting, Y.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Jan, T.-R. [Department and Graduate Institute of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wey, S.-P., E-mail: spwey@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hua 1st Road, Kweishan, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    We report herein the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant automated synthesis of {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridine, AV-45 (Florbetapir), a novel tracer for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. [{sup 18}F]AV-45 was prepared in 105 min using a tosylate precursor with Sumitomo modules for radiosynthesis under GMP-compliant conditions. The overall yield was 25.4{+-}7.7% with a final radiochemical purity of 95.3{+-}2.2% (n=19). The specific activity of [{sup 18}F]AV-45 reached as high as 470{+-}135 TBq/mmol (n=19). The present studies show that [{sup 18}F]AV-45 can be manufactured under GMP-compliant conditions and could be widely available for routine clinical use.

  2. Amyloid fibers provide structural integrity to Bacillus subtilis biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Aguilar, Claudio; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2010-02-02

    Bacillus subtilis forms biofilms whose constituent cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Previous studies have shown that the protein TasA and an exopolysaccharide are the main components of the matrix. Given the importance of TasA in biofilm formation, we characterized the physicochemical properties of this protein. We report that purified TasA forms fibers of variable length and 10-15 nm in width. Biochemical analyses, in combination with the use of specific dyes and microscopic analyses, indicate that TasA forms amyloid fibers. Consistent with this hypothesis, TasA fibers required harsh treatments (e.g., formic acid) to be depolymerized. When added to a culture of a tasA mutant, purified TasA restored wild-type biofilm morphology, indicating that the purified protein retained biological activity. We propose that TasA forms amyloid fibers that bind cells together in the biofilm.

  3. Cyclophilin A Levels Dictate Infection Efficiency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Capsid Escape Mutants A92E and G94D ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylinen, Laura M. J.; Schaller, Torsten; Price, Amanda; Fletcher, Adam J.; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; James, Leo C.; Towers, Greg J.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclophilin A (CypA) is an important human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cofactor in human cells. HIV-1 A92E and G94D capsid escape mutants arise during CypA inhibition and in certain cell lines are dependent on CypA inhibition. Here we show that dependence on CypA inhibition is due to high CypA levels. Restricted HIV-1 is stable, and remarkably, restriction is augmented by arresting cell division. Nuclear entry is not inhibited. We propose that high CypA levels and capsid mutations combine to disturb uncoating, leading to poor infectivity, particularly in arrested cells. Our data suggest a role for CypA in uncoating the core of HIV-1 to facilitate integration. PMID:19073742

  4. Peptide p5 binds both heparinase-sensitive glycosaminoglycans and fibrils in patient-derived AL amyloid extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Emily B.; Williams, Angela [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Heidel, Eric [Department of Surgery, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Macy, Sallie [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Kennel, Stephen J. [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Wall, Jonathan S., E-mail: jwall@utmck.edu [Department of Medicine, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, 1924 Alcoa Highway, Knoxville, TN 37922 (United States)

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Polybasic peptide p5 binds human light chain amyloid extracts. •The binding of p5 with amyloid involves both glycosaminoglycans and fibrils. •Heparinase treatment led to a correlation between p5 binding and fibril content. •p5 binding to AL amyloid requires electrostatic interactions. -- Abstract: In previously published work, we have described heparin-binding synthetic peptides that preferentially recognize amyloid deposits in a mouse model of reactive systemic (AA) amyloidosis and can be imaged by using positron and single photon emission tomographic imaging. We wanted to extend these findings to the most common form of visceral amyloidosis, namely light chain (AL); however, there are no robust experimental animal models of AL amyloidosis. To further define the binding of the lead peptide, p5, to AL amyloid, we characterized the reactivity in vitro of p5 with in situ and patient-derived AL amyloid extracts which contain both hypersulfated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as well as amyloid fibrils. Histochemical staining demonstrated that the peptide specifically localized with tissue-associated AL amyloid deposits. Although we anticipated that p5 would undergo electrostatic interactions with the amyloid-associated glycosaminoglycans expressing heparin-like side chains, no significant correlation between peptide binding and glycosaminoglycan content within amyloid extracts was observed. In contrast, following heparinase I treatment, although overall binding was reduced, a positive correlation between peptide binding and amyloid fibril content became evident. This interaction was further confirmed using synthetic light chain fibrils that contain no carbohydrates. These data suggest that p5 can bind to both the sulfated glycosaminoglycans and protein fibril components of AL amyloid. Understanding these complex electrostatic interactions will aid in the optimization of synthetic peptides for use as amyloid imaging agents and potentially as

  5. Bifunctional Anti-Non-Amyloid Component α-Synuclein Nanobodies Are Protective In Situ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Butler

    Full Text Available Misfolding, abnormal accumulation, and secretion of α-Synuclein (α-Syn are closely associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease (PD. VH14 is a human single domain intrabody selected against the non-amyloid component (NAC hydrophobic interaction region of α-Syn, which is critical for initial aggregation. Using neuronal cell lines, we show that as a bifunctional nanobody fused to a proteasome targeting signal, VH14PEST can counteract heterologous proteostatic effects of mutant α-Syn on mutant huntingtin Exon1 and protect against α-Syn toxicity using propidium iodide or Annexin V readouts. We compared this anti-NAC candidate to NbSyn87, which binds to the C-terminus of α-Syn. NbSyn87PEST degrades α-Syn as well or better than VH14PEST. However, while both candidates reduced toxicity, VH14PEST appears more effective in both proteostatic stress and toxicity assays. These results show that the approach of reducing intracellular monomeric targets with novel antibody engineering technology should allow in vivo modulation of proteostatic pathologies.

  6. Ultrafast Hydrogen-Bonding Dynamics in Amyloid Fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Ileana M; Ma, Jianqiang; Mukherjee, Debopreeti; Gai, Feng

    2018-06-08

    While there are many studies on the subject of hydrogen bonding dynamics in biological systems, few, if any, have investigated this fundamental process in amyloid fibrils. Herein, we seek to add insight into this topic by assessing the dynamics of a hydrogen bond buried in the dry interface of amyloid fibrils. To prepare a suitable model peptide system for this purpose, we introduce two mutations into the amyloid-forming Aβ(16-22) peptide. The first one is a lysine analog at position 19, which is used to help form structurally homogeneous fibrils, and the second one is an aspartic acid derivative (DM) at position 17, which is intended (1) to be used as a site-specific infrared probe and (2) to serve as a hydrogen-bond acceptor to lysine so that an inter-β-sheet hydrogen bond can be formed in the fibrils. Using both infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, we show that (1) this mutant peptide indeed forms well defined fibrils, (2) when bulk solvent is removed, there is no detectable water present in the fibrils, (3) infrared results obtained with the DM probe are consistent with a protofibril structure that is composed of two antiparallel β-sheets stacked in a parallel fashion, leading to formation of the expected hydrogen bond. Using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, we further show that the dynamics of this hydrogen bond occur on a timescale of ~2.3 ps, which is attributed to the rapid rotation of the -NH3+ group of lysine around its Cε-Nζ bond. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) DM is a useful infrared marker in facilitating structure determination of amyloid fibrils and (2) even in the tightly packed core of amyloid fibrils certain amino acid sidechains can undergo ultrafast motions, hence contributing to the thermodynamic stability of the system.

  7. Mutant human torsinA, responsible for early-onset dystonia, dominantly suppresses GTPCH expression, dopamine levels and locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster

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    Noriko Wakabayashi-Ito

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dystonia represents the third most common movement disorder in humans with over 20 genetic loci identified. TOR1A (DYT1, the gene responsible for the most common primary hereditary dystonia, encodes torsinA, an AAA ATPase family protein. Most cases of DYT1 dystonia are caused by a 3 bp (ΔGAG deletion that results in the loss of a glutamic acid residue (ΔE302/303 in the carboxyl terminal region of torsinA. This torsinAΔE mutant protein has been speculated to act in a dominant-negative manner to decrease activity of wild type torsinA. Drosophila melanogaster has a single torsin-related gene, dtorsin. Null mutants of dtorsin exhibited locomotion defects in third instar larvae. Levels of dopamine and GTP cyclohydrolase (GTPCH proteins were severely reduced in dtorsin-null brains. Further, the locomotion defect was rescued by the expression of human torsinA or feeding with dopamine. Here, we demonstrate that human torsinAΔE dominantly inhibited locomotion in larvae and adults when expressed in neurons using a pan-neuronal promoter Elav. Dopamine and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4 levels were significantly reduced in larval brains and the expression level of GTPCH protein was severely impaired in adult and larval brains. When human torsinA and torsinAΔE were co-expressed in neurons in dtorsin-null larvae and adults, the locomotion rates and the expression levels of GTPCH protein were severely reduced. These results support the hypothesis that torsinAΔE inhibits wild type torsinA activity. Similarly, neuronal expression of a Drosophila DtorsinΔE equivalent mutation dominantly inhibited larval locomotion and GTPCH protein expression. These results indicate that both torsinAΔE and DtorsinΔE act in a dominant-negative manner. We also demonstrate that Dtorsin regulates GTPCH expression at the post-transcriptional level. This Drosophila model of DYT1 dystonia provides an important tool for studying the differences in the molecular function between the

  8. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations

  9. A transgenic rat expressing human APP with the Swedish Alzheimer's disease mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Ronnie; Malkiewicz, Katarzyna; Kloskowska, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, transgenic mice have become valuable tools for studying mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the aim of developing an animal model better for memory and neurobehavioural testing, we have generated a transgenic rat model of AD. These animals express human amyloid precursor...... in cerebrovascular blood vessels with very rare diffuse plaques. We believe that crossing these animals with mutant PS1 transgenic rats will result in accelerated plaque formation similar to that seen in transgenic mice....

  10. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  11. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  12. Pro-inflammatory interleukin-18 increases Alzheimer’s disease-associated amyloid-β production in human neuron-like cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutinen Elina M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alzheimer’s disease (AD involves increased accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles as well as neuronal loss in various regions of the neocortex. Neuroinflammation is also present, but its role in AD is not fully understood. We previously showed increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18 in different regions of AD brains, where it co-localized with Aβ-plaques, as well as the ability of IL-18 to increase expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β and cyclin dependent kinase 5, involved in hyperphosphorylation of tau-protein. Elevated IL-18 has been detected in several risk conditions for AD, including obesity, type-II diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases as well as in stress. Methods We differentiated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells as neuron-like and exposed them to IL-18 for various times. We examined the protein levels of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP and its processing products, its cleaving enzymes, involved in amyloidogenic processing of APP, and markers of apoptosis. Results IL-18 increased protein levels of the β-site APP-cleaving enzyme BACE-1, the N-terminal fragment of presenilin-1 and slightly presenilin enhancer 2, both of which are members of the γ-secretase complex, as well as Fe65, which is a binding protein of the C-terminus of APP and one regulator for GSK-3β. IL-18 also increased APP expression and phosphorylation, which preceded increased BACE-1 levels. Further, IL-18 altered APP processing, increasing Aβ40 production in particular, which was inhibited by IL-18 binding protein. Increased levels of soluble APPβ were detected in culture medium after the IL-18 exposure. IL-18 also increased anti-apoptotic bcl-xL levels, which likely counteracted the minor increase of the pro-apoptotic caspase-3. Lactate dehydrogenase activity in culture medium was unaffected. Conclusions The IL-18 induction of BACE-1, APP processing, and Aβ is likely to be

  13. Human Lysozyme Synergistically Enhances Bactericidal Dynamics and Lowers the Resistant Mutant Prevention Concentration for Metronidazole to Helicobacter pylori by Increasing Cell Permeability

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    Xiaolin Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole (MNZ is an effective agent that has been employed to eradicate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. The emergence of broad MNZ resistance in H. pylori has affected the efficacy of this therapeutic agent. The concentration of MNZ, especially the mutant prevention concentration (MPC, plays an important role in selecting or enriching resistant mutants and regulating therapeutic effects. A strategy to reduce the MPC that can not only effectively treat H. pylori but also prevent resistance mutations is needed. H. pylori is highly resistant to lysozyme. Lysozyme possesses a hydrolytic bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan and a cationic dependent mode. These effects can increase the permeability of bacterial cells and promote antibiotic absorption into bacterial cells. In this study, human lysozyme (hLYS was used to probe its effects on the integrity of the H. pylori outer and inner membranes using as fluorescent probe hydrophobic 1-N-phenyl-naphthylamine (NPN and the release of aspartate aminotransferase. Further studies using a propidium iodide staining method assessed whether hLYS could increase cell permeability and promote cell absorption. Finally, we determined the effects of hLYS on the bactericidal dynamics and MPC of MNZ in H. pylori. Our findings indicate that hLYS could dramatically increase cell permeability, reduce the MPC of MNZ for H. pylori, and enhance its bactericidal dynamic activity, demonstrating that hLYS could reduce the probability of MNZ inducing resistance mutations.

  14. Connexin mutants and cataracts

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    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  15. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    , a number of factors appear to preclude these probes from clinical utilization. As the available "amyloid specific" positron emission tomography imaging probes have failed to demonstrate diagnostic value and have shown limited utility for monitoring therapeutic interventions in humans, a debate...

  16. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: Fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, W.E.; Kramer, R.A.; Rice, A.; Weldon, W.C.; Niezgoda, M.; Faber, M.; Slootstra, J.W.; Meloen, R.H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, M.; Visser, T.J.; Jongeneelen, M.; Thijsse, S.; Throsby, M.; Kruif, de J.; Rupprecht, C.E.; Dietzschold, B.; Goudsmit, J.; Bakker, A.B.H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  17. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  18. Exploring new biological functions of amyloids: bacteria cell agglutination mediated by host protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Torrent

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs are important effectors of the innate immune system that play a vital role in the prevention of infections. Recent advances have highlighted the similarity between AMPs and amyloid proteins. Using the Eosinophil Cationic Protein as a model, we have rationalized the structure-activity relationships between amyloid aggregation and antimicrobial activity. Our results show how protein aggregation can induce bacteria agglutination and cell death. Using confocal and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy we have tracked the formation in situ of protein amyloid-like aggregates at the bacteria surface and on membrane models. In both cases, fibrillar aggregates able to bind to amyloid diagnostic dyes were detected. Additionally, a single point mutation (Ile13 to Ala can suppress the protein amyloid behavior, abolishing the agglutinating activity and impairing the antimicrobial action. The mutant is also defective in triggering both leakage and lipid vesicle aggregation. We conclude that ECP aggregation at the bacterial surface is essential for its cytotoxicity. Hence, we propose here a new prospective biological function for amyloid-like aggregates with potential biological relevance.

  19. Characterization of five new mutants in the carboxyl-terminal domain of human apolipoprotein E: No cosegregation with severe hyperlipidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maagdenberg, A.M.J.M. van den; Bruijn, I.H. de; Hofker, M.H.; Frants, R.R. (Leiden Univ. (Netherlands)); Knijff, P. de; Smelt, A.H.M.; Leuven, J.A.G.; van' t Hooft, F.; Assmann, G.; Havekes, L.M. (Univ. Hospital, Leiden (Netherlands)); Weng, Wei; Funke, H. (Westfalische Wilhelms-Universitaet, Muester (Germany))

    1993-05-01

    Assessment of the apolipoprotein E (apoE) phenotype by isoelectric focusing of both hyperlipidemic and normolipidemic individuals identified five new variants. All mutations were confined to the downstream part of the APOE gene by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Sequence analysis revealed five new mutations causing unique amino acid substitutions in the carboxyl-terminal part of the protein containing the putative lipid-binding domain. Three hyperlipoproteinemic probands were carriers of the APOE*2(Va1236[r arrow]Glu) allele, the APOE*3(Cys112-Arg; Arg251[r arrow]Gly) allele, or the APOE*1(Arg158[r arrow]Cys; Leu252[r arrow]Glu) allele. DGGE of the region encoding the receptor-binding domain was useful for haplotyping the mutations at codons 112 and 158. Family studies failed to demonstrate cosegregation between the new mutations and severe hyperlipoproteinemia, although a number of carriers for the APOE*3(Cys112[r arrow]Arg; Arg251[r arrow]Gly) allele and the APOE*1(Arg158-Cys; Leu252[r arrow]Glu) allele expressed hypertriglyceridemia and/ or hypercholesterolemia. Two other mutant alleles, APOE*4[sup [minus

  20. An UHPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of human amyloid beta peptides Aβ1-38, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid using micro-elution solid phase extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ping-Ping; Chen, Wei-Li; Yuan, Fei; Sheng, Lei; Wu, Yu-Jia; Zhang, Wei-Wei; Li, Guo-Qing; Xu, Hong-Rong; Li, Xue-Ning

    2017-12-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides in cerebrospinal fluid are extensively estimated for identification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) as diagnostic biomarkers. Unfortunately, their pervasive application is hampered by interference from Aβ propensity of self-aggregation, nonspecifically bind to surfaces and matrix proteins, and by lack of quantitive standardization. Here we report on an alternative Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous measurement of human amyloid beta peptides Aβ1-38, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using micro-elution solid phase extraction (SPE). Samples were pre-processing by the mixed-mode micro-elution solid phase extraction and quantification was performed in the positive ion multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using electrospray ionization. The stable-isotope labeled Aβ peptides 15 N 51 - Aβ1-38, 15 N 53 - Aβ1-40 and 15 N 55 - Aβ1-42 peptides were used as internal standards. And the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) containing 5% rat plasma was used as a surrogate matrix for calibration curves. The quality control (QC) samples at 0.25, 2 and 15ng/mL were prepared. A "linear" regression (1/x 2 weighting): y=ax+b was used to fit the calibration curves over the concentration range of 0.1-20ng/mL for all three peptides. Coefficient of variation (CV) of intra-batch and inter-batch assays were all less than 6.44% for Aβ1-38, 6.75% for Aβ1-40 and 10.74% for Aβ1-42. The precision values for all QC samples of three analytes met the acceptance criteria. Extract recoveries of Aβ1-38, Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 were all greater than 70.78%, both in low and high QC samples. The stability assessments showed that QC samples at both low and high levels could be stable for at least 24h at 4°C, 4h at room temperature and through three freeze-thaw cycles without sacrificing accuracy or precision. And no significant carryover effect was observed. This validated UHPLC

  1. Y682 mutation of amyloid precursor protein promotes endo-lysosomal dysfunction by disrupting APP-SorLA interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Rosario La Rosa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular transport and localization of amyloid precursor protein (APP are critical determinants of APP processing and β-amyloid peptide production, thus crucially important for the pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Notably, the C-terminal Y682ENPTY687 domain of APP binds to specific adaptors controlling APP trafficking and sorting in neurons. Mutation on the Y682 residue to glycine (Y682G leads to altered APP sorting in hippocampal neurons that favors its accumulation in intracellular compartments and the release of soluble APPα. Such alterations induce premature aging and learning and cognitive deficits in APP Y682G mutant mice (APPYG/YG. Here, we report that Y682G mutation affects formation of the APP complex with sortilin-related receptor (SorLA, resulting in endo-lysosomal dysfunctions and neuronal degeneration. Moreover, disruption of the APP/SorLA complex changes the trafficking pathway of SorLA, with its consequent increase in secretion outside neurons. Mutations in the SorLA gene are a prognostic factor in AD, and increases in SorLA levels in cerebrospinal fluid are predictive of AD in humans. These results might open new possibilities in comprehending the role played by SorLA in its interaction with APP and in the progression of neuronal degeneration. In addition, they further underline the crucial role played by Y682 residue in controlling APP trafficking in neurons.

  2. A Novel Form of Compensation in the Tg2576 Amyloid Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somogyi, Attila; Katonai, Zoltán; Alpár, Alán; Wolf, Ervin

    2016-01-01

    One century after its first description, pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is still poorly understood. Amyloid-related dendritic atrophy and membrane alterations of susceptible brain neurons in AD, and in animal models of AD are widely recognized. However, little effort has been made to study the potential effects of combined morphological and membrane alterations on signal transfer and synaptic integration in neurons that build up affected neural networks in AD. In this study spatial reconstructions and electrophysiological measurements of layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the somatosensory cortex from wild-type (WT) and transgenic (TG) human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP) overexpressing Tg2576 mice were used to build faithful segmental cable models of these neurons. Local synaptic activities were simulated in various points of the dendritic arbors and properties of subthreshold dendritic impulse propagation and predictors of synaptic input pattern recognition ability were quantified and compared in modeled WT and TG neurons. Despite the widespread dendritic degeneration and membrane alterations in mutant mouse neurons, surprisingly little, or no change was detected in steady-state and 50 Hz sinusoidal voltage transfers, current transfers, and local and propagation delays of PSPs traveling along dendrites of TG neurons. Synaptic input pattern recognition ability was also predicted to be unaltered in TG neurons in two different soma-dendritic membrane models investigated. Our simulations predict the way how subthreshold dendritic signaling and pattern recognition are preserved in TG neurons: amyloid-related membrane alterations compensate for the pathological effects that dendritic atrophy has on subthreshold dendritic signal transfer and integration in layer II/III somatosensory neurons of this hAPP mouse model for AD. Since neither propagation of single PSPs nor integration of multiple PSPs (pattern recognition) changes in TG neurons, we conclude that AD

  3. Synergistic activity of vorinostat combined with gefitinib but not with sorafenib in mutant KRAS human non-small cell lung cancers and hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannot V

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Victor Jeannot,1,2 Benoit Busser,1–3 Laetitia Vanwonterghem,1,2 Sophie Michallet,1,2 Sana Ferroudj,1,2 Murat Cokol,4 Jean-Luc Coll,1,2 Mehmet Ozturk,1,2,5 Amandine Hurbin1,2 1INSERM U1209, Department Cancer Targets and Experimental Therapeutics, Grenoble, France; 2University Grenoble Alpes, Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Grenoble, France; 3Department of Biochemistry, Toxicology and Pharmacology, Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble, France; 4Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanci University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5Faculty of Medicine, Dokuz Eyul University, Izmir Biomedicine and Genome Center, Izmir, Turkey Abstract: Development of drug resistance limits the efficacy of targeted therapies. Alternative approaches using different combinations of therapeutic agents to inhibit several pathways could be a more effective strategy for treating cancer. The effects of the approved epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (gefitinib or a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor (sorafenib in combination with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (vorinostat on cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, and signaling pathway activation in human lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma cells with wild-type EGFR and mutant KRAS were investigated. The effects of the synergistic drug combinations were also studied in human lung adenocarcinoma and hepatocarcinoma cells in vivo. The combination of gefitinib and vorinostat synergistically reduced cell growth and strongly induced apoptosis through inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor/protein kinase B (IGF-1R/AKT-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, the gefitinib and vorinostat combination strongly inhibited tumor growth in mice with lung adenocarcinoma or hepatocarcinoma tumor xenografts. In contrast, the combination of sorafenib and vorinostat did not inhibit cell proliferation compared to a single treatment and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest without

  4. Star Polymers Reduce Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Toxicity via Accelerated Amyloid Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Emily H; Lai, May; Ge, Xinwei; Stanley, William J; Wang, Bo; Wang, Miaoyi; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Sani, Marc-Antonie; Whittaker, Michael R; Gurzov, Esteban N; Ding, Feng; Quinn, John F; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun

    2017-12-11

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is a ubiquitous phenomenon across the spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders and type 2 diabetes. A common strategy against amyloidogenesis is to minimize the populations of toxic oligomers and protofibrils by inhibiting protein aggregation with small molecules or nanoparticles. However, melanin synthesis in nature is realized by accelerated protein fibrillation to circumvent accumulation of toxic intermediates. Accordingly, we designed and demonstrated the use of star-shaped poly(2-hydroxyethyl acrylate) (PHEA) nanostructures for promoting aggregation while ameliorating the toxicity of human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), the peptide involved in glycemic control and the pathology of type 2 diabetes. The binding of PHEA elevated the β-sheet content in IAPP aggregates while rendering a new morphology of "stelliform" amyloids originating from the polymers. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the PHEA arms served as rodlike scaffolds for IAPP binding and subsequently accelerated IAPP aggregation by increased local peptide concentration. The tertiary structure of the star nanoparticles was found to be essential for driving the specific interactions required to impel the accelerated IAPP aggregation. This study sheds new light on the structure-toxicity relationship of IAPP and points to the potential of exploiting star polymers as a new class of therapeutic agents against amyloidogenesis.

  5. Yeast and Fungal Prions: Amyloid-Handling Systems, Amyloid Structure, and Prion Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickner, R B; Edskes, H K; Gorkovskiy, A; Bezsonov, E E; Stroobant, E E

    2016-01-01

    Yeast prions (infectious proteins) were discovered by their outré genetic properties and have become important models for an array of human prion and amyloid diseases. A single prion protein can become any of many distinct amyloid forms (called prion variants or strains), each of which is self-propagating, but with different biological properties (eg, lethal vs mild). The folded in-register parallel β sheet architecture of the yeast prion amyloids naturally suggests a mechanism by which prion variant information can be faithfully transmitted for many generations. The yeast prions rely on cellular chaperones for their propagation, but can be cured by various chaperone imbalances. The Btn2/Cur1 system normally cures most variants of the [URE3] prion that arise. Although most variants of the [PSI+] and [URE3] prions are toxic or lethal, some are mild in their effects. Even the most mild forms of these prions are rare in the wild, indicating that they too are detrimental to yeast. The beneficial [Het-s] prion of Podospora anserina poses an important contrast in its structure, biology, and evolution to the yeast prions characterized thus far. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A novel humanized mouse model of Huntington disease for preclinical development of therapeutics targeting mutant huntingtin alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Villanueva, Erika B

    2017-01-01

    transgenes in Hu128/21 mice match the human HTT exon 1 reference sequence. Conversely, the BACHD transgene carries a floxed, synthetic exon 1 sequence. Hu128/21 mice will be useful for investigations of human HTT that cannot be addressed in Hu97/18 mice, for developing therapies targeted to exon 1......Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. HTT is a large protein, interacts with many partners and is involved in many cellular pathways, which are perturbed in HD. Therapies targeting HTT directly are likely to provide the most global......-length, genomic human HTT transgenes heterozygous for the HD mutation and polymorphisms associated with HD in populations of East Asian descent and in a minority of patients from other ethnic groups. Hu128/21 mice display a wide variety of HD-like phenotypes that are similar to YAC128 mice. Additionally, both...

  7. Mutations in matrix and SP1 repair the packaging specificity of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 mutant by reducing the association of Gag with spliced viral RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristic Natalia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral genome of HIV-1 contains several secondary structures that are important for regulating viral replication. The stem-loop 1 (SL1 sequence in the 5' untranslated region directs HIV-1 genomic RNA dimerization and packaging into the virion. Without SL1, HIV-1 cannot replicate in human T cell lines. The replication restriction phenotype in the SL1 deletion mutant appears to be multifactorial, with defects in viral RNA dimerization and packaging in producer cells as well as in reverse transcription of the viral RNA in infected cells. In this study, we sought to characterize SL1 mutant replication restrictions and provide insights into the underlying mechanisms of compensation in revertants. Results HIV-1 lacking SL1 (NLΔSL1 did not replicate in PM-1 cells until two independent non-synonymous mutations emerged: G913A in the matrix domain (E42K on day 18 postinfection and C1907T in the SP1 domain (P10L on day 11 postinfection. NLΔSL1 revertants carrying either compensatory mutation showed enhanced infectivity in PM-1 cells. The SL1 revertants produced significantly more infectious particles per nanogram of p24 than did NLΔSL1. The SL1 deletion mutant packaged less HIV-1 genomic RNA and more cellular RNA, particularly signal recognition particle RNA, in the virion than the wild-type. NLΔSL1 also packaged 3- to 4-fold more spliced HIV mRNA into the virion, potentially interfering with infectious virus production. In contrast, both revertants encapsidated 2.5- to 5-fold less of these HIV-1 mRNA species. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of RNA cross-linked with Gag in formaldehyde-fixed cells demonstrated that the compensatory mutations reduced the association between Gag and spliced HIV-1 RNA, thereby effectively preventing these RNAs from being packaged into the virion. The reduction of spliced viral RNA in the virion may have a major role in facilitating infectious virus production, thus restoring the infectivity of NLΔSL1

  8. Adiponectin is protective against oxidative stress induced cytotoxicity in amyloid-beta neurotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koon-Ho Chan

    Full Text Available Beta-amyloid (Aβ neurotoxicity is important in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis. Aβ neurotoxicity causes oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial damage resulting in neuronal degeneration and death. Oxidative stress, inflammation and mitochondrial failure are also pathophysiological mechanisms of type 2 diabetes (T(2DM which is characterized by insulin resistance. Interestingly, T(2DM increases risk to develop AD which is associated with reduced neuronal insulin sensitivity (central insulin resistance. We studied the potential protective effect of adiponectin (an adipokine with insulin-sensitizing, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against Aβ neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y transfected with the Swedish amyloid precursor protein (Sw-APP mutant, which overproduced Aβ with abnormal intracellular Aβ accumulation. Cytotoxicity was measured by assay for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH released upon cell death and lysis. Our results revealed that Sw-APP transfected SH-SY5Y cells expressed both adiponectin receptor 1 and 2, and had increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB activation compared to control empty-vector transfected SH-SY5Y cells. Importantly, adiponectin at physiological concentration of 10 µg/ml protected Sw-APP transfected SH-SY5Y cells against cytotoxicity under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide. This neuroprotective action of adiponectin against Aβ neurotoxicity-induced cytotoxicity under oxidative stress involved 1 AMPK activation mediated via the endosomal adaptor protein APPL1 (adaptor protein with phosphotyrosine binding, pleckstrin homology domains and leucine zipper motif and possibly 2 suppression of NF-κB activation. This raises the possibility of novel therapies for AD such as adiponectin receptor agonists.

  9. Amyloid Precursor Protein Translation Is Regulated by a 3'UTR Guanine Quadruplex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel Crenshaw

    Full Text Available A central event in Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ peptides generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. APP overexpression leads to increased Aβ generation and Alzheimer's disease in humans and altered neuronal migration and increased long term depression in mice. Conversely, reduction of APP expression results in decreased Aβ levels in mice as well as impaired learning and memory and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Together these findings indicate that therapeutic interventions that aim to restore APP and Aβ levels must do so within an ideal range. To better understand the effects of modulating APP levels, we explored the mechanisms regulating APP expression focusing on post-transcriptional regulation. Such regulation can be mediated by RNA regulatory elements such as guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes, non-canonical structured RNA motifs that affect RNA stability and translation. Via a bioinformatics approach, we identified a candidate G-quadruplex within the APP mRNA in its 3'UTR (untranslated region at residues 3008-3027 (NM_201414.2. This sequence exhibited characteristics of a parallel G-quadruplex structure as revealed by circular dichroism spectrophotometry. Further, as with other G-quadruplexes, the formation of this structure was dependent on the presence of potassium ions. This G-quadruplex has no apparent role in regulating transcription or mRNA stability as wild type and mutant constructs exhibited equivalent mRNA levels as determined by real time PCR. Instead, we demonstrate that this G-quadruplex negatively regulates APP protein expression using dual luciferase reporter and Western blot analysis. Taken together, our studies reveal post-transcriptional regulation by a 3'UTR G-quadruplex as a novel mechanism regulating APP expression.

  10. Hyperactivity and Learning Deficits in Transgenic Mice Bearing a Human Mutant Thyroid Hormone β1 Receptor Gene

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Michael P.; Wong, Rosemary; Goldstein, Gregory; Weintraub, Bruce; Cheng, Sheue-yann; Crawley, Jacqueline N.

    1998-01-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a human syndrome mapped to the thyroid receptor β (TRβ) gene on chromosome 3, representing a mutation of the ligandbinding domain of the TRβ gene. The syndrome is characterized by reduced tissue responsiveness to thyroid hormone and elevated serum levels of thyroid hormones. A common behavioral phenotype associated with RTH is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To test the hypothesis that RTH produces attention deficits and/or hyperactivity...

  11. Crystallographic Analysis Reveals a Novel Second Binding Site for Trimethoprim in Active Site Double Mutants of Human Dihydrofolate Reductase†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Piraino, Jennifer; Queener, Sherry F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce a more potent replacement for trimethoprim (TMP) used as a therapy for Pneumocystis pneumonia and targets dihydrofolate reductase from Pneumocystis jirovecii (pjDHFR), it is necessary to understand the determinants of potency and selectivity against DHFR from the mammalian host and fungal pathogen cells. To this end, active site residues in human (h)DHFR were replaced with those from pjDHFR. Structural data are reported for two complexes of TMP with the double mutants Gln35Ser/Asn64Phe (Q35S/N64F) and Gln35Lys/Asn64Phe (Q35K/N64F) of hDHFR that unexpectedly show evidence for the binding of two molecules of TMP: one molecule that binds in the normal folate binding site and the second molecule that binds in a novel subpocket site such that the mutated residue Phe64 is involved in van der Waals contacts to the trimethoxyphenyl ring of the second TMP molecule. Kinetic data for the binding of TMP to hDHFR and pjDHFR reveal an 84-fold selectivity of TMP against pjDHFR (Ki 49 nM) compared to hDHFR (Ki 4093 nM). Two mutants that contain one substitution from pj- and one from the closely related Pneumocystis carinii DHFR (pcDHFR) (Q35K/N64F and Q35S/N64F) show Ki values of 593 and 617 nM, respectively; these Ki values are well above both the Ki for pjDHFR and are similar to pcDHFR (Q35K/N64F) and Q35S/N64F) (305 nM). These results suggest that active site residues 35 and 64 play key roles in determining selectivity for pneumocystis DHFR, but that other residues contribute to the unique binding of inhibitors to these enzymes. PMID:21684339

  12. Nanomechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweers, K K M; Bennink, M L; Subramaniam, V

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are traditionally associated with neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease or Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. However, the ability to form amyloid fibrils appears to be a more generic property of proteins. While disease-related, or pathological, amyloid fibrils are relevant for understanding the pathology and course of the disease, functional amyloids are involved, for example, in the exceptionally strong adhesive properties of natural adhesives. Amyloid fibrils are thus becoming increasingly interesting as versatile nanobiomaterials for applications in biotechnology. In the last decade a number of studies have reported on the intriguing mechanical characteristics of amyloid fibrils. In most of these studies atomic force microscopy (AFM) and atomic force spectroscopy play a central role. AFM techniques make it possible to probe, at nanometer length scales, and with exquisite control over the applied forces, biological samples in different environmental conditions. In this review we describe the different AFM techniques used for probing mechanical properties of single amyloid fibrils on the nanoscale. An overview is given of the existing mechanical studies on amyloid. We discuss the difficulties encountered with respect to the small fibril sizes and polymorphic behavior of amyloid fibrils. In particular, the different conformational packing of monomers within the fibrils leads to a heterogeneity in mechanical properties. We conclude with a brief outlook on how our knowledge of these mechanical properties of the amyloid fibrils can be exploited in the construction of nanomaterials from amyloid fibrils. (topical review)

  13. Gadd153 and NF-κB crosstalk regulates 27-hydroxycholesterol-induced increase in BACE1 and β-amyloid production in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Marwarha

    Full Text Available β-amyloid (Aβ peptide, accumulation of which is a culprit for Alzheimer's disease (AD, is derived from the initial cleavage of amyloid precursor protein by the aspartyl protease BACE1. Identification of cellular mechanisms that regulate BACE1 production is of high relevance to the search for potential disease-modifying therapies that inhibit BACE1 to reduce Aβ accumulation and AD progression. In the present study, we show that the cholesterol oxidation product 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OHC increases BACE1 and Aβ levels in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. This increase in BACE1 involves a crosstalk between the two transcription factors NF-κB and the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker, the growth arrest and DNA damage induced gene-153 (gadd153, also called CHOP. We specifically show that 27-OHC induces a substantial increase in NF-κB binding to the BACE1 promoter and subsequent increase in BACE1 transcription and Aβ production. The NF-κB inhibitor, sc514, significantly attenuated the 27-OHC-induced increase in NF-κB-mediated BACE1 expression and Aβ genesis. We further show that the 27-OHC-induced NF-κB activation and increased NF-κB-mediated BACE1 expression is contingent on the increased activation of gadd153. Silencing gadd153 expression with siRNA alleviated the 27-OHC-induced increase in NF-κB activation, NF-κB binding to the BACE1 promoter, and subsequent increase in BACE1 transcription and Aβ production. We also show that increased levels of BACE1 in the triple transgenic mouse model for AD is preceded by gadd153 and NF-κB activation. In summary, our study demonstrates that gadd153 and NF-κB work in concert to regulate BACE1 expression. Agents that inhibit gadd153 activation and subsequent interaction with NF-κB might be promising targets to reduce BACE1 and Aβ overproduction and may ultimately serve as disease-modifying treatments for AD.

  14. Investigation of Amyloid Structures at Nanoscale via AFM based Dynamic Nanomechncial Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid structures are one important kind of protein aggregations. They are a group of stable misfolded species, other than native states, which have been found to accumulate as plaques on neuron cells. This behavior is considered to associate with tens of human neurodegenerative diseases...... summarized the main methodologies of DNM. I also utilized DNM to explore the path way of amyloid self-assembly, and the substrate effect to the conformation of amyloid structures. Furthermore, 2D peptide based material has also been characterized by DNM....

  15. Influence of retinoic acid on mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in amyloid hydrogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reeba Susan Jacob

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents data related to the research article “Self healing hydrogels composed of amyloid nano fibrils for cell culture and stem cell differentiation” [1]. Here we probed the collective influence of all-trans retinoic acid (RA and substrate properties (amyloid hydrogel on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC differentiation. Stem cells were cultured on soft amyloid hydrogels [1,2] in the presence and absence of matrix encapsulated RA. The cell morphology was imaged and assessed via quantification of circularity. Further immunostaining and quantitative real time PCR was used to quantify various markers of differentiation in the neuronal lineage.

  16. Terapeutika amyloidóz

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Hrubý, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 12 (2016), s. 851-859 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloidosis * amyloid * Alzheimer's disease Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.387, year: 2016 http://www.chemicke-listy.cz/common/article-vol_110-issue_12-page_851.html

  17. Pathogenic properties of Alzheimer’s β -amyloid identi fi ed from structure – property patient- phenotype correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiwari, Manish Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    β -Amyloid (A β ) plays a central role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the speci fi c molecular mechanism and associated structures remain unknown. We compiled patient data for carriers of genetic variants of A β that cause AD and correlated these data against chemical properties for 56 mutant...

  18. Key points concerning amyloid infectivity and prion-like neuronal invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba eEspargaró

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid aggregation has been related to an increasing number of human illnesses, from Alzheimer and Parkinson’s diseases to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Traditionally only prions have been considered as infectious agents with a high capacity of propagation. Although recent publications have showed that many amyloid proteins, including amyloid β-peptide, α-synuclein and tau protein, also propagate in a prion-like manner, the link between propagation of pathological proteins and neurotoxicity has not been evidenced. The extremely low infectivity in natural conditions of the most of non-prion amyloids is far from the spreading capacity displayed by the prions. However, it is important to elucidate the key factors that cause non-prion amyloids become infectious agents. In recent years, important advances in the understanding of the amyloid processes of amyloid-like proteins and unrelated prions (i.e., yeast and fungal prions have yielded essential information that can be applied to shed light on the prion phenomenon in mammals and humans. As shown in this review, recent evidences suggest that there are key factors that could dramatically modulate the prion capacity of proteins in the amyloid conformation. The concentration of nuclei, the presence of oligomers, and the toxicity, resistance and localization of these aggregates could be key factors affecting their spreading. In short, those factors that favor the high concentration of extracellular nuclei or oligomers, characterized by a small size, with a low toxicity could dramatically increase prion propensity; whereas low concentrations of highly toxic intracellular amyloids, with a large size, would prevent infectivity.

  19. Production and enzyme engineerinq of human acetylcholinesterase and its mutant derivatives. Midterm report, 15 January 1993-15 July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafferman, A.

    1994-07-15

    Specificity determinants of human acetylcholinesterase (HuAChE) towards ligands (substrate and some reversible and irreversible inhibitors) were identified by combination of site-directed mutagenesis, molecular modeling and kinetic studies with enzymes mutated in active center residues Trp86, Glu202, Trp286, Phe295, Phe297, Tyr337, Phe338 and Glu450. Thus, the anionic and hydrophobic subsites as well as the acyl pocket were identified. Enzymes with resistance to OP aging were engineered.The role of N-glycosylation in the function, biosynthesis and stability of HuAChE was examined by site-directed mutagenesis (Asn to GIn substitution) of the three potential N glycosylation sites, Asn265, Asn350 and Asn464. Large scale preparation of recombinant HuAChE was performed utilizing the microcarrier technology. Over 500 milligrams of enzyme was prepared for x-ray crystallography.

  20. Altered methanol embryopathies in embryo culture with mutant catalase-deficient mice and transgenic mice expressing human catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the teratogenicity of methanol (MeOH) in rodents, unlike its acute toxicity in humans, are unclear, but may involve reactive oxygen species (ROS). Embryonic catalase, although expressed at about 5% of maternal activity, may protect the embryo by detoxifying ROS. This hypothesis was investigated in whole embryo culture to remove confounding maternal factors, including metabolism of MeOH by maternal catalase. C57BL/6 (C57) mouse embryos expressing human catalase (hCat) or their wild-type (C57 WT) controls, and C3Ga.Cg-Catb/J acatalasemic (aCat) mouse embryos or their wild-type C3HeB/FeJ (C3H WT) controls, were explanted on gestational day (GD) 9 (plug = GD 1), exposed for 24 h to 4 mg/ml MeOH or vehicle, and evaluated for functional and morphological changes. hCat and C57 WT vehicle-exposed embryos developed normally. MeOH was embryopathic in C57 WT embryos, evidenced by decreases in anterior neuropore closure, somites developed and turning, whereas hCat embryos were protected. Vehicle-exposed aCat mouse embryos had lower yolk sac diameters compared to C3H WT controls, suggesting that endogenous ROS are embryopathic. MeOH was more embryopathic in aCat embryos than WT controls, with reduced anterior neuropore closure and head length only in catalase-deficient embryos. These data suggest that ROS may be involved in the embryopathic mechanism of methanol, and that embryonic catalase activity may be a determinant of teratological risk.

  1. A role for 12/15 lipoxygenase in the amyloid beta precursor protein metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succol, Francesca; Praticò, Domenico

    2007-10-01

    12/15 Lipoxygenase (12/15LO) protein levels and activity are increased in pathologically affected regions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, compared with controls. Its metabolic products are elevated in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with AD and individuals with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that this enzyme may be involved early in AD pathogenesis. Herein, we investigate the effect of pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO on the amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) metabolism. To this end, we used CHO and N2A cells stably expressing human APP with the Swedish mutant, and two structurally distinct and selective 12/15LO inhibitors, PD146176 and CDC. Our results demonstrated that both drugs dose-dependently reduced Abeta formation without affecting total APP levels. Interestingly, in the same cells we observed a significant reduction in secreted (s)APPbeta and beta-secretase (BACE), but not sAPPalpha and ADAM10 protein levels. Together, these data show for the first time that this enzymatic pathway influences Abeta formation whereby modulating the BACE proteolytic cascade. We conclude that specific pharmacologic inhibition of 12/15LO could represent a novel therapeutic target for treating or preventing AD pathology in humans.

  2. Insights into the variability of nucleated amyloid polymerization by a minimalistic model of stochastic protein assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eugène, Sarah, E-mail: Sarah.Eugene@inria.fr; Doumic, Marie, E-mail: Philippe.Robert@inria.fr, E-mail: Marie.Doumic@inria.fr [INRIA de Paris, 2 Rue Simone Iff, CS 42112, 75589 Paris Cedex 12 (France); Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 7598, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, F-75005 Paris (France); Xue, Wei-Feng, E-mail: W.F.Xue@kent.ac.uk [School of Biosciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NJ (United Kingdom); Robert, Philippe, E-mail: Philippe.Robert@inria.fr [INRIA de Paris, 2 Rue Simone Iff, CS 42112, 75589 Paris Cedex 12 (France)

    2016-05-07

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid aggregates is an important biological phenomenon associated with human diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloid fibrils also have potential applications in nano-engineering of biomaterials. The kinetics of amyloid assembly show an exponential growth phase preceded by a lag phase, variable in duration as seen in bulk experiments and experiments that mimic the small volumes of cells. Here, to investigate the origins and the properties of the observed variability in the lag phase of amyloid assembly currently not accounted for by deterministic nucleation dependent mechanisms, we formulate a new stochastic minimal model that is capable of describing the characteristics of amyloid growth curves despite its simplicity. We then solve the stochastic differential equations of our model and give mathematical proof of a central limit theorem for the sample growth trajectories of the nucleated aggregation process. These results give an asymptotic description for our simple model, from which closed form analytical results capable of describing and predicting the variability of nucleated amyloid assembly were derived. We also demonstrate the application of our results to inform experiments in a conceptually friendly and clear fashion. Our model offers a new perspective and paves the way for a new and efficient approach on extracting vital information regarding the key initial events of amyloid formation.

  3. Modeling and Docking Studies on Novel Mutants (K71L and T204V of the ATPase Domain of Human Heat Shock 70 kDa Protein 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Elengoe

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of exploring protein interactions between human adenovirus and heat shock protein 70 is to exploit a potentially synergistic interaction to enhance anti-tumoral efficacy and decrease toxicity in cancer treatment. However, the protein interaction of Hsp70 with E1A32 kDa of human adenovirus serotype 5 remains to be elucidated. In this study, two residues of ATPase domain of human heat shock 70 kDa protein 1 (PDB: 1 HJO were mutated. 3D mutant models (K71L and T204V using PyMol software were then constructed. The structures were evaluated by PROCHECK, ProQ, ERRAT, Verify 3D and ProSA modules. All evidence suggests that all protein models are acceptable and of good quality. The E1A32 kDa motif was retrieved from UniProt (P03255, as well as subjected to docking interaction with NBD, K71L and T204V, using the Autodock 4.2 program. The best lowest binding energy value of −9.09 kcal/mol was selected for novel T204V. Moreover, the protein-ligand complex structures were validated by RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds and salt bridge analysis. This revealed that the T204V-E1A32 kDa motif complex was the most stable among all three complex structures. This study provides information about the interaction between Hsp70 and the E1A32 kDa motif, which emphasizes future perspectives to design rational drugs and vaccines in cancer therapy.

  4. Uncovering the Role of Hypermethylation by CTG Expansion in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Using Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Avitzour, Michal; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Schonberger, Oshrat; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Stella; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Birnbaum, Ramon Y; Gepstein, Lior; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-08-11

    CTG repeat expansion in DMPK, the cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), frequently results in hypermethylation and reduced SIX5 expression. The contribution of hypermethylation to disease pathogenesis and the precise mechanism by which SIX5 expression is reduced are unknown. Using 14 different DM1-affected human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, we characterized a differentially methylated region (DMR) near the CTGs. This DMR undergoes hypermethylation as a function of expansion size in a way that is specific to undifferentiated cells and is associated with reduced SIX5 expression. Using functional assays, we provide evidence for regulatory activity of the DMR, which is lost by hypermethylation and may contribute to DM1 pathogenesis by causing SIX5 haplo-insufficiency. This study highlights the power of hESCs in disease modeling and describes a DMR that functions both as an exon coding sequence and as a regulatory element whose activity is epigenetically hampered by a heritable mutation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Absence of linkage of apparently single gene mediated ADHD with the human syntenic region of the mouse mutant coloboma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, E.J.; Rogan, P.K.; Domoto, M. [Pennsylvania State Univ. College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-18

    Attention deficit disorder (ADHD) is a complex biobehavioral phenotype which affects up to 8% of the general population and often impairs social, academic, and job performance. Its origins are heterogeneous, but a significant genetic component is suggested by family and twin studies. The murine strain, coloboma, displays a spontaneously hyperactive phenotype that is responsive to dextroamphetamine and has been proposed as a genetic model for ADHD. Coloboma is a semi-dominant mutation that is caused by a hemizygous deletion of the SNAP-25 and other genes on mouse chromosome 2q. To test the possibility that the human homolog of the mouse coloboma gene(s) could be responsible for ADHD, we have carried out linkage studies with polymorphic markers in the region syntenic to coloboma (20p11-p12). Five families in which the pattern of inheritance of ADHD appears to be autosomal dominant were studied. Segregation analysis of the traits studied suggested that the best fitting model was a sex-influenced, single gene, Mendelian pattern. Several genetic models were evaluated based on estimates of penetrance, phenocopy rate, and allele frequency derived from our patient population and those of other investigators. No significant linkage was detected between the disease locus and markers spanning this chromosome 20 interval. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Vitamin k3 inhibits protein aggregation: Implication in the treatment of amyloid diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Parvez Alam; Sumit Kumar Chaturvedi; Mohammad Khursheed Siddiqi; Ravi Kant Rajpoot; Mohd Rehan Ajmal; Masihuz Zaman; Rizwan Hasan Khan

    2016-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human diseases such as Alzheimer?s, Parkinson?s and familial amyloid polyneuropathy etc. In this study, anti-fibrillation activity of vitamin k3 and its effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and A?-42 peptide were investigated. Here, in combination with Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), transmission electron microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay, we demons...

  7. Amyloid precursor protein secretases as therapeutic targets for traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Loane, David J; Pocivavsek, Ana; Moussa, Charbel E-H; Thompson, Rachel; Matsuoka, Yasuji; Faden, Alan I; Rebeck, G William; Burns, Mark P

    2009-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, found in Alzheimer’s disease brain, accumulate rapidly after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in both humans and animals. Here we show that blocking either β- or γ-secretase, enzymes required for production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein (APP), can ameliorate motor and cognitive deficits and reduce cell loss after experimental TBI in mice. Thus, APP secretases are promising targets for treatment of TBI.

  8. alpha7 Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor knockout selectively enhances ethanol-, but not beta-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, Nancyellen C; de Fiebre, Christopher M

    2005-01-03

    The alpha7 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been implicated as a potential site of action for two neurotoxins, ethanol and the Alzheimer's disease related peptide, beta-amyloid. Here, we utilized primary neuronal cultures of cerebral cortex from alpha7 nAChR null mutant mice to examine the role of this receptor in modulating the neurotoxic properties of subchronic, "binge" ethanol and beta-amyloid. Knockout of the alpha7 nAChR gene selectively enhanced ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a gene dosage-related fashion. Susceptibility of cultures to beta-amyloid induced toxicity, however, was unaffected by alpha7 nAChR gene null mutation. Further, beta-amyloid did not inhibit the binding of the highly alpha7-selective radioligand, [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin. On the other hand, in studies in Xenopus oocytes ethanol efficaciously inhibited alpha7 nAChR function. These data suggest that alpha7 nAChRs modulate the neurotoxic effects of binge ethanol, but not the neurotoxicity produced by beta-amyloid. It is hypothesized that inhibition of alpha7 nAChRs by ethanol provides partial protection against the neurotoxic properties of subchronic ethanol.

  9. A UV-resistant mutant without an increased repair synthesis activity, established from a UV-sensitive human clonal cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, N.

    1984-01-01

    When cells of a human clonal cell line, RSa, with high sensitivity to UV lethality, were treated with the mutagen, ethyl methanesulfonate, a variant cell strain, UVr-1, was established as a mutant resistant to 254-nm far-ultraviolet radiation (UV). Cell proliferation studies showed that UVr-1 cells survived and actively proliferated at doses of UV-irradiation that greatly suppressed the proliferation of RSa cells. Colony-formation assays also confirmed the increased resistance of UVr-1 cells to UV. The recovery from a UV-induced inhibition in DNA synthesis, as [methyl- 3 H]thymidine uptake into cellular DNA, was more pronounced in UVr-1 cells than in RSa cells. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference in the activity of UV-induced DNA repair synthesis in either cell line, as estimated by the extent of unscheduled DNA synthesis and DNA repair replication. These characteristics of UVr-1 cells are discussed in the light of a previously reported UV-resistant variant, UVr-10, which had an increased DNA repair synthesis activity. (Auth.)

  10. 3,3′,4,4′,5-Pentachlorobiphenyl Inhibits Drug Efflux Through P-Glycoprotein in KB-3 Cells Expressing Mutant Human P-Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Fujise

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects on the drug efflux of 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126, the most toxic of all coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (Co-PCBs, were examined in KB-3 cells expressing human wild-type and mutant P-glycoprotein in which the 61st amino acid was substituted for serine or phenylalanine (KB3-Phe61. In the cells expressing P-glycoproteins, accumulations of vinblastine and colchicine decreased form 85% to 92% and from 62% to 91%, respectively, and the drug tolerances for these chemicals were increased. In KB3-Phe61, the decreases in drug accumulation were inhibited by adding PCB-126 in a way similar to that with cyclosporine A: by adding 1 μM PCB-126, the accumulations of vinblastine and colchicine increased up to 3.3- and 2.3-fold, respectively. It is suggested that PCB-126 decreased the drug efflux by inhibiting the P-glycoprotein in KB3-Phe61. Since there were various P-glycoproteins and many congeners of Co-PCBs, this inhibition has to be considered a new cause of the toxic effects of Co-PCBs.

  11. Two mutant alleles of the human cytochrome P-450dbl gene (P450C2D1) associated with genetically deficient metabolism of debrisoquine and other drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoda, R.C.; Gonzalez, F.L.; Demierre, A.; Meyer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The debrisoquine polymorphism is a clinically important genetic defect of drug metabolism affecting 5-10% of individuals in Caucasian populations. It is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. A full-length cDNA for human cytochrome P-450db1, the deficient enzyme (also designated P450IID1 for P450 family II subfamily D isozyme 1), has recently been cloned. Leukocyte DNA from extensive metabolizers (EMs) or poor metabolizers (PMs) of debrisoquine was examined by Southern analysis. Two polymorphic restriction fragments were associated with the PM phenotype when DNAs from 24 unrelated PM and 29 unrelated EM individuals were probed with P-450db1 cDNA after digestion with Xba I restriction endonuclease and Southern blotting. Seventy-five percent of PMs had either the 44-kb or the 11.5-kb fragment or both. Segregation of these restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the families of six PM probands demonstrated that each of the two fragments is allelic with the 29-kb fragment present in all EM individuals and suggests that they identify two independent mutated alleles of the P-450db1 gene (designated P450C2D1). The Xba I 44-kb fragment and 11.5-kb fragment were in linkage disequilibrium with restriction fragment length polymorphisms generated by four and five additional restriction endonucleases, respectively, which can be used to identify the same mutant alleles for the P-450db1 gene

  12. secHsp70 as a tool to approach amyloid-β42 and other extracellular amyloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mena, Lorena; Chhangani, Deepak; Fernandez-Funez, Pedro; Rincon-Limas, Diego E

    2017-07-03

    Self-association of amyloidogenic proteins is the main pathological trigger in a wide variety of neurodegenerative disorders. These aggregates are deposited inside or outside the cell due to hereditary mutations, environmental exposures or even normal aging. Cumulative evidence indicates that the heat shock chaperone Hsp70 possesses robust neuroprotection against various intracellular amyloids in Drosophila and mouse models. However, its protective role against extracellular amyloids was largely unknown as its presence outside the cells is very limited. Our recent manuscript in PNAS revealed that an engineered form of secreted Hsp70 (secHsp70) is highly protective against toxicity induced by extracellular deposition of the amyloid-β42 (Aβ42) peptide. In this Extra View article, we extend our analysis to other members of the heat shock protein family. We created PhiC31-based transgenic lines for human Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60 and Hsp70 and compared their activities in parallel against extracellular Aβ42. Strikingly, only secreted Hsp70 exhibits robust protection against Aβ42-triggered toxicity in the extracellular milieu. These observations indicate that the ability of secHsp70 to suppress Aβ42 insults is quite unique and suggest that targeted secretion of Hsp70 may represent a new therapeutic approach against Aβ42 and other extracellular amyloids. The potential applications of this engineered chaperone are discussed.

  13. Localization of the homolog of a mouse craniofacial mutant to human chromosome 18q11 and evaluation of linkage to human CLP and CPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.C.; Yu, J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-15

    The transgene-induced mutation 9257 and the spontaneous mutation twirler cause craniofacial and inner ear malformations and are located on mouse chromosome 18 near the ataxia locus ax. To map the human homolog of 9257, a probe from the transgene insertion site was used to screen a human genomic library. Analysis of a cross-hybridizing human clone identified a 3-kb conserved sequence block that does not appear to contain protein coding sequence. Analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels assigned the human locus to 18q11. The polymorphic microsatellite markers D18S1001 and D18S1002 were isolated from the human locus and mapped by linkage analysis using the CEPH pedigrees. The 9257 locus maps close to the centromeres of human chromosome 18q and mouse chromosome 18 at the proximal end of a conserved linkage group. To evaluate the role of this locus in human craniofacial disorders, linkage to D18S1002 was tested in 11 families with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate and 3 families with autosomal dominant cleft palate only. Obligatory recombinants were observed in 8 of the families, and negative lod scores from the other families indicated that these disorders are not linked to the chromosome 18 loci. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Comparative Global Gene Expression Profiles of Wild-Type Yersinia pestis CO92 and Its Braun Lipoprotein Mutant at Flea and Human Body Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristi L. Galindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Braun/murein lipoprotein (Lpp is involved in inflammatory responses and septic shock. We previously characterized a Δlpp mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 and found that this mutant was defective in surviving in macrophages and was attenuated in a mouse inhalation model of plague when compared to the highly virulent wild-type (WT bacterium. We performed global transcriptional profiling of WT Y. pestis and its Δlpp mutant using microarrays. The organisms were cultured at 26 and 37 degrees Celsius to simulate the flea vector and mammalian host environments, respectively. Our data revealed vastly different effects of lpp mutation on the transcriptomes of Y. pestis grown at 37 versus 26C. While the absence of Lpp resulted mainly in the downregulation of metabolic genes at 26C, the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant cultured at 37C exhibited profound alterations in stress response and virulence genes, compared to WT bacteria. We investigated one of the stress-related genes (htrA downregulated in the Δlpp mutant relative to WT Y. pestis. Indeed, complementation of the Δlpp mutant with the htrA gene restored intracellular survival of the Y. pestis Δlpp mutant. Our results support a role for Lpp in Y. pestis adaptation to the host environment, possibly via transcriptional activation of htrA.

  15. Amyloid Goiter Secondary to Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Aydin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse amyloid goiter (AG is an entity characterized by the deposition of amyloid in the thyroid gland. AG may be associated with either primary or secondary amyloidosis. Secondary amyloidosis is rarely caused by inflammatory bowel diseases. Secondary amyloidosis is relatively more common in the patients with Crohn’s disease, whereas it is highly rare in patients with ulcerative colitis. Diffuse amyloid goiter caused by ulcerative colitis is also a rare condition. In the presence of amyloid in the thyroid gland, medullary thyroid cancer should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. Imaging techniques and biochemical tests are not very helpful in the diagnosis of secondary amyloid goiter and the definitive diagnosis is established based on the histopathologic analysis and histochemical staining techniques. In this report, we present a 35-year-old male patient with diffuse amyloid goiter caused by secondary amyloidosis associated with ulcerative colitis.

  16. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1β. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  17. Sorafenib promotes graft-versus-leukemia activity in mice and humans through IL-15 production in FLT3-ITD-mutant leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Nimitha R; Baumgartner, Francis; Braun, Lukas; O'Sullivan, David; Thomas, Simone; Waterhouse, Miguel; Müller, Tony A; Hanke, Kathrin; Taromi, Sanaz; Apostolova, Petya; Illert, Anna L; Melchinger, Wolfgang; Duquesne, Sandra; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Osswald, Lena; Yan, Kai-Li; Weber, Arnim; Tugues, Sonia; Spath, Sabine; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Follo, Marie; Claus, Rainer; Lübbert, Michael; Rummelt, Christoph; Bertz, Hartmut; Wäsch, Ralph; Haag, Johanna; Schmidts, Andrea; Schultheiss, Michael; Bettinger, Dominik; Thimme, Robert; Ullrich, Evelyn; Tanriver, Yakup; Vuong, Giang Lam; Arnold, Renate; Hemmati, Philipp; Wolf, Dominik; Ditschkowski, Markus; Jilg, Cordula; Wilhelm, Konrad; Leiber, Christian; Gerull, Sabine; Halter, Jörg; Lengerke, Claudia; Pabst, Thomas; Schroeder, Thomas; Kobbe, Guido; Rösler, Wolf; Doostkam, Soroush; Meckel, Stephan; Stabla, Kathleen; Metzelder, Stephan K; Halbach, Sebastian; Brummer, Tilman; Hu, Zehan; Dengjel, Joern; Hackanson, Björn; Schmid, Christoph; Holtick, Udo; Scheid, Christof; Spyridonidis, Alexandros; Stölzel, Friedrich; Ordemann, Rainer; Müller, Lutz P; Sicre-de-Fontbrune, Flore; Ihorst, Gabriele; Kuball, Jürgen; Ehlert, Jan E; Feger, Daniel; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Schnell, Jacqueline; Kuchenbauer, Florian; Bunjes, Donald; Chakraverty, Ronjon; Richardson, Simon; Gill, Saar; Kröger, Nicolaus; Ayuk, Francis; Vago, Luca; Ciceri, Fabio; Müller, Antonia M; Kondo, Takeshi; Teshima, Takanori; Klaeger, Susan; Kuster, Bernhard; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan; Weisdorf, Daniel; van der Velden, Walter; Dörfel, Daniela; Bethge, Wolfgang; Hilgendorf, Inken; Hochhaus, Andreas; Andrieux, Geoffroy; Börries, Melanie; Busch, Hauke; Magenau, John; Reddy, Pavan; Labopin, Myriam; Antin, Joseph H; Henden, Andrea S; Hill, Geoffrey R; Kennedy, Glen A; Bar, Merav; Sarma, Anita; McLornan, Donal; Mufti, Ghulam; Oran, Betul; Rezvani, Katayoun; Shah, Omid; Negrin, Robert S; Nagler, Arnon; Prinz, Marco; Burchert, Andreas; Neubauer, Andreas; Beelen, Dietrich; Mackensen, Andreas; von Bubnoff, Nikolas; Herr, Wolfgang; Becher, Burkhard; Socié, Gerard; Caligiuri, Michael A; Ruggiero, Eliana; Bonini, Chiara; Häcker, Georg; Duyster, Justus; Finke, Jürgen; Pearce, Erika; Blazar, Bruce R; Zeiser, Robert

    2018-03-01

    Individuals with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) harboring an internal tandem duplication (ITD) in the gene encoding Fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) who relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT) have a 1-year survival rate below 20%. We observed that sorafenib, a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, increased IL-15 production by FLT3-ITD + leukemia cells. This synergized with the allogeneic CD8 + T cell response, leading to long-term survival in six mouse models of FLT3-ITD + AML. Sorafenib-related IL-15 production caused an increase in CD8 + CD107a + IFN-γ + T cells with features of longevity (high levels of Bcl-2 and reduced PD-1 levels), which eradicated leukemia in secondary recipients. Mechanistically, sorafenib reduced expression of the transcription factor ATF4, thereby blocking negative regulation of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) activation, which enhanced IL-15 transcription. Both IRF7 knockdown and ATF4 overexpression in leukemia cells antagonized sorafenib-induced IL-15 production in vitro. Human FLT3-ITD + AML cells obtained from sorafenib responders following sorafenib therapy showed increased levels of IL-15, phosphorylated IRF7, and a transcriptionally active IRF7 chromatin state. The mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity and glycolytic capacity of CD8 + T cells increased upon sorafenib treatment in sorafenib responders but not in nonresponders. Our findings indicate that the synergism of T cells and sorafenib is mediated via reduced ATF4 expression, causing activation of the IRF7-IL-15 axis in leukemia cells and thereby leading to metabolic reprogramming of leukemia-reactive T cells in humans. Therefore, sorafenib treatment has the potential to contribute to an immune-mediated cure of FLT3-ITD-mutant AML relapse, an otherwise fatal complication after allo-HCT.

  18. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  19. Contact between the β1 and β2 Segments of α-Synuclein that Inhibits Amyloid Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Gauhar, Aziz; Wördehoff, Michael M; Grüning, Clara S R; Klein, Antonia N; Bannach, Oliver; Stoldt, Matthias; Willbold, Dieter; Härd, Torleif; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2015-07-20

    Conversion of the intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein (α-syn) into amyloid aggregates is a key process in Parkinson's disease. The sequence region 35-59 contains β-strand segments β1 and β2 of α-syn amyloid fibril models and most disease-related mutations. β1 and β2 frequently engage in transient interactions in monomeric α-syn. The consequences of β1-β2 contacts are evaluated by disulfide engineering, biophysical techniques, and cell viability assays. The double-cysteine mutant α-synCC, with a disulfide linking β1 and β2, is aggregation-incompetent and inhibits aggregation and toxicity of wild-type α-syn. We show that α-syn delays the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide and islet amyloid polypeptide involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes, an effect enhanced in the α-synCC mutant. Tertiary interactions in the β1-β2 region of α-syn interfere with the nucleation of amyloid formation, suggesting promotion of such interactions as a potential therapeutic approach. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of amyloid fibril formation by dynamic light scattering and fluorescence reveals complex aggregation kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M Streets

    Full Text Available An apparatus that combines dynamic light scattering and Thioflavin T fluorescence detection is used to simultaneously probe fibril formation in polyglutamine peptides, the aggregating subunit associated with Huntington's disease, in vitro. Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder in a class of human pathologies that includes Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. These pathologies are all related by the propensity of their associated protein or polypeptide to form insoluble, β-sheet rich, amyloid fibrils. Despite the wide range of amino acid sequence in the aggregation prone polypeptides associated with these diseases, the resulting amyloids display strikingly similar physical structure, an observation which suggests a physical basis for amyloid fibril formation. Thioflavin T fluorescence reports β-sheet fibril content while dynamic light scattering measures particle size distributions. The combined techniques allow elucidation of complex aggregation kinetics and are used to reveal multiple stages of amyloid fibril formation.

  1. Quantitation of amyloid beta peptides Aβ(1-38), Aβ(1-40), and Aβ(1-42) in human cerebrospinal fluid by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lame, Mary E; Chambers, Erin E; Blatnik, Matthew

    2011-12-15

    Critical events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) involve an imbalance between the production and clearance of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides from the brain. Current methods for Aβ quantitation rely heavily on immuno-based techniques. However, these assays require highly specific antibodies and reagents that are time-consuming and expensive to develop. Immuno-based assays are also characterized by poor dynamic ranges, cross-reactivity, matrix interferences, and dilution linearity problems. In particular, noncommercial immunoassays are especially subject to high intra- and interassay variability because they are not subject to more stringent manufacturing controls. Combinations of these factors make immunoassays more labor-intensive and often challenging to validate in support of clinical studies. Here we describe a mixed-mode solid-phase extraction method and an ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE UPLC-MS/MS) assay for the simultaneous quantitation of Aβ(1-38), Aβ(1-40), and Aβ(1-42) from human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Negative ion versus positive ion species were compared using their corresponding multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions, and negative ions were approximately 1.6-fold greater in intensity but lacked selectivity in matrix. The positive ion MRM assay was more than sufficient to quantify endogenous Aβ peptides. Aβ standards were prepared in artificial CSF containing 5% rat plasma, and quality control samples were prepared in three pooled CSF sources. Extraction efficiency was greater than 80% for all three peptides, and the coefficient of variation during analysis was less than 15% for all species. Mean basal levels of Aβ species from three CSF pools were 1.64, 2.17, and 1.26 ng/ml for Aβ(1-38); 3.24, 3.63, and 2.55 ng/ml for Aβ(1-40); and 0.50, 0.63, and 0.46 ng/ml for Aβ(1-42). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Further characterization of a highly attenuated Yersinia pestis CO92 mutant deleted for the genes encoding Braun lipoprotein and plasminogen activator protease in murine alveolar and primary human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lier, Christina J; Tiner, Bethany L; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L; Fitts, Eric C; Huante, Matthew B; Endsley, Janice J; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-03-01

    We recently characterized the Δlpp Δpla double in-frame deletion mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 molecularly, biologically, and immunologically. While Braun lipoprotein (Lpp) activates toll-like receptor-2 to initiate an inflammatory cascade, plasminogen activator (Pla) protease facilitates bacterial dissemination in the host. The Δlpp Δpla double mutant was highly attenuated in evoking bubonic and pneumonic plague, was rapidly cleared from mouse organs, and generated humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to provide subsequent protection to mice against a lethal challenge dose of wild-type (WT) CO92. Here, we further characterized the Δlpp Δpla double mutant in two murine macrophage cell lines as well as in primary human monocyte-derived macrophages to gauge its potential as a live-attenuated vaccine candidate. We first demonstrated that the Δpla single and the Δlpp Δpla double mutant were unable to survive efficiently in murine and human macrophages, unlike WT CO92. We observed that the levels of Pla and its associated protease activity were not affected in the Δlpp single mutant, and, likewise, deletion of the pla gene from WT CO92 did not alter Lpp levels. Further, our study revealed that both Lpp and Pla contributed to the intracellular survival of WT CO92 via different mechanisms. Importantly, the ability of the Δlpp Δpla double mutant to be phagocytized by macrophages, to stimulate production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and to activate the nitric oxide killing pathways of the host cells remained unaltered when compared to the WT CO92-infected macrophages. Finally, macrophages infected with either the WT CO92 or the Δlpp Δpla double mutant were equally efficient in their uptake of zymosan particles as determined by flow cytometric analysis. Overall, our data indicated that although the Δlpp Δpla double mutant of Y. pestis CO92 was highly attenuated, it retained the ability to elicit innate and subsequent acquired immune

  3. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J; Mahan, Thomas E; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle in both humans and mice; ISF Aβ is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of orexin increased wakefulness and ISF Aβ levels, and chronic sleep deprivation significantly increased Aβ plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic (APP) mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a well-documented sleep regulatory substance which promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. GHRHR(lit/lit) mice that lack functional GHRH receptor have shorter sleep duration and longer wakefulness during light periods. The current study was undertaken to determine whether manipulating sleep by interfering with GHRH signaling affects brain ISF Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (PS1APP) transgenic mice that overexpress mutant forms of APP and PSEN1 that cause autosomal dominant AD. We found that intraperitoneal injection of GHRH at dark onset increased sleep and decreased ISF Aβ and that delivery of a GHRH antagonist via reverse-microdialysis suppressed sleep and increased ISF Aβ. The diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/lit) mice was significantly smaller than that in PS1APP/GHRHR(lit/+) mice. However despite decreased sleep in GHRHR deficient mice, this was not associated with an increase in Aβ accumulation later in life. One of several possibilities for the finding is the fact that GHRHR deficient mice have GHRH-dependent but sleep-independent factors which protect against Aβ deposition. Copyright © 2014

  4. Variation of amino acid sequences of serum amyloid a (SAA) and immunohistochemical analysis of amyloid a (AA) in Japanese domestic cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tei, Meina; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Chambers, James K; Watanabe, Ken-Ichi; Tamamoto, Takashi; Ohno, Koichi; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2018-02-02

    Amyloid A (AA) amyloidosis, a fatal systemic amyloid disease, occurs secondary to chronic inflammatory conditions in humans. Although persistently elevated serum amyloid A (SAA) levels are required for its pathogenesis, not all individuals with chronic inflammation necessarily develop AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, many diseases in cats are associated with the elevated production of SAA, whereas only a small number actually develop AA amyloidosis. We hypothesized that a genetic mutation in the SAA gene may strongly contribute to the pathogenesis of feline AA amyloidosis. In the present study, genomic DNA from four Japanese domestic cats (JDCs) with AA amyloidosis and from five without amyloidosis was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and direct sequencing. We identified the novel variation combination of 45R-51A in the deduced amino acid sequences of four JDCs with amyloidosis and five without. However, there was no relationship between amino acid variations and the distribution of AA amyloid deposits, indicating that differences in SAA sequences do not contribute to the pathogenesis of AA amyloidosis. Immunohistochemical analysis using antisera against the three different parts of the feline SAA protein-i.e., the N-terminal, central, and C-terminal regions-revealed that feline AA contained the C-terminus, unlike human AA. These results indicate that the cleavage and degradation of the C-terminus are not essential for amyloid fibril formation in JDCs.

  5. Anti-amyloid treatments in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapra, Mamta; Kim, Kye Y

    2009-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most challenging threats to the healthcare system in society. One of the main characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is formation of amyloid plaques from accumulation of amyloid beta peptide. The therapeutic agents that are currently available for AD including acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AchEIs) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist are focused on improving the symptoms and do not revert the progression of the disease. This limitation coupled with the burgeoning increase in the prevalence of AD and resultant impact on healthcare economics calls for more substantial treatments for AD. According to the leading amyloid hypothesis, cleavage of amyloid precursor protein to release amyloid beta peptide is the critical event in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently treatment strategies have been focused on modifying the formation, clearance and accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid beta peptide. This article reviews different therapeutic approaches that have been investigated to target amyloid beta ranging from secretase modulators, antiaggregation agents to amyloid immunotherapy. Authors review the different novel drugs which are in clinical trials.

  6. Impaired STING Pathway in Human Osteosarcoma U2OS Cells Contributes to the Growth of ICP0-Null Mutant Herpes Simplex Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Thibaut; Kalamvoki, Maria

    2017-05-01

    Human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a widespread pathogen, with 80% of the population being latently infected. To successfully evade the host, the virus has evolved strategies to counteract antiviral responses, including the gene-silencing and innate immunity machineries. The immediately early protein of the virus, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), plays a central role in these processes. ICP0 blocks innate immunity, and one mechanism is by degrading hostile factors with its intrinsic E3 ligase activity. ICP0 also functions as a promiscuous transactivator, and it blocks repressor complexes to enable viral gene transcription. For these reasons, the growth of a ΔICP0 virus is impaired in most cells, except cells of the human osteosarcoma cell line U2OS, and it is only partially impaired in cells of the human osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2. We found that the two human osteosarcoma cell lines that supported the growth of the ΔICP0 virus failed to activate innate immune responses upon treatment with 2'3'-cyclic GAMP (2'3'-cGAMP), the natural agonist of STING (i.e., stimulator of interferon genes) or after infection with the ΔICP0 mutant virus. Innate immune responses were restored in these cells by transient expression of the STING protein but not after overexpression of interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Restoration of STING expression resulted in suppression of ΔICP0 virus gene expression and a decrease in viral yields. Overexpression of IFI16 also suppressed ΔICP0 virus gene expression, albeit to a lesser extent than STING. These data suggest that the susceptibility of U2OS and Saos-2 cells to the ΔICP0 HSV-1 is in part due to an impaired STING pathway. IMPORTANCE The DNA sensor STING plays pivotal role in controlling HSV-1 infection both in cell culture and in mice. The HSV-1 genome encodes numerous proteins that are dedicated to combat host antiviral responses. The immediate early protein of the virus ICP0 plays major role in this process as it targets

  7. Semen amyloids participate in spermatozoa selection and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Nadia R; Sandi-Monroy, Nathallie; Kohgadai, Nargis; Usmani, Shariq M; Hamil, Katherine G; Neidleman, Jason; Montano, Mauricio; Ständker, Ludger; Röcker, Annika; Cavrois, Marielle; Rosen, Jared; Marson, Kara; Smith, James F; Pilcher, Christopher D; Gagsteiger, Friedrich; Sakk, Olena; O'Rand, Michael; Lishko, Polina V; Kirchhoff, Frank; Münch, Jan; Greene, Warner C

    2017-06-27

    Unlike other human biological fluids, semen contains multiple types of amyloid fibrils in the absence of disease. These fibrils enhance HIV infection by promoting viral fusion to cellular targets, but their natural function remained unknown. The similarities shared between HIV fusion to host cell and sperm fusion to oocyte led us to examine whether these fibrils promote fertilization. Surprisingly, the fibrils inhibited fertilization by immobilizing sperm. Interestingly, however, this immobilization facilitated uptake and clearance of sperm by macrophages, which are known to infiltrate the female reproductive tract (FRT) following semen exposure. In the presence of semen fibrils, damaged and apoptotic sperm were more rapidly phagocytosed than healthy ones, suggesting that deposition of semen fibrils in the lower FRT facilitates clearance of poor-quality sperm. Our findings suggest that amyloid fibrils in semen may play a role in reproduction by participating in sperm selection and facilitating the rapid removal of sperm antigens.

  8. Endocytic vesicle rupture is a conserved mechanism of cellular invasion by amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, William P; Bousset, Luc; Green, Zachary C; Chu, Yaping; Skarpathiotis, Stratos; Chaney, Michael J; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Melki, Ronald; Campbell, Edward M

    2017-10-01

    Numerous pathological amyloid proteins spread from cell to cell during neurodegenerative disease, facilitating the propagation of cellular pathology and disease progression. Understanding the mechanism by which disease-associated amyloid protein assemblies enter target cells and induce cellular dysfunction is, therefore, key to understanding the progressive nature of such neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we utilized an imaging-based assay to monitor the ability of disease-associated amyloid assemblies to rupture intracellular vesicles following endocytosis. We observe that the ability to induce vesicle rupture is a common feature of α-synuclein (α-syn) assemblies, as assemblies derived from WT or familial disease-associated mutant α-syn all exhibited the ability to induce vesicle rupture. Similarly, different conformational strains of WT α-syn assemblies, but not monomeric or oligomeric forms, efficiently induced vesicle rupture following endocytosis. The ability to induce vesicle rupture was not specific to α-syn, as amyloid assemblies of tau and huntingtin Exon1 with pathologic polyglutamine repeats also exhibited the ability to induce vesicle rupture. We also observe that vesicles ruptured by α-syn are positive for the autophagic marker LC3 and can accumulate and fuse into large, intracellular structures resembling Lewy bodies in vitro. Finally, we show that the same markers of vesicle rupture surround Lewy bodies in brain sections from PD patients. These data underscore the importance of this conserved endocytic vesicle rupture event as a damaging mechanism of cellular invasion by amyloid assemblies of multiple neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, and suggest that proteinaceous inclusions such as Lewy bodies form as a consequence of continued fusion of autophagic vesicles in cells unable to degrade ruptured vesicles and their amyloid contents.

  9. The Common Inhalational Anesthetic Sevoflurane Induces Apoptosis and Increases β-Amyloid Protein Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Guohua; Zhang, Bin; Moir, Robert D.; Xia, Weiming; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Culley, Deborah J.; Crosby, Gregory; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Xie, Zhongcong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effects of sevoflurane, the most commonly used inhalation anesthetic, on apoptosis and β-amyloid protein (Aβ) levels in vitro and in vivo. Subjects: Naive mice, H4 human neuroglioma cells, and H4 human neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length amyloid precursor protein. Interventions: Human H4 neuroglioma cells stably transfected to express full-length amyloid precursor protein were exposed to 4.1% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Mice received 2.5% sevoflurane for 2 hours. Caspase-3 activation, apoptosis, and Aβ levels were assessed. Results: Sevoflurane induced apoptosis and elevated levels of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme and Aβ in vitro and in vivo. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD decreased the effects of sevoflurane on apoptosis and Aβ. Sevoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation was attenuated by the γ-secretase inhibitor L-685,458 and was potentiated by Aβ. These results suggest that sevoflurane induces caspase activation which, in turn, enhances β-site amyloid precursor protein–cleaving enzyme and Aβ levels. Increased Aβ levels then induce further rounds of apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that inhalational anesthetic sevoflurane may promote Alzheimer disease neuropathogenesis. If confirmed in human subjects, it may be prudent to caution against the use of sevoflurane as an anesthetic, especially in those suspected of possessing excessive levels of cerebral Aβ. PMID:19433662

  10. Dual role of interleukin-1β in islet amyloid formation and its β-cell toxicity: Implications for type 2 diabetes and islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoo Jin; Warnock, Garth L; Ao, Ziliang; Safikhan, Nooshin; Meloche, Mark; Asadi, Ali; Kieffer, Timothy J; Marzban, Lucy

    2017-05-01

    Islet amyloid, formed by aggregation of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), contributes to β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes, cultured and transplanted islets. We previously showed that biosynthetic hIAPP aggregates induce β-cell Fas upregulation and activation of the Fas apoptotic pathway. We used cultured human and hIAPP-expressing mouse islets to investigate: (1) the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in amyloid-induced Fas upregulation; and (2) the effects of IL-1β-induced β-cell dysfunction on pro-islet amyloid polypeptide (proIAPP) processing and amyloid formation. Human and h IAPP -expressing mouse islets were cultured to form amyloid without or with the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) anakinra, in the presence or absence of recombinant IL-1β. Human islets in which amyloid formation was prevented (amyloid inhibitor or Ad-prohIAPP-siRNA) were cultured similarly. β-cell function, apoptosis, Fas expression, caspase-8 activation, islet IL-1β, β-cell area, β-/α-cell ratio, amyloid formation, and (pro)IAPP forms were assessed. hIAPP aggregates were found to increase IL-1β levels in cultured human islets that correlated with β-cell Fas upregulation, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis, all of which were reduced by IL-1Ra treatment or prevention of amyloid formation. Moreover, IL-1Ra improved culture-induced β-cell dysfunction and restored impaired proIAPP processing, leading to lower amyloid formation. IL-1β treatment potentiated impaired proIAPP processing and increased amyloid formation in cultured human and h IAPP -expressing mouse islets, which were prevented by IL-1Ra. IL-1β plays a dual role by: (1) mediating amyloid-induced Fas upregulation and β-cell apoptosis; (2) inducing impaired proIAPP processing thereby potentiating amyloid formation. Blocking IL-1β may provide a new strategy to preserve β cells in conditions associated with islet amyloid formation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Hsp40 function in yeast prion propagation: Amyloid diversity necessitates chaperone functional complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2015-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable protein-based elements, most of which are formed of amyloid aggregates that rely on the action of molecular chaperones for transmission to progeny. Prions can form distinct amyloid structures, known as 'strains' in mammalian systems, that dictate both pathological progression and cross-species infection barriers. In yeast these same amyloid structural polymorphisms, called 'variants', dictate the intensity of prion-associated phenotypes and stability in mitosis. We recently reported that [PSI(+)] prion variants differ in the fundamental domain requirements for one chaperone, the Hsp40/J-protein Sis1, which are mutually exclusive between 2 different yeast prions, demonstrating a functional plurality for Sis1. Here we extend that analysis to incorporate additional data that collectively support the hypothesis that Sis1 has multiple functional roles that can be accomplished by distinct sets of domains. These functions are differentially required by distinct prions and prion variants. We also present new data regarding Hsp104-mediated prion elimination and show that some Sis1 functions, but not all, are conserved in the human homolog Hdj1/DNAJB1. Importantly, of the 10 amyloid-based prions indentified to date in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the chaperone requirements of only 4 are known, leaving a great diversity of amyloid structures, and likely modes of amyloid-chaperone interaction, largely unexplored.

  12. Amyloid oligomers and protofibrils, but not filaments, self-replicate from native lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulaj, Mentor; Foley, Joseph; Muschol, Martin

    2014-06-25

    Self-assembly of amyloid fibrils is the molecular mechanism best known for its connection with debilitating human disorders such as Alzheimer's disease but is also associated with various functional cellular responses. There is increasing evidence that amyloid formation proceeds along two distinct assembly pathways involving either globular oligomers and protofibrils or rigid monomeric filaments. Oligomers, in particular, have been implicated as the dominant molecular species responsible for pathogenesis. Yet the molecular mechanisms regulating their self-assembly have remained elusive. Here we show that oligomers/protofibrils and monomeric filaments, formed along distinct assembly pathways, display critical differences in their ability to template amyloid growth at physiological vs denaturing temperatures. At physiological temperatures, amyloid filaments remained stable but could not seed growth of native monomers. In contrast, oligomers and protofibrils not only remained intact but were capable of self-replication using native monomers as the substrate. Kinetic data further suggested that this prion-like growth mode of oligomers/protofibrils involved two distinct activities operating orthogonal from each other: autocatalytic self-replication of oligomers from native monomers and nucleated polymerization of oligomers into protofibrils. The environmental changes to stability and templating competence of these different amyloid species in different environments are likely to be important for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying both pathogenic and functional amyloid self-assembly.

  13. Role of sequence and structural polymorphism on the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwonchan Yoon

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils playing a critical role in disease expression, have recently been found to exhibit the excellent mechanical properties such as elastic modulus in the order of 10 GPa, which is comparable to that of other mechanical proteins such as microtubule, actin filament, and spider silk. These remarkable mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are correlated with their functional role in disease expression. This suggests the importance in understanding how these excellent mechanical properties are originated through self-assembly process that may depend on the amino acid sequence. However, the sequence-structure-property relationship of amyloid fibrils has not been fully understood yet. In this work, we characterize the mechanical properties of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP fibrils with respect to their molecular structures as well as their amino acid sequence by using all-atom explicit water molecular dynamics (MD simulation. The simulation result suggests that the remarkable bending rigidity of amyloid fibrils can be achieved through a specific self-aggregation pattern such as antiparallel stacking of β strands (peptide chain. Moreover, we have shown that a single point mutation of hIAPP chain constituting a hIAPP fibril significantly affects the thermodynamic stability of hIAPP fibril formed by parallel stacking of peptide chain, and that a single point mutation results in a significant change in the bending rigidity of hIAPP fibrils formed by antiparallel stacking of β strands. This clearly elucidates the role of amino acid sequence on not only the equilibrium conformations of amyloid fibrils but also their mechanical properties. Our study sheds light on sequence-structure-property relationships of amyloid fibrils, which suggests that the mechanical properties of amyloid fibrils are encoded in their sequence-dependent molecular architecture.

  14. Absence of beta-amyloid in cortical cataracts of donors with and without Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Ralph; Rosandić, Jurja; Montenegro, Gustavo A; Lobato, Elvira; Tresserra, Francisco; Barraquer, Rafael I; Vrensen, Gijs F J M

    2013-01-01

    Eye lenses from human donors with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD) were studied to evaluate the presence of amyloid in cortical cataract. We obtained 39 lenses from 21 postmortem donors with AD and 15 lenses from age-matched controls provided by the Banco de Ojos para Tratamientos de la Ceguera (Barcelona, Spain). For 17 donors, AD was clinically diagnosed by general physicians and for 4 donors the AD diagnosis was neuropathologically confirmed. Of the 21 donors with AD, 6 had pronounced bilateral cortical lens opacities and 15 only minor or no cortical opacities. As controls, 7 donors with pronounced cortical opacities and 8 donors with almost transparent lenses were selected. All lenses were photographed in a dark field stereomicroscope. Histological sections were analyzed using a standard and a more sensitive Congo red protocol, thioflavin staining and beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry. Brain tissue from two donors, one with cerebral amyloid angiopathy and another with advanced AD-related changes and one cornea with lattice dystrophy were used as positive controls for the staining techniques. Thioflavin, standard and modified Congo red staining were positive in the control brain tissues and in the dystrophic cornea. Beta-amyloid immunohistochemistry was positive in the brain tissues but not in the cornea sample. Lenses from control and AD donors were, without exception, negative after Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid immunohistochemical staining. The results of the positive control tissues correspond well with known observations in AD, amyloid angiopathy and corneas with lattice dystrophy. The absence of staining in AD and control lenses with the techniques employed lead us to conclude that there is no beta-amyloid in lenses from donors with AD or in control cortical cataracts. The inconsistency with previous studies of Goldstein et al. (2003) and Moncaster et al. (2010), both of which demonstrated positive Congo red, thioflavin, and beta-amyloid

  15. Genetic variation in Aquaporin-4 moderates the relationship between sleep and brain Aβ-amyloid burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Mazzucchelli, Gavin N; Villemagne, Victor L; Brown, Belinda M; Porter, Tenielle; Weinborn, Michael; Bucks, Romola S; Milicic, Lidija; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Taddei, Kevin; Ames, David; Maruff, Paul; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Salvado, Olivier; Martins, Ralph N; Laws, Simon M

    2018-02-26

    The glymphatic system is postulated to be a mechanism of brain Aβ-amyloid clearance and to be most effective during sleep. Ablation of the astrocytic end-feet expressed water-channel protein, Aquaporin-4, in mice, results in impairment of this clearance mechanism and increased brain Aβ-amyloid deposition, suggesting that Aquaporin-4 plays a pivotal role in glymphatic function. Currently there is a paucity of literature regarding the impact of AQP4 genetic variation on sleep, brain Aβ-amyloid burden and their relationship to each other in humans. To address this a cross-sectional observational study was undertaken in cognitively normal older adults from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study. Genetic variants in AQP4 were investigated with respect to self-reported Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index sleep parameters, positron emission tomography derived brain Aβ-amyloid burden and whether these genetic variants moderated the sleep-Aβ-amyloid burden relationship. One AQP4 variant, rs72878776, was associated with poorer overall sleep quality, while several SNPs moderated the effect of sleep latency (rs491148, rs9951307, rs7135406, rs3875089, rs151246) and duration (rs72878776, rs491148 and rs2339214) on brain Aβ-amyloid burden. This study suggests that AQP4 genetic variation moderates the relationship between sleep and brain Aβ-amyloid burden, which adds weight to the proposed glymphatic system being a potential Aβ-amyloid clearance mechanism and suggests that AQP4 genetic variation may impair this function. Further, AQP4 genetic variation should be considered when interpreting sleep-Aβ relationships.

  16. Promising rice mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    Two induced mutants namely, Mut NS 1 (tall) and Mut NS 5 (semi-dwarf) derived from rice variety Nizersail were evaluated for various agronomic characters at four locations in Bangladesh. Both the mutants matured about three weeks earlier and yielded significantly higher than the parent variety Nizersail. (author). 3 tabs., 9 refs

  17. Carbon nanospecies affecting amyloid formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Monika; Konefal, Rafal; Morávková, Zuzana; Zhigunov, Alexander; Svoboda, Jan; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Hromádková, Jiřina; Groborz, Ondřej; Štěpánek, Petr; Hrubý, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 85 (2017), s. 53887-53898 ISSN 2046-2069 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-30544A; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-03156S; GA TA ČR(CZ) TE01020118; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Grant - others:OPPK(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21545 Program:OPPK Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : amyloid fibril * nanodiamond * fullerene Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.108, year: 2016

  18. Amyloid beta peptide immunotherapy in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu, J; Ousset, P J; Voisin, T; Vellas, B

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis have led to the development of numerous compounds that might modify the disease process. Amyloid β peptide represents an important molecular target for intervention in Alzheimer's disease. The main purpose of this work is to review immunotherapy studies in relation to the Alzheimer's disease. Several types of amyloid β peptide immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease are under investigation, active immunization and passive administration with monoclonal antibodies directed against amyloid β peptide. Although immunotherapy approaches resulted in clearance of amyloid plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease, this clearance did not show significant cognitive effect for the moment. Currently, several amyloid β peptide immunotherapy approaches are under investigation but also against tau pathology. Results from amyloid-based immunotherapy studies in clinical trials indicate that intervention appears to be more effective in early stages of amyloid accumulation in particular solanezumab with a potential impact at mild Alzheimer's disease, highlighting the importance of diagnosing Alzheimer's disease as early as possible and undertaking clinical trials at this stage. In both phase III solanezumab and bapineuzumab trials, PET imaging revealed that about a quarter of patients lacked fibrillar amyloid pathology at baseline, suggesting that they did not have Alzheimer's disease in the first place. So a new third phase 3 clinical trial for solanezumab, called Expedition 3, in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and evidence of amyloid burden has been started. Thus, currently, amyloid intervention is realized at early stage of the Alzheimer's disease in clinical trials, at prodromal Alzheimer's disease, or at asymptomatic subjects or at risk to develop Alzheimer's disease and or at asymptomatic subjects with autosomal dominant mutation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Mutant heterosis in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    In the variety TKM6 a high yielding semidwarf mutant has been induced. This TKM6 mutant was used in test crosses with a number of other varieties and mutants to examine the extent of heterosis of dwarfs in rice and to select superior crosses. An excerpt of the published data is given. It appears from the backcross of the mutant with its original variety, that an increase in number of productive tillers occurs in the hybrid, leading to a striking grain yield increase, while the semi-dwarf culm length (the main mutant character) reverts to the normal phenotype. In the cross with IR8 on the other hand, there is only a minimal increase in tiller number but a substantial increase in TGW leading to more than 30% yield increase over the better parent

  20. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, blood-brain barrier disruption and amyloid accumulation in SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Jaume; Duran-Vilaregut, Joaquim; Manich, Gemma; Pallàs, Mercè; Camins, Antoni; Vilaplana, Jordi; Pelegrí, Carme

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular dysfunction and β-amyloid peptide deposition on the walls of cerebral blood vessels might be an early event in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Here we studied the time course of amyloid deposition in blood vessels and blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the CA1 subzone of the hippocampus of SAMP8 mice and the association between these two variables. We also studied the association between the amyloid deposition in blood vessels and the recently described amyloid clusters in the parenchyma, as well as the association of these clusters with vessels in which the BBB is disrupted. SAMP8 mice showed greater amyloid deposition in blood vessels than age-matched ICR-CD1 control mice. Moreover, at 12 months of age the number of vessels with a disrupted BBB had increased in both strains, especially SAMP8 animals. At this age, all the vessels with amyloid deposition showed BBB disruption, but several capillaries with an altered BBB showed no amyloid on their walls. Moreover, amyloid clusters showed no spatial association with vessels with amyloid deposition, nor with vessels in which the BBB had been disrupted. Finally, we can conclude that vascular amyloid deposition seems to induce BBB alterations, but BBB disruption may also be due to other factors. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  2. Arf6 controls beta-amyloid production by regulating macropinocytosis of the Amyloid Precursor Protein to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihao; Tam, Joshua H K; Seah, Claudia; Chiu, Justin; Tyrer, Andrea; Cregan, Sean P; Meakin, Susan O; Pasternak, Stephen H

    2015-07-14

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of Beta-Amyloid (Aβ) peptides in the brain. Aβ peptides are generated by cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) by the β - and γ - secretase enzymes. Although this process is tightly linked to the internalization of cell surface APP, the compartments responsible are not well defined. We have found that APP can be rapidly internalized from the cell surface to lysosomes, bypassing early and late endosomes. Here we show by confocal microscopy and electron microscopy that this pathway is mediated by macropinocytosis. APP internalization is enhanced by antibody binding/crosslinking of APP suggesting that APP may function as a receptor. Furthermore, a dominant negative mutant of Arf6 blocks direct transport of APP to lysosomes, but does not affect classical endocytosis to endosomes. Arf6 expression increases through the hippocampus with the development of Alzheimer's disease, being expressed mostly in the CA1 and CA2 regions in normal individuals but spreading through the CA3 and CA4 regions in individuals with pathologically diagnosed AD. Disruption of lysosomal transport of APP reduces both Aβ40 and Aβ42 production by more than 30 %. Our findings suggest that the lysosome is an important site for Aβ production and that altering APP trafficking represents a viable strategy to reduce Aβ production.

  3. Associations Between β-Amyloid Kinetics and the β-Amyloid Diurnal Pattern in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, Brendan P; Mawuenyega, Kwasi G; Patterson, Bruce W; Elbert, Donald L; Ovod, Vitaliy; Kasten, Tom; Morris, John C; Bateman, Randall J

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies found that the concentration of amyloid-β (Aβ) fluctuates with the sleep-wake cycle. Although the amplitude of this day/night pattern attenuates with age and amyloid deposition, to our knowledge, the association of Aβ kinetics (ie, production, turnover, and clearance) with this oscillation has not been studied. To determine the association between Aβ kinetics, age, amyloid levels, and the Aβ day/night pattern in humans. We measured Aβ concentrations and kinetics in 77 adults aged 60 to 87 years with and without amyloid deposition by a novel precise mass spectrometry method at the Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, Missouri. We compared findings of 2 orthogonal methods, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and mass spectrometry, to validate the day/night patterns and determine more precise estimates of the cosinor parameters. In vivo labeling of central nervous system proteins with stable isotopically labeled leucine was performed, and kinetics of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were measured. Serial cerebrospinal fluid collection via indwelling lumbar catheter over 36 to 48 hours before, during, and after in vivo labeling, with a 9-hour primed constant infusion of 13C6-leucine. The amplitude, linear increase, and other cosinor measures of each participant's serial cerebrospinal fluid Aβ concentrations and Aβ turnover rates. Of the 77 participants studied, 46 (59.7%) were men, and the mean (range) age was 72.6 (60.4-87.7) years. Day/night patterns in Aβ concentrations were more sharply defined by the precise mass spectrometry method than by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (mean difference of SD of residuals: Aβ40, -7.42 pM; P effects of age and amyloid on Aβ42 amplitude at least partially affect each other. Production and turnover rates suggest that day/night Aβ patterns are modulated by both production and clearance mechanisms active in sleep-wake cycles and that amyloid deposition may impair normal circadian patterns. These findings

  4. The metabolic enhancer piracetam ameliorates the impairment of mitochondrial function and neurite outgrowth induced by ß-amyloid peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, C; Ungerer, I; Lipka, U; Kirr, S; Schütt, T; Eckert, A; Leuner, K; Müller, WE

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: β-Amyloid peptide (Aβ) is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by initiating a cascade of events from mitochondrial dysfunction to neuronal death. The metabolic enhancer piracetam has been shown to improve mitochondrial dysfunction following brain aging and experimentally induced oxidative stress. Experimental approach: We used cell lines (PC12 and HEK cells) and murine dissociated brain cells. The protective effects of piracetam in vitro and ex vivo on Aβ-induced impairment of mitochondrial function (as mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production), on secretion of soluble Aβ and on neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells were investigated. Key results: Piracetam improves mitochondrial function of PC12 cells and acutely dissociated brain cells from young NMRI mice following exposure to extracellular Aβ1-42. Similar protective effects against Aβ1-42 were observed in dissociated brain cells from aged NMRI mice, or mice transgenic for mutant human amyloid precursor protein (APP) treated with piracetam for 14 days. Soluble Aβ load was markedly diminished in the brain of those animals after treatment with piracetam. Aβ production by HEK cells stably transfected with mutant human APP was elevated by oxidative stress and this was reduced by piracetam. Impairment of neuritogenesis is an important consequence of Aβ-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and Aβ-induced reduction of neurite growth in PC12 cells was substantially improved by piracetam. Conclusion and implications: Our findings strongly support the concept of improving mitochondrial function as an approach to ameliorate the detrimental effects of Aβ on brain function. This article is commented on by Moncada, pp. 217–219 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00706.x and to view related papers by Pravdic et al. and Puerta et al. visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00698.x and http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j

  5. The Production of Curli Amyloid Fibers Is Deeply Integrated into the Biology of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel R.; Price, Janet E.; Burby, Peter E.; Blanco, Luz P.; Chamberlain, Justin; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2017-01-01

    Curli amyloid fibers are the major protein component of the extracellular matrix produced by Enterobacteriaceae during biofilm formation. Curli are required for proper biofilm development and environmental persistence by Escherichia coli. Here, we present a complete and vetted genetic analysis of functional amyloid fiber biogenesis. The Keio collection of single gene deletions was screened on Congo red indicator plates to identify E. coli mutants that had defective amyloid production. We discovered that more than three hundred gene products modulated curli production. These genes were involved in fundamental cellular processes such as regulation, environmental sensing, respiration, metabolism, cell envelope biogenesis, transport, and protein turnover. The alternative sigma factors, σS and σE, had opposing roles in curli production. Mutations that induced the σE or Cpx stress response systems had reduced curli production, while mutant strains with increased σS levels had increased curli production. Mutations in metabolic pathways, including gluconeogenesis and the biosynthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), produced less curli. Regulation of the master biofilm regulator, CsgD, was diverse, and the screen revealed several proteins and small RNAs (sRNA) that regulate csgD messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Using previously published studies, we found minimal overlap between the genes affecting curli biogenesis and genes known to impact swimming or swarming motility, underlying the distinction between motile and sessile lifestyles. Collectively, the diversity and number of elements required suggest curli production is part of a highly regulated and complex developmental pathway in E. coli. PMID:29088115

  6. Vitamin C (Vit C) added after irradiation reduces the number and alters the spectrum of CD59- mutants in human/CHO AL cells exposed to high LET carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannais, D.B.; Hirai, Y.; Waldren, C.A.; Ueno, A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Miyazaki, Watanabe, Kumagai and colleagues discovered the existence in mammalian cells of long-lived radicals (LLR) with half-lives of minutes to hours. They further showed that concentrations of LLR were increased in a dose dependent manner by X-rays; that LLR were transforming and mutagenic but not clastogenic or lethal; that they were scavenged by Vit C but not by DMSO, and that they occured mainly (>99.8%) in proteins from which they escape by atomic tunneling. They also showed that Vit C added after radiation (but not DMSO) eliminated HPRT mutants in human cells exposed to X-rays. Following on their work, we found that Vit C (5 mM) added 30 min after radiation significantly reduced, but did not eliminate, induction of CD59- mutants in human-CHO hybrid AL cells exposed to high LET carbon beam radiation (NIRS-HIMAC, 290 MeV/nucleon, LET 100 KeV/μ: m). Lethality of the carbon beam was not affected by Vit C. DMSO decreased mutation and killing, only when present during radiation. Lycopene, reported to reduce spontaneous mutation, did not affect radiation killing or mutagenesis. Our findings with Vit C for high LET generally support the results reported for X-rays. Analysis of the spectrum of mutations in CD59- mutant cells isolated after carbon beam irradiation (2.5 Gy), indicates a substantial reduction by post-radiation Vit C in mutants with small mutations and those displaying genomic instability, seen as increased levels of translocations. Our results substantiate a role for LLR in radiation mutagenesis and implicate them in radiation-induced genomic instability

  7. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Differential regulation of amyloid-β-protein mRNA expression within hippocampal neuronal subpopulations in Alzheimer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, G.A.; Lewis, D.A.; Bahmanyar, S.; Goldgaber, D.; Gajdusek, D.C.; Young, W.G.; Morrison, J.H.; Wilson, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have mapped the neuroanatomical distribution of amyloid-β-protein mRNA within neuronal subpopulations of the hippocampal formation in the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), normal aged human, and patients with Alzheimer disease. Amyloid-β-protein mRNA appears to be expressed in all hippocampal neurons, but at different levels of abundance. In the central nervous system of monkey and normal aged human, image analysis shows that neurons of the dentate gyrus and cornu Ammonis fields contain a 2.5-times-greater hybridization signal than is present in neurons of the subiculum and entorhinal cortex. In contrast, in the Alzheimer disease hippocampal formation, the levels of amyloid-β-protein mRNA in the cornu Ammonis field 3 and parasubiculum are equivalent. These findings suggest that within certain neuronal subpopulations cell type-specific regulation of amyloid-β-protein gene expression may be altered in Alzheimer disease

  9. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  10. Imaging of Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy with Bivalent (99m)Tc-Hydroxamamide Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iikuni, Shimpei; Ono, Masahiro; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Kenji; Yoshimura, Masashi; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Okamoto, Yoko; Ihara, Masafumi; Saji, Hideo

    2016-05-16

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), characterized by the deposition of amyloid aggregates in the walls of cerebral vasculature, is a major factor in intracerebral hemorrhage and vascular cognitive impairment and is also associated closely with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously reported (99m)Tc-hydroxamamide ((99m)Tc-Ham) complexes with a bivalent amyloid ligand showing high binding affinity for β-amyloid peptide (Aβ(1-42)) aggregates present frequently in the form in AD. In this article, we applied them to CAA-specific imaging probes, and evaluated their utility for CAA-specific imaging. In vitro inhibition assay using Aβ(1-40) aggregates deposited mainly in CAA and a brain uptake study were performed for (99m)Tc-Ham complexes, and all (99m)Tc-Ham complexes with an amyloid ligand showed binding affinity for Aβ(1-40) aggregates and very low brain uptake. In vitro autoradiography of human CAA brain sections and ex vivo autoradiography of Tg2576 mice were carried out for bivalent (99m)Tc-Ham complexes ([(99m)Tc]SB2A and [(99m)Tc]BT2B), and they displayed excellent labeling of Aβ depositions in human CAA brain sections and high affinity and selectivity to CAA in transgenic mice. These results may offer new possibilities for the development of clinically useful CAA-specific imaging probes based on the (99m)Tc-Ham complex.

  11. Impact of amyloid imaging on drug development in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathis, Chester A. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)], E-mail: mathisca@upmc.edu; Lopresti, Brian J. [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Klunk, William E. [Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Imaging agents capable of assessing amyloid-beta (A{beta}) content in vivo in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects likely will be important as diagnostic agents to detect A{beta} plaques in the brain as well as to help test the amyloid cascade hypothesis of AD and as an aid to assess the efficacy of anti-amyloid therapeutics currently under development and in clinical trials. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies of amyloid deposition in human subjects with several A{beta} imaging agents are currently underway. We reported the first PET studies of the carbon 11-labeled thioflavin-T derivative Pittsburgh Compound B in 2004, and this work has subsequently been extended to include a variety of subject groups, including AD patients, mild cognitive impairment patients and healthy controls. The ability to quantify regional A{beta} plaque load in the brains of living human subjects has provided a means to begin to apply this technology as a diagnostic agent to detect regional concentrations of A{beta} plaques and as a surrogate marker of therapeutic efficacy in anti-amyloid drug trials.

  12. Chemical Genomic Screening of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genomewide Mutant Collection Reveals Genes Required for Defense against Four Antimicrobial Peptides Derived from Proteins Found in Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Sanjay; Schoenly, Nathan E.; Lee, Anna Y.; Nislow, Corey; Bobek, Libuse A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare the effects of four antimicrobial peptides (MUC7 12-mer, histatin 12-mer, cathelicidin KR20, and a peptide containing lactoferricin amino acids 1 to 11) on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we employed a genomewide fitness screen of combined collections of mutants with homozygous deletions of nonessential genes and heterozygous deletions of essential genes. When an arbitrary fitness score cutoffs of 1 (indicating a fitness defect, or hypersensitivity) and −1 (indicating a fitness gain, or resistance) was used, 425 of the 5,902 mutants tested exhibited altered fitness when treated with at least one peptide. Functional analysis of the 425 strains revealed enrichment among the identified deletions in gene groups associated with the Gene Ontology (GO) terms “ribosomal subunit,” “ribosome biogenesis,” “protein glycosylation,” “vacuolar transport,” “Golgi vesicle transport,” “negative regulation of transcription,” and others. Fitness profiles of all four tested peptides were highly similar, particularly among mutant strains exhibiting the greatest fitness defects. The latter group included deletions in several genes involved in induction of the RIM101 signaling pathway, including several components of the ESCRT sorting machinery. The RIM101 signaling regulates response of yeasts to alkaline and neutral pH and high salts, and our data indicate that this pathway also plays a prominent role in regulating protective measures against all four tested peptides. In summary, the results of the chemical genomic screens of S. cerevisiae mutant collection suggest that the four antimicrobial peptides, despite their differences in structure and physical properties, share many interactions with S. cerevisiae cells and consequently a high degree of similarity between their modes of action. PMID:23208710

  13. beta. -Amyloid gene dosage in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, G H; Manuelidis, L; Kim, J H; Manuelidis, E E

    1988-01-11

    The 4-5 kd amyloid ..beta..-peptide is a major constituent of the characteristic amyloid plaque of Alzheimer's disease. It has been reported that some cases of sporatic Alzheimer's disease are associated with at least a partial duplication of chromosome 21 containing the gene corresponding to the 695 residue precursor of this peptide. To contribute to an understanding of the frequency to such a duplication event in the overall Alzheimer's population, the authors have determined the gene dosage of the ..beta..-amyloid gene in this collection of cases. All cases had a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's confirmed neuropathologically. Each Alzheimer's case had an apparent normal diploid ..beta..-amyloid gene dosage, while control Down's cases had the expected triploid dosage. Thus partial duplication of chromosome 21 may be a rare finding in Alzheimer's disease. Similar conclusions were just reported in several studies of the Harvard Alzheimer collection.

  14. Bilateral metachronous periosteal tibial amyloid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, H.; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Hashiguchi, S.; Ueda, Hidetaka; Hirasawa, Yasusuke

    2000-01-01

    Localized primary periosteal amyloid tumors are extremely rare. A case of bilateral tibial amyloid tumor is presented. A 62-year-old woman initially presented with a painful mass in the anterior aspect of the right leg. There was no evidence of underlying systemic disease, including chronic infection or malignancy. Based on the results of resistance with Congo red staining to treatment with potassium permanganate and positivity for kappa light chain, we classified this particular case as AL-type amyloidosis. The patient noticed a swelling in the opposite leg 2 years later. The second tumor was also an AL-type amyloidoma. Amyloid tumors are generally solitary. This is the first case of bilateral periosteal amyloid tumors of the AL-type occurring in the tibiae. (orig.)

  15. Calumenin interacts with serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Jacobsen, Christian; Honoré, Bent

    2000-01-01

    with calumenin in the presence of Ca(2+). Amino acid sequencing identified this protein as serum amyloid P component (SAP). Furthermore, we verified and characterized the calumenin-SAP interaction by the surface plasmon resonance technique. The findings indicate that calumenin may participate...... in the immunological defense system and could be involved in the pathological process of amyloidosis that leads to formation of amyloid deposits seen in different types of tissues. Udgivelsesdato: 2000-Jan-14...

  16. Amyloid PET in neurodegenerative diseases with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, V; Gómez-Grande, A; Sopena, P; García-Solís, D; Gómez Río, M; Lorenzo, C; Rubí, S; Arbizu, J

    2018-05-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition characterized by progressive cognitive decline and memory loss, and is the most common form of dementia. Amyloid plaques with neurofibrillary tangles are a neuropathological hallmark of AD that produces synaptic dysfunction and culminates later in neuronal loss. Amyloid PET is a useful, available and non-invasive technique that provides in vivo information about the cortical amyloid burden. In the latest revised criteria for the diagnosis of AD biomarkers were defined and integrated: pathological and diagnostic biomarkers (increased retention on fibrillar amyloid PET or decreased Aβ 1-42 and increased T-Tau or P-Tau in CSF) and neurodegeneration or topographical biomarkers (temporoparietal hypometabolism on 18 F-FDG PET and temporal atrophy on MRI). Recently specific recommendations have been created as a consensus statement on the appropriate use of the imaging biomarkers, including amyloid PET: early-onset cognitive impairment/dementia, atypical forms of AD, mild cognitive impairment with early age of onset, and to differentiate between AD and other neurodegenerative diseases that occur with dementia. Amyloid PET is also contributing to the development of new therapies for AD, as well as in research studies for the study of other neurodegenerative diseases that occur with dementia where the deposition of Aβ amyloid is involved in its pathogenesis. In this paper, we review some general concepts and study the use of amyloid PET in depth and its relationship with neurodegenerative diseases and other diagnostic techniques. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Medicina Nuclear e Imagen Molecular. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Plasma based markers of [11C] PiB-PET brain amyloid burden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven John Kiddle

    Full Text Available Changes in brain amyloid burden have been shown to relate to Alzheimer's disease pathology, and are believed to precede the development of cognitive decline. There is thus a need for inexpensive and non-invasive screening methods that are able to accurately estimate brain amyloid burden as a marker of Alzheimer's disease. One potential method would involve using demographic information and measurements on plasma samples to establish biomarkers of brain amyloid burden; in this study data from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative was used to explore this possibility. Sixteen of the analytes on the Rules Based Medicine Human Discovery Multi-Analyte Profile 1.0 panel were found to associate with [(11C]-PiB PET measurements. Some of these markers of brain amyloid burden were also found to associate with other AD related phenotypes. Thirteen of these markers of brain amyloid burden--c-peptide, fibrinogen, alpha-1-antitrypsin, pancreatic polypeptide, complement C3, vitronectin, cortisol, AXL receptor kinase, interleukin-3, interleukin-13, matrix metalloproteinase-9 total, apolipoprotein E and immunoglobulin E--were used along with co-variates in multiple linear regression, and were shown by cross-validation to explain >30% of the variance of brain amyloid burden. When a threshold was used to classify subjects as PiB positive, the regression model was found to predict actual PiB positive individuals with a sensitivity of 0.918 and a specificity of 0.545. The number of APOE [Symbol: see text] 4 alleles and plasma apolipoprotein E level were found to contribute most to this model, and the relationship between these variables and brain amyloid burden was explored.

  18. Evaluation of systemic amyloidosis by scintigraphy with 123I-labeled serum amyloid P component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, P.N.; Lavender, J.P.; Pepys, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    In systemic amyloidosis the distribution and progression of disease have been difficult to monitor, because they can be demonstrated only by biopsy. Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a normal circulating plasma protein that is deposited on amyloid fibrils because of its specific binding affinity for them. We investigated whether labeled SAP could be used to locate amyloid deposits. Purified human SAP labeled with iodine-123 was given intravenously to 50 patients with biopsy-proved systemic amyloidosis--25 with the AL (primary) type and 25 with the AA (secondary) type--and to 26 control patients with disease and 10 healthy subjects. Whole-body images and regional views were obtained after 24 hours and read in a blinded fashion. In the patients with amyloidosis the 123I-SAP was localized rapidly and specifically in amyloid deposits. The scintigraphic images obtained were characteristic and appeared to identify the extent of amyloid deposition in all 50 patients. There was no uptake of the 123I-SAP by the control patients and the healthy subjects. In all patients with AA amyloidosis the spleen was affected, whereas the scans showed uptake in the heart, skin, carpal region, and bone marrow only in patients with the AL type. Positive images were seen in six patients in whom biopsies had been negative or unsuccessful; in all six, amyloid was subsequently found on biopsy or at autopsy. Progressive amyloid deposition was observed in 9 of 11 patients studied serially. Scintigraphy after the injection of 123I-SAP can be used for diagnosing, locating, and monitoring the extent of systemic amyloidosis

  19. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  20. Structural and functional consequences of binding site mutations in transferrin: crystal structures of the Asp63Glu and Arg124Ala mutants of the N-lobe of human transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; He, Qing-Yu; Briggs, Sara K; Mason, Anne B; Baker, Edward N

    2003-06-17

    Human transferrin is a serum protein whose function is to bind Fe(3+) with very high affinity and transport it to cells, for delivery by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Structurally, the transferrin molecule is folded into two globular lobes, representing its N-terminal and C-terminal halves, with each lobe possessing a high-affinity iron binding site, in a cleft between two domains. Central to function is a highly conserved set of iron ligands, including an aspartate residue (Asp63 in the N-lobe) that also hydrogen bonds between the two domains and an arginine residue (Arg124 in the N-lobe) that binds an iron-bound carbonate ion. To further probe the roles of these residues, we have determined the crystal structures of the D63E and R124A mutants of the N-terminal half-molecule of human transferrin. The structure of the D63E mutant, determined at 1.9 A resolution (R = 0.245, R(free) = 0.261), showed that the carboxyl group still binds to iron despite the larger size of the Glu side chain, with some slight rearrangement of the first turn of alpha-helix residues 63-72, to which it is attached. The structure of the R124A mutant, determined at 2.4 A resolution (R = 0.219, R(free) = 0.288), shows that the loss of the arginine side chain results in a 0.3 A displacement of the carbonate ion, and an accompanying movement of the iron atom. In both mutants, the iron coordination is changed slightly, the principal change being in each case a lengthening of the Fe-N(His249) bond. Both mutants also release iron more readily than the wild type, kinetically and in terms of acid lability of iron binding. We attribute this to more facile protonation of the synergistically bound carbonate ion, in the case of R124A, and to strain resulting from the accommodation of the larger Glu side chain, in the case of D63E. In both cases, the weakened Fe-N(His) bond may also contribute, consistent with protonation of the His ligand being an early intermediate step in iron release, following the

  1. Cross-interactions between the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid-β Peptide and Other Amyloid Proteins: A Further Aspect of the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Gräslund, Astrid; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-05

    Many protein folding diseases are intimately associated with accumulation of amyloid aggregates. The amyloid materials formed by different proteins/peptides share many structural similarities, despite sometimes large amino acid sequence differences. Some amyloid diseases constitute risk factors for others, and the progression of one amyloid disease may affect the progression of another. These connections are arguably related to amyloid aggregates of one protein being able to directly nucleate amyloid formation of another, different protein: the amyloid cross-interaction. Here, we discuss such cross-interactions between the Alzheimer disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and other amyloid proteins in the context of what is known from in vitro and in vivo experiments, and of what might be learned from clinical studies. The aim is to clarify potential molecular associations between different amyloid diseases. We argue that the amyloid cascade hypothesis in Alzheimer disease should be expanded to include cross-interactions between Aβ and other amyloid proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Covalent Tethering and Residues with Bulky Hydrophobic Side Chains Enable Self-Assembly of Distinct Amyloid Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Grogg, Marcel; Raya, Jésus; Schirer, Alicia; Crucifix, Corinne; Hellwig, Petra; Schultz, Patrick; Torbeev, Vladimir

    2016-12-02

    Polymorphism is a common property of amyloid fibers that complicates their detailed structural and functional studies. Here we report experiments illustrating the chemical principles that enable the formation of amyloid polymorphs with distinct stoichiometric composition. Using appropriate covalent tethering we programmed self-assembly of a model peptide corresponding to the [20-41] fragment of human β2-microglobulin into fibers with either trimeric or dimeric amyloid cores. Using a set of biophysical and biochemical methods we demonstrated their distinct structural, morphological, and templating properties. Furthermore, we showed that supramolecular approaches in which the peptide is modified with bulky substituents can also be applied to modulate the formation of different fiber polymorphs. Such strategies, when applied to disease-related peptides and proteins, will greatly help in the evaluation of the biological properties of structurally distinct amyloids. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Breast cancer and amyloid bodies: is there a role for amyloidosis in cancer-cell dormancy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizejewski GJ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gerald J Mizejewski Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY, USA Abstract: Breast cancer and Alzheimer’s disease (AD are major causes of death in older women. Interestingly, breast cancer occurs less frequently in AD patients than in the general population. Amyloidosis, the aggregation of amyloid proteins to form amyloid bodies, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of AD and other human neuropathies by forming intracellular fibrillary proteins. Contrary to popular belief, amyloidosis is a common occurrence in mammalian cells, and has recently been reported to be a natural physiological process in response to environmental stress stimulations (such as pH and temperature extremes, hypoxia, and oxidative stress. Many proteins contain an intrinsic “amyloid-converting motif”, which acts in conjunction with a specific noncoding RNA to induce formation of proteinaceous amyloid bodies that are stored in intracellular bundles. In cancer cells such as breast and prostate, the process of amyloidosis induces cells to enter a dormant or resting stage devoid of cell division and proliferation. Therefore, cancer cells undergo growth cessation and enter a dormant stage following amyloidosis in the cell; this is akin to giving the cell AD to cease growth. Keywords: α-fetoprotein, noncoding RNA, amyloid bodies, dormancy, breast cancer, Alzheimer’s disease

  4. Insulin amyloid fibrillation studied by terahertz spectroscopy and other biophysical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rui [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); He, Mingxia [College of Precision Instrument and Optoelectronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Su, Rongxin, E-mail: surx@tju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yu, Yanjun [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Membrane Science and Desalination Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2010-01-01

    Assembly and fibrillation of amyloid proteins are believed to play a key role in the etiology of various human diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's and type II diabetes. Insights into conformational changes and formation processes during amyloid fibrillation are essential for the clinical diagnosis and drug discovery. To study the changes in secondary, tertiary, quaternary structures, and the alteration in the collective vibrational mode density of states during the amyloid fibrillation, bovine insulin in 20% acetic acid was incubated at 60 {sup o}C, and its multi-level structures were followed by various biophysical techniques, including circular dichroism (CD), thioflavin T fluorescence (ThT), dynamic light scattering (DLS), electron microscopy, and terahertz (THz) absorption spectroscopy. The experimental data demonstrated a transformation of {alpha}-helix into {beta}-sheet starting at 26 h. This was followed by the aggregation of insulin, as shown by ThT binding, with a transition midpoint at 41 h, and by the bulk formation of mature aggregates after about 71 h. THz is a quick and non-invasive technique, which has the advantage of allowing the study of the conformational state of biomolecules and tissues. We first applied THz spectroscopy to study the amyloid fibrillation. At the terahertz frequency range of 0.2-2.0 THz, there was an apparent increase in both the absorbance and refractive index in THz spectra. Thus, THz is expected to provide a new way of looking into amyloid fibrillation.

  5. Productive mutants of niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, R.C.

    2001-01-01

    Seeds of six niger (Guizotia abyssinica Cass.) varieties ('GA-10', 'ONS-8', 'IGP-72', 'N-71', 'NB-9' and 'UN-4') were treated with 0.5, 0.75 and 1% ethyl methanesulphonate. After four generations of selection, 29 mutant lines were developed and those were evaluated from 1990-92 during Kharif (July to October) and Rabi (December to March) seasons. Average plant characteristics and yield data of four high yielding mutants along with 'IGP-76' (National Check), GA-10 (Zonal Check) and 'Semiliguda Local' (Local Check) are presented

  6. Diagnostic performance of I-123-labeled serum amyloid P component scintigraphy in patients with amyloidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hazenberg, BPC; van Rijswijk, MH; Piers, DA; Lub-de Hooge, MN; Vellenga, E; Haagsma, EB; Hawkins, PN; Jager, PL

    Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy and additional information provided by I-123-labeled serum amyloid P component ( SAP) scintigraphy in patients with systemic and localized amyloidosis. Subjects and Methods: I-123-labeled human SAP was injected intravenously into 20 controls and 189

  7. Stereoselective determination of amino acids in beta-amyloid peptides and senile plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsén, G; Bergquist, J; Westlind-Danielsson, A; Josefsson, B

    2001-06-01

    A novel method for the determination of the enantiomeric composition of peptides is presented. In this paper, the focus has been on beta-amyloid peptides from deceased Alzheimer's disease patients. The peptides are hydrolyzed using mineral acid. The free amino acids are derivatized with the chiral reagent (+)- or (-)-1-(9-anthryl)-2-propyl chloroformate and subsequently separated using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and detected using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. The high separation efficiency of the MEKC-LIF system, yielding approximately 1 million theoretical plates/m for most amino acids, facilitates the simultaneous chiral determination of nine amino acids. The samples that have been analyzed were standard 1-40 beta-amyloid peptides, in vitro precipitated beta-amyloid fibrils, and human senile plaque samples.

  8. Differential gene expression in ADAM10 and mutant ADAM10 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postina Rolf

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer disease (AD, cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP by the α-secretase ADAM10 prevented amyloid plaque formation, and alleviated cognitive deficits. Furthermore, ADAM10 overexpression increased the cortical synaptogenesis. These results suggest that upregulation of ADAM10 in the brain has beneficial effects on AD pathology. Results To assess the influence of ADAM10 on the gene expression profile in the brain, we performed a microarray analysis using RNA isolated from brains of five months old mice overexpressing either the α-secretase ADAM10, or a dominant-negative mutant (dn of this enzyme. As compared to non-transgenic wild-type mice, in ADAM10 transgenic mice 355 genes, and in dnADAM10 mice 143 genes were found to be differentially expressed. A higher number of genes was differentially regulated in double-transgenic mouse strains additionally expressing the human APP[V717I] mutant. Overexpression of proteolytically active ADAM10 affected several physiological pathways, such as cell communication, nervous system development, neuron projection as well as synaptic transmission. Although ADAM10 has been implicated in Notch and β-catenin signaling, no significant changes in the respective target genes were observed in adult ADAM10 transgenic mice. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed a downregulation of genes coding for the inflammation-associated proteins S100a8 and S100a9 induced by moderate ADAM10 overexpression. Overexpression of the dominant-negative form dnADAM10 led to a significant increase in the expression of the fatty acid-binding protein Fabp7, which also has been found in higher amounts in brains of Down syndrome patients. Conclusion In general, there was only a moderate alteration of gene expression in ADAM10 overexpressing mice. Genes coding for pro-inflammatory or pro-apoptotic proteins were not over-represented among differentially regulated genes. Even a decrease of

  9. Effect of valine 106 on structure-function relation of cytosolic human thymidine kinase - Kinetic properties and oligomerization pattern of nine substitution mutants of V106

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Hanne; Berenstein, Dvora; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    Information on the regulation and structure-function relation of enzymes involved in DNA precursor synthesis is pivotal, as defects in several of these enzymes have been found to cause depletion or deletion of mitochondrial DNA resulting in severe diseases. Here, the effect of amino acid 106...... and characterized nine mutants of amino acid 106 differing in size, conformation and polarity. According to their oligomerization pattern and thymidine kinetics, the TK1 mutants can be divided into two groups. Group I (V106A, V106I and V106T) behaves like V106WT, in that pre-assay exposure to ATP induces reversible...... transition from a dimer with low catalytic activity to a tetramer with high catalytic activity. Group II (V106G, V106H, V106K, V106L and V106Q) behaves like V106M in that they are permanently high activity tetramers, irrespective of ATP exposure. We conclude that size and conformation of amino acid 106...

  10. A dominant-negative mutant inhibits multiple prion variants through a common mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Pei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prions adopt alternative, self-replicating protein conformations and thereby determine novel phenotypes that are often irreversible. Nevertheless, dominant-negative prion mutants can revert phenotypes associated with some conformations. These observations suggest that, while intervention is possible, distinct inhibitors must be developed to overcome the conformational plasticity of prions. To understand the basis of this specificity, we determined the impact of the G58D mutant of the Sup35 prion on three of its conformational variants, which form amyloids in S. cerevisiae. G58D had been previously proposed to have unique effects on these variants, but our studies suggest a common mechanism. All variants, including those reported to be resistant, are inhibited by G58D but at distinct doses. G58D lowers the kinetic stability of the associated amyloid, enhancing its fragmentation by molecular chaperones, promoting Sup35 resolubilization, and leading to amyloid clearance particularly in daughter cells. Reducing the availability or activity of the chaperone Hsp104, even transiently, reverses curing. Thus, the specificity of inhibition is determined by the sensitivity of variants to the mutant dosage rather than mode of action, challenging the view that a unique inhibitor must be developed to combat each variant.

  11. Interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gdovinová, Veronika [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tomašovičová, Natália, E-mail: nhudak@saske.sk [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Batko, Ivan; Batková, Marianna; Balejčíková, Lucia [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Garamus, Vasyl M. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht: Zentrum fr Material, und Kstenforschung GmbH, Max-Plank-Strae 1, Geesthacht 216502 (Germany); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Physics Department, Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, 01601 Kyiv (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kopčanský, Peter [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-06-01

    This work is devoted to the structural study of complex solutions of magnetic nanoparticles with lysozyme amyloid fibrils due to possible ordering of such system by applying the external magnetic field. The interaction of magnetic nanoparticles with amyloid fibrils has been followed by atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. It has been observed that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. It was found that MNPs alter amyloids structures, namely the diameter of lysozyme amyloid fibrils is increased whereas the length of fibrils is decreased. In the same time MNPs do not change the helical pitch significantly. - Highlights: • Solution of MNPs with lysozyme amyloid fibrils was characterized by AFM and SAXS. • MNPs adsorb to lysozyme amyloid fibrils. • Diameter and size of lysozyme amyloid fibrils change due to doping with MNPs.

  12. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  13. Apolipoprotein E Regulates Amyloid Formation within Endosomes of Pigment Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume van Niel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of toxic amyloid oligomers is a key feature in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases. Formation of mature amyloid fibrils is one defense mechanism to neutralize toxic prefibrillar oligomers. This mechanism is notably influenced by apolipoprotein E variants. Cells that produce mature amyloid fibrils to serve physiological functions must exploit specific mechanisms to avoid potential accumulation of toxic species. Pigment cells have tuned their endosomes to maximize the formation of functional amyloid from the protein PMEL. Here, we show that ApoE is associated with intraluminal vesicles (ILV within endosomes and remain associated with ILVs when they are secreted as exosomes. ApoE functions in the ESCRT-independent sorting mechanism of PMEL onto ILVs and regulates the endosomal formation of PMEL amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo. This process secures the physiological formation of amyloid fibrils by exploiting ILVs as amyloid nucleating platforms.

  14. Chirality and chiroptical properties of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzwolak, Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Chirality of amyloid fibrils-linear beta-sheet-rich aggregates of misfolded protein chains-often manifests in morphological traits such as helical twist visible in atomic force microscopy and in chiroptical properties accessible to vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). According to recent studies the relationship between molecular chirality of polypeptide building blocks and superstructural chirality of amyloid fibrils may be more intricate and less deterministic than previously assumed. Several puzzling experimental findings have put into question earlier intuitive ideas on: 1) the bottom-up chirality transfer upon amyloidogenic self-assembly, and 2) the structural origins of chiroptical properties of protein aggregates. For example, removal of a single amino acid residue from an amyloidogenic all-L peptide was shown to reverse handedness of fibrils. On the other hand, certain types of amyloid aggregates revealed surprisingly strong VCD spectra with the sign and shape dependent on the conditions of fibrillation. Hence, microscopic and chiroptical studies have highlighted chirality as one more aspect of polymorphism of amyloid fibrils. This brief review is intended to outline the current state of research on amyloid-like fibrils from the perspective of their structural and superstructural chirality and chiroptical properties. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2017-07-20

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures.

  16. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hostetler, Eric D.; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gammage, Linda; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Mulhearn, James; Harrison, Scott T.; Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Barrow, James C.; Williams, David L.; Hargreaves, Richard J.; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: An 18 F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Methods: Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood–brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with 18 F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. Results: [ 18 F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC 50 =10.5±1.3 nM). Conclusions: [ 18 F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted.

  17. Modeling Cerebrovascular Pathophysiology in Amyloid-β Metabolism using Neural-Crest-Derived Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Cheung

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Summary: There is growing recognition of cerebrovascular contributions to neurodegenerative diseases. In the walls of cerebral arteries, amyloid-beta (Aβ accumulation is evident in a majority of aged people and patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Here, we leverage human pluripotent stem cells to generate vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, recapitulating brain-vasculature-specific attributes of Aβ metabolism. We confirm that the lipoprotein receptor, LRP1, functions in our neural-crest-derived SMCs to mediate Aβ uptake and intracellular lysosomal degradation. Hypoxia significantly compromises the contribution of SMCs to Aβ clearance by suppressing LRP1 expression. This enabled us to develop an assay of Aβ uptake by using the neural crest-derived SMCs with hypoxia as a stress paradigm. We then tested several vascular protective compounds in a high-throughput format, demonstrating the value of stem-cell-based phenotypic screening for novel therapeutics and drug repurposing, aimed at alleviating amyloid burden. : The contribution of blood vessel pathologies to neurodegenerative disorders is relatively neglected, partly due to inadequate human tissues for research. By using human stem cells, Cheung et al. establish a method of generating vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs from neural crest progenitors, the primary precursors that give rise to brain blood vessels. These stem-cell-derived SMCs display defective amyloid processing under chronic hypoxia, a phenomenon well documented in the cerebral vasculatures of aged people and patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Amyloid in basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Westermark, Per

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of amyloid substance was studied in two different types of skin tumours: basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis. In 9 out of 49 cases of seborrheic keratosis amyloid substance was found. In the basal cell carcinomas, 194 out of 260 cases showed amyloid deposits, a rate...

  19. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  20. Brazilin inhibits amyloid β-protein fibrillogenesis, remodels amyloid fibrils and reduces amyloid cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Jie; Guo, Jing-Jing; Gao, Ming-Tao; Hu, Sheng-Quan; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Han, Yi-Fan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Jiang, Shaoyi; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Soluble amyloid β-protein (Aβ) oligomers, the main neurotoxic species, are predominantly formed from monomers through a fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Herein, we virtually screened an in-house library of natural compounds and discovered brazilin as a dual functional compound in both Aβ42 fibrillogenesis inhibition and mature fibril remodeling, leading to significant reduction in Aβ42 cytotoxicity. The potent inhibitory effect of brazilin was proven by an IC50 of 1.5 +/- 0.3 μM, which was smaller than that of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate in Phase III clinical trials and about one order of magnitude smaller than those of curcumin and resveratrol. Most importantly, it was found that brazilin redirected Aβ42 monomers and its mature fibrils into unstructured Aβ aggregates with some β-sheet structures, which could prevent both the primary nucleation and the fibril-catalyzed secondary nucleation. Molecular simulations demonstrated that brazilin inhibited Aβ42 fibrillogenesis by directly binding to Aβ42 species via hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonding and remodeled mature fibrils by disrupting the intermolecular salt bridge Asp23-Lys28 via hydrogen bonding. Both experimental and computational studies revealed a different working mechanism of brazilin from that of known inhibitors. These findings indicate that brazilin is of great potential as a neuroprotective and therapeutic agent for Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Broad neutralization of calcium-permeable amyloid pore channels with a chimeric Alzheimer/Parkinson peptide targeting brain gangliosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Scala, Coralie; Yahi, Nouara; Flores, Alessandra; Boutemeur, Sonia; Kourdougli, Nazim; Chahinian, Henri; Fantini, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    Growing evidence supports a role for brain gangliosides in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Recently we deciphered the ganglioside-recognition code controlling specific ganglioside binding to Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ1-42) peptide and Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein. Cracking this code allowed us to engineer a short chimeric Aβ/α-synuclein peptide that recognizes all brain gangliosides. Here we show that ganglioside-deprived neural cells do no longer sustain the formation of zinc-sensitive amyloid pore channels induced by either Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein, as assessed by single-cell Ca(2+) fluorescence microscopy. Thus, amyloid channel formation, now considered a key step in neurodegeneration, is a ganglioside-dependent process. Nanomolar concentrations of chimeric peptide competitively inhibited amyloid pore formation induced by Aβ1-42 or α-synuclein in cultured neural cells. Moreover, this peptide abrogated the intracellular calcium increases induced by Parkinson's-associated mutant forms of α-synuclein (A30P, E46K and A53T). The chimeric peptide also prevented the deleterious effects of Aβ1-42 on synaptic vesicle trafficking and decreased the Aβ1-42-induced impairment of spontaneous activity in rat hippocampal slices. Taken together, these data show that the chimeric peptide has broad anti-amyloid pore activity, suggesting that a common therapeutic strategy based on the prevention of amyloid-ganglioside interactions is a reachable goal for both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Tomonaga, Masanori; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Shimada, Hiroyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy was studied clinicopathologically, with special attention given to the CT images. Cerebral hemorrhage caused by amyloid angiopathy is characterized, by a lobar-type hemorrhage involving the cortex, with direct extension into the subarachnoid space. Multiple hemorrhages are frequent, and cortical infarctions are present as complications in elderly patients without risk factors. CT scans taken in 5 cases demonstrated lobar hemorrhages in superficial locations, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently, with surrounding edema and mass effect. A subarachnoid extension of the hemorrhage through the superficial cortex, proven pathologically in all cases, was noted by CT in 4 of the 5 cases. However, cortical infarction was not detected by CT in any case. Therefore, CT is of value in the diagnosis of cerebral hemorrhage due to amyloid angiopathy based on distinctive findings such as a lobar hemorrhage in superficial regions, with extension into the subarachnoid space, frequently in multiple sites or recurrently. (author)

  3. Biofilm inhibitors that target amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-24

    Bacteria establish stable communities, known as biofilms, that are resistant to antimicrobials. Biofilm robustness is due to the presence of an extracellular matrix, which for several species-among them Bacillus subtilis-includes amyloid-like protein fibers. In this work, we show that B. subtilis biofilms can be a simple and reliable tool for screening of molecules with antiamyloid activity. We identified two molecules, AA-861 and parthenolide, which efficiently inhibited biofilms by preventing the formation of amyloid-like fibers. Parthenolide also disrupted pre-established biofilms. These molecules also impeded the formation of biofilms of other bacterial species that secrete amyloid proteins, such as Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the identified molecules decreased the conversion of the yeast protein New1 to the prion state in a heterologous host, indicating the broad range of activity of the molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Resveratrol and Amyloid-Beta: Mechanistic Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Jia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid-beta (Aβ hypothesis that dyshomeostasis between Aβ production and clearance is a very early, key molecular factor in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD has been proposed and examined in the AD research field. Scientists have focused on seeking natural products or drugs to influence the dynamic equilibrium of Aβ, targeting production and clearance of Aβ. There is emerging evidence that resveratrol (Res, a naturally occurring polyphenol mainly found in grapes and red wine, acts on AD in numerous in vivo and in vitro models. Res decreases the amyloidogenic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, enhances clearance of amyloid beta-peptides, and reduces Aβ aggregation. Moreover, Res also protects neuronal functions through its antioxidant properties. This review discusses the action of Res on Aβ production, clearance and aggregation and multiple potential mechanisms, providing evidence of the useful of Res for AD treatment.

  5. The proteome response to amyloid protein expression in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A Gomes

    Full Text Available Protein misfolding disorders such as Alzheimer, Parkinson and transthyretin amyloidosis are characterized by the formation of protein amyloid deposits. Although the nature and location of the aggregated proteins varies between different diseases, they all share similar molecular pathways of protein unfolding, aggregation and amyloid deposition. Most effects of these proteins are likely to occur at the proteome level, a virtually unexplored reality. To investigate the effects of an amyloid protein expression on the cellular proteome, we created a yeast expression system using human transthyretin (TTR as a model amyloidogenic protein. We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a living test tube, to express native TTR (non-amyloidogenic and the amyloidogenic TTR variant L55P, the later forming aggregates when expressed in yeast. Differential proteome changes were quantitatively analyzed by 2D-differential in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. We show that the expression of the amyloidogenic TTR-L55P causes a metabolic shift towards energy production, increased superoxide dismutase expression as well as of several molecular chaperones involved in protein refolding. Among these chaperones, members of the HSP70 family and the peptidyl-prolyl-cis-trans isomerase (PPIase were identified. The latter is highly relevant considering that it was previously found to be a TTR interacting partner in the plasma of ATTR patients but not in healthy or asymptomatic subjects. The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO expression is also increased. Our findings suggest that refolding and degradation pathways are activated, causing an increased demand of energetic resources, thus the metabolic shift. Additionally, oxidative stress appears to be a consequence of the amyloidogenic process, posing an enhanced threat to cell survival.

  6. Perforin Promotes Amyloid Beta Internalisation in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, Erica; Khanbolouki, Mahbod; Degavre, Charline; Samuelsson, Eva-Britt; Åkesson, Elisabet; Winblad, Bengt; Alici, Evren; Lithner, Christina Unger; Behbahani, Homira

    2017-03-01

    Studies on the mechanisms of neuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) internalisation are crucial for understanding the neuropathological progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We here investigated how extracellular Aβ peptides are internalised and focused on three different pathways: (i) via endocytic mechanisms, (ii) via the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and (iii) via the pore-forming protein perforin. Both Aβ 40 and Aβ 42 were internalised in retinoic acid differentiated neuroblastoma (RA-SH-SY5Y) cells. A higher concentration was required for Aβ 40 (250 nM) compared with Aβ 42 (100 nM). The internalised Aβ 40 showed a dot-like pattern of distribution whereas Aβ 42 accumulated in larger and distinct formations. By confocal microscopy, we showed that Aβ 40 and Aβ 42 co-localised with mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lysosomes. Aβ treatment of human primary cortical neurons (hPCN) confirmed our findings in RA-SH-SY5Y cells, but hPCN were less sensitive to Aβ; therefore, a 20 (Aβ 40 ) and 50 (Aβ 42 ) times higher concentration was needed for inducing uptake. The blocking of endocytosis completely inhibited the internalisation of Aβ peptides in RA-SH-SY5Y cells and hPCN, indicating that this is a major pathway by which Aβ enters the cells. In addition, the internalisation of Aβ 42 , but not Aβ 40 , was reduced by 55 % by blocking RAGE. Finally, for the first time we showed that pore formation in cell membranes by perforin led to Aβ internalisation in hPCN. Understanding how Aβ is internalised sheds light on the pathological role of Aβ and provides further ideas of inhibitory strategies for preventing Aβ internalisation and the spreading of neurodegeneration in AD.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide Associates with Amyloid Plaques, Neurons and Oligodendrocytes in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zhan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This review proposes that lipopolysaccharide (LPS, found in the wall of all Gram-negative bacteria could play a role in causing sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD. This is based in part upon recent studies showing that: Gram-negative E. coli bacteria can form extracellular amyloid; bacterial-encoded 16S rRNA is present in all human brains with over 70% being Gram-negative bacteria; ultrastructural analyses have shown microbes in erythrocytes of AD patients; blood LPS levels in AD patients are 3-fold the levels in control; LPS combined with focal cerebral ischemia and hypoxia produced amyloid-like plaques and myelin injury in adult rat cortex. Moreover, Gram-negative bacterial LPS was found in aging control and AD brains, though LPS levels were much higher in AD brains. In addition, LPS co-localized with amyloid plaques, peri-vascular amyloid, neurons, and oligodendrocytes in AD brains. Based upon the postulate LPS caused oligodendrocyte injury, degraded Myelin Basic Protein (dMBP levels were found to be much higher in AD compared to control brains. Immunofluorescence showed that the dMBP co-localized with β amyloid (Aβ and LPS in amyloid plaques in AD brain, and dMBP and other myelin molecules were found in the walls of vesicles in periventricular White Matter (WM. These data led to the hypothesis that LPS acts on leukocyte and microglial TLR4-CD14/TLR2 receptors to produce NFkB mediated increases of cytokines which increase Aβ levels, damage oligodendrocytes and produce myelin injury found in AD brain. Since Aβ1–42 is also an agonist for TLR4 receptors, this could produce a vicious cycle that accounts for the relentless progression of AD. Thus, LPS, the TLR4 receptor complex, and Gram-negative bacteria might be treatment or prevention targets for sporadic AD.

  8. Case report 480: Periosteal amyloid tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, S.O.; Karjoo, R.; Johnstone, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    In summary, a 66-year-old woman presented with an asymptomatic left pretibial tumor of 7 years duration. Serial radiographs over this period demonstrated a slowly enlarging periosteal tumor with focal and increasing calcifications/ossifications. No involvement of the underlying medullary bone, as demonstrated by computed tomography was noted. Following the diagnosis by biopsy of an amyloid tumor, serum and urine electrophoreses, complete blood count, SMAC panel, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum rheumatoid factor level were found to be within reference ranges. A needle biopsy of the abdominal wall failed to reveal amyloid in the fat by Congo-red staining. (orig.)

  9. Bone marrow amyloid spherulites in a case of AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommannan B K, Karthik; Sonai, Mukinkumar; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh

    2016-05-01

    Parallel arrangement of β-pleated sheets by amyloidogenic proteins is a well known phenomenon. Rarely, amyloid fibrils undergo radial orientation to form globular structures called spherulites. These amyloid spherulites show Maltese cross pattern under polarized microscopy. The clinical significance of amyloid spherulites is undetermined. Amyloidogenic proteins like insulin and β-lactoglobulin form spherulites in vitro. The senile plaques of Alzheimer's disease rarely form in vivo spherulites. Amyloid spherulites have been described in the liver and small intestine. For the first time, we document amyloid spherulite formation in the bone marrow biopsy of an AL amyloidosis patient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Brain amyloid β protein and memory disruption in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Xia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Weiming XiaCenter for Neurologic Diseases, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: The development of amyloid-containing neuritic plaques is an invariable characteristic of Alzheimer’s diseases (AD. The conversion from monomeric amyloid β protein (Aβ to oligomeric Aβ and finally neuritic plaques is highly dynamic. The specific Aß species that is correlated with disease severity remains to be discovered. Oligomeric Aβ has been detected in cultured cells, rodent and human brains, as well as human cerebrospinal fluid. Synthetic, cell, and brain derived Aβ oligomers have been found to inhibit hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP and this effect can be suppressed by the blockage of Aβ oligomer formation. A large body of evidence suggests that Aβ oligomers inhibit N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor dependent LTP; additional receptors have also been found to elicit downstream pathways upon binding to Aβ oligomers. Amyloid antibodies and small molecular compounds that reduce brain Aβ levels and block Aβ oligomer formation are capable of reversing synaptic dysfunction and these approaches hold a promising therapeutic potential to rescue memory disruption.Keywords: Alzheimer, amyloid, oligomer, long-term potentiation, NMDA

  11. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease with A2V variants of Amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-02-11

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics.

  12. Tackling amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease with A2V variants of Amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fede, Giuseppe; Catania, Marcella; Maderna, Emanuela; Morbin, Michela; Moda, Fabio; Colombo, Laura; Rossi, Alessandro; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Virgilio, Tommaso; Palamara, Luisa; Ruggerone, Margherita; Giaccone, Giorgio; Campagnani, Ilaria; Costanza, Massimo; Pedotti, Rosetta; Salvalaglio, Matteo; Salmona, Mario; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) exploiting the properties of a natural variant of Amyloid-β (Aβ) carrying the A2V substitution, which protects heterozygous carriers from AD by its ability to interact with wild-type Aβ, hindering conformational changes and assembly thereof. As prototypic compound we designed a six-mer mutated peptide (Aβ1-6A2V), linked to the HIV-related TAT protein, which is widely used for brain delivery and cell membrane penetration of drugs. The resulting molecule [Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D)] revealed strong anti-amyloidogenic effects in vitro and protected human neuroblastoma cells from Aβ toxicity. Preclinical studies in AD mouse models showed that short-term treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) inhibits Aβ aggregation and cerebral amyloid deposition, but a long treatment schedule unexpectedly increases amyloid burden, although preventing cognitive deterioration. Our data support the view that the AβA2V-based strategy can be successfully used for the development of treatments for AD, as suggested by the natural protection against the disease in human A2V heterozygous carriers. The undesirable outcome of the prolonged treatment with Aβ1-6A2VTAT(D) was likely due to the TAT intrinsic attitude to increase Aβ production, avidly bind amyloid and boost its seeding activity, warning against the use of the TAT carrier in the design of AD therapeutics. PMID:26864599

  13. Familial hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in cloned minipigs created by DNA transposition of a human PCSK9 gain-of-function mutant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Mashhadi, Rozh Husain; Sørensen, Charlotte Brandt; Kragh, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    dominant hypercholesterolemia and accelerates atherosclerosis in humans. Using Sleeping Beauty DNA transposition and cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer, we created Yucatan minipigs with liver-specific expression of human D374Y-PCSK9. D374Y-PCSK9 transgenic pigs displayed reduced hepatic low...

  14. Amyloid-β Peptide Induces Prion Protein Amyloid Formation: Evidence for Its Widespread Amyloidogenic Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo

    2018-04-12

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is associated with misfolding of prion protein (PrP) into an amyloid β-rich aggregate. Previous studies have indicated that PrP interacts with Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), but it remains elusive how this interaction impacts on the misfolding of PrP. This study presents the first in vitro evidence that Aβ induces PrP-amyloid formation at submicromolar concentrations. Interestingly, systematic mutagenesis of PrP revealed that Aβ requires no specific amino acid sequences in PrP, and induces the misfolding of other unrelated proteins (insulin and lysozyme) into amyloid fibrils in a manner analogous to PrP. This unanticipated nonspecific amyloidogenic effect of Aβ indicates that this peptide might be involved in widespread protein aggregation, regardless of the amino acid sequences of target proteins, and exacerbate the pathology of many neurodegenerative diseases. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Induced dural lymphangiogenesis facilities soluble amyloid-beta clearance from brain in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ru Wen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired amyloid-β clearance from the brain is a core pathological event in Alzheimer's disease. The therapeutic effect of current pharmacotherapies is unsatisfactory, and some treatments cause severe side effects. The meningeal lymphatic vessels might be a new route for amyloid-β clearance. This study investigated whether promoting dural lymphangiogenesis facilitated the clearance of amyloid-β from the brain. First, human lymphatic endothelial cells were treated with 100 ng/mL recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor-C (rhVEGF-C protein. Light microscopy verified that rhVEGF-C, a specific ligand for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3, significantly promoted tube formation of human lymphatic endothelial cells in vitro. In an in vivo study, 200 μg/mL rhVEGF-C was injected into the cisterna magna of APP/PS1 transgenic mice, once every 2 days, four times in total. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated high levels of dural lymphangiogenesis in Alzheimer's disease mice. One week after rhVEGF-C administration, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that levels of soluble amyloid-β were decreased in cerebrospinal fluid and brain. The Morris water maze test demonstrated that spatial cognition was restored. These results indicate that the upregulation of dural lymphangiogenesis facilities amyloid-β clearance from the brain of APP/PS1 mice, suggesting the potential of the VEGF-C/VEGFR-3 signaling pathway as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Boun...

  17. Pro-domain removal in ASP-2 and the cleavage of the amyloid precursor are influenced by pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austen Brian

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the signatures of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of aggregated amyloid protein, Aβ, in the brain. Aβ arises from cleavage of the Amyloid Precursor protein by β and γ secretases, which present attractive candidates for therapeutic targeting. Two β-secretase candidates, ASP-1 and ASP-2, were identified as aspartic proteases, both of which cleave the amyloid precursor at the β-site. These are produced as immature transmembrane proteins containing a pro-segment. Results ASP-2 expressed in HEK293-cells cleaved the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor at different β-sites at different pHs in vitro. Recent reports show that furin cleaves the pro-peptide of ASP-2, whereas ASP-1 undergoes auto-catalysis. We show that purified recombinant ASP-2 cleaves its own pro-peptide at ph 5 but not pH 8.5 as seen by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis and N-terminal sequencing. Conclusion We suggest that ASP-2 processing as well as activity are influenced by pH, and hence the cellular localisation of the protein may have profound effects on the production of Aβ. These factors should be taken into consideration in the design of potential inhibitors for these enzymes.

  18. Involvement of receptor tyrosine kinase Tyro3 in amyloidogenic APP processing and β-amyloid deposition in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zheng

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease known to humankind. It is characterized by brain atrophy, extracellular amyloid plaques, and intracellular neurofibril tangles. β-Amyloid cascade is considered the major causative player in AD. Up until now, the mechanisms underlying the process of Aβ generation and accumulation in the brain have not been well understood. Tyro3 receptor belongs to the TAM receptor subfamily of receptor protein tyrosine kinases (RPTKs. It is specifically expressed in the neurons of the neocortex and hippocampus. In this study, we established a cell model stably expressing APPswe mutants and producing Aβ. We found that overexpression of Tyro3 receptor in the cell model significantly decreased Aβ generation and also down-regulated the expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE1. However, the effects of Tyro3 were inhibited by its natural ligand, Gas6, in a concentration-dependent manner. In order to confirm the role of Tyro3 in the progression of AD development, we generated an AD transgenic mouse model accompanied by Tyro3 knockdown. We observed a significant increase in the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus in the mouse model. More plaque-associated clusters of astroglia were also detected. The present study may help researchers determine the role of Tyro3 receptor in the neuropathology of AD.

  19. Formation of amyloid fibers by monomeric light chain variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumshtein, Boris; Esswein, Shannon R; Landau, Meytal; Ryan, Christopher M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Phillips, Martin L; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R; Eisenberg, David S

    2014-10-03

    Systemic light chain amyloidosis is a lethal disease characterized by excess immunoglobulin light chains and light chain fragments composed of variable domains, which aggregate into amyloid fibers. These fibers accumulate and damage organs. Some light chains induce formation of amyloid fibers, whereas others do not, making it unclear what distinguishes amyloid formers from non-formers. One mechanism by which sequence variation may reduce propensity to form amyloid fibers is by shifting the equilibrium toward an amyloid-resistant quaternary structure. Here we identify the monomeric form of the Mcg immunoglobulin light chain variable domain as the quaternary unit required for amyloid fiber assembly. Dimers of Mcg variable domains remain stable and soluble, yet become prone to assemble into amyloid fibers upon disassociation into monomers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Human DNA polymerase delta double-mutant D316A;E318A interferes with DNA mismatch repair in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dekang; Frederiksen, Jane H.; Liberti, Sascha Emilie

    2017-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) is a highly-conserved DNA repair mechanism, whose primary role is to remove DNA replication errors preventing them from manifesting as mutations, thereby increasing the overall genome stability. Defects in MMR are associated with increased cancer risk in humans and other...... organisms. Here, we characterize the interaction between MMR and a proofreading-deficient allele of the human replicative DNA polymerase delta, PolδD316A;E318A, which has a higher capacity for strand displacement DNA synthesis than wild type Polδ. Human cell lines overexpressing PolδD316A;E318A display...

  1. Lost region in amyloid precursor protein (APP) through TALEN-mediated genome editing alters mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Wu, Fengyi; Pan, Haining; Zheng, Wenzhong; Feng, Chi; Wang, Yunfu; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Luo, Jie; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-29

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition in the brain. Aβ plaques are produced through sequential β/γ cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP), of which there are three main APP isoforms: APP695, APP751 and APP770. KPI-APPs (APP751 and APP770) are known to be elevated in AD, but the reason remains unclear. Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) induce mutations with high efficiency at specific genomic loci, and it is thus possible to knock out specific regions using TALENs. In this study, we designed and expressed TALENs specific for the C-terminus of APP in HeLa cells, in which KPI-APPs are predominantly expressed. The KPI-APP mutants lack a 12-aa region that encompasses a 5-aa trans-membrane (TM) region and 7-aa juxta-membrane (JM) region. The mutated KPI-APPs exhibited decreased mitochondrial localization. In addition, mitochondrial morphology was altered, resulting in an increase in spherical mitochondria in the mutant cells through the disruption of the balance between fission and fusion. Mitochondrial dysfunction, including decreased ATP levels, disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, increased ROS generation and impaired mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity, was also found. These results suggest that specific regions of KPI-APPs are important for mitochondrial localization and function.

  2. Functional analysis of the accessory protein TapA in Bacillus subtilis amyloid fiber assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation relies on the assembly of a fibrous scaffold formed by the protein TasA. TasA polymerizes into highly stable fibers with biochemical and morphological features of functional amyloids. Previously, we showed that assembly of TasA fibers requires the auxiliary protein TapA. In this study, we investigated the roles of TapA sequences from the C-terminal and N-terminal ends and TapA cysteine residues in its ability to promote the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers. We found that the cysteine residues are not essential for the formation of TasA fibers, as their replacement by alanine residues resulted in only minor defects in biofilm formation. Mutating sequences in the C-terminal half had no effect on biofilm formation. However, we identified a sequence of 8 amino acids in the N terminus that is key for TasA fiber formation. Strains expressing TapA lacking these 8 residues were completely defective in biofilm formation. In addition, this TapA mutant protein exhibited a dominant negative effect on TasA fiber formation. Even in the presence of wild-type TapA, the mutant protein inhibited fiber assembly in vitro and delayed biofilm formation in vivo. We propose that this 8-residue sequence is crucial for the formation of amyloid-like fibers on the cell surface, perhaps by mediating the interaction between TapA or TapA and TasA molecules.

  3. Photoacoustic assay for probing amyloid formation: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Elena; Yoon, Soon Joon; Pelivanov, Ivan; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2018-02-01

    The formation of amyloid - aggregate of misfolded proteins - is associated with more than 50 human pathologies, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Investigating protein aggregation is a critical step in drug discovery and development of therapeutics targeted to these pathologies. However, screens to identify protein aggregates are challenging due to the stochastic character of aggregate nucleation. Here we employ photoacoustics (PA) to screen thermodynamic conditions and solution components leading to formation of protein aggregates. Particularly, we study the temperature dependence of the Gruneisen parameter in optically-contrasted, undersaturated and supersaturated solutions of glycoside hydrolase (lysozyme). As nucleation of protein aggregates proceeds in two steps, where the first is liquid-liquid separation (rearrangement of solute's density), the PA response from complex solutions and its temperature-dependence monitor nucleation and differentiate undersaturated and supersaturated protein solutions. We demonstrate that in the temperature range from 22 to 0° C the PA response of contrasted undersaturated protein solution behaves similar to water and exhibits zero thermal expansion at 4°C or below, while the response of contrasted supersaturated protein solution is nearly temperature independent, similar to the behavior of oils. These results can be used to develop a PA assay for high-throughput screening of multi-parametric conditions (pH, ionic strength, chaperone, etc.) for protein aggregation that can become a key tool in drug discovery, targeting aggregate formation for a variety of amyloids.

  4. Amyloid positron emission tomography in sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy: A systematic critical update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Farid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is a very common small vessel disease of the brain, showing preferential and progressive amyloid-βdeposition in the wall of small arterioles and capillaries of the leptomeninges and cerebral cortex. CAA now encompasses not only a specific cerebrovascular pathological trait, but also different clinical syndromes - including spontaneous lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH, dementia and ‘amyloid spells’ - an expanding spectrum of brain parenchymal MRI lesions and a set of diagnostic criteria – the Boston criteria, which have resulted in increasingly detecting CAA during life. Although currently available validated diagnostic criteria perform well in multiple lobar ICH, a formal diagnosis is currently lacking unless a brain biopsy is performed. This is partly because in practice CAA MRI biomarkers provide only indirect evidence for the disease. An accurate diagnosis of CAA in different clinical settings would have substantial impact for ICH risk stratification and antithrombotic drug use in elderly people, but also for sample homogeneity in drug trials. It has recently been demonstrated that vascular (in addition to parenchymal amyloid-βdeposition can be detected and quantified in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET amyloid tracers. This non-invasive approach has the potential to provide a molecular signature of CAA, and could in turn have major clinical impact. However, several issues around amyloid-PET in CAA remain unsettled and hence its diagnostic utility is limited. In this article we systematically review and critically appraise the published literature on amyloid-PET (PiB and other tracers in sporadic CAA. We focus on two key areas: (a the diagnostic utility of amyloid-PET in CAA and (b the use of amyloid-PET as a window to understand pathophysiological mechanism of the disease. Key issues around amyloid-PET imaging in CAA, including relevant technical aspects are also covered in depth

  5. Enamelin (Enam) is essential for amelogenesis: ENU-induced mouse mutants as models for different clinical subtypes of human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kunihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Nagano, Junko; Shimizu, Aya; Fujimoto, Naomi; Kawai, Akiko; Miura, Ikuo; Kaneda, Hideki; Kobayashi, Kimio; Ishijima, Junko; Maeda, Takahide; Gondo, Yoichi; Noda, Tetsuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2005-03-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of commonly inherited defects of dental enamel formation, which exhibits marked genetic and clinical heterogeneity. The genetic basis of this heterogeneity is still poorly understood. Enamelin, the affected gene product in one form of AI (AIH2), is an extracellular matrix protein that is one of the components of enamel. We isolated three ENU-induced dominant mouse mutations, M100395, M100514 and M100521, which caused AI-like phenotypes in the incisors and molars of the affected individuals. Linkage analyses mapped each of the three mutations to a region of chromosome 5 that contained the genes encoding enamelin (Enam) and ameloblastin (Ambn). Sequence analysis revealed that each mutation was a single-base substitution in Enam. M100395 (Enam(Rgsc395)) and M100514 (Enam(Rgsc514)) were putative missense mutations that caused S to I and E to G substitutions at positions 55 and 57 of the translated protein, respectively. Enam(Rgsc395) and Enam(Rgsc514) heterozygotes showed severe breakage of the enamel surface, a phenotype that resembled local hypoplastic AI. The M100521 mutation (Enam(Rgsc521)) was a T to A substitution at the splicing donor site in intron 4. This mutation resulted in a frameshift that gave rise to a premature stop codon. The transcript of the Enam(Rgsc521) mutant allele was degraded, indicating that Enam(Rgsc521) is a loss-of-function mutation. Enam(Rgsc521) heterozygotes showed a hypomaturation-type AI phenotype in the incisors, possibly due to haploinsufficiency of Enam. Enam(Rgsc521) homozygotes showed complete loss of enamel on the incisors and the molars. Thus, we report here that the Enam gene is essential for amelogenesis, and that mice with different point mutations at Enam may provide good animal models to study the different clinical subtypes of AI.

  6. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, C.Z.; Yee, J.; Mitchell, D.L.; Britt, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  7. Construindo Marcas Mutantes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizete De Azevedo Kreutz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é o resultado de estudos realizados desde 2000 e busca instrumentalizar os proñssionals para a construção de Marcas Mutantes, que é   uma tendência contemporânea nas estratégias comunicacionais e de branding. Embora esta estratégia ainda não esteja consolidada, observamos que a mesma tem obtido um crescimento constante e tem sido adotadas pelas mais diferentes categorias de marcas e não apenas por aquelas direcionadas aos jovens, ao esporte, ao entretenimento, como era no principia. Com base na Hermenêutica de Profundidade de Thompson (1995, alicerçada nas pesquisas bibliográficas, de intemet, entrevistas e análise semiótica, desenhamos um método de construção de Marcas Mutantes dividido em sete fases. Como resultado, esperamos que este estudo possa auxiliar na compreensão dos processos envolvidos, ao mesmo tempo que provoque a discussão sobreo mesmo e, por consequência, o seu aprimoramento.

  8. [Architecture of the X chromosome, expression of LIM kinase 1, and recombination in the agnostic mutants of Drosophila: a model of human Williams syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savvateeva-Popova, E V; Peresleni, A I; Sharagina, L M; Medvedeva, A V; Korochkina, S E; Grigor'eva, I V; Diuzhikova, N A; Popov, A V; Baricheva, E M; Karagodin, D; Heisenberg, M

    2004-06-01

    As the Human Genome and Drosophila Genome Projects were completed, it became clear that functions of human disease-associated genes may be elucidated by studying the phenotypic expression of mutations affecting their structural or functional homologs in Drosophila. Genomic diseases were identified as a new class of human disorders. Their cause is recombination, which takes place at gene-flanking duplicons to generate chromosome aberrations such as deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations. The resulting imbalance of the dosage of developmentally important genes arises at a frequency of 10(-3) (higher than the mutation rate of individual genes) and leads to syndromes with multiple manifestations, including cognitive defects. Genomic DNA fragments were cloned from the Drosophila melanogaster agnostic locus, whose mutations impair learning ability and memory. As a result, the locus was exactly localized in X-chromosome region 11A containing the LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) gene (CG1848), which is conserved among many species. Hemizygosity for the LIMK1 gene, which is caused by recombination at neighboring extended repeats, underlies cognitive disorders in human Williams syndrome. LIMK1 is a component of the integrin signaling cascade, which regulates the functions of the actin cytoskeleton, synaptogenesis, and morphogenesis in the developing brain. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed LIMK1 in all subdomains of the central complex and the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster. Like in the human genome, the D. melanogaster region is flanked by numerous repeats, which were detected by molecular genetic methods and analysis of ectopic chromosome pairing. The repeats determined a higher rate of spontaneous and induced recombination. including unequal crossing over, in the agnostic gene region. Hence, the agnostic locus was considered as the first D. melanogaster model suitable for studying the genetic defect associated with Williams syndrome in human.

  9. Alzheimer's disease amyloid-beta links lens and brain pathology in Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliet A Moncaster

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, trisomy 21 is the most common chromosomal disorder and the leading genetic cause of intellectual disability in humans. In DS, triplication of chromosome 21 invariably includes the APP gene (21q21 encoding the Alzheimer's disease (AD amyloid precursor protein (APP. Triplication of the APP gene accelerates APP expression leading to cerebral accumulation of APP-derived amyloid-beta peptides (Abeta, early-onset AD neuropathology, and age-dependent cognitive sequelae. The DS phenotype complex also includes distinctive early-onset cerulean cataracts of unknown etiology. Previously, we reported increased Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and disease-linked supranuclear cataracts in the ocular lenses of subjects with AD. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that related AD-linked Abeta pathology underlies the distinctive lens phenotype associated with DS. Ophthalmological examinations of DS subjects were correlated with phenotypic, histochemical, and biochemical analyses of lenses obtained from DS, AD, and normal control subjects. Evaluation of DS lenses revealed a characteristic pattern of supranuclear opacification accompanied by accelerated supranuclear Abeta accumulation, co-localizing amyloid pathology, and fiber cell cytoplasmic Abeta aggregates (approximately 5 to 50 nm identical to the lens pathology identified in AD. Peptide sequencing, immunoblot analysis, and ELISA confirmed the identity and increased accumulation of Abeta in DS lenses. Incubation of synthetic Abeta with human lens protein promoted protein aggregation, amyloid formation, and light scattering that recapitulated the molecular pathology and clinical features observed in DS lenses. These results establish the genetic etiology of the distinctive lens phenotype in DS and identify the molecular origin and pathogenic mechanism by which lens pathology is expressed in this common chromosomal disorder. Moreover, these findings confirm increased Abeta

  10. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  11. Modeling the Interaction between β-Amyloid Aggregates and Choline Acetyltransferase Activity and Its Relation with Cholinergic Dysfunction through Two-Enzyme/Two-Compartment Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedia Fgaier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of β-amyloid aggregates on activity of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT which is responsible for synthesizing acetylcholine (ACh in human brain is investigated through the two-enzyme/two-compartment (2E2C model where the presynaptic neuron is considered as compartment 1 while both the synaptic cleft and the postsynaptic neuron are considered as compartment 2 through suggesting three different kinetic mechanisms for the inhibition effect. It is found that the incorporation of ChAT inhibition by β-amyloid aggregates into the 2E2C model is able to yield dynamic solutions for concentrations of generated β-amyloid, ACh, choline, acetate, and pH in addition to the rates of ACh synthesis and ACh hydrolysis in compartments 1 and 2. It is observed that ChAT activity needs a high concentration of β-amyloid aggregates production rate. It is found that ChAT activity is reduced significantly when neurons are exposed to high levels of β-amyloid aggregates leading to reduction in levels of ACh which is one of the most significant physiological symptoms of AD. Furthermore, the system of ACh neurocycle is dominated by the oscillatory behavior when ChAT enzyme is completely inhibited by β-amyloid. It is observed that the direct inactivation of ChAT by β-amyloid aggregates may be a probable mechanism contributing to the development of AD.

  12. Two-dimensional sum-frequency generation (2D SFG) spectroscopy: summary of principles and its application to amyloid fiber monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Ho, Jia-Jung; Serrano, Arnaldo L; Skoff, David R; Zhang, Tianqi; Zanni, Martin T

    2015-01-01

    By adding a mid-infrared pulse shaper to a sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectrometer, we have built a 2D SFG spectrometer capable of measuring spectra analogous to 2D IR spectra but with monolayer sensitivity and SFG selection rules. In this paper, we describe the experimental apparatus and provide an introduction to 2D SFG spectroscopy to help the reader interpret 2D SFG spectra. The main aim of this manuscript is to report 2D SFG spectra of the amyloid forming peptide FGAIL. FGAIL is a critical segment of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) that aggregates in people with type 2 diabetes. FGAIL is catalyzed into amyloid fibers by many types of surfaces. Here, we study the structure of FGAIL upon deposition onto a gold surface covered with a self-assembled monolayer of methyl-4-mercaptobenzoate (MMB) that produces an ester coating. FGAIL deposited on bare gold does not form ordered layers. The measured 2D SFG spectrum is consistent with amyloid fiber formation, exhibiting both the parallel (a+) and perpendicular (a-) symmetry modes associated with amyloid β-sheets. Cross peaks are observed between the ester stretches of the coating and the FGAIL peptides. Simulations are presented for two possible structures of FGAIL amyloid β-sheets that illustrate the sensitivity of the 2D SFG spectra to structure and orientation. These results provide some of the first molecular insights into surface catalyzed amyloid fiber structure.

  13. A Peptide Derived from the HIV-1 gp120 Coreceptor-Binding Region Promotes Formation of PAP248-286 Amyloid Fibrils to Enhance HIV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinquan Chen

    Full Text Available Semen is a major vehicle for HIV transmission. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP fragments, such as PAP248-286, in human semen can form amyloid fibrils to enhance HIV infection. Other endogenous or exogenous factors present during sexual intercourse have also been reported to promote the formation of seminal amyloid fibrils.Here, we demonstrated that a synthetic 15-residue peptide derived from the HIV-1 gp120 coreceptor-binding region, designated enhancing peptide 2 (EP2, can rapidly self-assemble into nanofibers. These EP2-derivated nanofibers promptly accelerated the formation of semen amyloid fibrils by PAP248-286, as shown by Thioflavin T (ThT and Congo red assays. The amyloid fibrils presented similar morphology, assessed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM, in the presence or absence of EP2. Circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy revealed that EP2 accelerates PAP248-286 amyloid fibril formation by promoting the structural transition of PAP248-286 from a random coil into a cross-β-sheet. Newly formed semen amyloid fibrils effectively enhanced HIV-1 infection in TZM-bl cells and U87 cells by promoting the binding of HIV-1 virions to target cells.Nanofibers composed of EP2 promote the formation of PAP248-286 amyloid fibrils and enhance HIV-1 infection.

  14. 2A4 binds soluble and insoluble light chain aggregates from AL amyloidosis patients and promotes clearance of amyloid deposits by phagocytosis †.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Mark; Torres, Ronald; Dolan, Philip J; Tam, Stephen J; Tapia, Jose R; Li, Lauri; Salmans, Joshua R; Barbour, Robin M; Shughrue, Paul J; Nijjar, Tarlochan; Schenk, Dale; Kinney, Gene G; Zago, Wagner

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis is characterized by misfolded light chain (LC) (amyloid) deposition in various peripheral organs, leading to progressive dysfunction and death. There are no regulatory agency-approved treatments for AL amyloidosis, and none of the available standard of care approaches directly targets the LC protein that constitutes the amyloid. NEOD001, currently in late-stage clinical trials, is a conformation-specific, anti-LC antibody designed to specifically target misfolded LC aggregates and promote phagocytic clearance of AL amyloid deposits. The present study demonstrated that the monoclonal antibody 2A4, the murine form of NEOD001, binds to patient-derived soluble and insoluble LC aggregates and induces phagocytic clearance of AL amyloid in vitro. 2A4 specifically labeled all 21 fresh-frozen organ samples studied, which were derived from 10 patients representing both κ and λ LC amyloidosis subtypes. 2A4 immunoreactivity largely overlapped with thioflavin T-positive labeling, and 2A4 bound both soluble and insoluble LC aggregates extracted from patient tissue. Finally, 2A4 induced macrophage engagement and phagocytic clearance of AL amyloid deposits in vitro. These findings provide further evidence that 2A4/NEOD001 can effectively clear and remove human AL-amyloid from tissue and further support the rationale for the evaluation of NEOD001 in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  15. 2A4 binds soluble and insoluble light chain aggregates from AL amyloidosis patients and promotes clearance of amyloid deposits by phagocytosis †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, Mark; Torres, Ronald; Dolan, Philip J.; Tam, Stephen J.; Tapia, Jose R.; Li, Lauri; Salmans, Joshua R.; Barbour, Robin M.; Shughrue, Paul J.; Nijjar, Tarlochan; Schenk, Dale; Kinney, Gene G.; Zago, Wagner

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis is characterized by misfolded light chain (LC) (amyloid) deposition in various peripheral organs, leading to progressive dysfunction and death. There are no regulatory agency–approved treatments for AL amyloidosis, and none of the available standard of care approaches directly targets the LC protein that constitutes the amyloid. NEOD001, currently in late-stage clinical trials, is a conformation-specific, anti-LC antibody designed to specifically target misfolded LC aggregates and promote phagocytic clearance of AL amyloid deposits. The present study demonstrated that the monoclonal antibody 2A4, the murine form of NEOD001, binds to patient-derived soluble and insoluble LC aggregates and induces phagocytic clearance of AL amyloid in vitro. 2A4 specifically labeled all 21 fresh-frozen organ samples studied, which were derived from 10 patients representing both κ and λ LC amyloidosis subtypes. 2A4 immunoreactivity largely overlapped with thioflavin T–positive labeling, and 2A4 bound both soluble and insoluble LC aggregates extracted from patient tissue. Finally, 2A4 induced macrophage engagement and phagocytic clearance of AL amyloid deposits in vitro. These findings provide further evidence that 2A4/NEOD001 can effectively clear and remove human AL-amyloid from tissue and further support the rationale for the evaluation of NEOD001 in patients with AL amyloidosis. PMID:27494229

  16. Inactivation of Prions and Amyloid Seeds with Hypochlorous Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hughson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypochlorous acid (HOCl is produced naturally by neutrophils and other cells to kill conventional microbes in vivo. Synthetic preparations containing HOCl can also be effective as microbial disinfectants. Here we have tested whether HOCl can also inactivate prions and other self-propagating protein amyloid seeds. Prions are deadly pathogens that are notoriously difficult to inactivate, and standard microbial disinfection protocols are often inadequate. Recommended treatments for prion decontamination include strongly basic (pH ≥~12 sodium hypochlorite bleach, ≥1 N sodium hydroxide, and/or prolonged autoclaving. These treatments are damaging and/or unsuitable for many clinical, agricultural and environmental applications. We have tested the anti-prion activity of a weakly acidic aqueous formulation of HOCl (BrioHOCl that poses no apparent hazard to either users or many surfaces. For example, BrioHOCl can be applied directly to skin and mucous membranes and has been aerosolized to treat entire rooms without apparent deleterious effects. Here, we demonstrate that immersion in BrioHOCl can inactivate not only a range of target microbes, including spores of Bacillus subtilis, but also prions in tissue suspensions and on stainless steel. Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC assays showed that BrioHOCl treatments eliminated all detectable prion seeding activity of human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, bovine spongiform encephalopathy, cervine chronic wasting disease, sheep scrapie and hamster scrapie; these findings indicated reductions of ≥103- to 106-fold. Transgenic mouse bioassays showed that all detectable hamster-adapted scrapie infectivity in brain homogenates or on steel wires was eliminated, representing reductions of ≥~105.75-fold and >104-fold, respectively. Inactivation of RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated with free chlorine concentration and higher order aggregation or destruction of proteins generally, including prion

  17. Vitamin k3 inhibits protein aggregation: Implication in the treatment of amyloid diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Parvez; Chaturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Zaman, Masihuz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-05-27

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and familial amyloid polyneuropathy etc. In this study, anti-fibrillation activity of vitamin k3 and its effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and Aβ-42 peptide were investigated. Here, in combination with Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), transmission electron microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay, we demonstrated that vitamin k3 significantly inhibits fibril formation as well as the inhibitory effect is dose dependent manner. Our experimental studies inferred that vitamin k3 exert its neuro protective effect against amyloid induced cytotoxicity through concerted pathway, modifying the aggregation formation towards formation of nontoxic aggregates. Molecular docking demonstrated that vitamin k3 mediated inhibition of HEWL and Aβ-42 fibrillogenesis may be initiated by interacting with proteolytic resistant and aggregation prone regions respectively. This work would provide an insight into the mechanism of protein aggregation inhibition by vitamin k3; pave the way for discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effect against amyloid formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Caspase activation increases beta-amyloid generation independently of caspase cleavage of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, Giuseppina; Koh, Young Ho; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2003-11-14

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes "alternative" proteolysis mediated by caspases. Three major caspase recognition sites have been identified in the APP, i.e. one at the C terminus (Asp720) and two at the N terminus (Asp197 and Asp219). Caspase cleavage at Asp720 has been suggested as leading to increased production of Abeta. Thus, we set out to determine which putative caspase sites in APP, if any, are cleaved in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines concurrently with the increased Abeta production that occurs during apoptosis. We found that cleavage at Asp720 occurred concurrently with caspase 3 activation and the increased production of total secreted Abeta and Abeta1-42 in association with staurosporine- and etoposide-induced apoptosis. To investigate the contribution of caspase cleavage of APP to Abeta generation, we expressed an APP mutant truncated at Asp720 that mimics APP caspase cleavage at the C-terminal site. This did not increase Abeta generation but, in contrast, dramatically decreased Abeta production in Chinese hamster ovary cells. Furthermore, the ablation of caspase-dependent cleavage at Asp720, Asp197, and Asp219 (by site-directed mutagenesis) did not prevent enhanced Abeta production following etoposide-induced apoptosis. These findings indicate that the enhanced Abeta generation associated with apoptosis does not require cleavage of APP at its C-terminal (Asp720) and/or N-terminal caspase sites.

  19. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the T790M mutant EGFR inhibitor osimertinib (AZD9291) in human plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rood, Johannes J M; van Bussel, Mark T J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Sparidans, Rolf W

    2016-01-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry of the highly selective irreversible covalent inhibitor of EGFR-TK, osimertinib in human plasma was developed and validated, using pazopanib as an internal standard. The validation was

  20. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D. [Univ. of MIchigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  1. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  2. Isozyme differences in barley mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AI-Jibouri, A A.M.; Dham, K M [Department of Botany, Nuclear Research Centre, Baghdad (Iraq)

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Thirty mutants (M{sub 11}) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) induced by physical and chemical mutagens were analysed for isozyme composition using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that these mutants were different in the isozymes leucine aminopeptidase, esterase and peroxidase. The differences included the number of forms of each enzyme, relative mobility value and their intensity on the gel. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase isozyme was found in six molecular forms and these forms were similar in all mutants. (author)

  3. Isozyme differences in barley mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AI-Jibouri, A.A.M.; Dham, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Thirty mutants (M 11 ) of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) induced by physical and chemical mutagens were analysed for isozyme composition using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results show that these mutants were different in the isozymes leucine aminopeptidase, esterase and peroxidase. The differences included the number of forms of each enzyme, relative mobility value and their intensity on the gel. Glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase isozyme was found in six molecular forms and these forms were similar in all mutants. (author)

  4. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H.; Rao, Eshaan R.; McNellis, Brittany M.; Huang, Eric S.; Hemmy, Laura S.; Forster, Colleen L.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Borchelt, David R.; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H.; Zahs, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) with Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ~4.5 times that of 21-month Tg2576 mice and ~15 times that of 21–24-month rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort. PMID:28059792

  5. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H; Rao, Eshaan R; McNellis, Brittany M; Huang, Eric S; Hemmy, Laura S; Forster, Colleen L; Kuskowski, Michael A; Borchelt, David R; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H; Zahs, Kathleen R

    2017-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) with Alzheimer's disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ∼4.5 times that of 21-month-old Tg2576 mice and ∼15 times that of 21-24-month-old rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort.

  6. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    The success of Pseudomonas species as opportunistic pathogens derives in great part from their ability to form stable biofilms that offer protection against chemical and mechanical attack. The extracellular matrix of biofilms contains numerous biomolecules, and it has recently been discovered...... that in Pseudomonas one of the components includes β-sheet rich amyloid fibrils (functional amyloid) produced by the fap operon. However, the role of the functional amyloid within the biofilm has not yet been investigated in detail. Here we investigate how the fap-based amyloid produced by Pseudomonas affects biofilm...... hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  7. Ten Challenges of the Amyloid Hypothesis of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2017-01-01

    The inability to effectively halt or cure Alzheimer's disease (AD), exacerbated by the recent failures of high-profile clinical trials, emphasizes the urgent need to understand the complex biochemistry of this major neurodegenerative disease. In this paper, ten central, current challenges of the major paradigm in the field, the amyloid hypothesis, are sharply formulated. These challenges together show that new approaches are necessary that address data heterogeneity, increase focus on the proteome level, use available human patient data more actively, account for the aging phenotype as a background model of the disease, unify our understanding of the interplay between genetic and non-genetic risk factors, and combine into one framework both the familial and sporadic forms of the disease.

  8. Detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms in p53 mutation hotspots and expression of mutant p53 in human cell lines using an enzyme-linked electrochemical assay

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Šimková, Eva; Vychodilová, Zdenka; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 15 (2009), s. 1723-1729 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/07/1195; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : enzyme-linked electrochemical assay * SNP typing * p53 mutation Subject RIV: AQ - Safety, Health Protection, Human - Machine Impact factor: 2.630, year: 2009

  9. Strong transthyretin immunostaining: potential pitfall in cardiac amyloid typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoskar, Anjali A; Efebera, Yvonne; Hasan, Ayesha; Brodsky, Sergey; Nadasdy, Gyongyi; Dogan, Ahmet; Nadasdy, Tibor

    2011-11-01

    Although systemic amyloidosis commonly presents with renal disease, cardiac involvement usually determines the patient's prognosis. Cardiac involvement is seen in light chain amyloid and transthyretin amyloidosis. Distinguishing between these two is critical because prognosis and treatment differ. Our study demonstrates the unreliability of transthyretin immunostaining in subtyping cardiac amyloid. Between January 2003 and August 2010, we retrieved 229 native endomyocardial biopsies, of which 24 had amyloid. Immunohistochemistry for κ, λ, transthyretin, and serum amyloid A protein was performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Staining was graded as weak (trace to 1+) or strong (2 to 3+). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic typing of microdissected amyloid material was performed on selected cases. Fifteen patients had monoclonal gammopathy/plasma cell dyscrasia with cardiac amyloid. Eight of them (53%) showed strong transthyretin staining in the cardiac amyloid deposits. MS was performed in 5 of these 8 biopsies, and all 5 biopsies revealed light chain amyloid-type amyloid. Two of these 5 light chain amyloid biopsies did not even have concomitant strong staining for the appropriate light chain. Among the 15 cases with plasma cell dyscrasia, only 7 biopsies showed strong staining for the corresponding monoclonal light chain. Strong, false-positive immunostaining for transthyretin in cardiac amyloid is a potential pitfall, augmented by the frequent lack of staining for immunoglobulin light chains. Therefore, the presence of amyloid in the cardiac biopsy should prompt a search for plasma cell dyscrasia irrespective of transthyretin staining. Confirmation with MS should be sought, particularly if there is any discrepancy between κ/λ staining and serum immunofixation results.

  10. Pharmacological and functional characterisation of the wild-type and site-directed mutants of the human H1 histamine receptor stably expressed in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguilevsky, N; Varsalona, F; Guillaume, J P; Noyer, M; Gillard, M; Daliers, J; Henichart, J P; Bollen, A

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA clone for the human histamine H1 receptor was isolated from a lung cDNA library and stably expressed in CHO cells. The recombinant receptor protein present in the cell membranes, displayed the functional and binding characteristics of histamine H1 receptors. Mutation of Ser155 to Ala in the fourth transmembrane domain did not significantly change the affinity of the receptor for histamine and H1 antagonists. However, mutation of the fifth transmembrane Asn198 to Ala resulted in a dramatic decrease of the affinity for histamine binding, and for the histamine-induced polyphosphoinositides breakdown, whereas the affinity towards antagonists was not significantly modified. In addition, mutation of another fifth transmembrane amino acid, Thr194 to Ala also diminished, but to a lesser extent, the affinity for histamine. These data led us to propose a molecular model for histamine interaction with the human H1 receptor. In this model, the amide moiety of Asn198 and the hydroxyl group of Thr194 are involved in hydrogen bonding with the nitrogen atoms of the imidazole ring of histamine. Moreover, mutation of Thr194 to Ala demonstrated that this residue is responsible for the discrimination between enantiomers of cetirizine.

  11. Toxic β-Amyloid (Aβ) Alzheimer's Ion Channels: From Structure to Function and Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    Full-length amyloid beta peptides (Aβ1-40/42) form neuritic amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and are implicated in AD pathology. Recent biophysical and cell biological studies suggest a direct mechanism of amyloid beta toxicity -- ion channel mediated loss of calcium homeostasis. Truncated amyloid beta fragments (Aβ11-42 and Aβ17-42), commonly termed as non-amyloidogenic are also found in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and in the preamyloid lesions of Down's syndrome (DS), a model system for early onset AD study. Very little is known about the structure and activity of these smaller peptides although they could be key AD and DS pathological agents. Using complementary techniques of explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), channel conductance measurements, cell calcium uptake assays, neurite degeneration and cell death assays, we have shown that non-amyloidogenic Aβ9-42 and Aβ17-42 peptides form ion channels with loosely attached subunits and elicit single channel conductances. The subunits appear mobile suggesting insertion of small oligomers, followed by dynamic channel assembly and dissociation. These channels allow calcium uptake in APP-deficient cells and cause neurite degeneration in human cortical neurons. Channel conductance, calcium uptake and neurite degeneration are selectively inhibited by zinc, a blocker of amyloid ion channel activity. Thus truncated Aβ fragments could account for undefined roles played by full length Aβs and provide a novel mechanism of AD and DS pathology. The emerging picture from our large-scale simulations is that toxic ion channels formed by β-sheets are highly polymorphic, and spontaneously break into loosely interacting dynamic units (though still maintaining ion channel structures as imaged with AFM), that associate and dissociate leading to toxic ion flux. This sharply contrasts intact conventional gated ion channels that consist of tightly

  12. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-28

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  13. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  14. Amyloid PET in pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Cortés-Martínez, Ana; Pytel, Vanesa; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-07-01

    Pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis is a rare form of demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) using amyloid-tracers has also been suggested as a marker of damage in white matter lesions in multiple sclerosis due to the nonspecific uptake of these tracers in white matter. We present the case of a 59 year-old woman with a pathological-confirmed pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis, who was studied with the amyloid tracer 18 F-florbetaben. The patient had developed word-finding difficulties and right hemianopia twelve years ago. In that time, MRI showed a lesion on the left hemisphere with an infiltrating aspect in frontotemporal lobes. Brain biopsy showed demyelinating areas and inflammation. During the following years, two new clinical relapses occurred. 18 F-florbetaben PET showed lower uptake in the white matter lesion visualized in the CT and MRI images. Decreased tracer uptake was also observed in a larger area of the left hemisphere beyond the lesions observed on MRI or CT. White matter lesion volume on FLAIR was 44.2mL, and tracer uptake change between damaged white matter and normal appearing white matter was - 40.5%. Standardized uptake value was inferior in the pseudotumoral lesion than in the other white matter lesions. We report the findings of amyloid PET in a patient with pseudotumoral multiple sclerosis. This case provides further evidence on the role of amyloid PET in the assessment of white matter and demyelinating diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transbronchial biopsies safely diagnose amyloid lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Praveen; Keyes, Colleen M.; Hankinson, Elizabeth A.; O’Hara, Carl J.; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Berk, John L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Autopsy identifies lung involvement in 58–92% of patients with the most prevalent forms of systemic amyloidoses. In the absence of lung biopsies, amyloid lung disease often goes unrecognized. Report of a death following transbronchial biopsies in a patient with systemic amyloidosis cautioned against the procedure in this patient cohort. We reviewed our experience with transbronchial biopsies in patients with amyloidosis to determine the safety and utility of bronchoscopic lung biopsies. Methods We identified patients referred to the Amyloidosis Center at Boston Medical Center with lung amyloidosis diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsies (TBBX). Amyloid typing was determined by immunohistochemistry or mass spectrometry. Standard end organ assessments, including pulmonary function test (PFT) and chest tomography (CT) imaging, and extra-thoracic biopsies established the extent of disease. Results Twenty-five (21.7%) of 115 patients with lung amyloidosis were diagnosed by TBBX. PFT classified 33.3% with restrictive physiology, 28.6% with obstructive disease, and 9.5% mixed physiology; 9.5% exhibited isolated diffusion defects while 19% had normal pulmonary testing. Two view chest or CT imaging identified focal opacities in 52% of cases and diffuse interstitial disease in 48%. Amyloid type and disease extent included 68% systemic AL disease, 16% localized (lung limited) AL disease, 12% ATTR disease, and 4% AA amyloidosis. Fluoroscopy was not used during biopsy. No procedure complications were reported. Conclusions Our case series of 25 patients supports the use of bronchoscopic transbronchial biopsies for diagnosis of parenchymal lung amyloidosis. Normal PFTs do not rule out the histologic presence of amyloid lung disease. PMID:28393574

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Sally L; Waddington, Lynne J; Goldie, Kenneth N

    2011-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy of negatively stained and cryo-prepared specimens allows amyloid fibrils to be visualised at high resolution in a dried or a hydrated state, and is an essential method for characterising the morphology of fibrils and pre-fibrillar species. We outline the key steps involved in the preparation and observation of samples using negative staining and cryo-electron preservation. We also discuss methods to measure fibril characteristics, such as fibril width, from electron micrographs.

  17. Beta-amyloid and cholinergic neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležal, Vladimír; Kašparová, Jana

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 28, 3-4 (2003), s. 499-506 ISSN 0364-3190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/01/0283; GA AV ČR IAA5011206 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cholinergic neurons * AlzheimerŽs disease * beta-amyloid Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.511, year: 2003

  18. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy: diagnosis and potential therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stewart A; Patel, Ranish K; Lutsep, Helmi L

    2018-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by the pathologic deposition of amyloid-beta within cortical and leptomeningeal arteries, arterioles, capillaries and, in rare cases, the venules of the brain. It is often associated with the development of lobar intracerebral hemorrhages (ICHs) but may cause other neurologic symptoms or be asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics, such as lobar microbleeds, support a diagnosis of CAA and assist with hemorrhage risk assessments. Immunosuppressants are used to treat rarer inflammatory forms of CAA. For the more common forms of CAA, the use of antihypertensive medications can prevent ICH recurrence while the use of antithrombotics may increase hemorrhage risk. Anti-amyloid approaches to treatment have not yet been investigated in phase 3 trials. Areas covered: A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE on the topics of imaging, biomarkers, ICH prevention and treatment trials in CAA, focusing on its current diagnosis and management and opportunities for future therapeutic approaches. Expert commentary: There is likely a significant unrecognized burden of CAA in the elderly population. Continued research efforts to discover biomarkers that allow the early diagnosis of CAA will enhance the opportunity to develop treatment interventions.

  19. Mapping of the gene encoding the. beta. -amyloid precursor protein and its relationship to the Down syndrome region of chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, D.; Gardiner, K.; Kao, F.T.; Tanzi, R.; Watkins, P.; Gusella, J.F. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute for Cancer Research, Denver, CO (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The gene encoding the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein has been assigned to human chromosome 21, as has a gene responsible for at least some cases of familial Alzheimer disease. Linkage studies strongly suggest that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein and the product corresponding to familial Alzheimer disease are from two genes, or at least that several million base pairs of DNA separate the markers. The precise location of the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene on chromosome 21 has not yet been determined. Here the authors show, by using a somatic-cell/hybrid-cell mapping panel, in situ hybridization, and transverse-alternating-field electrophoresis, that the {beta}-amyloid precursor protein gene is located on chromosome 21 very near the 21q21/21q/22 border and probably within the region of chromosome 21 that, when trisomic, results in Down syndrome.

  20. Distinct temporal and anatomical distributions of amyloid-β and tau abnormalities following controlled cortical impact in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hien T Tran

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Intracellular accumulations of amyloid-β and tau proteins have been observed within hours following severe TBI in humans. Similar abnormalities have been recapitulated in young 3xTg-AD mice subjected to the controlled cortical impact model (CCI of TBI and sacrificed at 24 h and 7 days post injury. This study investigated the temporal and anatomical distributions of amyloid-β and tau abnormalities from 1 h to 24 h post injury in the same model. Intra-axonal amyloid-β accumulation in the fimbria was detected as early as 1 hour and increased monotonically over 24 hours following injury. Tau immunoreactivity in the fimbria and amygdala had a biphasic time course with peaks at 1 hour and 24 hours, while tau immunoreactivity in the contralateral CA1 rose in a delayed fashion starting at 12 hours after injury. Furthermore, rapid intra-axonal amyloid-β accumulation was similarly observed post controlled cortical injury in APP/PS1 mice, another transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. Acute increases in total and phospho-tau immunoreactivity were also evident in single transgenic Tau(P301L mice subjected to controlled cortical injury. These data provide further evidence for the causal effects of moderately severe contusional TBI on acceleration of acute Alzheimer-related abnormalities and the independent relationship between amyloid-β and tau in this setting.

  1. A Cultivated Form of a Red Seaweed (Chondrus crispus, Suppresses β-Amyloid-Induced Paralysis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatinder Singh Sangha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report here the protective effects of a methanol extract from a cultivated strain of the red seaweed, Chondrus crispus, against β-amyloid-induced toxicity, in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans, expressing human Aβ1-42 gene. The methanol extract of C. crispus (CCE, delayed β-amyloid-induced paralysis, whereas the water extract (CCW was not effective. The CCE treatment did not affect the transcript abundance of amy1; however, Western blot analysis revealed a significant decrease of Aβ species, as compared to untreated worms. The transcript abundance of stress response genes; sod3, hsp16.2 and skn1 increased in CCE-treated worms. Bioassay guided fractionation of the CCE yielded a fraction enriched in monogalactosyl diacylglycerols (MGDG that significantly delayed the onset of β-amyloid-induced paralysis. Taken together, these results suggested that the cultivated strain of C. crispus, whilst providing dietary nutritional value, may also have significant protective effects against β-amyloid-induced toxicity in C. elegans, partly through reduced β-amyloid species, up-regulation of stress induced genes and reduced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS.

  2. A ketogenic diet reduces amyloid beta 40 and 42 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Van Leuven Fred; Wera Stefaan; Van der Auwera Ingrid; Henderson Samuel T

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily strikes the elderly. Studies in both humans and animal models have linked the consumption of cholesterol and saturated fats with amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition and development of AD. Yet, these studies did not examine high fat diets in combination with reduced carbohydrate intake. Here we tested the effect of a high saturated fat/low carbohydrate diet on a transgenic mouse model of AD. Results S...

  3. Evaluation of tall rice mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakim, L.; Azam, M.A.; Miah, A.J.; Mansur, M.A.; Akanda, H.R.

    1989-01-01

    One tall mutant (Mut NS1) of rice variety Nizersail was put to multilocation on-farm trial. It showed improvement over the parent in respect of by earlier maturity and higher grain yield at all locations and thus it appears as an improved mutant of Nizersail. (author). 6 refs

  4. Experimental transmission of AA amyloidosis by injecting the AA amyloid protein into interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, K; Uchida, K; Chambers, J K; Tei, M; Shoji, A; Ushio, N; Nakayama, H

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of AA amyloidosis is high in humans with rheumatoid arthritis and several animal species, including cats and cattle with prolonged inflammation. AA amyloidosis can be experimentally induced in mice using severe inflammatory stimuli and a coinjection of AA amyloid; however, difficulties have been associated with transmitting AA amyloidosis to a different animal species, and this has been attributed to the "species barrier." The interleukin-1 receptor antagonist knockout (IL-1raKO) mouse, a rodent model of human rheumatoid arthritis, has been used in the transmission of AA amyloid. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were intraperitoneally injected with mouse AA amyloid together with a subcutaneous pretreatment of 2% AgNO3, all mice from both strains that were injected with crude or purified murine AA amyloid developed AA amyloidosis. However, the amyloid index, which was determined by the intensity of AA amyloid deposition, was significantly higher in IL-1raKO mice than in BALB/c mice. When IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified bovine AA amyloid together with the pretreatment, 83% (5/6 cases) and 38% (3/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 17% (1/6 cases) and 0% (0/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. Similarly, when IL-1raKO and BALB/c mice were injected with crude or purified feline AA amyloid, 33% (2/6 cases) and 88% (7/8 cases) of IL-1raKO mice and 0% (0/6 cases) and 29% (2/6 cases) of BALB/c mice, respectively, developed AA amyloidosis. These results indicated that IL-1raKO mice are a useful animal model for investigating AA amyloidogenesis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Structures of a minimal human CFTR first nucleotide-binding domain as a monomer, head-to-tail homodimer, and pathogenic mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwell, Shane; Brouillette, Christie G.; Conners, Kris; Emtage, Spencer; Gheyi, Tarun; Guggino, William B.; Hendle, Jorg; Hunt, John F.; Lewis, Hal A.; Lu, Frances; Protasevich, Irina I.; Rodgers, Logan A.; Romero, Rich; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Weber, Patricia C.; Wetmore, Diana; Zhang, Feiyu F.; Zhao, Xun (Cystic); (UAB); (JHU); (Columbia); (Lilly)

    2010-04-26

    Upon removal of the regulatory insert (RI), the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) can be heterologously expressed and purified in a form that remains stable without solubilizing mutations, stabilizing agents or the regulatory extension (RE). This protein, NBD1 387-646({Delta}405-436), crystallizes as a homodimer with a head-to-tail association equivalent to the active conformation observed for NBDs from symmetric ATP transporters. The 1.7-{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure shows how ATP occupies the signature LSGGQ half-site in CFTR NBD1. The {Delta}F508 version of this protein also crystallizes as a homodimer and differs from the wild-type structure only in the vicinity of the disease-causing F508 deletion. A slightly longer construct crystallizes as a monomer. Comparisons of the homodimer structure with this and previously published monomeric structures show that the main effect of ATP binding at the signature site is to order the residues immediately preceding the signature sequence, residues 542-547, in a conformation compatible with nucleotide binding. These residues likely interact with a transmembrane domain intracellular loop in the full-length CFTR channel. The experiments described here show that removing the RI from NBD1 converts it into a well-behaved protein amenable to biophysical studies yielding deeper insights into CFTR function.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 KK26-27 matrix mutants display impaired infectivity, circularization and integration but not nuclear import

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mannioui, Abdelkrim; Nelson, Elisabeth; Schiffer, Cecile

    2005-01-01

    We analyzed the role of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 matrix protein (MA) during the virus replication afferent phase. Single-round infection of H9 T lymphocytes showed that the combined mutation of MA Lys residues 26-27 in MA reported nuclear localization signal (NLS)-1 [Haffar, O.K., Popov, S., Dubrovsky, L., Agostini, I., Tang, H., Pushkarsky, T., Nadler, S.G., Bukrinsky, M., 2000. Two nuclear localization signals in the HIV-1 matrix protein regulate nuclear import of the HIV-1 pre-integration complex. J. Mol. Biol. 299 (2): 359-368] impaired infectivity, abrogated 2-LTR-circle formation and significantly reduced integration. However, the mutation did not affect viral DNA docking to chromatin in either interphasic or mitotic cells, indicating that MA N-terminal basic domain should not represent a major determinant of HIV-1 nuclear import in T lymphocytes. These data point to a previously unreported role of MA in the late, post-chromatin-binding, afferent phase of HIV-1 replication cycle

  7. Uncovering the Role of Hypermethylation by CTG Expansion in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Using Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanovsky-Dagan, Shira; Avitzour, Michal; Altarescu, Gheona; Renbaum, Paul; Eldar-Geva, Talia; Schonberger, Oshrat; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, Stella; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat; Birnbaum, Ramon Y.; Gepstein, Lior; Epsztejn-Litman, Silvina; Eiges, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Summary CTG repeat expansion in DMPK, the cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), frequently results in hypermethylation and reduced SIX5 expression. The contribution of hypermethylation to disease pathogenesis and the precise mechanism by which SIX5 expression is reduced are unknown. Using 14 different DM1-affected human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, we characterized a differentially methylated region (DMR) near the CTGs. This DMR undergoes hypermethylation as a function of expansion size in a way that is specific to undifferentiated cells and is associated with reduced SIX5 expression. Using functional assays, we provide evidence for regulatory activity of the DMR, which is lost by hypermethylation and may contribute to DM1 pathogenesis by causing SIX5 haplo-insufficiency. This study highlights the power of hESCs in disease modeling and describes a DMR that functions both as an exon coding sequence and as a regulatory element whose activity is epigenetically hampered by a heritable mutation. PMID:26190529

  8. Uncovering the Role of Hypermethylation by CTG Expansion in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 Using Mutant Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira Yanovsky-Dagan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available CTG repeat expansion in DMPK, the cause of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, frequently results in hypermethylation and reduced SIX5 expression. The contribution of hypermethylation to disease pathogenesis and the precise mechanism by which SIX5 expression is reduced are unknown. Using 14 different DM1-affected human embryonic stem cell (hESC lines, we characterized a differentially methylated region (DMR near the CTGs. This DMR undergoes hypermethylation as a function of expansion size in a way that is specific to undifferentiated cells and is associated with reduced SIX5 expression. Using functional assays, we provide evidence for regulatory activity of the DMR, which is lost by hypermethylation and may contribute to DM1 pathogenesis by causing SIX5 haplo-insufficiency. This study highlights the power of hESCs in disease modeling and describes a DMR that functions both as an exon coding sequence and as a regulatory element whose activity is epigenetically hampered by a heritable mutation.

  9. Hyperforin prevents beta-amyloid neurotoxicity and spatial memory impairments by disaggregation of Alzheimer's amyloid-beta-deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinamarca, M C; Cerpa, W; Garrido, J; Hancke, J L; Inestrosa, N C

    2006-11-01

    The major protein constituent of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). In the present work, we have determined the effect of hyperforin an acylphloroglucinol compound isolated from Hypericum perforatum (St John's Wort), on Abeta-induced spatial memory impairments and on Abeta neurotoxicity. We report here that hyperforin: (1) decreases amyloid deposit formation in rats injected with amyloid fibrils in the hippocampus; (2) decreases the neuropathological changes and behavioral impairments in a rat model of amyloidosis; (3) prevents Abeta-induced neurotoxicity in hippocampal neurons both from amyloid fibrils and Abeta oligomers, avoiding the increase in reactive oxidative species associated with amyloid toxicity. Both effects could be explained by the capacity of hyperforin to disaggregate amyloid deposits in a dose and time-dependent manner and to decrease Abeta aggregation and amyloid formation. Altogether these evidences suggest that hyperforin may be useful to decrease amyloid burden and toxicity in AD patients, and may be a putative therapeutic agent to fight the disease.

  10. Probiotic features of Lactobacillus plantarum mutant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Pasquale; Gallone, Anna; Russo, Pasquale; Capozzi, Vittorio; Albenzio, Marzia; Spano, Giuseppe; Fiocco, Daniela

    2012-10-01

    In this study, the probiotic potential of Lactobacillus plantarum wild-type and derivative mutant strains was investigated. Bacterial survival was evaluated in an in vitro system, simulating the transit along the human oro-gastro-intestinal tract. Interaction with human gut epithelial cells was studied by assessing bacterial adhesive ability to Caco-2 cells and induction of genes involved in innate immunity. L. plantarum strains were resistant to the combined stress at the various steps of the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Major decreases in the viability of L. plantarum cells were observed mainly under drastic acidic conditions (pH ≤ 2.0) of the gastric compartment. Abiotic stresses associated to small intestine poorly affected bacterial viability. All the bacterial strains significantly adhered to Caco-2 cells, with the ΔctsR mutant strain exhibiting the highest adhesion. Induction of immune-related genes resulted higher upon incubation with heat-inactivated bacteria rather than with live ones. For specific genes, a differential transcriptional pattern was observed upon stimulation with different L. plantarum strains, evidencing a possible role of the knocked out bacterial genes in the modulation of host cell response. In particular, cells from Δhsp18.55 and ΔftsH mutants strongly triggered immune defence genes. Our study highlights the relevance of microbial genetic background in host-probiotic interaction and might contribute to identify candidate bacterial genes and molecules involved in probiosis.

  11. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Reynel; Silve