WorldWideScience

Sample records for muscular atrophy mice

  1. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Release Fischbeck Group Learning About Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? What are the ... for Spinal Muscular Atrophy What is spinal muscular atrophy? Spinal muscular atrophy is a group of inherited ...

  2. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) A A A What's in this article? ... Outlook en español Atrofia muscular espinal Spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA, is an inherited condition that causes ...

  3. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Print ... treatment for the disease's most troubling symptoms. About SMA Normally, healthy nerve cells in the brain called ...

  4. Spinal muscular atrophy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D'Amico, Adele; Mercuri, Eugenio; Tiziano, Francesco D; Bertini, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis...

  5. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic disease that attacks nerve cells, called motor neurons, in the spinal cord. These cells communicate with your voluntary muscles - the ones you can control, like in your ...

  6. Arrhythmia and cardiac defects are a feature of spinal muscular atrophy model mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Christopher R; Satta, Rosalba; Lutz, Cathleen; DiDonato, Christine J

    2010-10-15

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Traditionally, SMA has been described as a motor neuron disease; however, there is a growing body of evidence that arrhythmia and/or cardiomyopathy may present in SMA patients at an increased frequency. Here, we ask whether SMA model mice possess such phenotypes. We find SMA mice suffer from severe bradyarrhythmia characterized by progressive heart block and impaired ventricular depolarization. Echocardiography further confirms functional cardiac deficits in SMA mice. Additional investigations show evidence of both sympathetic innervation defects and dilated cardiomyopathy at late stages of disease. Based upon these data, we propose a model in which decreased sympathetic innervation causes autonomic imbalance. Such imbalance would be characterized by a relative increase in the level of vagal tone controlling heart rate, which is consistent with bradyarrhythmia and progressive heart block. Finally, treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, a drug known to benefit phenotypes of SMA model mice, produces prolonged maturation of the SMA heartbeat and an increase in cardiac size. Treated mice maintain measures of motor function throughout extended survival though they ultimately reach death endpoints in association with a progression of bradyarrhythmia. These data represent the novel identification of cardiac arrhythmia as an early and progressive feature of murine SMA while providing several new, quantitative indices of mouse health. Together with clinical cases that report similar symptoms, this reveals a new area of investigation that will be important to address as we move SMA therapeutics towards clinical success.

  7. Inhibition of myostatin does not ameliorate disease features of severe spinal muscular atrophy mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Charlotte J.; Wee, Claribel D.; Warsing, Leigh C.; Choe, Dong W.; Ng, Andrew S.; Lutz, Cathleen; Wagner, Kathryn R.

    2009-01-01

    There is currently no treatment for the inherited motor neuron disease, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Severe SMA causes lower motor neuron loss, impaired myofiber development, profound muscle weakness and early mortality. Myostatin is a transforming growth factor-β family member that inhibits muscle growth. Loss or blockade of myostatin signaling increases muscle mass and improves muscle strength in mouse models of primary muscle disease and in the motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, we evaluated the effects of blocking myostatin signaling in severe SMA mice (hSMN2/delta7SMN/mSmn−/−) by two independent strategies: (i) transgenic overexpression of the myostatin inhibitor follistatin and (ii) post-natal administration of a soluble activin receptor IIB (ActRIIB-Fc). SMA mice overexpressing follistatin showed little increase in muscle mass and no improvement in motor function or survival. SMA mice treated with ActRIIB-Fc showed minimal improvement in motor function, and no extension of survival compared with vehicle-treated mice. Together these results suggest that inhibition of myostatin may not be a promising therapeutic strategy in severe forms of SMA. PMID:19477958

  8. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  9. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  10. Physical exercise reduces cardiac defects in type 2 spinal muscular atrophy-like mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Olivier; Lopes, Philippe; Desseille, Céline; Branchu, Julien; Chali, Farah; Ben Salah, Amina; Pariset, Claude; Chanoine, Christophe; Charbonnier, Frédéric

    2012-11-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading genetic cause of death in infants worldwide, is due to the misexpression of the survival of motor neuron protein, causing death of motor neurons. Several clinical symptoms suggested that, in addition to motor neurons, the autonomic nervous systems could be implicated in the cardiac function alterations observed in patienst with SMA. These alterations were also found in a severe SMA mouse model, including bradycardia and a reduction of sympathetic innervation, both associated with autonomic imbalance. In the present study, we investigate the extent of autonomic dysfunction and the effects of a running-based exercise on the altered cardiorespiratory function in type 2 SMA-like mice. We observed that the SMA induced: (1) a dramatic alteration of intrinsic cardiac conduction associated with bradycardia; (2) a severe cardiomyopathy associated with extensive ventricular fibrosis; and (3) a delay in cardiac muscle maturation associated with contractile protein expression defects. Furthermore, our data indicate that the sympathetic system is not only functioning, but also likely contributes to alleviate the bradycardia and the arrhythmia in SMA-like mice. Moreover, physical exercise provides many benefits, including the reduction of cardiac protein expression defect, the reduction of fibrosis, the increase in cardiac electrical conduction velocity, and the drastic reduction in bradycardia and arrhythmias resulting in the partial restoration of the cardiac function in these mice. Thus, modulating the cardiorespiratory function in SMA could represent a new target for improving supportive care and for developing new pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions that would most certainly include physical exercise.

  11. Muscular atrophy in diabetic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H; Gadeberg, P C; Brock, B

    1997-01-01

    Diabetic patients with polyneuropathy develop motor dysfunction. To establish whether motor dysfunction is associated with muscular atrophy the ankle dorsal and plantar flexors of the non-dominant leg were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging in 8 patients with symptomatic neuropathy, in 8 non...... confirmed that the atrophy predominated distally. We conclude that muscular atrophy underlies motor weakness at the ankle in diabetic patients with polyneuropathy and that the atrophy is most pronounced in distal muscles of the lower leg indicating that a length dependent neuropathic process explains...

  12. Histopathological Defects in Intestine in Severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy Mice Are Improved by Systemic Antisense Oligonucleotide Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palittiya Sintusek

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI defects, including gastroesophageal reflux, constipation and delayed gastric emptying, are common in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Similar GI dysmotility has been identified in mouse models with survival of motor neuron (SMN protein deficiency. We previously described vascular defects in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice and we hypothesized that similar defects could be involved in the GI pathology observed in these mice. We therefore investigated the gross anatomical structure, enteric vasculature and neurons in the small intestine in a severe mouse model of SMA. We also assessed the therapeutic response of GI histopathology to systemic administration of morpholino antisense oligonucleotide (AON designed to increase SMN protein expression. Significant anatomical and histopathological abnormalities, with striking reduction of vascular density, overabundance of enteric neurons and increased macrophage infiltration, were detected in the small intestine in SMA mice. After systemic AON treatment in neonatal mice, all the abnormalities observed were significantly restored to near-normal levels. We conclude that the observed GI histopathological phenotypes and functional defects observed in these SMA mice are strongly linked to SMN deficiency which can be rescued by systemic administration of AON. This study on the histopathological changes in the gastrointestinal system in severe SMA mice provides further indication of the complex role that SMN plays in multiple tissues and suggests that at least in SMA mice restoration of SMN production in peripheral tissues is essential for optimal outcome.

  13. Antiandrogen flutamide protects male mice from androgen-dependent toxicity in three models of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renier, Kayla J; Troxell-Smith, Sandra M; Johansen, Jamie A; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Chua, Jason P; Sun Kim, Hong; Lieberman, Andrew P; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease linked to a polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Men affected by SBMA show marked muscle weakness and atrophy, typically emerging midlife. Given the androgen-dependent nature of this disease, one might expect AR antagonists to have therapeutic value for treating SBMA. However, current work from animal models suggests otherwise, raising questions about whether polyQ-expanded AR exerts androgen-dependent toxicity through mechanisms distinct from normal AR function. In this study, we asked whether the nonsteroidal AR antagonist flutamide, delivered via a time-release pellet, could reverse or prevent androgen-dependent AR toxicity in three different mouse models of SBMA: the AR97Q transgenic (Tg) model, a knock-in (KI) model, and a myogenic Tg model. We find that flutamide protects mice from androgen-dependent AR toxicity in all three SBMA models, preventing or reversing motor dysfunction in the Tg models and significantly extending the life span in KI males. Given that flutamide effectively protects against androgen-dependent disease in three different mouse models of SBMA, our data are proof of principle that AR antagonists have therapeutic potential for treating SBMA in humans and support the notion that toxicity caused by polyQ-expanded AR uses at least some of the same mechanisms as normal AR before diverging to produce disease and muscle atrophy.

  14. Types of SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes other than the SMN1 gene. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Respiratory Distress (SMARD) SMARD is a very rare ... and 50. It causes muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) throughout the body, which is most noticeable in ...

  15. Beta-agonist stimulation ameliorates the phenotype of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice and patient-derived myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioto, Carmelo; Malena, Adriana; Maino, Eleonora; Polanco, Maria J.; Marchioretti, Caterina; Borgia, Doriana; Pereira, Marcelo Gomes; Blaauw, Bert; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Venturini, Roberta; Plebani, Mario; Sambataro, Fabio; Vergani, Lodovica; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni; Pennuto, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by the loss of lower motor neurons. SBMA is caused by expansions of a polyglutamine tract in the gene coding for androgen receptor (AR). Expression of polyglutamine-expanded AR causes damage to motor neurons and skeletal muscle cells. Here we investigated the effect of β-agonist stimulation in SBMA myotube cells derived from mice and patients, and in knock-in mice. We show that treatment of myotubes expressing polyglutamine-expanded AR with the β-agonist clenbuterol increases their size. Clenbuterol activated the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and decreased the accumulation of polyglutamine-expanded AR. Treatment of SBMA knock-in mice with clenbuterol, which was started at disease onset, ameliorated motor function and extended survival. Clenbuterol improved muscle pathology, attenuated the glycolytic-to-oxidative metabolic alterations occurring in SBMA muscles and induced hypertrophy of both glycolytic and oxidative fibers. These results indicate that β-agonist stimulation is a novel therapeutic strategy for SBMA. PMID:28117338

  16. Beta-agonist stimulation ameliorates the phenotype of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice and patient-derived myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milioto, Carmelo; Malena, Adriana; Maino, Eleonora; Polanco, Maria J; Marchioretti, Caterina; Borgia, Doriana; Pereira, Marcelo Gomes; Blaauw, Bert; Lieberman, Andrew P; Venturini, Roberta; Plebani, Mario; Sambataro, Fabio; Vergani, Lodovica; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni; Pennuto, Maria

    2017-01-24

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disease characterized by the loss of lower motor neurons. SBMA is caused by expansions of a polyglutamine tract in the gene coding for androgen receptor (AR). Expression of polyglutamine-expanded AR causes damage to motor neurons and skeletal muscle cells. Here we investigated the effect of β-agonist stimulation in SBMA myotube cells derived from mice and patients, and in knock-in mice. We show that treatment of myotubes expressing polyglutamine-expanded AR with the β-agonist clenbuterol increases their size. Clenbuterol activated the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and decreased the accumulation of polyglutamine-expanded AR. Treatment of SBMA knock-in mice with clenbuterol, which was started at disease onset, ameliorated motor function and extended survival. Clenbuterol improved muscle pathology, attenuated the glycolytic-to-oxidative metabolic alterations occurring in SBMA muscles and induced hypertrophy of both glycolytic and oxidative fibers. These results indicate that β-agonist stimulation is a novel therapeutic strategy for SBMA.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kennedy spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy Kennedy's disease SBMA X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy Related ... Natural history of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA): a study of 223 Japanese patients. Brain. 2006 ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes muscle weakness ... muscle jerks (myoclonic epilepsy). In individuals with SMA-PME, spinal muscular atrophy results from a loss of ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and abdomen, weakness in the leg muscles, involuntary muscle contractions, tremors, and a protrusion of the abdomen thought to be related to muscle weakness. Some affected individuals experience difficulty swallowing and problems with bladder and ... Frequency Spinal muscular atrophy affects 1 in 6,000 to 1 ...

  20. Differential induction of muscle atrophy pathways in two mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguise, Marc-Olivier; Boyer, Justin G.; McFall, Emily R.; Yazdani, Armin; De Repentigny, Yves; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Motor neuron loss and neurogenic atrophy are hallmarks of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant deaths. Previous studies have focused on deciphering disease pathogenesis in motor neurons. However, a systematic evaluation of atrophy pathways in muscles is lacking. Here, we show that these pathways are differentially activated depending on severity of disease in two different SMA model mice. Although proteasomal degradation is induced in skeletal muscle of both models, autophagosomal degradation is present only in Smn2B/− mice but not in the more severe Smn−/−; SMN2 mice. Expression of FoxO transcription factors, which regulate both proteasomal and autophagosomal degradation, is elevated in Smn2B/− muscle. Remarkably, administration of trichostatin A reversed all molecular changes associated with atrophy. Cardiac muscle also exhibits differential induction of atrophy between Smn2B/− and Smn−/−; SMN2 mice, albeit in the opposite direction to that of skeletal muscle. Altogether, our work highlights the importance of cautious analysis of different mouse models of SMA as distinct patterns of atrophy induction are at play depending on disease severity. We also revealed that one of the beneficial impacts of trichostatin A on SMA model mice is via attenuation of muscle atrophy through reduction of FoxO expression to normal levels. PMID:27349908

  1. Decreasing disease severity in symptomatic, Smn(-/-);SMN2(+/+), spinal muscular atrophy mice following scAAV9-SMN delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascock, Jacqueline J; Osman, Erkan Y; Wetz, Mary J; Krogman, Megan M; Shababi, Monir; Lorson, Christian L

    2012-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder, is the leading genetic cause of infant mortality. SMA is caused by the homozygous loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In humans, a nearly identical copy gene is present, SMN2. SMN2 is retained in all SMA patients and encodes the same protein as SMN1. However, SMN1 and SMN2 differ by a silent C-to-T transition at the 5' end of exon 7, causing alternative splicing of SMN2 transcripts and low levels of full-length SMN. SMA is monogenic and therefore well suited for gene-replacement strategies. Recently, self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors have been used to deliver the SMN cDNA to an animal model of disease, the SMNΔ7 mouse. In this study, we examine a severe model of SMA, Smn(-/-);SMN2(+/+), to determine whether gene replacement is viable in a model in which disease development begins in utero. Using two delivery paradigms, intracerebroventricular injections and intravenous injections, we delivered scAAV9-SMN and demonstrated a two to four fold increase in survival, in addition to improving many of the phenotypic parameters of the model. This represents the longest extension in survival for this severe model for any therapeutic intervention and suggests that postsymptomatic treatment of SMA may lead to significant improvement of disease severity.

  2. Neuronal involvement in muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alejandro Cisterna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The innervation of skeletal myofibers exerts a crucial influence on the maintenance of muscle tone and normal operation. Consequently, denervated myofibers manifest atrophy, which is preceded by an increase in sarcolemma permeability. Recently, de novo expression of hemichannels formed by connexins and other none selective channels, including P2X7 receptors, TRPV2 channels were demonstrated in denervated fast skeletal muscles. The denervation-induced atrophy was drastically prevented in denervated muscles deficient in connexins 43 and 45. Nonetheless, the transduction mechanism by which the nerve represses the expression of the above mentioned none selective channels remains unknown. The paracrine action of extracellular signaling molecules including ATP, neurotrophic factors (i.e., BDNF, agrin/Lrp4/MuSK and acetylcholine are among the possible perpetrators of repression for connexin expression. This review discusses the possible role of relevant factors in maintaining the normal functioning of fast skeletal muscles and suppression of connexin hemichannel expression.

  3. [Fractures in spinal muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febrer, Anna; Vigo, Meritxell; Rodríguez, Natalia; Medina, Julita; Colomer, Jaume; Nascimento, Andrés

    2013-09-01

    Objetivo. Determinar la frecuencia de fracturas en pacientes con atrofia muscular espinal, mecanismo de produccion, edad de aparicion y repercusion funcional. Pacientes y metodos. Se estudian 65 pacientes con atrofia muscular espinal. Se recogen las fracturas diagnosticadas mediante radiografia y se analizan los siguientes parametros: tipo de atrofia muscular espinal, marcha, edad en el momento de la fractura, mecanismo de produccion, localizacion, tratamiento aplicado y repercusion funcional. Resultados. Presentaron fracturas 13 pacientes (20%), con un total de 20 (cuatro presentaron dos o mas fracturas). La edad media fue de 6,35 años. La localizacion fue en su mayoria en el femur y el mecanismo de produccion, en 12 casos por caidas y en 8 por traumatismo menor. No detectamos ninguna fractura vertebral. Todas se trataron de manera conservadora. El unico paciente ambulante que presento una fractura dejo de caminar despues de la inmovilizacion. Conclusiones. La existencia de fracturas en estos pacientes interfiere en su calidad de vida y en el nivel funcional. Es importante la prevencion de las mismas en el manejo del paciente y vigilando la correcta postura en la silla de ruedas con sistemas de sujecion Deberian emprenderse mas estudios sobre la perdida de densidad mineral osea en estos pacientes y su posible relacion con las fracturas.

  4. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy (Type 0).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dakhoul, Suleiman

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a rare phenotype of very severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a newborn who presented with reduced fetal movements in utero and significant respiratory distress at birth. The patient was homozygously deleted for exon 7 and exon 8 of the survival motor neuron gene 1. Very severe SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress at birth, and more research should be dedicated to investigate the genetic determinants of its widely variable phenotypes.

  5. Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: current orthopedic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haaker G

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gerrit Haaker, Albert Fujak Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany Abstract: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary neuromuscular disease of lower motor neurons that is caused by a defective "survival motor neuron" (SMN protein that is mainly associated with proximal progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Although SMA involves a wide range of disease severity and a high mortality and morbidity rate, recent advances in multidisciplinary supportive care have enhanced quality of life and life expectancy. Active research for possible treatment options has become possible since the disease-causing gene defect was identified in 1995. Nevertheless, a causal therapy is not available at present, and therapeutic management of SMA remains challenging; the prolonged survival is increasing, especially orthopedic, respiratory and nutritive problems. This review focuses on orthopedic management of the disease, with discussion of key aspects that include scoliosis, muscular contractures, hip joint disorders, fractures, technical devices, and a comparative approach of conservative and surgical treatment. Also emphasized are associated complications including respiratory involvement, perioperative care and anesthesia, nutrition problems, and rehabilitation. The SMA disease course can be greatly improved with adequate therapy with established orthopedic procedures in a multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Keywords: spinal muscular atrophy, scoliosis, contractures, fractures, lung function, treatment, rehabilitation, surgery, ventilation, nutrition, perioperative management

  6. Improvement of neuromuscular synaptic phenotypes without enhanced survival and motor function in severe spinal muscular atrophy mice selectively rescued in motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximena Paez-Colasante

    Full Text Available In the inherited childhood neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, lower motor neuron death and severe muscle weakness result from the reduction of the ubiquitously expressed protein survival of motor neuron (SMN. Although SMA mice recapitulate many features of the human disease, it has remained unclear if their short lifespan and motor weakness are primarily due to cell-autonomous defects in motor neurons. Using Hb9(Cre as a driver, we selectively raised SMN expression in motor neurons in conditional SMAΔ7 mice. Unlike a previous study that used choline acetyltransferase (ChAT(Cre+ as a driver on the same mice, and another report that used Hb9(Cre as a driver on a different line of conditional SMA mice, we found no improvement in survival, weight, motor behavior and presynaptic neurofilament accumulation. However, like in ChAT(Cre+ mice, we detected rescue of endplate size and mitigation of neuromuscular junction (NMJ denervation status. The rescue of endplate size occurred in the absence of an increase in myofiber size, suggesting endplate size is determined by the motor neuron in these animals. Real time-PCR showed that the expression of spinal cord SMN transcript was sharply reduced in Hb9(Cre+ SMA mice relative to ChAT(Cre+ SMA mice. This suggests that our lack of overall phenotypic improvement is most likely due to an unexpectedly poor recombination efficiency driven by Hb9(Cre . Nonetheless, the low levels of SMN were sufficient to rescue two NMJ structural parameters indicating that these motor neuron cell autonomous phenotypes are very sensitive to changes in motoneuronal SMN levels. Our results directly suggest that even those therapeutic interventions with very modest effects in raising SMN in motor neurons may provide mitigation of neuromuscular phenotypes in SMA patients.

  7. Severe spinal muscular atrophy variant associated with congenital bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Grohmann, Katja; Harder, Anja; Stadelmann, Christine; Zerres, Klaus; Bührer, Christoph; Obladen, Michael

    2002-09-01

    Infantile autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy (type I) represents a lethal disorder leading to progressive symmetric muscular atrophy of limb and trunk muscles. Ninety-six percent cases of spinal muscular atrophy type I are caused by deletions or mutations in the survival motoneuron gene (SMNI) on chromosome 5q11.2-13.3. However, a number of chromosome 5q-negative patients with additional clinical features (respiratory distress, cerebellar hypoplasia) have been designated in the literature as infantile spinal muscular atrophy plus forms. In addition, the combination of severe spinal muscular atrophy and neurogenic arthrogryposis has been described. We present clinical, molecular, and autopsy findings of a newborn boy presenting with generalized muscular atrophy in combination with congenital bone fractures and extremely thin ribs but without contractures.

  8. Congenital Bone Fractures in Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Functional Role for SMN Protein in Bone Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugarajan, Srinivasan; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Ries, William L.; Maria, Bernard L.; Reddy, Sakamuri V.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is the second most common fatal childhood disorder. Core clinical features include muscle weakness caused by degenerating lower motor neurons and a high incidence of bone fractures and hypercalcemia. Fractures further compromise quality of life by progression of joint contractures or additional loss of motor function. Recent observations suggest that bone disease in spinal muscular atrophy may not be attributed entirely to lower motor neuron degeneration. The presence of the spinal muscular atrophy disease-determining survival motor neuron gene (SMN), SMN expression, and differential splicing in bone-resorbing osteoclasts was recently discovered. Its ubiquitous expression and the differential expression of splice variants suggest that SMN has specific roles in bone cell function. SMN protein also interacts with osteoclast stimulatory factor. Mouse models of human spinal muscular atrophy disease suggest a potential role of SMN protein in skeletal development. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry analysis demonstrated a substantial decrease in total bone area and poorly developed caudal vertebra in the mouse model. These mice also had pelvic bone fractures. Studies delineating SMN signaling mechanisms and gene transcription in a cell-specific manner will provide important molecular insights into the pathogenesis of bone disease in children with spinal muscular atrophy. Moreover, understanding bone remodeling in spinal muscular atrophy may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to enhance skeletal health and quality of life. This article reviews the skeletal complications associated with spinal muscular atrophy and describes a functional role for SMN protein in osteoclast development and bone resorption activity. PMID:17761651

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases.

  10. The Relationship between Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Soltani

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveA 4-month-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI type II was admitted in PICU of our center due to severe respiratory distress and fever with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia, and mechanical ventilation was initiated. Due to severe hypotonia, NCV and EMG were performed, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I was diagnosed.Keywords: Osteogenesis imperfecta; spinal muscular atrophy; hypotonia

  11. Deletion of atrophy enhancing genes fails to ameliorate the phenotype in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Chitra C; McGovern, Vicki L; Wise, Dawnne O; Glass, David J; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2014-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease causing degeneration of lower motor neurons and muscle atrophy. One therapeutic avenue for SMA is targeting signaling pathways in muscle to ameliorate atrophy. Muscle Atrophy F-box, MAFbx, and Muscle RING Finger 1, MuRF1, are muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases upregulated in skeletal and cardiac muscle during atrophy. Homozygous knock-out of MAFbx or MuRF1 causes muscle sparing in adult mice subjected to atrophy by denervation. We wished to determine whether blockage of the major muscle atrophy pathways by deletion of MAFbx or MuRF1 in a mouse model of SMA would improve the phenotype. Deletion of MAFbx in the Δ7 SMA mouse model had no effect on the weight and the survival of the mice while deletion of MuRF1 was deleterious. MAFbx(-/-)-SMA mice showed a significant alteration in fiber size distribution tending towards larger fibers. In skeletal and cardiac tissue MAFbx and MuRF1 transcripts were upregulated whereas MuRF2 and MuRF3 levels were unchanged in Δ7 SMA mice. We conclude that deletion of the muscle ubiquitin ligases does not improve the phenotype of a Δ7 SMA mouse. Furthermore, it seems unlikely that the beneficial effect of HDAC inhibitors is mediated through inhibition of MAFbx and MuRF1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Current Therapeutic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Alex S.; Gurney, Mark E.

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. There are variable numbers of copies of a second, related gene named SMN2 located in the proximity to SMN1. Both genes encode the same protein (Smn). Loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 affect cellular levels of Smn triggering death of motor neurons. The severity of SMA is directly related to the normal number of copies of SMN2 carried by the patient. A considerable effort has been dedicated to identifying modalities including both biological and small molecule agents that increase SMN2 promoter activity to upregulate gene transcription and produce increased quantities of full-length Smn protein. This review summarizes recent progress in the area and suggests potential target product profile for an SMA therapeutic.

  13. Forced oscillation technique in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauld, Leanne M; Keeling, Lucy A; Shackleton, Claire E; Sly, Peter D

    2014-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes respiratory compromise that is difficult to assess in young children. The forced oscillation technique (FOT) is commercially available for children as young as 2 years of age and is nonvolitional. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of FOT in young children with SMA. Children with SMA aged resistance at 8 Hz (Rrs8) (mean z score, +0.66; SD, 1.34; P = .12) were abnormal. Four children performed spirometry. Linear relationships to Xrs8 exist: FVC (R2, 0.54), unassisted PCF (R2, 0.33), assisted PCF (R2, 0.43), and AHI (R2, 0.32). Over 12 months, Xrs8z score worsened (rate of change of +1.08, P change +0.51, P .05) was found between clinical characteristics and FOT values. FOT is feasible in young children with SMA, with abnormal values of reactance and resistance on grouped data, worsening over 12 months. Xrs8 is related to respiratory tests used to monitor progress in SMA (FVC, PCF, AHI). Further research on the value of FOT in managing individuals is warranted.

  14. Electrophysiological biomarkers in spinal muscular atrophy: proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Arnold, W; Porensky, Paul N; McGovern, Vicki L; Iyer, Chitra C; Duque, Sandra; Li, Xiaobai; Meyer, Kathrin; Schmelzer, Leah; Kaspar, Brian K; Kolb, Stephen J; Kissel, John T; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2014-01-01

    Objective Preclinical therapies that restore survival motor neuron (SMN) protein levels can dramatically extend survival in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) mouse models. Biomarkers are needed to effectively translate these promising therapies to clinical trials. Our objective was to investigate electrophysiological biomarkers of compound muscle action potential (CMAP), motor unit number estimation (MUNE) and electromyography (EMG) using an SMA mouse model. Methods Sciatic CMAP, MUNE, and EMG were obtained in SMNΔ7 mice at ages 3–13 days and at 21 days in mice with SMN selectively reduced in motor neurons (ChATCre). To investigate these measures as biomarkers of treatment response, measurements were obtained in SMNΔ7 mice treated with antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) or gene therapy. Results CMAP was significantly reduced in SMNΔ7 mice at days 6–13 (P < 0.01), and MUNE was reduced at days 7–13 (P < 0.01). Fibrillations were present on EMG in SMNΔ7 mice but not controls (P = 0.02). Similar findings were seen at 21 days in ChATCre mice. MUNE in ASO-treated SMNΔ7 mice were similar to controls at day 12 and 30. CMAP reduction persisted in ASO-treated SMNΔ7 mice at day 12 but was corrected at day 30. Similarly, CMAP and MUNE responses were corrected with gene therapy to restore SMN. Interpretation These studies confirm features of preserved neuromuscular function in the early postnatal period and subsequent motor unit loss in SMNΔ7 mice. SMN restoring therapies result in preserved MUNE and gradual repair of CMAP responses. This provides preclinical evidence for the utilization of CMAP and MUNE as biomarkers in future SMA clinical trials. PMID:24511555

  15. Congenital segmental spinal muscular atrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savaş, Tülin; Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies are genetic disorders in which anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor nuclei of the brainstem are progressively lost. We present a patient with arthrogryposis due to congenital spinal muscular atrophy predominantly affecting the upper limbs. Spinal muscular atrophies with onset at birth may be a cause of arthrogryposis. Localized forms of neurogenic arthrogryposis have been divided into cervical and caudal forms. Our case is similar to the cases described by Hageman et al (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1993;56:365-368): severe symmetric lower motor neuron deficit in the upper extremities at the time of birth, no history of injury to the cervical spinal cord or the brachial plexus during delivery, and severe muscle wasting suggesting chronic denervation in utero. Because there was improvement of our patient's situation, her disease was also possibly nonprogressive and sporadic. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Turkish patient with congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy affecting predominantly the upper limbs is a relatively rare form of motor neuron disease and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants with congenital contractures and severe muscle weakness by wasting mainly confined to the upper limbs.

  16. Transgenic mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, M; Adachi, H; Inukai, A; Sobue, G

    2003-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by proximal muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. Only males develop symptoms, while female carriers usually are asymptomatic. A specific treatment for SBMA has not been established. The molecular basis of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The pathologic hallmark is nuclear inclusions (NIs) containing the mutant and truncated AR with expanded polyQ in the residual motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord as well as in some other visceral organs. Several transgenic (Tg) mouse models have been created for studying the pathogenesis of SBMA. The Tg mouse model carrying pure 239 CAGs under human AR promoter and another model carrying truncated AR with expanded CAGs show motor impairment and nuclear NIs in spinal motor neurons. Interestingly, Tg mice carrying full-length human AR with expanded polyQ demonstrate progressive motor impairment and neurogenic pathology as well as sexual difference of phenotypes. These models recapitulate the phenotypic expression observed in SBMA. The ligand-dependent nuclear localization of the mutant AR is found to be involved in the disease mechanism, and hormonal therapy is suggested to be a therapeutic approach applicable to SBMA.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions SMARD1 spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... All Close All Description Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 ( SMARD1 ) is an inherited condition that ...

  18. Skeletal muscle training for spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (Protocol).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, B.; Montes, J.; Pol, W.L. van der; Groot, J.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene (5q11.2-q13.3) (Lefebvre 1995). With an incidence of one in 10,000 live births, it is the leading genetic cause of infant death (Lunn 2008; Mercur

  19. Best practice guidelines for molecular analysis in spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, H; Cobben, JM; Matthijs, G; Wirth, B

    With a prevalence of approximately 1/10 000, and a carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60 the proximal spinal muscular atrophies (SMAs) are among the most frequent autosomal recessive hereditary disorders. Patients can be classified clinically into four groups: acute, intermediate, mild, and adult (SMA

  20. Skeletal muscle training for spinal muscular atrophy type 3 (Protocol).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, B.; Montes, J.; Pol, W.L. van der; Groot, J.F. de

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by a genetic mutation in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene (5q11.2-q13.3) (Lefebvre 1995). With an incidence of one in 10,000 live births, it is the leading genetic cause of infant death (Lunn 2008;

  1. The Relationship between Osteogenesis Imperfecta and Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Soltani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveA 4-month-old female with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI type II was admitted in PICU of our center due to severe respiratory distress and fever with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia, and mechanical ventilation was initiated. Due to severe hypotonia, NCV and EMG were performed, and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I was diagnosed.

  2. Epidural anaesthesia in a child with possible spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A; Molenbuur, B; Richardson, FJ

    2002-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare lower motor neurone disease in which anaesthetic management is often difficult as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents. Neuraxial anaesthesia is controversial in these patients; however, some cases have been reporte

  3. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, Joost; van Tol, Marie-José; Groot, Paul F C; Altena, Ellemarije; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; Majoie, Charles B; van der Kooi, Anneke J; van den Berg, Leonard H; Schmand, Ben; de Visser, Marianne; Veltman, Dick J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). METHODS: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  4. Prefrontal involvement related to cognitive impairment in progressive muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Raaphorst; M.J. van Tol; P.F.C. Groot; E. Altena; Y.D. van der Werf; C.B. Majoie; A.J. van der Kooi; L.H. van den Berg; B. Schmand; M. de Visser; D.J. Veltman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine brain activation patterns during verbal fluency performance in patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: fMRI was used to examine the blood oxygen level-dependent response during letter and category fluency performance in

  5. Cardiac pathology in spinal muscular atrophy : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarde, C A; Blank, A C; Stam, M; Wadman, R I; van den Berg, L H; van der Pol, W L

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hereditary proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease of childhood caused by homozygous loss of function of the survival motor neuron (SMN) 1 gene. The presence of a second, nearly identical SMN gene (SMN2) in the human genome ensures production of residual

  6. Epidural anaesthesia in a child with possible spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A; Molenbuur, B; Richardson, FJ

    2002-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare lower motor neurone disease in which anaesthetic management is often difficult as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents. Neuraxial anaesthesia is controversial in these patients; however, some cases have been reporte

  7. Skeletal muscle training for spinal muscular atrophy type 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, Bart; Montes, Jacqueline; van der Pol, W. Ludo; de Groot, Janke F.

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of skeletal muscle training on functional performance in people with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 3 and to identify any adverse effects.

  8. The neuromuscular impact of symptomatic SMN restoration in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W; McGovern, Vicki L; Sanchez, Benjamin; Li, Jia; Corlett, Kaitlyn M; Kolb, Stephen J; Rutkove, Seward B; Burghes, Arthur H

    2016-03-01

    Significant advances in the development of SMN-restoring therapeutics have occurred since 2010 when very effective biological treatments were reported in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy. As these treatments are applied in human clinical trials, there is pressing need to define quantitative assessments of disease progression, treatment stratification, and therapeutic efficacy. The electrophysiological measures Compound Muscle Action Potential and Motor Unit Number Estimation are reliable measures of nerve function. In both the SMN∆7 mouse and a pig model of spinal muscular atrophy, early SMN restoration results in preservation of electrophysiological measures. Currently, clinical trials are underway in patients at post-symptomatic stages of disease progression. In this study, we present results from both early and delayed SMN restoration using clinically-relevant measures including electrical impedance myography, compound muscle action potential, and motor unit number estimation to quantify the efficacy and time-sensitivity of SMN-restoring therapy. SMA∆7 mice were treated via intracerebroventricular injection with antisense oligonucleotides targeting ISS-N1 to increase SMN protein from the SMN2 gene on postnatal day 2, 4, or 6 and compared with sham-treated spinal muscular atrophy and control mice. Compound muscle action potential and motor unit number estimation of the triceps surae muscles were performed at day 12, 21, and 30 by a single evaluator blinded to genotype and treatment. Similarly, electrical impedance myography was measured on the biceps femoris muscle at 12days for comparison. Electrophysiological measures and electrical impedance myography detected significant differences at 12days between control and late-treated (4 or 6days) and sham-treated spinal muscular atrophy mice, but not in mice treated at 2days (patrophy trials. The ease of application and simplicity of electrical impedance myography compared with standard electrophysiological

  9. Spinal muscular atrophy: development and implementation of potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W David; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2013-09-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, effective treatments are urgently needed, along with methods to determine whether treatment worked. In this review, we discuss the rapid progress in the understanding of recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy and how this is leading to exciting potential treatments of the disease. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by loss of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and reduced levels of SMN protein. The critical downstream targets of SMN deficiency that result in motor neuron loss are not known. However, increasing SMN levels has a marked impact in mouse models, and these therapeutics are rapidly moving toward clinical trials. Promising preclinical therapies, the varying degree of impact on the mouse models, and potential measures of treatment effect are reviewed. One key issue discussed is the variable outcome of increasing SMN at different stages of disease progression.

  10. Changes in muscular strength and electromyogram in rats with muscular disuse atrophy following electrical stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyu Lü; Xuanming Hao

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrophy of skeletal muscle is found under the condition of muscular disuse or in the process of fixation. It is affected by fixation, and electromyogram (EMG) discharge and muscular strength levels will be significantly decreased with accelerating tendency. Electrical stimulation (ES) therapy can release the velocity of muscular disuse atrophy effectively, so it is an effective method for preventing and treating muscular disuse atrophy and accelerating rehabilitation velocity following removal of fixation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of ES therapy at different time points following the fixation of rat models of muscular disuse atrophy on muscular strength and EMG of quadriceps femoris.DESIGN: A randomized and controlled animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Rehabilitation and Physiotherapy, Guangzhou General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Area Command of Chinese PLA; College of Sports Science, South China Normal University.MATERIALS: Male SD rats, of clean grade, aged 4 months old, weighing (230±10) g, were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Sun Yat-sen University. EMG measurement and analysis system (NEC Company, Japan) and four-channel recorder (NEC Company, Japan) were used in this experiment.METHODS: This experiment was carried out in the Laboratory of Human Sports Science, South China Normal University between September 2003 and March 2004. Totally 125 successful SD rat models of muscular disuse atrophy were randomly divided into 5 groups with 25 rats in each by a lot: normal control group, in which, the rats were untouched; ES 24 hours, 1, 2 and 3 weeks groups: the knees of rats in these four groups were fixed. Rats in four groups underwent ES therapy at 24 hours, 1, 2 and 3 weeks after fixation. T90- Ⅱ computer ES muscular strength training instrument was used in ES therapy every other day. The instrument was set as square wave,5 mA current intensity and 10 minutes a day. Muscular strength of quadriceps femoris and data of

  11. Management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Sumeet

    2016-01-01

    Scoliosis occurs in nearly all non-ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Non-operative treatments have not been shown to be effective at preventing progression of scoliosis. Progressive scoliosis can impact the ability of patients to sit comfortably, be cosmetically unappealing, and in severe cases exacerbate pulmonary disease. The main goal of operative treatment is to improve sitting balance and prevent progression of scoliosis. Complication rates are high and there is little data on effect of operative treatment on quality of life in children with SMA and DMD. Comprehensive multi-disciplinary pre-operative evaluations are vital to reduce the risks of operative treatment.

  12. Neuropathology and Therapeutic Intervention in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruhiko Banno

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a hereditary motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR. The histopathological finding in SBMA is loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in the brainstem motor nuclei. Animal studies have revealed that the pathogenesis of SBMA depends on the level of serum testosterone, and that androgen deprivation mitigates neurodegeneration through inhibition of nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR. Heat shock proteins, ubiquitin-proteasome system and transcriptional regulation are also potential targets of therapy development for SBMA.

  13. Large deletions within the spinal muscular atrophy gene region in a patient with spinal muscular atrophy type 3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wei; Chunyue Chen; Wenting Liu; Zhenfang Du; Xiaoling Chen; Xianning Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration and loss of anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and brain stem nuclei, leading to progressive limb and trunk paralysis and muscular atrophy. Depending on the age of onset and maximum muscular function achieved, SMA is recognized as SMA1, SMA2, SMA3 or SMA4, and most patients have a deletion or truncation of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. In this report, we present a patient with a mild SMA phenotype, SMA3, and define his genetic abnormality. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and array comparative genomic hybridization were used to determine the genetic variations in this patient. A 500 kb deletion in chromosome 5q13.2, including homozygous deletion of neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, and heterozygous deletion of occludin and B-double prime 1 was identified. This SMA region deletion did not involve SMN, indicating that SMN was likely to function normally. The phenotype was dependent of the large deletion and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein, occludin and B-double prime 1 may be candidate genes for SMA3.

  14. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    1993-01-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from cramp

  15. Dominant inherited distal spinal muscular atrophy with atrophic and hypertrophic calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, R J; Sie, O G; van Weerden, T W

    1993-01-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological, radiological and morphological data of 3 members of a family with autosomal dominant distal spinal muscular atrophy (DSMA) are reported. One patient has the clinical picture of peroneal muscular atrophy with atrophic calves. His father and sister suffer from cramp

  16. Insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 administration ameliorates disease manifestations in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Carlo; Bott, Laura C; Chen, Ke-lian; Harmison, George G; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Pennuto, Maria; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2012-12-06

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor. Patients develop slowly progressive proximal muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and fasciculations. Affected individuals often show gynecomastia, testicular atrophy and reduced fertility as a result of mild androgen insensitivity. No effective disease-modifying therapy is currently available for this disease. Our recent studies have demonstrated that insulinlike growth factor (IGF)-1 reduces the mutant androgen receptor toxicity through activation of Akt in vitro, and spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy transgenic mice that also overexpress a noncirculating muscle isoform of IGF-1 have a less severe phenotype. Here we sought to establish the efficacy of daily intraperitoneal injections of mecasermin rinfabate, recombinant human IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein 3, in a transgenic mouse model expressing the mutant androgen receptor with an expanded 97 glutamine tract. The study was done in a controlled, randomized, blinded fashion, and, to reflect the clinical settings, the injections were started after the onset of disease manifestations. The treatment resulted in increased Akt phosphorylation and reduced mutant androgen receptor aggregation in muscle. In comparison to vehicle-treated controls, IGF-1-treated transgenic mice showed improved motor performance, attenuated weight loss and increased survival. Our results suggest that peripheral tissue can be targeted to improve the spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy phenotype and indicate that IGF-1 warrants further investigation in clinical trials as a potential treatment for this disease.

  17. Transcriptional activation of TFEB/ZKSCAN3 target genes underlies enhanced autophagy in spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jason P; Reddy, Satya L; Merry, Diane E; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2014-03-01

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA demonstrates androgen-dependent toxicity due to unfolding and aggregation of the mutant protein. There are currently no disease-modifying therapies, but of increasing interest for therapeutic targeting is autophagy, a highly conserved cellular process mediating protein quality control. We have previously shown that genetic manipulations inhibiting autophagy diminish skeletal muscle atrophy and extend the lifespan of AR113Q knock-in mice. In contrast, manipulations inducing autophagy worsen muscle atrophy, suggesting that chronic, aberrant upregulation of autophagy contributes to pathogenesis. Since the degree to which autophagy is altered in SBMA and the mechanisms responsible for such alterations are incompletely defined, we sought to delineate autophagic status in SBMA using both cellular and mouse models. Here, we confirm that autophagy is induced in cellular and knock-in mouse models of SBMA and show that the transcription factors transcription factor EB (TFEB) and ZKSCAN3 operate in opposing roles to underlie these changes. We demonstrate upregulation of TFEB target genes in skeletal muscle from AR113Q male mice and SBMA patients. Furthermore, we observe a greater response in AR113Q mice to physiological stimulation of autophagy by both nutrient starvation and exercise. Taken together, our results indicate that transcriptional signaling contributes to autophagic dysregulation and provides a mechanistic framework for the pathologic increase of autophagic responsiveness in SBMA.

  18. Spinal muscular atrophy: Factors that modulate motor neurone vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Yo; Simpson, Julie E; Highley, J Robin; Heath, Paul R

    2017-02-02

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death, is a neurodegenerative disease characterised by the selective loss of particular groups of motor neurones in the anterior horn of the spinal cord with concomitant muscle weakness. To date, no effective treatment is available, however, there are ongoing clinical trials are in place which promise much for the future. However, there remains an ongoing problem in trying to link a single gene loss to motor neurone degeneration. Fortunately, given successful disease models that have been established and intensive studies on SMN functions in the past ten years, we are fast approaching the stage of identifying the underlying mechanisms of SMA pathogenesis Here we discuss potential disease modifying factors on motor neurone vulnerability, in the belief that these factors give insight into the pathological mechanisms of SMA and therefore possible therapeutic targets.

  19. Exercise Therapy in Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Other Neuromuscular Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlqvist, Julia Rebecka; Vissing, John

    2016-01-01

    There is no curative treatment for most neuromuscular disorders. Exercise, as a treatment for these diseases, has therefore received growing attention. When executed properly, exercise can maintain and improve health and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, and diabetes. In persons...... in patients with neuromuscular diseases associated with weakness and wasting. We review studies that have investigated different types of exercise in both myopathies and motor neuron diseases, with particular emphasis on training of persons affected by spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Finally, we provide...... with muscle wasting due to neuromuscular conditions, however, a common belief has been that physical activity could accelerate degeneration of the diseased muscle and a careful approach to training has therefore been suggested. In this review, we describe the current knowledge about physical training...

  20. Strategies for treating scoliosis in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobert, Daniel G; Vitale, Michael G

    2013-11-01

    Progressive pulmonary dysfunction is a major complication of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Growing constructs are a well-established alternative to spinal arthrodesis to maximize pulmonary growth. We describe patients who demonstrated sustained pulmonary function and improved quality of life following hybrid growing construct implantation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a range of approaches for managing scoliosis in children with SMA by utilizing vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib implantation or growing rods with lateral rib fixation to improve clinical and patient-reported outcomes. Pulmonary compromise and quality of life decline are leading concerns in the SMA population. This case series highlights important surgical strategies that can be utilized to treat scoliosis in patients with SMA.

  1. [Development of therapeutics for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, Gen

    2003-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is a hereditary motor neuron disease that affects males, caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in androgen receptor (AR). Female carriers are usually asymptomatic. The transgenic mouse (Tg) model carrying a full-length human AR with expanded polyQ has significant gender-related motor impairment. This phenotype is inhibited by castration, which prevents nuclear translocation of mutant AR. Leuprorelin, an LHRH agonist that reduces testosterone release from the testis, also rescues motor dysfunction and nuclear accumulation of mutant AR in the male Tg. Over-expression of a molecular chaperone HSP70, which renatures misfolded mutant AR, ameliorates neuromuscular phenotypes of the Tg by reducing nuclear-localized mutant AR. HSP70 appears to enhance the degradation of mutant AR via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. These experimental approaches indicate the possibility of clinical application of drugs, such as leuprorelin, for SBMA patients.

  2. Development and Translation of Therapies for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah K. Shorrock

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder characterised by widespread loss of lower motor neurons from the spinal cord, leading to progressive weakness and muscle atrophy. SMA is largely caused by homozygous loss of the survival motor neuron (SMN 1 gene, resulting in reduced levels of full-length SMN protein. Although no approved treatment is currently available for SMA, several clinical trials investigating different approaches to increase SMN levels are showing promising early results. Trials investigating the use of therapies targeting muscle strength and neuroprotective pathways are also in progress, generating the possibility of delivering combination therapies utilising both SMN-dependent and SMN-independent targets. Due to an increased understanding of the cellular and molecular consequences of SMN depletion, a second wave of therapies targeted at pathways downstream of SMN are currently undergoing preclinical development. As these therapies move forward towards the clinic, new treatment options are likely to become available, raising the potential to generate an effective ‘cure’ for SMA.

  3. Current Status of Treatment of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumiaki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is the first member identified among polyglutamine diseases characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of the bulbar, facial, and limb muscles pathologically associated with motor neuron loss in the spinal cord and brainstem. Androgen receptor (AR, a disease-causing protein of SBMA, is a well-characterized ligand-activated transcription factor, and androgen binding induces nuclear translocation, conformational change and recruitment of coregulators for transactivation of AR target genes. Some therapeutic strategies for SBMA are based on these native functions of AR. Since ligand-induced nuclear translocation of mutant AR has been shown to be a critical step in motor neuron degeneration in SBMA, androgen deprivation therapies using leuprorelin and dutasteride have been developed and translated into clinical trials. Although the results of these trials are inconclusive, renewed clinical trials with more sophisticated design might prove the effectiveness of hormonal intervention in the near future. Furthermore, based on the normal function of AR, therapies targeted for conformational changes of AR including amino-terminal (N and carboxy-terminal (C (N/C interaction and transcriptional coregulators might be promising. Other treatments targeted for mitochondrial function, ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS, and autophagy could be applicable for all types of polyglutamine diseases.

  4. Pathogenesis and therapy of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Sobue, Gen

    2012-12-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a late-onset motor neuron disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. During the last two decades, basic and clinical research has provided important insights into the disease phenotype and pathophysiology. The cause of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA exclusively affects adult males, whereas females homozygous for the AR mutation do not manifest neurological symptoms. The ligand-dependent nuclear accumulation of the polyglutamine-expanded AR protein is central to the gender-specific pathogenesis of SBMA, although additional steps, e.g., DNA binding, inter-domain interactions, and post-translational modification of AR, modify toxicity. The interactions with co-regulators are another requisite for the toxic properties of the polyglutamine-expanded AR. It is also shown that the polyglutamine-expanded AR induces diverse molecular events, such as transcriptional dysregulation, axonal transport disruption, and mitochondrial dysfunction, which play causative roles in the neurodegeneration in SBMA. The pathogenic AR-induced myopathy also contributes to the non-cell autonomous degeneration of motor neurons. Pre-clinical studies using animal models show that the pathogenic AR-mediated neurodegeneration is suppressed by androgen inactivation, the efficacy of which has been tested in clinical trials. Pharmacological activation of cellular defense machineries, such as molecular chaperones, ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy, also exerts neuroprotective effects in experimental models of SBMA.

  5. Fibrosis, adipogenesis, and muscle atrophy in congenital muscular torticollis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-Xiong; Tang, Sheng-Ping; Gao, Fu-Tang; Xu, Jiang-Long; Jiang, Xian-Ping; Cao, Juan; Fu, Gui-Bing; Sun, Ke; Liu, Shi-Zhe; Shi, Wei

    2014-11-01

    In the traditional view, muscle atrophy and interstitial fibrosis were regarded as the basic pathological features of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT). But in the ultrastructure study, the mesenchyme-like cells, myoblasts, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts were found in the proliferation of interstitium of CMT. To investigate the characteristics of pathological features and the mechanisms of muscle atrophy in CMT, we retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 185 CMT patients from July 2009 to July 2011 in Shenzhen Children's Hospital in China and performed pathological studies. According to age, the 185 CMT patients were divided into 4 groups. All resected surgical specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson trichromic staining. Sudan III staining was used for frozen sections, whereas immunohistochemical staining for S-100, calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome was carried out on 40 CMT specimens. Eight adductor muscle specimens from 8 patients with development dysplasia of the hip were taken as control group in the immunohistochemical staining. By Masson trichromic staining, the differences in the percent area of fibrous tissue in each CMT groups were significant. In Sudan III staining and immunostaining for S-100, adipocyte hyperplasia was the pathological feature of CMT. Moreover, compared with controls, most atrophic muscle fibers in CMT specimens were found to show strong immunoreactivity for calpain-1, ubiquitin, and 20S proteasome. With increasing age, fibrosis peaked at both sides and it was low in middle age group. Adipocytes increased with age. The characteristics of pathological features in CMT are changeable with age. The calpain and the ubiquitin-proteasome system may play a role in muscle atrophy of CMT. In the CMT, adipogenesis, fibrogenesis, and myogenesis may be the results of mesenchyme-like cells in SCM (sternocleidomastoid muscle). In conclusion, the present study furthermore supports maldevelopment of the

  6. Clinical features of adult spinal muscular atrophy:46 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojun He; Ping Zhang; Guanghui Chen

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a kind of degenerative disease of nervous system. There are 4 types in clinic, especially types Ⅰ, Ⅱ and Ⅲ are common, and the researches on those 3 types are relative mature. Type Ⅳ is a kind of adult spinal muscular atrophy (ASMA), which has low incidence rate and is often misdiagnosed as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, cervical syndrome, or others.OBJECTIVE: To observe the clinical features of 46 ASMA patients and analyze the relationship between course and activity of daily living.DESIGN: Case analysis.SETTING: Departments of Neurology of the 81 Hospital of Chinese PLA, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical College and General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 46 ASMA patients were selected from the Departments of Neurology of the 81Hospital of Chinese PLA, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical College and General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command of Chinese PLA between April 1998 and January 2002. All patients were consentient. Among 46 cases, there were 37 males and 9 females with the mean age of 42 years. The patients' courses in all ranged from 6 months to 23 years, concretely, courses of 37 cases were less than or equal to 5 years, and those of 9 cases were more than or equal to 6 years.METHODS : ① All the 46 ASMA patients were asked to check blood sedimentation, anti O, serum creatinine,creatine, blood creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and muscular biopsy as early as possible. ② X-ray was used to measure plain film of cervical vertebra borderline film of cranium and neck at proximal end of upper limb of 25 cases and plain film of abdominal vertebra at proximal end of lower limb of 17 cases.③ Cerebrospinal fluid of lumbar puncture was checked on 42 cases, for routine examination, biochemical examination, and immunoglobulin examination. Electromyogram (EMG) was also examined to 42 cases. ④ Barthel index

  7. Different atrophy-hypertrophy transcription pathways in muscles affected by severe and mild spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millino Caterina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative disorder associated with mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN and is characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy caused by degeneration of spinal motor neurons. SMN has a role in neurons but its deficiency may have a direct effect on muscle tissue. Methods We applied microarray and quantitative real-time PCR to study at transcriptional level the effects of a defective SMN gene in skeletal muscles affected by the two forms of SMA: the most severe type I and the mild type III. Results The two forms of SMA generated distinct expression signatures: the SMA III muscle transcriptome is close to that found under normal conditions, whereas in SMA I there is strong alteration of gene expression. Genes implicated in signal transduction were up-regulated in SMA III whereas those of energy metabolism and muscle contraction were consistently down-regulated in SMA I. The expression pattern of gene networks involved in atrophy signaling was completed by qRT-PCR, showing that specific pathways are involved, namely IGF/PI3K/Akt, TNF-α/p38 MAPK and Ras/ERK pathways. Conclusion Our study suggests a different picture of atrophy pathways in each of the two forms of SMA. In particular, p38 may be the regulator of protein synthesis in SMA I. The SMA III profile appears as the result of the concurrent presence of atrophic and hypertrophic fibers. This more favorable condition might be due to the over-expression of MTOR that, given its role in the activation of protein synthesis, could lead to compensatory hypertrophy in SMA III muscle fibers.

  8. The gross motor function measure is a valid and sensitive outcome measure for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leslie; Owens, Hollis; Hynan, Linda S; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2006-06-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a genetic disease of the anterior horn cell with high morbidity rate in childhood. Certain drugs may be of benefit and are in or under consideration for Phase II trials. Outcome measures that are age appropriate and representative of disease activity remain under study. Several have not yet been validated for spinal muscular atrophy. The Gross Motor Function Measure is a measure of motor function. We showed previously that the Gross Motor Function Measure is a reliable outcome measure to assess motor function in children with spinal muscular atrophy. By collating our data from 40 spinal muscular atrophy patients, ages 5 through 17 years, we now show the validity of the Gross Motor Function Measure when compared to Quantitative Muscle Testing and ambulatory status in children with spinal muscular atrophy. The median for Gross Motor Function Measure total scores for walkers was 237 (range: 197-261) and for non-walkers, 64 (range: 4-177; PGross Motor Function Measure is valid and sensitive as an outcome measure for clinical trials in pediatric spinal muscular atrophy.

  9. Resistance strength training exercise in children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J; Stoddard, Gregory J; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A; White, Andrea T; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H; Carey, John C; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2015-10-01

    Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4 ± 3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3-day/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [A case of spinal muscular atrophy type 0 in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kentaro; Saito, Kayoko; Sato, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Keiko; Funatsuka, Makoto; Osawa, Makiko

    2012-09-01

    The patient was a 2-month-old female infant born at 41 weeks and 2 days of gestation presenting multiple arthrogryposis, severe muscle hypotonia and respiratory distress with difficulty in feeding. She suffered from repeated complications with aspiration pneumonia. On admission to our hospital, she exhibited fasciculation and absence of deep tendon reflexes. Examination of the motor nerve conduction velocity (MCV) revealed no muscle contraction. Deletions of the SMN and NAIP genes were noted. Based on severe clinical course and disease development in utero, she was given a diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 0 (very severe type). Arthrogryposis and disappearance of MCV are exclusion criteria for SMA. However, the clinical course of the infant was very severe and included such exclusion items. Consequently, when an infant presents muscle hypotonia and respiratory distress, SMA must be considered as one of the differential diagnoses, even though arthrogryposis is an exclusion criterion for SMA. We discuss this case in relation to the few extant reports on SMA type 0 in Japanese infants in the literature.

  11. Biomarkers in Rare Disorders: The Experience with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Brahe

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by homozygous mutations of the SMN1 gene. Based on clinical severity, three forms of SMA are recognized (type I–III. All patients have at least one (usually 2–4 copies of a highly homologous gene (SMN2 which produces insufficient levels of functional SMN protein, due to alternative splicing of exon7. Recently, evidence has been provided that SMN2 expression can be enhanced by different strategies. The availability of potential candidates to treat SMA has raised a number of issues, including the availability of data on the natural history of the disease, the reliability and sensitivity of outcome measures, the duration of the studies, and the number and clinical homogeneity of participating patients. Equally critical is the availability of reliable biomarkers. So far, different tools have been proposed as biomarkers in SMA, classifiable into two groups: instrumental (the Compound Motor Action Potential, the Motor Unit Number Estimation, and the Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and molecular (SMN gene products dosage, either transcripts or protein. However, none of the biomarkers available so far can be considered the gold standard. Preclinical studies on SMA animal models and double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are crucial to evaluate the appropriateness of biomarkers, on the basis of correlations with clinical outcome.

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Cases with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Canpolat

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study is was to evaluate the clinical features of cases with diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight pediatric patients were evaluated retrospectively. All patients were followed in the Pediatric Neurology Department of Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine. The diagnosis of patients had been confirmed by genetic analysis of homozygous deletions of survival motor neuron 1 gene. Detailed history, newborn symptoms, nutritional characteristics, initial complaints, physical examination, concomitant pathologies, genetic characteristics, and treatment modalities were investigated in all patients. Results: The study population consisted of 19 boys (50% and 19 girls (50%. The mean age of patients was 26.9±25.7 months (range: 3-96 months. The mean follow-up period was 12.2±13.3 months (range: 2-48 months. According to SMA classification, 22 patients (57.8% were type 1, 8 patients (21.1% were type 2, and 8 patients were (21.1% type 3. Neonatal respiratory distress, age at early diagnosis, nutritional problems, and recurrent lung diseases were detected as poor prognostic factors. Conclusions: SMA is a neuromuscular disease that requires multidisciplinary approach to medical care. There is a wide range of clinical severity. Identification of poor prognostic factors will help in terms of guiding close monitoring and timely treatments of children with SMA.

  13. Founder effect in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, F; Doyu, M; Ito, Y; Matsumoto, M; Mitsuma, T; Abe, K; Aoki, M; Itoyama, Y; Fischbeck, K H; Sobue, G

    1996-09-01

    We analyzed the polymorphic (CAG)n and (GGC)n repeats of the androgen receptor gene in 113 unrelated X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) X chromosomes and 173 control X chromosomes in Japanese males. The control chromosomes had an average CAG repeat number of 21 +/- 3 with a range from 14-32 repeat units, and SBMA chromosomes had a range from 40-55 with a median of 47 +/- 3 copies. The control chromosomes had seven different alleles of the (GGC)n repeat with the range of 11 to 17; the most frequent size of (GGC)n was 16 (79%), while (GGC)17 was very rare (1%). However, in SBMA chromosomes only two alleles were seen; the most frequent size of (GGC)n was 16 (61%) followed by 17 (39%). (GGC)n size distribution was significantly different between SBMA and control chromosomes (P SBMA patients, which suggests that a founder effect makes a more significant contribution to generation of Japanese SBMA chromosomes than new mutations.

  14. Optimization of Spinal Muscular Atrophy subject's muscle activity during gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umat, Gazlia; Rambely, Azmin Sham

    2014-06-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary disease related muscle nerve disorder caused by degeneration of the anterior cells of the spinal cord. SMA is divided into four types according to the degree of seriousness. SMA patients show different gait with normal people. Therefore, this study focused on the effects of SMA patient muscle actions and the difference that exists between SMA subjects and normal subjects. Therefore, the electromyography (EMG) test will be used to track the behavior of muscle during walking and optimization methods are used to get the muscle stress that is capable of doing the work while walking. Involved objective function is non-linear function of the quadratic and cubic functions. The study concludes with a comparison of the objective function using the force that sought to use the moment of previous studies and the objective function using the data obtained from EMG. The results shows that the same muscles, peroneus longus and bisepsfemoris, were used during walking activity by SMA subjects and control subjects. Muscle stress force best solution achieved from part D in simulation carried out.

  15. Atrofia muscular espinal en el niño Spinal muscular atrophy present in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Garófalo Gómez

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. Las atrofias musculares espinales en la infancia (AME son trastornos genéticos autosómicos recesivos, caracterizados por degeneración de las motoneuronas espinales y bulbares. El presente estudio tuvo el objetivo principal de describir las principales características clínicas en una serie de niños con AME. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de los pacientes con AME atendidos en el Instituto de Neurología y Neurocirugía de Cuba, entre enero de 1997 y diciembre de 2001. Se recopilaron los datos de 35 pacientes, 4 de ellos, fetos con confirmación prenatal de AME. Se precisaron las principales características clínicas, electromiográficas, de la biopsia muscular y de los estudios genéticos moleculares realizados en cada caso. RESULTADOS. La AME de tipo II resultó la forma clínica más frecuente (58 %, seguida por la AME de tipo I (42 %. Las principales manifestaciones clínicas resultaron la debilidad muscular generalizada con predominio proximal en extremidades, asociada a hipotonía y arreflexia osteotendinosa. La deleción de los exones 7 y 8 del gen SMN1 se detectó en 20 de 23 casos estudiados (87 %.INTRODUCTION: Spinal muscular atrophies (SMA in childhood are autosomal recessive genetic disorders, characterized by spinal and bulbar motoneurons degenerations. Aim of present paper was to describe the main clinical features in a series of children presenting SMA. METHODS: A retrospective study of patients with SMA seen in the Neurology and Neurosurgery Institute of Cuba from January, 2997 and December, 2001 was made. Data from 35 patients were available; four of them were fetus with prenatal confirmation of SMA. Main clinical, electromyography, muscular biopsy, and of molecular genetic studies performed in each case were determined. RESULTS: Type II SMA was the more frequent clinical presentation (58%, followed by type I SMA (42,%. Main clinical manifestations were a systemic muscular weakness with

  16. [Triplet repeat disease, with particular emphasis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, G

    2000-12-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. To date, eight CAG-repeat diseases have been identified, including spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Huntington's disease (HD), dentatorubralpallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) and five spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs 1, 2, 3, 6, 7). These disorders likely share a common pathogenesis caused by the gain of a toxic function associated with the expanded polyglutamine tract. Several mechanisms have been postulated as a pathogenic process for neurodegeneration caused by the expanded polyglutamine tract. Processing of the polyglutamine containing proteins by proteases liberate truncated polyglutamine tract, which may cause neurodegeneration as demonstrated in transgenic mice and transfected cells. In addition to cellular toxicity, truncated and expanded polyglutamine tracts have been shown to form intranuclear inclusions (NI). The NIs formed by the disease protein are a common pathological feature of these diseases. In SBMA, NIs containing AR protein have been observed in regions of SBMA central nervous system susceptible to degenerations. Transcriptional factors or their cofactors, such as cerb or creb-binding protein (CBP) sequestrated in the NI may alter the major intracellular transcriptional signal transduction, and ultimately may result in neuronal degeneration. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may also contribute to the pathogenesis of CAG-repeat diseases. As for the therapeutic strategies, many possibilities have been demonstrated. Overexpression of Hsp70 and Hsp40 chaperones act together to protect a cultured neuronal cell model of SBMA from a cellular toxicity of expanded polyglutamine tract.

  17. Whole-body vibration training in children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vry, Julia; Schubert, Isabel J; Semler, Oliver; Haug, Verena; Schönau, Eckhard; Kirschner, Janbernd

    2014-03-01

    Whole-body-vibration training is used to improve muscle strength and function and might therefore constitute a potential supportive therapy for neuromuscular diseases. To evaluate safety of whole-body vibration training in ambulatory children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). 14 children with DMD and 8 with SMA underwent an 8-week vibration training programme on a Galileo MedM at home (3 × 3 min twice a day, 5 days a week). Primary outcome was safety of the training, assessed clinically and by measuring serum creatine kinase levels. Secondary outcome was efficacy as measured by changes in time function tests, muscle strength and angular degree of dorsiflexion of the ankles. All children showed good clinical tolerance. In boys with DMD, creatine kinase increased by 56% after the first day of training and returned to baseline after 8 weeks of continuous whole-body vibration training. No changes in laboratory parameters were observed in children with SMA. Secondary outcomes showed mild, but not significant, improvements with the exception of the distance walked in the 6-min walking test in children with SMA, which rose from 371.3 m to 402.8 m (p training is clinically well tolerated in children with DMD and SMA. The relevance of the temporary increase in creatine kinase in DMD during the first days of training is unclear, but it is not related to clinical symptoms or deterioration. Copyright © 2013 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  19. [Molecular-targeted therapy for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, Gen

    2010-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The cause of SBMA is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine tract, within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA exclusively occurs in males, whereas both heterozygous and homozygous females are usually asymptomatic. In a transgenic mouse model of SBMA, neuromuscular symptoms are markedly pronounced in the male mice, but far less severe in the female counterparts. Androgen deprivation through both surgical and chemical castration substantially suppresses nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR, and thereby improves symptoms in the male mice. Since the nuclear translocation of AR is ligand-dependent, testosterone appears to show toxic effects by accelerating nuclear translocation of the pathogenic AR. In a phase 2 clinical trial, 12-month treatment with leuprorelin significantly diminished the serum level of creatine kinase, and suppressed nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR. The ligand-dependent accumulation of the pathogenic AR, an initial step in the neurodegenerative process in SBMA, is followed by several downstream molecular events such as transcriptional dysregulation, axonal transport disruption, and mitochondrial insufficiency, indicating that both upstream and downstream molecular abnormalities should be corrected.

  20. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  1. Nemo-like kinase is a novel regulator of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Tiffany W; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Miranda, Helen C; Cortes, Constanza J; La Spada, Albert R; Lim, Janghoo

    2015-08-26

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) protein. Despite extensive research, the exact pathogenic mechanisms underlying SBMA remain elusive. In this study, we present evidence that Nemo-like kinase (NLK) promotes disease pathogenesis across multiple SBMA model systems. Most remarkably, loss of one copy of Nlk rescues SBMA phenotypes in mice, including extending lifespan. We also investigated the molecular mechanisms by which NLK exerts its effects in SBMA. Specifically, we have found that NLK can phosphorylate the mutant polyglutamine-expanded AR, enhance its aggregation, and promote AR-dependent gene transcription by regulating AR-cofactor interactions. Furthermore, NLK modulates the toxicity of a mutant AR fragment via a mechanism that is independent of AR-mediated gene transcription. Our findings uncover a crucial role for NLK in controlling SBMA toxicity and reveal a novel avenue for therapy development in SBMA.

  2. Dificuldades diagnósticas na atrofia muscular espinhal Spinal muscular atrophy diagnostic difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Prufer de Q-C. Araújo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever o perfil clínico e laboratorial de pacientes com atrofia muscular espinhal (AME com deleção no gene da proteína sobrevivência do neurônio motor (SMN. MÉTODO: Estudo descritivo de uma série de casos confirmados pela presença da deleção no gene SMN. Determinação da freqüência da positividade dos critérios clínicos e laboratoriais revisados. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 22 casos. Em todos havia paresia simétrica, sendo a localização difusa predominante nos casos de início antes de 6 meses (75 %, enquanto nos demais havia predominância de localização proximal e/ou em membros inferiores (67 %. Fasciculações e atrofia foram freqüentes (82 %. Os exames complementares tiveram resultados variáveis, sendo a positividade da eletroneuromiografia (ENMG de 57 % e da biopsia muscular de 58 %. CONCLUSÃO: A presença de deleção no gene SMN pode ajudar a confirmar o diagnóstico de casos indefinidos .OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical findings of patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA with survival motor neuron (SMN gene deletion. METHOD: Descriptive study of SMA cases confirmed with the deletion of the SMN gene. Frequency determination of positive clinical and laboratory revised diagnostic criteria. RESULTS: All of the 22 included patients had symmetrical muscle weakness, which was diffuse in those with onset of symptoms up to 6 months of age (75 %, and either proximal or predominant in lower limbs in the remaining group (67 %. Fasciculations and atrophy were both frequent findings (82 %. Laboratory tests findings were variable, with a positivity of 57 % for electrophysiology and of 58 % for muscle biopsy. CONCLUSION: The presence of a deletion in the SMN gene can help to confirm this diagnosis in unclear presentations.

  3. Cardiac pathology in spinal muscular atrophy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarde, C A; Blank, A C; Stam, M; Wadman, R I; van den Berg, L H; van der Pol, W L

    2017-04-11

    Hereditary proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe neuromuscular disease of childhood caused by homozygous loss of function of the survival motor neuron (SMN) 1 gene. The presence of a second, nearly identical SMN gene (SMN2) in the human genome ensures production of residual levels of the ubiquitously expressed SMN protein. Alpha-motor neurons in the ventral horns of the spinal cord are most vulnerable to reduced SMN concentrations but the development or function of other tissues may also be affected, and cardiovascular abnormalities have frequently been reported both in patients and SMA mouse models. We systematically reviewed reported cardiac pathology in relation to SMN deficiency. To investigate the relevance of the possible association in more detail, we used clinical classification systems to characterize structural cardiac defects and arrhythmias. Seventy-two studies with a total of 264 SMA patients with reported cardiac pathology were identified, along with 14 publications on SMA mouse models with abnormalities of the heart. Structural cardiac pathology, mainly septal defects and abnormalities of the cardiac outflow tract, was reported predominantly in the most severely affected patients (i.e. SMA type 1). Cardiac rhythm disorders were most frequently reported in patients with milder SMA types (e.g. SMA type 3). All included studies lacked control groups and a standardized approach for cardiac evaluation. The convergence to specific abnormalities of cardiac structure and function may indicate vulnerability of specific cell types or developmental processes relevant for cardiogenesis. Future studies would benefit from a controlled and standardized approach for cardiac evaluation in patients with SMA.

  4. Observational Study of Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Petra; McDermott, Michael P.; Darras, Basil T.; Finkel, Richard; Kang, Peter; Oskoui, Maryam; Constantinescu, Andrei; Sproule, Douglas Michael; Foley, A. Reghan; Yang, Michele; Tawil, Rabi; Chung, Wendy; Martens, Bill; Montes, Jacqueline; O'Hagen, Jessica; Dunaway, Sally; Flickinger, Jean M.; Quigley, Janet; Riley, Susan; Glanzman, Allan M.; Benton, Maryjane; Ryan, Patricia A.; Irvine, Carrie; Annis, Christine L.; Butler, Hailly; Caracciolo, Jayson; Montgomery, Megan; Marra, Jonathan; Koo, Benjamin; De Vivo, Darryl C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the short-term course of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a genetically and clinically well-defined cohort of patients with SMA. Design A comprehensive multicenter, longitudinal, observational study. Setting The Pediatric Neuromuscular Clinical Research Network for SMA, a consortium of clinical investigators at 3 clinical sites. Participants Sixty-five participants with SMA types 2 and 3, aged 20 months to 45 years, were prospectively evaluated. Intervention We collected demographic and medical history information and determined the SMN2 copy number. Main Outcome Measures Clinical outcomes included measures of motor function (Gross Motor Function Measure and expanded Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale), pulmonary function (forced vital capacity), and muscle strength (myometry). Participants were evaluated every 2 months for the initial 6 months and every 3 months for the subsequent 6 months. We evaluated change over 12 months for all clinical outcomes and examined potential correlates of change over time including age, sex, SMA type, ambulatory status, SMN2 copy number, medication use, and baseline function. Results There were no significant changes over 12 months in motor function, pulmonary function, and muscle strength measures. There was evidence of motor function gain in ambulatory patients, especially in those children younger than 5 years. Scoliosis surgery during the observation period led to a subsequent decline in motor function. Conclusions Our results confirm previous clinical reports suggesting that SMA types 2 and 3 represent chronic phenotypes that have relatively stable clinical courses. We did not detect any measurable clinical disease progression in SMA types 2 and 3 over 12 months, suggesting that clinical trials will have to be designed to measure improvement rather than stabilization of disease progression. PMID:21320981

  5. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of a mouse model of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy reveals severe muscular atrophy restricted to fast glycolytic fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trollet, Capucine; Anvar, Seyed Yahya; Venema, Andrea; Hargreaves, Iain P; Foster, Keith; Vignaud, Alban; Ferry, Arnaud; Negroni, Elisa; Hourde, Christophe; Baraibar, Martin A; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Davies, Janet E; Rubinsztein, David C; Heales, Simon J; Mouly, Vincent; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Raz, Vered; Dickson, George

    2010-06-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is an adult-onset disorder characterized by ptosis, dysphagia and proximal limb weakness. Autosomal-dominant OPMD is caused by a short (GCG)(8-13) expansions within the first exon of the poly(A)-binding protein nuclear 1 gene (PABPN1), leading to an expanded polyalanine tract in the mutated protein. Expanded PABPN1 forms insoluble aggregates in the nuclei of skeletal muscle fibres. In order to gain insight into the different physiological processes affected in OPMD muscles, we have used a transgenic mouse model of OPMD (A17.1) and performed transcriptomic studies combined with a detailed phenotypic characterization of this model at three time points. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a massive gene deregulation in the A17.1 mice, among which we identified a significant deregulation of pathways associated with muscle atrophy. Using a mathematical model for progression, we have identified that one-third of the progressive genes were also associated with muscle atrophy. Functional and histological analysis of the skeletal muscle of this mouse model confirmed a severe and progressive muscular atrophy associated with a reduction in muscle strength. Moreover, muscle atrophy in the A17.1 mice was restricted to fast glycolytic fibres, containing a large number of intranuclear inclusions (INIs). The soleus muscle and, in particular, oxidative fibres were spared, even though they contained INIs albeit to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate a fibre-type specificity of muscle atrophy in this OPMD model. This study improves our understanding of the biological pathways modified in OPMD to identify potential biomarkers and new therapeutic targets.

  6. [Upper limb functional assessment scale for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Spinal muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Raúl G; Lucero, Nayadet; Solares, Carmen; Espinoza, Victoria; Moscoso, Odalie; Olguín, Polín; Muñoz, Karin T; Rosas, Ricardo

    2016-08-16

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes significant disability and progressive functional impairment. Readily available instruments that assess functionality, especially in advanced stages of the disease, are required to monitor the progress of the disease and the impact of therapeutic interventions. To describe the development of a scale to evaluate upper limb function (UL) in patients with DMD and SMA, and describe its validation process, which includes self-training for evaluators. The development of the scale included a review of published scales, an exploratory application of a pilot scale in healthy children and those with DMD, self-training of evaluators in applying the scale using a handbook and video tutorial, and assessment of a group of children with DMD and SMA using the final scale. Reliability was assessed using Cronbach and Kendall concordance and with intra and inter-rater test-retest, and validity with concordance and factorial analysis. A high level of reliability was observed, with high internal consistency (Cronbach α=0.97), and inter-rater (Kendall W=0.96) and intra-rater concordance (r=0.97 to 0.99). The validity was demonstrated by the absence of significant differences between results by different evaluators with an expert evaluator (F=0.023, P>.5), and by the factor analysis that showed that four factors account for 85.44% of total variance. This scale is a reliable and valid tool for assessing UL functionality in children with DMD and SMA. It is also easily implementable due to the possibility of self-training and the use of simple and inexpensive materials. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Proteomic assessment of a cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kelvin H

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion or mutation(s of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a neuromuscular disease characterized by spinal motor neuron death and muscle paralysis. Complete loss of the SMN protein is embryonically lethal, yet reduced levels of this protein result in selective death of motor neurons. Why motor neurons are specifically targeted by SMN deficiency remains to be determined. In this study, embryonic stem (ES cells derived from a severe SMA mouse model were differentiated into motor neurons in vitro by addition of retinoic acid and sonic hedgehog agonist. Proteomic and western blot analyses were used to probe protein expression alterations in this cell-culture model of SMA that could be relevant to the disease. Results When ES cells were primed with Noggin/fibroblast growth factors (bFGF and FGF-8 in a more robust neural differentiation medium for 2 days before differentiation induction, the efficiency of in vitro motor neuron differentiation was improved from ~25% to ~50%. The differentiated ES cells expressed a pan-neuronal marker (neurofilament and motor neuron markers (Hb9, Islet-1, and ChAT. Even though SMN-deficient ES cells had marked reduced levels of SMN (~20% of that in control ES cells, the morphology and differentiation efficiency for these cells are comparable to those for control samples. However, proteomics in conjunction with western blot analyses revealed 6 down-regulated and 14 up-regulated proteins with most of them involved in energy metabolism, cell stress-response, protein degradation, and cytoskeleton stability. Some of these activated cellular pathways showed specificity for either undifferentiated or differentiated cells. Increased p21 protein expression indicated that SMA ES cells were responding to cellular stress. Up-regulation of p21 was confirmed in spinal cord tissues from the same SMA mouse model from which the ES cells were derived. Conclusion SMN

  8. Synaptic defects in the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen K Y Ling

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a major genetic cause of death in childhood characterized by marked muscle weakness. To investigate mechanisms underlying motor impairment in SMA, we examined the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry governing hindlimb ambulatory behavior in SMA model mice (SMNΔ7. In the neuromuscular circuitry, we found that nearly all neuromuscular junctions (NMJs in hindlimb muscles of SMNΔ7 mice remained fully innervated at the disease end stage and were capable of eliciting muscle contraction, despite a modest reduction in quantal content. In the spinal circuitry, we observed a ∼28% loss of synapses onto spinal motoneurons in the lateral column of lumbar segments 3-5, and a significant reduction in proprioceptive sensory neurons, which may contribute to the 50% reduction in vesicular glutamate transporter 1(VGLUT1-positive synapses onto SMNΔ7 motoneurons. In addition, there was an increase in the association of activated microglia with SMNΔ7 motoneurons. Together, our results present a novel concept that synaptic defects occur at multiple levels of the spinal and neuromuscular circuitry in SMNΔ7 mice, and that proprioceptive spinal synapses could be a potential target for SMA therapy.

  9. Survival motor neuron protein in motor neurons determines synaptic integrity in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Tara L; Kong, Lingling; Wang, Xueyong; Osborne, Melissa A; Crowder, Melissa E; Van Meerbeke, James P; Xu, Xixi; Davis, Crystal; Wooley, Joe; Goldhamer, David J; Lutz, Cathleen M; Rich, Mark M; Sumner, Charlotte J

    2012-06-20

    The inherited motor neuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by deficient expression of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein and results in severe muscle weakness. In SMA mice, synaptic dysfunction of both neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and central sensorimotor synapses precedes motor neuron cell death. To address whether this synaptic dysfunction is due to SMN deficiency in motor neurons, muscle, or both, we generated three lines of conditional SMA mice with tissue-specific increases in SMN expression. All three lines of mice showed increased survival, weights, and improved motor behavior. While increased SMN expression in motor neurons prevented synaptic dysfunction at the NMJ and restored motor neuron somal synapses, increased SMN expression in muscle did not affect synaptic function although it did improve myofiber size. Together these data indicate that both peripheral and central synaptic integrity are dependent on motor neurons in SMA, but SMN may have variable roles in the maintenance of these different synapses. At the NMJ, it functions at the presynaptic terminal in a cell-autonomous fashion, but may be necessary for retrograde trophic signaling to presynaptic inputs onto motor neurons. Importantly, SMN also appears to function in muscle growth and/or maintenance independent of motor neurons. Our data suggest that SMN plays distinct roles in muscle, NMJs, and motor neuron somal synapses and that restored function of SMN at all three sites will be necessary for full recovery of muscle power.

  10. VERY SEVERE SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY (TYPE 0: A REPORT OF THREE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad BARZEGAR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveWe describe three patients with very severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA presented with reduced fetal movement in utero, profound hypotonia, severe weakness and respiratory insufficiency at birth. In all infants, electrodiagnostic studies were compatible with a neurogenic pattern. In genetic studies, all cases had homozygous deletions of exons 7 and 8 of Survival Motor Neuron (SMN and exon 5 of Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitory Protein (NAIP gene. SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of reduced fetal movement and respiratory insufficiency at birth.Keywords:Spinal muscular atrophy, survival motor neuron gene, neonate

  11. Rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms in a patient with spinobulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal reflux, who dramatically improved with multimodality therapy.

  12. Fasudil improves survival and promotes skeletal muscle development in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bowerman Melissa; Murray Lyndsay M; Boyer Justin G; Anderson Carrie L; Kothary Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the leading genetic cause of infant death. It is caused by mutations/deletions of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and is typified by the loss of spinal cord motor neurons, muscular atrophy, and in severe cases, death. The SMN protein is ubiquitously expressed and various cellular- and tissue-specific functions have been investigated to explain the specific motor neuron loss in SMA. We have previously shown that the RhoA/Rho kinase (...

  13. Distal spinal muscular atrophy and ophthalmoparesis. A case with selective type 2 fiber hypotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovsky, A; Taratuto, A L; Martino, R

    1981-09-01

    A patient had distal muscular atrophy involving the upper and lower extremities, ptosis of the lid, and ophthalmoparesis and cataracts. Muscle histochemistry and electromyographic examination showed lower motor neuron involvement. This case is similar to others described in the literature and designated as distal spinal muscular atrophy. The unique association with ophthalmologic signs can be considered either as a variant form of the disease or as a separate entity. Muscle biopsy showed selective type 2 muscle fiber hypotrophy in the biceps. A second biopsy specimen of the quadriceps showed type grouping with persistence of small type 2 fibers, suggesting that reinnervation capability is independent of neuronal trophic influence.

  14. The Smn-independent beneficial effects of trichostatin A on an intermediate mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by the progressive loss of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord. Trichostatin A (TSA is a histone deacetylase inhibitor with beneficial effects in spinal muscular atrophy mouse models that carry the human SMN2 transgene. It is currently unclear whether TSA specifically targets the SMN2 gene or whether other genes respond to TSA and in turn provide neuroprotection in SMA mice. We have taken advantage of the Smn2B/- mouse model that does not harbor the human SMN2 transgene, to test the hypothesis that TSA has its beneficial effects through a non-SMN mediated pathway. TSA increased the median lifespan of Smn2B/- mice from twenty days to eight weeks. As well, there was a significant attenuation of weight loss and improved motor behavior. Pen test and righting reflex both showed significant improvement, and motor neurons in the spinal cord of Smn2B/- mice were protected from degeneration. Both the size and maturity of neuromuscular junctions were significantly improved in TSA treated Smn2B/- mice. Of interest, TSA treatment did not increase the levels of Smn protein in mouse embryonic fibroblasts or myoblasts obtained from the Smn2B/- mice. In addition, no change in the level of Smn transcripts or protein in the brain or spinal cord of TSA-treated SMA model mice was observed. Furthermore, TSA did not increase Smn protein levels in the hind limb muscle, heart, or liver of Smn2B/- mice. We therefore conclude that TSA likely exerts its effects independent of the endogenous mouse Smn gene. As such, identification of the pathways regulated by TSA in the Smn2B/- mice could lead to the development of novel therapeutics for treating SMA.

  15. TDP-43 expression in mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansorge Olaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Redistribution of nuclear TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43 to the cytoplasm and ubiquitinated inclusions of spinal motor neurons and glial cells is characteristic of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS pathology. Recent evidence suggests that TDP-43 pathology is common to sporadic ALS and familial ALS without SOD1 mutation, but not SOD1-related fALS cases. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether TDP-43 abnormalities occur in non-ALS forms of motor neuron disease. Here, we characterise TDP-43 localisation, expression levels and post-translational modifications in mouse models of ALS and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. Results TDP-43 mislocalisation to ubiquitinated inclusions or cytoplasm was notably lacking in anterior horn cells from transgenic mutant SOD1G93A mice. In addition, abnormally phosphorylated or truncated TDP-43 species were not detected in fractionated ALS mouse spinal cord or brain. Despite partial colocalisation of TDP-43 with SMN, depletion of SMN- and coilin-positive Cajal bodies in motor neurons of affected SMA mice did not alter nuclear TDP-43 distribution, expression or biochemistry in spinal cords. Conclusion These results emphasise that TDP-43 pathology characteristic of human sporadic ALS is not a core component of the neurodegenerative mechanisms caused by SOD1 mutation or SMN deficiency in mouse models of ALS and SMA, respectively.

  16. Dysphagia in spinal muscular atrophy type II: more than a bulbar problem?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel-Hoek, L. van den; Erasmus, C.E.; Bruggen, H.W. van; Swart, B.J.M. de; Sie, L.T.L.; Steenks, M.H.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type II, feeding problems and dysphagia are common, but the underlying mechanisms of these problems are not well defined. This case control study was designed to determine the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in SMA type II. METHODS: Six

  17. A PROVISIONAL TRANSCRIPT MAP OF THE SPINAL MUSCULAR-ATROPHY (SMA) CRITICAL REGION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; DRAAIJERS, TG; GROOTSCHOLTEN, PM; OSINGA, J; ANZEVINO, R; VELONA, [No Value; DENDUNNEN, JT; SCHEFFER, H; BRAHE, C; VANOMMEN, GJB; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    YACs from the region containing the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus at 5q12 have been used as probes in a direct screening of cDNA libraries to isolate 8 cDNAs, mapped to different YAC fragments. Three clones showed complete identity to the genes for cyclin B1 (CCNB1), the p44 subunit of the tra

  18. A PROVISIONAL TRANSCRIPT MAP OF THE SPINAL MUSCULAR-ATROPHY (SMA) CRITICAL REGION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; DRAAIJERS, TG; GROOTSCHOLTEN, PM; OSINGA, J; ANZEVINO, R; VELONA, [No Value; DENDUNNEN, JT; SCHEFFER, H; BRAHE, C; VANOMMEN, GJB; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    YACs from the region containing the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) locus at 5q12 have been used as probes in a direct screening of cDNA libraries to isolate 8 cDNAs, mapped to different YAC fragments. Three clones showed complete identity to the genes for cyclin B1 (CCNB1), the p44 subunit of the

  19. Clinical and mutational characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, Xenia L.; Verrips, Aad; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Cobben, Jan-Maarten; Snoeck, Irma N.; de Coo, Irenaeus F. M.; Brooks, Alice; Bulk, Saskia; Gooskens, Rob; Fock, Annemarie; Verschuuren - Bemelmans, Cornelia; Sinke, Richard J.; de Visser, Marianne; Lemmink, Henny H.

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 is an autosomal recessive disorder with early respiratory difficulties, distal muscle weakness, and contractures leading to foot deformities as the most striking clinical symptoms. Mutations of the gene encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain

  20. Clinical and mutational characteristics of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stalpers, X.L.; Verrips, A.; Poll-The, B.T.; Cobben, J.M.; Snoeck, I.N.; Coo, I.F.M. de; Brooks, A.; Bulk, S.; Gooskens, R.; Fock, A.; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C.; Sinke, R.J.; Visser, M. de; Lemmink, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 is an autosomal recessive disorder with early respiratory difficulties, distal muscle weakness, and contractures leading to foot deformities as the most striking clinical symptoms. Mutations of the gene encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain

  1. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  2. Distal spinal muscular atrophy as a major feature in adult-onset ataxia telangiectasia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiel, J.A.P.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Broeks, A.; Verrips, A.; Laak, H.J. ter; Vingerhoets, H.M.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Gabreëls, F.J.M.; Last, J.I.; Taylor, A.M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The authors report four adult-onset ataxia telangiectasia (AT) patients belonging to two families lacking pronounced cerebellar ataxia but displaying distal spinal muscular atrophy. AT was proven by genetic studies showing ATM mutations and a reduced level of ATM. ATM activity, as measured by phosph

  3. Aquatic Therapy for a Child with Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Gropack, Stacy Jaffee

    2010-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons. This case report describes an aquatic therapy program and the outcomes for a 3-year-old girl with type III SMA. Motor skills were examined using the 88-item Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales…

  4. Physician attitudes towards ventilatory support for spinal muscular atrophy type 1 in Australasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geevasinga, Nimeshan; Ryan, Monique M.

    2007-01-01

    Without ventilatory support, premature death from respiratory insufficiency is virtually universal in infants with spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA1). With mechanical ventilation, however, long-term survival has been reported from numerous international centres. We aimed to characterize physician

  5. Congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy in megaconial myopathy due to a mutation in CHKB gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Dacruz-Alvarez, David; Pintos-Martínez, Elena; Beiras-Iglesias, Andrés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta gene (CHKB) mutations have been identified in Megaconial Congenital Muscular Dystrophy (MDCMC) patients, a very rare inborn error of metabolism with 21 cases reported worldwide. We report the case of a Spanish boy of Caucasian origin who presented a generalized congenital muscular hypotonia, more intense at lower limb muscles, mildly elevated creatine kinase (CK), serum aspartate transaminase (AST) and lactate. Electromyography (EMG) showed neurogenic potentials in the proximal muscles. Histological studies of a muscle biopsy showed neurogenic atrophy with enlarged mitochondria in the periphery of the fibers, and complex I deficiency. Finally, genetic analysis showed the presence of a homozygous mutation in the gene for choline kinase beta (CHKB: NM_005198.4:c.810T>A, p.Tyr270(∗)). We describe here the second Spanish patient whit mutation in CHKB gene, who despite having the same mutation, presented an atypical aspect: congenital neurogenic muscular atrophy progressing to a combined neuropathic and myopathic phenotype (mixed pattern).

  6. [Association of post-radiation focal muscular atrophy and hypertrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serratrice, G; Sangla, I; Pouget, J; Azulay, J P

    1993-01-01

    We report a 48 year old woman who had radiotherapy for uterine carcinoma and who developed amyotrophy and muscle hypertrophy in one lower limb. Very few cases of post-radiation monomelic amyotrophy have been reported. On the other hand denervation hypertrophy was presumed to be well known. The seat of the lesions was presumed to be radicular and spinal. The mechanism of atrophy and hypertrophy is discussed.

  7. Plastin 3 Expression Does Not Modify Spinal Muscular Atrophy Severity in the ∆7 SMA Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Vicki L; Massoni-Laporte, Aurélie; Wang, Xueyong; Le, Thanh T; Le, Hao T; Beattie, Christine E; Rich, Mark M; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2015-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by loss of the SMN1 gene and retention of SMN2. The SMN2 copy number inversely correlates with phenotypic severity and is a modifier of disease outcome. The SMN2 gene essentially differs from SMN1 by a single nucleotide in exon 7 that modulates the incorporation of exon 7 into the final SMN transcript. The majority of the SMN2 transcripts lack exon 7 and this leads to a SMN protein that does not effectively oligomerize and is rapidly degraded. However the SMN2 gene does produce some full-length SMN and the SMN2 copy number along with how much full-length SMN the SMN2 gene makes correlates with severity of the SMA phenotype. However there are a number of discordant SMA siblings that have identical haplotypes and SMN2 copy number yet one has a milder form of SMA. It has been suggested that Plastin3 (PLS3) acts as a sex specific phenotypic modifier where increased expression of PLS3 modifies the SMA phenotype in females. To test the effect of PLS3 overexpression we have over expressed full-length PLS3 in SMA mice. To ensure no disruption of functionality or post-translational processing of PLS3 we did not place a tag on the protein. PLS3 protein was expressed under the Prion promoter as we have shown previously that SMN expression under this promoter can rescue SMA mice. High levels of PLS3 mRNA were expressed in motor neurons along with an increased level of PLS3 protein in total spinal cord, yet there was no significant beneficial effect on the phenotype of SMA mice. Specifically, neither survival nor the fundamental electrophysiological aspects of the neuromuscular junction were improved upon overexpression of PLS3 in neurons.

  8. ROCK inhibition as a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy: understanding the repercussions on multiple cellular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle eCoque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is the most common genetic disease causing infant death, due to an extended loss of motoneurons. This neuromuscular disorder results from deletions and/or mutations within the surviving motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, leading to a pathological decreased expression of functional full-length SMN protein. Emerging studies suggest that the small GTPase RhoA and its major downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK, which both play an instrumental role in cytoskeleton organization, contribute to the pathology of motoneuron diseases. Indeed, an enhanced activation of RhoA and ROCK has been reported in the spinal cord of an SMA mouse model. Moreover, the treatment of SMA mice with ROCK inhibitors leads to an increased lifespan as well as improved skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction pathology, without preventing motoneuron degeneration. Although motoneurons are the primary target in SMA, an increasing number of reports show that other cell types inside and outside the central nervous system contribute to SMA pathogenesis. As administration of ROCK inhibitors to SMA mice was systemic, the improvement in survival and phenotype could therefore be attributed to specific effects on motoneurons and/or on other non-neuronal cell types. In the present review, we will present the various roles of the RhoA/ROCK pathway in several SMA cellular targets including neurons, myocytes, glial cells, cardiomyocytes and pancreatic cells as well as discuss how ROCK inhibition may ameliorate their health and function. It is most likely a concerted influence of ROCK modulation on all these cell types that ultimately lead to the observed benefits of pharmacological ROCK inhibition in SMA mice.

  9. ROCK inhibition as a therapy for spinal muscular atrophy: understanding the repercussions on multiple cellular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coque, Emmanuelle; Raoul, Cédric; Bowerman, Mélissa

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is the most common genetic disease causing infant death, due to an extended loss of motoneurons. This neuromuscular disorder results from deletions and/or mutations within the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to a pathological decreased expression of functional full-length SMN protein. Emerging studies suggest that the small GTPase RhoA and its major downstream effector Rho kinase (ROCK), which both play an instrumental role in cytoskeleton organization, contribute to the pathology of motoneuron diseases. Indeed, an enhanced activation of RhoA and ROCK has been reported in the spinal cord of an SMA mouse model. Moreover, the treatment of SMA mice with ROCK inhibitors leads to an increased lifespan as well as improved skeletal muscle and neuromuscular junction pathology, without preventing motoneuron degeneration. Although motoneurons are the primary target in SMA, an increasing number of reports show that other cell types inside and outside the central nervous system contribute to SMA pathogenesis. As administration of ROCK inhibitors to SMA mice was systemic, the improvement in survival and phenotype could therefore be attributed to specific effects on motoneurons and/or on other non-neuronal cell types. In the present review, we will present the various roles of the RhoA/ROCK pathway in several SMA cellular targets including neurons, myoblasts, glial cells, cardiomyocytes and pancreatic cells as well as discuss how ROCK inhibition may ameliorate their health and function. It is most likely a concerted influence of ROCK modulation on all these cell types that ultimately lead to the observed benefits of pharmacological ROCK inhibition in SMA mice.

  10. Plastin-3 extends survival and reduces severity in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaifer, Kevin A.; Osman, Erkan Y.; Glascock, Jacqueline J.; Arnold, Laura L.; Cornelison, D.D.W.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infantile death and is caused by the loss of survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1). Importantly, a nearly identical gene is present called SMN2; however, the majority of SMN2-derived transcripts are alternatively spliced and encode a truncated, dysfunctional protein. Recently, several compounds designed to increase SMN protein have entered clinical trials, including antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), traditional small molecules, and gene therapy. Expanding beyond SMN-centric therapeutics is important, as it is likely that the breadth of the patient spectrum and the inherent complexity of the disease will be difficult to address with a single therapeutic strategy. Several SMN-independent pathways that could impinge upon the SMA phenotype have been examined with varied success. To identify disease-modifying pathways that could serve as stand-alone therapeutic targets or could be used in combination with an SMN-inducing compound, we investigated adeno-associated virus–mediated (AAV-mediated) gene therapy using plastin-3 (PLS3). Here, we report that AAV9-PLS3 extends survival in an intermediate model of SMA mice as well as in a pharmacologically induced model of SMA using a splice-switching ASO that increases SMN production. PLS3 coadministration improves the phenotype beyond the ASO, demonstrating the potential utility of combinatorial therapeutics in SMA that target SMN-independent and SMN-dependent pathways. PMID:28289706

  11. Bioenergetic status modulates motor neuron vulnerability and pathogenesis in a zebrafish model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penelope J Boyd

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Degeneration and loss of lower motor neurons is the major pathological hallmark of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, resulting from low levels of ubiquitously-expressed survival motor neuron (SMN protein. One remarkable, yet unresolved, feature of SMA is that not all motor neurons are equally affected, with some populations displaying a robust resistance to the disease. Here, we demonstrate that selective vulnerability of distinct motor neuron pools arises from fundamental modifications to their basal molecular profiles. Comparative gene expression profiling of motor neurons innervating the extensor digitorum longus (disease-resistant, gastrocnemius (intermediate vulnerability, and tibialis anterior (vulnerable muscles in mice revealed that disease susceptibility correlates strongly with a modified bioenergetic profile. Targeting of identified bioenergetic pathways by enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis rescued motor axon defects in SMA zebrafish. Moreover, targeting of a single bioenergetic protein, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (Pgk1, was found to modulate motor neuron vulnerability in vivo. Knockdown of pgk1 alone was sufficient to partially mimic the SMA phenotype in wild-type zebrafish. Conversely, Pgk1 overexpression, or treatment with terazosin (an FDA-approved small molecule that binds and activates Pgk1, rescued motor axon phenotypes in SMA zebrafish. We conclude that global bioenergetics pathways can be therapeutically manipulated to ameliorate SMA motor neuron phenotypes in vivo.

  12. The emerging role of epigenetic modifications and chromatin remodeling in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunke, Sebastian; El-Osta, Assam

    2009-06-01

    As the leading genetic cause for infantile death, Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) has been extensively studied since its first description in the early 1890s. Though today much is known about the cause of the disease, a cure or effective treatment is not currently available. Recently the short chain fatty acid valproic acid, a drug used for decades in the management of epilepsy and migraine therapy, has been shown to elevate the levels of the essential survival motor neuron protein in cultured cells. In SMA mice, valproic acid diminished the severity of the disease phenotype. This effect was linked to the ability of the short chain fatty acid to suppress histone deacetylase activity and activate gene transcription. Since then, the study of different histone deacetylase inhibitors and their epigenetic modifying capabilities has been of high interest in an attempt to find potential candidates for effective treatment of SMA. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about use of histone deacetylase inhibitors in SMA as well as their proposed effects on chromatin structure and discuss further implications for possible treatments of SMA arising from research examining epigenetic change.

  13. Neuromuscular junctions are pathological but not denervated in two mouse models of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poort, Jessica E; Rheuben, Mary B; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2016-09-01

    Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive, late onset neuromuscular disease causing motor dysfunction in men. While the morphology of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is typically affected by neuromuscular disease, whether NMJs in SBMA are similarly affected by disease is not known. Such information will shed light on whether defective NMJs might contribute to the loss of motor function and represent a potential therapeutic target for treating symptoms of SBMA. To address this gap in information, the morphology of NMJs was examined in two mouse models of SBMA, a myogenic model that overexpresses wildtype androgen receptor (AR) exclusively in muscle fibres and a knockin (KI) model expressing a humanized mutant AR gene. The tripartite motor synapse consisting of motor nerve terminal, terminal Schwann cells (tSCs) and postsynaptic specialization were visualized and analysed using confocal microscopy. Counter to expectation, we found no evidence of denervation in either model, but junctions in both models show pathological fragmentation and an abnormal synaptophysin distribution consistent with functionally weak synapses. Neurofilament accumulations were observed only in the myogenic model, even though axonal transport dysfunction is characteristic of both models. The ultrastructure of NMJs revealed additional pathology, including deficits in docked vesicles presynaptically, wider synaptic clefts, and simpler secondary folds postsynaptically. The observed pathology of NMJs in diseased SBMA mice is likely the morphological correlates of defects in synaptic function which may underlie motor impairments associated with SBMA.

  14. MiR-298 Counteracts Mutant Androgen Receptor Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourshafie, Naemeh; Lee, Philip R; Chen, Ke-Lian; Harmison, George G; Bott, Laura C; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen; Burnett, Barrington G; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Rinaldi, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a currently untreatable adult-onset neuromuscular disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine repeat in the androgen receptor (AR). In SBMA, as in other polyglutamine diseases, a toxic gain of function in the mutant protein is an important factor in the disease mechanism; therefore, reducing the mutant protein holds promise as an effective treatment strategy. In this work, we evaluated a microRNA (miRNA) to reduce AR expression. From a list of predicted miRNAs that target human AR, we selected microRNA-298 (miR-298) for its ability to downregulate AR mRNA and protein levels when transfected in cells overexpressing wild-type and mutant AR and in SBMA patient-derived fibroblasts. We showed that miR-298 directly binds to the 3'-untranslated region of the human AR transcript, and counteracts AR toxicity in vitro. Intravenous delivery of miR-298 with adeno-associated virus serotype 9 vector resulted in efficient transduction of muscle and spinal cord and amelioration of the disease phenotype in SBMA mice. Our findings support the development of miRNAs as a therapeutic strategy for SBMA and other neurodegenerative disorders caused by toxic proteins.

  15. Severe neuromuscular denervation of clinically relevant muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Karen K Y; Gibbs, Rebecca M; Feng, Zhihua; Ko, Chien-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a motoneuron disease caused by a deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein, is characterized by motoneuron loss and muscle weakness. It remains unclear whether widespread loss of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) is involved in SMA pathogenesis. We undertook a systematic examination of NMJ innervation patterns in >20 muscles in the SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. We found that severe denervation (<50% fully innervated endplates) occurs selectively in many vulnerable axial muscles and several appendicular muscles at the disease end stage. Since these vulnerable muscles were located throughout the body and were comprised of varying muscle fiber types, it is unlikely that muscle location or fiber type determines susceptibility to denervation. Furthermore, we found a similar extent of neurofilament accumulation at NMJs in both vulnerable and resistant muscles before the onset of denervation, suggesting that neurofilament accumulation does not predict subsequent NMJ denervation. Since vulnerable muscles were initially innervated, but later denervated, loss of innervation in SMA may be attributed to defects in synapse maintenance. Finally, we found that denervation was amendable by trichostatin A (TSA) treatment, which increased innervation in clinically relevant muscles in TSA-treated SMNΔ7 mice. Our findings suggest that neuromuscular denervation in vulnerable muscles is a widespread pathology in SMA, and can serve as a preparation for elucidating the biological basis of synapse loss, and for evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  16. IPLEX administration improves motor neuron survival and ameliorates motor functions in a severe mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Luchetti, Andrea; Saieva, Luciano; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; de Leonibus, Elvira; Filareto, Antonio; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Novelli, Giuseppe; Musarò, Antonio; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2012-09-25

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder and the first genetic cause of death in childhood. SMA is caused by low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein that induce selective loss of α-motor neurons (MNs) in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive muscle atrophy and consequent respiratory failure. To date, no effective treatment is available to counteract the course of the disease. Among the different therapeutic strategies with potential clinical applications, the evaluation of trophic and/or protective agents able to antagonize MNs degeneration represents an attractive opportunity to develop valid therapies. Here we investigated the effects of IPLEX (recombinant human insulinlike growth factor 1 [rhIGF-1] complexed with recombinant human IGF-1 binding protein 3 [rhIGFBP-3]) on a severe mouse model of SMA. Interestingly, molecular and biochemical analyses of IGF-1 carried out in SMA mice before drug administration revealed marked reductions of IGF-1 circulating levels and hepatic mRNA expression. In this study, we found that perinatal administration of IPLEX, even if does not influence survival and body weight of mice, results in reduced degeneration of MNs, increased muscle fiber size and in amelioration of motor functions in SMA mice. Additionally, we show that phenotypic changes observed are not SMN-dependent, since no significant SMN modification was addressed in treated mice. Collectively, our data indicate IPLEX as a good therapeutic candidate to hinder the progression of the neurodegenerative process in SMA.

  17. Training improves oxidative capacity, but not function, in spinal muscular atrophy type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karen Lindhardt; Hansen, Regitze Sølling; Preisler, Nicolai

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effect of 12 weeks of cycle ergometer training in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type III (SMA III), a hereditary motor neuron disease with progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. METHODS: Six SMA III patients and 9 healthy subjects completed......max (17 ± 2 to 21 ± 2 ml/kg/min, P SMA III without causing muscle...... damage, but it also induces significant fatigue. This warrants study into alternative training methods to improve exercise capacity in SMA III patients....

  18. [Alternative treatment forms used by patients with muscular atrophy. A questionnaire study of the use of alternative treatment by 345 patients with muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsballe, J M; Mortensen, F V

    1990-04-30

    An investigation about the use of alternative treatment by a group of persons with muscular atrophy revealed that 24% had employed alternative treatment during the period 1.1.1983-1.4.1986. This is probably a greater proportion than in the Danish population as a whole. Patients with muscular atrophy were subdivided into three groups on the basis of their ability to function in daily life. No significant connection was found between the degree of loss of function and alternative treatment as regards the frequencies of alternative treatment and the numbers of treatments employed. A given form form of treatment was most frequently recommended by an unaffected acquaintance. Physical forms of treatment such as zone therapy and chiropractics were employed more frequently than chemical forms of therapy. Less than half of the patients were satisfied with the results of treatment. Treatment was often concluded in a negative manner. Patients considered that, in contrast to the alternative therapist, the doctor performs the best and most thorough examination and provides them with the best information about their condition.

  19. Convenient diagnosis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy using a microchip electrophoresis system

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Noda, Kouichi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a slowly progressive motor neuron disease. Lower and primary sensory neuronopathy is one of the major neuropathological changes that occurs in SBMA. However, many sings are common to SBMA and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and SBMA patients are sometimes diagnosed with ALS. Leuprorelin may be used to treat SBMA, but an accurate diagnosis is necessary for treatment and care. Genetic diagnosis can be performed to detect the expansion of a CAG r...

  20. Aberrant Autophagic Response in The Muscle of A Knock-in Mouse Model of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmini, Paola; Polanco, Maria Josefa; Cristofani, Riccardo; Cicardi, Maria Elena; Meroni, Marco; Galbiati, Mariarita; Piccolella, Margherita; Messi, Elio; Giorgetti, Elisa; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Milioto, Carmelo; Rocchi, Anna; Aggarwal, Tanya; Pennuto, Maria; Crippa, Valeria; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by loss of motoneurons and sensory neurons, accompanied by atrophy of muscle cells. SBMA is due to an androgen receptor containing a polyglutamine tract (ARpolyQ) that misfolds and aggregates, thereby perturbing the protein quality control (PQC) system. Using SBMA AR113Q mice we analyzed proteotoxic stress-induced alterations of HSPB8-mediated PQC machinery promoting clearance of misfolded proteins by autophagy. In muscle of symptomatic AR113Q male mice, we found expression upregulation of Pax-7, myogenin, E2-ubiquitin ligase UBE2Q1 and acetylcholine receptor (AchR), but not of MyoD, and of two E3-ligases (MuRF-1 and Cullin3). TGFβ1 and PGC-1α were also robustly upregulated. We also found a dramatic perturbation of the autophagic response, with upregulation of most autophagic markers (Beclin-1, ATG10, p62/SQSTM1, LC3) and of the HSPB8-mediated PQC response. Both HSPB8 and its co-chaperone BAG3 were robustly upregulated together with other specific HSPB8 interactors (HSPB2 and HSPB3). Notably, the BAG3:BAG1 ratio increased in muscle suggesting preferential misfolded proteins routing to autophagy rather than to proteasome. Thus, mutant ARpolyQ induces a potent autophagic response in muscle cells. Alteration in HSPB8-based PQC machinery may represent muscle-specific biomarkers useful to assess SBMA progression in mice and patients in response to pharmacological treatments. PMID:26490709

  1. Testosterone treatment fails to accelerate disease in a transgenic mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S. Chevalier-Larsen

    2012-01-01

    Evidence from multiple animal models demonstrates that testosterone plays a crucial role in the progression of symptoms in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, a condition that results in neurodegeneration and muscle atrophy in affected men. Mice bearing a transgene encoding a human androgen receptor (AR that contains a stretch of 112 glutamines (expanded polyglutamine tract; AR112Q mice reproduce several aspects of the human disease. We treated transgenic male AR112Q mice with testosterone for 6 months. Surprisingly, testosterone treatment of AR112Q males did not exacerbate the disease. Although transgenic AR112Q males exhibited functional deficits when compared with non-transgenics, long-term testosterone treatment had no effect on motor function. Testosterone treatment also failed to affect cellular markers of disease, including inclusion formation (the accumulation of large nuclear aggregates of mutant AR protein and levels of unphosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain. These data suggest that the mechanism of disease in SBMA saturates at close to endogenous hormone levels and that individuals with SBMA who take, or have taken, testosterone for its putative therapeutic properties are unlikely to suffer adverse effects.

  2. Muscle fatigue, nNOS and muscle fiber atrophy in limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Corrado; Tasca, Elisabetta; Nascimbeni, Anna Chiara; Fanin, Marina

    2014-12-01

    Muscle fatigability and atrophy are frequent clinical signs in limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD), but their pathogenetic mechanisms are still poorly understood. We review a series of different factors that may be connected in causing fatigue and atrophy, particularly considering the role of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and additional factors such as gender in different forms of LGMD (both recessive and dominant) underlying different pathogenetic mechanisms. In sarcoglycanopathies, the sarcolemmal nNOS reactivity varied from absent to reduced, depending on the residual level of sarcoglycan complex: in cases with complete sarcoglycan complex deficiency (mostly in beta-sarcoglycanopathy), the sarcolemmal nNOS reaction was absent and it was always associated with early severe clinical phenotype and cardiomyopathy. Calpainopathy, dysferlinopathy, and caveolinopathy present gradual onset of fatigability and had normal sarcolemmal nNOS reactivity. Notably, as compared with caveolinopathy and sarcoglycanopathies, calpainopathy and dysferlinopathy showed a higher degree of muscle fiber atrophy. Males with calpainopathy and dysferlinopathy showed significantly higher fiber atrophy than control males, whereas female patients have similar values than female controls, suggesting a gender difference in muscle fiber atrophy with a relative protection in females. In female patients, the smaller initial muscle fiber size associated to endocrine factors and less physical effort might attenuate gender-specific muscle loss and atrophy.

  3. Vitamin D intake is inadequate in spinal muscular atrophy type I cohort: correlations with bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aton, Jennifer; Davis, Rebecca Hurst; Jordan, Kristine C; Scott, Charles B; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2014-03-01

    Children with type I spinal muscular atrophy commonly demonstrate reduced bone mineral density. Our objectives were to evaluate and assess adequacy of vitamin D intake, serum levels, and association with bone mineral density. Assessments were completed using 3-day food records and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans. The spinal muscular atrophy type I cohort included 22 males and 18 females (N = 40), with a mean age of 18.6 months. Data collection occurred from 2001 to 2011. Seventy-five percent of patients had inadequate intake of vitamin D at the initial visit. Using mixed-effects analyses, vitamin D and calcium intakes correlated positively with bone mineral density (r = 0.31 and r = 0.53, respectively). Increased vitamin D and calcium consumption were associated with an increase in bone mineral density (P = .04 and P = .01, respectively). Vitamin D intake correlated positively with serum levels (r = 0.65). Further study is needed to determine optimal intakes of vitamin D and calcium in the spinal muscular atrophy type I population.

  4. Co-induction of the heat shock response ameliorates disease progression in a mouse model of human spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: implications for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bilal; Nirmalananthan, Niranjanan; Gray, Anna L.; La Spada, Albert R.; Hanna, Michael G.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, also known as Kennedy’s disease, is an adult-onset hereditary neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of the polyglutamine repeat in the first exon in the androgen receptor gene. Pathologically, the disease is defined by selective loss of spinal and bulbar motor neurons causing bulbar, facial and limb weakness. Although the precise disease pathophysiology is largely unknown, it appears to be related to abnormal accumulation of the pathogenic androgen receptor protein within the nucleus, leading to disruption of cellular processes. Using a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy that exhibits many of the characteristic features of the human disease, in vivo physiological assessment of muscle function revealed that mice with the pathogenic expansion of the androgen receptor develop a motor deficit characterized by a reduction in muscle force, abnormal muscle contractile characteristics, loss of functional motor units and motor neuron degeneration. We have previously shown that treatment with arimoclomol, a co-inducer of the heat shock stress response, delays disease progression in the mutant superoxide dismutase 1 mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal motor neuron disease. We therefore evaluated the therapeutic potential of arimoclomol in mice with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Arimoclomol was administered orally, in drinking water, from symptom onset and the effects established at 18 months of age, a late stage of disease. Arimoclomol significantly improved hindlimb muscle force and contractile characteristics, rescued motor units and, importantly, improved motor neuron survival and upregulated the expression of the vascular endothelial growth factor which possess neurotrophic activity. These results provide evidence that upregulation of the heat shock response by treatment with arimoclomol may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and may also

  5. A large animal model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy and correction of phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Sandra I.; Arnold, W. David; Odermatt, Philipp; Li, Xiaohui; Porensky, Paul N.; Schmelzer, Leah; Meyer, Kathrin; Kolb, Stephen J.; Schümperli, Daniel; Kaspar, Brian K.; Burghes, Arthur H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by reduced levels of SMN which results in motoneuron loss. Therapeutic strategies to increase SMN levels including drug compounds, antisense oligonucleotides or scAAV9 gene therapy have proved effective in mice. We wished to determine whether reduction of SMN in postnatal motoneurons resulted in SMA in a large animal model, whether SMA could be corrected after development of muscle weakness and the response of clinically relevant biomarkers. Methods Using intrathecal delivery of scAAV9 expressing a shRNA targeting pig SMN1, SMN was knocked down in motoneurons postnatally to SMA levels. This resulted in an SMA phenotype representing the first large animal model of SMA. Restoration of SMN was performed at different time points with scAAV9 expressing human SMN (scAAV9-SMN) and electrophysiology measures and pathology were performed. Results Knockdown of SMN in postnatal motoneurons results in overt proximal weakness, fibrillations on electromyography (EMG) indicating active denervation, and reduced compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor unit number estimates (MUNE), like human SMA. Neuropathology showed loss of motoneurons and motor axons. Pre-symptomatic delivery of scAAV9-SMN prevented SMA symptoms indicating all changes are SMN dependent. Delivery of scAAV9-SMN after symptom onset had a marked impact on phenotype, electrophysiological measures and pathology. Interpretation High SMN levels are critical in postnatal motoneurons and reduction of SMN results in a SMA phenotype which is SMN dependent. Importantly, clinically relevant biomarkers including CMAP and MUNE are responsive to SMN restoration and abrogation of phenotype can be achieved even after symptom onset. PMID:25516063

  6. A novel lamin A/C gene mutation causing spinal muscular atrophy phenotype with cardiac involvement: report of one case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Kawamata, Jun; Shimohama, Shun

    2015-02-20

    Mutations of the lamin A/C gene have been associated with several diseases such as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, referred to as laminopathies. Only one report of spinal muscular atrophy and cardiomyopathy phenotype with lamin A/C gene mutations has been published. The concept that lamin A/C gene mutations cause spinal muscular atrophy has not been established. We report a man aged 65 years who presented with amyotrophy of lower limbs, arrhythmia and cardiac hypofunction. He showed gait disturbance since childhood, and his family showed similar symptoms. Neurological and electrophysiological findings suggested spinal muscular atrophy type 3. Gene analysis of lamin A/C gene showed a novel nonsense mutation p.Q353X (c.1057C > T). Further investigations revealed that he and his family members had cardiac diseases including atrioventricular block. We report the first Japanese case of spinal muscular atrophy phenotype associated with lamin A/C mutation. When a patient presents a spinal muscular atrophy phenotype and unexplained cardiac disease, especially when the family history is positive, gene analysis of lamin A/C gene should be considered.

  7. Discovery and Optimization of Small Molecule Splicing Modifiers of Survival Motor Neuron 2 as a Treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Matthew G; Qi, Hongyan; Turpoff, Anthony; Zhang, Nanjing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Guangming; Li, Chunshi; Huang, Song; Yang, Tianle; Moon, Young-Choon; Lee, Chang-Sun; Choi, Soongyu; Almstead, Neil G; Naryshkin, Nikolai A; Dakka, Amal; Narasimhan, Jana; Gabbeta, Vijayalakshmi; Welch, Ellen; Zhao, Xin; Risher, Nicole; Sheedy, Josephine; Weetall, Marla; Karp, Gary M

    2016-07-14

    The underlying cause of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a deficiency of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Starting from hits identified in a high-throughput screening campaign and through structure-activity relationship investigations, we have developed small molecules that potently shift the alternative splicing of the SMN2 exon 7, resulting in increased production of the full-length SMN mRNA and protein. Three novel chemical series, represented by compounds 9, 14, and 20, have been optimized to increase the level of SMN protein by >50% in SMA patient-derived fibroblasts at concentrations of <160 nM. Daily administration of these compounds to severe SMA Δ7 mice results in an increased production of SMN protein in disease-relevant tissues and a significant increase in median survival time in a dose-dependent manner. Our work supports the development of an orally administered small molecule for the treatment of patients with SMA.

  8. Partial restoration of cardio-vascular defects in a rescued severe model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shababi, Monir; Habibi, Javad; Ma, Lixin; Glascock, Jacqueline J; Sowers, James R; Lorson, Christian L

    2012-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infantile death. Loss of a gene called Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) and, as a result, reduced levels of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein leads to SMA development. SMA is characterized by the loss of functional motor neurons in the spinal cord. However, accumulating evidence suggests the contribution of other organs to the composite SMA phenotype and disease progression. A growing number of congenital heart defects have been identified in severe SMA patients. Consistent with the clinical cases, we have recently identified developmental and functional heart defects in two SMA mouse models, occurring at embryonic stage in a severe SMA model and shortly after birth in a less severe model (SMN∆7). Our goal was to examine the late stage cardiac abnormalities in untreated SMN∆7 mice and to determine whether gene replacement therapy restores cardiac structure/function in rescued SMN∆7 model. To reveal the extent of the cardiac structural/functional repair in the rescued mice, we analyzed the heart of untreated and treated SMN∆7 model using self-complementary Adeno-associated virus (serotype 9) expressing the full-length SMN cDNA. We examined the characteristics of the heart failure such as remodeling, fibrosis, oxidative stress, and vascular integrity in both groups. Our results clearly indicate that fibrosis, oxidative stress activation, vascular remodeling, and a significant decrease in the number of capillaries exist in the SMA heart. The cardiac structural defects were improved drastically in the rescued animals, however, the level of impairment was still significant compared to the age-matched wildtype littermates. Furthermore, functional analysis by in vivo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that the heart of the treated SMA mice still exhibits functional defects. In conclusion, cardiac abnormalities are only partially rescued in post-birth treated SMA animals and these

  9. Head and Arm Tremor in X-linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicua, Irene; Verhagen, Okker; Arenaza, Naroa; Cubo, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Background X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare adult-onset neuronopathy. Although tremor is known to occur in this disease, the number of reported cases of SBMA with tremor is rare, and the number with videotaped documentation is exceedingly rare. Our aim was to describe/document the characteristic signs of tremor in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Case Report We report a case of a 58-year-old male with a positive family history of tremor. On examination, the patient had jaw and hand tremors but he also exhibited gynecomastia, progressive bulbar paresis, and wasting and weakness primarily in the proximal limb muscles. The laboratory tests revealed an elevated creatine phosphokinase. Genetic testing was positive for X-SBMA, with 42 CAG repeats. Discussion Essential tremor is one of the most common movement disorders, yet it is important for clinicians to be aware of the presence of other distinguishing features that point to alternative diagnoses. The presence of action tremor associated with muscle atrophy and gynecomastia should lead to a suspicion of SBMA. PMID:25374767

  10. A case of bulbospinal muscular atrophy with chief complaint of sensory disorder in the lower extremities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda,Shigetoshi

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old man was admitted to our department with a chief complaint of lower extremity dysesthesia. He described a dull numbness below the ankle and a dull pain in the nates for the past two years. Although the numbness extended to the thigh, he did not notice any muscular weakness or atrophy. Neurological examination revealed weakness and atrophy in the face, tongue and the proximal portions of all four extremities. Deep tendon reflexes were decreased. A moderate loss of vibratory sensation was noted below the knees. Electromyography showed neurogenic changes. Muscle biopsy revealed both myogenic and neurogenic changes. Sural nerve biopsy revealed a mild reduction of myelinated fibers, particularly the large-diameter fibers. Based on these findings, a diagnosis of bulbospinal muscular atrophy (BSMA was made. In recent years, there have been some case reports of BSMA with sensory disturbances, or merely with subclinical manifestations of a sensory disturbance. This case is included in the same category as those reports, but it is interesting to note that the sensory disturbance in the lower extremities occurred as the chief complaint of the disease.

  11. Klinefelter′s syndrome associated with progressive muscular atrophy simulating Kennedy′s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Enrique Jiménez Caballero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kennedy′s disease, an X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, is characterized by loss of lower motor neurons. Mild sensory deficits, gynecomastia and infertility may be observed. Klinefelter′s syndrome is a variation of sex chromosome disorder characterized by hypogonadism, gynecomastia and azoospermia, and the most frequent karyotype is XXY. A 55-year-old man who presented with slowly progressive and diffuse neurogenic muscle atrophy without bulbar or sensory symptoms. He also had Klinefelter′s syndrome. Genetic study of Kennedy′s disease was normal. Our patient differs from those with Kennedy′s disease in the absence of bulbar and sensory symptoms. It is suggested that the X chromosome plays an important role in the biology of motor neurons.

  12. Clinical features and molecular mechanisms of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2010-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The cause of this disease is the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine tract, within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA exclusively occurs in adult males, whereas both heterozygous and homozygous females are usually asymptomatic. Lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord and those in the brainstem motor nuclei are predominantly affected in SBMA, and other neuronal and nonneuronal tissues are also widely involved to some extent. Testosterone-dependent nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR protein has been considered to be a fundamental step of neurodegenerative process, which is followed by several molecular events such as transcriptional dysregulation, axonal transport disruption and mitochondrial dysfunction. Results of animal studies suggest that androgen deprivation and activation of protein quality control systems are potential therapies for SBMA.

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Modeling of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennuto, Maria; Basso, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease characterized by late-onset, progressive degeneration of lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle atrophy. SBMA is caused by expansions of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR). One striking feature of SBMA is sex specificity: SBMA fully manifests only in males, whereas females show subclinical or mild disease manifestations even when homozygous for the mutation. Since the identification of the mutation responsible for SBMA in 1991, several cell and animal models have been developed to recapitulate the main features of disease in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we describe the most widely used cellular and animal models of SBMA, highlighting advantages and disadvantages in the use of these models to gain mechanistic and therapeutic insights into SBMA.

  14. Genotype-phenotype correlation in Chinese patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ni

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is an X-linked recessive motor neuron disease characterized by slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of proximal limbs and bulbar muscles. To assess the genotype-phenotype correlation in Chinese patients, we identified 155 patients with SBMA and retrospectively examined available data from laboratory tests and neurophysiological analyses. Correlations between genotype and phenotype were analyzed. There was an inverse correlation between the length of CAG repeats and age at first muscle weakness (p<0.0001. The serum creatine kinase level showed a significant inverse correlation with disease duration and the age at examination (p=0.019 and p=0.004, respectively. Unlike previous classification of motor- and sensory-dominant phenotypes, all findings of nerve conduction, except the amplitudes of median nerve compound motor action potential, were positively correlated to the length of CAG repeats. A significant decline in sensory nerve action potential amplitudes may assist differential diagnosis of SBMA.

  15. Distinct Etiological Roles for Myocytes and Motor Neurons in a Mouse Model of Kennedy's Disease/Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzan, Firyal; McPhail, Mike; Rao, Pengcheng; Mo, Kaiguo; Halievski, Katherine; Swift-Gallant, Ashlyn; Mendoza-Viveros, Lucia; Cheng, Hai-Ying M; Monks, D Ashley

    2015-04-22

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion of the androgen receptor (AR) causes Kennedy's disease/spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA) through poorly defined cellular mechanisms. Although KD/SBMA has been thought of as a motor neuron disease, recent evidence indicates a key role for skeletal muscle. To resolve which early aspects of the disease can be caused by neurogenic or myogenic mechanisms, we made use of the tet-On and Cre-loxP genetic systems to selectively and acutely express polyQ AR in either motor neurons (NeuroAR) or myocytes (MyoAR) of transgenic mice. After 4 weeks of transgene induction in adulthood, deficits in gross motor function were seen in NeuroAR mice, but not MyoAR mice. Conversely, reduced size of fast glycolytic fibers and alterations in expression of candidate genes were observed only in MyoAR mice. Both NeuroAR and MyoAR mice exhibited reduced oxidative capacity in skeletal muscles, as well as a shift in fast fibers from oxidative to glycolytic. Markers of oxidative stress were increased in the muscle of NeuroAR mice and were reduced in motor neurons of both NeuroAR and MyoAR mice. Despite secondary pathology in skeletal muscle and behavioral deficits, no pathological signs were observed in motor neurons of NeuroAR mice, possibly due to relatively low levels of polyQ AR expression. These results indicate that polyQ AR in motor neurons can produce secondary pathology in muscle. Results also support both neurogenic and myogenic contributions of polyQ AR to several acute aspects of pathology and provide further evidence for disordered cellular respiration in KD/SBMA skeletal muscle.

  16. Kinesio taping application in a pediatric patient with spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesio taping is one of the elastic bandage methods which has been quite popular in the last 20 years and has been applied in various musculoskeletal conditions. Although the mechanism of action is not clear, many theories have been suggested so far. In this case report, we aimed to present the results of kinesiotape application for back pain of the patient with spinal muscular atrophy which is one of the progressive muscular disorders. It was performed for three times with four days interval. Fascial technique B (Space technique was applied. Reduce of pain was also observed during the subsequent applications. The application of kinesio taping could be beneficial on reducing the pain in patients with progressive muscle diseases. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 386-389

  17. VERY SEVERE SPINAL MUSCULAR ATROPHY (TYPE 0: A REPORT OF THREE CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARZEGAR mohammad MD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectiveWe describe three patients with very severe Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA presented with reduced fetal movement in utero, profound hypotonia, severe weakness and respiratory insufficiency at birth. In all infants, electrodiagnostic studies were compatible with a neurogenic pattern. In genetic studies, all cases had homozygous deletions of exons 7 and 8 of Survival Motor Neuron (SMN and exon 5 of Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitory Protein (NAIP gene. SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of reduced fetal movement and respiratory insufficiency at birth.

  18. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geeta Gathwala

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature.

  19. Recovery of function in a myogenic mouse model of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Jamie A.; Yu, Zhigang; Mo, Kaiguo; Monks, D. Ashley; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Breedlove, S. Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L.

    2008-01-01

    With this paper, we deliberately challenge the prevailing neurocentric theory of the etiology of spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). We offer data supporting an alternative view that androgen receptor (AR) acts in skeletal muscles to cause the symptoms of SBMA. While SBMA has been linked to a CAG repeat expansion in the AR gene and mutant AR is presumed to act in motoneurons to cause SBMA, we find that over-expression of wild type AR solely in skeletal muscle fibers results in the same and...

  20. Splicing regulation of the Survival Motor Neuron genes and implications for treatment of spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Bebee, Thomas W.; Gladman, Jordan T.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by low levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The reduced SMN levels are due to loss of the survival motor neuron-1 (SMN1) gene. Humans carry a nearly identical SMN2 gene that generates a truncated protein, due to a C to T nucleotide alteration in exon 7 that leads to inefficient RNA splicing of exon 7. This exclusion of SMN exon 7 is central to the onset of the SMA disease, however, this offers a unique ther...

  1. Air stacking: effects on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy*,**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Tanyse Bahia Carvalho; Neves, Juliana de Carvalho; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Salge, João Marcos; Zanoteli, Edmar; Reed, Umbertina Conti

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Respiratory complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD). The objectives of this study were to determine the effects that routine daily home air-stacking maneuvers have on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD), as well as to identify associations between spinal deformities and the effects of the maneuvers. METHODS: Eighteen NMD patients (ten with CMD and eight with SMA) were submitted to routine daily air-stacking maneuvers at home with manual resuscitators for four to six months, undergoing pulmonary function tests before and after that period. The pulmonary function tests included measurements of FVC; PEF; maximum insufflation capacity (MIC); and assisted and unassisted peak cough flow (APCF and UPCF, respectively) with insufflations. RESULTS: After the use of home air-stacking maneuvers, there were improvements in the APCF and UPCF. In the patients without scoliosis, there was also a significant increase in FVC. When comparing patients with and without scoliosis, the increases in APCF and UPCF were more pronounced in those without scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Routine daily air-stacking maneuvers with a manual resuscitator appear to increase UPCF and APCF in patients with NMD, especially in those without scoliosis. PMID:25410841

  2. Air stacking: effects on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanyse Bahia Carvalho Marques

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Respiratory complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with neuromuscular disease (NMD. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects that routine daily home air-stacking maneuvers have on pulmonary function in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA and in patients with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD, as well as to identify associations between spinal deformities and the effects of the maneuvers. METHODS: Eighteen NMD patients (ten with CMD and eight with SMA were submitted to routine daily air-stacking maneuvers at home with manual resuscitators for four to six months, undergoing pulmonary function tests before and after that period. The pulmonary function tests included measurements of FVC; PEF; maximum insufflation capacity (MIC; and assisted and unassisted peak cough flow (APCF and UPCF, respectively with insufflations. RESULTS: After the use of home air-stacking maneuvers, there were improvements in the APCF and UPCF. In the patients without scoliosis, there was also a significant increase in FVC. When comparing patients with and without scoliosis, the increases in APCF and UPCF were more pronounced in those without scoliosis. CONCLUSIONS: Routine daily air-stacking maneuvers with a manual resuscitator appear to increase UPCF and APCF in patients with NMD, especially in those without scoliosis.

  3. Perioperative complications of scoliosis surgery in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy, focussing on wound healing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Mareike; Forst, Raimund; Forst, Jürgen; Hofner, Benjamin; Fujak, Albert

    2017-06-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), both neuromuscular diseases, sustain spinal scoliosis in the course of their disease. To reduce the concomitant major morbidity and to improve their quality of life, patients require surgical spine stabilization. This can lead to complications like respiratory, cardiac or neurological complications or wound healing disorders (WHD). To find out the different complexities and risk factors increasing the chance to develop a WHD, the inpatient database was analyzed. We performed a retrospective statistical study. Therefore, we analyzed the inpatient database of 180 patients (142 DMD and 38 SMA patients). The focus was on WHD. To figure out the risk factors leading to WHD, we conducted a logistic regression. Cardiac complications occurred most frequently, followed by pulmonary complications and neurological lesions. Fifty-seven out of 180 patients developed a WHD. In 23 cases the WHD was aseptic, in the other 34 cases dermal organisms, Pseudomonas species and intestinal organisms were responsible. By means of the logistic regression, we were able to identify two more risk factors, in addition to diagnosis and gender, for developing a WHD in our patients: the year of surgery and the direction of pelvic tilt. Most common complications following scoliosis surgery are respiratory and cardiac complications. WHD is a severe complication that implies a prolonged therapy. Some risk factors for developing WHD could be identified in this analysis. Specifically, these were the date of surgery and the direction of pelvic tilt.

  4. Skeletal muscle DNA damage precedes spinal motor neuron DNA damage in a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2014-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis by progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. The mechanisms by which lack of SMN causes SMA pathology are not known, making it very difficult to develop effective therapies. We investigated whether DNA damage is a perinatal pathological event in SMA, and whether DNA damage and cell death first occur in skeletal muscle or spinal cord of SMA mice. We used a mouse model of severe SMA to ascertain the extent of cell death and DNA damage throughout the body of prenatal and newborn mice. SMA mice at birth (postnatal day 0) exhibited internucleosomal fragmentation in genomic DNA from hindlimb skeletal muscle, but not in genomic DNA from spinal cord. SMA mice at postnatal day 5, compared with littermate controls, exhibited increased apoptotic cell death profiles in skeletal muscle, by hematoxylin and eosin, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and electron microscopy. SMA mice had no increased cell death, no loss of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT)-positive motor neurons, and no overt pathology in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. At embryonic days 13 and 15.5, SMA mice did not exhibit statistically significant increases in cell death profiles in spinal cord or skeletal muscle. Motor neuron numbers in the ventral horn, as identified by ChAT immunoreactivity, were comparable in SMA mice and control littermates at embryonic day 15.5 and postnatal day 5. These observations demonstrate that in SMA, disease in skeletal muscle emerges before pathology in spinal cord, including loss of motor neurons. Overall, this work identifies DNA damage and cell death in skeletal muscle as therapeutic targets for SMA.

  5. Skeletal muscle DNA damage precedes spinal motor neuron DNA damage in a mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saniya Fayzullina

    Full Text Available Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis by progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. The mechanisms by which lack of SMN causes SMA pathology are not known, making it very difficult to develop effective therapies. We investigated whether DNA damage is a perinatal pathological event in SMA, and whether DNA damage and cell death first occur in skeletal muscle or spinal cord of SMA mice. We used a mouse model of severe SMA to ascertain the extent of cell death and DNA damage throughout the body of prenatal and newborn mice. SMA mice at birth (postnatal day 0 exhibited internucleosomal fragmentation in genomic DNA from hindlimb skeletal muscle, but not in genomic DNA from spinal cord. SMA mice at postnatal day 5, compared with littermate controls, exhibited increased apoptotic cell death profiles in skeletal muscle, by hematoxylin and eosin, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and electron microscopy. SMA mice had no increased cell death, no loss of choline acetyl transferase (ChAT-positive motor neurons, and no overt pathology in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. At embryonic days 13 and 15.5, SMA mice did not exhibit statistically significant increases in cell death profiles in spinal cord or skeletal muscle. Motor neuron numbers in the ventral horn, as identified by ChAT immunoreactivity, were comparable in SMA mice and control littermates at embryonic day 15.5 and postnatal day 5. These observations demonstrate that in SMA, disease in skeletal muscle emerges before pathology in spinal cord, including loss of motor neurons. Overall, this work identifies DNA damage and cell death in skeletal muscle as therapeutic targets for SMA.

  6. Decreased stathmin expression ameliorates neuromuscular defects but fails to prolong survival in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Hsin-Lan; Ting, Chen-Hung; Liu, Huei-Chun; Li, Hung; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2013-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a genetic neurodegenerative disorder, is caused by mutations or deletions in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene that result in SMN deficiency. SMN deficiency impairs microtubule networks in Smn-deficient cells and in SMA-like motor neuron cultures. Microtubule defects can be restored by knockdown of the stathmin gene (Stmn), which is upregulated in SMA. However, whether in vivo reduction of stathmin levels could improve the pathology of SMA has not been investigated. Here we generated SMA-like mice in a Stmn knockout (KO) background through a series of genetic crosses. Analyses of motor performance and histology showed that heterozygous StmnKO (Stmn(+/-)) but not homozygous StmnKO (Stmn(-/-)) ameliorates some SMA defects, with increased microtubule densities in sciatic axons, improved motor performance, enhanced NMJ maturation, and mitigated neuroinflammation. However, Stmn deletion does not prolong the lifespan of SMA-like mice, suggesting that stathmin dysregulation and microtubule disruption are not a cause but rather a consequence of SMA pathology. This work demonstrates that limiting the amount of stathmin in SMA-like mice is effective in reducing their neuromuscular defects, whereas induced aberrant expression of stathmin in SMA-like animals is detrimental.

  7. Muscle expression of mutant androgen receptor accounts for systemic and motor neuron disease phenotypes in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Constanza J; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Guo, Ling T; Hung, Gene; Tsunemi, Taiji; Ly, Linda; Tokunaga, Seiya; Lopez, Edith; Sopher, Bryce L; Bennett, C Frank; Shelton, G Diane; Cleveland, Don W; La Spada, Albert R

    2014-04-16

    X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by adult-onset muscle weakness and lower motor neuron degeneration. SBMA is caused by CAG-polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Pathological findings include motor neuron loss, with polyQ-AR accumulation in intranuclear inclusions. SBMA patients exhibit myopathic features, suggesting a role for muscle in disease pathogenesis. To determine the contribution of muscle, we developed a BAC mouse model featuring a floxed first exon to permit cell-type-specific excision of human AR121Q. BAC fxAR121 mice develop systemic and neuromuscular phenotypes, including shortened survival. After validating termination of AR121 expression and full rescue with ubiquitous Cre, we crossed BAC fxAR121 mice with Human Skeletal Actin-Cre mice. Muscle-specific excision prevented weight loss, motor phenotypes, muscle pathology, and motor neuronopathy and dramatically extended survival. Our results reveal a crucial role for muscle expression of polyQ-AR in SBMA and suggest muscle-directed therapies as effective treatments.

  8. Dysphagia in spinal muscular atrophy type II: more than a bulbar problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Engel-Hoek, L; Erasmus, C E; van Bruggen, H W; de Swart, B J M; Sie, L T L; Steenks, M H; de Groot, I J M

    2009-11-24

    In patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type II, feeding problems and dysphagia are common, but the underlying mechanisms of these problems are not well defined. This case control study was designed to determine the underlying mechanisms of dysphagia in SMA type II. Six children with SMA type II and 6 healthy matched controls between 6.4 and 13.4 years of age were investigated during swallowing liquid and solid food in 2 different postures using surface EMG (sEMG) of the submental muscle group (SMG) and a video fluoroscopic swallow study (VFSS). The VFSS showed postswallow residue of solid food in the vallecula and above the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), which can be responsible for indirect aspiration. Better results in swallowing were achieved in a more forward head position. These findings were supported by the sEMG measurements of the SMG during swallowing. Dysphagia in spinal muscular atrophy type II is due to a neurologic dysfunction (lower motor neuron problems from the cranial nerves in the brainstem) influencing the muscle force and efficiency of movement of the tongue and the submental muscle group in combination with a biomechanical component (compensatory head posture). The results suggest an integrated treatment with an adapted posture during meals and the advice of drinking water after meals to prevent aspiration pneumonias.

  9. Review of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) for Prenatal and Pediatric Genetic Counselors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carré, Amanda; Empey, Candice

    2016-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular condition with degeneration of the anterior horn cells in the spinal column. Five SMA subtypes exist with classification dependent upon the motor milestones achieved. Study of the SMN1 (survival motor neuron) and SMN2 genes as well as the concepts of the "2 + 0" carriers, gene conversion, de novo mutations and intragenic mutations allow for a better understanding of SMA. Detailing the carrier and diagnostic testing options further deepens the genetic counselor's knowledge of SMA. A review of care guidelines and research options is included as this information gives a patient a well-rounded view of SMA. Although SMA is most commonly associated with the SMN1 gene, a number of spinal muscular atrophies not caused by genetic changes in this gene may be included as differential diagnoses until confirmatory testing can be completed. SMA is a complex condition requiring a detailed knowledge on the genetic counselor's part in order to explain the disorder to the patient with clarity thus facilitating increased communication and decision making guidance with the patient.

  10. Atrophy, fibrosis, and increased PAX7-positive cells in pharyngeal muscles of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidaro, Teresa; Negroni, Elisa; Perié, Sophie; Mirabella, Massimiliano; Lainé, Jeanne; Lacau St Guily, Jean; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Mouly, Vincent; Trollet, Capucine

    2013-03-01

    Oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD) is a late-onset autosomal dominant inherited dystrophy caused by an abnormal trinucleotide repeat expansion in the poly(A)-binding-protein-nuclear 1 (PABPN1) gene. Primary muscular targets of OPMD are the eyelid elevator and pharyngeal muscles, including the cricopharyngeal muscle (CPM), the progressive involution of which leads to ptosis and dysphagia, respectively. To understand the consequences of PABPN1 polyalanine expansion in OPMD, we studied muscle biopsies from 14 OPMD patients, 3 inclusion body myositis patients, and 9 healthy controls. In OPMD patient CPM (n = 6), there were typical dystrophic features with extensive endomysial fibrosis and marked atrophy of myosin heavy-chain IIa fibers. There were more PAX7-positive cells in all CPM versus other muscles (n = 5, control; n = 3, inclusion body myositis), and they were more numerous in OPMD CPM versus control normal CPM without any sign of muscle regeneration. Intranuclear inclusions were present in all OPMD muscles but unaffected OPMD patient muscles (i.e. sternocleidomastoid, quadriceps, or deltoid; n = 14) did not show evidence of fibrosis, atrophy, or increased PAX7-positive cell numbers. These results suggest that the specific involvement of CPM in OPMD might be caused by failure of the regenerative response with dysfunction of PAX7-positive cells and exacerbated fibrosis that does not correlate with the presence of PABPN1 inclusions.

  11. Sensoric Protection after Median Nerve Injury: Babysitter-Procedure Prevents Muscular Atrophy and Improves Neuronal Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicta E. Beck-Broichsitter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The babysitter-procedure might offer an alternative when nerve reconstruction is delayed in order to overcome muscular atrophy due to denervation. In this study we aimed to show that a sensomotoric babysitter-procedure after median nerve injury is capable of preserving irreversible muscular atrophy. The median nerve of 20 female Wistar rats was denervated. 10 animals received a sensory protection with the N. cutaneous brachii. After six weeks the median nerve was reconstructed by autologous nerve grafting from the contralateral median nerve in the babysitter and the control groups. Grasping tests measured functional recovery over 15 weeks. At the end of the observation period the weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle was determined. The median nerve was excised for histological examinations. Muscle weight (P<0.0001 was significantly superior in the babysitter group compared to the control group at the end of the study. The histological evaluation revealed a significantly higher diameter of axons (P=0.0194, nerve fiber (P=0.0409, and nerve surface (P=0.0184 in the babysitter group. We conclude that sensory protection of a motor nerve is capable of preserving muscule weight and we may presume that metabolism of the sensory nerve was sufficient to keep the target muscle’s weight and vitality.

  12. Clinical and molecular features and therapeutic perspectives of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanoli, Fiammetta; Rinchetti, Paola; Porro, Francesca; Parente, Valeria; Corti, Stefania

    2015-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by mutations in the IGHMBP2 gene, encoding the immunoglobulin μ-binding protein 2, leading to motor neuron degeneration. It is a rare and fatal disease with an early onset in infancy in the majority of the cases. The main clinical features are muscular atrophy and diaphragmatic palsy, which requires prompt and permanent supportive ventilation. The human disease is recapitulated in the neuromuscular degeneration (nmd) mouse. No effective treatment is available yet, but novel therapeutical approaches tested on the nmd mouse, such as the use of neurotrophic factors and stem cell therapy, have shown positive effects. Gene therapy demonstrated effectiveness in SMA, being now at the stage of clinical trial in patients and therefore representing a possible treatment for SMARD1 as well. The significant advancement in understanding of both SMARD1 clinical spectrum and molecular mechanisms makes ground for a rapid translation of pre-clinical therapeutic strategies in humans.

  13. Silencing neuronal mutant androgen receptor in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Katsuno, Masahisa; Hung, Gene; Adachi, Hiroaki; Kondo, Naohide; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Tohnai, Genki; Iida, Madoka; Bennett, C Frank; Sobue, Gen

    2015-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an adult-onset neurodegenerative disease that affects males, results from a CAG triplet repeat/polyglutamine expansions in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Patients develop progressive muscular weakness and atrophy, and no effective therapy is currently available. The tissue-specific pathogenesis, especially relative pathological contributions between degenerative motor neurons and muscles, remains inconclusive. Though peripheral pathology in skeletal muscle caused by toxic AR protein has been recently reported to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SBMA using mouse models, the role of motor neuron degeneration in SBMA has not been rigorously investigated. Here, we exploited synthetic antisense oligonucleotides to inhibit the RNA levels of mutant AR in the central nervous system (CNS) and explore its therapeutic effects in our SBMA mouse model that harbors a mutant AR gene with 97 CAG expansions and characteristic SBMA-like neurogenic phenotypes. A single intracerebroventricular administration of the antisense oligonucleotides in the presymptomatic phase efficiently suppressed the mutant gene expression in the CNS, and delayed the onset and progression of motor dysfunction, improved body weight gain and survival with the amelioration of neuronal histopathology in motor units such as spinal motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions and skeletal muscle. These findings highlight the importance of the neurotoxicity of mutant AR protein in motor neurons as a therapeutic target.

  14. Microarray analysis of gene expression by skeletal muscle of three mouse models of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiguo Mo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence implicates altered gene expression within skeletal muscle in the pathogenesis of Kennedy disease/spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA. We therefore broadly characterized gene expression in skeletal muscle of three independently generated mouse models of this disease. The mouse models included a polyglutamine expanded (polyQ AR knock-in model (AR113Q, a polyQ AR transgenic model (AR97Q, and a transgenic mouse that overexpresses wild type AR solely in skeletal muscle (HSA-AR. HSA-AR mice were included because they substantially reproduce the KD/SBMA phenotype despite the absence of polyQ AR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed microarray analysis of lower hindlimb muscles taken from these three models relative to wild type controls using high density oligonucleotide arrays. All microarray comparisons were made with at least 3 animals in each condition, and only those genes having at least 2-fold difference and whose coefficient of variance was less than 100% were considered to be differentially expressed. When considered globally, there was a similar overlap in gene changes between the 3 models: 19% between HSA-AR and AR97Q, 21% between AR97Q and AR113Q, and 17% between HSA-AR and AR113Q, with 8% shared by all models. Several patterns of gene expression relevant to the disease process were observed. Notably, patterns of gene expression typical of loss of AR function were observed in all three models, as were alterations in genes involved in cell adhesion, energy balance, muscle atrophy and myogenesis. We additionally measured changes similar to those observed in skeletal muscle of a mouse model of Huntington's Disease, and to those common to muscle atrophy from diverse causes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: By comparing patterns of gene expression in three independent models of KD/SBMA, we have been able to identify candidate genes that might mediate the core myogenic features of KD/SBMA.

  15. Nosology of Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity: From Monomelic Amyotrophy to Hirayama Disease—Indian Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kaukab Maqbool Hassan; Hirdesh Sahni

    2013-01-01

    Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, “juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity” has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD), also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradia...

  16. Deletion analysis of SMN1 and NAIP genes in southern Chinese children with spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-hua LIANG; Xiao-ling CHEN; Zhong-sheng YU; Chun-yue CHEN; Sheng BI; Lian-gen MAO; Bo-lin ZHOU; Xian-ning ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a disorder characterized by degeneration of lower motor neurons and occasionally bulbar motor neurons leading to progressive limb and trunk paralysis as well as muscular atrophy. Three types of SMA are rec-ognized depending on the age of onset, the maximum muscular activity achieved, and survivorship: SMA1, SMA2, and SMA3. The survival of motor neuron (SMN) gene has been identified as an SMA determining gene, whereas the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered to be a modifying factor of the severity of SMA. The main objective of this study was to analyze the deletion of SMN1 and NAIP genes in southern Chinese children with SMA. Here, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was performed to detect the deletion of both exon 7 and exon 8 of SMNI and exon 5 of NAIP in 62 southern Chinese children with strongly suspected clinical symptoms of SMA. All the 32 SMAI patients and 76% (13/17) of SMA2 patients showed homozygous deletions for exon 7 and exon 8, and all the 13 SMA3 patients showed single deletion of SMN1 exon 7 along with 24% (4/17) of SMA2 patients. Eleven out of 32 (34%) SMA1 patients showed NAIP deletion, and none of SMA2 and SMA3 patients was found to have NAIP deletion. The findings of homozygous deletions of exon 7 and/or exon 8 of SMN1 gene confirmed the diagnosis of SMA, and suggested that the deletion of SMN1 exon 7 is a major cause of SMA in southern Chinese children, and that the NA1P gene may be a modifying factor for disease severity of SMA 1. The molecular diagnosis system based on PCR-RFLP analysis can conveniently be applied in the clinical testing, genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis and preimplantation genetic diagnosis of SMA.

  17. Preventive effects of Chlorella on skeletal muscle atrophy in muscle-specific mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohsawa, Ikuroh; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Kumamoto, Shoichiro; Maruyama, Isao; Suzuki, Yoshihiko; Ohta, Shigeo

    2014-10-11

    Oxidative stress is involved in age-related muscle atrophy, such as sarcopenia. Since Chlorella, a unicellular green alga, contains various antioxidant substances, we used a mouse model of enhanced oxidative stress to investigate whether Chlorella could prevent muscle atrophy. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is an anti-oxidative enzyme that detoxifies reactive aldehydes derived from lipid peroxides such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). We therefore used transgenic mice expressing a dominant-negative form of ALDH2 (ALDH2*2 Tg mice) to selectively decrease ALDH2 activity in the muscles. To evaluate the effect of Chlorella, the mice were fed a Chlorella-supplemented diet (CSD) for 6 months. ALDH2*2 Tg mice exhibited small body size, muscle atrophy, decreased fat content, osteopenia, and kyphosis, accompanied by increased muscular 4-HNE levels. The CSD helped in recovery of body weight, enhanced oxidative stress, and increased levels of a muscle impairment marker, creatine phosphokinase (CPK) induced by ALDH2*2. Furthermore, histological and histochemical analyses revealed that the consumption of the CSD improved skeletal muscle atrophy and the activity of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. This study suggests that long-term consumption of Chlorella has the potential to prevent age-related muscle atrophy.

  18. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report Aracnodactilia contratural congênita com atrofia muscular espinhal: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Herminia Scola

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 3-1/2-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA. The serum muscle enzimes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.Relatamos o caso de uma paciente do sexo feminino de 3 anos e 6 meses com hipotonia, contraturas de múltiplas articulações, aracnodactilia, polegares aduzidos, dolicostenomelia e orelhas externas anormais sugerindo o diagnóstico de aracnodactilia contratural congênita (ACC. As enzimas musculares eram normais e a eletromiografia de agulha mostrou desinervação ativa e crônica. A biópsia muscular mostrou desinervação ativa e crônica compatível com atrofia muscular espinhal. A análise dos exons 7 e 8 do gene do survival motor neuron por reação em cadeia de polimerase não mostrou deleções. Atrofia muscular neurogênica é uma nova anormalidade associada a ACC, sugerindo a heterogeneidade clínica da ACC.

  19. Automated analysis of whole skeletal muscle for muscular atrophy detection of ALS in whole-body CT images: preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Naoki; Ieda, Kosuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Yamada, Megumi; Kato, Hiroki; Muramatsu, Chisako; Hara, Takeshi; Miyoshi, Toshiharu; Inuzuka, Takashi; Matsuo, Masayuki; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes functional disorders such as difficulty in breathing and swallowing through the atrophy of voluntary muscles. ALS in its early stages is difficult to diagnose because of the difficulty in differentiating it from other muscular diseases. In addition, image inspection methods for aggressive diagnosis for ALS have not yet been established. The purpose of this study is to develop an automatic analysis system of the whole skeletal muscle to support the early differential diagnosis of ALS using whole-body CT images. In this study, the muscular atrophy parts including ALS patients are automatically identified by recognizing and segmenting whole skeletal muscle in the preliminary steps. First, the skeleton is identified by its gray value information. Second, the initial area of the body cavity is recognized by the deformation of the thoracic cavity based on the anatomical segmented skeleton. Third, the abdominal cavity boundary is recognized using ABM for precisely recognizing the body cavity. The body cavity is precisely recognized by non-rigid registration method based on the reference points of the abdominal cavity boundary. Fourth, the whole skeletal muscle is recognized by excluding the skeleton, the body cavity, and the subcutaneous fat. Additionally, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients are automatically identified by comparison of the muscle mass. The experiments were carried out for ten cases with abnormality in the skeletal muscle. Global recognition and segmentation of the whole skeletal muscle were well realized in eight cases. Moreover, the areas of muscular atrophy including ALS patients were well identified in the lower limbs. As a result, this study indicated the basic technology to detect the muscle atrophy including ALS. In the future, it will be necessary to consider methods to differentiate other kinds of muscular atrophy as well as the clinical application of this detection method for early ALS

  20. Identification of a Peptide for Systemic Brain Delivery of a Morpholino Oligonucleotide in Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Hammond, Suzan M; Abendroth, Frank; Hazell, Gareth; Wood, Matthew J A; Gait, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Splice-switching antisense oligonucleotides are emerging treatments for neuromuscular diseases, with several splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs) currently undergoing clinical trials such as for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). However, the development of systemically delivered antisense therapeutics has been hampered by poor tissue penetration and cellular uptake, including crossing of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to reach targets in the central nervous system (CNS). For SMA application, we have investigated the ability of various BBB-crossing peptides for CNS delivery of a splice-switching phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) targeting survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) exon 7 inclusion. We identified a branched derivative of the well-known ApoE (141-150) peptide, which as a PMO conjugate was capable of exon inclusion in the CNS following systemic administration, leading to an increase in the level of full-length SMN2 transcript. Treatment of newborn SMA mice with this peptide-PMO (P-PMO) conjugate resulted in a significant increase in the average lifespan and gains in weight, muscle strength, and righting reflexes. Systemic treatment of adult SMA mice with this newly identified P-PMO also resulted in small but significant increases in the levels of SMN2 pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) exon inclusion in the CNS and peripheral tissues. This work provides proof of principle for the ability to select new peptide paradigms to enhance CNS delivery and activity of a PMO SSO through use of a peptide-based delivery platform for the treatment of SMA potentially extending to other neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 delays motor function defects in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Frank; Elflein, Nicole; Saenger, Stefanie; Wirthgen, Elisa; Rak, Kristen; Frantz, Stefan; Hoeflich, Andreas; Toyka, Klaus V; Metzger, Friedrich; Jablonka, Sibylle

    2014-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 is a neuromuscular disorder characterized by progressive weakness and atrophy of the diaphragm and skeletal muscles, leading to death in childhood. No effective treatment is available. The neuromuscular degeneration (Nmd(2J)) mouse shares a crucial mutation in the immunoglobulin mu-binding protein 2 gene (Ighmbp2) with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 patients and also displays some basic features of the human disease. This model serves as a promising tool in understanding the complex mechanisms of the disease and in exploring novel treatment modalities such as insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) which supports myogenic and neurogenic survival and stimulates differentiation during development. Here we investigated the treatment effects with polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 and its mechanisms of action in neurons and muscles. Polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 was applied subcutaneously every second day from post-natal Day 14 to post-natal Day 42 and the outcome was assessed by morphology, electromyography, and molecular studies. We found reduced IGF1 serum levels in Nmd(2J) mice 2 weeks after birth, which was normalized by polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 treatment. Nmd(2J) mice showed marked neurogenic muscle fibre atrophy in the gastrocnemius muscle and polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 treatment resulted in muscle fibre hypertrophy and slowed fibre degeneration along with significantly higher numbers of functionally active axonal sprouts. In the diaphragm with predominant myogenic changes a profound protection from muscle fibre degeneration was observed under treatment. No effects of polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 were monitored at the level of motor neuron survival. The beneficial effects of polyethylene glycol-coupled IGF1 corresponded to a marked activation of the IGF1 receptor, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B) and the ribosomal protein S6 kinase in

  2. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgetti, Elise; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone

  3. Neurocalcin Delta Suppression Protects against Spinal Muscular Atrophy in Humans and across Species by Restoring Impaired Endocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riessland, M.; Kaczmarek, A.; Schneider, S.; Swoboda, K.J.; Lohr, H.; Bradler, C.; Grysko, V.; Dimitriadi, M.; Hosseinibarkooie, S.; Torres-Benito, L.; Peters, M.; Upadhyay, A.; Biglari, N.; Krober, S.; Holker, I.; Garbes, L.; Gilissen, C.; Hoischen, A.; Nurnberg, G.; Nurnberg, P.; Walter, M.; Rigo, F.; Bennett, C.F.; Kye, M.J.; Hart, A.C.; Hammerschmidt, M.; Kloppenburg, P.; Wirth, B.

    2017-01-01

    Homozygous SMN1 loss causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most common lethal genetic childhood motor neuron disease. SMN1 encodes SMN, a ubiquitous housekeeping protein, which makes the primarily motor neuron-specific phenotype rather unexpected. SMA-affected individuals harbor low SMN

  4. Mutations in BICD2, which Encodes a Golgin and Important Motor Adaptor, Cause Congenital Autosomal-Dominant Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neveling, Kornelia; Martinez-Carrera, Lilian A.; Hoelker, Irmgard; Heister, Angelien; Verrips, Aad; Hosseini-Barkooie, Seyyed Mohsen; Gilissen, Christian; Vermeer, Sascha; Pennings, Maartje; Meijer, Rowdy; te Riele, Margot; Frijns, Catharina J. M.; Suchowersky, Oksana; MacLaren, Linda; Rudnik-Schoeneborn, Sabine; Sinke, Richard J.; Zerres, Klaus; Lowry, R. Brian; Lemmink, Henny H.; Garbes, Lutz; Veltman, Joris A.; Schelhaas, Helenius J.; Scheffer, Hans; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a heterogeneous group of neuromuscular disorders caused by degeneration of lower motor neurons. Although functional loss of SMN1 is associated with autosomal-recessive childhood SMA, the genetic cause for most families affected by dominantly inherited SMA is unknown.

  5. Clinical Trials in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy-Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weydt, Patrick; Sagnelli, Anna; Rosenbohm, Angela; Fratta, Pietro; Pradat, Pierre-François; Ludolph, Albert C; Pareyson, Davide

    2016-03-01

    Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is a rare adult-onset lower motor neuron disorder with a classic X-linked inheritance pattern. It is caused by the abnormal expansion of the CAG-repeat tract in the androgen receptor gene. Despite important progress in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis and the availability of a broad set of model organisms, successful translation of these insights into clinical interventions remains elusive. Here we review the available information on clinical trials in SBMA and discuss the challenges and pitfalls that impede therapy development. Two important factors are the variability of the complex neuro-endocrinological phenotype and the comparatively low incidence of the disease that renders recruitment for clinical trials demanding. We propose that these challenges can be and need to be overcome by fostering closer collaborations between clinical research centers, the patient communities and the industry and non-industry sponsors of clinical trials.

  6. Fatigue in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II and congenital myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Ulla; Højberg, A; Firla-Holme, R

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the fatigue severity scale (FSS) is an appropriate instrument to assess fatigue in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II (SMA II) and congenital myopathies (CM). METHODS: FSS and visual analog scale (VAS) were administered to 33 SMA II......- and 72 CM patients. The psychometric properties of the FSS were evaluated by means of classical test theories for each of the disease groups. If abnormal fatigue was present in the disease group, the construct of fatigue was evaluated by means of focus group interviews. RESULTS: Fatigue was rare in SMA...... II patients, but very frequent in patients with CM. The cut-off score designating abnormal fatigue (FSS score ≥ 4) was exceeded by 10% of the SMA II patients in contrast to 76% of the CM patients, of whom 52% suffered from severe fatigue (FSS score ≥ 5). Focus group interviews demonstrated...

  7. Adiposity is increased among High-Functioning, Non-Ambulatory Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Douglas M.; Montes, Jacqueline; Dunaway, Sally; Montgomery, Megan; Battista, Vanessa; Koenigsberger, Dorcas; Martens, Bill; Shen, Wei; Punyanitya, Mark; Benton, Maryjane; Butler, Hailly; Caracciolo, Jayson; Mercuri, Eugenio; Finkel, Richard; Darras, Basil; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Kaufmann, Petra

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between body composition and function in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is poorly understood. 53 subjects with SMA were stratified by type and Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale, Expanded score into three cohorts: Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory (type 2 with Hammersmith score 85th percentile for age and gender (connoting “at risk of overweight”) versus 9 of 19 subjects (47%) in the Low-Functioning Non-Ambulatory cohort and 8 of 17 ambulatory subjects (47%). Despite differences in clinical function, a similar proportion of low functioning (7/18, 39%) and high functioning (2/7, 29%) type 2 subjects reported swallowing or feeding dysfunction. Non-ambulatory patients with relatively high clinical function may be at particular risk of excess adiposity, perhaps reflecting access to excess calories despite relative immobility, emphasizing the importance of individualized nutritional management in SMA. PMID:20610154

  8. Diagnosis of Progressive Spinal Muscular Atrophy by Using Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚娟; 丁新生; 陈克连; 程虹; 邓晓萱; 沈鸣九; 王颖

    2001-01-01

    Objective To understand the deletion in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN) of childhood-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in Chinese, and the value of diagnosis of SMA using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP)method. Methods Deletions of SMN gene of exon 7 and 8 in 10 cases of presumed SMA, and 20 normal controls from 6 families and 30 unrelated controls were performed by PCR-RFLP analysis. Results Deletions of SMN gene detected in 9 of 10 (90%) cases of presumed SMA . No deletions of SMN in the telomere were found in the other members of families and controls.Conclusion PCR-RFLP is a sensitive, specific and simple method in diagnosis of SMA.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy in Chinese by genetic analysis of fetal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ting; DING Xin-sheng; LI Wen-lei; YAO Juan; DENG Xiao-xuan

    2005-01-01

    Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by degeneration of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord.The survival motor neuron gene is SMA-determining gene deleted in approximately 95% of SMA patients.This study was undertaken to predict prenatal SMA efficiently and rapidly in families with previously affected child.Methods Prenatal diagnosis was made in 8 fetuses with a family history of SMA.Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used for the detection of the survival motor neuron gene.Results The survival motor neuron gene was not found in 6 fetuses, ruling out the diagnosis of SMA.Two fetuses were detected positive and the pregnancies were terminated.Conclusion Our method is effective and convenient in prenatal diagnosis of SMA.

  10. Sequencing analysis of the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy CAG expansion reveals absence of repeat interruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratta, Pietro; Collins, Toby; Pemble, Sally; Nethisinghe, Suran; Devoy, Anny; Giunti, Paola; Sweeney, Mary G; Hanna, Michael G; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2014-02-01

    Trinucleotide repeat disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by the expansion, beyond a pathogenic threshold, of unstable DNA tracts in different genes. Sequence interruptions in the repeats have been described in the majority of these disorders and may influence disease phenotype and heritability. Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Diagnostic testing and previous research have relied on fragment analysis polymerase chain reaction to determine the AR CAG repeat size, and have therefore not been able to assess the presence of interruptions. We here report a sequencing study of the AR CAG repeat in a cohort of SBMA patients and control subjects in the United Kingdom. We found no repeat interruptions to be present, and we describe differences between sequencing and traditional sizing methods.

  11. Patient with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 presenting initially with hypertonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunxi; Mai, Jiahui; Tian, Tian; He, Yanxia; Liao, Jianxiang; Wen, Feiqiu; Yi, Xin; Yang, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is a rare autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the IGHMBP2 gene and characterized by life-threatening respiratory distress due to irreversible diaphragmatic paralysis between 6weeks and 6months of age. In this study, we describe a two-month-old boy who presented with hypertonia at first and developed to hypotonia progressively, which was in contrast to the manifestations reported previously. Bone tissue compromise was also observed as one of the unique symptoms. Muscle biopsy indicated mild myogenic changes. He was misdiagnosed until genetic screening to be confirmed as SMARD1. SMARD1 is a clinical heterogeneous disease and this case broadens our perception of its phenotypes.

  12. Tremor in X-linked recessive spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study tremor in patients with X-linked recessive spinobulbar muscular atrophy or Kennedy's disease. METHODS: Ten patients (from 7 families with a genetic diagnosis of Kennedy's disease were screened for the presence of tremor using a standardized clinical protocol and followed up at a neurology outpatient clinic. All index patients were genotyped and showed an expanded allele in the androgen receptor gene. RESULTS: Mean patient age was 37.6 years and mean number of CAG repeats 47 (44-53. Tremor was present in 8 (80% patients and was predominantly postural hand tremor. Alcohol responsiveness was detected in 7 (88% patients with tremor, who all responded well to treatment with a β-blocker (propranolol. CONCLUSION: Tremor is a common feature in patients with Kennedy's disease and has characteristics similar to those of essential tremor.

  13. CT muscle scanning in the evaluation of patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambrook, P.; Rickards, D.; Cumming, W.J.K.

    1988-12-01

    One hundred with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were assessed by CT scanning using a standardised technique. The spectrum of CT abnormality occurring in SMA was observed and by overall analysis the patients were divided into 4 groups. While the CT appearances of these groups correlated well with clinical assessment of severity of disease, the disease process was usually much more widespread than clinical examination suggested. CT abnormality was first observed in the leg and gluteal muscles, progressing to the posterior spinal, thigh, shoulder girdle and sternomastoid muscles. Hypertrophy of sartorius and gracilis was observed in a significant number of patients. Fascial planes were preserved in involved muscles in over half of the patients, even in late-stage disease. Asymmetrical muscle involvement was seen with increasing frequency as the disease process increased in extent as evaluated by CT scanning. There was no discernible difference in the CT appearances in those patients who clinically had limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral or scapuloperoneal distribution of weakness.

  14. Towards a European Registry and Biorepository for Patients with Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareyson, Davide; Fratta, Pietro; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Pathomechanisms of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) have been extensively investigated and are partially understood, but no effective treatment is currently available for this disabling disorder. Its rarity, the slow disease progression, and lack of sensitive-to-change outcome measures...... as possible can be included, with the following aims: facilitate planning of clinical trials and recruitment of patients, define natural history of the disease, characterize epidemiology, develop standards of care, and inform the community of patients about research progresses and ongoing trials. We also aim...... at developing harmonized and coordinated biorepositories. The experience obtained during the last years in the field of other neuromuscular disorders and of Huntington disease offers valuable precedents....

  15. Neuromuscular Junctions as Key Contributors and Therapeutic Targets in Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boido, Marina; Vercelli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a recessive autosomal neuromuscular disease, representing the most common fatal pediatric pathology. Even though, classically and in a simplistic way, it is categorized as a motor neuron (MN) disease, there is an increasing general consensus that its pathogenesis is more complex than expected. In particular, neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) are affected by dramatic alterations, including immaturity, denervation and neurofilament accumulation, associated to impaired synaptic functions: these abnormalities may in turn have a detrimental effect on MN survival. Here, we provide a description of NMJ development/maintenance/maturation in physiological conditions and in SMA, focusing on pivotal molecules and on the time-course of pathological events. Moreover, since NMJs could represent an important target to be exploited for counteracting the pathology progression, we also describe several therapeutic strategies that, directly or indirectly, aim at NMJs. PMID:26869891

  16. Effect of aerobic training in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy disease)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Andersen, G; Thøgersen, F

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined the effect of aerobic exercise in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). SBMA is caused by a defect androgen receptor. This defect causes motor neuron death, but considering the important function of androgens in muscle, it is possible that muscle damage...... in SBMA also occurs independently of motor neuron damage. METHODS: Eight patients with SBMA engaged in regular cycling exercise for 12 weeks. Maximum oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)), maximal work capacity (W(max)), muscle morphology, citrate synthase (CS) activity, body composition, EMG, static strength...... measurements, lung function, plasma proteins, and hormones were evaluated before and after training. Evaluation of improvements in activities of daily living (ADL) was conducted after training. RESULTS: W(max) increased by 18%, and CS activity increased by 35%. There was no significant change in Vo(2max...

  17. [Somatic mosaicism of expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, F; Ito, Y; Sobue, G

    1999-04-01

    The CAG repeat in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is relatively stable in mitotic and meiotic processes as compared with other CAG repeat diseases. Previous reports indicate that SBMA does not manifest somatic mosaicism. However, detailed analysis in various tissues from 20 SBMA including 4 autopsied patients revealed the presence of the tissue-specific pattern of mosaicism. The prominent somatic mosaicism was observed in the cardiac and skeletal muscles, which are predominantly composed of postmitotic cells, and in the skin, prostate, and testis. The central nervous system (CNS) tissues, liver, and spleen showed smallest mosaicism. Such tissue-specific pattern of somatic mosaicism in SBMA is not explained by cell composition with different cell turnover rates. Other cell specific factors are likely more important for the somatic mosaicism in SBMA.

  18. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA): somatic stability of an expanded CAG repeat in fetal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedele, K B; Wahl, D; Chahrokh-Zadeh, S; Wirtz, A; Murken, J; Holinski-Feder, E

    1998-08-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare X-linked motor neuron degenerative disease caused by an expanded trinucleotide repeat. Unlike most other trinucleotide repeat diseases, SBMA shows limited meiotic instability, and evidence thus far indicates absence of somatic instability in adults. Data regarding the presence of fetal tissue somatic mosaicism is unavailable. We present a family in which a woman whose father had SBMA requested prenatal testing. After informed consent. molecular genetic evaluation showed the male fetus to carry the SBMA repeat elongation. Testing of fetal tissues after elective pregnancy termination showed no somatic mosaicism in the CAG repeat length. This is the first report of molecular genetic analysis of multiple tissues in an affected fetus, and only the second report of prenatal diagnosis in SBMA.

  19. [Anti-androgen therapy for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Hashizume, Atsushi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), or Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset lower motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The testosterone-dependent nuclear accumulation of polyglutamine-expanded AR protein is central to the pathogenesis. This hypothesis is supported by pre-clinical studies showing that testosterone deprivation ameliorates motor neuron degeneration in animal modes of SBMA. In a randomized placebo-controlled multi-centric clinical trial, leuprorelin, which suppresses secretion of testosterone, showed no definite effect on motor functions, although there was the improvement of swallowing function in a subgroup of patients whose disease duration was less than 10 years. Elucidation of the entire disease mechanism, early initiation of therapeutic intervention, and sensitive outcome measures to evaluate drug effect appear to be the key to a successful translational research on SBMA.

  20. Familial adult spinal muscular atrophy associated with the VAPB gene: report of 42 cases in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Kosac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Familial spinal muscular atrophy (FSMA associated with the vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein B (VAPB gene is a rare autosomal dominant disease with late onset and slow progression. We studied 10 of 42 patients from 5 families by taking clinical histories and performing physical exams, electrophysiological studies, and genetic tests. All patients presented late onset disease with slow progression characterized by fasciculations, proximal weakness, amyotrophy, and hypoactive deep tendon reflex, except two who exhibited brisk reflex. Two patients showed tongue fasciculations and respiratory insufficiency. Electrophysiological studies revealed patterns of lower motor neuron disease, and genetic testing identified a P56S mutation of the VAPB gene. Although it is a rare motor neuron disease, FSMA with this mutation might be much more prevalent in Brazil than expected, and many cases may be undiagnosed. Genetic exams should be performed whenever it is suspected in Brazil.

  1. An Integrative Transcriptomic Analysis for Identifying Novel Target Genes Corresponding to Severity Spectrum in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wei Yang

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an inherited neuromuscular disease resulting from a recessive mutation in the SMN1 gene. This disease affects multiple organ systems with varying degrees of severity. Exploration of the molecular pathological changes occurring in different cell types in SMA is crucial for developing new therapies. This study collected 39 human microarray datasets from ArrayExpress and GEO databases to build an integrative transcriptomic analysis for recognizing novel SMA targets. The transcriptomic analysis was conducted through combining weighted correlation network analysis (WGCNA for gene module detection, gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA for functional categorization and filtration, and Cytoscape (visual interaction gene network analysis for target gene identification. Seven novel target genes (Bmp4, Serpine1, Gata6, Ptgs2, Bcl2, IL6 and Cntn1 of SMA were revealed, and are all known in the regulation of TNFα for controlling neural, cardiac and bone development. Sequentially, the differentially expressed patterns of these 7 target genes in mouse tissues (e.g., spinal cord, heart, muscles and bone were validated in SMA mice of different severities (pre-symptomatic, mildly symptomatic, and severely symptomatic. In severely symptomatic SMA mice, TNFα was up-regulated with attenuation of Bmp4 and increase of Serpine1 and Gata6 (a pathway in neural and cardiac development, but not in pre-symptomatic and mildly symptomatic SMA mice. The severely symptomatic SMA mice also had the elevated levels of Ptgs2 and Bcl2 (a pathway in skeletal development as well as IL6 and Cntn1 (a pathway in nervous system development. Thus, the 7 genes identified in this study might serve as potential target genes for future investigations of disease pathogenesis and SMA therapy.

  2. X-linked lethal infantile spinal muscular atrophy: From clinical description to molecular mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumbach, L.; Schiavi, A. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The proximal spinal muscular atrophies (PSMA), one of the most common forms of lower motor neuron disease in children, are characterized by progressive muscle weakness due to loss of anterior horn cells. All three autosomal recessive forms have been mapped to chromosome 5q11.2-11.3, implying an allelic association between these disorders. Recent evidence from our laboratories, as well as others, suggests that a distinct form of lethal neonatal spinal muscular atrophy, associated with early onset contractures, is determined by a gene on the X chromosome. We report our efforts in mapping this disease locus. Our original studies have focused on two unrelated multigenerational families with similar clinical presentations of severe hypotonia, muscle weakness, and a disease course similar to Werdnig Hoffman except for the additional finding of congenital or early onset contractures. Muscle biopsy and/or autopsy were indicative of anterior horn cell loss in affected males. Disease occurrence in each of the families was consistent with an X-linked recessive mode of inheritance. Subsequently, two additional families have been identified, as well as several sporadic male cases. Linkage analysis has been completed in one of these families using highly polymorphic repeats dispersed 10 cM on the X chromosome. Interpretation of results was achieved using an automated data acquisition program. Analysis of over 300 haplotypes generated using PCR-based DNA markers have identified two 16 cM regions on Xp with complete concordance to the disease phenotype. Our currents efforts are focused on the region surrounding the Kallman gene, in attempts to better define a candidate region, as well as analyze possible candidate genes within this region.

  3. Social support network to family caregiver of a patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy I and II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Barreto de Mesquita

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the formal and informal support given to the family caregiver of a patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy I and II. Method: This was a study with a qualitative approach developed in 2008 in the homes of informants and in the premises of the Hospital Infantil Albert Sabin in Fortaleza, Ceara, conducted with 13 mothers, primary caregivers for their ill children. For data collection we used both the interview and the instrument generator of the names and qualifier of the relations, adapted for this study. Quantitative data were processed using the programs UCINET NetDraw 6.123 and 2.38, while the qualitative data were organized based on the technique of the Collective Subject Discourse. The analyses were conducted by means of network maps and collective discourses raised by central ideas. Results: The formal social network of family caregivers was composed of 72 actors, among professionals in the areas of health, education and others, linked to 12 institutions. The informal network was comprised of 83 actors. It was found that the management of care, even when the caregiver has support from other people is a cause of stress and overload. Conclusion: It is evident the importance of applying Social Network Analysis as a tool for understanding structural features and the dynamics of social relations of family caregiver. Of a patient with spinal muscular atrophy. The analysis suggests the need for intervention in thestudy group as a way to contribute to the recognition and use of existing services, increasing the significance of the help provided by network interactions.

  4. Pathogenesis, animal models and therapeutics in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Waza, Masahiro; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Doyu, Manabu; Sobue, Gen

    2006-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of bulbar, facial, and limb muscles. The cause of SBMA is expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA chiefly occurs in adult males, whereas neurological symptoms are rarely detected in females having mutant AR gene. The cardinal histopathological finding of SBMA is loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of spinal cord as well as in brainstem motor nuclei. Animal models carrying human mutant AR gene recapitulate polyglutamine-mediated motor neuron degeneration, providing clues to the pathogenesis of SBMA. There is increasing evidence that testosterone, the ligand of AR, plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration in SBMA. The striking success of androgen deprivation therapy in SBMA mouse models has been translated into clinical trials. In addition, elucidation of pathophysiology using animal models leads to emergence of candidate drugs to treat this devastating disease: HSP inducer, Hsp90 inhibitor, and histone deacetylase inhibitor. Utilizing biomarkers such as scrotal skin biopsy would improve efficacy of clinical trials to verify the results from animal studies. Advances in basic and clinical researches on SBMA are now paving the way for clinical application of potential therapeutics.

  5. [Disease-modifying therapy for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Banno, Haruhiko; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-03-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases have long been construed as incurable disorders. However, therapeutic developments for these diseases are now facing a turning point, that is, analyses of cellular and animal models have provided insights into the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases and have indicated rational therapeutic approaches. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset motor neuron disease characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. This disease is caused by the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat within the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The results of animal studies suggest that testosterone-dependent nuclear accumulation of the pathogenic AR protein is a fundamental step in the neurodegenerative process. Androgen deprivation with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogue suppresses the toxicity of the mutant AR in animal models of SBMA. In a phase 3 trial, 48 weeks of treatment with leuprorelin acetate, an LHRH analogue, tended to improve swallowing function in a subgroup of SBMA patients with disease duration less than 10 years but did not significantly affect the total population. Disease duration might influence the efficacy of leuprorelin acetate, and therefore, a further clinical trial that involves sensitive outcome measures is in progress. Advances in basic and clinical research on SBMA are now paving the way for the clinical application of pathogenesis-targeting therapies. To optimize translational research related to the process of testing candidate therapies in humans, it is important to identify biomarkers that can be used as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials for neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Pathogenesis-targeting therapeutics for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Kastuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Sobue, Gen

    2009-08-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an hereditary, adult-onset, lower motor neuron disease caused by an aberrant elongation of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The main symptoms are slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy of bulbar, facial and limb muscles. The cardinal histopathological findings of SBMA are an extensive loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in brainstem motor nuclei and intranuclear accumulations of mutant AR protein in the residual motor neurons. Androgen deprivation therapy rescues neuronal dysfunction in animal models of SBMA, suggesting that the molecular basis for motor neuron degeneration in this disorder is testosterone-dependent nuclear accumulation of the mutant AR. Suppression of disease progression by leuprorelin acetate has also been demonstrated in a phase 2 clinical trial. In addition, the clarification of pathophysiology leads to appearance of candidate drugs to treat this devastating disease: heat shock protein (HSP) inducer, Hsp90 inhibitor, and histone deacetylase inhibitor. Advances in basic and clinical research on SBMA are now paving the way for clinical application of pathogenesis-targeting therapeutics.

  7. Pathogenesis and molecular targeted therapy of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Haruhiko; Katsuno, Masahisa; Suzuki, Keisuke; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), also known as Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset, X-linked motor neuron disease characterized by muscle atrophy, weakness, contraction fasciculations, and bulbar involvement. SBMA is caused by the expansion of a CAG triplet repeat, encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The histopathological finding in SBMA is the loss of lower motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord as well as in the brainstem motor nuclei. There is no established disease-modifying therapy for SBMA. Animal studies have revealed that the pathogenesis of SBMA depends on the level of serum testosterone, and that androgen deprivation mitigates neurodegeneration through inhibition of nuclear accumulation and/or stabilization of the pathogenic AR. Heat shock proteins, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and transcriptional regulation are also potential targets for development of therapy for SBMA. Among these therapeutic approaches, the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue, leuprorelin, prevents nuclear translocation of aberrant AR proteins, resulting in a significant improvement of disease phenotype in a mouse model of SBMA. In a phase 2 clinical trial of leuprorelin, the patients treated with this drug exhibited decreased mutant AR accumulation in scrotal skin biopsy. Phase 3 clinical trial showed the possibility that leuprorelin treatment is associated with improved swallowing function particularly in patients with a disease duration less than 10 years. These observations suggest that pharmacological inhibition of the toxic accumulation of mutant AR is a potential therapy for SBMA.

  8. Increased mitophagy in the skeletal muscle of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Doriana; Malena, Adriana; Spinazzi, Marco; Andrea Desbats, Maria; Salviati, Leonardo; Russell, Aaron P; Miotto, Giovanni; Tosatto, Laura; Pegoraro, Elena; Sorarù, Gianni; Pennuto, Maria; Vergani, Lodovica

    2017-01-13

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) and characterized by the loss of lower motor neurons. Here we investigated pathological processes occurring in muscle biopsy specimens derived from SBMA patients and, as controls, age-matched healthy subjects and patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neurogenic atrophy. We detected atrophic fibers in the muscle of SBMA, ALS and neurogenic atrophy patients. In addition, SBMA muscle was characterized by the presence of a large number of hypertrophic fibers, with oxidative fibers having a larger size compared to glycolytic fibers. Polyglutamine-expanded AR expression was decreased in whole muscle, yet enriched in the nucleus, and localized to mitochondria. Ultrastructural analysis revealed myofibrillar disorganization and streaming in zones lacking mitochondria and degenerating mitochondria. Using molecular (mtDNA copy number), biochemical (citrate synthase and respiratory chain enzymes) and morphological (dark blue area in NADH-stained muscle cross sections) analyses, we found a depletion of the mitochondria associated with enhanced mitophagy. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed an increase of phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylserines in mitochondria isolated from SBMA muscles, as well as a 50% depletion of cardiolipin associated with decreased expression of the cardiolipin synthase gene. These observations suggest a causative link between nuclear polyglutamine-expanded AR accumulation, depletion of mitochondrial mass, increased mitophagy and altered mitochondrial membrane composition in SBMA muscle patients. Given the central role of mitochondria in cell bioenergetics, therapeutic approaches towards improving the mitochondrial network are worth considering to support SBMA patients.

  9. Neuroelectrophysiological indexes and clinical characteristics of patients with peroneal muscular atrophy: Retrospective analysis of 24 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Changchun Su; Qinbao Qin

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peroneal muscular atrophy (PMA) is characterized by insidious onset, gradually progressive course of disease, very mild disability degree and easily subjecting to missed diagnosis and misdiagnosis.Nerve conductive velocity is helpful in the diagnosis of atypical cases.OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively analyze the characteristics of clinical manifestation, electromyogram (EMG),motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity of patients with PMA.DESIGN: Retrospective case analysis.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Guangzhou First People's Hospital.PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four patients with PMA, including 16 males and 8 females, aged 5-68 years old,admitted to Guangzhou First People's Hospital between March 1996 and January 2006 were recruited.Informed consents were obtained from all the patients.METHODS: All the patients subjected to EMG and detection of nerve conduction velocity at distal end of four extremities with a Keypoint evoked potential/ EMG instrument (Denmark). Sensory and motor conduction velocity, EMG changes of upper and lower extremities were observed, and relationship of neuroelectrophysiological characteristics and clinical symptoms was analyzed.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in sensory and motor conduction velocity, EMG and clinical manifestations of 24 patients.RESULTS: ① All the patients suffered from insidious onset and gradually progressive course of PMA.Muscular atrophy of lower extremity was found in 14 patients, and that of upper extremity in 5 patients. ② Routine nerve conduction study showed that sensory and motor conduction velocity were stepped down,especially in 16 patients with type Ⅰ PMA (demyelinating pattern, nerve conduction velocity below normal level 50%). Motor nerve conduction velocity of median nerve, ulnar nerve, common peroneal nerve and tibial nerve averaged 34.8 m/s, 37.2 m/s, 16.5 m/s and 17.4 m/s, respectively; Sensory nerve conduction velocity of median nerve, ulnar nerve and sural nerve averaged 27.9%, 24.6 m

  10. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons "in vitro" and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  12. Neuroprotective effect of non-viral gene therapy treatment based on tetanus toxin C-fragment in a severe mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Olivan Garcia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC, which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons in vitro and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3 and p62 and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln, TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  13. Non-aggregating tau phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nimrod; Feng, Zhihua; Edens, Brittany M; Yang, Ben; Shi, Han; Sze, Christie C; Hong, Benjamin Taige; Su, Susan C; Cantu, Jorge A; Topczewski, Jacek; Crawford, Thomas O; Ko, Chien-Ping; Sumner, Charlotte J; Ma, Long; Ma, Yong-Chao

    2015-04-15

    Mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading inherited cause of infant mortality, remain largely unknown. Many studies have established the importance of hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in various neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. However, tau phosphorylation in SMA pathogenesis has yet to be investigated. Here we show that tau phosphorylation on serine 202 (S202) and threonine 205 (T205) is increased significantly in SMA motor neurons using two SMA mouse models and human SMA patient spinal cord samples. Interestingly, phosphorylated tau does not form aggregates in motor neurons or neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), even at late stages of SMA disease, distinguishing it from other tauopathies. Hyperphosphorylation of tau on S202 and T205 is mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in SMA disease condition, because tau phosphorylation at these sites is significantly reduced in Cdk5 knock-out mice; genetic knock-out of Cdk5 activating subunit p35 in an SMA mouse model also leads to reduced tau phosphorylation on S202 and T205 in the SMA;p35(-/-) compound mutant mice. In addition, expression of the phosphorylation-deficient tauS202A,T205A mutant alleviates motor neuron defects in a zebrafish SMA model in vivo and mouse motor neuron degeneration in culture, whereas expression of phosphorylation-mimetic tauS202E,T205E promotes motor neuron defects. More importantly, genetic knock-out of tau in SMA mice rescues synapse stripping on motor neurons, NMJ denervation, and motor neuron degeneration in vivo. Altogether, our findings suggest a novel mechanism for SMA pathogenesis in which hyperphosphorylation of non-aggregating tau by Cdk5 contributes to motor neuron degeneration.

  14. Chondrolectin affects cell survival and neuronal outgrowth in in vitro and in vivo models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleigh, James N; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón; Oliver, Peter L; Biba, Angeliki; Becker, Thomas; Davies, Kay E; Becker, Catherina G; Talbot, Kevin

    2014-02-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is characterized by the selective loss of spinal motor neurons owing to reduced levels of survival motor neuron (Smn) protein. In addition to its well-established role in assembling constituents of the spliceosome, diverse cellular functions have been proposed for Smn, but the reason why low levels of this widely expressed protein result in selective motor neuron pathology is still debated. In longitudinal studies of exon-level changes in SMA mouse model tissues, designed to determine the contribution of splicing dysfunction to the disease, we have previously shown that a generalized defect in splicing is unlikely to play a causative role in SMA. Nevertheless, we identified a small subset of genes that were alternatively spliced in the spinal cord compared with control mice before symptom onset, indicating a possible mechanistic role in disease. Here, we have performed functional studies of one of these genes, chondrolectin (Chodl), known to be highly expressed in motor neurons and important for correct motor axon outgrowth in zebrafish. Using in vitro and in vivo models of SMA, we demonstrate altered expression of Chodl in SMA mouse spinal motor neurons, show that Chodl has distinct effects on cell survival and neurite outgrowth and that increasing the expression of chodl can rescue motor neuron outgrowth defects in Smn-depleted zebrafish. Our findings thus link the dysregulation of Chodl to the pathophysiology of motor neuron degeneration in SMA.

  15. DNA Damage Response and DNA Repair in Skeletal Myocytes From a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayzullina, Saniya; Martin, Lee J

    2016-09-01

    We studied DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair capacities of skeletal muscle cells from a mouse model of infantile spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) caused by loss-of-function mutation of survival of motor neuron (Smn). Primary myocyte cultures derived from skeletal muscle satellite cells of neonatal control and mutant SMN mice had similar myotube length, myonuclei, satellite cell marker Pax7 and differentiated myotube marker myosin, and acetylcholine receptor clustering. DNA damage was induced in differentiated skeletal myotubes by γ-irradiation, etoposide, and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Unexposed control and SMA myotubes had stable genome integrity. After γ-irradiation and etoposide, myotubes repaired most DNA damage equally. Control and mutant myotubes exposed to MMS exhibited equivalent DNA damage without repair. Control and SMA myotube nuclei contained DDR proteins phospho-p53 and phospho-H2AX foci that, with DNA damage, dispersed and then re-formed similarly after recovery. We conclude that mouse primary satellite cell-derived myotubes effectively respond to and repair DNA strand-breaks, while DNA alkylation repair is underrepresented. Morphological differentiation, genome stability, genome sensor, and DNA strand-break repair potential are preserved in mouse SMA myocytes; thus, reduced SMN does not interfere with myocyte differentiation, genome integrity, and DNA repair, and faulty DNA repair is unlikely pathogenic in SMA.

  16. Adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide reduces phosphorylation and toxicity of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor in spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Maria Josè; Parodi, Sara; Piol, Diana; Stack, Conor; Chivet, Mathilde; Contestabile, Andrea; Miranda, Helen C; Lievens, Patricia M-J; Espinoza, Stefano; Jochum, Tobias; Rocchi, Anna; Grunseich, Christopher; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Cato, Andrew C B; Lieberman, Andrew P; La Spada, Albert R; Sambataro, Fabio; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Gozes, Illana; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-12-21

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA belongs to the family of polyQ diseases, which are fatal neurodegenerative disorders mainly caused by protein-mediated toxic gain-of-function mechanisms and characterized by deposition of misfolded proteins in the form of aggregates. The neurotoxicity of the polyQ proteins can be modified by phosphorylation at specific sites, thereby providing the rationale for the development of disease-specific treatments. We sought to identify signaling pathways that modulate polyQ-AR phosphorylation for therapy development. We report that cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) phosphorylates polyQ-AR specifically at Ser(96) Phosphorylation of polyQ-AR by CDK2 increased protein stabilization and toxicity and is negatively regulated by the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. To translate these findings into therapy, we developed an analog of pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), a potent activator of the AC/PKA pathway. Chronic intranasal administration of the PACAP analog to knock-in SBMA mice reduced Ser(96) phosphorylation, promoted polyQ-AR degradation, and ameliorated disease outcome. These results provide proof of principle that noninvasive therapy based on the use of PACAP analogs is a therapeutic option for SBMA.

  17. Rescue of the spinal muscular atrophy phenotype in a mouse model by early postnatal delivery of SMN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Kevin D; Wang, Xueyong; McGovern, Vicki L; Braun, Lyndsey; Bevan, Adam K; Haidet, Amanda M; Le, Thanh T; Morales, Pablo R; Rich, Mark M; Burghes, Arthur H M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2010-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most common autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease affecting children, results in impaired motor neuron function. Despite knowledge of the pathogenic role of decreased survival motor neuron (SMN) protein levels, efforts to increase SMN have not resulted in a treatment for patients. We recently demonstrated that self-complementary adeno-associated virus 9 (scAAV9) can infect approximately 60% of motor neurons when injected intravenously into neonatal mice. Here we use scAAV9-mediated postnatal day 1 vascular gene delivery to replace SMN in SMA pups and rescue motor function, neuromuscular physiology and life span. Treatment on postnatal day 5 results in partial correction, whereas postnatal day 10 treatment has little effect, suggesting a developmental period in which scAAV9 therapy has maximal benefit. Notably, we also show extensive scAAV9-mediated motor neuron transduction after injection into a newborn cynomolgus macaque. This demonstration that scAAV9 traverses the blood-brain barrier in a nonhuman primate emphasizes the clinical potential of scAAV9 gene therapy for SMA.

  18. Infantile spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type I presenting without respiratory involvement: Novel mutations and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Xinghua; Huang, Xiaojun; Liu, Xiaoli; Zhou, Haiyan; Chen, Shengdi; Cao, Li

    2016-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1), also known as distal spinal muscular atrophy 1 (DSMA1) or distal hereditary motor neuropathies type 6 (dHMN6), is a rare autosomal recessive motor neuron disorder that affects infants and is characterized by diaphragmatic palsy, distal muscular weakness and muscle atrophy. The disease is caused by mutations in the gene encoding immunoglobulinm-binding protein 2 (IGHMBP2). We present a female child with novel compound heterozygous mutations in IGHMBP2 gene c.344C>T (p.115T>M) and c.1737C>A (p.579F>L), displaying distal limbs weakness and atrophy without signs of diaphragmatic palsy or respiratory insufficiency. We review 20 reported SMARD1 cases that have no respiratory involvement or have late onsets. We propose that IGHMBP2 gene mutations are characterized by significant phenotypic heterogeneity. Diaphragmatic palsy and respiratory distress may be absent and SMARD1 should be considered in infantile with the onset of peripheral neuropathies.

  19. Dexamethasone-induced muscular atrophy is mediated by functional expression of connexin-based hemichannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea, Luis A; Balboa, Elisa; Puebla, Carlos; Vargas, Aníbal A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Regueira, Tomás; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term treatment with high glucocorticoid doses induces skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanism of such atrophy remains unclear. We evaluated the possible involvement of connexin-based hemichannels (Cx HCs) in muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, on control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl)) and Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre) skeletal myofibers. Myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice treated with DEX (5h) expressed several proteins that form non-selective membrane channels (Cx39, Cx43, Cx45, Panx1, P2X7 receptor and TRPV2). After 5h DEX treatment in vivo, myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice showed Evans blue uptake, which was absent in myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Similar results were obtained in vitro using ethidium as an HC permeability probe, and DEX-induced dye uptake in control myofibers was blocked by P2X7 receptor inhibitors. DEX also induced a significant increase in basal intracellular Ca(2+) signal and a reduction in resting membrane potential in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, changes that were not elicited by myofibers deficient in Cx43/Cx45 expression. Moreover, treatment with DEX induced NFκB activation and increased mRNA levels of TNF-α in control but not in Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient myofibers. Finally, a prolonged DEX treatment (7days) increased atrogin-1 and Murf-1 and reduced the cross sectional area of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, but these parameters remained unaffected in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre myofibers. Therefore, DEX-induced expression of Cx43 and Cx45 plays a critical role in early sarcolemma changes that lead to atrophy. Consequently, this side effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment might be avoided by co-administration with a Cx HC blocker.

  20. Transmission of multiple system atrophy prions to transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joel C; Giles, Kurt; Oehler, Abby; Middleton, Lefkos; Dexter, David T; Gentleman, Steve M; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2013-11-26

    Prions are proteins that adopt alternative conformations, which become self-propagating. Increasing evidence argues that prions feature in the synucleinopathies that include Parkinson's disease, Lewy body dementia, and multiple system atrophy (MSA). Although TgM83(+/+) mice homozygous for a mutant A53T α-synuclein transgene begin developing CNS dysfunction spontaneously at ∼10 mo of age, uninoculated TgM83(+/-) mice (hemizygous for the transgene) remain healthy. To determine whether MSA brains contain α-synuclein prions, we inoculated the TgM83(+/-) mice with brain homogenates from two pathologically confirmed MSA cases. Inoculated TgM83(+/-) mice developed progressive signs of neurologic disease with an incubation period of ∼100 d, whereas the same mice inoculated with brain homogenates from spontaneously ill TgM83(+/+) mice developed neurologic dysfunction in ∼210 d. Brains of MSA-inoculated mice exhibited prominent astrocytic gliosis and microglial activation as well as widespread deposits of phosphorylated α-synuclein that were proteinase K sensitive, detergent insoluble, and formic acid extractable. Our results provide compelling evidence that α-synuclein aggregates formed in the brains of MSA patients are transmissible and, as such, are prions. The MSA prion represents a unique human pathogen that is lethal upon transmission to Tg mice and as such, is reminiscent of the prion causing kuru, which was transmitted to chimpanzees nearly 5 decades ago.

  1. Androgen-dependent impairment of myogenesis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malena, Adriana; Pennuto, Maria; Tezze, Caterina; Querin, Giorgia; D'Ascenzo, Carla; Silani, Vincenzo; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Scaramozza, Annarita; Romito, Silvia; Morandi, Lucia; Pegoraro, Elena; Russell, Aaron P; Sorarù, Gianni; Vergani, Lodovica

    2013-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disease caused by expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the androgen receptor (AR). SBMA is triggered by the interaction between polyQ-AR and its natural ligands, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). SBMA is characterized by the loss of lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle fasciculations, weakness, and atrophy. To test the hypothesis that the interaction between polyQ-AR and androgens exerts cell-autonomous toxicity in skeletal muscle, we characterized the process of myogenesis and polyQ-AR expression in DHT-treated satellite cells obtained from SBMA patients and age-matched healthy control subjects. Treatment with androgens increased the size and number of myonuclei in myotubes from control subjects, but not from SBMA patients. Myotubes from SBMA patients had a reduced number of nuclei, suggesting impaired myotube fusion and altered contractile structures. The lack of anabolic effects of androgens on myotubes from SBMA patients was not due to defects in myoblast proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. DHT treatment of myotubes from SBMA patients increased nuclear accumulation of polyQ-AR and decreased the expression of interleukin-4 (IL-4) when compared to myotubes from control subjects. Following DHT treatment, exposure of myotubes from SBMA patients with IL-4 treatment rescued myonuclear number and size to control levels. This supports the hypothesis that androgens alter the fusion process in SBMA myogenesis. In conclusion, these results provide evidence of an androgen-dependent impairment of myogenesis in SBMA that could contribute to disease pathogenesis.

  2. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and efficacy of a small-molecule SMN2 splicing modifier in mouse models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Feng, Zhihua; Ling, Karen K. Y.; Mollin, Anna; Sheedy, Josephine; Yeh, Shirley; Petruska, Janet; Narasimhan, Jana; Dakka, Amal; Welch, Ellen M.; Karp, Gary; Chen, Karen S.; Metzger, Friedrich; Ratni, Hasane; Lotti, Francesco; Tisdale, Sarah; Naryshkin, Nikolai A.; Pellizzoni, Livio; Paushkin, Sergey; Ko, Chien-Ping; Weetall, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is caused by the loss or mutation of both copies of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The related SMN2 gene is retained, but due to alternative splicing of exon 7, produces insufficient levels of the SMN protein. Here, we systematically characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics properties of the SMN splicing modifier SMN-C1. SMN-C1 is a low-molecular weight compound that promotes the inclusion of exon 7 and increases production of SMN protein in human cells and in two transgenic mouse models of SMA. Furthermore, increases in SMN protein levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skin correlate with those in the central nervous system (CNS), indicating that a change of these levels in blood or skin can be used as a non-invasive surrogate to monitor increases of SMN protein levels in the CNS. Consistent with restored SMN function, SMN-C1 treatment increases the levels of spliceosomal and U7 small-nuclear RNAs and corrects RNA processing defects induced by SMN deficiency in the spinal cord of SMNΔ7 SMA mice. A 100% or greater increase in SMN protein in the CNS of SMNΔ7 SMA mice robustly improves the phenotype. Importantly, a ∼50% increase in SMN leads to long-term survival, but the SMA phenotype is only partially corrected, indicating that certain SMA disease manifestations may respond to treatment at lower doses. Overall, we provide important insights for the translation of pre-clinical data to the clinic and further therapeutic development of this series of molecules for SMA treatment. PMID:26931466

  3. High-frequency chest-wall oscillation in a noninvasive-ventilation-dependent patient with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joanna M; Collins, Nicola; Bush, Andrew; Chatwin, Michelle

    2011-11-01

    With the recent increased use of noninvasive ventilation, the prognoses of children with neuromuscular disease has improved significantly. However, children with muscle weakness remain at risk for recurrent respiratory infection and atelectasis. We report the case of a young girl with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy who was dependent on noninvasive ventilation, and in whom conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy became insufficient to clear secretions. We initiated high-frequency chest-wall oscillation (HFCWO) as a rescue therapy, and she had improved self-ventilation time. This is the first case report of HFCWO for secretion clearance in a severely weak child with type 1 spinal muscular atrophy. In a patient with neuromuscular disease and severe respiratory infection and compromise, HFCWO can be used safely in combination with conventional secretion-clearance physiotherapy.

  4. Natural history of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA): a study of 223 Japanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsuta, Naoki; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Katsuno, Masahisa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Sobue, Gen

    2006-06-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset motoneuron disease caused by a CAG-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene and for which no curative therapy exists. However, since recent research may provide opportunities for medical treatment, information concerning the natural history of SBMA would be beneficial in planning future clinical trials. We investigated the natural course of SBMA as assessed by nine activities of daily living (ADL) milestones in 223 Japanese SBMA patients (mean age at data collection = 55.2 years; range = 30-87 years) followed from 1 to 20 years. All the patients were diagnosed by genetic analysis. Hand tremor was an early event that was noticed at a median age of 33 years. Muscular weakness occurred predominantly in the lower limbs, and was noticed at a median age of 44 years, followed by the requirement of a handrail to ascend stairs at 49, dysarthria at 50, dysphagia at 54, use of a cane at 59 and a wheelchair at 61 years. Twenty-one of the patients developed pneumonia at a median age of 62 and 15 of them died at a median age of 65 years. The most common cause of death in these cases was pneumonia and respiratory failure. The ages at onset of each ADL milestone were strongly correlated with the length of CAG repeats in the AR gene. However CAG-repeat length did not correlate with the time intervals between each ADL milestone, suggesting that although the onset age of each ADL milestone depends on the CAG-repeat length in the AR gene, the rate of disease progression does not. The levels of serum testosterone, an important triggering factor for polyglutamine-mediated motoneuron degeneration, were maintained at relatively high levels even at advanced ages. These results provide beneficial information for future clinical therapeutic trials, although further detailed prospective studies are also needed.

  5. A missense mutation in the 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase FVT1 as candidate causal mutation for bovine spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, Stefan; Medugorac, Ivica; Röther, Susanne; Strässer, Katja; Förster, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The bovine form of the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) shows striking similarity to the human form of the disease. It has, however, been mapped to a genomic region not harboring the bovine orthologue of the SMN gene, mutation of which causes human SMA. After refinement of the mapping results we analyzed positional and functional candidate genes. One of three candidate genes, FVT1, encoding 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, which catalyzes a crucia...

  6. Distinct domains of the spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN are required for targeting to Cajal bodies in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Khoobarry, Kevinee; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Cibert, Christian; Viollet, Louis; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2006-01-01

    Mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN1 cause the inherited disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ubiquitous SMN protein facilitates the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The protein is detected in the cytoplasm, nucleoplasm and enriched with snRNPs in nuclear Cajal bodies. It is structurally divided into at least an amino-terminal region rich in basic amino acid residues, a central Tudor domain, a self-association tyrosine-glycine-box and an ...

  7. Selective loss of alpha motor neurons with sparing of gamma motor neurons and spinal cord cholinergic neurons in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powis, Rachael A; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disease characterised primarily by loss of lower motor neurons from the ventral grey horn of the spinal cord and proximal muscle atrophy. Recent experiments utilising mouse models of SMA have demonstrated that not all motor neurons are equally susceptible to the disease, revealing that other populations of neurons can also be affected. Here, we have extended investigations of selective vulnerability of neuronal populations in the spinal cord of SMA mice to include comparative assessments of alpha motor neuron (α-MN) and gamma motor neuron (γ-MN) pools, as well as other populations of cholinergic neurons. Immunohistochemical analyses of late-symptomatic SMA mouse spinal cord revealed that numbers of α-MNs were significantly reduced at all levels of the spinal cord compared with controls, whereas numbers of γ-MNs remained stable. Likewise, the average size of α-MN cell somata was decreased in SMA mice with no change occurring in γ-MNs. Evaluation of other pools of spinal cord cholinergic neurons revealed that pre-ganglionic sympathetic neurons, central canal cluster interneurons, partition interneurons and preganglionic autonomic dorsal commissural nucleus neuron numbers all remained unaffected in SMA mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that α-MNs are uniquely vulnerable among cholinergic neuron populations in the SMA mouse spinal cord, with γ-MNs and other cholinergic neuronal populations being largely spared.

  8. An Ashkenazi Jewish SMN1 haplotype specific to duplication alleles improves pan-ethnic carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Minjie; Liu, Liu; Peter, Inga; Zhu, Jun; Scott, Stuart A; Zhao, Geping; Eversley, Chevonne; Kornreich, Ruth; Desnick, Robert J; Edelmann, Lisa

    2014-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is a common autosomal-recessive disorder caused by mutations of the SMN1 gene. Spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening uses dosage-sensitive methods that determine SMN1 copy number, and the frequency of carriers varies by ethnicity, with detection rates ranging from 71 to 94% due to the inability to identify silent (2 + 0) carriers with two copies of SMN1 on one chromosome 5 and deletion on the other. We hypothesized that identification of deletion and/or duplication founder alleles might provide an approach to identify silent carriers in various ethnic groups. SMN1 founder alleles were investigated in the Ashkenazi Jewish population by microsatellite analysis and next-generation sequencing. An extended haplotype block, specific to Ashkenazi Jewish SMN1 duplications, was identified by microsatellite analysis, and next-generation sequencing of SMN1 further defined a more localized haplotype. Of note, six novel SMN1 sequence variants were identified that were specific to duplications and not present on single-copy alleles. The haplotype was also identified on SMN1 duplication alleles in additional ethnic groups. Identification of these novel variants in an individual with two copies of SMN1 significantly improves the accuracy of residual risk estimates and has important implications for spinal muscular atrophy carrier screening.

  9. Clinical and molecular analysis of spinal muscular atrophy in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, the second most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder, has an incidence of 1:10,000 newborns. SMA is divided into acute (Werdnig-Hoffmann disease, type I, intermediate (type II and juvenile forms (Kugelberg-Welander disease, type III. The gene of all three forms of SMA maps to chromosome 5q 11.2-13.3. Two candidate genes, the survival motor neuron (SMN gene and the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP gene, have been identified; SMN is deleted in most SMA patients. We studied both genes in 87 Brazilian SMA patients (20 type I, 14 type II and 53 type III from 74 unrelated families, by using PCR and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP. Deletions of exons 7 and/or 8 of the SMN gene were found in 69% of the families: 16/20 in type I, 9/12 in type II and 26/42 in type III. Among 51 families with deletions, 44 had both exons deleted while seven had deletions only of exon 7. Deletions of exon 5 of the NAIP gene were found in 7/20 of type I, 2/12 of type II and 1/42 of type III patients. No deletion of SMN and NAIP genes was found in 112 parents, 26 unaffected sibs and 104 normal controls. No correlation between deletions of one or both genes and phenotype severity was found.

  10. Revised Hammersmith Scale for spinal muscular atrophy: A SMA specific clinical outcome assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Danielle; Scoto, Mariacristina; Mayhew, Anna; Main, Marion; Mazzone, Elena S; Montes, Jacqueline; de Sanctis, Roberto; Dunaway Young, Sally; Salazar, Rachel; Glanzman, Allan M; Pasternak, Amy; Quigley, Janet; Mirek, Elizabeth; Duong, Tina; Gee, Richard; Civitello, Matthew; Tennekoon, Gihan; Pane, Marika; Pera, Maria Carmela; Bushby, Kate; Day, John; Darras, Basil T; De Vivo, Darryl; Finkel, Richard; Mercuri, Eugenio; Muntoni, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Recent translational research developments in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), outcome measure design and demands from regulatory authorities require that clinical outcome assessments are 'fit for purpose'. An international collaboration (SMA REACH UK, Italian SMA Network and PNCRN USA) undertook an iterative process to address discontinuity in the recorded performance of the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded and developed a revised functional scale using Rasch analysis, traditional psychometric techniques and the application of clinical sensibility via expert panels. Specifically, we intended to develop a psychometrically and clinically robust functional clinician rated outcome measure to assess physical abilities in weak SMA type 2 through to strong ambulant SMA type 3 patients. The final scale, the Revised Hammersmith Scale (RHS) for SMA, consisting of 36 items and two timed tests, was piloted in 138 patients with type 2 and 3 SMA in an observational cross-sectional multi-centre study across the three national networks. Rasch analysis demonstrated very good fit of all 36 items to the construct of motor performance, good reliability with a high Person Separation Index PSI 0.98, logical and hierarchical scoring in 27/36 items and excellent targeting with minimal ceiling. The RHS differentiated between clinically different groups: SMA type, World Health Organisation (WHO) categories, ambulatory status, and SMA type combined with ambulatory status (all p SMA. Further longitudinal testing of the scale with regards change in scores over 6 and 12 months are required prior to its adoption in clinical trials.

  11. Juvenile-onset spinal muscular atrophy caused by compound heterozygosity for mutations in the HEXA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon, R; Khosravi, R; Melki, J; Drucker, L; Fontaine, B; Turpin, J C; N'Guyen, B; Fardeau, M; Rondot, P; Baumann, N

    1997-05-01

    Progressive proximal muscle weakness is present both in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease) and in GM2 gangliosidosis, diseases that segregate in an autosomal recessive fashion. The SMN gene for SMA and the HEXA gene for GM2 gangliosidosis were investigated in a woman with progressive proximal muscle weakness, long believed to be SMA type III (Kugelberg-Welander type). She and her family underwent biochemical studies for GM2 gangliosidosis. Analysis of SMN excluded SMA. Biochemical studies on GM2 gangliosidosis showed deficiency in hexosaminidase A activity and increased GM2 ganglioside accumulation in the patient's fibroblasts. The HEXA gene was first analyzed for the Gly269-->Ser mutation characteristic for adult GM2 gangliosidosis. Since the patient was carrying the adult mutation heterozygously, all 14 exons and adjacent intron sequences were analyzed. A novel mutation in exon 1 resulting in an A-to-T change in the initiation codon (ATG to TTG) was identified. The adult patient is a compound heterozygote, with each allele containing a different mutation. Although mRNA was transcribed from the novel mutant allele, expression experiments showed no enzyme activity, suggesting that neither the TTG nor an alternative codon serve as an initiation codon in the HEXA gene.

  12. ISS-N1 makes the First FDA-approved Drug for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottesen, Eric W

    2017-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the leading genetic diseases of children and infants. SMA is caused by deletions or mutations of Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1, cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 due to predominant skipping of exon 7. While various regulatory elements that modulate SMN2 exon 7 splicing have been proposed, intronic splicing silencer N1 (ISS-N1) has emerged as the most promising target thus far for antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing correction in SMA. Upon procuring exclusive license from the University of Massachussets Medical School in 2010, Ionis Pharmaceuticals (formerly ISIS Pharamaceuticals) began clinical development of Spinraza(™) (synonyms: Nusinersen, IONIS-SMNRX, ISIS-SMNRX), an antisense drug based on ISS-N1 target. Spinraza(™) showed very promising results at all steps of the clinical development and was approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on December 23, 2016. Spinraza(™) is the first FDA-approved treatment for SMA and the first antisense drug to restore expression of a fully functional protein via splicing correction. The success of Spinraza(™) underscores the potential of intronic sequences as promising therapeutic targets and sets the stage for further improvement of antisense drugs based on advanced oligonucleotide chemistries and delivery protocols.

  13. Cardiac function in types II and III spinal muscular atrophy: should we change standards of care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Flaviana; Pane, Marika; D'Amico, Adele; Messina, Sonia; Delogu, Angelica Bibiana; Soraru, Gianni; Pera, Maria Carmela; Mongini, Tiziana; Politano, Luisa; Baranello, Giovanni; Vita, Gianluca; Tiziano, Francesco Danilo; Morandi, Lucia; Bertini, Enrico; Mercuri, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    In the last years, there has been increasing evidence of cardiac involvement in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Autonomic dysfunction has been reported in animal models and in several patients with types I and III SMA, these findings raising the question whether heart rate should be routinely investigated in all SMA patients. The aim of our study was to detect possible signs of autonomic dysfunction and, more generally, of cardiac involvement in types II and III SMA. We retrospectively reviewed 24-hour electrocardiography (ECG) in 157 types II and III SMA patients (age range, 2-74 years). Of them, 82 also had echocardiography. None of the patients had signs of bradycardia, atrial fibrillation, or the other previously reported rhythm disturbances regardless of the age at examination or the type of SMA. Echocardiography was also normal. There were no signs of congenital cardiac defects with the exception of one patient with a history of ventricular septal defects. Our results suggest that cardiac abnormalities are not common in type II and type III SMA. These findings provide no evidence to support a more accurate cardiac surveillance or changes in the existing standards of care. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. A Short Antisense Oligonucleotide Ameliorates Symptoms of Severe Mouse Models of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Keil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports underscore the unparalleled potential of antisense-oligonucleotide (ASO-based approaches to ameliorate various pathological conditions. However, in vivo studies validating the effectiveness of a short ASO (<10-mer in the context of a human disease have not been performed. One disease with proven amenability to ASO-based therapy is spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. SMA is a neuromuscular disease caused by loss-of-function mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene. Correction of aberrant splicing of the remaining paralog, SMN2, can rescue mouse models of SMA. Here, we report the therapeutic efficacy of an 8-mer ASO (3UP8i in two severe models of SMA. While 3UP8i modestly improved survival and function in the more severe Taiwanese SMA model, it dramatically increased survival, improved neuromuscular junction pathology, and tempered cardiac deficits in a new, less severe model of SMA. Our results expand the repertoire of ASO-based compounds for SMA therapy, and for the first time, demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of a short ASO in the context of a human disease.

  15. Cardiac defects contribute to the pathology of spinal muscular atrophy models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shababi, Monir; Habibi, Javad; Yang, Hsiao T; Vale, Spencer M; Sewell, Will A; Lorson, Christian L

    2010-10-15

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder, which is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. SMA is the most common inherited motor neuron disease and occurs in approximately 1:6000 live births. The gene responsible for SMA is called Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). Interestingly, a human-specific copy gene is present on the same region of chromosome 5q, called SMN2. Motor neurons are the primary tissue affected in SMA. Although it is clear that SMA is a neurodegenerative disease, there are clinical reports that suggest that other tissues contribute to the overall phenotype, especially in the most severe forms of the disease. In severe SMA cases, a growing number of congenital heart defects have been identified upon autopsy. The most common defect is a developmental defect referred to as hypoplastic left heart. The purpose of this report is to determine whether cardiac tissue is altered in SMA models and whether this could contribute to SMA pathogenesis. Here we identified early-stage developmental defects in a severe model of SMA. Additionally, pathological responses including fibrosis and oxidative stress markers were observed shortly after birth in a less severe model of disease. Similarly, functional differences were detected between wild-type and early-stage SMA animals. Collectively, this work demonstrates the importance of cardiac development and function in these severe models of SMA.

  16. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W; Breedlove, S Marc; Jordan, Cynthia L

    2015-04-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics.

  17. Is spinal muscular atrophy a disease of the motor neurons only: pathogenesis and therapeutic implications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Chiara; Ramirez, Agnese; Bucchia, Monica; Rinchetti, Paola; Rideout, Hardy; Papadimitriou, Dimitra; Re, Diane B; Corti, Stefania

    2016-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neurological disease that causes infant mortality; no effective therapies are currently available. SMA is due to homozygous mutations and/or deletions in the survival motor neuron 1 gene and subsequent reduction of the SMN protein, leading to the death of motor neurons. However, there is increasing evidence that in addition to motor neurons, other cell types are contributing to SMA pathology. In this review, we will discuss the involvement of non-motor neuronal cells, located both inside and outside the central nervous system, in disease onset and progression. Even if SMN restoration in motor neurons is needed, it has been shown that optimal phenotypic amelioration in animal models of SMA requires a more widespread SMN correction. It has been demonstrated that non-motor neuronal cells are also involved in disease pathogenesis and could have important therapeutic implications. For these reasons it will be crucial to take this evidence into account for the clinical translation of the novel therapeutic approaches.

  18. Improved single-cell protocol for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlet, Philippe; Frydman, Nelly; Gigarel, Nadine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Kerbrat, Violaine; Tachdjian, Gérard; Frydman, René; Munnich, Arnold; Steffann, Julie; Ray, Pierre F

    2005-09-01

    To develop and validate a simple and reliable single-cell analysis protocol for the preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Molecular tests based on specific enzymatic digestion have already been described for SMA diagnosis. We modified the amplified DNA fragments so as to introduce a novel restriction site that provides an internal control for the completeness of the digestion. The genetics and reproduction departments of two teaching hospitals. Six informed couples at risk of transmitting SMA. All patients underwent standard procedures associated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Improvement of SMA diagnostic efficiency and accuracy on single cell. One hundred fifty lymphocytes were analyzed with our protocol. One hundred percent diagnostic accuracy was achieved from both homozygous normal and SMN1-deleted leukocytes. Successful molecular analysis was achieved for 36 of 42 biopsied embryos (86%). Twenty-five normal embryos were transferred, but no pregnancy was achieved. We developed an improved protocol for PGD of SMA that is simple, robust, and accurate; unfortunately, no pregnancies were achieved for any of the six patients who have undergone PGD in the program thus far.

  19. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging in spinal muscular atrophy type 3: Selective and progressive involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmus, Hacer; Yilmaz, Ravza; Gulsen-Parman, Yesim; Oflazer-Serdaroglu, Piraye; Cuttini, Marina; Dursun, Memduh; Deymeer, Feza

    2017-05-01

    In this study we sought to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of selective muscle involvement and disease progression in patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 3b (SMA3b). Twenty-five patients with genetically confirmed SMA3b underwent MRI on a 1.5-Tesla MR scanner. MRI showed significantly more severe involvement of the iliopsoas than of the gluteus maximus muscles, and more severe involvement of the triceps brachii than of the biceps brachii muscles. The quadriceps femoris muscles were severely involved. The deltoid, adductor longus, portions of the hamstrings, gracilis, sartorius, and rectus abdominis muscles were well preserved. We found a significant positive correlation between MRI changes and disease duration for gluteus maximus and triceps brachii. Follow-up MRIs of 4 patients showed disease progression. This study confirms the pattern of selective muscle involvement suggested by previous studies and further refines muscle MRI changes in SMA3b. Progressive muscle involvement is implicated. Muscle Nerve 55: 651-656, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Contractile dysfunction in muscle may underlie androgen-dependent motor dysfunction in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oki, Kentaro; Halievski, Katherine; Vicente, Laura; Xu, Youfen; Zeolla, Donald; Poort, Jessica; Katsuno, Masahisa; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Wiseman, Robert W.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is characterized by progressive muscle weakness linked to a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR). Current evidence indicates that mutant AR causes SBMA by acting in muscle to perturb its function. However, information about how muscle function is impaired is scant. One fundamental question is whether the intrinsic strength of muscles, an attribute of muscle independent of its mass, is affected. In the current study, we assess the contractile properties of hindlimb muscles in vitro from chronically diseased males of three different SBMA mouse models: a transgenic (Tg) model that broadly expresses a full-length human AR with 97 CAGs (97Q), a knock-in (KI) model that expresses a humanized AR containing a CAG expansion in the first exon, and a Tg myogenic model that overexpresses wild-type AR only in skeletal muscle fibers. We found that hindlimb muscles in the two Tg models (97Q and myogenic) showed marked losses in their intrinsic strength and resistance to fatigue, but were minimally affected in KI males. However, diseased muscles of all three models showed symptoms consistent with myotonic dystrophy type 1, namely, reduced resting membrane potential and deficits in chloride channel mRNA. These data indicate that muscle dysfunction is a core feature of SBMA caused by at least some of the same pathogenic mechanisms as myotonic dystrophy. Thus mechanisms controlling muscle function per se independent of mass are prime targets for SBMA therapeutics. PMID:25663674

  1. Performance of the timed "up & go" test in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Sally; Montes, Jacqueline; Garber, Carol Ewing; Carr, Brendan; Kramer, Samantha S; Kamil-Rosenberg, Shirit; Strauss, Nancy; Sproule, Douglas; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2014-08-01

    The timed "up & go" (TUG) test is a quick measure of balance and mobility. TUG scores correlate with clinical, functional, and strength assessment and decline linearly over time. Reliability and validity have not been tested in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Fifteen ambulatory SMA participants performed TUG testing and strength, functional, and clinical assessments. Intraclass correlation coefficients quantified test-retest reliability. Convergent validity was determined using Pearson correlation coefficients. Test-retest reliability was excellent for all participants. TUG was associated significantly with total leg and knee flexor strength, as well as the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded, the 10-meter walk/run, and 6-minute walk tests. TUG findings were not associated with knee extensor strength, pulmonary function, or fatigue. In SMA, the TUG test is easily administered, reliable, and correlates with established outcome measures. TUG testing is a potentially useful outcome measure for clinical trials and a measure of disability in ambulatory patients with SMA. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Minor cognitive disturbances in X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Kennedy's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Elisabeth; Wegrzyn, Martin; Marx, Ivo; Korp, Christin; Kress, Wolfram; Benecke, Reiner; Teipel, Stefan J; Prudlo, Johannes

    2014-03-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset hereditary neurodegenerative disorder, associated predominantly with a lower motor neuron syndrome and eventually endocrine and sensory disturbances. In contrast to other motor neuron diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the impairment of cognition in SBMA is not well documented. We conducted a systematic cross-sectional neuropsychological study in order to investigate cognition in SBMA patients more thoroughly. We investigated 20 genetically proven SBMA patients compared to 20 age- and education-matched control subjects using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery, measuring executive functioning, attention, memory and visuospatial abilities. The SBMA patients performed significantly worse than healthy controls in three sub-tests in the executive and attention domains. This low performance was in the working memory (digit span backward task), verbal fluency category (single letter fluency task) and memory storage capacity (digit span forward task). No disturbances were detected in other cognitive domains. The impairments were subclinical and not relevant to the patients' everyday functioning. In addition, no correlations were found between cognitive scores and the CAG repeat length. In conclusion, we found minor cognitive disturbances in patients with SBMA, which could indicate subtle frontal lobe dysfunction. These findings extend our neurobiological understanding of SBMA.

  3. Convenient diagnosis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy using a microchip electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Hirofumi; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Noda, Kouichi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2013-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a slowly progressive motor neuron disease. Lower and primary sensory neuronopathy is one of the major neuropathological changes that occurs in SBMA. However, many sings are common to SBMA and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and SBMA patients are sometimes diagnosed with ALS. Leuprorelin may be used to treat SBMA, but an accurate diagnosis is necessary for treatment and care. Genetic diagnosis can be performed to detect the expansion of a CAG repeat in the androgen receptor gene in SBMA patients. To screen for this expansion, we used a microchip electrophoresis system. The discrepancy between the actual repeat length and that found by the microchip electrophoresis system was roughly dependent on the repeat length. The mean difference was -6.8 base pairs (bp) in SBMA patients, -0.30 bp in controls. The microchip electrophoresis results were approximately 2 CAG repeats shorter than the actual repeat length in SBMA patients. Using this method, we screened our ALS samples (31 were familial, 271 were sporadic): 4 subjects were diagnosed with SBMA; 2 had familial ALS, and 2 had sporadic ALS (0.7%). The microchip electrophoresis system is semi-quantitative, convenient and useful for screening a large number of samples.

  4. Founder effect in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A; Udd, B; Juvonen, V; Andersen, P M; Cederquist, K; Ronnevi, L O; Sistonen, P; Sörensen, S A; Tranebjaerg, L; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Savontaus, M L

    2000-08-01

    We haplotyped 13 Finnish, 10 Swedish, 12 Danish and 2 Norwegian SBMA (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, Kennedy disease) families with a total of 45 patients and 7 carriers for 17 microsatellite markers spanning a 25.2 cM region around the androgen receptor gene on chromosome Xq11-q12 in search of a genetic founder effect. In addition, the haplotypes of 50 Finnish, 20 Danish and 22 Swedish control males were examined. All the Scandinavian SBMA families shared the same 18 repeat allele for the intragenic GGC repeat, which was present in only 24% of the controls. Linkage disequilibrium was also seen for the closest microsatellite markers. In addition, extended haplotypes of the Finnish, Swedish and Danish SBMA families revealed country-specific common founder haplotypes, which over time became gradually shortened by recombinations. No common haplotype was found among the controls. The data suggest that the SBMA mutation was introduced into western Finland 20 generations ago. Haplotype analysis implies a common ancestor for the majority of Scandinavian SBMA patients.

  5. Multiple founder effects in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, Kennedy disease) around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, A; Udd, B; Juvonen, V; Andersen, P M; Cederquist, K; Davis, M; Gellera, C; Kölmel, C; Ronnevi, L O; Sperfeld, A D; Sörensen, S A; Tranebjaerg, L; Van Maldergem, L; Watanabe, M; Weber, M; Yeung, L; Savontaus, M L

    2001-06-01

    SBMA (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy), also called Kennedy disease, is an X-chromosomal recessive adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder caused by death of the spinal and bulbar motor neurones and dorsal root ganglia. Patients may also show signs of partial androgen insensitivity. SBMA is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene on the X-chromosome. Our previous study suggested that all the Nordic patients with SBMA originated from an ancient Nordic founder mutation, but the new intragenic SNP marker ARd12 revealed that the Danish patients derive their disease chromosome from another ancestor. In search of relationships between patients from different countries, we haplotyped altogether 123 SBMA families from different parts of the world for two intragenic markers and 16 microsatellites spanning 25 cM around the AR gene. The fact that different SBMA founder haplotypes were found in patients from around the world implies that the CAG repeat expansion mutation has not been a unique event. No expansion-prone haplotype could be detected. Trinucleotide diseases often show correlation between the repeat length and the severity and earlier onset of the disease. The longer the repeat, the more severe the symptoms are and the onset of the disease is earlier. A negative correlation between the CAG repeat length and the age of onset was found in the 95 SBMA patients with defined ages at onset.

  6. [Clinical features of a genetically identified spinal and 
bulbar muscular atrophy pedigree].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Chen, Qihua; Li, Qiuxiang; Bi, Fangfang

    2016-10-28

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare X-linked motor neuron disease with significant phenotypic viability. Here, we present a genetically identified SBMA family without bulbar paralysis or androgen insensitivity. All four male patients presented with progressive lower motor neuron paralysis in all limbs, with distal extremities more dominant. None of them had bulbar palsy or androgen insensitivity. A consistently mild elevated blood creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels were detected in all patients and the EMG showed a chronic neurogenic damage. Muscle biopsy of propositus indicated a typical neurogenic amyotrophy. Genetic testing for SMA of mutation in SMN1 was negative, while for SBMA of androgen receptor showed the increased CAG repeat in exon 1, suggesting that although bulbar symptoms and androgen insensitivity are characteristic symptoms of SBMA, they are not obligatory for the diagnosis. In adult males with a chronic motor neuron syndrome without upper motor neuron signs, even in absence of the classical features of androgen insensitivity or bulbar findings, genetic testing for SBMA should be strongly considered.

  7. Early heart failure in the SMNDelta7 model of spinal muscular atrophy and correction by postnatal scAAV9-SMN delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Adam K; Hutchinson, Kirk R; Foust, Kevin D; Braun, Lyndsey; McGovern, Vicki L; Schmelzer, Leah; Ward, Jennifer G; Petruska, Jeffrey C; Lucchesi, Pamela A; Burghes, Arthur H M; Kaspar, Brian K

    2010-10-15

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a debilitating neurological disease marked by isolated lower motor neuron death and subsequent atrophy of skeletal muscle. Historically, SMA pathology was thought to be limited to lower motor neurons and the skeletal muscles they control, yet there are several reports describing the coincidence of cardiovascular abnormalities in SMA patients. As new therapies for SMA emerge, it is necessary to determine whether these non-neuromuscular systems need to be targeted. Therefore, we have characterized left ventricular (LV) function of SMA mice (SMN2+/+; SMNΔ7+/+; Smn-/-) and compared it with that of their unaffected littermates at 7 and 14 days of age. Anatomical and physiological measurements made by electrocardiogram and echocardiography show that affected mouse pups have a dramatic decrease in cardiac function. At 14 days of age, SMA mice have bradycardia and develop a marked dilated cardiomyopathy with a concomitant decrease in contractility. Signs of decreased cardiac function are also apparent as early as 7 days of age in SMA animals. Delivery of a survival motor neuron-1 transgene using a self-complementary adeno-associated virus serotype 9 abolished the symptom of bradycardia and significantly decreased the severity of the heart defect. We conclude that severe SMA animals have compromised cardiac function resulting at least partially from early bradycardia, which is likely attributable to aberrant autonomic signaling. Further cardiographic studies of human SMA patients are needed to clarify the clinical relevance of these findings from this SMA mouse.

  8. Altered Levels of MicroRNA-9, -206, and -132 in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Their Response to Antisense Oligonucleotide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Francesco; Zaharieva, Irina; Scoto, Mariacristina; Marrosu, Elena; Morgan, Jennifer; Muntoni, Francesco; Zhou, Haiyan

    2016-07-05

    The identification of noninvasive biomarkers to monitor the disease progression in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is becoming increasingly important. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression and are implicated in the pathogenesis of neuromuscular diseases, including motor neuron degeneration. In this study, we selectively characterized the expression of miR-9, miR-206, and miR-132 in spinal cord, skeletal muscle, and serum from SMA transgenic mice, and in serum from SMA patients. A systematic analysis of miRNA expression was conducted in SMA mice with different disease severities (severe type I-like and mild type III-like) at different disease stages (pre-, mid-, and late-symptomatic stages), and in morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-treated mice. There was differential expression of all three miRNAs in spinal cord, skeletal muscle and serum samples in SMA mice. Serum miRNAs were altered prior to the changes in spinal cord and skeletal muscle at the presymptomatic stage. The altered miR-132 levels in spinal cord, muscle, and serum transiently reversed to normal level after a single-dose morpholino antisense oligomer PMO25 treatment in SMA mice. We also confirmed a significant alteration of miR-9 and miR-132 level in serum samples from SMA patients. Our study indicates the potential of developing miRNAs as noninvasive biomarkers in SMA.

  9. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit gene and spinal muscular atrophy disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica STAVARACHI

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a frequent neuromuscular disorder caused by motoneuronal apoptosis, as a result of SMN (Survival Motor Neuron protein deficiency. Although the SMA determining gene was identified, the molecular mechanism of the disease is not clearly understood, due to the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations. Trying to complete the molecular describing SMA picture, by identifying potential modulators factors, we investigated the relationship between phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase p85 regulatory subunit gene (PIK3R1 and SMA pathology. As IGF signaling pathway has been reported to play an important role in motoneurons survival and PIK3 is a key element of this cascade signaling, we focused on the relationship between PIK3R1 gene Met326Ile polymorphism and SMA type I, the most severe form of the disease. A total of 80 subjects (40 SMA type I patients and 40 unrelated healthy controls were included in the study. The statistical analyzes performed consequently to the genotyping by mismatch PCR-RFLP method, revealed that Met326Ile polymorphism is not associated with SMA type I disease: ORMet/Met = 0.398 with a p = 0.072 meanwhile ORMet = 0.495, p = 0.063. However, the Cochrane – Armitage test indicated that there is a statistically association trend between the analyzed polymorphism and SMA type I pathology: ORMet = 0.438, p = 0.032. We concluded that additional researches with an increased subjects number and replicates studies in other populations will clarify the investigated relationship and it may contribute to the SMA molecular mechanism understanding.

  10. Compound heterozygous mutation in two unrelated cases of Chinese spinal muscular atrophy patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Yu-jin; SONG Fang; YANG Yan-ling; JIN Yu-wei; BAI Jin-li

    2011-01-01

    Background Infantile proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder. Approximately 90-95% cases of SMA result from homozygous deletion of survival motor neuron gene 1(SMN1) and 5% cases are caused by compound heterozygous mutation (a SMN1 deletion on one allele and a subtle mutation on the other allele).Methods In this research, two unrelated patients were clinically diagnosed according to the criteria of proximal SMA. Genetic diagnosis was performed to detect the homozygous deletion of exon 7 of SMN1 by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and genomic sequencing. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis was carried out to measure copy numbers of SMN1, SMN2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein (NAIP) in the patients. Further sequencing of SMN1allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) and SMN1 clones were also performed to analyze the point mutation of SMN1 gene. Additionally,the pedigree analysis of these two families was carried out to identify the transmission of the mutation.Results The inconsistent results using PCR-RFLP and genomic sequencing showed homozygous deletion of exon 7 of SMN1 and heterozygous deletion accompanied with a suspicious mutation in SMN1 gene, respectively. MLPA analysis of these two cases exhibited one SMN1 copy deletion. One identical c.863G>T (p. Arg288Met) mutation was found in two cases by sequencing the SMN1 clones, which confirmed that both cases were SMA compound heterozygotes. One case showed partial conversion to form hybrid SMN (SMN2 17/SMN1 E8) identified by clones sequencing and another case carrying 3 SMN2 implied complete conversion from SMN1 to SMN2.Conclusion p. Arg288Met is more a disease-causing mutation than a polymorphism variation, and children with this mutation may have more severe phenotypes.

  11. SMA-MAP: a plasma protein panel for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Dione T; Shi, Jing; Stephen, Laurie; Ballard, Karri L; Dewey, Ruth; Mapes, James; Chung, Brett; McCarthy, Kathleen; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Crawford, Thomas O; Li, Rebecca; Plasterer, Thomas; Joyce, Cynthia; Chung, Wendy K; Kaufmann, Petra; Darras, Basil T; Finkel, Richard S; Sproule, Douglas M; Martens, William B; McDermott, Michael P; De Vivo, Darryl C; Walker, Michael G; Chen, Karen S

    2013-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) presents challenges in (i) monitoring disease activity and predicting progression, (ii) designing trials that allow rapid assessment of candidate therapies, and (iii) understanding molecular causes and consequences of the disease. Validated biomarkers of SMA motor and non-motor function would offer utility in addressing these challenges. Our objectives were (i) to discover additional markers from the Biomarkers for SMA (BforSMA) study using an immunoassay platform, and (ii) to validate the putative biomarkers in an independent cohort of SMA patients collected from a multi-site natural history study (NHS). BforSMA study plasma samples (N = 129) were analyzed by immunoassay to identify new analytes correlating to SMA motor function. These immunoassays included the strongest candidate biomarkers identified previously by chromatography. We selected 35 biomarkers to validate in an independent cohort SMA type 1, 2, and 3 samples (N = 158) from an SMA NHS. The putative biomarkers were tested for association to multiple motor scales and to pulmonary function, neurophysiology, strength, and quality of life measures. We implemented a Tobit model to predict SMA motor function scores. 12 of the 35 putative SMA biomarkers were significantly associated (pSMA outcome measures. From these 35 biomarkers, 27 analytes were selected for inclusion in a commercial panel (SMA-MAP) for association with motor and other functional measures. Discovery and validation using independent cohorts yielded a set of SMA biomarkers significantly associated with motor function and other measures of SMA disease activity. A commercial SMA-MAP biomarker panel was generated for further testing in other SMA collections and interventional trials. Future work includes evaluating the panel in other neuromuscular diseases, for pharmacodynamic responsiveness to experimental SMA therapies, and for predicting functional changes over time in SMA patients.

  12. Targeting SR proteins improves SMN expression in spinal muscular atrophy cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claribel D Wee

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is one of the most common inherited causes of pediatric mortality. SMA is caused by deletions or mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, which results in SMN protein deficiency. Humans have a centromeric copy of the survival of motor neuron gene, SMN2, which is nearly identical to SMN1. However, SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 because SMN2 has a single-nucleotide difference in exon 7, which negatively affects splicing of the exon. As a result, most mRNA produced from SMN2 lacks exon 7. SMN2 mRNA lacking exon 7 encodes a truncated protein with reduced functionality. Improving SMN2 exon 7 inclusion is a goal of many SMA therapeutic strategies. The identification of regulators of exon 7 inclusion may provide additional therapeutic targets or improve the design of existing strategies. Although a number of regulators of exon 7 inclusion have been identified, the function of most splicing proteins in exon 7 inclusion is unknown. Here, we test the role of SR proteins and hnRNP proteins in SMN2 exon 7 inclusion. Knockdown and overexpression studies reveal that SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF3, SRSF4, SRSF5, SRSF6, SRSF7, SRSF11, hnRNPA1/B1 and hnRNP U can inhibit exon 7 inclusion. Depletion of two of the most potent inhibitors of exon 7 inclusion, SRSF2 or SRSF3, in cell lines derived from SMA patients, increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion and SMN protein. Our results identify novel regulators of SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, revealing potential targets for SMA therapeutics.

  13. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Chong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1 gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  14. Responsiveness of the motor function measure in patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerot, Carole; Payan, Christine; Iwaz, Jean; Ecochard, René; Bérard, Carole

    2013-08-01

    To assess the ability of the Motor Function Measure (MFM) to detect changes in the progression of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Observational, retrospective, multicenter cohort study. Seventeen departments of pediatric physical medicine. Volunteer patients with SMA (N=112) aged 5.7 to 59 years with no treatment other than physical therapy and nutritional or respiratory assistance. Not applicable. The distributions of the MFM scores (total score and 3 subscores) were analyzed per SMA subtype. The relationships between scores and age were studied. The slopes of score changes (reflecting MFM responsiveness) were estimated in patients with at least 6 months' follow-up and 2 MFMs. Hypothetical sample sizes for specific effect sizes in clinical trial scenarios are given. In 12 patients with SMA type 2 and 19 with SMA type 3 (mean ± SD follow-up, 25.8 ± 19mo), there was a moderate inverse relationship between age and the MFM total score. Patients with less than 6 months' follow-up showed little score changes. Patients with longer follow-ups showed a slow deterioration (-0.9 points/y for type 2 and -0.6 points/y for type 3). Substantial responsiveness was obtained with the MFM Dimension 2 subscore (proximal and axial motricity) in patients with SMA type 2 (standardized response mean [SRM]=1.29), and with the MFM Dimension 1 subscore (standing and transfers) in patients with SMA type 3 aged 10 to 15 years (SRM=.94). If further confirmed by larger studies, these preliminary results on the relative responsiveness of the MFM in SMA will foster its use in monitoring disease progression in patients who participate in clinical trials. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology as early pathological changes in human models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chong-Chong; Denton, Kyle R; Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), characterized by specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons, is caused by mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1, telomeric (SMN1) gene and subsequent decreased levels of functional SMN. How the deficiency of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein, leads to spinal motor neuron-specific degeneration in individuals affected by SMA remains unknown. In this study, we examined the role of SMN in mitochondrial axonal transport and morphology in human motor neurons by generating SMA type 1 patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and differentiating these cells into spinal motor neurons. The initial specification of spinal motor neurons was not affected, but these SMA spinal motor neurons specifically degenerated following long-term culture. Moreover, at an early stage in SMA spinal motor neurons, but not in SMA forebrain neurons, the number of mitochondria, mitochondrial area and mitochondrial transport were significantly reduced in axons. Knocking down of SMN expression led to similar mitochondrial defects in spinal motor neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells, confirming that SMN deficiency results in impaired mitochondrial dynamics. Finally, the application of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) mitigated the impairment in mitochondrial transport and morphology and rescued motor neuron degeneration in SMA long-term cultures. Furthermore, NAC ameliorated the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential in SMA spinal motor neurons, suggesting that NAC might rescue apoptosis and motor neuron degeneration by improving mitochondrial health. Overall, our data demonstrate that SMN deficiency results in abnormal mitochondrial transport and morphology and a subsequent reduction in mitochondrial health, which are implicated in the specific degeneration of spinal motor neurons in SMA.

  16. [Ethical attitudes of intensive care paediatricians as regards patients with spinal muscular atrophy type 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Tuñas, María Carmen; Hernández Rastrollo, Ramón; Hernández González, Arturo; Ramil Fraga, Carmen; Cambra Lasaosa, Francisco José; Quintero Otero, Sebastián; Ruiz Extremera, Angela; Rodríguez Núñez, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1) is a progressive and fatal disease that leads to ethical problems for Paediatric professionals. Our objective was to determine the ethical options of Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) paediatricians as regards a child with SMA-1 and respiratory failure. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using an anonymous questionnaire sent to PICUs in Spain (which can be accessed through the Spanish Society of Paediatric Critical Care web page). Of the 124 responses analysed, 70% were from women, 51% younger than 40 years, 54% from a PICU with more than 10 beds, 69% with prior experience in such cases, and 53% with religious beliefs. In the last patient cared for, most paediatricians opted for non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) and limitation of therapeutic effort (LET) in case of NIV failure. Confronted with a future hypothetical case, half of paediatricians would opt for the same plan (NIV+LET), and 74% would support the family's decision, even in case of disagreement. Age, prior experience and sex were not related to the preferred options. Paediatricians with religious beliefs were less in favour of initial LET. Less than two-thirds (63%) scored the quality of life of a child with SMA-1 and invasive mechanical ventilation as very poor. Faced with child with SMA-1 and respiratory failure, most paediatricians are in favour of initiating NIV and LET when such support is insufficient, but they would accept the family's decision, even in case of disagreement. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Spinal muscular atrophy and respiratory failure. How do primary care pediatricians act in a simulated scenario?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agra Tuñas, M C; Sánchez Santos, L; Busto Cuiñas, M; Rodríguez Núñez, A

    2015-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy type 1 (SMA-1) tends to be fatal in the first year of life if there is no ventilatory support. The decision whether to start such support is an ethical conflict for healthcare professionals. A scenario of acute respiratory failure in an infant with SMA-1 has been included in a training program using advanced simulation for Primary Care pediatricians (PCP). The performances of 34 groups of 4 pediatricians, who participated in 17 courses, were systematically analyzed. Clinical, ethical and communication aspects with parents were evaluated. The initial technical assistance (Administration of oxygen and immediate ventilatory support) was correctly performed by 94% of the teams. However, the PCP had problems in dealing with the ethical aspects of the case. Of the 85% of the teams that raised the ethical conflict with parents, 29% did so on their own initiative, 23% actively excluded them, and only 6% involved them and took their opinion into account in making decisions. Only 11.7% asked about the quality of life of children and 12% for their knowledge of the prognosis of the disease. None explained treatment alternatives, nor tried to contact the pediatrician responsible for the child. When faced with a simulated SMA-1 infant with respiratory failure, PCP have difficulties in interacting with the family, and to involve it in the decision making process. Practical training of all pediatricians should include case scenarios with an ethical clinical problem. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Revised Hammersmith Scale for spinal muscular atrophy: A SMA specific clinical outcome assessment tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoto, Mariacristina; Mayhew, Anna; Main, Marion; Mazzone, Elena S.; Montes, Jacqueline; de Sanctis, Roberto; Dunaway Young, Sally; Salazar, Rachel; Glanzman, Allan M.; Pasternak, Amy; Quigley, Janet; Mirek, Elizabeth; Duong, Tina; Gee, Richard; Civitello, Matthew; Tennekoon, Gihan; Pane, Marika; Pera, Maria Carmela; Bushby, Kate; Day, John; Darras, Basil T.; De Vivo, Darryl; Finkel, Richard; Mercuri, Eugenio; Muntoni, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Recent translational research developments in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), outcome measure design and demands from regulatory authorities require that clinical outcome assessments are ‘fit for purpose’. An international collaboration (SMA REACH UK, Italian SMA Network and PNCRN USA) undertook an iterative process to address discontinuity in the recorded performance of the Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Expanded and developed a revised functional scale using Rasch analysis, traditional psychometric techniques and the application of clinical sensibility via expert panels. Specifically, we intended to develop a psychometrically and clinically robust functional clinician rated outcome measure to assess physical abilities in weak SMA type 2 through to strong ambulant SMA type 3 patients. The final scale, the Revised Hammersmith Scale (RHS) for SMA, consisting of 36 items and two timed tests, was piloted in 138 patients with type 2 and 3 SMA in an observational cross-sectional multi-centre study across the three national networks. Rasch analysis demonstrated very good fit of all 36 items to the construct of motor performance, good reliability with a high Person Separation Index PSI 0.98, logical and hierarchical scoring in 27/36 items and excellent targeting with minimal ceiling. The RHS differentiated between clinically different groups: SMA type, World Health Organisation (WHO) categories, ambulatory status, and SMA type combined with ambulatory status (all p < 0.001). Construct and concurrent validity was also confirmed with a strong significant positive correlation with the WHO motor milestones rs = 0.860, p < 0.001. We conclude that the RHS is a psychometrically sound and versatile clinical outcome assessment to test the broad range of physical abilities of patients with type 2 and 3 SMA. Further longitudinal testing of the scale with regards change in scores over 6 and 12 months are required prior to its adoption in clinical trials. PMID:28222119

  19. Clearance of the mutant androgen receptor in motoneuronal models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Giorgetti, Elisa; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cristofani, Riccardo; Carra, Serena; Poletti, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion of a tandem CAG repeat in exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene that results in an abnormally long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the AR protein. As a result, the mutant AR (ARpolyQ) misfolds, forming cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates in the affected neurons. Neurotoxicity only appears to be associated with the formation of nuclear aggregates. Thus, improved ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, which indirectly decreases ARpolyQ nuclear accumulation, has beneficial effects on affected motoneurons. In addition, increased ARpolyQ clearance contributes to maintenance of motoneuron proteostasis and viability, preventing the blockage of the proteasome and autophagy pathways that might play a role in the neuropathy in SBMA. The expression of heat shock protein B8 (HspB8), a member of the small heat shock protein family, is highly induced in surviving motoneurons of patients affected by motoneuron diseases, where it seems to participate in the stress response aimed at cell protection. We report here that HspB8 facilitates the autophagic removal of misfolded aggregating species of ARpolyQ. In addition, though HspB8 does not influence p62 and LC3 (two key autophagic molecules) expression, it does prevent p62 bodies formation, and restores the normal autophagic flux in these cells. Interestingly, trehalose, a well-known autophagy stimulator, induces HspB8 expression, suggesting that HspB8 might act as one of the molecular mediators of the proautophagic activity of trehalose. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that treatments aimed at restoring a normal autophagic flux that result in the more efficient clearance of mutant ARpolyQ might produce beneficial effects in SBMA patients.

  20. A single administration of morpholino antisense oligomer rescues spinal muscular atrophy in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porensky, Paul N; Mitrpant, Chalermchai; McGovern, Vicki L; Bevan, Adam K; Foust, Kevin D; Kaspar, Brain K; Wilton, Stephen D; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2012-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by α-motor neuron loss in the spinal cord anterior horn. SMA results from deletion or mutation of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 gene (SMN1) and retention of SMN2. A single nucleotide difference between SMN1 and SMN2 results in exclusion of exon 7 from the majority of SMN2 transcripts, leading to decreased SMN protein levels and development of SMA. A series of splice enhancers and silencers regulate incorporation of SMN2 exon 7; these splice motifs can be blocked with antisense oligomers (ASOs) to alter SMN2 transcript splicing. We have evaluated a morpholino (MO) oligomer against ISS-N1 [HSMN2Ex7D(-10,-29)], and delivered this MO to postnatal day 0 (P0) SMA pups (Smn-/-, SMN2+/+, SMNΔ7+/+) by intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. Survival was increased markedly from 15 days to >100 days. Delayed CNS MO injection has moderate efficacy, and delayed peripheral injection has mild survival advantage, suggesting that early CNS ASO administration is essential for SMA therapy consideration. ICV treatment increased full-length SMN2 transcript as well as SMN protein in neural tissue, but only minimally in peripheral tissue. Interval analysis shows a decrease in alternative splice modification over time. We suggest that CNS increases of SMN will have a major impact on SMA, and an early increase of the SMN level results in correction of motor phenotypes. Finally, the early introduction by intrathecal delivery of MO oligomers is a potential treatment for SMA patients.

  1. Correlation of insulin resistance and motor function in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Araki, Amane; Hashizume, Atsushi; Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Shinichiro; Inagaki, Tomonori; Suzuki, Keisuke; Banno, Haruhiko; Suga, Noriaki; Okada, Yohei; Ohyama, Manabu; Nakagawa, Tohru; Kishida, Ken; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro; Okano, Hideyuki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2017-02-22

    This study aimed to evaluate various metabolic parameters in patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), to investigate the association between those indices and disease severity, and to explore the underlying molecular pathogenesis. We compared the degree of obesity, metabolic parameters, and blood pressure in 55 genetically confirmed SBMA patients against those in 483 age- and sex-matched healthy control. In SBMA patients, we investigated the correlation between these factors and motor functional indices. SBMA patients had lower body mass index, blood glucose, and Hemoglobin A1c, but higher blood pressure, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, a marker of insulin resistance), total cholesterol, and adiponectin levels than the control subjects. There were no differences in visceral fat areas, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), or triglyceride levels in two groups. Revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis functional rating scale (ALSFRS-R) correlated positively with HDL-C, but negatively with HOMA-IR. Through stepwise multiple regression analysis, we identified HOMA-IR as a significant metabolic determinant of ALSFRS-R. In biochemical analysis, we found that decreased expressions of insulin receptors, insulin receptor substrate-1 and insulin receptor-β, in autopsied muscles and fibroblasts of SBMA patients. This study demonstrates that SBMA patients have insulin resistance, which is associated with the disease severity. The expressions of insulin receptors are attenuated in the skeletal muscle of SBMA, providing a possible pathomechanism of metabolic alterations. These findings suggested that insulin resistance is a metabolic index reflecting disease severity and pathogenesis as well as a potential therapeutic target for SBMA.

  2. Differences in F-Wave Characteristics between Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jia; Cui, Liying; Liu, Mingsheng; Guan, Yuzhou; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Dawei; Cui, Bo; Shen, Dongchao; Ding, Qingyun

    2016-01-01

    There is limited data on the differences in F-wave characteristics between spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) and lower motor neuron dominant (LMND) amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We compared the parameters of F-waves recorded bilaterally from the median, ulnar, tibial, and deep peroneal nerves in 32 SBMA patients, 37 patients with LMND ALS, and 30 normal controls. The maximum F-wave amplitudes, frequencies of giant F-waves, and frequencies of patients with giant F-waves in all nerves examined were significantly higher in the SBMA patients than in the ALS patients and the normal controls. The mean F-wave amplitude, maximum F-wave amplitude, frequency of giant F-waves, and frequency of patients with giant F-waves in the median and deep peroneal nerves were comparable between the ALS patients and normal controls. Giant F-waves were detected in multiple nerves and were often symmetrical in the SBMA patients compared with the ALS patients. The number of nerves with giant F-waves seems to be the most robust variable for differentiation of SBMA from ALS, with an area under the curve of 0.908 (95% CI: 0.835-0.982). A cut-off value of the number of nerves with giant F-waves (≥3) for diagnosing SBMA showed high sensitivity and specificity: 85% sensitivity and 81% specificity vs. ALS patients. No significant correlations were found between the pooled frequency of giant F-waves and disease duration in the SBMA (r = 0.162, P = 0.418) or ALS groups (r = 0.107, P = 0.529). Our findings suggested that F-waves might be used to discriminate SBMA from ALS, even at early stages of disease.

  3. Differences in F-wave characteristics between Spinobulbar Muscular Atrophy and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia eFang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is limited data on the differences in F-wave characteristics between spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA and lower motor neuron dominant (LMND amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. We compared the parameters of F-waves recorded bilaterally from the median, ulnar, tibial, and deep peroneal nerves in 32 SBMA patients, 37 patients with LMND ALS, and 30 normal controls. The maximum F-wave amplitudes, frequencies of giant F-waves, and frequencies of patients with giant F-waves in all nerves examined were significantly higher in the SBMA patients than in the ALS patients and the normal controls. The mean F-wave amplitude, maximum F-wave amplitude, frequency of giant F-waves, and frequency of patients with giant F-waves in the median and deep peroneal nerves were comparable between the ALS patients and normal controls. Giant F-waves were detected in multiple nerves and were often symmetrical in the SBMA patients compared with the ALS patients. The number of nerves with giant F-waves seems to be the most robust variable for differentiation of SBMA from ALS, with an area under the curve of 0.908 (95% CI: 0.835–0.982. A cut-off value of the number of nerves with giant F-waves (≥ 3 for diagnosing SBMA showed high sensitivity and specificity: 85% sensitivity and 81% specificity vs. ALS patients. No significant correlations were found between the pooled frequency of giant F-waves and disease duration in the SBMA (r = 0.162, P = 0.418 or ALS groups (r = 0.107, P = 0.529. Our findings suggested that F-waves might be used to discriminate SBMA from ALS, even at early stages of disease.

  4. Loganin possesses neuroprotective properties, restores SMN protein and activates protein synthesis positive regulator Akt/mTOR in experimental models of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Chang, Fang-Rong; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2016-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by motor neurons degeneration and muscular atrophy. There is no effective SMA treatment. Loganin is a botanical candidate with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, glucose-lowering and anti-diabetic nephropathy activities. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential protective effects of loganin on SMA using two cellular models, SMN-deficient NSC34 cells and SMA patient fibroblasts, and an animal disease model, SMAΔ7 mice. In SMN-deficient NSC34 cells, loganin increased cell viability, neurite length, and expressions of SMN, Gemin2, SMN-Gemin2 complex, p-Akt, p-GSK-3β, p-CREB, BDNF and Bcl-2. However, both AG1024 (IGF-1 R antagonist) and IGF-1 R siRNA attenuated the protective effects of loganin on SMN level and cell viability in SMN-deficient NSC34 cells. In SMA patient fibroblasts, loganin up-regulated levels of SMN, FL-SMN2, and Gemins, increased numbers of SMN-containing nuclear gems, modulated splicing factors, and up-regulated p-Akt. Furthermore, in the brain, spinal cord and gastrocnemius muscle of SMAΔ7 mice, loganin up-regulated the expressions of SMN and p-Akt. Results from righting reflex and hind-limb suspension tests indicated loganin improved muscle strength of SMAΔ7 mice; moreover, loganin activated Akt/mTOR signal and inhibited atrogin-1/MuRF-1 signal in gastrocnemius muscle of SMAΔ7 mice. Loganin also increased body weight, but the average lifespan of loganin (20mg/kg/day)-treated SMA mice was 16.80±0.73 days, while saline-treated SMA mice was 10.91±0.96 days. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate that loganin provides benefits to SMA therapeutics via improving SMN restoration, muscle strength and body weight. IGF-1 plays an important role in loganin neuroprotection. Loganin can be therefore a valuable complementary candidate for treatment of neuromuscular diseases via regulation of muscle protein synthesis and neuroprotection.

  5. Inhibition of apoptosis blocks human motor neuron cell death in a stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruv Sareen

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder caused by a deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 gene leading to motor neuron loss, muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death. We show here that induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines generated from two Type I SMA subjects-one produced with lentiviral constructs and the second using a virus-free plasmid-based approach-recapitulate the disease phenotype and generate significantly fewer motor neurons at later developmental time periods in culture compared to two separate control subject iPSC lines. During motor neuron development, both SMA lines showed an increase in Fas ligand-mediated apoptosis and increased caspase-8 and-3 activation. Importantly, this could be mitigated by addition of either a Fas blocking antibody or a caspase-3 inhibitor. Together, these data further validate this human stem cell model of SMA, suggesting that specific inhibitors of apoptotic pathways may be beneficial for patients.

  6. Early onset and novel features in a spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy patient with a 68 CAG repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunseich, Christopher; Kats, Ilona R; Bott, Laura C; Rinaldi, Carlo; Kokkinis, Angela; Fox, Derrick; Chen, Ke-Lian; Schindler, Alice B; Mankodi, Ami K; Shrader, Joseph A; Schwartz, Daniel P; Lehky, Tanya J; Liu, Chia-Ying; Fischbeck, Kenneth H

    2014-11-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Patients with SBMA have weakness, atrophy, and fasciculations in the bulbar and extremity muscles. Individuals with CAG repeat lengths greater than 62 have not previously been reported. We evaluated a 29year old SBMA patient with 68 CAGs who had unusually early onset and findings not seen in others with the disease. Analysis of the androgen receptor gene confirmed the repeat length of 68 CAGs in both peripheral blood and fibroblasts. Evaluation of muscle and sensory function showed deficits typical of SBMA, and in addition the patient had manifestations of autonomic dysfunction and abnormal sexual development. These findings extend the known phenotype associated with SBMA and shed new insight into the effects of the mutated androgen receptor.

  7. Relationship between the pathology of skeletal muscle and muscular atrophy in adult spinal muscular atrophy%成人型脊髓性肌萎缩症的骨骼肌病理与肌萎缩的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何晓军; 张平; 陈光辉

    2004-01-01

    背景:脊髓性肌萎缩症是运动神经元疾病中病变仅影响下运动神经元的一组疾病.成人型少见,目前对其研究较少.目的:总结成人型脊髓性肌萎缩症骨骼肌病理学特征.设计:以诊断为依据的回顾性研究.地点和对象:收集1998-02/2002-02在解放军第八一医院南京医学院第二附属医院和南京军区总医院经肌肉活检确诊的、有完整临床资料的门诊和住院患者共46例.方法:结合临床特征及病理学改变进行分析.主要观察指标:病史、家族史、完整体格检查、相关血液及血生化、肌电图和肌肉活检.结果:临床表现为进行性对称性肢体近端肌萎缩,肌无力,实验室检查血肌酸磷酸肌酶12例中轻度升高,肌电图检查2例正常,3例呈轻度肌源性损害,余37例呈神经元性损害,肌活检主要为小群性肌萎缩,腺苷三磷酸酶染色见同型肌群化及肌纤维代偿性肥大.结论:肌活检对成人型脊髓性肌萎缩症具有诊断和鉴别诊断意义.适当、持久的康复锻炼可能对维持患者的运动功能有帮助.%BACKGROUND: Spinal muscular atrophy is a group of diseases in motor neuronal diseases that only affect lower motor neurons, of which adult type is very rare and thereby only few researches available at present.OBJECTIVE: To summarize the pathological features of skeletal muscle in adult spinal muscular atrophy.DESIGN: A retrospective study based on diagnosis.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: Totally 46 cases from outpatient and inpatient departments during February 1998 to February 2002 of the 81 Hospital of Chinese PLA with confirmed muscular biopsy and complete clinical data were collected.INTERVENTIONS: Combined analysis with clinical features and pathological changes.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Case history, family history, complete physical examination, relative blood and blood biochemistry, electromyogram (EMG) and muscle biopsy.RESULTS: The clinical manifestations were progressive

  8. Using General Anesthesia plus Muscle Relaxant in a Patient with Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type IV: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiu-Fen; Wang, Dong-Xin; Ma, Daqing

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a rare genetic disease characterized by degeneration of spinal cord motor neurons, which results in hypotonia and muscle weakness. Patients with type IV SMA often have onset of weakness from adulthood. Anesthetic management is often difficult in these patients as a result of muscle weakness and hypersensitivity to neuromuscular blocking agents as shown by (Lunn and Wang; 2008, Simic; 2008, and Cifuentes-Diaz et al.; 2002). Herein we report a case of anesthetic management of a patient with SMA type IV for mammectomy and review some other cases of SMA patients receiving different kinds of anesthesia.

  9. Use of Genetic and Physical Mapping to Locate the Spinal Muscular Atrophy Locus between Two New Highly Polymorphic DNA Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Clermont, Olivier; Burlet, Philippe; Burglen, Lydie; Lefebvre, Suzie; Pascal, Fabrice; McPherson, John; Wasmuth, John J.; Cohen, Daniel; Le Paslier, Denis; Weissenbach, Jean; Lathrop, Mark; Munnich, Arnold; Melki, Judith

    1994-01-01

    The gene for autosomal recessive forms of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has recently been mapped to chromosome 5ql3, within a 4-cM region between the blocks D5S465/D5S125 and MAP-1B/D5S112. We identified two new highly polymorphic microsatellite DNA markers—namely, AFM265wf5 (D5S629) and AFM281yh9 (D5S637)—which are the closest markers to the SMA locus. Multilocus analysis by the location-score method was used to establish the best estimate of the SMA gene location. Our data suggest that the ...

  10. Muscular dystrophy in PTFR/cavin-1 null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shi-Ying; Pilch, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    ice and humans lacking the caveolae component polymerase I transcription release factor (PTRF, also known as cavin-1) exhibit lipo- and muscular dystrophy. Here we describe the molecular features underlying the muscle phenotype for PTRF/cavin-1 null mice. These animals had a decreased ability to exercise, and exhibited muscle hypertrophy with increased muscle fiber size and muscle mass due, in part, to constitutive activation of the Akt pathway. Their muscles were fibrotic and exhibited impaired membrane integrity accompanied by an apparent compensatory activation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex along with elevated expression of proteins involved in muscle repair function. Ptrf deletion also caused decreased mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption, and altered myofiber composition. Thus, in addition to compromised adipocyte-related physiology, the absence of PTRF/cavin-1 in mice caused a unique form of muscular dystrophy with a phenotype similar or identical to that seen in humans lacking this protein. Further understanding of this muscular dystrophy model will provide information relevant to the human situation and guidance for potential therapies.

  11. Morphological characteristics of motor neurons do not determine their relative susceptibility to degeneration in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R Thomson

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a leading genetic cause of infant mortality, resulting primarily from the degeneration and loss of lower motor neurons. Studies using mouse models of SMA have revealed widespread heterogeneity in the susceptibility of individual motor neurons to neurodegeneration, but the underlying reasons remain unclear. Data from related motor neuron diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, suggest that morphological properties of motor neurons may regulate susceptibility: in ALS larger motor units innervating fast-twitch muscles degenerate first. We therefore set out to determine whether intrinsic morphological characteristics of motor neurons influenced their relative vulnerability to SMA. Motor neuron vulnerability was mapped across 10 muscle groups in SMA mice. Neither the position of the muscle in the body, nor the fibre type of the muscle innervated, influenced susceptibility. Morphological properties of vulnerable and disease-resistant motor neurons were then determined from single motor units reconstructed in Thy.1-YFP-H mice. None of the parameters we investigated in healthy young adult mice - including motor unit size, motor unit arbor length, branching patterns, motor endplate size, developmental pruning and numbers of terminal Schwann cells at neuromuscular junctions - correlated with vulnerability. We conclude that morphological characteristics of motor neurons are not a major determinant of disease-susceptibility in SMA, in stark contrast to related forms of motor neuron disease such as ALS. This suggests that subtle molecular differences between motor neurons, or extrinsic factors arising from other cell types, are more likely to determine relative susceptibility in SMA.

  12. Whole transcriptome sequencing in blood provides a diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernohan, Kristin D; Frésard, Laure; Zappala, Zachary; Hartley, Taila; Smith, Kevin S; Wagner, Justin; Xu, Hongbin; McBride, Arran; Bourque, Pierre R; Consortium, Care Rare Canada; Bennett, Steffany A L; Dyment, David A; Boycott, Kym M; Montgomery, Stephen B; Warman-Chardon, Jodi

    2017-03-02

    At least 15% of disease-causing mutations affect mRNA splicing. Many splicing mutations are missed in a clinical setting due to limitations of in silico prediction algorithms or their location in non-coding regions. Whole transcriptome sequencing is a promising new tool to identify these mutations; however, it will be a challenge to obtain disease relevant tissue for RNA. Here, we describe an individual with a sporadic atypical spinal muscular atrophy, in whom clinical DNA sequencing reported one pathogenic ASAH1 mutation (c.458A>G;p.Tyr153Cys). Transcriptome sequencing on patient leukocytes identified a highly significant and atypical ASAH1 isoform not explained by c.458A>G(pC;p.Lys168Asn) and provided a molecular diagnosis of autosomal recessive spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME). Our findings demonstrate the utility of RNA sequencing from blood to identify splice-impacting disease mutations for non-hematological conditions, providing a diagnosis for these otherwise unsolved patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Brief report: phenotypic rescue of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motoneurons of a spinal muscular atrophy patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tammy; Zheng, Weiyan; Tsark, Walter; Bates, Steven; Huang, He; Lin, Ren-Jang; Yee, Jiing-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders in humans and is a common genetic cause of infant mortality. The disease is caused by loss of the survival of motoneuron (SMN) protein, resulting in the degeneration of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord and muscular atrophy in the limbs and trunk. One function of SMN involves RNA splicing. It is unclear why a deficiency in a housekeeping function such as RNA splicing causes profound effects only on motoneurons but not on other cell types. One difficulty in studying SMA is the scarcity of patient's samples. The discovery that somatic cells can be reprogrammed to become induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) raises the intriguing possibility of modeling human diseases in vitro. We reported the establishment of five iPSC lines from the fibroblasts of a type 1 SMA patient. Neuronal cultures derived from these SMA iPSC lines exhibited a reduced capacity to form motoneurons and an abnormality in neurite outgrowth. Ectopic SMN expression in these iPSC lines restored normal motoneuron differentiation and rescued the phenotype of delayed neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that the observed abnormalities are indeed caused by SMN deficiency and not by iPSC clonal variability. Further characterization of the cellular and functional deficits in motoneurons derived from these iPSCs may accelerate the exploration of the underlying mechanisms of SMA pathogenesis.

  14. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Nicole; Lattanzi, Annalisa; Jeavons, Matthieu; Van Wittenberghe, Laetitia; Gjata, Bernard; Marais, Thibaut; Martin, Samia; Vignaud, Alban; Voit, Thomas; Mavilio, Fulvio; Barkats, Martine; Buj-Bello, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1) under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV) space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV) did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  15. Efficacy and biodistribution analysis of intracerebroventricular administration of an optimized scAAV9-SMN1 vector in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Armbruster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive disease of variable severity caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene. Deficiency of the ubiquitous SMN function results in spinal cord α-motor neuron degeneration and proximal muscle weakness. Gene replacement therapy with recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors showed therapeutic efficacy in several animal models of SMA. Here, we report a study aimed at analyzing the efficacy and biodistribution of a serotype-9, self-complementary AAV vector expressing a codon-optimized human SMN1 coding sequence (coSMN1 under the control of the constitutive phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK promoter in neonatal SMNΔ7 mice, a severe animal model of the disease. We administered the scAAV9-coSMN1 vector in the intracerebroventricular (ICV space in a dose-escalating mode, and analyzed survival, vector biodistribution and SMN protein expression in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues. All treated mice showed a significant, dose-dependent rescue of lifespan and growth with a median survival of 346 days. Additional administration of vector by an intravenous route (ICV+IV did not improve survival, and vector biodistribution analysis 90 days postinjection indicated that diffusion from the cerebrospinal fluid to the periphery was sufficient to rescue the SMA phenotype. These results support the preclinical development of SMN1 gene therapy by CSF vector delivery.

  16. Mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, disrupts the recruitment of SMN, the spinal muscular atrophy protein to nuclear Cajal bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariya, Shingo; Re, Diane B; Jacquier, Arnaud; Nelson, Katelyn; Przedborski, Serge; Monani, Umrao R

    2012-08-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are among the most common motor neuron diseases to afflict the human population. A deficiency of the survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein causes SMA and is also reported to be an exacerbating factor in the development of ALS. However, pathways linking the two diseases have yet to be defined and it is not clear precisely how the pathology of ALS is aggravated by reduced SMN or whether mutant proteins underlying familial forms of ALS interfere with SMN-related biochemical pathways to exacerbate the neurodegenerative process. In this study, we show that mutant superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), a cause of familial ALS, profoundly alters the sub-cellular localization of the SMN protein, preventing the formation of nuclear 'gems' by disrupting the recruitment of the protein to Cajal bodies. Overexpressing the SMN protein in mutant SOD1 mice, a model of familial ALS, alleviates this phenomenon, most likely in a cell-autonomous manner, and significantly mitigates the loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and in culture dishes. In the mice, the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype is delayed and motor function enhanced, suggestive of a therapeutic benefit for ALS patients treated with agents that augment the SMN protein. Nevertheless, this finding is tempered by an inability to prolong survival, a limitation most likely imposed by the inexorable denervation that characterizes ALS and eventually disrupts the neuromuscular synapses even in the presence of increased SMN.

  17. A Comparative Study of SMN Protein and mRNA in Blood and Fibroblasts in Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Healthy Controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, Renske I.; Stam, Marloes; Jansen, Marc D.; van der Weegen, Yana; Wijngaarde, Camiel A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Sodaar, Peter; Braun, Kees P. J.; Dooijes, Dennis; Lemmink, Henny H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; van der Pol, W. Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical trials to test safety and efficacy of drugs for patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are currently underway. Biomarkers that document treatment-induced effects are needed because disease progression in childhood forms of SMA is slow and clinical outcome measures may lack

  18. A SUBLOCUS OF THE MULTICOPY MICROSATELLITE MARKER CMS1 MAPS PROXIMAL TO SPINAL MUSCULAR-ATROPHY (SMA) AS SHOWN BY RECOMBINANT ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSTEEGE, G; COBBEN, JM; OSINGA, J; SCHEFFER, H; VANOMMEN, GJB; BUYS, CHCM

    1995-01-01

    The critical region containing the spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) gene is flanked by the 5q11-q13 markers, D5S435 and D5S557, as determined by linkage analysis. Here we present the results of an analysis of a Dutch SMA family with the multicopy microsatellite marker CMS1. A crossover is revealed in

  19. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes...

  20. Congenital heart defects in spinal muscular atrophy type I : A clinical report of two siblings and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, Leonie A.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Clur, Sally-Ann; Bilardo, Catia M.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Lenunink, Henny H.; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    A newborn girl presented with asphyxia, joint contractures and diminished spontaneous movements. Echocardiography showed hypoplastic left heart. Spinal muscular atrophy type I (SMA I) was diagnosed by detecting a homozygous deletion in the survival motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). In the first trimester

  1. Molecular chaperones enhance the degradation of expanded polyglutamine repeat androgen receptor in a cellular model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, CK; Andriola, IFM; Kampinga, HH; Merry, DE

    2002-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is one of a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases caused by a polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, and is caused by an expansion within exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The family of polyglutamine diseases is characteri

  2. A Comparative Study of SMN Protein and mRNA in Blood and Fibroblasts in Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Healthy Controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wadman, Renske I.; Stam, Marloes; Jansen, Marc D.; van der Weegen, Yana; Wijngaarde, Camiel A.; Harschnitz, Oliver; Sodaar, Peter; Braun, Kees P. J.; Dooijes, Dennis; Lemmink, Henny H.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; van der Pol, W. Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical trials to test safety and efficacy of drugs for patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are currently underway. Biomarkers that document treatment-induced effects are needed because disease progression in childhood forms of SMA is slow and clinical outcome measures may lack s

  3. Congenital heart defects in spinal muscular atrophy type I : A clinical report of two siblings and a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menke, Leonie A.; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Clur, Sally-Ann; Bilardo, Catia M.; van der Wal, Allard C.; Lenunink, Henny H.; Cobben, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    A newborn girl presented with asphyxia, joint contractures and diminished spontaneous movements. Echocardiography showed hypoplastic left heart. Spinal muscular atrophy type I (SMA I) was diagnosed by detecting a homozygous deletion in the survival motor neuron 1 gene (SMN1). In the first trimester

  4. Molecular chaperones enhance the degradation of expanded polyglutamine repeat androgen receptor in a cellular model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, CK; Andriola, IFM; Kampinga, HH; Merry, DE

    2002-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is one of a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases caused by a polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, and is caused by an expansion within exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The family of polyglutamine diseases is

  5. Compensatory axon sprouting for very slow axonal die-back in a transgenic model of spinal muscular atrophy type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Esther; Putman, Charles T; Harris, Luke R; Tyreman, Neil; Cook, Victoria E; Gordon, Tessa

    2017-03-01

    Smn(+/-) transgenic mouse is a model of the mildest form of spinal muscular atrophy. Although there is a loss of spinal motoneurons in 11-month-old animals, muscular force is maintained. This maintained muscular force is mediated by reinnervation of the denervated fibres by surviving motoneurons. The spinal motoneurons in these animals do not show an increased susceptibility to death after nerve injury and they retain their regenerative capacity. We conclude that the hypothesized immaturity of the neuromuscular system in this model cannot explain the loss of motoneurons by systematic die-back. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder in humans and is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. Patients lack the SMN1 gene with the severity of the disease depending on the number of copies of the highly homologous SMN2 gene. Although motoneuron death in the Smn(+/-) transgenic mouse model of the mildest form of SMA, SMA type III, has been reported, we have used retrograde tracing of sciatic and femoral motoneurons in the hindlimb with recording of muscle and motor unit isometric forces to count the number of motoneurons with intact neuromuscular connections. Thereby, we investigated whether incomplete maturation of the neuromuscular system induced by survival motoneuron protein (SMN) defects is responsible for die-back of axons relative to survival of motoneurons. First, a reduction of ∼30% of backlabelled motoneurons began relatively late, at 11 months of age, with a significant loss of 19% at 7 months. Motor axon die-back was affirmed by motor unit number estimation. Loss of functional motor units was fully compensated by axonal sprouting to retain normal contractile force in four hindlimb muscles (three fast-twitch and one slow-twitch) innervated by branches of the sciatic nerve. Second, our evaluation of whether axotomy of motoneurons in the adult Smn(+/-) transgenic mouse increases their susceptibility to cell death

  6. 脊髓性肌萎缩症伴开(牙合)1例%Spinal muscular atrophy with open bite: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑闱颖; 林军

    2013-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is one rare type of autosomal recessive disorder.The disease is characterized by the progressive degeneration of spinal cord anterior horn motor neurons and brainstem motor nuclei,which leads to muscle atrophy and paralysis.One case of spinal muscular atrophy with open bite was reported here.%脊髓性肌萎缩症是由于脊髓前角运动神经元和脑干运动神经核变性而导致肌无力、肌萎缩的一种罕见的常染色体隐形遗传疾病.该病临床上极为罕见,本文报道1例脊髓性肌萎缩症伴开(牙合)的病例.

  7. Biomarker for Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Expression of SMN in Peripheral Blood of SMA Patients and Healthy Controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Czech

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by a functional deletion of SMN1 on Chromosome 5, which leads to a progressive loss of motor function in affected patients. SMA patients have at least one copy of a similar gene, SMN2, which produces functional SMN protein, although in reduced quantities. The severity of SMA is variable, partially due to differences in SMN2 copy numbers. Here, we report the results of a biomarker study characterizing SMA patients of varying disease severity. SMN copy number, mRNA and Protein levels in whole blood of patients were measured and compared against a cohort of healthy controls. The results show differential regulation of expression of SMN2 in peripheral blood between patients and healthy subjects.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging in a juvenile type of distal and segmental muscular atrophy of the upper extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Uchino, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshida, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kira, J. [Dept. of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Masuda, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    Eight patients with a juvenile type of distal and segmental muscular atrophy of the upper extremities (DSMA), a type of cervical flexion myelopathy, were evaluated using MR imaging. In the neutral position there was no spinal cord compression, but in flexion the spinal cord was displaced anteriorly and was compressed by the posterior surfaces or margins of the vertebrae and/or any herniated disks in all cases. In flexion, compression of the cord was exaggerated in seven patients by the anterior displacement of the posterior margin of the thecal sac, which was accompanied by dilated posterior internal vertebral veins. In patients suspected of having DSMA, MR images made in flexion are regarded essential for verifying the diagnosis. (orig.)

  9. Feasibility of Using Microsoft Kinect to Assess Upper Limb Movement in Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebourg-Polster, Juliane; Wolf, Detlef; Czech, Christian; Bonati, Ulrike; Fischer, Dirk; Khwaja, Omar; Strahm, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Although functional rating scales are being used increasingly as primary outcome measures in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), sensitive and objective assessment of early-stage disease progression and drug efficacy remains challenging. We have developed a game based on the Microsoft Kinect sensor, specifically designed to measure active upper limb movement. An explorative study was conducted to determine the feasibility of this new tool in 18 ambulant SMA type III patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Upper limb movement was analysed elaborately through derived features such as elbow flexion and extension angles, arm lifting angle, velocity and acceleration. No significant differences were found in the active range of motion between ambulant SMA type III patients and controls. Hand velocity was found to be different but further validation is necessary. This study presents an important step in the process of designing and handling digital biomarkers as complementary outcome measures for clinical trials. PMID:28122039

  10. Use of sugammadex in a patient with progressive muscular atrophy and in a patient with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jae Hwa; Kim, Soon Im; Park, Sun Young; Jun, Mi Roung; Kim, Yong Eun; Kim, Hyoung June

    2017-06-01

    We herein present 2 cases involving the combination of rocuronium and sugammadex in patients with motor neuron disease. The patients were a 54-year-old man with progressive muscular atrophy who underwent removal of internal fixators in the arm and leg, and a 66-year-old woman with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis who underwent skin grafting in the left lower leg. General anesthesia was induced with propofol, rocuronium, and remifentanil and maintained with desflurane and remifentanil. At the end of the surgical procedure, we administered sugammadex. Three or 4 minutes after administration of sugammadex, the patients began to breathe spontaneously and were extubated without complications. Sugammadex can be used successfully to reverse neuromuscular blockade in patients with motor neuron disease.

  11. Protein arginine methyltransferase 6 enhances polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor function and toxicity in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M J; Polanco, Maria J; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Taylor, J Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis.

  12. Protein Arginine Methyltransferase 6 Enhances Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Function and Toxicity in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzzino, Chiara; Casci, Ian; Parodi, Sara; Lievens, Patricia M.J.; Polanco, Maria J.; Milioto, Carmelo; Chivet, Mathilde; Monaghan, John; Mishra, Ashutosh; Badders, Nisha; Aggarwal, Tanya; Grunseich, Christopher; Sambataro, Fabio; Basso, Manuela; Fackelmayer, Frank O.; Taylor, J. Paul; Pandey, Udai Bhan; Pennuto, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Polyglutamine expansion in androgen receptor (AR) is responsible for spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) that leads to selective loss of lower motor neurons. Using SBMA as a model, we explored the relationship between protein structure/function and neurodegeneration in polyglutamine diseases. We show here that protein arginine methyltransferase 6 (PRMT6) is a specific co-activator of normal and mutant AR and that the interaction of PRMT6 with AR is significantly enhanced in the AR mutant. AR and PRMT6 interaction occurs through the PRMT6 steroid receptor interaction motif, LXXLL, and the AR activating function 2 surface. AR transactivation requires PRMT6 catalytic activity and involves methylation of arginine residues at Akt consensus site motifs, which is mutually exclusive with serine phosphorylation by Akt. The enhanced interaction of PRMT6 and mutant AR leads to neurodegeneration in cell and fly models of SBMA. These findings demonstrate a direct role of arginine methylation in polyglutamine disease pathogenesis. PMID:25569348

  13. Frontotemporal cognitive function in X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA): a controlled neuropsychological study of 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Georg Rüdiger; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Uttner, Ingo; Karitzky, Jochen; Ludolph, Albert Christian; Kassubek, Jan; Schreiber, Herbert

    2009-11-01

    A cross-sectional neuropsychological study of cognitive functions in 20 male patients with genetically proven spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) was performed, with a comparison of their cognitive performance with that of 20 age- and education-matched control subjects. Neuropsychological assessment covered executive functioning, memory, and attentional control. The SBMA patients revealed deficits in verbal and non-verbal fluency as well as concept formation. Additionally, they showed significant memory deficits in all of the investigated domains of working memory, short-term and long-term memory. With respect to attentional control, the SBMA patients underperformed in relevant subtests, although performance differences did not reach significance overall. We conclude that fronto-temporal cognitive functions are impaired in SMBA, although at a subclinical level. Thus, functional deficits in SBMA are not confined to motor neurons but also affect extramotor networks.

  14. Feasibility of Using Microsoft Kinect to Assess Upper Limb Movement in Type III Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Siebourg-Polster, Juliane; Wolf, Detlef; Czech, Christian; Bonati, Ulrike; Fischer, Dirk; Khwaja, Omar; Strahm, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Although functional rating scales are being used increasingly as primary outcome measures in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), sensitive and objective assessment of early-stage disease progression and drug efficacy remains challenging. We have developed a game based on the Microsoft Kinect sensor, specifically designed to measure active upper limb movement. An explorative study was conducted to determine the feasibility of this new tool in 18 ambulant SMA type III patients and 19 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Upper limb movement was analysed elaborately through derived features such as elbow flexion and extension angles, arm lifting angle, velocity and acceleration. No significant differences were found in the active range of motion between ambulant SMA type III patients and controls. Hand velocity was found to be different but further validation is necessary. This study presents an important step in the process of designing and handling digital biomarkers as complementary outcome measures for clinical trials.

  15. Mechanisms mediating spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: Investigations into polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor function and dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenore K. Beitel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, Kennedy’s disease, a late-onset neuromuscular disorder, is caused by expansion of the polymorphic polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR. The AR is a ligand-activated transcription factor, but plays roles in other cellular pathways. In SBMA, selective motor neuron degeneration occurs in the brainstem and spinal cord, thus the causes of neuronal dysfunction have been studied. However, pathogenic pathways in muscles may also be involved. Cultured cells, fly and mouse models have been used to study the molecular mechanisms leading to SBMA. Both the structure of the polyglutamine expanded AR (polyQ AR and its interactions with other proteins are altered relative to the normal AR. The ligand-dependent translocation of the polyQ AR to the nucleus appears to be critical, as are interdomain interactions. The polyQ AR, or fragments thereof, can form nuclear inclusions, but their pathogenic or protective nature is unclear. Other data suggests soluble polyQ AR oligomers can be harmful. Post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and ubiquitination influence AR function and modulate the deleterious effects of the polyQ AR. Transcriptional dysregulation is highly likely to be a factor in SBMA; deregulation of nongenomic AR signaling may also be involved. Studies on polyQ AR protein degradation suggest inhibition of the ubiquitin proteasome system and changes to autophagic pathways may be relevant. Mitochondrial function and axonal transport may also be affected by the polyQ AR. Androgens, acting through the AR, can be neurotrophic and are important in muscle development; hence both loss of normal AR functions and gain of novel harmful functions by the polyQ AR can contribute to neurodegeneration and muscular atrophy. Thus investigations into polyQ AR function have shown that multiple complex mechanisms lead to the initiation and progression of SBMA.

  16. Muscular Basis of Whisker Torsion in Mice and Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidarliu, Sebastian; Bagdasarian, Knarik; Shinde, Namrata; Ahissar, Ehud

    2017-09-01

    Whisking mammals move their whiskers in the rostrocaudal and dorsoventral directions with simultaneous rolling about their long axes (torsion). Whereas muscular control of the first two types of whisker movement was already established, the anatomic muscular substrate of the whisker torsion remains unclear. Specifically, it was not clear whether torsion is induced by asymmetrical operation of known muscles or by other largely unknown muscles. Here, we report that mystacial pads of newborn and adult rats and mice contain oblique intrinsic muscles (OMs) that connect diagonally adjacent vibrissa follicles. Each of the OMs is supplied by a cluster of motor end plates. In rows A and B, OMs connect the ventral part of the rostral follicle with the dorsal part of the caudal follicle. In rows C-E, in contrast, OMs connect the dorsal part of the rostral follicle to the ventral part of the caudal follicle. This inverse architecture is consistent with previous behavioral observations [Knutsen et al.: Neuron 59 (2008) 35-42]. In newborn mice, torsion occurred in irregular single twitches. In adult anesthetized rats, microelectrode mediated electrical stimulation of an individual OM that is coupled with two adjacent whiskers was sufficient to induce a unidirectional torsion of both whiskers. Torsional movement was associated with protracting movement, indicating that in the vibrissal system, like in the ocular system, torsional movement is mechanically coupled to horizontal and vertical movements. This study shows that torsional whisker rotation is mediated by specific OMs whose morphology and attachment sites determine rotation direction and mechanical coupling, and motor innervation determines rotation dynamics. Anat Rec, 300:1643-1653, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Nosology of Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity: From Monomelic Amyotrophy to Hirayama Disease—Indian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Sahni, Hirdesh

    2013-01-01

    Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, “juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity” has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD), also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradialis giving the characteristic appearance of oblique amyotrophy. Symmetrically bilateral disease has also been recognized. Believed to be a cervical flexion myelopathy, HD differs from motor neuron diseases because of its nonprogressive course and pathologic findings of chronic microcirculatory changes in the lower cervical cord. Electromyography shows features of acute and/or chronic denervation in C7, C8, and T1 myotomes in clinically affected limb and sometimes also in clinically unaffected contralateral limb. Dynamic forward displacement of dura in flexion causes asymmetric flattening of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast magnetic resonance imaging is diagnostic, routine study has high predictive value. There is a need to lump all the nomenclatures under the rubric of HD as prognosis in this condition is benign and prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy. PMID:24063005

  18. Nosology of juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity: from monomelic amyotrophy to Hirayama disease--Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Kaukab Maqbool; Sahni, Hirdesh

    2013-01-01

    Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, "juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity" has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD), also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradialis giving the characteristic appearance of oblique amyotrophy. Symmetrically bilateral disease has also been recognized. Believed to be a cervical flexion myelopathy, HD differs from motor neuron diseases because of its nonprogressive course and pathologic findings of chronic microcirculatory changes in the lower cervical cord. Electromyography shows features of acute and/or chronic denervation in C7, C8, and T1 myotomes in clinically affected limb and sometimes also in clinically unaffected contralateral limb. Dynamic forward displacement of dura in flexion causes asymmetric flattening of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast magnetic resonance imaging is diagnostic, routine study has high predictive value. There is a need to lump all the nomenclatures under the rubric of HD as prognosis in this condition is benign and prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  19. Nosology of Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity: From Monomelic Amyotrophy to Hirayama Disease—Indian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaukab Maqbool Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since its original description by Keizo Hirayama in 1959, “juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity” has been described under many nomenclatures from the east. Hirayama disease (HD, also interchangeably referred to as monomelic amyotrophy, has been more frequently recognised in the west only in the last two decades. HD presents in adolescence and young adulthood with insidious onset unilateral or bilateral asymmetric atrophy of hand and forearm with sparing of brachioradialis giving the characteristic appearance of oblique amyotrophy. Symmetrically bilateral disease has also been recognized. Believed to be a cervical flexion myelopathy, HD differs from motor neuron diseases because of its nonprogressive course and pathologic findings of chronic microcirculatory changes in the lower cervical cord. Electromyography shows features of acute and/or chronic denervation in C7, C8, and T1 myotomes in clinically affected limb and sometimes also in clinically unaffected contralateral limb. Dynamic forward displacement of dura in flexion causes asymmetric flattening of lower cervical cord. While dynamic contrast magnetic resonance imaging is diagnostic, routine study has high predictive value. There is a need to lump all the nomenclatures under the rubric of HD as prognosis in this condition is benign and prompt diagnosis is important to institute early collar therapy.

  20. Muscular hypertrophy and atrophy in normal rats provoked by the administration of normal and denervated muscle extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Eduardo; Castilla, Salvador; Luque, Evelio; Jimena, Ignacio; Leiva-Cepas, Fernando; Ruz-Caracuel, Ignacio; Peña, José

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of extracts obtained from both normal and denervated muscles on different muscle types. Wistar rats were used and were divided into a control group and four experimental groups. Each experimental group was treated intraperitoneally during 10 consecutive days with a different extract. These extracts were obtained from normal soleus muscle, denervated soleus, normal extensor digitorum longus, and denervated extensor digitorum longus. Following treatment, the soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles were obtained for study under optic and transmission electron microscope; morphometric parameters and myogenic responses were also analyzed. The results demonstrated that the treatment with normal soleus muscle and denervated soleus muscle extracts provoked hypertrophy and increased myogenic activity. In contrast, treatment with extracts from the normal and denervated EDL had a different effect depending on the muscle analyzed. In the soleus muscle it provoked hypertrophy of type I fibers and increased myogenic activity, while in the extensor digitorum longus atrophy of the type II fibers was observed without changes in myogenic activity. This suggests that the muscular responses of atrophy and hypertrophy may depend on different factors related to the muscle type which could be related to innervation.

  1. Intrafamilial variable hearing loss in TRPV4 induced spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, A.M.M.; Ekker, M.S.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Kremer, H.; Schelhaas, J.J.; Pennings, R.J.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 gene (TRPV4) can induce a great diversity of neuropathies. Together with these neuropathies, hearing loss can occur. This study is focused on providing an audiometric phenotype description of a Dutch family with spinal muscular

  2. Intrafamilial variable hearing loss in TRPV4 induced spinal muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, A.M.M.; Ekker, M.S.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Kremer, H.; Schelhaas, J.J.; Pennings, R.J.E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 gene (TRPV4) can induce a great diversity of neuropathies. Together with these neuropathies, hearing loss can occur. This study is focused on providing an audiometric phenotype description of a Dutch family with spinal muscular atr

  3. p62/SQSTM1 differentially removes the toxic mutant androgen receptor via autophagy and inclusion formation in a spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Katsuno, Masahisa; Minamiyama, Makoto; Matsumoto, Shinjiro; Kondo, Naohide; Miyazaki, Yu; Iida, Madoka; Tohnai, Genki; Qiang, Qiang; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Yanagawa, Toru; Warabi, Eiji; Ishii, Tetsuro; Sobue, Gen

    2013-05-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are inherited neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the expansion of trinucleotide CAG repeats in the causative genes. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an inherited motor neuron disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyQ tract within the androgen receptor (AR). p62 is a ubiquitin- and light-chain 3-binding protein that is known to regulate the degradation of targeted proteins via autophagy and inclusion formation. In this study, we examined the effects of p62 depletion and overexpression on cultured cells and in a transgenic mouse model that overexpressed the mutant AR. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of p62 significantly exacerbated motor phenotypes and the neuropathological outcome, whereas overexpression of p62 protected against mutant AR toxicity in SBMA mice. Depletion of p62 significantly increased the levels of monomeric mutant AR and mutant AR protein complexes in an SBMA mouse model via the impairment of autophagic degradation. In addition, p62 overexpression improved SBMA mouse phenotypes by inducing cytoprotective inclusion formation. Our results demonstrate that p62 provides two different therapeutic targets in SBMA pathogenesis: (1) autophagy-dependent degradation and (2) benevolent inclusion formation of the mutant AR.

  4. Acylated and unacylated ghrelin impair skeletal muscle atrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome associated with cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, and several other disease states. It is characterized by weight loss, fatigue, loss of appetite, and skeletal muscle atrophy and is associated with poor patient prognosis, making it an important treatment target. Ghreli...

  5. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation of SMN1 and NAIP Deletions in Korean Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun-Ji; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Yoo, Han-Wook; Lee, Beom Hee; Kim, Gu-Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. Most SMA patients have a homozygous deletion in survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene is considered a phenotype modifier. We investigated the genotype-phenotype correlation of SMN1 and NAIP deletions in Korean SMA patients. Methods Thirty-three patients (12 males and 21 females) treated at the Asan Medical Center between 1999 and 2013 were analyzed retrospectively. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis, and multiplex PCR were used to detect deletions in SMN1 (exons 7 and 8) and NAIP (exons 4 and 5). We reviewed clinical presentations and outcomes and categorized the patients into three clinical types. NAIP deletion-driven differences between the two genotypes were analyzed. Results Deletion analysis identified homozygous deletions of SMN1 exons 7 and 8 in 30 patients (90.9%). Among these, compared with patients without an NAIP deletion, those with an NAIP deletion showed a significantly lower age at symptom onset (1.9±1.7 months vs. 18.4±20.4 months, mean±SD; p=0.007), more frequent type 1 phenotype (6/6 vs. 8/24, p=0.005), and worse outcomes, with early death or a requirement for ventilator support (4/4 vs. 2/12, p=0.008). Conclusions Homozygous deletion in SMN1 and a concurrent NAIP deletion were associated with an early onset, severe hypotonia, and worse outcome in SMA patients. Deletion analysis of NAIP and SMN1 can help to accurately predict prognostic outcomes in SMA. PMID:27730768

  6. Enhanced aggregation of androgen receptor in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nihei, Yoshihiro; Ito, Daisuke; Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Yagi, Takuya; Yoshizaki, Takahito; Okano, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2013-03-22

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motor neuron disease caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Ligand-dependent nuclear accumulation of mutant AR protein is a critical characteristic of the pathogenesis of SBMA. SBMA has been modeled in AR-overexpressing animals, but precisely how the polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion leads to neurodegeneration is unclear. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a new technology that can be used to model human diseases, study pathogenic mechanisms, and develop novel drugs. We established SBMA patient-derived iPSCs, investigated their cellular biochemical characteristics, and found that SBMA-iPSCs can differentiate into motor neurons. The CAG repeat numbers in the AR gene of SBMA-iPSCs and also in the atrophin-1 gene of iPSCs derived from another polyQ disease, dentato-rubro-pallido-luysian atrophy (DRPLA), remain unchanged during reprogramming, long term passage, and differentiation, indicating that polyQ disease-associated CAG repeats are stable during maintenance of iPSCs. The level of AR expression is up-regulated by neuronal differentiation and treatment with the AR ligand dihydrotestosterone. Filter retardation assays indicated that aggregation of ARs following dihydrotestosterone treatment in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs increases significantly compared with neurological control iPSCs, easily recapitulating the pathological feature of mutant ARs in SBMA-iPSCs. This phenomenon was not observed in iPSCs and fibroblasts, thereby showing the neuron-dominant phenotype of this disease. Furthermore, the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylaminogeldanamycin sharply decreased the level of aggregated AR in neurons derived from SBMA-iPSCs, indicating a potential for discovery and validation of candidate drugs. We found that SBMA-iPSCs possess disease-specific biochemical features and could thus open new avenues of research into not only SBMA, but also other polyglutamine diseases.

  7. Cross-disease comparison of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy reveals conservation of selective vulnerability but differential neuromuscular junction pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comley, Laura H; Nijssen, Jik; Frost-Nylen, Johanna; Hedlund, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Neuromuscular junctions are primary pathological targets in the lethal motor neuron diseases spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Synaptic pathology and denervation of target muscle fibers has been reported prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms in mouse models of both diseases, suggesting that neuromuscular junctions are highly vulnerable from the very early stages, and are a key target for therapeutic intervention. Here we examined neuromuscular pathology longitudinally in three clinically relevant muscle groups in mouse models of ALS and SMA in order to assess their relative vulnerabilities. We show for the first time that neuromuscular junctions of the extraocular muscles (responsible for the control of eye movement) were resistant to degeneration in endstage SMA mice, as well as in late symptomatic ALS mice. Tongue muscle neuromuscular junctions were also spared in both animal models. Conversely, neuromuscular junctions of the lumbrical muscles of the hind-paw were vulnerable in both SMA and ALS, with a loss of neuronal innervation and shrinkage of motor endplates in both diseases. Thus, the pattern of selective vulnerability was conserved across these two models of motor neuron disease. However, the first evidence of neuromuscular pathology occurred at different timepoints of disease progression, with much earlier evidence of presynaptic involvement in ALS, progressing to changes on the postsynaptic side. Conversely, in SMA changes appeared concomitantly at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that mechanisms of neuromuscular disruption are distinct in these diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1424-1442, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Cross‐disease comparison of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy reveals conservation of selective vulnerability but differential neuromuscular junction pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijssen, Jik; Frost‐Nylen, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular junctions are primary pathological targets in the lethal motor neuron diseases spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Synaptic pathology and denervation of target muscle fibers has been reported prior to the appearance of clinical symptoms in mouse models of both diseases, suggesting that neuromuscular junctions are highly vulnerable from the very early stages, and are a key target for therapeutic intervention. Here we examined neuromuscular pathology longitudinally in three clinically relevant muscle groups in mouse models of ALS and SMA in order to assess their relative vulnerabilities. We show for the first time that neuromuscular junctions of the extraocular muscles (responsible for the control of eye movement) were resistant to degeneration in endstage SMA mice, as well as in late symptomatic ALS mice. Tongue muscle neuromuscular junctions were also spared in both animal models. Conversely, neuromuscular junctions of the lumbrical muscles of the hind‐paw were vulnerable in both SMA and ALS, with a loss of neuronal innervation and shrinkage of motor endplates in both diseases. Thus, the pattern of selective vulnerability was conserved across these two models of motor neuron disease. However, the first evidence of neuromuscular pathology occurred at different timepoints of disease progression, with much earlier evidence of presynaptic involvement in ALS, progressing to changes on the postsynaptic side. Conversely, in SMA changes appeared concomitantly at the neuromuscular junction, suggesting that mechanisms of neuromuscular disruption are distinct in these diseases. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1424–1442, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26502195

  9. The analysis of antioxidant expression during muscle atrophy induced by hindlimb suspension in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuoc, Tran-Non; Kim, Suhee; Ahn, Sun Hee; Lee, Jin-Sil; Park, Byung-Ju; Lee, Tae-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to acceleration of muscle atrophy. However, it is still not completely understood what triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during muscle atrophy. The objective of this study was to investigate redox balance during muscle atrophy. ROS generators and antioxidants were analyzed in atrophied soleus muscles after 2 weeks of hindlimb suspension (HLS) in mice. The HLS group showed an increase in lipid peroxidation, upregulated NOX1 and NOXO1, and downregulated mitochondrial complex I subunits NDUFS5 and NDUFV2. Additionally, HLS mice demonstrated a decrease in Prdx5 and MnSOD, but an increase in GPX2 and GPX3 in both mRNA and protein levels. As expected, MnSOD activity declined in the HLS group, while GPX activity was enhanced. These results suggest that redox imbalance occurs during muscle atrophy through NOX1 activation, mitochondrial complex I deficiency, and disturbance of antioxidants. Antioxidants altered by HLS may represent potential therapeutic targets for the protection against muscle atrophy.

  10. How to diagnose muscular atrophy in children%小儿肌肉萎缩的诊断思路及鉴别诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张成

    2009-01-01

    在临床上,小儿肌肉萎缩较为常见,但由于皮下脂肪较厚不易发现.详细询问病史,仔细观察患儿的运动功能、哭声大小、卧位和坐立姿势,全面查体,合理的辅助检查等,均有助于早期诊断婴幼儿的肌肉萎缩疾病.%In clinical practice, muscular atrophy is a common sign in children. Because of relatively thick subcutaneous fat in children, muscular atrophy is not easy to be discovered. In order to confirm the diagnosis earlier, it is very important to take history in detail, to observe the motor function, cry, the posture of sitting and standing carefully, to do the physical examination thoroughly, and to use the assistant test reasonably.

  11. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A: Co-existence of two rare neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagnelli, Anna; Scaioli, Vidmer; Piscosquito, Giuseppe; Salsano, Ettore; Dalla Bella, Eleonora; Gellera, Cinzia; Pareyson, Davide

    2015-10-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by a trinucleotide CAG repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene; it is clinically characterized by adult-onset, slowly progressive weakness and atrophy mainly affecting proximal limb and bulbar muscles. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A is an autosomal dominant polyneuropathy due to peripheral myelin protein 22 gene duplication and characterized by slowly progressive distal limb muscle weakness, atrophy and sensory loss with foot deformities. Here we report the co-occurrence of both neuromuscular genetic diseases in the same male patient. Difficulties in climbing stairs and jaw weakness were presenting symptoms consistent with SBMA. However, predominant distal weakness and bilateral pes cavus were rather suggestive of a hereditary polyneuropathy. The combination of two diseases, even if extremely rare, should be considered in the presence of atypical symptoms; in the case of genetic diseases this event may have important implications on family members' counseling.

  12. An Evaluation of a Continuing Education Program for Family Caregivers of Ventilator-Dependent Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S. Boroughs

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Until 25 years ago, there were limited options for long-term mechanical ventilation of children, and the majority of children were cared for in hospitals. However, with improving technology, the pediatric intensive care unit has moved from the hospital to a home setting, as children with increasingly complex healthcare needs are now often cared for by family members. One of the most complex care conditions involves ventilator and tracheostomy support. Advanced respiratory technologies that augment natural respiratory function prolong the lives of children with respiratory compromise; however, this care often comes with serious risks, including respiratory muscle impairment, respiratory failure, and chronic pulmonary disease. Both non-invasive assisted ventilation and assisted ventilation via tracheostomy can prolong survival into adulthood in many cases; however, mechanical ventilation in the home is a high-stakes, high risk intervention. Increasing complexity of care over time requires perpetual skill training of family caregivers that is delivered and supported by professional caregivers; yet, opportunities for additional training outside of the hospital rarely exist. Recent data has confirmed that repetitive caregiver education is essential for retention of memory and skills in adult learners. This study analyzes the use of continued education and training in the community for family caregivers of ventilator-dependent children diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA.

  13. Improved antisense oligonucleotide design to suppress aberrant SMN2 gene transcript processing: towards a treatment for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalermchai Mitrpant

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is caused by loss of the Survival Motor Neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, resulting in reduced SMN protein. Humans possess the additional SMN2 gene (or genes that does produce low level of full length SMN, but cannot adequately compensate for loss of SMN1 due to aberrant splicing. The majority of SMN2 gene transcripts lack exon 7 and the resultant SMNΔ7 mRNA is translated into an unstable and non-functional protein. Splice intervention therapies to promote exon 7 retention and increase amounts of full-length SMN2 transcript offer great potential as a treatment for SMA patients. Several splice silencing motifs in SMN2 have been identified as potential targets for antisense oligonucleotide mediated splice modification. A strong splice silencer is located downstream of exon 7 in SMN2 intron 7. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting this motif promoted SMN2 exon 7 retention in the mature SMN2 transcripts, with increased SMN expression detected in SMA fibroblasts. We report here systematic optimisation of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotides (PMO that promote exon 7 retention to levels that rescued the phenotype in a severe mouse model of SMA after intracerebroventricular delivery. Furthermore, the PMO gives the longest survival reported to date after a single dosing by ICV.

  14. Motor unit loss estimation by the multipoint incremental MUNE method in children with spinal muscular atrophy--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, Malgorzata; Kostera-Pruszczyk, Anna; Lusakowska, Anna; Jedrzejowska, Maria; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Lipowska, Marta; Gawel, Damian; Kaminska, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative EMG reflects denervation of muscles after lower motor neuron degeneration in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) but does not reflect actual motor unit loss. The aim of our study was to assess the value of the multipoint incremental motor unit number estimation (MUNE) method in the modification by Shefner in estimating motor unit loss in SMA. The number of motor units, the mean amplitude of an average surface-detected single motor unit potential (SMUP), and the amplitude of compound motor action potentials (CMAP) were estimated in 14 children with SMA in the abductor pollicis brevis (ABP). Significant differences in MUNE values and SMUP and CMAP amplitude were found between the SMA and control groups (P < 0.0001). MUNE values correlated with Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (HFMS) scores (P < 0.05). Increased SMUP amplitude values correlated with decreased HFMS scores (P < 0.05). The study confirms that MUNE method in the modification by Shefner is a useful tool reflecting motor unit loss in SMA, and it is easy to perform and well tolerated. MUNE and SMUP amplitude seemed to be sensitive parameters reflecting motor dysfunction in SMA but a longitudinal study in a larger number of subjects is needed.

  15. An Evaluation of a Continuing Education Program for Family Caregivers of Ventilator-Dependent Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Deborah S

    2017-04-29

    Until 25 years ago, there were limited options for long-term mechanical ventilation of children, and the majority of children were cared for in hospitals. However, with improving technology, the pediatric intensive care unit has moved from the hospital to a home setting, as children with increasingly complex healthcare needs are now often cared for by family members. One of the most complex care conditions involves ventilator and tracheostomy support. Advanced respiratory technologies that augment natural respiratory function prolong the lives of children with respiratory compromise; however, this care often comes with serious risks, including respiratory muscle impairment, respiratory failure, and chronic pulmonary disease. Both non-invasive assisted ventilation and assisted ventilation via tracheostomy can prolong survival into adulthood in many cases; however, mechanical ventilation in the home is a high-stakes, high risk intervention. Increasing complexity of care over time requires perpetual skill training of family caregivers that is delivered and supported by professional caregivers; yet, opportunities for additional training outside of the hospital rarely exist. Recent data has confirmed that repetitive caregiver education is essential for retention of memory and skills in adult learners. This study analyzes the use of continued education and training in the community for family caregivers of ventilator-dependent children diagnosed with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  16. Increased fat mass and high incidence of overweight despite low body mass index in patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproule, Douglas M.; Montes, Jacqueline; Montgomery, Megan; Battista, Vanessa; Koenigsberger, Dorcas; Shen, Wei; Punyanitya, Mark; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Kaufmann, Petra

    2009-01-01

    Body composition is sparsely described in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Body (BMI, mass/height in m2), fat-free (FFMI, lean mass/height in m2) and fat (FMI, fat mass/height in m2) mass indexes were estimated in 25 children (ages 5–18) with SMA (2 type I, 13 type II, 10 type III) using dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry and anthropometric data referenced to gender and age-matched healthy children (NHANES III, New York Pediatric Rosetta Body Project). BMI was ≥ 50th percentile in 11 (44%) and ≥ 85th in 5 (20%). FFMI was reduced (p<0.005) and FMI was increased (P<0.005) in the overall study cohort. FMI was ≥ 50th, ≥ 85th and 95th percentiles in 19 (76%), 10 (40%) and 5 (20%) subjects, respectively. Using a receiver operator characteristic curve, BMI above 75th, 50th and 3rd percentiles maximized sensitivity and specificity for FMI ≥ 95th, ≥ 85th and ≥ 50th percentiles, respectively. Children with SMA have reduced lean and increased fat mass compared to healthy children. Obesity is a potentially important modifiable source of morbidity in SMA. PMID:19427208

  17. A missense mutation in the 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase FVT1 as candidate causal mutation for bovine spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Stefan; Medugorac, Ivica; Röther, Susanne; Strässer, Katja; Förster, Martin

    2007-04-17

    The bovine form of the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) shows striking similarity to the human form of the disease. It has, however, been mapped to a genomic region not harboring the bovine orthologue of the SMN gene, mutation of which causes human SMA. After refinement of the mapping results we analyzed positional and functional candidate genes. One of three candidate genes, FVT1, encoding 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, which catalyzes a crucial step in the glycosphingolipid metabolism, showed a G-to-A missense mutation that changes Ala-175 to Thr. The identified mutation is limited to SMA-affected animals and carriers and always appears in context of the founder haplotype. The Ala variant found in healthy animals showed the expected 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase activity in an in vitro enzyme assay. Importantly, the Thr variant found in SMA animals showed no detectable activity. Surprisingly, in an in vivo assay the mutated gene complements the growth defect of a homologous yeast knockout strain as well as the healthy variant. This finding explains the viability of affected newborn calves and the later neuron-specific onset of the disease, which might be due to the high sensitivity of these neurons to changes in housekeeping functions. Taken together, the described mutation in FVT1 is a strong candidate for causality of SMA in cattle. This result provides an animal model for understanding the underlying mechanisms of the development of SMA and will allow efficient selection against the disease in cattle.

  18. Assessing Function and Endurance in Adults with Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy: Validity of the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O. Harris-Love

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The adult myopathy assessment tool (AMAT is a performance-based battery comprised of functional and endurance subscales that can be completed in approximately 30 minutes without the use of specialized equipment. The purpose of this study was to determine the construct validity and internal consistency of the AMAT with a sample of adults with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA. Methods. AMAT validity was assessed in 56-male participants with genetically confirmed SBMA (mean age, 53 ± 10 years. The participants completed the AMAT and assessments for disease status, strength, and functional status. Results. Lower AMAT scores were associated with longer disease duration (r=-0.29; P<0.03 and lower serum androgen levels (r=0.49–0.59; P<0.001. The AMAT was significantly correlated with strength and functional status (r=0.82–0.88; P<0.001. The domains of the AMAT exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.77–0.89; P<0.001. Conclusions. The AMAT is a standardized, performance-based tool that may be used to assess functional limitations and muscle endurance. The AMAT has good internal consistency, and the construct validity of the AMAT is supported by its significant associations with hormonal, strength, and functional characteristics of adults with SBMA. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00303446.

  19. Rapid genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis of spinal muscular atrophy by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-yan; WU Ling-qian; PAN Qian; TANG Bei-sha; LIANG De-sheng; LONG Zhi-gao; DAI He-ping; XIA Kun; XIA Jia-hui

    2006-01-01

    @@ Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder1 (1in 6000 to 10 000 births) caused by mutations in the SMN1 gene at 5q13. More than 90%-98% of SMA patients show homozygous deletion of SMN1,2which has proved to be useful in the diagnosis of SMA. But it is hampered because of the existence of a highly homologous gene, SMN2.3 Based on nucleotide mismatches between SMN1 and SMN2,the following two DNA tests are usually performed:single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP)3and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by a restriction enzyme digestion.4,5 In this study we developed a new method for rapid genetic diagnosis of SMA by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), which is based on different retention of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes in detecting the homozygous deletion of SMN1. Both genetic and prenatal diagnoses were performed successfully for a SMA family by DHPLC, which was confirmed as a rapid and effective technique for detecting the deletion of SMN1.

  20. Reorganization of Cajal bodies and nucleolar targeting of coilin in motor neurons of type I spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Olga; Bengoechea, Rocío; Palanca, Ana; Arteaga, Rosa; Val-Bernal, J Fernando; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2012-05-01

    Type I spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by loss or mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The reduction in SMN protein levels in SMA leads to degeneration and death of motor neurons. In this study, we have analyzed the nuclear reorganization of Cajal bodies, PML bodies and nucleoli in type I SMA motor neurons with homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of the SMN1 gene. Western blot analysis is is revealed a marked reduction of SMN levels compared to the control sample. Using a neuronal dissociation procedure to perform a careful immunocytochemical and quantitative analysis of nuclear bodies, we demonstrated a severe decrease in the mean number of Cajal bodies per neuron and in the proportion of motor neurons containing these structures in type I SMA. Moreover, most Cajal bodies fail to recruit SMN and spliceosomal snRNPs, but contain the proteasome activator PA28, a molecular marker associated with the cellular stress response. Neuronal stress in SMA motor neurons also increases PML body number. The existence of chromatolysis and eccentric nuclei in SMA motor neurons correlates with Cajal body disruption and nucleolar relocalization of coil in, a Cajal body marker. Our results indicate that the Cajal body is a pathophysiological target in type I SMA motor neurons. They also suggest the Cajal body-dependent dysfunction of snRNP biogenesis and, therefore, pre-mRNA splicing in these neurons seems to be an essential component for SMA pathogenesis.

  1. Distinct domains of the spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN are required for targeting to Cajal bodies in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Khoobarry, Kevinee; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Cibert, Christian; Viollet, Louis; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2006-02-15

    Mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN1 cause the inherited disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ubiquitous SMN protein facilitates the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The protein is detected in the cytoplasm, nucleoplasm and enriched with snRNPs in nuclear Cajal bodies. It is structurally divided into at least an amino-terminal region rich in basic amino acid residues, a central Tudor domain, a self-association tyrosine-glycine-box and an exon7-encoded C-terminus. To examine the domains required for the intranuclear localization of SMN, we have used fluorescently tagged protein mutants transiently overexpressed in mammalian cells. The basic amino acid residues direct nucleolar localization of SMN mutants. The Tudor domain promotes localization of proteins in the nucleus and it cooperates with the basic amino acid residues and the tyrosine-glycine-box for protein localization in Cajal bodies. Moreover, the most frequent disease-linked mutant SMNDeltaex7 reduces accumulation of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, suggesting that the C-terminus of SMN participates in targeting to Cajal bodies. A reduced number of Cajal bodies in patient fibroblasts associates with the absence of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, revealing that intranuclear snRNA organization is modified in disease. These results indicate that direct and indirect mechanisms regulate localization of SMN in Cajal bodies.

  2. Sensory neurons do not induce motor neuron loss in a human stem cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Andrew J; Ebert, Allison D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder leading to paralysis and early death due to reduced SMN protein. It is unclear why there is such a profound motor neuron loss, but recent evidence from fly and mouse studies indicate that cells comprising the whole sensory-motor circuit may contribute to motor neuron dysfunction and loss. Here, we used induced pluripotent stem cells derived from SMA patients to test whether sensory neurons directly contribute to motor neuron loss. We generated sensory neurons from SMA induced pluripotent stem cells and found no difference in neuron generation or survival, although there was a reduced calcium response to depolarizing stimuli. Using co-culture of SMA induced pluripotent stem cell derived sensory neurons with control induced pluripotent stem cell derived motor neurons, we found no significant reduction in motor neuron number or glutamate transporter boutons on motor neuron cell bodies or neurites. We conclude that SMA sensory neurons do not overtly contribute to motor neuron loss in this human stem cell system.

  3. Analysis of the conformation of the androgen receptor in spinal bulbar muscular atrophy by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Tobias; Cato, Andrew C B

    2014-01-01

    Spinal bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) (also known as Kennedy's disease) is a motor degenerative disease caused by an amplification of the polyglutamine stretch at the N-terminus of the human androgen receptor (AR). Amplifications larger than 40 glutamine residues are thought to lead to the disease. A characteristic feature of this disease is a ligand-dependent misfolding and aggregation of the mutant receptor that lead to the death of motor neurons. Initially, large cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates reaching sizes of 6 μm were thought to be the pathogenic agents. Later studies have suggested that oligomeric species with sizes of less than 1 μm that occur prior to the formation of the larger aggregates are the toxic agents. However, there have been disagreements regarding the shape of these oligomers, as most studies have been carried out with peptide fragments of the androgen receptor containing different lengths of polyglutamine stretch. We have isolated the wild-type AR with a polyglutamine stretch of 22 (ARQ22) and a mutant receptor with a stretch of 65 (ARQ65) using a baculovirus system and have analyzed the oligomeric structures formed by these receptors with atomic force microscopy. This method has allowed us to determine the conformations of the full-length wild-type and mutant AR and revealed the conformation of the mutant AR that causes SBMA.

  4. Pan-ethnic carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis for spinal muscular atrophy: clinical laboratory analysis of >72,400 specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Elaine A; Nagan, Narasimhan; Zhu, Hui; Akmaev, Viatcheslav R; Zhou, Zhaoqing; Rohlfs, Elizabeth M; Flynn, Kerry; Hendrickson, Brant C; Scholl, Thomas; Sirko-Osadsa, Deborah Alexa; Allitto, Bernice A

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading inherited cause of infant death with a reported incidence of ~1 in 10,000 live births and is second to cystic fibrosis as a common, life-shortening autosomal recessive disorder. The American College of Medical Genetics has recommended population carrier screening for SMA, regardless of race or ethnicity, to facilitate informed reproductive options, although other organizations have cited the need for additional large-scale studies before widespread implementation. We report our data from carrier testing (n = 72,453) and prenatal diagnosis (n = 121) for this condition. Our analysis of large-scale population carrier screening data (n = 68,471) demonstrates the technical feasibility of high throughput testing and provides mutation carrier and allele frequencies at a level of accuracy afforded by large data sets. In our United States pan-ethnic population, the calculated a priori carrier frequency of SMA is 1/54 with a detection rate of 91.2%, and the pan-ethnic disease incidence is calculated to be 1/11,000. Carrier frequency and detection rates provided for six major ethnic groups in the United States range from 1/47 and 94.8% in the Caucasian population to 1/72 and 70.5% in the African American population, respectively. This collective experience can be utilized to facilitate accurate pre- and post-test counseling in the settings of carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis for SMA.

  5. [The role of RNA splicing in the pathogenesis of spinal muscular atrophy and development of its therapeutics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahashi, Kentaro; Sobue, Gen

    2014-12-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in SMN1 cause spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant mortality. Degeneration of alpha-motor neurons that results in progressive paralysis is a pathological hallmark of SMA. Recently, peripheral-tissue involvement has also been reported in SMA. Patients have low levels of functional SMN which is attributed to alternative splicing in SMN2, a gene closely-related to SMN1. This decrease in the expression of SMN, a ubiquitously expressed protein involved in promoting snRNP assembly required for splicing, is responsible for SMA. However, the mechanism through which decrease in SMN levels causes SMA remains unclear. Currently, no curative treatment is available for SMA, but SMN restoration is thought to be necessary and sufficient for cure. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) can be designed to specifically alter splicing patterns of target pre-mRNAs. We identified an ASO that redirects SMN2 splicing and is currently in clinical trials for use as RNA-targeting therapeutics. Further, we have also reported a novel application of splicing-modulating ASOs--creation of animal phenocopy models of diseases by inducing mis-splicing. Exploring the relationship between the spatial and temporal effects of therapeutic and pathogenic ASOs yields relevant insights into the roles of SMN in SMA pathogenesis and into its normal physiological functions. This knowledge, in turn, contributes to the ongoing development of targeted therapeutics.

  6. Sleep disorders in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease): a controlled polysomnographic and self-reported questionnaires study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romigi, Andrea; Liguori, Claudio; Placidi, Fabio; Albanese, Maria; Izzi, Francesca; Uasone, Elisabetta; Terracciano, Chiara; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Ludovisi, Raffaella; Massa, Roberto

    2014-05-01

    No data are available regarding the occurrence of sleep disorders in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). We investigated the sleep-wake cycle in SBMA patients compared with healthy subjects. Nine SBMA outpatients and nine age-matched and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated. Subjective quality of sleep was assessed by means of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used in order to evaluate excessive daytime sleepiness. All participants underwent a 48-h polysomnography followed by the multiple sleep latency test. Time in bed, total sleep time and sleep efficiency were significantly lower in SBMA than controls. Furthermore, the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was significantly higher in SBMA than controls. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA: AHI >5/h) was evident in 6/9 patients (66.6 %). REM sleep without atonia was evident in three patients also affected by OSA and higher AHI in REM; 2/9 (22.2 %) SBMA patients showed periodic limb movements in sleep. The global PSQI score was higher in SBMA versus controls. Sleep quality in SBMA is poorer than in controls. OSA is the most common sleep disorder in SBMA. The sleep impairment could be induced both by OSA or/and the neurodegenerative processes involving crucial areas regulating the sleep-wake cycle.

  7. Transcriptional profile of muscle following acute induction of symptoms in a mouse model of Kennedy's disease/spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Halievski

    Full Text Available Kennedy's disease/Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (KD/SBMA is a degenerative neuromuscular disease affecting males. This disease is caused by polyglutamine expansion mutations of the androgen receptor (AR gene. Although KD/SBMA has been traditionally considered a motor neuron disease, emerging evidence points to a central etiological role of muscle. We previously reported a microarray study of genes differentially expressed in muscle of three genetically unique mouse models of KD/SBMA but were unable to detect those which are androgen-dependent or are associated with onset of symptoms.In the current study we examined the time course and androgen-dependence of transcriptional changes in the HSA-AR transgenic (Tg mouse model, in which females have a severe phenotype after acute testosterone treatment. Using microarray analysis we identified differentially expressed genes at the onset and peak of muscle weakness in testosterone-treated Tg females. We found both transient and persistent groups of differentially expressed genes and analysis of gene function indicated functional groups such as mitochondrion, ion and nucleotide binding, muscle development, and sarcomere maintenance.By comparing the current results with those from the three previously reported models we were able to identify KD/SBMA candidate genes that are androgen dependent, and occur early in the disease process, properties which are promising for targeted therapeutics.

  8. Decreased Peak Expiratory Flow Associated with Muscle Fiber-Type Switching in Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinichiro; Hashizume, Atsushi; Hijikata, Yasuhiro; Inagaki, Tomonori; Suzuki, Keisuke; Kondo, Naohide; Kawai, Kaori; Noda, Seiya; Nakanishi, Hirotaka; Banno, Haruhiko; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Koike, Haruki; Halievski, Katherine; Jordan, Cynthia L; Katsuno, Masahisa; Sobue, Gen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the respiratory function profile of subjects with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), and to explore the underlying pathological mechanism by comparing the clinical and biochemical indices of this disease with those of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We enrolled male subjects with SBMA (n = 40) and ALS (n = 25) along with 15 healthy control subjects, and assessed their respiratory function, motor function, and muscle strength. Predicted values of peak expiratory flow (%PEF) and forced vital capacity were decreased in subjects with SBMA compared with controls. In SBMA, both values were strongly correlated with the trunk subscores of the motor function tests and showed deterioration relative to disease duration. Compared with activities of daily living (ADL)-matched ALS subjects, %PEF, tongue pressure, and grip power were substantially decreased in subjects with SBMA. Both immunofluorescence and RT-PCR demonstrated a selective decrease in the expression levels of the genes encoding the myosin heavy chains specific to fast-twitch fibers in SBMA subjects. The mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta were up-regulated in SBMA compared with ALS and controls. In conclusion, %PEF is a disease-specific respiratory marker for the severity and progression of SBMA. Explosive muscle strength, including %PEF, was selectively affected in subjects with SBMA and was associated with activation of the mitochondrial biogenesis-related molecular pathway in skeletal muscles.

  9. Morphological changes of skeletal muscle in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), Kennedy's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acewicz, Albert; Wierzba-Bobrowicz, Teresa; Lewandowska, Eliza; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, Halina; Sulek, Anna; Antczak, Jakub; Rakowicz, Maria; Ryglewicz, Danuta

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, Kennedy's disease) is an X-linked recessive disease affecting lower motor neurons. In the present case report, we describe morphological changes in a muscle biopsy obtained from a 62-year-old patient with gynecomastia and with the following neurological symptoms: dysphagia, dysarthria, wasting and fasciculation of the tongue, proximal weakness, fasciculations in the limb muscles, and an absence of all tendon reflexes. Neurogenic alternations were predominantly observed using light and electron microscopy. The angulated atrophic muscle fibers formed bundles. The numerous nuclei were pyknotic or pale, some of them were also ubiquitin positive; they were grouped inside so-called "nuclear sacks". At the ultrastructural level, atrophic muscle fibers revealed disruption and loss of sarcomeres, duplication of Z-line, and rod-like structures. The nuclei, often with irregular shapes, revealed varying degrees of chromatin condensation, from dispersed to highly condensed, like pyknotic nuclei. Occasionally electron-dense inclusions in the nuclei were found. Some myogenic features like hypertrophic muscle fibers and proliferation of connective tissue were also visible. The neurogenic and myogenic pathological changes suggested SBMA, which was confirmed with genetic analysis (trinucleotide CAG (glutamie)-repeat expansion in the androgen-receptor gene).

  10. Motor Neurons Exhibit Sustained Loss of Atrophy Reversal in Immunodeficent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi; Petitto, John M

    2013-01-01

    Our lab showed previously that whereas a substantial portion of chronically resected facial motor neurons reside in an atrophied state that can be reversed at 14 days following reinjury in wild-type (WT) mice, atrophy reversal was altered in immunodeficient mice. It was unclear, however, if the abnormal response at day 14 post-reinjury in immunodeficient mice might be due to differences in the kinetics of the reversal response or impaired regeneration. We sought to address this question, and test our working hypothesis that the normal regeneration of atrophied motor neurons is dependent on normal adaptive immunity, by comparing WT and immunodeficient recombination activating gene-2 knockout (RAG2-KO) mice that lack a mature T and B lymphocytes, at 3 and 28 days following reinjury. In WT mice, facial motor neurons that were resected for 10 weeks and subsequently reinjured for 3 days were able to regain fully an apparent 40% loss of countable neurons, and nearly 45% of that robust increase in neurons was sustained at 28 days post-reinjury in the WT mice. By contrast, at both 3 and 28 days post-reinjury RAG2-KO mice failed to show any increase in neuronal number. Size measurements showed that the surviving neurons of WT and RAG2-KO mice exhibited substantial motor neuron hypertrophy at 3 days post-reinjury, and similar levels of normal size motor neurons by 28 days post-reinjury. Among the WT mice, small numbers of T lymphocytes where found in the reinjured facial motor nucleus (FMN), and were significantly higher at 3 days, but not 28 days, in the reinjury compared to sham-reinjury groups. No differences were seen between the WT and RAG2-KO mice in overall microglial cell activity using CD11b expression following reinjury. These data suggest that many resected motor neurons did not survive the initial resection in RAG2-KO mice, whereas in WT mice they atrophied and could be restimulated by reinjury to regenerate their phenotype. Moreover, they indicate that normal T

  11. Advanced glycation end-products induce skeletal muscle atrophy and dysfunction in diabetic mice via a RAGE-mediated, AMPK-down-regulated, Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chen-Yuan; Yang, Rong-Sen; Sheu, Meei-Ling; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Yang, Ting-Hua; Tsai, Keh-Sung; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2016-02-01

    Diabetic myopathy, a less studied complication of diabetes, exhibits the clinical observations characterized by a less muscle mass, muscle weakness and a reduced physical functional capacity. Accumulation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), known to play a role in diabetic complications, has been identified in ageing human skeletal muscles. However, the role of AGEs in diabetic myopathy remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of AGEs on myogenic differentiation and muscle atrophy in vivo and in vitro. We also evaluated the therapeutic potential of alagebrium chloride (Ala-Cl), an inhibitor of AGEs. Muscle fibre atrophy and immunoreactivity for AGEs, Atrogin-1 (a muscle atrophy marker) and phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) expressions were markedly increased in human skeletal muscles from patients with diabetes as compared with control subjects. Moreover, in diabetic mice we found increased blood AGEs, less muscle mass, lower muscular endurance, atrophic muscle size and poor regenerative capacity, and increased levels of muscle AGE and receptor for AGE (RAGE), Atrogin-1 and phosphorylated AMPK, which could be significantly ameliorated by Ala-Cl. Furthermore, in vitro, AGEs (in a dose-dependent manner) reduced myotube diameters (myotube atrophy) and induced Atrogin-1 protein expression in myotubes differentiated from both mouse myoblasts and primary human skeletal muscle-derived progenitor cells. AGEs exerted a negative regulation of myogenesis of mouse and human myoblasts. Ala-Cl significantly inhibited the effects of AGEs on myotube atrophy and myogenesis. We further demonstrated that AGEs induced muscle atrophy/myogenesis impairment via a RAGE-mediated AMPK-down-regulation of the Akt signalling pathway. Our findings support that AGEs play an important role in diabetic myopathy, and that an inhibitor of AGEs may offer a therapeutic strategy for managing the dysfunction of muscle due to diabetes or ageing. Copyright © 2015

  12. [Animal models of neurodegenerative diseases on the road to disease-modifying therapy: spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobue, Gen

    2007-11-01

    SBMA is a hereditary neurodegenerative disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat, which encodes the polyglutamine tract, in the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The phenotypic difference with gender, which is a specific feature of SBMA, has been recapitulated in a transgenic mouse model of SBMA expressing the full-length human AR containing 97 CAGs under the control of a cytomegalovirus enhancer and a chicken beta-actin promoter (AR-97Q). Affected SBMA mice demonstrate small body size, short life span, progressive muscle atrophy and weakness as well as reduced cage activity, all of which are markedly pronounced and accelerated in the male SBMA mice, but either not observed or far less severe in the female SBMA mice. There is increasing evidence that testosterone, the ligand of AR, plays a pivotal role in the neurodegeneration in SBMA. The striking success of androgen deprivation therapy in SBMA mouse models has been translated into phase 2, and then phase 3, clinical trials. Moreover, animal studies have also been revealing key molecules in the pathogenesis of SBMA such as heat shock proteins, transcriptional co-activators, and axon motors, suggesting additional therapeutic targets.

  13. The Power of Human Protective Modifiers: PLS3 and CORO1C Unravel Impaired Endocytosis in Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Rescue SMA Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinibarkooie, Seyyedmohsen; Peters, Miriam; Torres-Benito, Laura; Rastetter, Raphael H; Hupperich, Kristina; Hoffmann, Andrea; Mendoza-Ferreira, Natalia; Kaczmarek, Anna; Janzen, Eva; Milbradt, Janine; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C Frank; Guschlbauer, Christoph; Büschges, Ansgar; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Riessland, Markus; Kye, Min Jeong; Clemen, Christoph S; Wirth, Brunhilde

    2016-09-01

    Homozygous loss of SMN1 causes spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the most common and devastating childhood genetic motor-neuron disease. The copy gene SMN2 produces only ∼10% functional SMN protein, insufficient to counteract development of SMA. In contrast, the human genetic modifier plastin 3 (PLS3), an actin-binding and -bundling protein, fully protects against SMA in SMN1-deleted individuals carrying 3-4 SMN2 copies. Here, we demonstrate that the combinatorial effect of suboptimal SMN antisense oligonucleotide treatment and PLS3 overexpression-a situation resembling the human condition in asymptomatic SMN1-deleted individuals-rescues survival (from 14 to >250 days) and motoric abilities in a severe SMA mouse model. Because PLS3 knockout in yeast impairs endocytosis, we hypothesized that disturbed endocytosis might be a key cellular mechanism underlying impaired neurotransmission and neuromuscular junction maintenance in SMA. Indeed, SMN deficit dramatically reduced endocytosis, which was restored to normal levels by PLS3 overexpression. Upon low-frequency electro-stimulation, endocytotic FM1-43 (SynaptoGreen) uptake in the presynaptic terminal of neuromuscular junctions was restored to control levels in SMA-PLS3 mice. Moreover, proteomics and biochemical analysis revealed CORO1C, another F-actin binding protein, whose direct binding to PLS3 is dependent on calcium. Similar to PLS3 overexpression, CORO1C overexpression restored fluid-phase endocytosis in SMN-knockdown cells by elevating F-actin amounts and rescued the axonal truncation and branching phenotype in Smn-depleted zebrafish. Our findings emphasize the power of genetic modifiers to unravel the cellular pathomechanisms underlying SMA and the power of combinatorial therapy based on splice correction of SMN2 and endocytosis improvement to efficiently treat SMA. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The spinal muscular atrophy with pontocerebellar hypoplasia gene VRK1 regulates neuronal migration through an amyloid-β precursor protein-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinograd-Byk, Hadar; Sapir, Tamar; Cantarero, Lara; Lazo, Pedro A; Zeligson, Sharon; Lev, Dorit; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Renbaum, Paul; Reiner, Orly; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-21

    Spinal muscular atrophy with pontocerebellar hypoplasia (SMA-PCH) is an infantile SMA variant with additional manifestations, particularly severe microcephaly. We previously identified a nonsense mutation in Vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1), R358X, as a cause of SMA-PCH. VRK1-R358X is a rare founder mutation in Ashkenazi Jews, and additional mutations in patients of different origins have recently been identified. VRK1 is a nuclear serine/threonine protein kinase known to play multiple roles in cellular proliferation, cell cycle regulation, and carcinogenesis. However, VRK1 was not known to have neuronal functions before its identification as a gene mutated in SMA-PCH. Here we show that VRK1-R358X homozygosity results in lack of VRK1 protein, and demonstrate a role for VRK1 in neuronal migration and neuronal stem cell proliferation. Using shRNA in utero electroporation in mice, we show that Vrk1 knockdown significantly impairs cortical neuronal migration, and affects the cell cycle of neuronal progenitors. Expression of wild-type human VRK1 rescues both proliferation and migration phenotypes. However, kinase-dead human VRK1 rescues only the migration impairment, suggesting the role of VRK1 in neuronal migration is partly noncatalytic. Furthermore, we found that VRK1 deficiency in human and mouse leads to downregulation of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), a known neuronal migration gene. APP overexpression rescues the phenotype caused by Vrk1 knockdown, suggesting that VRK1 affects neuronal migration through an APP-dependent mechanism.

  15. The experiences of families living with the anticipatory loss of a school-age child with spinal muscular atrophy - the parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bao-Huan; Mu, Pei-Fan; Wang, Wen-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    To probe into parents' anticipatory loss of school-age children with Type I or II spinal muscular atrophy. Spinal muscular atrophy is a rare disorder that causes death. Children die early due to either gradual atrophy or an infection of the lungs. Therefore, family members experience anticipatory loss, which causes grief before the actual loss. Family members feel physically and mentally exhausted, which results in a family crisis. Therefore, it is important to explore their experiences related to anticipatory loss to assist with the adjustment of the families to their circumstances. This study applied a phenomenology method and purposive sampling. The 19 parents who participated in this study were referred to us by two medical centers in Taiwan. Their average age was 32-49 years. Using in-depth interviews, this study explored parents' anticipatory loss. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. Meanings were extracted using Giorgi analysis, and precision was assessed according to Guba and Lincoln, which was treated as the evaluation standard. Four themes were identified from the parents' interviews. The themes included enduring the helplessness and pressure of care, suffering due to the child's rare and unknown condition, loss of hope and a reinforcement of the parent-child attachment, and avoiding the pressure of death and enriching the child's life. The research findings help nurses identify anticipatory loss among parents of school-age children with type I or II spinal muscular atrophy. They enhance health professionals' understanding of the panic that occurs in the society surrounding the families, family members' dynamic relationships, and the families' demands for care. In an attempt to providing intersubjective empathy and support with family having a child with type I and II SMA, nurses may recognize relevant family reactions and enhancing their hope and parent-child attachment. Encourage family members and child go beyond the pressure of death and

  16. Association of amyloid burden, brain atrophy and memory deficits in aged apolipoprotein ε4 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Junxiang; Turner, Gregory H; Coons, Stephen W; Maalouf, Marwan; Reiman, Eric M; Shi, Jiong

    2014-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele (ApoE4) has been associated with increased risk of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD) and of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to AD. But the underlying mechanism of ApoE4 affecting brain atrophy and cognition is not fully understood. We investigated the effect of ApoE4 on amyloid beta (Aβ) protein burden and its correlation with the structure change of hippocampus and cortex, cognitive and behavioral changes in ApoE4 transgenic mice. Male ApoE4 transgenic mice and age-matched control mice at age 12 months and 24 months were tested in the Morris Water Maze (MWM). Brain volume changes (including whole brain, hippocampus, cortex, total ventricles and caudate putamen) were assessed by using small animal 7T-MRI. Aβ level was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunoprecipitation/western blot. In MWM, escape latency was longer and time spent in the target quadrant was shorter in aged ApoE4 mice (12- and 24-month-old), suggesting age- and ApoE4-dependent visuospatial deficits. Atrophy on MRI was prominent in the hippocampus (p=0.039) and cortex (p=0.013) of ApoE4 mice (24-month-old) as compared to age-matched control mice. IHC revealed elevated Aβ deposition in the hippocampus. Consistently, both soluble and insoluble Aβ aggregates were increased in aged ApoE4 mice. This increase was correlated inversely with hippocampal atrophy and cognitive deficits. These data give further evidence that ApoE4 plays an important role in brain atrophy and memory impairment by modulating amyloid production and deposition.

  17. Understanding the muscular dystrophy caused by deletion of choline kinase beta in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gengshu; Sher, Roger B; Cox, Gregory A; Vance, Dennis E

    2009-05-01

    Choline kinase in mice is encoded by two genes, Chka and Chkb. Disruption of murine Chka leads to embryonic lethality, whereas a spontaneously occurring genomic deletion in murine Chkb results in neonatal bone deformity and hindlimb muscular dystrophy. We have investigated the mechanism by which a lack of choline kinase beta, encoded by Chkb, causes hindlimb muscular dystrophy. The biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC) is impaired in the hindlimbs of Chkb -/- mice, with an accumulation of choline and decreased amount of phosphocholine. The activity of CTP: phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase is also decreased in the hindlimb muscle of mutant mice. Concomitantly, the activities of PC phospholipase C and phospholipase A2 are increased. The mitochondria in Chkb -/- mice are abnormally large and exhibit decreased inner membrane potential. Despite the muscular dystrophy in Chkb -/- mice, we observed increased expression of insulin like growth factor 1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. However, regeneration of hindlimb muscles of Chkb -/- mice was impaired when challenged with cardiotoxin. Injection of CDP-choline increased PC content of hindlimb muscle and decreased creatine kinase activity in plasma of Chkb -/- mice. We conclude that the hindlimb muscular dystrophy in Chkb -/- mice is due to attenuated PC biosynthesis and enhanced catabolism of PC.

  18. Laminin alpha2 deficiency and muscular dystrophy; genotype-phenotype correlation in mutant mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, L T; Zhang, X U; Kuang, W

    2003-01-01

    Deficiency of laminin alpha2 is the cause of one of the most severe muscular dystrophies in humans and other species. It is not yet clear how particular mutations in the laminin alpha2 chain gene affect protein expression, and how abnormal levels or structure of the protein affect disease. Animal...... models may be valuable for such genotype-phenotype analysis and for determining mechanism of disease as well as function of laminin. Here, we have analyzed protein expression in three lines of mice with mutations in the laminin alpha2 chain gene and in two lines of transgenic mice overexpressing...... substantially prevented the muscular dystrophy in these mice. However, dy(W)/dy(W) mice, expressing the human laminin alpha2 under the control of the striated muscle-specific portion of the desmin promoter, still developed muscular dystrophy. This failure to rescue is apparently because of insufficient...

  19. Hindlimb unloading-induced muscle atrophy and phenotype transition is attenuated in Smad3+/- mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. P.; Zhang, P.; Liu, S. H.; Wang, F.; Ge, X.; Wu, Y.; Fan, M.

    Currently it has been well defined that the microgravity-induced muscle disuse characterized by atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition of the postural muscles such as soleus muscle but the basic mechanism underlying the atrophy and phenotype transition of soleus muscle is still unclear To investigate the developmental mechanisms of muscle atrophy and its phenotype transition under microgravity the soleus muscle of Smad3 and Smad3 - mice after 14 days hindlimb unloading was examined Using histology and immunohistochemistry assay we found that the soleus muscle volume and fiber number appeared a remarkable increases in Smad3 - mice compared to those in Smad3 control In addition Western blot analysis showed that the expression level of myosin heavy chain MHC -slow myofiber specific protein in soleus muscle was visibly higher in Smad3 - mice than in Smad3 mice In contrast the expression level of MHC-fast myofiber specific protein in soleus muscle was visibly lower in Smad3 - mice than in Smad3 mice Furthermore RT-PCR revealed that the expression of Smad3 and myogenic regulatory factor MRF mRNA was inversely regulated Finally we determined that either Smad3 mRNA or Smad3 protein were selectively distributed in quiescent satellite cells in vivo and in reserve cells in vitro Therefore our findings suggested that Smad3 might be a key transcriptional factor for soleus muscle atrophy and slow-to-fast phenotype transition of the slow muscle under microgravity In the future an agent that regulates Smad3 expression may be used to prevent

  20. Genetic and expression studies of SMN2 gene in Russian patients with spinal muscular atrophy type II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiöth Helgi B

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type I, II and III is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1. SMN2 is a centromeric copy gene that has been characterized as a major modifier of SMA severity. SMA type I patients have one or two SMN2 copies while most SMA type II patients carry three SMN2 copies and SMA III patients have three or four SMN2 copies. The SMN1 gene produces a full-length transcript (FL-SMN while SMN2 is only able to produce a small portion of the FL-SMN because of a splice mutation which results in the production of abnormal SMNΔ7 mRNA. Methods In this study we performed quantification of the SMN2 gene copy number in Russian patients affected by SMA type II and III (42 and 19 patients, respectively by means of real-time PCR. Moreover, we present two families consisting of asymptomatic carriers of a homozygous absence of the SMN1 gene. We also developed a novel RT-qPCR-based assay to determine the FL-SMN/SMNΔ7 mRNA ratio as SMA biomarker. Results Comparison of the SMN2 copy number and clinical features revealed a significant correlation between mild clinical phenotype (SMA type III and presence of four copies of the SMN2 gene. In both asymptomatic cases we found an increased number of SMN2 copies in the healthy carriers and a biallelic SMN1 absence. Furthermore, the novel assay revealed a difference between SMA patients and healthy controls. Conclusions We suggest that the SMN2 gene copy quantification in SMA patients could be used as a prognostic tool for discrimination between the SMA type II and SMA type III diagnoses, whereas the FL-SMN/SMNΔ7 mRNA ratio could be a useful biomarker for detecting changes during SMA pharmacotherapy.

  1. Social/economic costs and health-related quality of life in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bastida, Julio; Peña-Longobardo, Luz María; Aranda-Reneo, Isaac; Tizzano, Eduardo; Sefton, Mark; Oliva-Moreno, Juan

    2017-08-18

    The aim of this study was to determine the economic burden and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) and their caregivers in Spain. This was a cross-sectional and retrospective study of patients diagnosed with SMA in Spain. We adopted a bottom up, prevalence approach design to study patients with SMA. The patient's caregivers completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their socio-demographic characteristics, use of healthcare services and non-healthcare services. Costs were estimated from a societal perspective (including healthcare costs and non-healthcare costs), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed using the EQ-5D questionnaire. The main caregivers also answered a questionnaire on their characteristics and on their HRQOL. A total of 81 caregivers of patients with different subtypes of SMA completed the questionnaire. Based on the reference unitary prices for 2014, the average annual costs per patient were € 33,721. Direct healthcare costs were € 10,882 (representing around 32.3% of the total cost) and the direct non-healthcare costs were € 22,839 (67.7% of the total cost). The mean EQ-5D social tariff score for patients was 0.16, and the mean score of the EQ-5D visual analogue scale was 54. The mean EQ-5D social tariff score for caregivers was 0.49 and their mean score on the EQ-5D visual analogue scale was 69. The results highlight the burden that SMA has in terms of costs and decreased HRQOL, not only for patients but also for their caregivers. In particular, the substantial social/economic burden is mostly attributable to the high direct non-healthcare costs.

  2. [Molecular Features of SMA-related Genes in Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients of Han Nationality in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Jin; Wang, Jun; Bai, Meng-Ge; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Wu, Li-Juan; Tang, Si-Shi; Lu, Xiao-Jun; Ying, Bin-Wu

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the molecular features of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) related genes in SMA patients of Han nationality of southwest of China. We collected 62 unrelated patients of SMA and 50 unrelated healthy individuals in this study.The copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene (SMN) and uronal-apoptosis inhibitory protein gene (NAIP) were measured by using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Of 62 patients,the copy number of SMA1-4 were 30.65% (19/62),41.94%(26/62),16.13% (10/62),11.29% (7/62),respectively.The deletion of SMN1 exon 7 accounts for 98.38% (61/62).The deletion of SMN1 exon 8 accounts for 82.26% (51/62).Among SMA 1 patients,the homozygous deletion of NAIP exon 5 accounts for 68.42% (13/19) and heterzygous deletion accounts for 26.32% (5/19).Among SMA2-4patients,the homozygous deletion of NAIP exon 5 accounts for 13.95% (6/43) and heterzygous deletion accounts for 62.79% (27/43).Furthermore,68.42% (13/19) patients of SMA1have 1 copy and 2 copies of SMN2 gene,84.62% (22/26) patients of SMA 2 have more than 2 copies of SMN2 gene,90.00% (9/10) SMA3 and 85.71% (6/7) SMA4 have over 2 copies of SMN2 gene and even have 5 and 6 copy of SMN2 gene. The deletion of SMN1 gene is the main cause of SMA,and the change of SMN2 and NAIP copy number can affect the severity of SMA.

  3. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Bo Wang; Xiaoqing Zhang; Xue-Jun Li

    2013-01-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease.Here,we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene,survival motor neuron (SMN),in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons.Notably,the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated.Furthermore,these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-A7 (lacking exon 7)knockdown,and were specific to spinal motor neurons.Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes,including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss.Finally,knockdown of SMNFL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors.The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine,a potent antioxidant,which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death.Thus,we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model,which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity,cell type specificity,and phenotype reversibility.Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  4. How the discovery of ISS-N1 led to the first medical therapy for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N N; Howell, M D; Androphy, E J; Singh, R N

    2017-05-09

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a prominent genetic disease of infant mortality, is caused by low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein owing to deletions or mutations of the SMN1 gene. SMN2, a nearly identical copy of SMN1 present in humans, cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 because of predominant skipping of exon 7 during pre-mRNA splicing. With the recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of nusinersen (Spinraza), the potential for correction of SMN2 exon 7 splicing as an SMA therapy has been affirmed. Nusinersen is an antisense oligonucleotide that targets intronic splicing silencer N1 (ISS-N1) discovered in 2004 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. ISS-N1 has emerged as the model target for testing the therapeutic efficacy of antisense oligonucleotides using different chemistries as well as different mouse models of SMA. Here, we provide a historical account of events that led to the discovery of ISS-N1 and describe the impact of independent validations that raised the profile of ISS-N1 as one of the most potent antisense targets for the treatment of a genetic disease. Recent approval of nusinersen provides a much-needed boost for antisense technology that is just beginning to realize its potential. Beyond treating SMA, the ISS-N1 target offers myriad potentials for perfecting various aspects of the nucleic-acid-based technology for the amelioration of the countless number of pathological conditions.Gene Therapy advance online publication, 25 May 2017; doi:10.1038/gt.2017.34.

  5. Systems biology investigation of cAMP modulation to increase SMN levels for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean G Mack

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA, a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1, which encodes the protein SMN. The loss of SMN1 causes a deficiency in SMN protein levels leading to motor neuron cell death in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMN2, however, can also produce some functional SMN to partially compensate for loss of SMN1 in SMA suggesting increasing transcription of SMN2 as a potential therapy to treat patients with SMA. A cAMP response element was identified on the SMN2 promoter, implicating cAMP activation as a step in the transcription of SMN2. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modulating the cAMP signaling cascade on SMN production in vitro and in silico. SMA patient fibroblasts were treated with the cAMP signaling modulators rolipram, salbutamol, dbcAMP, epinephrine and forskolin. All of the modulators tested were able to increase gem formation, a marker for SMN protein in the nucleus, in a dose-dependent manner. We then derived two possible mathematical models simulating the regulation of SMN2 expression by cAMP signaling. Both models fit well with our experimental data. In silico treatment of SMA fibroblasts simultaneously with two different cAMP modulators resulted in an additive increase in gem formation. This study shows how a systems biology approach can be used to develop potential therapeutic targets for treating SMA.

  6. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Dossena

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease is an X-linked CAG/polyglutamine expansion motoneuron disease, in which an elongated polyglutamine tract (polyQ in the N-terminal androgen receptor (ARpolyQ confers toxicity to this protein. Typical markers of SBMA disease are ARpolyQ intranuclear inclusions. These are generated after the ARpolyQ binds to its endogenous ligands, which promotes AR release from chaperones, activation and nuclear translocation, but also cell toxicity. The SBMA mouse models developed so far, and used in preclinical studies, all contain an expanded CAG repeat significantly longer than that of SBMA patients. Here, we propose the use of SBMA patients adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a new human in vitro model to study ARpolyQ toxicity. These cells have the advantage to express only ARpolyQ, and not the wild type AR allele. Therefore, we isolated and characterized adipose-derived MSCs from three SBMA patients (ADSC from Kennedy's patients, ADSCK and three control volunteers (ADSCs. We found that both ADSCs and ADSCKs express mesenchymal antigens, even if only ADSCs can differentiate into the three typical cell lineages (adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes, whereas ADSCKs, from SBMA patients, showed a lower growth potential and differentiated only into adipocyte. Moreover, analysing AR expression on our mesenchymal cultures we found lower levels in all ADSCKs than ADSCs, possibly related to negative pressures exerted by toxic ARpolyQ in ADSCKs. In addition, with proteasome inhibition the ARpolyQ levels increased specifically in ADSCKs, inducing the formation of HSP70 and ubiquitin positive nuclear ARpolyQ inclusions. Considering all of this evidence, SBMA patients adipose-derived MSCs cultures should be considered an innovative in vitro human model to understand the molecular mechanisms of ARpolyQ toxicity and to test novel therapeutic approaches in SBMA.

  7. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Elisa; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone (or dihydrotestosterone), and the polyQ triggers ARpolyQ misfolding and aggregation in spinal cord motoneurons and muscle cells. In motoneurons, testosterone triggers nuclear toxicity by inducing AR nuclear translocation. Thus, (i) prevention of ARpolyQ nuclear localization, combined with (ii) an increased ARpolyQ cytoplasmic clearance, should reduce its detrimental activity. Using the antiandrogen Bicalutamide (Casodex(®)), which slows down AR activation and nuclear translocation, and the disaccharide trehalose, an autophagy activator, we found that, in motoneurons, the two compounds together reduced ARpolyQ insoluble forms with higher efficiency than that obtained with single treatments. The ARpolyQ clearance was mediated by trehalose-induced autophagy combined with the longer cytoplasmic retention of ARpolyQ bound to Bicalutamide. This allows an increased recognition of misfolded species by the autophagic system prior to their migration into the nucleus. Interestingly, the combinatory use of trehalose and Bicalutamide was also efficient in the removal of insoluble species of AR with a very long polyQ (Q112) tract, which typically aggregates into the cell nuclei. Collectively, these data suggest that the combinatory use of Bicalutamide and trehalose is a novel approach to facilitate ARpolyQ clearance that has to be tested in other cell types target of SBMA (i.e. muscle cells) and in vivo in animal models of SBMA.

  8. Human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a new model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossena, Marta; Bedini, Gloria; Rusmini, Paola; Giorgetti, Elisa; Canazza, Alessandra; Tosetti, Valentina; Salsano, Ettore; Sagnelli, Anna; Mariotti, Caterina; Gellera, Cinzia; Navone, Stefania Elena; Marfia, Giovanni; Alessandri, Giulio; Corsi, Fabio; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Pareyson, Davide; Poletti, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) or Kennedy's disease is an X-linked CAG/polyglutamine expansion motoneuron disease, in which an elongated polyglutamine tract (polyQ) in the N-terminal androgen receptor (ARpolyQ) confers toxicity to this protein. Typical markers of SBMA disease are ARpolyQ intranuclear inclusions. These are generated after the ARpolyQ binds to its endogenous ligands, which promotes AR release from chaperones, activation and nuclear translocation, but also cell toxicity. The SBMA mouse models developed so far, and used in preclinical studies, all contain an expanded CAG repeat significantly longer than that of SBMA patients. Here, we propose the use of SBMA patients adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a new human in vitro model to study ARpolyQ toxicity. These cells have the advantage to express only ARpolyQ, and not the wild type AR allele. Therefore, we isolated and characterized adipose-derived MSCs from three SBMA patients (ADSC from Kennedy's patients, ADSCK) and three control volunteers (ADSCs). We found that both ADSCs and ADSCKs express mesenchymal antigens, even if only ADSCs can differentiate into the three typical cell lineages (adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteocytes), whereas ADSCKs, from SBMA patients, showed a lower growth potential and differentiated only into adipocyte. Moreover, analysing AR expression on our mesenchymal cultures we found lower levels in all ADSCKs than ADSCs, possibly related to negative pressures exerted by toxic ARpolyQ in ADSCKs. In addition, with proteasome inhibition the ARpolyQ levels increased specifically in ADSCKs, inducing the formation of HSP70 and ubiquitin positive nuclear ARpolyQ inclusions. Considering all of this evidence, SBMA patients adipose-derived MSCs cultures should be considered an innovative in vitro human model to understand the molecular mechanisms of ARpolyQ toxicity and to test novel therapeutic approaches in SBMA.

  9. Candidate proteins, metabolites and transcripts in the Biomarkers for Spinal Muscular Atrophy (BforSMA clinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Finkel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA is a neurodegenerative motor neuron disorder resulting from a homozygous mutation of the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene. The gene product, SMN protein, functions in RNA biosynthesis in all tissues. In humans, a nearly identical gene, SMN2, rescues an otherwise lethal phenotype by producing a small amount of full-length SMN protein. SMN2 copy number inversely correlates with disease severity. Identifying other novel biomarkers could inform clinical trial design and identify novel therapeutic targets. OBJECTIVE: To identify novel candidate biomarkers associated with disease severity in SMA using unbiased proteomic, metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional single evaluation was performed in 108 children with genetically confirmed SMA, aged 2-12 years, manifesting a broad range of disease severity and selected to distinguish factors associated with SMA type and present functional ability independent of age. Blood and urine specimens from these and 22 age-matched healthy controls were interrogated using proteomic, metabolomic and transcriptomic discovery platforms. Analyte associations were evaluated against a primary measure of disease severity, the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS and to a number of secondary clinical measures. RESULTS: A total of 200 candidate biomarkers correlate with MHFMS scores: 97 plasma proteins, 59 plasma metabolites (9 amino acids, 10 free fatty acids, 12 lipids and 28 GC/MS metabolites and 44 urine metabolites. No transcripts correlated with MHFMS. DISCUSSION: In this cross-sectional study, "BforSMA" (Biomarkers for SMA, candidate protein and metabolite markers were identified. No transcript biomarker candidates were identified. Additional mining of this rich dataset may yield important insights into relevant SMA-related pathophysiology and biological network associations. Additional prospective studies are needed

  10. [Tissue variability of androgen receptor gene in bulbospinal muscular atrophy--comparison of the number of CAG repeats between muscles and peripheral blood leukocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H; Kimura, F; Shinoda, K; Ohsawa, N; Nakagawa, T; Shimizu, A

    1993-10-01

    We investigated an expansion of CAG repeats in exon 1 of androgen receptor gene in skeletal muscle tissue obtained from the patients with various neuro-muscular disorders (5 BSMA, 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 3 patients with spinal progressive muscular atrophy and 2 patients with hereditary motor sensory neuropathy), by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification according to LaSpadas' description. These muscle tissues had been stored at -70 degrees C freezer during 7 years. We also studied the tissue variation of CAG repeats size between muscles and peripheral blood leukocytes in 4 patients with BSMA. And we confirmed the increased number of CAG repeats in all 5 BSMA except for other patients with neurogenic muscular atrophy. In the 4 BSMA patients, we subcloned the PCR products from muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes, and we determined the number of CAG repeats by sequencing. The repeats of them were 43-51, and all BSMA patients showed the same number of CAG repeats in muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes. The CAG repeats fragment of BSMA may be stable region in frozen storage state for 7 years, and we didn't recognized the somatic variation at least between muscles tissues and peripheral blood leukocytes.

  11. Dosing schedule-dependent attenuation of dexamethasone-induced muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Reiko; Yamamoto, Saori; Yasumoto, Yuki; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2014-05-01

    Many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases are treated using synthetic glucocorticoids. However, excessive glucocorticoid can often cause unpredictable effects including muscle atrophy. Endogenous glucocorticoid levels robustly fluctuate in a circadian manner and peak just before the onset of the active phase in both humans and nocturnal rodents. The present study determines whether muscle atrophy induced by exogenous glucocorticoid can be avoided by optimizing dosing times. We administered single daily doses of the glucocorticoid analog dexamethasone (Dex) to mice for 10 days at the times of day corresponding to peak (early night) or trough (early morning) endogenous glucocorticoid levels. Administration at the acrophase of endogenous glucocorticoids significantly attenuated Dex-induced wasting of the gastrocnemius (Ga) and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles that comprise mostly fast-twitch muscle fibers. Real-time RT-PCR revealed that the Dex-induced mRNA expression of genes encoding the atrophy-related ubiquitin ligases Muscle Atrophy F-box (Fbxo32, also known as MAFbx/Atrogin-1) and Muscle RING finger 1 (Trim63, also known as MuRF1) in the Ga and TA muscles was significantly attenuated by Dex when administered during the early night. Dex negligibly affected the weight of the soleus (So) muscle that mostly comprises slow-twitch muscle fibers, but significantly and similarly decreased the weight of the spleen at both dosing times. These results suggest that glucocorticoid-induced muscle atrophy can be attenuated by optimizing the dosing schedule.

  12. Inducing Muscle Heat Shock Protein 70 Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Muscular Performance in Aged Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Marnie G; Ordanes, Diane; Wylie, Ashley T; Files, D Clark; Milligan, Carol; Presley, Tennille D; Kavanagh, Kylie

    2015-07-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are molecular chaperones with roles in longevity and muscular preservation. We aimed to show elevating HSP70 improves indices of health span. Aged C57/BL6 mice acclimated to a western diet were randomized into: geranylgeranylacetone (GGA)-treated (100 mg/kg/d), biweekly heat therapy (HT), or control. The GGA and HT are well-known pharmacological and environmental inducers of HSP70, respectively. Assessments before and after 8 weeks of treatment included glycemic endpoints, body composition, and muscular endurance, power, and perfusion. An HT mice had more than threefold, and GGA mice had a twofold greater HSP70 compared with control. Despite comparable body compositions, both treatment groups had significantly better insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling capacity. Compared with baseline, HT mice ran 23% longer than at study start, which was significantly more than GGA or control. Hanging ability (muscular endurance) also tended to be best preserved in HT mice. Muscle power, contractile force, capillary perfusion, and innervation were not different. Heat treatment has a clear benefit on muscular endurance, whereas HT and GGA both improved insulin sensitivity. Different effects may relate to muscle HSP70 levels. An HSP induction could be a promising approach for improving health span in the aged mice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Moving ahead in language: observations on a report of precocious language development in 3-4 year old children with spinal muscular atrophy type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieratzki, Jechil S; Woll, Bencie

    2005-01-01

    Benony and Benony in a recent issue of this Journal have presented new data on the precocity of language acquisition in children with type II spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), at age 36-47 months. They refer to our interim report of advanced early language development in these motor-impaired children, which covers the age period 18-35 months. Here, we provide more details of our findings and discuss them in relation to their report and our theory of the role of the procedural system in language learning.

  14. Change in muscle strength over time in spinal muscular atrophy types II and III. A long-term follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, U; Vissing, J; Steffensen, B F

    2012-01-01

    Whether muscle strength deteriorates with time in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) types II and III is still debated. We present a long-term follow-up study on muscle strength in 30 patients with SMA types II and III. Median follow-up time was 17 years. Median number of assessments was four. All...... patients were assessed by Manual Muscle Testing (MMT), Brooke upper limb scale and EK scale. There was a difference in muscle strength of the upper limbs from first to last assessment in SMA II (p...

  15. Na+ Dysregulation Coupled with Ca2+ Entry through NCX1 Promotes Muscular Dystrophy in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Adam R.; Millay, Douglas P.; Goonasekera, Sanjeewa A.; Park, Ki Ho; Sargent, Michelle A.; Collins, James; Altamirano, Francisco; Philipson, Kenneth D.; Allen, Paul D.; Ma, Jianjie; López, José Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Unregulated Ca2+ entry is thought to underlie muscular dystrophy. Here, we generated skeletal-muscle-specific transgenic (TG) mice expressing the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger 1 (NCX1) to model its identified augmentation during muscular dystrophy. The NCX1 transgene induced dystrophy-like disease in all hind-limb musculature, as well as exacerbated the muscle disease phenotypes in δ-sarcoglycan (Sgcd−/−), Dysf−/−, and mdx mouse models of muscular dystrophy. Antithetically, muscle-specific deletion of the Slc8a1 (NCX1) gene diminished hind-limb pathology in Sgcd−/− mice. Measured increases in baseline Na+ and Ca2+ in dystrophic muscle fibers of the hind-limb musculature predicts a net Ca2+ influx state due to reverse-mode operation of NCX1, which mediates disease. However, the opposite effect is observed in the diaphragm, where NCX1 overexpression mildly protects from dystrophic disease through a predicted enhancement in forward-mode NCX1 operation that reduces Ca2+ levels. Indeed, Atp1a2+/− (encoding Na+-K+ ATPase α2) mice, which have reduced Na+ clearance rates that would favor NCX1 reverse-mode operation, showed exacerbated disease in the hind limbs of NCX1 TG mice, similar to treatment with the Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor digoxin. Treatment of Sgcd−/− mice with ranolazine, a broadly acting Na+ channel inhibitor that should increase NCX1 forward-mode operation, reduced muscular pathology. PMID:24662047

  16. Schisandrae Fructus Supplementation Ameliorates Sciatic Neurectomy-Induced Muscle Atrophy in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Wan Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the possible beneficial skeletal muscle preserving effects of ethanol extract of Schisandrae Fructus (EESF on sciatic neurectomy- (NTX- induced hindlimb muscle atrophy in mice. Here, calf muscle atrophy was induced by unilateral right sciatic NTX. In order to investigate whether administration of EESF prevents or improves sciatic NTX-induced muscle atrophy, EESF was administered orally. Our results indicated that EESF dose-dependently diminished the decreases in markers of muscle mass and activity levels, and the increases in markers of muscle damage and fibrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokines, and apoptotic events in the gastrocnemius muscle bundles are induced by NTX. Additionally, destruction of gastrocnemius antioxidant defense systems after NTX was dose-dependently protected by treatment with EESF. EESF also upregulated muscle-specific mRNAs involved in muscle protein synthesis but downregulated those involved in protein degradation. The overall effects of 500 mg/kg EESF were similar to those of 50 mg/kg oxymetholone, but it showed more favorable antioxidant effects. The present results suggested that EESF exerts a favorable ameliorating effect on muscle atrophy induced by NTX, through anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects related to muscle fiber protective effects and via an increase in protein synthesis and a decrease in protein degradation.

  17. Irreversible splenic atrophy following chronic LCMV infection is associated with compromised immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbanwi, Achire N; Wang, Chao; Geddes, Kaoru; Philpott, Dana J; Watts, Tania H

    2017-01-01

    Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus clone 13 (LCMV13) infection of mice is a widely used model for investigating the mechanisms driving persistent viral infection in humans. LCMV13 disrupts splenic architecture early during infection, but this returns to normal within a few weeks. However, the long-term effects of LCMV13 infection on splenic structure have not been reported. Here, we report that persistent infection with LCMV13 results in sustained splenic atrophy that persists for at least 500 days following infection, whereas infection with the acutely infecting LCMV Armstrong is associated with a return to preinfection spleen weights. Splenic atrophy is associated with loss of T, B, and non-B non-T cells, with B cells most significantly affected. These effects were partly ameliorated by anti-NK1.1 or anti-CD8 antibody treatment. Antigen presentation was detectable at the time of contraction of the spleen, but no longer detected at late time points, suggesting that continued antigen presentation is not required to maintain splenic atrophy. Immunity to Salmonella infection and influenza vaccination were decreased after the virus was no longer detected. Thus splenic atrophy following LCMV13 infection is irreversible and may contribute to impaired immunity following clearance of LCMV13. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Leiomodin-3-deficient mice display nemaline myopathy with fast-myofiber atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Ding, Sheng; You, Yun; Li, Tong-ruei; Liu, Yan; Wu, Xiaohui; Sun, Ling; Xu, Tian

    2015-06-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is one of the most common forms of congenital myopathy, and affects either fast myofibers, slow myofibers, or both. However, an animal model for congenital myopathy with fast-myofiber-specific atrophy is not available. Furthermore, mutations in the leiomodin-3 (LMOD3) gene have recently been identified in a group of individuals with NM. However, it is not clear how loss of LMOD3 leads to NM. Here, we report a mouse mutant in which the piggyBac (PB) transposon is inserted into the Lmod3 gene and disrupts its expression. Lmod3(PB/PB) mice show severe muscle weakness and postnatal growth retardation. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies of the mutant skeletal muscles revealed the presence of nemaline bodies, a hallmark of NM, and disorganized sarcomeric structures. Interestingly, Lmod3 deficiency caused muscle atrophy specific to the fast fibers. Together, our results show that Lmod3 is required in the fast fibers for sarcomere integrity, and this study offers the first NM mouse model with muscle atrophy that is specific to fast fibers. This model could be a valuable resource for interrogating myopathy pathogenesis and developing therapeutics for NM as well as other pathophysiological conditions with preferential atrophy of fast fibers, including cancer cachexia and sarcopenia. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Leiomodin-3-deficient mice display nemaline myopathy with fast-myofiber atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Tian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nemaline myopathy (NM is one of the most common forms of congenital myopathy, and affects either fast myofibers, slow myofibers, or both. However, an animal model for congenital myopathy with fast-myofiber-specific atrophy is not available. Furthermore, mutations in the leiomodin-3 (LMOD3 gene have recently been identified in a group of individuals with NM. However, it is not clear how loss of LMOD3 leads to NM. Here, we report a mouse mutant in which the piggyBac (PB transposon is inserted into the Lmod3 gene and disrupts its expression. Lmod3PB/PB mice show severe muscle weakness and postnatal growth retardation. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence studies of the mutant skeletal muscles revealed the presence of nemaline bodies, a hallmark of NM, and disorganized sarcomeric structures. Interestingly, Lmod3 deficiency caused muscle atrophy specific to the fast fibers. Together, our results show that Lmod3 is required in the fast fibers for sarcomere integrity, and this study offers the first NM mouse model with muscle atrophy that is specific to fast fibers. This model could be a valuable resource for interrogating myopathy pathogenesis and developing therapeutics for NM as well as other pathophysiological conditions with preferential atrophy of fast fibers, including cancer cachexia and sarcopenia.

  20. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Botulinum toxin may be used to treat jaw spasms or drooling. Excessive saliva can be treated with ... Botulinum toxin may be used to treat jaw spasms or drooling. Excessive saliva can be treated with ...

  1. Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most often affected. Complications include scoliosis and joint contractures—chronic shortening of muscles or tendons around joints, ... of SMA include: Congenital SMA with arthrogryposis (persistent contracture of joints with fixed abnormal posture of the ...

  2. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also enjoy such hobbies as computer technology and music com- position (including the publication of two songs ... men as old as 60. In those few women who have the disease, the symptoms are usually ...

  3. The PedsQL™ in Pediatric Patients with Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Feasibility, Reliability, and Validity of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Generic Core Scales and Neuromuscular Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannaccone, Susan T.; Hynan, Linda S.; Morton, Anne; Buchanan, Renee; Limbers, Christine A.; Varni, James W.

    2009-01-01

    For Phase II and III clinical trials in children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), reliable and valid outcome measures are necessary. Since 2000, the American Spinal Muscular Atrophy Randomized Trials (AmSMART) group has established reliability and validity for measures of strength, lung function, and motor function in the population from age 2 years to 18 years. The PedsQL™ (Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™) Measurement Model was designed to integrate the relative merits of generic and disease-specific approaches, with disease-specific modules. The PedsQL™ 3.0 Neuromuscular Module was designed to measure HRQOL dimensions specific to children ages 2 to 18 years with neuromuscular disorders, including SMA. One hundred seventy-six children with SMA and their parents completed the PedsQL™ 4.0 Generic Core Scales and PedsQL™ 3.0 Neuromuscular Module. The PedsQL™ demonstrated feasibility, reliability and validity in the SMA population. Consistent with the conceptualization of disease-specific symptoms as causal indicators of generic HRQOL, the majority of intercorrelations among the Neuromuscular Module Scales and the Generic Core Scales were in the medium to large range, supporting construct validity. For the purposes of a clinical trial, the PedsQL™ Neuromuscular Module and Generic Core Scales provide an integrated measurement model with the advantages of both generic and condition-specific instruments. PMID:19846309

  4. Proteasome-mediated proteolysis of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor is a late event in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Erin M; Berger, Tamar R; Pluciennik, Anna; Orr, Christopher R; Zboray, Lori; Merry, Diane E

    2015-05-15

    Proteolysis of polyglutamine-expanded proteins is thought to be a required step in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. The accepted view for many polyglutamine proteins is that proteolysis of the mutant protein produces a "toxic fragment" that induces neuronal dysfunction and death in a soluble form; toxicity of the fragment is buffered by its incorporation into amyloid-like inclusions. In contrast to this view, we show that, in the polyglutamine disease spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, proteolysis of the mutant androgen receptor (AR) is a late event. Immunocytochemical and biochemical analyses revealed that the mutant AR aggregates as a full-length protein, becoming proteolyzed to a smaller fragment through a process requiring the proteasome after it is incorporated into intranuclear inclusions. Moreover, the toxicity-predicting conformational antibody 3B5H10 bound to soluble full-length AR species but not to fragment-containing nuclear inclusions. These data suggest that the AR is toxic as a full-length protein, challenging the notion of polyglutamine protein fragment-associated toxicity by redefining the role of AR proteolysis in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy pathogenesis.

  5. Ouabain exacerbates botulinum neurotoxin-induced muscle paralysis via progression of muscle atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Ryu; Muroi, Yoshikage; Unno, Toshihiro; Ishii, Toshiaki

    2010-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) inhibits acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction in isolated muscles, and ouabain can partially block its effect. However, it is not clear whether ouabain attenuates BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis in vivo. In this work, we investigated the effects of ouabain on BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis in mice. Ouabain was administered to mice intraperitoneally immediately after a single injection of BoNT/A into skeletal muscle. The effects of ouabain on BoNT/A-induced muscle paralysis were assessed by quantitative monitoring of muscle tension and digit abduction via the digit abduction scoring (DAS) assay. A single administration of ouabain significantly prolonged BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis. Moreover, consecutive daily injection of ouabain exacerbated BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis, and led to a significant decrease in both twitch and tetanic forces as assayed in isolated BoNT/A-injected muscles. We next looked at the effects of ouabain on BoNT/A-induced muscle atrophy. Administration of ouabain led to a decrease in the myofibrillar cross-sectional area (CSAs) by 14 post-BoNT/A injection. In addition, repeated administration of ouabain increased mRNA expression levels of ubiquitin ligases, which are markers of muscle atrophy, in BoNT/A-injected muscle. These results suggest that ouabain exacerbates BoNT/A-induced neuromuscular paralysis via a marked progression of BoNT/A-induced muscle atrophy.

  6. The paradox of muscle hypertrophy in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornegay, Joe N; Childers, Martin K; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Nghiem, Peter; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Howard, James F; Schatzberg, Scott J; Dow, Jennifer L; Grange, Robert W; Styner, Martin A; Hoffman, Eric P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in humans and syndromes in mice, dogs, and cats. Affected humans and dogs have progressive disease that leads primarily to muscle atrophy. Mdx mice progress through an initial phase of muscle hypertrophy followed by atrophy. Cats have persistent muscle hypertrophy. Hypertrophy in humans has been attributed to deposition of fat and connective tissue (pseudohypertrophy). Increased muscle mass (true hypertrophy) has been documented in animal models. Muscle hypertrophy can exaggerate postural instability and joint contractures. Deleterious consequences of muscle hypertrophy should be considered when developing treatments for muscular dystrophy.

  7. Sonographic Visualization of the Rotator Cable in Patients With Symptomatic Full-Thickness Rotator Cuff Tears: Correlation With Tear Size, Muscular Fatty Infiltration and Atrophy, and Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau, Nathalie J; Blain-Paré, Etienne; Tétreault, Patrice; Rouleau, Dominique M; Hagemeister, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    To assess the prevalence of sonographic visualization of the rotator cable in patients with symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears and asymptomatic controls and to correlate rotator cable visualization with tear size, muscular fatty infiltration and atrophy, and the functional outcome in the patients with rotator cuff tears. Fifty-seven patients with rotator cuff tears and 30 asymptomatic volunteers underwent shoulder sonography for prospective assessment of the rotator cable and rotator cuff tear and responded to 2 functional outcome questionnaires (shortened Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [QuickDASH] and Constant). In the patients with rotator cuff tears, appropriate tests were used to correlate rotator cable visualization with the tear size, functional outcome, muscular fatty infiltration, and atrophy. The patients with rotator cuff tears included 25 women and 32 men (mean age,57 years; range, 39-67 years), and the volunteers included 13 women and 17 men (mean age, 56 years; range, 35-64 years). The rotator cable was identified in 77% (23 of 30) of controls and 23% (13 of 57) of patients with rotator cuff tears. In the patients, nonvisualization of the rotator cable correlated with larger tears (P infraspinatus fatty infiltration (P = .065). Nonvisualization of the rotator cable was more prevalent in patients with symptomatic rotator cuff tears than asymptomatic controls and was associated with a larger tear size and greater supraspinatus fatty infiltration and atrophy. Diligent assessment of the supraspinatus muscle should be done in patients with rotator cuff tears without a visible rotator cable, as the integrity of these anatomic structures may be interdependent.

  8. [Translation and validation of the Egen Klassifikation scale for the Spanish population: functional assessment for non-ambulatory individuals with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagoaga, Joaquín; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Febrer, Anna; Steffensen, Birgit F

    2013-06-01

    Introduccion. La escala Egen Klassifikation (EK) es un cuestionario que valora la capacidad funcional de personas con distrofia muscular de Duchenne y atrofia muscular espinal no ambulantes y que estan en silla de ruedas. Objetivo. Traducir y validar la EK para la poblacion espanola, como instrumento de medicion de la capacidad funcional en dichos pacientes. Pacientes y metodos. Se realiza, en primer lugar, una traduccion-retrotraduccion de la EK en la poblacion espanola y, posteriormente, se practica el estudio de fiabilidad de la version traducida al espanol de dicha escala. Se llevan a cabo tres mediciones a 30 pacientes con edades comprendidas entre 4 y 67 anos. Dos de estas mediciones se realizan por el mismo observador, y la tercera, por un segundo observador, para evaluar la concordancia intra e interobservador. Resultados. Los valores obtenidos referidos a la puntuacion total de los items de la escala, suma EK, reflejan un indice de fiabilidad del 0,995. Tambien muestran una fiabilidad superior a 0,86 en cada uno de los items, tanto en las observaciones intra como interobservador. Conclusiones. La version espanola de la EK es un instrumento valido y fiable para la poblacion espanola, como herramienta de medicion de la capacidad funcional en pacientes con distrofia muscular de Duchenne y atrofia muscular espinal no ambulantes y que estan en silla de ruedas.

  9. Cerebrolysin reverses hippocampal neural atrophy in a mice model of diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Vega, Lizzette; Juárez, Ismael; Gomez-Villalobos, Maria De Jesus; Flores, Gonzalo

    2015-06-01

    The animal model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) is used to study neuronal and behavioral changes produced by an increase in blood-glucose levels. Our previous report showed that chronic streptozotocin administration induced atrophy of dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 dorsal hippocampus. In addition, we showed that Cerebrolysin (Cbl), a neurotrophic peptide mixture, reduces the dendritic atrophy in animal models of aging. This study aimed to determine whether Cbl was capable of reducing behavioral and neuronal alterations, after 6 weeks of hyperglycemia in mice (streptozotocin-induced DM1). The levels of glucose in the blood were evaluated before and after streptozotocin administration and only animals with more than 240 mg/dL of blood-levels of glucose were used. After streptozotocin treatment, the mice received 6 weeks of Cbl, locomotor activity was measured and dendritic morphological changes were evaluated using Golgi-Cox stain procedure, and analyzed by the Sholl method. In mice treated with streptozotocin there was a clear reduction in the dendritic length of pyramidal neurons of the CA1 and granular cells of the dental gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus. Interestingly, Cbl reversed the morphological changes induced by streptozotocin. Our results extend the list of abnormal morphological changes detected in this model of DM, and support the possibility that Cbl may have beneficial effects in the management of brain alterations induced by DM.

  10. Acute antibody-directed myostatin inhibition attenuates disuse muscle atrophy and weakness in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T; Cobani, Vera; Ryall, James G; Ibebunjo, Chikwendu; Lynch, Gordon S

    2011-04-01

    Counteracting the atrophy of skeletal muscle associated with disuse has significant implications for minimizing the wasting and weakness in plaster casting, joint immobilization, and other forms of limb unloading, with relevance to orthopedics, sports medicine, and plastic and reconstructive surgery. We tested the hypothesis that antibody-directed myostatin inhibition would attenuate the loss of muscle mass and functional capacity in mice during 14 or 21 days of unilateral hindlimb casting. Twelve-week-old C57BL/10 mice were subjected to unilateral hindlimb plaster casting or served as controls. Mice received subcutaneous injections of saline or a mouse chimera of anti-human myostatin antibody (PF-354, 10 mg/kg; n = 6-9) on days 0 and 7 and were tested for muscle function on day 14, or were treated on days 0, 7, and 14 and tested for muscle function on day 21. Hindlimb casting reduced muscle mass, fiber size, and function of isolated soleus and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles (P casting, when wasting and weakness had plateaued (P casting with reductions in muscle size and strength being most apparent during the first 14 days of disuse. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential of antibody-directed myostatin inhibition for disuse atrophy especially within the first 2 wk of disuse.

  11. Prevention of disuse muscle atrophy by dietary ingestion of 8-prenylnaringenin in denervated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Mukai

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have attracted considerable attention in relation to their effects upon health. 8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN is found in the common hop (Humulus lupulus and assumed to be responsible for the health impact of beer consumption. We wanted to clarify the effects of prenylation on the physiological functions of dietary flavonoids by comparing the effects of 8-PN with that of intact naringenin in the prevention of disuse muscle atrophy using a model of denervation in mice. Consumption of 8-PN (but not naringenin prevented loss of weight in the gastrocnemius muscle further supported by the lack of induction of the protein content of a key ubiquitin ligase involved in muscle atrophy, atrogin-1, and by the activation of Akt phosphorylation. 8-PN content in the gastrocnemius muscle was tenfold higher than that of naringenin. These results suggested that, compared with naringenin, 8-PN was effectively concentrated into skeletal muscle to exert its preventive effects upon disuse muscle atrophy. It is likely that prenylation generates novel functions for 8-PN by enhancing its accumulation into muscle tissue through dietary intake.

  12. [Evolution of functional capacity, assessed with the Egen Klassifikation scale, in the Spanish population with spinal muscular atrophy or Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A three year longitudinal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagoaga, J; Girabent-Farres, M; Bagur-Calafat, C; Steffensen, B F

    2015-10-16

    Introduccion. La atrofia muscular espinal (AME) y la distrofia muscular de Duchenne (DMD) son dos enfermedades neuromusculares que evolucionan con perdida progresiva de la fuerza muscular y, en consecuencia, perdida de la capacidad funcional. La valoracion con escalas de medicion permite conocer mejor y cuantificar esta involucion, asi como tomar decisiones terapeuticas para anticiparse a los problemas y mejorar la calidad de vida de las personas afectas de estas patologias. Objetivo. Estudiar los cambios de la capacidad funcional de un grupo de pacientes con AME y DMD en un periodo de tres años. Pacientes y metodos. Diecinueve personas de la poblacion española afectas de AME o DMD, a las que se valoro con la escala Egen Klassifikation en dos ocasiones, en un periodo de tres años. Resultados. Los resultados obtenidos reflejan una disminucion de la capacidad funcional de estas personas durante este periodo de tiempo, con una diferencia significativa en la suma total de la escala (p = 0,003). Todos los items de la escala tuvieron valoraciones inferiores despues de tres años, y se llego a la significacion estadistica en la valoracion de la capacidad de mover las manos y de toser. Conclusion. La capacidad funcional de los pacientes con AME y DMD disminuye de forma significativa en tres años.

  13. PGC1-α over-expression prevents metabolic alterations and soleus muscle atrophy in hindlimb unloaded mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2014-10-15

    Prolonged skeletal muscle inactivity causes muscle fibre atrophy. Redox imbalance has been considered one of the major triggers of skeletal muscle disuse atrophy, but whether redox imbalance is actually the major cause or simply a consequence of muscle disuse remains of debate. Here we hypothesized that a metabolic stress mediated by PGC-1α down-regulation plays a major role in disuse atrophy. First we studied the adaptations of soleus to mice hindlimb unloading (HU) in the early phase of disuse (3 and 7 days of HU) with and without antioxidant treatment (trolox). HU caused a reduction in cross-sectional area, redox status alteration (NRF2, SOD1 and catalase up-regulation), and induction of the ubiquitin proteasome system (MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 mRNA up-regulation) and autophagy (Beclin1 and p62 mRNA up-regulation). Trolox completely prevented the induction of NRF2, SOD1 and catalase mRNAs, but not atrophy or induction of catabolic systems in unloaded muscles, suggesting that oxidative stress is not a major cause of disuse atrophy. HU mice showed a marked alteration of oxidative metabolism. PGC-1α and mitochondrial complexes were down-regulated and DRP1 was up-regulated. To define the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and disuse muscle atrophy we unloaded mice overexpressing PGC-1α. Transgenic PGC-1α animals did not show metabolic alteration during unloading, preserving muscle size through the reduction of autophagy and proteasome degradation. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in disuse atrophy and that compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat/prevent muscle atrophy. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  14. RNA-sequencing of a mouse-model of spinal muscular atrophy reveals tissue-wide changes in splicing of U12-dependent introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Hua, Yimin; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by insufficient levels of the Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. SMN is expressed ubiquitously and functions in RNA processing pathways that include trafficking of mRNA and assembly of snRNP complexes. Importantly, SMA severity...... is correlated with decreased snRNP assembly activity. In particular, the minor spliceosomal snRNPs are affected, and some U12-dependent introns have been reported to be aberrantly spliced in patient cells and animal models. SMA is characterized by loss of motor neurons, but the underlying mechanism is largely...... unknown. It is likely that aberrant splicing of genes expressed in motor neurons is involved in SMA pathogenesis, but increasing evidence indicates that pathologies also exist in other tissues. We present here a comprehensive RNA-seq study that covers multiple tissues in an SMA mouse model. We show...

  15. GRS defective axonal distribution as a potential contributor to distal spinal muscular atrophy type V pathogenesis in a new model of GRS-associated neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ah Jung; Park, Byung Sun; Jung, Junyang

    2014-11-01

    Distal spinal muscular atrophy type V (dSMA-V), a hereditary axonal neuropathy, is a glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GRS)-associated neuropathy caused by a mutation in GRS. In this study, using an adenovirus vector system equipped with a neuron-specific promoter, we constructed a new GRS-associated neuropathy mouse model. We found that wild-type GRS (WT) is distributed in peripheral axons, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cell bodies, central axon terminals and motor neuron cell bodies in the mouse model. In contrast, the L129P mutant GRS was localized in DRG and motor neuron cell bodies. Thus, we propose that the disease-causing L129P mutant is linked to a distribution defect in peripheral nerves in vivo.

  16. VPAC2 receptor agonist BAY 55-9837 increases SMN protein levels and moderates disease phenotype in severe spinal muscular atrophy mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common inherited causes of infant death and is caused by the loss of functional survival motor neuron (SMN) protein due to mutations or deletion in the SMN1 gene. One of the treatment strategies for SMA is to induce the expression of the protein from the homologous SMN2 gene, a rescuing paralog for SMA. Methods and results Here we demonstrate the promise of pharmacological modulation of SMN2 gene by BAY 55-9837, an agonist of the vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2 (VPAC2), a member of G protein coupled receptor family. Treatment with BAY 55-9837 lead to induction of SMN protein levels via activation of MAPK14 or p38 pathway in vitro. Importantly, BAY 55-9837 also ameliorated disease phenotype in severe SMA mouse models. Conclusion Our findings suggest the VPAC2 pathway is a potential SMA therapeutic target. PMID:24405637

  17. Functional and Muscular Adaptations in an Experimental Model for Isometric Strength Training in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Karsten Krüger; Gessner, Denise K; Michael Seimetz; Jasmin Banisch; Robert Ringseis; Klaus Eder; Norbert Weissmann; Mooren, Frank C.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST) for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionall...

  18. Upper limb evaluation and one-year follow up of non-ambulant patients with spinal muscular atrophy: an observational multicenter trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Mihaela Seferian

    Full Text Available Assessment of the upper limb strength in non-ambulant neuromuscular patients remains challenging. Although potential outcome measures have been reported, longitudinal data demonstrating sensitivity to clinical evolution in spinal muscular atrophy patients are critically lacking. Our study recruited 23 non-ambulant patients, 16 patients (males/females = 6/10; median age 15.4 years with a range from 10.7 to 31.1 years with spinal muscular atrophy type II and 7 patients (males/females = 2/5; median age 19.9 years with a range from 8.3 to 29.9 years with type III. The Brooke functional score was on median 3 with a range from 2 to 6. The average total vital capacity was 46%, and seven patients required non-invasive ventilation at night. Patients were assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 1 year using the Motor Function Measure and innovative devices MyoGrip, MyoPinch, and MoviPlate, which assess handgrip strength, key pinch strength, and hand/finger extension-flexion function, respectively. The study demonstrated the feasibility and reliability of these measures for all patients, and sensitivity to negative changes after the age of 14 years. The younger patients showed an increase of the distal force in the follow-up period. The distal force measurements and function were correlated to different functional scales. These data represent an important step in the process of validating these devices as potential outcome measures for future clinical trials.

  19. 婴儿型脊肌萎缩症合并肺炎患儿的护理%Nursing care of spinal muscular atrophy complicated with pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王海勤; 喻筱倩; 周琴; 李承; 项慧慧; 吴轶璇

    2014-01-01

    Objective We summarized the nursing care experience of spinal muscular atrophy complicated with pneumonia.Methods The measures of nursing care to the 9 children patients were comprised of preventing sputum blockage; preventing suffocating due to milk choking; paying special attention to the time being when the sputum blockage and milk choking occurred; early detection of paralysis of respiratory muscle; and training nursing skills to the families,and so on.Results All 9 children patients were cured and discharged from hospital.Conclusions The measure of targeting nursing intervention to the children with infantile spinal muscular atrophy and pneumonia could improve therapeutic effect and reduce mortality rate.%目的 总结婴儿型脊肌萎缩症合并肺炎的护理经验.方法 对9例婴儿型脊肌萎缩症合并肺炎的患儿给予预防突发痰堵窒息、呛奶窒息,关注痰堵、呛奶高危时间段,警惕呼吸肌麻痹的发生,培训家庭救护技能等护理措施.结果 9例患儿肺炎均治愈出院.结论 对婴儿型脊肌萎缩症合并肺炎的患儿实施针对性的护理干预措施,能提高治疗效果,降低死亡率.

  20. FHL1 reduces dystrophy in transgenic mice overexpressing FSHD muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Feeney

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is an autosomal-dominant disease with no effective treatment. The genetic cause of FSHD is complex and the primary pathogenic insult underlying the muscle disease is unknown. Several disease candidate genes have been proposed including DUX4 and FRG1. Expression analysis studies of FSHD report the deregulation of genes which mediate myoblast differentiation and fusion. Transgenic mice overexpressing FRG1 recapitulate the FSHD muscular dystrophy phenotype. Our current study selectively examines how increased expression of FRG1 may contribute to myoblast differentiation defects. We generated stable C2C12 cell lines overexpressing FRG1, which exhibited a myoblast fusion defect upon differentiation. To determine if myoblast fusion defects contribute to the FRG1 mouse dystrophic phenotype, this strain was crossed with skeletal muscle specific FHL1-transgenic mice. We previously reported that FHL1 promotes myoblast fusion in vitro and FHL1-transgenic mice develop skeletal muscle hypertrophy. In the current study, FRG1 mice overexpressing FHL1 showed an improvement in the dystrophic phenotype, including a reduced spinal kyphosis, increased muscle mass and myofiber size, and decreased muscle fibrosis. FHL1 expression in FRG1 mice, did not alter satellite cell number or activation, but enhanced myoblast fusion. Primary myoblasts isolated from FRG1 mice showed a myoblast fusion defect that was rescued by FHL1 expression. Therefore, increased FRG1 expression may contribute to a muscular dystrophy phenotype resembling FSHD by impairing myoblast fusion, a defect that can be rescued by enhanced myoblast fusion via expression of FHL1.

  1. SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in cell lines derived from patients with spinal muscular atrophy as measured by array digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabley, Deborah L; Harris, Ashlee W; Holbrook, Jennifer; Chubbs, Nicholas J; Lozo, Kevin W; Crawford, Thomas O; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Funanage, Vicky L; Wang, Wenlan; Mackenzie, William; Scavina, Mena; Sol-Church, Katia; Butchbach, Matthew E R

    2015-07-01

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an early-onset motor neuron disease characterized by loss of α-motor neurons and associated muscle atrophy. SMA is caused by deletion or other disabling mutation of survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1). In the human genome, a large duplication of the SMN-containing region gives rise to a second copy of this gene (SMN2) that is distinguishable by a single nucleotide change in exon 7. Within the SMA population, there is substantial variation in SMN2 copy number; in general, those individuals with SMA who have a high SMN2 copy number have a milder disease. Because SMN2 functions as a disease modifier, its accurate copy number determination may have clinical relevance. In this study, we describe the development of an assay to assess SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers in DNA samples using an array-based digital PCR (dPCR) system. This dPCR assay can accurately and reliably measure the number of SMN1 and SMN2 copies in DNA samples. In a cohort of SMA patient-derived cell lines, the assay confirmed a strong inverse correlation between SMN2 copy number and disease severity. Array dPCR is a practical technique to determine, accurately and reliably, SMN1 and SMN2 copy numbers from SMA samples.

  2. Rescue of a Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy With Respiratory Distress Type 1 by AAV9-IGHMBP2 Is Dose Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shababi, Monir; Feng, Zhihua; Villalon, Eric; Sibigtroth, Christine M; Osman, Erkan Y; Miller, Madeline R; Williams-Simon, Patricka A; Lombardi, Abby; Sass, Thalia H; Atkinson, Arleigh K; Garcia, Michael L; Ko, Chien-Ping; Lorson, Christian L

    2016-05-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an autosomal recessive disease occurring during childhood. The gene responsible for disease development is a ubiquitously expressed protein, IGHMBP2. Mutations in IGHMBP2 result in the loss of α-motor neurons leading to muscle atrophy in the distal limbs accompanied by respiratory complications. Although genetically and clinically distinct, proximal SMA is also caused by the loss of a ubiquitously expressed gene (SMN). Significant preclinical success has been achieved in proximal SMA using viral-based gene replacement strategies. We leveraged the technologies employed in SMA to demonstrate gene replacement efficacy in an SMARD1 animal model. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of single-stranded AAV9 expressing the full-length cDNA of IGHMBP2 in a low dose led to a significant level of rescue in treated SMARD1 animals. Consistent with drastically increased survival, weight gain, and strength, the rescued animals demonstrated a significant improvement in muscle, NMJ, motor neurons, and axonal pathology. In addition, increased levels of IGHMBP2 in lumbar motor neurons verified the efficacy of the virus to transduce the target tissues. Our results indicate that AAV9-based gene replacement is a viable strategy for SMARD1, although dosing effects and potential negative impacts of high dose and ICV injection should be thoroughly investigated.

  3. The molecular responses of skeletal muscle satellite cells to continuous expression of IGF-1: implications for the rescue of induced muscular atrophy in aged rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Booth, F. W.; Spangenburg, E. E.

    2001-01-01

    Approximately 50% of humans older than 85 years have physical frailty due to weak skeletal muscles. This indicates a need for determining mechanisms to combat this problem. A critical cellular factor for postnatal muscle growth is a population of myogenic precursor cells called satellite cells. Given the complex process of sarcopenia, it has been postulated that, at some point in this process, a limited satellite cell proliferation potential could become rate-limiting to the regrowth of old muscles. It is conceivable that if satellite cell proliferative capacity can be maintained or enhanced with advanced age, sarcopenia could potentially be delayed or prevented. Therefore, the purposes of this paper are to describe whether IGF-I can prevent muscular atrophy induced by repeated cycles of hindlimb immobilization, increase the in vitro proliferation in satellite cells from these muscles and, if so, the molecular mechanisms by which IGF-I mediates this increased proliferation. Our results provide evidence that IGF-I can enhance aged muscle regrowth possibly through increased satellite cell proliferation. The results also suggest that IGF-I enhances satellite cell proliferation by decreasing the cell cycle inhibitor, p27Kip1, through the PI3'-K/Akt pathway. These data provide molecular evidence for IGF-I's rescue effect upon aging-associated skeletal muscle atrophy.

  4. Uniparental disomy as a cause of spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy: phenotypic homogeneity due to the homozygous c.125C>T mutation in ASAH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giráldez, Beatriz G; Guerrero-López, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Verdú, Alfonso; Carrascosa-Romero, M Carmen; García-Campos, Óscar; García-Muñozguren, Susana; Pardal-Fernández, José Manuel; Serratosa, José M

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy and progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMAPME, OMIM#159950) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the combination of progressive myoclonic epilepsy and muscular weakness due to lower motor neuron disease. Mutations in ASAH1, previously associated only to Farber disease, have been recently described in seven patients with SMAPME. A homozygous c.125C>T mutation was initially found in six patients with a clinical homogeneous phenotype. A heterozygous compound mutation found in an additional patient has broadened the clinical and genetic spectrum of clinical SMAPME. We report a new case of a 13-year-old girl with SMAPME with the homozygous ASAH1 c.125C>T mutation, unique in that it is due to paternal uniparental disomy. She experienced muscle weakness from the age of three due to lower motor neuron involvement that lead to severe handicap and onset in late childhood of a progressive myoclonic epilepsy. This clinical picture fully overlaps with that of previously reported patients with this mutation and supports our view that the clinical phenotype associated with the homozygous c.125C>T mutation constitutes a clinically homogenous and recognizable disease.

  5. Estimulação elétrica neuromuscular em cães com atrofia muscular induzida Neuromuscular electric stimulation in dogs with induced muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Pelizzari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Empregou-se a estimulação elétrica neuromuscular (EENM de baixa freqüência no músculo quadríceps femoral de cães com atrofia induzida e avaliou-se a ocorrência de ganho de massa nessa musculatura. Foram utilizados oito cães com pesos entre 15 e 30kg, distribuídos aleatoriamente em dois grupos denominados de I ou controle e II ou tratado. A articulação femorotibiopatelar esquerda foi imobilizada por 30 dias pelo método de transfixação percutânea tipo II, com retirada de aparelho de imobilização após esse período. Decorridas 48 horas da remoção, foi realizada a EENM nos cães do grupo II, cinco vezes por semana, com intervalo de 24 horas cada sessão, pelo período de 60 dias. Foram avaliadas a circunferência da coxa, a goniometria do joelho, a análise clínica da marcha, as enzimas creatina-quinase (CK e aspartato-amino-transferase (AST e a morfometria das fibras musculares em cortes transversais do músculo vasto lateral colhido mediante biópsia muscular. A EENM foi empregada no músculo quadríceps femoral na freqüência de 50Hz, duração de pulso de 300 milisegundos e relação de tempo on/off de 1:2. Quanto à morfometria das fibras do músculo vasto lateral, no grupo tratado houve aumento significativo (PLow frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES was used on the femoral quadriceps of dogs with induced muscular atrophy and the occurrence of gain in mass in these muscles was evaluated. Eight dogs from 15 to 30kg were randomly distributed in two groups named I, or control; and II, or treated. For the induction of muscular atrophy, the left femoral-tibial-patellar joint was immobilized for 30 days by percutaneous transfixation type II. After 30 days, the immobilization device was removed. The NMES treatment began 48 hours after the removal of the immobilization device of the dogs of group II, and it was carried out five times per week with an interval of 24 hours between each session, for 60 days. The

  6. Angiotensin-(1-7 attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Gabriela Morales

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7 [Ang-(1-7], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7 in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7 and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophy in vivo using unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT and Mas-knockout (Mas KO mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7 immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7 prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7 increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7 via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy.

  7. Selective activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) inhibits muscular degeneration in mdx dystrophic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Paulo Emílio Correa; Gandía, Luís; de Pascual, Ricardo; Nanclares, Carmen; Colmena, Inés; Santos, Wilson C; Lagrota-Candido, Jussara; Quirico-Santos, Thereza

    2014-07-21

    Amount evidence indicates that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation reduces production of inflammatory mediators. This work aimed to verify the influence of endogenous nAChRα7 activation on the regulation of full-blown muscular inflammation in mdx mouse with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We used mdx mice with 3 weeks-old at the height myonecrosis, and C57 nAChRα7(+/+) wild-type and nAChRα7(-/-) knockout mice with muscular injury induced with 60µL 0.5% bupivacaine (bp) in the gastrocnemius muscle. Pharmacological treatment included selective nAChRα7 agonist PNU282987 (0.3mg/kg and 1.0mg/kg) and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA at 1.0mg/kg) injected intraperitoneally for 7 days. Selective nAChRα7 activation of mdx mice with PNU282987 reduced circulating levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, a marker of cell death by necrosis) and the area of perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, and production of inflammatory mediators TNFα and metalloprotease MMP-9 activity. Conversely, PNU282987 treatment increased MMP-2 activity, an indication of muscular tissue remodeling associated with regeneration, in both mdx mice and WTα7 mice with bp-induced muscular lesion. Treatment with PNU282987 had no effect on α7KO, and MLA abolished the nAChRα7 agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect in both mdx and WT. In conclusion, nAChRα7 activation inhibits muscular inflammation and activates tissue remodeling by increasing muscular regeneration. These effects were not accompanied with fibrosis and/or deposition of non-functional collagen. The nAChRα7 activation may be considered as a potential target for pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation and activate mechanisms of muscular regeneration.

  8. 8-Prenylnaringenin promotes recovery from immobilization-induced disuse muscle atrophy through activation of the Akt phosphorylation pathway in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Rie; Horikawa, Hitomi; Lin, Pei-Yi; Tsukumo, Nao; Nikawa, Takeshi; Kawamura, Tomoyuki; Nemoto, Hisao; Terao, Junji

    2016-12-01

    8-Prenylnaringenin (8-PN) is a prenylflavonoid that originates from hop extracts and is thought to help prevent disuse muscle atrophy. We hypothesized that 8-PN affects muscle plasticity by promoting muscle recovery under disuse muscle atrophy. To test the promoting effect of 8-PN on muscle recovery, we administered an 8-PN mixed diet to mice that had been immobilized with a cast to one leg for 14 days. Intake of the 8-PN mixed diet accelerated recovery from muscle atrophy, and prevented reductions in Akt phosphorylation. Studies on cell cultures of mouse myotubes in vitro demonstrated that 8-PN activated the PI3K/Akt/P70S6K1 pathway at physiological concentrations. A cell-culture study using an inhibitor of estrogen receptors and an in vivo experiment with ovariectomized mice suggested that the estrogenic activity of 8-PN contributed to recovery from disuse muscle atrophy through activation of an Akt phosphorylation pathway. These data strongly suggest that 8-PN is a naturally occurring compound that could be used as a nutritional supplement to aid recovery from disuse muscle atrophy. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Angiotensin-(1-7) attenuates disuse skeletal muscle atrophy in mice via its receptor, Mas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, María Gabriela; Abrigo, Johanna; Acuña, María José; Santos, Robson A; Bader, Michael; Brandan, Enrique; Simon, Felipe; Olguin, Hugo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cabello-Verrugio, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Immobilization is a form of disuse characterized by a loss of strength and muscle mass. Among the main features are decreased IGF-1/Akt signalling and increased ubiquitin-proteasome pathway signalling, which induce greater myosin heavy chain degradation. Activation of the classical renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causes deleterious effects in skeletal muscle, including muscle wasting. In contrast, angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)], a peptide of the non-classical RAS, produces beneficial effects in skeletal muscle. However, the role of Ang-(1-7) in skeletal muscle disuse atrophy and independent of classical RAS activation has not been evaluated. Therefore, we assessed the functions of Ang-(1-7) and the Mas receptor in disuse muscle atrophyin vivousing unilateral cast immobilization of the hind limb in male, 12-week-old wild-type (WT) and Mas-knockout (Mas KO) mice for 1 and 14 days. Additionally, we evaluated the participation of IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt signalling and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway expression on the effects of Ang-(1-7) immobilization-induced muscle atrophy. Our results found that Ang-(1-7) prevented decreased muscle strength and reduced myofiber diameter, myosin heavy chain levels, and the induction of atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expressions, all of which normally occur during immobilization. Analyses indicated that Ang-(1-7) increases IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt pathway signalling through IGFR-1 and Akt phosphorylation, and the concomitant activation of two downstream targets of Akt, p70S6K and FoxO3. These anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) were not observed in Mas KO mice, indicating crucial participation of the Mas receptor. This report is the first to propose anti-atrophic effects of Ang-(1-7) via the Mas receptor and the participation of the IGF-1/IGFR-1/Akt/p70S6K/FoxO3 mechanism in disuse skeletal muscle atrophy. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. The posterior cricoarytenoid muscle is spared from MuRF1-mediated muscle atrophy in mice with acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, D Clark; Xiao, Kunhong; Zhang, Tan; Liu, Chun; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo; Feng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle wasting in acute lung injury (ALI) patients increases the morbidity and mortality associated with this critical illness. The contribution of laryngeal muscle wasting to these outcomes is unknown, though voice impairments and aspiration are common in intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. We evaluated the intrinsic laryngeal abductor (PCA, posterior cricoarytenoid), adductor (CT, cricothyroid) and limb (EDL, extensor digitorum longus) muscles in a mouse model of ALI. Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharides were instilled into the lungs of adult male C57Bl6J mice (ALI mice). Limb and intrinsic laryngeal muscles were analyzed for fiber size, type, protein expression and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition by SDS-PAGE and mass spectroscopy. Marked muscle atrophy occurred in the CT and EDL muscles, while the PCA was spared. The E3 ubiquitin ligase muscle ring finger-1 protein (MuRF1), a known mediator of limb muscle atrophy in this model, was upregulated in the CT and EDL, but not in the PCA. Genetic inhibition of MuRF1 protected the CT and EDL from ALI-induced muscle atrophy. MyHC-Extraocular (MyHC-EO) comprised 27% of the total MyHC in the PCA, distributed as hybrid fibers throughout 72% of PCA muscle fibers. The vocal cord abductor (PCA) contains a large proportion of fibers expressing MyHC-EO and is spared from muscle atrophy in ALI mice. The lack of MuRF1 expression in the PCA suggests a previously unrecognized mechanism whereby this muscle is spared from atrophy. Atrophy of the vocal cord adductor (CT) may contribute to the impaired voice and increased aspiration observed in ICU survivors. Further evaluation of the sparing of muscles involved in systemic wasting diseases may lead to potential therapeutic targets for these illnesses.

  11. 脊髓延髓肌肉萎缩症的临床特点%Clinical features of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛琳; 潘钰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the elinical features of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy(SBMA). Method The clinical data of 8 SBMA patients diagnosed by gene were analyzed retrospectively. Result All of the patients in ihis group were young middle-aped men. The initial symploin was weakness of lower limbs in 3 cases, myasthenia of limbs m 1 cast, harymastia in 2 cases, upper limbs postural tremor in 2 cases,. The main manifestations were progressive lower limbs and muscular atrophy. There was relatively serious in lower limbs, and the disease progresses slowly. All the patients have fascie, and upper limbs postural tremor was in 3 cases, tongue muscles atrophy and tremor in 5 cases, barymastia in 4 cases, and sexual function decrement in 2 cases. The serum creatine kinase was increased in all the patients, lipid abnormality in 5 cases, and sex hormones abnormality in 7 cases. Electromyogram (EMG) showed a wide range of neurogenic damage. The number of (CAG)n repeat in androgen receptors ( AR) gene was above 40. Conclusions SBMA shows a slowly progressing lower motor neuron paralysis and atrophy in spinal and bulbar muscles. The definite diagnosis of SBMA disease should he made by delecting the number of (CAG)n repeat of androgen receptor gene.%目的 探讨脊髓延髓肌肉萎缩症(SBMA)的临床特点.方法 对8例基因确诊的SBMA患者的临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 本组患者均为中青年男性.首发症状为双下胺无力3例,四肢无力1例,乳房增大2例,双上肢姿位性震颤2例.主要临床表现为进行性肢体无力、肌肉萎缩,下肢重,病情进展缓慢.患者均出现束颤,出现双上肢姿位性震颤3例,舌肌萎缩和震颤5例,乳房增大4例,性功能减退2例.血清肌酸激酶均增高,血脂异常5例,性激素水平异常7例.肌电图均呈广泛神经源性损害.雄激素受体(AR)基因CAG重复序列数均>40次.结论 SBMA主要表现为缓慢进展的脊髓和延髓下运动神经元性瘫痪,确诊

  12. Association between the SMN2 gene copy number and clinical characteristics of patients with spinal muscular atrophy with homozygous deletion of exon 7 of the SMN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žarkov Marija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord and the medulla oblongata, causing progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. The aim of this study was to determine association between the SMN2 gene copy number and disease phenotype in Serbian patients with SMA with homozygous deletion of exon 7 of the SMN1 gene. Methods. The patients were identified using regional Serbian hospital databases. Investigated clinical characteristics of the disease were: patients’ gender, age at disease onset, achieved and current developmental milestones, disease duration, current age, and the presence of the spinal deformities and joint contractures. The number of SMN1 and SMN2 gene copies was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results. Among 43 identified patients, 37 (86.0% showed homozygous deletion of SMN1 exon 7. One (2.7% of 37 patients had SMA type I with 3 SMN2 copies, 11 (29.7% patients had SMA type II with 3.1 ± 0.7 copies, 17 (45.9% patients had SMA type III with 3.7 ± 0.9 copies, while 8 (21.6% patients had SMA type IV with 4.2 ± 0.9 copies. There was a progressive increase in the SMN2 gene copy number from type II towards type IV (p < 0.05. A higher SMN2 gene copy number was associated with better current motor performance (p < 0.05. Conclusion. In the Serbian patients with SMA, a higher SMN2 gene copy number correlated with less severe disease phenotype. A possible effect of other phenotype modifiers should not be neglected.

  13. Functional and muscular adaptations in an experimental model for isometric strength training in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Karsten; Gessner, Denise K; Seimetz, Michael; Banisch, Jasmin; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Weissmann, Norbert; Mooren, Frank C

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST) for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionally, either a sedentary control group (CT) or a regular endurance training group (ET) groups were used as controls. Performance capacity was determined by maximum holding time (MHT) and treadmill spirometry, respectively. Furthermore, muscle fiber types and diameter, muscular concentration of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK), succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa), and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) were determined. In a further approach, the effect of ST on glucose intolerance was tested in diabetic mice. In mice of the ST group we observed an increase of MHT in isometric strength tests, a type II fiber hypertrophy, and an increased GLUT4 protein content in the membrane fraction. In contrast, in mice of the ET group an increase of VO(2max), a shift to oxidative muscle fiber type and an increase of oxidative enzyme content was measured. Furthermore strength training was effective in reducing glucose intolerance in mice fed a high fat diet. An effective murine strength training model was developed and evaluated, which revealed marked differences in adaptations known from endurance training. This approach seems also suitable to test for therapeutical effects of strength training.

  14. Functional and muscular adaptations in an experimental model for isometric strength training in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Krüger

    Full Text Available Exercise training induces muscular adaptations that are highly specific to the type of exercise. For a systematic study of the differentiated exercise adaptations on a molecular level mouse models have been used successfully. The aim of the current study was to develop a suitable mouse model of isometric strength exercise training characterized by specific adaptations known from strength training. C57BL/6 mice performed an isometric strength training (ST for 10 weeks 5 days/week. Additionally, either a sedentary control group (CT or a regular endurance training group (ET groups were used as controls. Performance capacity was determined by maximum holding time (MHT and treadmill spirometry, respectively. Furthermore, muscle fiber types and diameter, muscular concentration of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK, succinate dehydrogenase (SDHa, and glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 were determined. In a further approach, the effect of ST on glucose intolerance was tested in diabetic mice. In mice of the ST group we observed an increase of MHT in isometric strength tests, a type II fiber hypertrophy, and an increased GLUT4 protein content in the membrane fraction. In contrast, in mice of the ET group an increase of VO(2max, a shift to oxidative muscle fiber type and an increase of oxidative enzyme content was measured. Furthermore strength training was effective in reducing glucose intolerance in mice fed a high fat diet. An effective murine strength training model was developed and evaluated, which revealed marked differences in adaptations known from endurance training. This approach seems also suitable to test for therapeutical effects of strength training.

  15. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lee,Young Il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-01-01

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precedes the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any ...

  16. AMP-activated kinase α2 deficiency protects mice from denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuting; Meng, Jin; Tang, Yinglong; Wang, Ting; Wei, Bin; Feng, Run; Gong, Bing; Wang, Huiwen; Ji, Guangju; Lu, Zhongbing

    2016-06-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master regulator of skeletal muscle metabolic pathways. Recently, AMPK activation by AICAR has been shown to increase myofibrillar protein degradation in C2C12 myotubes via stimulating autophagy and ubiquitin proteasome system. However, the impact of AMPKα on denervation induced muscle atrophy has not been tested. In this study, we performed sciatic denervation on hind limb muscles in both wild type (WT) and AMPKα2(-/-) mice. We found that AMPKα was phosphorylated in atrophic muscles following denervation. In addition, deletion of AMPKα2 significantly attenuated denervation induced skeletal muscle wasting and protein degradation, as evidenced by preserved muscle mass and myofiber area, as well as lower levels of ubiquitinated protein, Atrogin-1 and MuRF-1 expression, and LC3-II/I ratio in tibial anterior (TA) muscles. Interestingly, the phosphorylated FoxO3a at Ser253 was significantly decreased in atrophic TA muscles, which was preserved in AMPKα2(-/-) mice. Collectively, our data support the notion that the activation of AMPKα2 contributes to the atrophic effects of denervation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the CAG repeat region of the androgen receptor gene in a kindred with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsham, D D; Yee, W C; Greenberg, C R; Wrogemann, K

    1992-10-01

    Herein we describe a family with X-linked spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA or Kennedy's disease), an adult onset neuromuscular disease characterized by slow progression, predominant proximal and bulbar muscle weakness. One frequent association is the appearance of gynecomastia. This disorder was previously shown to be linked to the locus DXYS1 on the proximal long arm of the X chromosome. Recently, a report implicated a mutation at the N-terminus of the androgen receptor gene involving amplification of CAG repeats as the cause of X-linked SBMA. We studied this region of the androgen receptor in a kindred clinically suspected but not confirmed of having X-linked SBMA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by Southern analysis and DNA sequencing. The mutated allele was found to have an increased number of 51 CAG repeats confirming the clinical diagnosis of SBMA. Normal individuals revealed 23 repeat numbers within the normal range, while another unrelated X-linked SBMA patient had an enlarged CAG repeat region. The carrier or disease status could be established or confirmed in 12 individuals of this family on the basis of detecting normal and disease alleles reflected by the number of CAG repeats.

  18. The polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy inhibits the APC/C(Cdh1) ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Laura C; Salomons, Florian A; Maric, Dragan; Liu, Yuhong; Merry, Diane; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Dantuma, Nico P

    2016-06-17

    Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked neuromuscular disease that is fully manifest only in males. It has been suggested that proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts impair ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis due to their propensity to aggregate, but recent studies indicate that the overall activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is preserved in SBMA models. Here we report that AR selectively interferes with the function of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which, together with its substrate adaptor Cdh1, is critical for cell cycle arrest and neuronal architecture. We show that both wild-type and mutant AR physically interact with the APC/C(Cdh1) complex in a ligand-dependent fashion without being targeted for proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of APC/C(Cdh1) by mutant but not wild-type AR in PC12 cells results in enhanced neurite outgrowth which is typically followed by rapid neurite retraction and mitotic entry. Our data indicate a role of AR in neuronal differentiation through regulation of APC/C(Cdh1) and suggest abnormal cell cycle reactivation as a pathogenic mechanism in SBMA.

  19. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Andrea; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Murdocca, Michela; Malgieri, Arianna; Masotti, Andrea; Sanchez, Massimo; Farace, Maria Giulia; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2015-08-06

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1), encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs), leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs) are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT) counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  20. Metalloprotease-mediated cleavage of PlexinD1 and its sequestration to actin rods in the motoneuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Sebastian; Verheijen, Bert M; Hensel, Niko; Peters, Miriam; Bora, Gamze; Brandes, Gudrun; Vieira de Sá, Renata; Heidrich, Natascha; Fischer, Silke; Brinkmann, Hella; van der Pol, W Ludo; Wirth, Brunhilde; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Claus, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Cytoskeletal rearrangement during axon growth is mediated by guidance receptors and their ligands which act either as repellent, attractant or both. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is disturbed in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting mainly motoneurons, but receptor-ligand interactions leading to the dysregulation causing SMA are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed the role of the guidance receptor PlexinD1 in SMA pathogenesis. We showed that PlexinD1 is cleaved by metalloproteases in SMA and that this cleavage switches its function from an attractant to repellent. Moreover, we found that the PlexinD1 cleavage product binds to actin rods, pathological aggregate-like structures which had so far been described for age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Our data suggest a novel disease mechanism for SMA involving formation of actin rods as a molecular sink for a cleaved PlexinD1 fragment leading to dysregulation of receptor signaling. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Quantification, by solid-phase minisequencing, of the telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene in families with spinal muscular atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, M; Sørensen, N; Hansen, F J

    1997-01-01

    In an analysis of 30 families affected by spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) we have used the solid-phase minisequencing method to determine the ratio between the number of telomeric and centromeric copies of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN and cBCD541 respectively) on normal and SMA chromosomes....... This has enabled us to establish haplotypes with regard to SMN and cBCD541, and estimate their frequencies, on both types of chromosomes. Six predominant haplotypes were identified, three for normal chromosomes and three for SMA chromosomes, characterized by having 0, 1, or 2 copies, respectively, of c......BCD541. We found evidence for the presence of patients homozygous for a deletion of SMN and with only one copy of cBCD541, but found none deleted for all copies of this gene. Several asymptomatic carriers of SMA with only a single copy of SMN and no copy of cBCD541 were identified. We could not confirm...

  2. A novel role for CARM1 in promoting nonsense-mediated mRNA decay: potential implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Gabriel; Bondy-Chorney, Emma; Laframboise, Janik; Paris, Geneviève; Didillon, Andréanne; Jasmin, Bernard J; Côté, Jocelyn

    2016-04-07

    Loss of 'Survival of Motor Neurons' (SMN) leads to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a disease characterized by degeneration of spinal cord alpha motor neurons, resulting in muscle weakness, paralysis and death during early childhood. SMN is required for assembly of the core splicing machinery, and splicing defects were documented in SMA. We previously uncovered that Coactivator-Associated Methyltransferase-1 (CARM1) is abnormally up-regulated in SMA, leading to mis-regulation of a number of transcriptional and alternative splicing events. We report here that CARM1 can promote decay of a premature terminating codon (PTC)-containing mRNA reporter, suggesting it can act as a mediator of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD). Interestingly, this pathway, while originally perceived as solely a surveillance mechanism preventing expression of potentially detrimental proteins, is now emerging as a highly regulated RNA decay pathway also acting on a subset of normal mRNAs. We further show that CARM1 associates with major NMD factor UPF1 and promotes its occupancy on PTC-containing transcripts. Finally, we identify a specific subset of NMD targets that are dependent on CARM1 for degradation and that are also misregulated in SMA, potentially adding exacerbated targeting of PTC-containing mRNAs to the already complex array of molecular defects associated with this disease.

  3. The spinal muscular atrophy gene region at 5q13.1 has a paralogous chromosomal region at 6p21.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyer, J L; Goldwurm, S; Cullen, L; van der Griend, B; Zournazi, A; Smit, D J; Powell, L W; Jazwinska, E C

    1998-03-01

    Paralogous regions are duplicated segments of chromosomal DNA that have been acquired during the evolution of the genome. Subsequent divergent evolution of the genes within paralogous regions can lead to the formation of gene families. Here, we report the identification of a region on Chromosome (Chr) 6 at 6p21.3 that is paralogous with the Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) gene region on Chr 5 at 5q13.1. Partial characterization of this region identified nine sequences all of which are highly homologous to DNA sequences of the SMA gene region at 5q13.1. These sequences include four beta-glucuronidase sequences, two retrotransposon sequences, a novel cDNA, a Sequence Tagged Site (STS), and one that is homologous to exon 9 of the Neuronal Apoptosis Inhibitor Protein (NAIP) gene. The 6p21.3 paralogous SMA region may contain genes that are related to those in the SMA region at 5q13.1; however, a direct association of this region with SMA is unlikely given that no linkage of SMA with Chr 6 has been reported.

  4. A Perturbed MicroRNA Expression Pattern Characterizes Embryonic Neural Stem Cells Derived from a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Luchetti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is an inherited neuromuscular disorder and the leading genetic cause of death in infants. Despite the disease-causing gene, survival motor neuron (SMN1, encodes a ubiquitous protein, SMN1 deficiency preferentially affects spinal motor neurons (MNs, leaving the basis of this selective cell damage still unexplained. As neural stem cells (NSCs are multipotent self-renewing cells that can differentiate into neurons, they represent an in vitro model for elucidating the pathogenetic mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases such as SMA. Here we characterize for the first time neural stem cells (NSCs derived from embryonic spinal cords of a severe SMNΔ7 SMA mouse model. SMNΔ7 NSCs behave as their wild type (WT counterparts, when we consider neurosphere formation ability and the expression levels of specific regional and self-renewal markers. However, they show a perturbed cell cycle phase distribution and an increased proliferation rate compared to wild type cells. Moreover, SMNΔ7 NSCs are characterized by the differential expression of a limited number of miRNAs, among which miR-335-5p and miR-100-5p, reduced in SMNΔ7 NSCs compared to WT cells. We suggest that such miRNAs may be related to the proliferation differences characterizing SMNΔ7 NSCs, and may be potentially involved in the molecular mechanisms of SMA.

  5. Hybrids monosomal for human chromosome 5 reveal the presence of a spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) carrier with two SMN1 copies on one chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailman, M D; Hemingway, T; Darsey, R L; Glasure, C E; Huang, Y; Chadwick, R B; Heinz, J W; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Schafer, R W; Abuelo, D N; Reich, E W; Theil, K S; Burghes, A H; de la Chapelle, A; Prior, T W

    2001-02-01

    We have analyzed the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) dosage in 100 parents of children with homozygous SMN1 deletions. Of these parents, 96 (96%) demonstrated the expected one-copy SMN1 carrier genotype. However, four parents (4%) were observed to have a normal two-copy SMN1 dosage. The presence of two intact SMN1 genes in the parent of an affected child indicates either the occurrence of a de novo mutation event or a situation in which one chromosome has two copies of SMN1, whereas the other is null. We have separated individual chromosomes from two of these parents with two-copy SMN1 dosage by somatic cell hybridization and have employed a modified quantitative dosage assay to provide direct evidence that one parent is a two-copy/ zero-copy SMN1 carrier, whereas the other parent had an affected child as the result of a de novo mutation. These findings are important for assessing the recurrence risk of parents of children with spinal muscular atrophy and for providing accurate family counseling.

  6. Rasch analysis of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-computer adaptive test (PEDI-CAT) item bank for children and young adults with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Amy; Sideridis, Georgios; Fragala-Pinkham, Maria; Glanzman, Allan M; Montes, Jacqueline; Dunaway, Sally; Salazar, Rachel; Quigley, Janet; Pandya, Shree; O'Riley, Susan; Greenwood, Jonathan; Chiriboga, Claudia; Finkel, Richard; Tennekoon, Gihan; Martens, William B; McDermott, Michael P; Fournier, Heather Szelag; Madabusi, Lavanya; Harrington, Timothy; Cruz, Rosangel E; LaMarca, Nicole M; Videon, Nancy M; Vivo, Darryl C De; Darras, Basil T

    2016-12-01

    In this study we evaluated the suitability of a caregiver-reported functional measure, the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test (PEDI-CAT), for children and young adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). PEDI-CAT Mobility and Daily Activities domain item banks were administered to 58 caregivers of children and young adults with SMA. Rasch analysis was used to evaluate test properties across SMA types. Unidimensional content for each domain was confirmed. The PEDI-CAT was most informative for type III SMA, with ability levels distributed close to 0.0 logits in both domains. It was less informative for types I and II SMA, especially for mobility skills. Item and person abilities were not distributed evenly across all types. The PEDI-CAT may be used to measure functional performance in SMA, but additional items are needed to identify small changes in function and best represent the abilities of all types of SMA. Muscle Nerve 54: 1097-1107, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Association of copy numbers of survival motor neuron gene 2 and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein gene with the natural history in a Chinese spinal muscular atrophy cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yu-jin; Ge, Xiu-shan; Bai, Jin-li; Wang, Li-wen; Cao, Yan-yan; Lu, Yan-yu; Jin, Yu-wei; Wang, Hong; Song, Fang

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) gene copy distribution and the association of copy number with survival in 232 Chinese spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. The SMN2 and NAIP copy numbers correlated positively with the median onset age (r = 0.72 and 0.377). The risk of death for patients with fewer copies of SMN2 or NAIP was much higher than for those with more copies (P < .01). The survival probabilities at 5 years were 5.1%, 90.7%, and 100% for 2, 3, and 4 SMN2 copies and 27.9%, 66.7%, and 87.2% for 0, 1, and 2 NAIP copies, respectively. Our results indicated that combined SMN1-SMN2-NAIP genotypes with fewer copies were associated with earlier onset age and poorer survival probability. Better survival status for Chinese type I SMA might due to a higher proportion of 3 SMN2 and a lower rate of zero NAIP.

  8. 儿童型脊髓性肌萎缩症遗传学研究进展%Advances in the genetics of spinal muscular atrophy in childhood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘维亮; 李芳

    2010-01-01

    儿童型脊髓性肌萎缩症是常见的遗传性神经肌肉病,为常染色体隐性遗传.SMN1基因纯合缺失和微小突变是该病的主要病因,其高度同源拷贝SMN2基因可调节疾病的严重性,两个基因间功能的不同是编码区单个核苷酸不同致沉默突变使SMN2转录翻译大为降低.组蛋白脱乙酰基酶抑制剂在临床治疗实验中已显示出较好前景.%Spinal muscular atrophy in childhood is one of the most common neuromuscular disorders with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The main pathogenesis is homozygous loss and small intragenic mutations of the SMN1. SMN2 ,as a very identical copy of SMN1, modulates the disease severity. The functional difference between both genes is a variance of single nucleotide within the coding region, causing silent mutation obviously to decrease SMN2 transcripts. Histone deacetylase inhibitors have been shown better perspective in clinical trials.

  9. The polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy inhibits the APC/CCdh1 ubiquitin ligase complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bott, Laura C.; Salomons, Florian A.; Maric, Dragan; Liu, Yuhong; Merry, Diane; Fischbeck, Kenneth H.; Dantuma, Nico P.

    2016-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) causes spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked neuromuscular disease that is fully manifest only in males. It has been suggested that proteins with expanded polyglutamine tracts impair ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis due to their propensity to aggregate, but recent studies indicate that the overall activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome system is preserved in SBMA models. Here we report that AR selectively interferes with the function of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), which, together with its substrate adaptor Cdh1, is critical for cell cycle arrest and neuronal architecture. We show that both wild-type and mutant AR physically interact with the APC/CCdh1 complex in a ligand-dependent fashion without being targeted for proteasomal degradation. Inhibition of APC/CCdh1 by mutant but not wild-type AR in PC12 cells results in enhanced neurite outgrowth which is typically followed by rapid neurite retraction and mitotic entry. Our data indicate a role of AR in neuronal differentiation through regulation of APC/CCdh1 and suggest abnormal cell cycle reactivation as a pathogenic mechanism in SBMA. PMID:27312068

  10. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles attenuate aging-like skin atrophy via antioxidant activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Shuichi; Ozawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Kenji; Izuo, Naotaka; Toda, Toshihiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Shimizu, Takahiko

    2014-01-01

    Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1) loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1-/- mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1-/- mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage.

  11. Palladium and platinum nanoparticles attenuate aging-like skin atrophy via antioxidant activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Shibuya

    Full Text Available Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1 loss causes a redox imbalance as it leads to excess superoxide generation, which results in the appearance of various aging-related phenotypes, including skin atrophy. Noble metal nanoparticles, such as palladium (Pd and platinum (Pt nanoparticles, are considered to function as antioxidants due to their strong catalytic activity. In Japan, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles called PAPLAL has been used to treat chronic diseases over the past 60 years. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of PAPLAL against aging-related skin pathologies in mice. Transdermal PAPLAL treatment reversed skin thinning associated with increased lipid peroxidation in Sod1-/- mice. Furthermore, PAPLAL normalized the gene expression levels of Col1a1, Mmp2, Has2, Tnf-α, Il-6, and p53 in the skin of the Sod1-/- mice. Pt nanoparticles exhibited marked SOD and catalase activity, while Pd nanoparticles only displayed weak SOD and catalase activity in vitro. Although the SOD and catalase activity of the Pt nanoparticles significantly declined after they had been oxidized in air, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation. Importantly, a mixture of Pd and Pt nanoparticles with a molar ratio of 3 or 4 to 1 continued to exhibit SOD and catalase activity after oxidation, indicating that Pd nanoparticles prevent the oxidative deterioration of Pt nanoparticles. These findings indicate that PAPLAL stably suppresses intrinsic superoxide generation both in vivo and in vitro via SOD and catalase activity. PAPLAL is a potentially powerful tool for the treatment of aging-related skin diseases caused by oxidative damage.

  12. Stand-up exercise training facilitates muscle recovery from disuse atrophy by stimulating myogenic satellite cell proliferation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuta; Hayakawa, Kimihide; Mori, Tomohiro; Agata, Nobuhide; Inoue-Miyazu, Masumi; Murakami, Taro; Sokabe, Masahiro; Kawakami, Keisuke

    2014-11-01

    Determining the cellular and molecular recovery processes in inactivity - or unloading -induced atrophied muscles should improve rehabilitation strategies. We assessed the effects of stand-up exercise (SE) training on the recovery of atrophied skeletal muscles in male mice. Mice were trained to stand up and press an elevated lever in response to a light-tone cue preceding an electric foot shock and then subjected to tail suspension (TS) for 2 weeks to induce disuse atrophy in hind limb muscles. After release from TS, mice were divided into SE-trained (SE cues: 25 times per set, two sets per day) and non-SE-trained groups. Seven days after the training, average myofiber cross-sectional area (CSA) of the soleus muscle was significantly greater in the SE-trained group than in the non-SE-trained group (1843 ± 194 μm(2) vs. 1315 ± 153 μm(2)). Mean soleus muscle CSA in the SE trained group was not different from that in the CON group subjected to neither TS nor SE training (2005 ± 196 μm(2)), indicating that SE training caused nearly complete recovery from muscle atrophy. The number of myonuclei per myofiber was increased by ~60% in the SE-trained group compared with the non-SE-trained and CON groups (0.92 ± 0.03 vs. 0.57 ± 0.03 and 0.56 ± 0.11, respectively). The number of proliferating myonuclei, identified by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine staining, increased within the first few days of SE training. Thus, it is highly likely that myogenic satellite cells proliferated rapidly in atrophied muscles in response to SE training and fused with existing myofibers to reestablish muscle mass.

  13. Muscular reconstruction to improve the deterioration of facial appearance and speech caused by mandibular atrophy: technique and case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosker, H; Wardle, M L

    1999-08-01

    One of the consequences of severe mandibular atrophy is the loss of attachment of the facial muscles that originate from the alveolar process and basal bone. Another is a loss of vestibular depth and reduction in the width of the attached gingiva. The result is reduced ability to chew, a changed and aged appearance, difficulties with pronunciation, and a reduced range of expressions. The traditional goal of treatment has been to improve the ability to chew. We describe a technique by which all these functions can be improved by a combination of insertion of implants and functional reconstruction of the facial muscles and position of the lips. When the muscles are repositioned, the buccal vestibule is deepened, and the incidence of gingival hyperplasia and infrabony pockets along the posts is eliminated. This treatment, which also rejuvenates the face and improves the ability to speak, should help to overcome the loss of self-confidence and self-esteem of these patients by improving their quality of life.

  14. Balanced Diet-Fed Fat-1 Transgenic Mice Exhibit Lower Hindlimb Suspension-Induced Soleus Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzuca-Nassr, Gabriel Nasri; Murata, Gilson Masahiro; Martins, Amanda Roque; Vitzel, Kaio Fernando; Crisma, Amanda Rabello; Torres, Rosângela Pavan; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; Kang, Jing Xuan; Curi, Rui

    2017-10-06

    The consequences of two-week hindlimb suspension (HS) on skeletal muscle atrophy were investigated in balanced diet-fed Fat-1 transgenic and C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Body composition and gastrocnemius fatty acid composition were measured. Skeletal muscle force, cross-sectional area (CSA), and signaling pathways associated with protein synthesis (protein kinase B, Akt; ribosomal protein S6, S6, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1, 4EBP1; glycogen synthase kinase3-beta, GSK3-beta; and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2, ERK 1/2) and protein degradation (atrophy gene-1/muscle atrophy F-box, atrogin-1/MAFbx and muscle RING finger 1, MuRF1) were evaluated in the soleus muscle. HS decreased soleus muscle wet and dry weights (by 43% and 26%, respectively), muscle isotonic and tetanic force (by 29% and 18%, respectively), CSA of the soleus muscle (by 36%), and soleus muscle fibers (by 45%). Fat-1 transgenic mice had a decrease in the ω-6/ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) ratio as compared with C57BL/6 wild-type mice (56%, p Fat-1 mice had lower soleus muscle dry mass loss (by 10%) and preserved absolute isotonic force (by 17%) and CSA of the soleus muscle (by 28%) after HS as compared with C57BL/6 wild-type mice. p-GSK3B/GSK3B ratio was increased (by 70%) and MuRF-1 content decreased (by 50%) in the soleus muscle of Fat-1 mice after HS. Balanced diet-fed Fat-1 mice are able to preserve in part the soleus muscle mass, absolute isotonic force and CSA of the soleus muscle in a disuse condition.

  15. MRI findings of nonprogressive juvenile spinal muscular atrophy of the distal upper limbs (Hirayama's disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Song, Jong Woon; Lee, Suk Hong; Choi, Kwang Dong; Park, Kyoung Pil; Choi, Ki Bok [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dynamic changes of the cervical dural sac and the spinal cord during neck flexion in patients suffering from Hirayama's disease and to present the usefulness of flexion MR study for the diagnosis. Seven consecutive male patients (age ranging 17-43 years, mean age 23.7 years) with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease and 5 healthy subjects (aged 25-32 years) for controls had done cervical MRI from January 2001 through June 2002. Cervical MRI was done in neutral and neck flexed positions using 1.5T system (Sonata, Siemens, Germany) and obtained images were reviewed by two radiologists. We compared the cervical MRI findings of 7 patients with those of 5 healthy controls regarding neck flexion induced changes in the lower cervical segments. Neutral positioned cervical sagittal MR images revealed subtle or mild cord atrophy in only 2 patients. On maximal neck flexion, AP diameter of the cresent posterior epidural space was increased and also cord flattening with anterior shifting of posterior wall of the lower cervical dural canal was noted in all 7 patients. In all 7 cases, the level and side of spinal cord changes corresponded to the clinical phenotype. All control subjects showed neither cord flattening nor widening of posterior epidural space on neck flexion. In patients with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease, MRI scans obtained on maximal neck flexion showed characteristically dynamic flattening of lower cervical cord and widening of posterior epidural space. Therefore, a flexion MR study is needed to prove the diagnosis.

  16. MRI findings of nonprogressive juvenile spinal muscular atrophy of the distal upper limbs(Hirayama's disease)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Tae Hong; Kim, Hak Jin; Song, Jong Woon; Lee, Suk Hong; Choi, Kwang Dong; Park, Kyoung Pil [Pusan National University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ki Bok [Inje University College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the dynamic changes of the cervical dural sac and the spinal cord during neck flexion in patients suffering from Hirayama's disease and to present the usefulness of flexion MR study for the diagnosis. Seven consecutive male patients (age ranging 17-43 years, mean age 23.7 years) with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease and 5 healthy subjects (aged 25-32 years) for controls had done cervical MRI from January 2001 through June 2002. Cervical MRI was done in neutral and neck flexed positions using 1.5 T system (Sonata, Siemens, Germany) and obtained images were reviewed by two radiologists. We compared the cervical MRI findings of 7 patients with those of 5 healthy controls regarding neck flexion induced changes in the lower cervical segments. Neutral positioned cervical sagittal MR images revealed subtle or mild cord atrophy in only 2 patients. On maximal neck flexion, AP diameter of the cresent posterior epidural space was increased and also cord flattening with anterior shifting of posterior wall of the lower cervical dural canal was noted in all 7 patients. In all 7 cases, the level and side of spinal cord changes corresponded to the clinical phenotype. All control subjects showed neither cord flattening nor widening of posterior epidural space on neck flexion. In patients with the clinical diagnosis of Hirayama's disease, MRI scans obtained on maximal neck flexion showed characteristically dynamic flattening of lower cervical cord and widening of posterior epidural space. Therefore, a flexion MR study is needed to prove the diagnosis.

  17. Combination of valproic acid and morpholino splice-switching oligonucleotide produces improved outcomes in spinal muscular atrophy patient-derived fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly-Rosch, Anna; Lau, Chew Ling; Patil, Nitin; Turner, Bradley J; Shabanpoor, Fazel

    2017-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), the leading genetic cause of infant mortality worldwide, is characterised by the homozygous loss of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. The consequent degeneration of spinal motor neurons and progressive atrophy of voluntary muscle groups results in paralysis and eventually premature infantile death. Humans possess a second nearly identical copy of SMN1, known as SMN2. However, SMN2 produces only 10-20% functional SMN protein due to aberrant splicing of its pre-mRNA that leads to the exclusion of exon 7. This level of SMN is insufficient to rescue the phenotype. Recently developed splice-switching antisense oligonuclotides (SSO) have shown great promise in correcting the aberrant splicing of SMN2 towards producing functional SMN protein. Several FDA approved drugs are being repurposed for SMA treatment including valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, which has been shown to increase overall SMN2 expression. In this study, we have characterised the effects of single and combined treatment of VPA and a SSO based on phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO) chemistry. We conjugated both VPA and PMO to a single cell-penetrating peptide (Apolipoprotein E (ApoE)) for their simultaneous intracellular delivery. Treatment of SMA Type I patient-derived fibroblasts with the conjugates showed no additive increase in the level of full-length SMN2 mRNA expression over both 4 and 16 h treatments indicating that conjugation of VPA to ApoE-PMO has limited benefit. However, treatment with a combination of VPA and ApoE-PMO induced more favourable splice switching activity than either agent alone, promoting exon 7 inclusion in SMN2 transcripts. Our results suggest that combination therapy of VPA and ApoE-PMO is superior in upregulating SMN2 production in vitro, as compared to singular treatment of each compound at both transcriptional and protein levels. This study provides the first indication of a novel dual therapy approach

  18. Clinical features of childhood-onset spinal muscular atrophy%儿童型脊肌萎缩症的临床特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻绪恩; 杨任民; 王训; 孙丹丹; 石永光; 付晓明; 周志华; 程楠; 胡纪源; 韩咏竹

    2011-01-01

    Objective To approach the clinical features of childhood-onset spinal muscular atrophy ( CSMA). Method The clinical data of 11 CSMA patients were analyzed retrospectively. Result In this group, the average age of onset was (6. 1 ±5.5) years old. The onset in all of them were chronic. The mainly clinical manifestations were limbs weakness, thinner and walking instability. The level of serum enzyme in 5 cases was rising slightly. The result of electromyography examination in 8 cases was neurogenic damage and the other 3 cases was normal. Muscle pathologic examination showed that the size of muscle fibers was inequality in all the cases, the different degree of myofibers grouping in 10 cases, nuclear ingression myofibers in 8 cases, with little keratosic fibers in 7 cases and target fibers in 6 cases. Conclusions The clinical features of CSMA are limb weakness and atrophy appeared in the childhood. The features of muscle electrophysiology and pathology are neurogenic damage.%目的 探讨儿童型脊肌萎缩症(CSMA)的临床特点.方法 回顾性分析11例CSMA患者的临床资料.结果 本组患者平均发病年龄为(6.1±5.5)岁,均为慢性起病,主要临床表现为四肢无力、变细及行走不稳;血清肌酶水平5例轻度升高;肌电图检查结果显示8例为神经源性损害,3例未见异常;肌肉病理学检查显示11例患者均出现肌纤维大小不等,10例出现程度不等的肌纤维类型群组化,8例核内移纤维,7例小角化纤维和6例靶纤维.结论 CSMA临床特征为儿童期出现的四肢无力和肌萎缩,肌肉神经电生理学及病理学特征是神经源性损害.

  19. Expression of full-length utrophin prevents muscular dystrophy in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, J; Deconinck, N; Fisher, R; Kahn, D; Phelps, S; Gillis, J M; Davies, K

    1998-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, progressive muscle wasting disease caused by a loss of sarcolemmal bound dystrophin, which results in the death of the muscle fiber leading to the gradual depletion of skeletal muscle. The molecular structure of dystrophin is very similar to that of the related protein utrophin. Utrophin is found in all tissues and is confined to the neuromuscular and myotendinous junctions in mature muscle. Sarcolemmal localization of a truncated utrophin transgene in the dystrophin-deficient mdx mouse significantly improves the dystrophic muscle phenotype. Therefore, up-regulation of utrophin by drug therapy is a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of DMD. Here we demonstrate that expression of full-length utrophin in mdx mice prevents the development of muscular dystrophy. We assessed muscle morphology, fiber regeneration and mechanical properties (force development and resistance to stretch) of mdx and transgenic mdx skeletal and diaphragm muscle. The utrophin levels required in muscle are significantly less than the normal endogenous utrophin levels seen in lung and kidney, and we provide evidence that the pathology depends on the amount of utrophin expression. These results also have important implications for DMD therapies in which utrophin replacement is achieved by delivery using exogenous vectors.

  20. Intragenic mutations in SMN1 may contribute more significantly to clinical severity than SMN2 copy numbers in some spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tomoto; Sato, Hideyuki; Lai, Poh San; Nurputra, Dian Kesumapramudya; Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Morikawa, Satoru; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Kurashige, Takashi; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Hideki; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Yoshinobu; Toda, Soichiro; Takanashi, Jun-Ichi; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Tohyama, Yumi; Kubo, Yuji; Saito, Kayoko; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi; Nishio, Hisahide

    2014-11-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by deletion or intragenic mutation of SMN1. SMA is classified into several subtypes based on clinical severity. It has been reported that the copy number of SMN2, a highly homologous gene to SMN1, is associated with clinical severity among SMA patients with homozygous deletion of SMN1. The purpose of this study was to clarify the genotype-phenotype relationship among the patients without homozygous deletion of SMN1. We performed molecular genetic analyses of SMN1 and SMN2 in 112 Japanese patients diagnosed as having SMA based on the clinical findings. For the patients retaining SMN1, the PCR or RT-PCR products of SMN1 were sequenced to identify the mutation. Out of the 112 patients, 106 patients were homozygous for deletion of SMN1, and six patients were compound heterozygous for deletion of one SMN1 allele and intragenic mutation in the retained SMN1 allele. Four intragenic mutations were identified in the six patients: p.Ala2Val, p.Trp92Ser, p.Thr274TyrfsX32 and p.Tyr277Cys. To the best of our knowledge, all mutations except p.Trp92Ser were novel mutations which had never been previously reported. According to our observation, clinical severity of the six patients was determined by the type and location of the mutation rather than SMN2 copy number. SMN2 copy number is not always associated with clinical severity of SMA patients, especially SMA patients retaining one SMN1 allele. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic screening of spinal muscular atrophy using a real-time modified COP-PCR technique with dried blood-spot DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ar Rochmah, Mawaddah; Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Niba, Emma Tabe Eko; Nakanishi, Kenta; Awano, Hiroyuki; Morioka, Ichiro; Iijima, Kazumoto; Saito, Toshio; Saito, Kayoko; Lai, Poh San; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Bouike, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Maya; Nishio, Hisahide; Shinohara, Masakazu

    2017-10-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in SMN1. More than 95% of SMA patients carry homozygous SMN1 deletion. SMA is the leading genetic cause of infant death, and has been considered an incurable disease. However, a recent clinical trial with an antisense oligonucleotide drug has shown encouraging clinical efficacy. Thus, early and accurate detection of SMN1 deletion may improve prognosis of many infantile SMA patients. A total of 88 DNA samples (37 SMA patients, 12 carriers and 39 controls) from dried blood spots (DBS) on filter paper were analyzed. All participants had previously been screened for SMN genes by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) using DNA extracted from freshly collected blood. DNA was extracted from DBS that had been stored at room temperature (20-25°C) for 1week to 5years. To ensure sufficient quality and quantity of DNA samples, target sequences were pre-amplified by conventional PCR. Real-time modified competitive oligonucleotide priming-PCR (mCOP-PCR) with the pre-amplified PCR products was performed for the gene-specific amplification of SMN1 and SMN2 exon 7. Compared with PCR-RFLP using DNA from freshly collected blood, results from real-time mCOP-PCR using DBS-DNA for detection of SMN1 exon 7 deletion showed a sensitivity of 1.00 (CI [0.87, 1.00])] and specificity of 1.00 (CI [0.90, 1.00]), respectively. We combined DNA extraction from DBS on filter paper, pre-amplification of target DNA, and real-time mCOP-PCR to specifically detect SMN1 and SMN2 genes, thereby establishing a rapid, accurate, and high-throughput system for detecting SMN1-deletion with practical applications for newborn screening. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL PART II: a prospective, single-armed trial of L-carnitine and valproic acid in ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Kissel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple lines of evidence have suggested that valproic acid (VPA might benefit patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA. The SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL was a two part prospective trial to evaluate oral VPA and L-carnitine in SMA children. Part 1 targeted non-ambulatory children ages 2-8 in a 12 month cross over design. We report here Part 2, a twelve month prospective, open-label trial of VPA and L-carnitine in ambulatory SMA children. METHODS: This study involved 33 genetically proven type 3 SMA subjects ages 3-17 years. Subjects underwent two baseline assessments over 4-6 weeks and then were placed on VPA and L-carnitine for 12 months. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes included safety, adverse events and the change at 6 and 12 months in motor function assessed using the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Extend (MHFMS-Extend, timed motor tests and fine motor modules. Secondary outcomes included changes in ulnar compound muscle action potential amplitudes (CMAP, handheld dynamometry, pulmonary function, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scores. RESULTS: Twenty-eight subjects completed the study. VPA and carnitine were generally well tolerated. Although adverse events occurred in 85% of subjects, they were usually mild and transient. Weight gain of 20% above body weight occurred in 17% of subjects. There was no significant change in any primary outcome at six or 12 months. Some pulmonary function measures showed improvement at one year as expected with normal growth. CMAP significantly improved suggesting a modest biologic effect not clinically meaningful. CONCLUSIONS: This study, coupled with the CARNIVAL Part 1 study, indicate that VPA is not effective in improving strength or function in SMA children. The outcomes used in this study are feasible and reliable, and can be employed in future trials in SMA. TRIAL REGSITRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00227266.

  3. SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL PART II: a prospective, single-armed trial of L-carnitine and valproic acid in ambulatory children with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissel, John T; Scott, Charles B; Reyna, Sandra P; Crawford, Thomas O; Simard, Louise R; Krosschell, Kristin J; Acsadi, Gyula; Elsheik, Bakri; Schroth, Mary K; D'Anjou, Guy; LaSalle, Bernard; Prior, Thomas W; Sorenson, Susan; Maczulski, Jo Anne; Bromberg, Mark B; Chan, Gary M; Swoboda, Kathryn J

    2011-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence have suggested that valproic acid (VPA) might benefit patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL was a two part prospective trial to evaluate oral VPA and L-carnitine in SMA children. Part 1 targeted non-ambulatory children ages 2-8 in a 12 month cross over design. We report here Part 2, a twelve month prospective, open-label trial of VPA and L-carnitine in ambulatory SMA children. This study involved 33 genetically proven type 3 SMA subjects ages 3-17 years. Subjects underwent two baseline assessments over 4-6 weeks and then were placed on VPA and L-carnitine for 12 months. Assessments were performed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcomes included safety, adverse events and the change at 6 and 12 months in motor function assessed using the Modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale Extend (MHFMS-Extend), timed motor tests and fine motor modules. Secondary outcomes included changes in ulnar compound muscle action potential amplitudes (CMAP), handheld dynamometry, pulmonary function, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory scores. Twenty-eight subjects completed the study. VPA and carnitine were generally well tolerated. Although adverse events occurred in 85% of subjects, they were usually mild and transient. Weight gain of 20% above body weight occurred in 17% of subjects. There was no significant change in any primary outcome at six or 12 months. Some pulmonary function measures showed improvement at one year as expected with normal growth. CMAP significantly improved suggesting a modest biologic effect not clinically meaningful. This study, coupled with the CARNIVAL Part 1 study, indicate that VPA is not effective in improving strength or function in SMA children. The outcomes used in this study are feasible and reliable, and can be employed in future trials in SMA. TRIAL REGSITRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00227266.

  4. The role of experiential knowledge within attitudes towards genetic carrier screening: A comparison of people with and without experience of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Felicity K; Young, Philip J; Warren, Oliver; Griffiths, Frances E

    2017-07-13

    Autosomal recessive conditions, while individually rare, are a significant health burden with limited treatment options. Population carrier screening has been suggested as a means of tackling them. Little is known, however, about the attitudes of the general public towards such carrier screening and still less about the views of people living with candidate genetic diseases. Here, we focus on the role that such experience has on screening attitudes by comparing views towards screening of people with and without prior experience of the monogenetic disorder, Spinal Muscular Atrophy. An exploratory sequential mixed methods design was adopted. In-depth qualitative interviews were used to develop two surveys. The surveys addressed attitudes towards carrier screening (pre-conceptual and prenatal) for SMA. 337 participants with SMA experience completed the SMA Screening Survey (UK) and 336 participants with no prior experience of SMA completed the UK GenPop Survey, an amended version of the SMA Screening Survey (UK). The majority of both cohorts were in favour of pre-conception and prenatal carrier screening, however people with experience of type II SMA were least likely to support either. Key differences emerged around perceptions of SMA, with those without SMA experience taking a dimmer view of the condition than those with. This study underscores the significance of prior experience with the condition to screening attitudes. It highlights the need for accurate and high-quality educational resources to support any future carrier screening programmes, that particularly in relation to rare genetic disorders like SMA that will fall outside the remit of everyday experience for the majority of the population. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Mutations in Subunits of the Activating Signal Cointegrator 1 Complex Are Associated with Prenatal Spinal Muscular Atrophy and Congenital Bone Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Ellen; Hirata, Hiromi; Wolf, Nicole I.; Morales-Gonzalez, Susanne; Schottmann, Gudrun; Tanaka, Yu; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Orgeur, Mickael; Zerres, Klaus; Vogt, Stefanie; van Riesen, Anne; Gill, Esther; Seifert, Franziska; Zwirner, Angelika; Kirschner, Janbernd; Goebel, Hans Hilmar; Hübner, Christoph; Stricker, Sigmar; Meierhofer, David; Stenzel, Werner; Schuelke, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional signal cointegrators associate with transcription factors or nuclear receptors and coregulate tissue-specific gene transcription. We report on recessive loss-of-function mutations in two genes (TRIP4 and ASCC1) that encode subunits of the nuclear activating signal cointegrator 1 (ASC-1) complex. We used autozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing to search for pathogenic mutations in four families. Affected individuals presented with prenatal-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), multiple congenital contractures (arthrogryposis multiplex congenita), respiratory distress, and congenital bone fractures. We identified homozygous and compound-heterozygous nonsense and frameshift TRIP4 and ASCC1 mutations that led to a truncation or the entire absence of the respective proteins and cosegregated with the disease phenotype. Trip4 and Ascc1 have identical expression patterns in 17.5-day-old mouse embryos with high expression levels in the spinal cord, brain, paraspinal ganglia, thyroid, and submandibular glands. Antisense morpholino-mediated knockdown of either trip4 or ascc1 in zebrafish disrupted the highly patterned and coordinated process of α-motoneuron outgrowth and formation of myotomes and neuromuscular junctions and led to a swimming defect in the larvae. Immunoprecipitation of the ASC-1 complex consistently copurified cysteine and glycine rich protein 1 (CSRP1), a transcriptional cofactor, which is known to be involved in spinal cord regeneration upon injury in adult zebrafish. ASCC1 mutant fibroblasts downregulated genes associated with neurogenesis, neuronal migration, and pathfinding (SERPINF1, DAB1, SEMA3D, SEMA3A), as well as with bone development (TNFRSF11B, RASSF2, STC1). Our findings indicate that the dysfunction of a transcriptional coactivator complex can result in a clinical syndrome affecting the neuromuscular system. PMID:26924529

  6. Carrier screening for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA in 107,611 pregnant women during the period 2005-2009: a prospective population-based cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ning Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is the most common neuromuscular autosomal recessive disorder. The American College of Medical Genetics has recently recommended routine carrier screening for SMA because of the high carrier frequency (1 in 25-50 as well as the severity of that genetic disease. Large studies are needed to determine the feasibility, benefits, and costs of such a program. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This is a prospective population-based cohort study of 107,611 pregnant women from 25 counties in Taiwan conducted during the period January 2005 to June 2009. A three-stage screening program was used: (1 pregnant women were tested for SMA heterozygosity; (2 if the mother was determined to be heterozygous for SMA (carrier status, the paternal partner was then tested; (3 if both partners were SMA carriers, prenatal diagnostic testing was performed. During the study period, a total of 2,262 SMA carriers with one copy of the SMN1 gene were identified among the 107,611 pregnant women that were screened. The carrier rate was approximately 1 in 48 (2.10%. The negative predictive value of DHPLC coupled with MLPA was 99.87%. The combined method could detect approximately 94% of carriers because most of the cases resulted from a common single deletion event. In addition, 2,038 spouses were determined to be SMA carriers. Among those individuals, 47 couples were determined to be at high risk for having offspring with SMA. Prenatal diagnostic testing was performed in 43 pregnant women (91.49% and SMA was diagnosed in 12 (27.91% fetuses. The prevalence of SMA in our population was 1 in 8,968. CONCLUSION: The main benefit of SMA carrier screening is to reduce the burden associated with giving birth to an affected child. In this study, we determined the carrier frequency and genetic risk and provided carrier couples with genetic services, knowledge, and genetic counseling.

  7. The loss of the snoRNP chaperone Nopp140 from Cajal bodies of patient fibroblasts correlates with the severity of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Colasse, Sabrina; Burlet, Philippe; Viollet, Louis; Meier, U Thomas; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2009-04-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by reduced survival motor neuron (SMN) levels. The assembly machinery containing SMN is implicated in the biogenesis of the spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). SMN is present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, where it transiently accumulates in subnuclear domains named Cajal bodies (CBs) and functions in the maturation of snRNPs and small nucleolar (sno)RNPs. The impact of lowering SMN levels on the composition of CBs in SMA cells is still not completely understood. Here, we analyse the CB composition in immortalized and primary fibroblasts from SMA patients. We show that the U snRNA export factors PHAX and chromosome region maintenance 1 and the box C/D snoRNP core protein fibrillarin concentrate in CBs from SMA cells, whereas the box H/ACA core proteins GAR1 and NAP57/dyskerin show reduced CB localization. Remarkably, the functional deficiency in SMA cells is associated with decreased localization of the snoRNP chaperone Nopp140 in CBs that correlates with disease severity. Indeed, RNA interference knockdown experiments in control fibroblasts demonstrate that SMN is required for accumulation of Nopp140 in CBs. Conversely, overexpression of SMN in SMA cells restores the CB localization of Nopp140, whereas SMN mutants found in SMA patients are defective in promoting the association of Nopp140 with CBs. Taken together, we demonstrate that only a subset of CB functions (as indicated by the association of representative factors) are impaired in SMA cells and, importantly, we identify the decrease of Nopp140 localization in CBs as a phenotypic marker for SMA.

  8. Disruption of nesprin-1 produces an Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy-like phenotype in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric; Zhang, Yuan; Hodzic, Didier; Randles, K. Natalie; Morris, Glenn; Earley, Judy U.; Hadhazy, Michele; Holaska, James M.; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the inner nuclear membrane proteins lamins A and C produce cardiac and skeletal muscle dysfunction referred to as Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Lamins A and C participate in the LINC complex that, along with the nesprin and SUN proteins, LInk the Nucleoskeleton with the Cytoskeleton. Nesprins 1 and 2 are giant spectrin-repeat containing proteins that have large and small forms. The nesprins contain a transmembrane anchor that tethers to the nuclear membrane followed by a short domain that resides within the lumen between the inner and outer nuclear membrane. Nesprin’s luminal domain binds directly to SUN proteins. We generated mice where the C-terminus of nesprin-1 was deleted. This strategy produced a protein lacking the transmembrane and luminal domains that together are referred to as the KASH domain. Mice homozygous for this mutation exhibit lethality with approximately half dying at or near birth from respiratory failure. Surviving mice display hindlimb weakness and an abnormal gait. With increasing age, kyphoscoliosis, muscle pathology and cardiac conduction defects develop. The protein components of the LINC complex, including mutant nesprin-1α, lamin A/C and SUN2, are localized at the nuclear membrane in this model. However, the LINC components do not normally associate since coimmunoprecipitation experiments with SUN2 and nesprin reveal that mutant nesprin-1 protein no longer interacts with SUN2. These findings demonstrate the role of the LINC complex, and nesprin-1, in neuromuscular and cardiac disease. PMID:19008300

  9. Prevention of muscular dystrophy in mice by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of germline DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Chengzu; McAnally, John R; Shelton, John M; Mireault, Alex A; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N

    2014-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited X-linked disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fiber integrity. DMD is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and a shortened life span, and there is no effective treatment. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-mediated genome editing to correct the dystrophin gene (Dmd) mutation in the germ line of mdx mice, a model for DMD, and then monitored muscle structure and function. Genome editing produced genetically mosaic animals containing 2 to 100% correction of the Dmd gene. The degree of muscle phenotypic rescue in mosaic mice exceeded the efficiency of gene correction, likely reflecting an advantage of the corrected cells and their contribution to regenerating muscle. With the anticipated technological advances that will facilitate genome editing of postnatal somatic cells, this strategy may one day allow correction of disease-causing mutations in the muscle tissue of patients with DMD.

  10. SMA CARNI-VAL trial part I: double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of L-carnitine and valproic acid in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn J Swoboda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Valproic acid (VPA has demonstrated potential as a therapeutic candidate for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Two cohorts of subjects were enrolled in the SMA CARNIVAL TRIAL, a non-ambulatory group of "sitters" (cohort 1 and an ambulatory group of "walkers" (cohort 2. Here, we present results for cohort 1: a multicenter phase II randomized double-blind intention-to-treat protocol in non-ambulatory SMA subjects 2-8 years of age. Sixty-one subjects were randomized 1:1 to placebo or treatment for the first six months; all received active treatment the subsequent six months. The primary outcome was change in the modified Hammersmith Functional Motor Scale (MHFMS score following six months of treatment. Secondary outcomes included safety and adverse event data, and change in MHFMS score for twelve versus six months of active treatment, body composition, quantitative SMN mRNA levels, maximum ulnar CMAP amplitudes, myometry and PFT measures. RESULTS: At 6 months, there was no difference in change from the baseline MHFMS score between treatment and placebo groups (difference = 0.643, 95% CI = -1.22-2.51. Adverse events occurred in >80% of subjects and were more common in the treatment group. Excessive weight gain was the most frequent drug-related adverse event, and increased fat mass was negatively related to change in MHFMS values (p = 0.0409. Post-hoc analysis found that children ages two to three years that received 12 months treatment, when adjusted for baseline weight, had significantly improved MHFMS scores (p = 0.03 compared to those who received placebo the first six months. A linear regression analysis limited to the influence of age demonstrates young age as a significant factor in improved MHFMS scores (p = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated no benefit from six months treatment with VPA and L-carnitine in a young non-ambulatory cohort of subjects with SMA. Weight gain, age and treatment

  11. Atrofia muscular bulbo espinhal recessiva ligada ao cromossomo X (doença de Kennedy: estudo de uma família X-linked recessive bulbospinal muscular atrophy (Kennedy's disease: study of a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAMACIO RAMÓN KAIMEN-MACIEL

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available A doença de Kennedy (DK é forma rara de doença do neurônio motor caracterizada por mutação na região codificadora do gene do receptor androgênico localizado no braço longo do cromossoma X (Xq 11-12. Há expansão das sequências de trinucleotídeos CAG que nos pacientes deve atingir número maior do que 347 repetições de pares de bases. Apresentamos quatro gerações de uma família com dez indivíduos acometidos. Avaliamos três pacientes do sexo masculino com idade variando entre 50 e 60 anos que desenvolveram sintomatologia por volta de 30 anos de idade caracterizada por fraqueza muscular progressiva associada a disfagia e disartria. O exame demonstrou ginecomastia, atrofia testicular, amiotrofia, fasciculações, paresia, abolição de reflexos e tremor postural. A análise do DNA pela técnica do PCR demonstrou número de repetições CAG aumentado no locus Xq 11-12 nos três pacientes e em uma mulher assintomática da família. Demonstramos a primeira família brasileira com diagnóstico de DK através de genética molecular. A DK deve fazer parte do diagnóstico diferencial das doenças do neurônio motor e a identificação destes pacientes é importante para o prognóstico e para o aconselhamento genético.Kennedy's disease is a rare type of motor neuron disease with a sex-linked recessive trait. DNA studies show a mutation at the androgen receptor gene on the long arm of X cromossome (Xq 11-12 with expanded CAG triplets (more than 347 repeats. We present three patients and one carrier among ten patients of a four generation family with clinical phenotype of the disease. The patients' ages ranged from 50 to 60 years with symptomatology usually beginning around 30 years of age. Patients had gynecomastia, testicular atrophy, muscular weakness, fasciculation, amyotrophy, absent deep tendon reflexes and postural tremor. PCR techniques of DNA analysis showed expanded size of CAG repeats on Xq 11-12 in all the three patients and in

  12. Embryonic stem cells improve skeletal muscle recovery after extreme atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Guilherme Giannini; De Oliveira Silvestre, João Guilherme; Guilherme, João Paulo Limongi França; Baptista, Igor Luchini; Ramos, Gracielle Vieira; Da Silva, Willian José; Miyabara, Elen Haruka; Moriscot, Anselmo Sigari

    2015-03-01

    We injected embryonic stem cells into mouse tibialis anterior muscles subjected to botulinum toxin injections as a model for reversible neurogenic atrophy. Muscles were exposed to botulinum toxin for 4 weeks and allowed to recover for up to 6 weeks. At the onset of recovery, a single muscle injection of embryonic stem cells was administered. The myofiber cross-sectional area, single twitch force, peak tetanic force, time-to-peak force, and half-relaxation time were determined. Although the stem cell injection did not affect the myofiber cross-sectional area gain in recovering muscles, most functional parameters improved significantly compared with those of recovering muscles that did not receive the stem cell injection. Muscle function recovery was accelerated by embryonic stem cell delivery in this durable neurogenic atrophy model. We conclude that stem cells should be considered a potential therapeutic tool for recovery after extreme skeletal muscle atrophy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Alterations in Notch signalling in skeletal muscles from mdx and dko dystrophic mice and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jarrod E; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lamon, Séverine; Angelini, Corrado; Russell, Aaron P; Lynch, Gordon S

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? The Notch signalling pathway plays an important role in muscle regeneration, and activation of the pathway has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration in aged mice. It is unknown whether Notch activation will have a similarly beneficial effect on muscle regeneration in the context of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). What is the main finding and its importance? Although expression of Notch signalling components is altered in both mouse models of DMD and in human DMD patients, activation of the Notch signalling pathway does not confer any functional benefit on muscles from dystrophic mice, suggesting that other signalling pathways may be more fruitful targets for manipulation in treating DMD. Abstract In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), muscle damage and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle wasting, weakness and premature death. The Notch signalling pathway represents a central regulator of gene expression and is critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic signalling during all stages of embryonic muscle development. Notch activation improves muscle regeneration in aged mice, but its potential to restore regeneration and function in muscular dystrophy is unknown. We performed a comprehensive examination of several genes involved in Notch signalling in muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx and dko (utrophin- and dystrophin-null) mice and DMD patients. A reduction of Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA in tibialis anterior muscles of dko mice and quadriceps muscles of DMD patients and a reduction of Hes1 mRNA in the diaphragm of the mdx mice were observed, with other targets being inconsistent across species. Activation and inhibition of Notch signalling, followed by measures of muscle regeneration and function, were performed in the mouse models of DMD. Notch activation had no effect on functional regeneration in C57BL/10, mdx or dko mice. Notch inhibition significantly depressed the

  14. 53例脊肌萎缩症Ⅱ型患者的临床特征①%Clinical Features of Spinal Muscular Atrophy TypeⅡ:53 Cases Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features of spinal muscular atrophy typeⅡ. Methods The data of clinical manifesta-tion, laboratory data, onset, diagnosis, and rehabilitation of 53 outpatients suffering from spinal muscular atrophy typeⅡ(SMA-Ⅱ) were analyzed. Results Among 53 patients with SMA-Ⅱconfirmed by molecular genetic tests, 27 patients were male while 26 were female. The mean age was 3.35 years (ranged 0.75~7.8 years), and the age receiving gene diagnosis was 17.27 months. Only 15%had a family history, and abnormalities were found in 23%patients' mothers during pregnancy. 83.4%of them had water choke cough, while 87%expectoration weakness. None of them had cough assist machines and had regular spirometry monitoring. 53%of the patients took semi-liquid diet, how-ever, none of them used stomach tube. Symmetrical flaccid paralysis was so remarkable, even muscle strength of lower limbs in 87.7%of these patients were only grades 1-2. 92%had scoliosis, while 83%had tendon contracture. EMG showed extensive neurogenic changes. All children did not accept normal pre-school education, and 85%patients did not accept formal rehabilitation. Conclusion Most of phenotype of SMA-Ⅱfor the children was similar and more severe in China. Most of the patient didn't get formal education, rehabilitation and care.%  目的探讨脊肌萎缩症(SMA)-Ⅱ型患者的临床特征。方法对门诊基因确诊的53例SMA-Ⅱ患者的临床和实验室资料给予分析,并进行问卷调查。结果男∶女为1.04∶1(27∶26)。本次就诊年龄为9个月~7.8岁,平均3.35岁。首次基因确诊平均年龄为17.27月龄。15%有家族史,其余均为散发。23%母亲孕期异常。87%患者反复感冒,咳痰无力,但均未进行常规肺活量监测,也未给予咳痰器辅助咳痰。83.4%患者有饮水呛咳。53%半流质饮食,均未予胃管辅助。所有患者均表现为四肢呈对称性、弛缓性瘫痪,下肢重于上肢,87.7%

  15. Diagnosis and cell-based therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans, mice, and zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of genetically caused muscle degenerative disorders. The Kunkel laboratory has had a longstanding research program into the pathogenesis and treatment of these diseases. Starting with our identification of dystrophin as the defective protein in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), we have continued our work on normal dystrophin function and how it is altered in muscular dystrophy. Our work has led to the identification of the defective genes in...

  16. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body in Balance › Vaginal Atrophy Fact Sheet Vaginal Atrophy November, 2011 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors JoAnn ... MD Richard J. Santen, MD What is vaginal atrophy? Vaginal atrophy is a condition in which the ...

  17. Direct observation of failing fibers in muscles of dystrophic mice provides mechanistic insight into muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claflin, Dennis R; Brooks, Susan V

    2008-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is caused by the absence of the protein dystrophin. Dystrophin's function is not known, but its cellular location and associations with both the force-generating contractile core and membrane-spanning entities suggest a role in mechanically coupling force from its intracellular origins to the fiber membrane and beyond. We report here the presence of destructive contractile activity in lumbrical muscles from dystrophin-deficient (mdx) mice during nominally quiescent periods following exposure to mechanical stress. The ectopic activity, which was observable microscopically, resulted in longitudinal separation and clotting of fiber myoplasm and was absent when calcium (Ca(2+)) was removed from the bathing medium. Separation and clotting of myoplasm were also produced in dystrophin-deficient muscles by local application of a Ca(2+) ionophore to create membrane breaches in the absence of mechanical stress, whereas muscles from control mice tolerated ionophore-induced entry of Ca(2+) without damage. These observations suggest a failure cascade in dystrophin-deficient fibers that 1) is initiated by a stress-induced influx of extracellular Ca(2+), causing localized activation to continue after cessation of stimulation, and 2) proceeds as the persistent local activation, combined with reduced lateral mechanical coupling between the contractile core and the extracellular matrix, results in longitudinal separation of myoplasm in nonactivated regions of the fiber. This mechanism invokes both the membrane stabilization and the mechanical coupling functions frequently proposed for dystrophin and suggests that, whereas the absence of either function alone is not sufficient to cause fiber failure, their combined absence is catastrophic.

  18. Inhibition of Stat3 signaling ameliorates atrophy of the soleus muscles in mice lacking the vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Suchitra D

    2017-01-25

    Although skeletal muscle wasting has long been observed as a clinical outcome of impaired vitamin D signaling, precise molecular mechanisms that mediate the loss of muscle mass in the absence of vitamin D signaling are less clear. To determine the molecular consequences of vitamin D signaling, we analyzed the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling, a known contributor to various muscle wasting pathologies, in skeletal muscles. We isolated soleus (slow) and tibialis anterior (fast) muscles from mice lacking the vitamin D receptor (VDR(-/-)) and used western blot analysis, quantitative RTPCR, and pharmacological intervention to analyze muscle atrophy in VDR(-/-) mice. We found that slow and fast subsets of muscles of the VDR(-/-) mice displayed elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3 accompanied by an increase in Myostatin expression and signaling. Consequently, we observed reduced activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling components, ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal S6 protein (rpS6), that regulate protein synthesis and cell size, respectively. Concomitantly, we observed an increase in atrophy regulators and a block in autophagic gene expression. An examination of the upstream regulation of Stat3 levels in VDR(-/-) muscles revealed an increase in IL-6 protein expression in the soleus, but not in the tibialis anterior muscles. To investigate the involvement of satellite cells (SCs) in atrophy in VDR(-/-) mice, we found that there was no significant deficit in SC numbers in VDR(-/-) muscles compared to the wild type. Unlike its expression within VDR(-/-) fibers, Myostatin levels in VDR(-/-) SCs from bulk muscles were similar to those of wild type. However, VDR(-/-) SCs induced to differentiate in culture displayed increased p-Stat3 signaling and Myostatin expression. Finally, VDR(-/-) mice injected with a Stat3 inhibitor displayed reduced Myostatin expression and function and restored active p70S6K and

  19. Force impairment in calpain 3-deficient mice is not correlated with mechanical disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougerousse, Françoise; Gonin, Patrick; Durand, Muriel; Richard, Isabelle; Raymackers, Jean-Marc

    2003-05-01

    Defects in human calpain 3 are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized mainly by late-onset proximal muscular atrophy. A corresponding murine model has previously been generated by gene targeting. In this report, muscular activity of calpain 3-deficient (capn3(-/-)) mice was evaluated at different ages. Growth curves showed a progressive global muscular atrophy. Histological examination throughout the lifespan of mice confirmed the dystrophic lesions. Whole animal tests showed only a mild significant impairment of the forelimbs. Studies of the mechanical properties of selected isolated fast- and slow-twitch muscles demonstrated that slow-twitch muscles were significantly weaker in capn3(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. Three different tests showed that there was no membrane disruption, suggesting a nonmechanical etiology of capn3(-/-) mice dystrophy. These findings are consistent with a mechanism involving signaling systems.

  20. Reversal of muscle atrophy by Zhimu-Huangbai herb-pair via Akt/mTOR/FoxO3 signal pathway in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbao Zhang

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy is one of the serious complications of diabetes. Zhimu-Huangbai herb-pair (ZB is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine formulas for treating Xiaoke (known as diabetes and its complications. However, the effect of ZB on reversal of muscle atrophy and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this research, we investigated the effect and possible mechanisms of ZB on skeletal muscle atrophy in diabetic mice. Animal model of diabetic muscle atrophy was developed by high fat diet (HFD feeding plus streptozotocin (STZ injection. After oral adminstration of ZB for 6 weeks, the effects of ZB on reversal of muscle atrophy and the underlying mechanisms were evaluated by biochemical, histological and western blot methods. The skeletal muscle weight, strength, and cross-sectional area of diabetic mice were significantly increased by ZB treatment. Biochemical results showed that ZB treatment reduced the serum glucose level, and elevated the serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and insulin levels significantly compared with untreated diabetic group. The western blot results showed that ZB activated the mTOR signal pathway, shown as increased phosphorylations (p- of Akt, mTOR, Raptor, S6K1 and reduced Foxo3 expression compared with the model group. ZB could reverse muscle atrophy in diabetic mice. This may be through activation of mTOR signaling pathway that promotes protein synthesis, and inactivation foxo3 protein that inhibits protein degradation. These findings suggested that ZB may be considered as a potential candidate drug in treatment of diabetic muscle atrophy.

  1. Reversal of muscle atrophy by Zhimu-Huangbai herb-pair via Akt/mTOR/FoxO3 signal pathway in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinbao; Zhuang, Pengwei; Wang, Yan; Song, Lili; Zhang, Mixia; Lu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jing; Alemu, Paulos N; Zhang, Yanjun; Wei, Hongjun; Li, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is one of the serious complications of diabetes. Zhimu-Huangbai herb-pair (ZB) is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine formulas for treating Xiaoke (known as diabetes) and its complications. However, the effect of ZB on reversal of muscle atrophy and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this research, we investigated the effect and possible mechanisms of ZB on skeletal muscle atrophy in diabetic mice. Animal model of diabetic muscle atrophy was developed by high fat diet (HFD) feeding plus streptozotocin (STZ) injection. After oral adminstration of ZB for 6 weeks, the effects of ZB on reversal of muscle atrophy and the underlying mechanisms were evaluated by biochemical, histological and western blot methods. The skeletal muscle weight, strength, and cross-sectional area of diabetic mice were significantly increased by ZB treatment. Biochemical results showed that ZB treatment reduced the serum glucose level, and elevated the serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin levels significantly compared with untreated diabetic group. The western blot results showed that ZB activated the mTOR signal pathway, shown as increased phosphorylations (p-) of Akt, mTOR, Raptor, S6K1 and reduced Foxo3 expression compared with the model group. ZB could reverse muscle atrophy in diabetic mice. This may be through activation of mTOR signaling pathway that promotes protein synthesis, and inactivation foxo3 protein that inhibits protein degradation. These findings suggested that ZB may be considered as a potential candidate drug in treatment of diabetic muscle atrophy.

  2. Human polyclonal antibodies produced in transchromosomal cattle prevent lethal Zika virus infection and testicular atrophy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Derek R; Golden, Joseph W; Griffin, Bryan D; Warner, Bryce M; Ranadheera, Charlene; Scharikow, Leanne; Sloan, Angela; Frost, Kathy L; Kobasa, Darwyn; Booth, Stephanie A; Josleyn, Matthew; Ballantyne, John; Sullivan, Eddie; Jiao, Jin-An; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Hooper, Jay W; Safronetz, David

    2017-09-08

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is rapidly spreading throughout the Americas and is associated with significant fetal complications, most notably microcephaly. Treatment with polyclonal antibodies for pregnant women at risk of ZIKV-related complications could be a safe alternative to vaccination. We found that large quantities of human polyclonal antibodies could be rapidly produced in transchromosomal bovines (TcB) and successfully used to protect mice from lethal infection. Additionally, antibody treatment eliminated ZIKV induced tissue damage in immunologically privileged sites such as the brain and testes and protected against testicular atrophy. These data indicate that rapid development and deployment of human polyclonal antibodies could be a viable countermeasure against ZIKV. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lack of dystrophin leads to the selective loss of superior cervical ganglion neurons projecting to muscular targets in genetically dystrophic mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, M Egle; Leone, Lucia; Lombardi, Loredana; Paggi, Paola

    2005-12-01

    Autonomic imbalance is a pathological aspect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here, we show that the sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) of mdx mice, which lack dystrophin (Dp427), has 36% fewer neurons than that of wild-type animals. Cell loss occurs around P10 and affects those neurons innervating muscular targets (heart and iris), which, differently from the submandibular gland (non-muscular target), are precociously damaged by the lack of Dp427. In addition, although we reveal altered axonal defasciculation in the submandibular gland and reduced terminal sprouting in all SCG target organs, poor adrenergic innervation is observed only in the heart and iris. These alterations, detected as early as P5, when neuronal loss has not yet occurred, suggest that in mdx mice the absence of Dp427 directly impairs the axonal growth and terminal sprouting of sympathetic neurons. However, when these intrinsic alterations combine with structural and/or functional damages of muscular targets, neuronal death occurs.

  4. Modulation of Muscle Atrophy, Fatigue and MLC Phosphorylation by MuRF1 as Indicated by Hindlimb Suspension Studies on MuRF1-KO Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siegfried Labeit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MuRF1 is a member of the TRIM/RBCC superfamily, a gene family that encompasses a large variety of proteins, all sharing the conserved TRIM (Tripartite Motive sequential array of RING, B-box, and coiled-coil domains. Within this family, MuRF1(also named TRIM63 is a specialized member that contributes to the development of muscle atrophy and sarcopenia. Here we studied MuRF1's role in muscle atrophy during muscle unloading induced by hindlimb suspension. Consistent with previous studies, we found that MuRF1 inactivation leads to an attenuated muscle atrophy response. The amount of protection was higher as compared to the denervation model, and within the 10 day-suspension period the soleus muscle was spared from atrophy in MuRF1-KO mice. Contractility studies on hindlimb suspended muscle tissues suggested that MuRF1's functions extend beyond muscle trophicity and implicate MuRF1 in muscle fatigue and MLC phosphorylation control: soleus muscle from MuRF1-KO mice fatigued significantly faster and in addition showed a reduced posttetanic twitch potentiation. Thus the present work further established the role of MuRF1 in muscle atrophy and for the first time shows that MuRF1 plays a role in muscle fatigue and twitch potentiation.

  5. Muscle Atrophy Reversed by Growth Factor Activation of Satellite Cells in a Mouse Muscle Atrophy Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerslev, Simon; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory...... factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth...... control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we...

  6. 青少年上肢远端肌萎缩症临床解剖及MRI特点%Juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity: clinical anatomy and MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁秋发; 王文军; 刘文松; 王麓山; 孟红旗; 陈圣龙

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study clinical characteristics of juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity, for early diagnosis and treatment. Methods The clinical data, neuro-electrophysiological features, clinical anatomy and MRI features of 13 patients diagnosed by the criteria of Hirayama Disease were retrospectively analyzed. Results The mean age of onset was about 18.6 years old. Hirayama disease was characterized by muscular atrophy in the hand and forearm. The brachioradialis was spared (oblique amyotrophy). EMG indicated that the impairment of spinal anterior cells was limited to the arm relevant segments and both sides were involved. During neck flexion, the spinal cord was placed forward and flattened. The diameter of cervical spine cord in the sixth cervical vertebra along the horizontal in juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity was smaller than that in normal volunteers significantly (P<0.05). Conclusions Juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity may be a special type of cervical myelopathy. The neuro-electrophysiological check and the neck flexion MRI check are valuable to the clinical diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Cervical collar therapy is recommended the sooner the better and avoiding long time neck flexion position is very important for the patients.%目的 探讨青少年上肢远端肌萎缩症的临床解剖及MRI特点,为该病的早期诊断和治疗提供依据.方法 对13例确诊的青少年上肢远端肌萎缩症患者的临床表现、临床解剖、神经电生理特征及影像学资料进行回顾性分析.结果 青少年上肢远端肌萎缩症平均发病年龄18.6岁,表现为局限于手和前臂的肌萎缩,前臂呈斜坡样;肌电图显示患者双侧上肢远端肌肉均呈神经源性损害,受损节段多在下颈髓前角细胞;屈颈MRI均见下段颈髓前移、变平,硬脊膜向前移位,硬脊膜外间隙增宽,硬脊膜外间隙内半月形信号影;与正常自愿者比较,在C6

  7. Vaginal Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaginal atrophy Overview Vaginal atrophy (atrophic vaginitis) is thinning, drying and inflammation of the vaginal walls due to your body having less estrogen. Vaginal atrophy occurs most often after ...

  8. Influence of the N-acetylcysteine in the muscular degenaration process in dystrophic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael de Senzi Moraes Pinto

    2010-01-01

    Estudos recentes demonstram o envolvimento do estresse oxidativo nas distrofinopatias. Neste trabalho, verificamos se o uso do antioxidante N-acetilcisteína (NAC) no período que antecede a mionecrose diminui a degeneração muscular em camundongos mdx, modelo experimental da distrofia muscular de Duchenne. Quinze camundongos mdx com 14 dias de vida receberam por via intraperitoneal 150mg/kg de NAC diluído em salina por 14 dias. Quinze camundongos mdx receberam salina pela mesma via e período. O...

  9. Effects of exercise training on atrophy gene expression in skeletal muscle of mice with chronic allergic lung inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L.Q. Durigan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effects of chronic allergic airway inflammation and of treadmill training (12 weeks of low and moderate intensity on muscle fiber cross-sectional area and mRNA levels of atrogin-1 and MuRF1 in the mouse tibialis anterior muscle. Six 4-month-old male BALB/c mice (28.5 ± 0.8 g per group were examined: 1 control, non-sensitized and non-trained (C; 2 ovalbumin sensitized (OA, 20 µg per mouse; 3 non-sensitized and trained at 50% maximum speed _ low intensity (PT50%; 4 non-sensitized and trained at 75% maximum speed _ moderate intensity (PT75%; 5 OA-sensitized and trained at 50% (OA+PT50%, 6 OA-sensitized and trained at 75% (OA+PT75%. There was no difference in muscle fiber cross-sectional area among groups and no difference in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression between C and OA groups. All exercised groups showed significantly decreased expression of atrogin-1 compared to C (1.01 ± 0.2-fold: PT50% = 0.71 ± 0.12-fold; OA+PT50% = 0.74 ± 0.03-fold; PT75% = 0.71 ± 0.09-fold; OA+PT75% = 0.74 ± 0.09-fold. Similarly significant results were obtained regarding MuRF1 gene expression compared to C (1.01 ± 0.23-fold: PT50% = 0.53 ± 0.20-fold; OA+PT50% = 0.55 ± 0.11-fold; PT75% = 0.35 ± 0.15-fold; OA+PT75% = 0.37 ± 0.08-fold. A short period of OA did not induce skeletal muscle atrophy in the mouse tibialis anterior muscle and aerobic training at low and moderate intensity negatively regulates the atrophy pathway in skeletal muscle of healthy mice or mice with allergic lung inflammation.

  10. 表现为上肢近端肌肉萎缩的平山病临床与影像学特点%Hirayama disease simple presenting proximal upper extremity muscular atrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林建华; 张文明; 王柠; 曹代荣; 陈小荣; 李文波; 张立群

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)findings of patients with Hirayama disease simply presenting proximal upper extremity muscular atrophy.Methods Three patients with Hirayama disease simply presenting proximal upper extremity muscular atrophy received cervical spine MRI on neutral and flexion position. The relationship between MRI findings and their clinical symptoms were analyzed. The outcomes were compared with those of 43 patients who were diagnosed as Hirayama disease with muscular atrophy at the hand and forearm. Results 1) Clinical features:three patients were young men. The disease was characterized by unilateral weakness and atrophy of the proximal upper limbs, such as pectoralis major muscle, deltoid muscle, and biceps brachii muscle. Electromyogram (EMG) showed bilateral upper extremities neurogenic damage. 2) Cervical spine MRI findings:cervical spine kyphosis without spinal cord compression was found on neutral position. On flexion position,anterior shifting of C3-C5 cervical cord and the posterior wall of dural sac were found; C4-C5 cervical cord was compressed by vertebral body or intervertebral disc or dural sac. Engorged posterior internal vertebral venous plexus were observed in epidural space. In the 43 patients who were diagnosed Hirayama disease with muscular atrophy at the hand and forearm, similar MRI findings were found, while cervical cords compression were at C6-C7 level. Conclusion Hirayama disease could present as proximal upper extremity muscular atrophy and weakness, such as pectoralis major muscle, deltoid muscle, and biceps brachii muscle.Neglecting of this will result in diagnostic errors or missed diagnosis. Flexion position MRI is an important base of early diagnosis of Hirayama disease.%目的 研究表现为上肢近端肌肉萎缩的平山病患者的临床表现和颈椎中立位、屈曲位MR影像特征.方法 3例临床上表现为上肢近端肌肉萎缩的平山病患者,行

  11. ADAM12 overexpression does not improve outcome in mice with laminin alpha2-deficient muscular dystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Ling T; Shelton, G Diane; Wewer, Ulla M

    2005-01-01

    We have recently shown that overexpression of ADAM12 results in increased muscle regeneration and significantly reduced pathology in mdx, dystrophin deficient mice. In the present study, we tested the effect of overexpressing ADAM12 in dy(W) laminin-deficient mice. dy mice have a very severe clin...

  12. 脊髓性肌萎缩伴呼吸窘迫1型1例回顾性研究%Retrospective Study of One Case of Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress Type 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麦嘉卉; 马伟科; 韩春锡; 何颜霞; 廖建湘

    2015-01-01

    Aim To report the first case of spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) in China and discuss the diagnosis strategy of SMARD1.Methods The history, physical examination, clinical exams and genetic analysis results of the patient with SMARD1 were retrospectively analyzed, and the related literatures were reviewed.Results At 1 month old, the patient had scaffold orthodontic treatment because of the hip dysplasia, then developed into muscle weakness, more evident in the distal parts and predominantly in the legs. At the age of 2 years old, she developed contractures of the knees and elbows. Respiratory failure happened at the age of 4 years and 10 months. Her blood tests and genetic analysis of SMN gene were not remarkable except for the slightly increased of creatine kinase and the aminotransferases. The EMG revealed neurogenic damages. Her chest X-ray reported eventration of the right diaphragm. IGHMBP2 gene sequencing identiifed homozygous mutation of c.1813 C>T. The diagnosis of SMARD1 was conformed. Conclusion SMARD1 is one of the variation types of spinal muscular atrophy, which manifested as irreversible diaphragmatic paralysis, respiratory failure between 6 weeks and 6 months of age, as well as progressive symmetrical muscular weakness and muscle atrophy. Nowadays, genetic analysis is the principal method for diagnosis.%目的:报道国内首例脊髓性肌萎缩伴呼吸窘迫1型(SMARD1)病例,探讨SMARD1的诊断和鉴别诊断。方法回顾性分析1例女性4岁10个月患儿的病史、体格检查、辅助检查以及基因检测结果,并结合文献进行讨论。结果患儿出生1个月,因“双侧髋关节发育不良”行支架矫正治疗1个月后发现四肢肌无力,下肢重于上肢、远端重于近端。2岁时出现膝关节和肘关节变形,4岁10个月时出现呼吸窘迫、呼吸衰竭。患儿血常规、生化、SMN基因检测均正常。肌酸激酶轻度升高。肌电图检查提示

  13. microRNA-206 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration and delays progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Williams, Andrew H.; Maxeiner, Johanna M.; Bezprozvannaya, Svetlana; Shelton, John M.; Richardson, James A.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injury activates adult myogenic stem cells, known as satellite cells, to initiate proliferation and differentiation to regenerate new muscle fibers. The skeletal muscle–specific microRNA miR-206 is upregulated in satellite cells following muscle injury, but its role in muscle regeneration has not been defined. Here, we show that miR-206 promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in response to injury. Genetic deletion of miR-206 in mice substantially delayed regeneration induced by cardiotoxin injury. Furthermore, loss of miR-206 accelerated and exacerbated the dystrophic phenotype in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We found that miR-206 acts to promote satellite cell differentiation and fusion into muscle fibers through suppressing a collection of negative regulators of myogenesis. Our findings reveal an essential role for miR-206 in satellite cell differentiation during skeletal muscle regeneration and indicate that miR-206 slows progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:22546853

  14. The clinical and electrophysiological features of patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy%脊髓延髓肌萎缩症临床及电生理特点分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈海; 笪宇威; 李韵; 张新卿; 贾建平

    2011-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical features of 5 Chinese patients with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy ( SBMA ), a sex-linked inheritance disorder. Methods We collected the clinical data of 5 SBMA patients whose diagnosis were confirmed by gene examination to analyze their clinical features, as well as their serum levels of sex hormones, CSF, biochemical indicators and electromyogram. Results Patients with spinal and bulbar and muscular atrophy tend to have an adult onset, exhibiting a slow progression of lower motor neuronal weakness and atrophy involving limbs and bulbar zones. There was mild motor functional lesion. Part of the invalids presented signs of androgen insensitivity such as gynecomastia, the level of testosterone were increased. CAG were 43-51 ( mean 47. 2 ±3. 6). The degrees of creatine kinase( 481. 8 ±264. 8 IU/L ) were increased mildly. CSF were normal. Electromyogram had generally changes derived from lower motor neuron. Conclusions Basically, the clinical features of Chinese SBMA patients presents adult onset, slow progression of lower motor neuronal weakness and atrophy involving limbs and bulbar zones.%目的 分析5例脊髓延髓肌萎缩症患者的临床特征,以便临床医生对该病的认识.方法 收集基因确诊的5例脊髓延髓肌萎缩症患者的临床资料,分析其临床特点及血清性激素、各生化指标水平、脑脊液及肌电图特点.结果 脊髓延髓肌萎缩症患者青年发病,病情进展缓慢.神经系统表现为以肢体近端和延髓部受累为主的瘫痪.舌肌受累较早,运动功能损害较轻.血清睾酮(969.3±234.9ng/dl)、雌二醇(57.1±5.3pg/ml)水平增高,男性乳腺发育出现在病史较长的患者.三核苷酸(CAG)重复序列数目43~51(平均47.2±3.6pg/ml).患者的肌酸激酶(CK,481.8±264.8 IU/L)均增高,脑脊液检查均正常.肌电图为广泛神经源性损害.结论 脊髓延髓肌萎缩症患者的早期症状不典型,易误诊,临床特征为青年起

  15. [THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY OF MICRONIZED MEBENDAZOLE IN THE MUSCULAR PHASE OF EXPERIMENTAL TRICHINELLA SPIRALIS INVASION IN ALBINO MICE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukhaleva, I V; Kovalenko, F P; Shkolyar, N A; Legonkov, Yu A; Musaev, A Kh; Bulanova, T E; Samochatova, E I

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of trichinosis in Russia was 0.07 per 100,000 population in 2014, which was 2.9-fold higher than that in 2013. Two WHO recommended medications mebendazole and albendazole are now used to treat humari trichinosis. The drugs are active against only mature helminths and non-encysted muscle larvae. The original oil suspension of micronized mebendazole was.found to have 100% efficacy against trichinosis in albino mice in the late muscular phase (encysted larvae) of hyperinvasion after intensive therapy under lifetime diagnostic guidance during and after a treatment cycle. The lifetime diagnostic method used to evaluate the larvicidal activity of anti-trichinosis agents in animals with experimental trichinosis revealed the signs of viaility, established a trend for deatih of Trichinella larvae, and determined their destructive changes.

  16. Spinal muscular atrophy type II (intermediary and III (Kugelberg-Welander: evolution of 50 patients with physiotherapy and hydrotherapy in a swimming pool Atrofia muscular espinhal tipo II (intermediária e III (Kugelberg-Welander: evolução de 50 pacientes com fisioterapia e hidroterapia em piscina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia C. B. Cunha

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available We added hydrotherapy to 50 patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA who were being treated with individual conventional physiotherapy. Hydrotherapy was performed at an approximate temperature of 30 degrees Celsius, twice a week, for thirty minutes in children and for forty-five minutes in adults during a 2-year period. The outcome derived from this combined modality of treatment was rated according to physiotherapeutic evaluations, the MMT (Manual Muscular Test, and the Barthel Ladder. Patients were reevaluated at 2-month intervals. After two years of ongoing treatment, we were able to observe that the deformities in hip, knee and foot were progressive in all SMA Type II patients, and in some Type III. Muscle strength stabilized in most SMA Type III patients, and improved in some. MMT was not done in SMA Type II. In all patients we were able to detect an improvement in the Barthel Ladder scale. This study suggests that a measurable improvement in the quality of daily living may be obtained in patients with SMA Types II and III subjected to conventional physiotherapy when associated with hydrotherapy.A hidroterapia foi realizada em SO pacientes com atrofia muscular espinhal, os quais foram também tratados com fisioterapia individual convencional. O tratamento hidroterápico foi realizado em piscina aquecida numa temperatura de aproximadamente 30° Celsius, duas vezes por semana, durante 30 minutos em crianças e 45 minutos em adultos num período de dois anos. Os benefícios deste tipo de tratamento foram avaliados de acordo com a evolução clínica, o MMT(Teste de Força Muscular e a Escala de Barthel. Os pacientes foram reavaliados a cada dois meses. Após dois anos de tratamento nós observamos que as deformidades nos quadris, joelhos e pés foram progressivas em todos os pacientes do Tipo II e em alguns do Tipo III. Houve estabilização da força muscular na maioria dos pacientes com SMA Tipo III, e melhora da força em alguns; nos

  17. Multi-parametric MRI at 14T for muscular dystrophy mice treated with AAV vector-mediated gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Park

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy of using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive tool for the monitoring of gene therapy for muscular dystrophy. The clinical investigations for this family of diseases often involve surgical biopsy which limits the amount of information that can be obtained due to the invasive nature of the procedure. Thus, other non-invasive tools may provide more opportunities for disease assessment and treatment responses. In order to explore this, dystrophic mdx4cv mice were systemically treated with a recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV vector containing a codon-optimized micro-dystrophin gene. Multi-parametric MRI of T2, magnetization transfer, and diffusion effects alongside 3-D volume measurements were then utilized to monitor disease/treatment progression. Mice were imaged at 10 weeks of age for pre-treatment, then again post-treatment at 8, 16, and 24 week time points. The efficacy of treatment was assessed by physiological assays for improvements in function and quantification of expression. Tissues from the hindlimbs were collected for histological analysis after the final time point for comparison with MRI results. We found that introduction of the micro-dystrophin gene restored some aspects of normal muscle histology and pathology such as decreased necrosis and resistance to contraction-induced injury. T2 relaxation values showed percentage decreases across all muscle types measured (tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and soleus when treated groups were compared to untreated groups. Additionally, the differences between groups were statistically significant for the tibialis anterior as well. The diffusion measurements showed a wider range of percentage changes and less statistical significance while the magnetization transfer effect measurements showed minimal change. MR images displayed hyper-intense regions of muscle that correlated with muscle pathology in

  18. The Dietary Supplement Protandim® Decreases Plasma Osteopontin and Improves Markers of Oxidative Stress in Muscular Dystrophy Mdx Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Muddasir; McClure, Warren C.; Arevalo, Nicole L.; Rabon, Rick E.; Mohr, Benjamin; Bose, Swapan K.; McCord, Joe M.; Tseng, Brian S.

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic options for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and lethal neuromuscular disorder in children, remain elusive. Oxidative damage is implicated as a pertinent factor involved in its pathogenesis. Protandim® is an over-the-counter supplement with the ability to induce antioxidant enzymes. In this study we investigated whether Protandim® provided benefit using surrogate markers and functional measures in the dystrophin-deficient (mdx)mouse model of DMD. Male 3-week-old mdx mice were randomized into two treatment groups: control (receiving standard rodent chow) and Protandim®-supplemented standard rodent chow. The diets were continued for 6-week and 6-month studies. The endpoints included the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), plasma osteopontin (OPN), plasma paraoxonase (PON1) activity, H&E histology, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of leg muscle and motor functional measurements. The Protandim® chow diet in mdx mice for 6 months was safe and well tolerated. After 6 months of Protandim®, a 48% average decrease in plasma TBARS was seen; 0.92 nmol/mg protein in controls versus 0.48 nmol/mg protein in the Protandim® group (p = .006). At 6 months, plasma OPN was decreased by 57% (p = .001) in the Protandim®-treated mice. Protandim® increased the plasma antioxidant enzyme PON1 activity by 35% (p = .018). After 6 months, the mdx mice with Protandim® showed 38% less MRI signal abnormality (p = .07) than mice on control diet. In this 6-month mdx mouse study, Protandim® did not significantly alter motor function nor histological criteria. PMID:20740052

  19. The Dietary Supplement Protandim Decreases Plasma Osteopontin and Improves Markers of Oxidative Stress in Muscular Dystrophy Mdx Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Muhammad Muddasir; McClure, Warren C; Arevalo, Nicole L; Rabon, Rick E; Mohr, Benjamin; Bose, Swapan K; McCord, Joe M; Tseng, Brian S

    2010-06-01

    Therapeutic options for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common and lethal neuromuscular disorder in children, remain elusive. Oxidative damage is implicated as a pertinent factor involved in its pathogenesis. Protandim((R)) is an over-the-counter supplement with the ability to induce antioxidant enzymes. In this study we investigated whether Protandim((R)) provided benefit using surrogate markers and functional measures in the dystrophin-deficient (mdx)mouse model of DMD. Male 3-week-old mdx mice were randomized into two treatment groups: control (receiving standard rodent chow) and Protandim((R))-supplemented standard rodent chow. The diets were continued for 6-week and 6-month studies. The endpoints included the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), plasma osteopontin (OPN), plasma paraoxonase (PON1) activity, H&E histology, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of leg muscle and motor functional measurements. The Protandim((R)) chow diet in mdx mice for 6 months was safe and well tolerated. After 6 months of Protandim((R)), a 48% average decrease in plasma TBARS was seen; 0.92 nmol/mg protein in controls versus 0.48 nmol/mg protein in the Protandim((R)) group (p = .006). At 6 months, plasma OPN was decreased by 57% (p = .001) in the Protandim((R))-treated mice. Protandim((R)) increased the plasma antioxidant enzyme PON1 activity by 35% (p = .018). After 6 months, the mdx mice with Protandim((R)) showed 38% less MRI signal abnormality (p = .07) than mice on control diet. In this 6-month mdx mouse study, Protandim((R)) did not significantly alter motor function nor histological criteria.

  20. Supplementation of Magnolol Attenuates Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Bladder Cancer-Bearing Mice Undergoing Chemotherapy via Suppression of FoxO3 Activation and Induction of IGF-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Chen

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy, the most prominent phenotypic feature of cancer cachexia, is often observed in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. Magnolol (M extracted from Magnolia officinalis exhibits several pharmacological effects including anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we investigated whether magnolol supplementation protects against the development of cachexia symptoms in bladder cancer-bearing mice undergoing chemotherapy. Combined treatment of magnolol with chemotherapeutic drugs, such as gemcitabine and cisplatin (TGCM or gemcitabine (TGM, markedly attenuates the body weight loss and skeletal muscle atrophy compared with conventional chemotherapy (TGC. The antiatrophic effect of magnolol may be associated with inhibition of myostatin and activin A formation, as well as FoxO3 transcriptional activity resulting from Akt activation, thereby suppressing ubiquitin ligases MuRF-1 and MAFbx/atrogin-1 expression, as well as proteasomal enzyme activity. Notably, magnolol-induced insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 production and related protein synthesis may also contribute to its protective effects. The decreased food intake, and intestinal injury and dysfunction observed in the mice of TGC group were significantly improved in the TGCM and TGM groups. Moreover, the increased inflammatory responses evidenced by elevation of proinflammatory cytokine formation and NF-κB activation occurred in the atrophying muscle of TGC group were markedly inhibited in mice of combined treatment with magnolol. In summary, these findings support that magnolol is a promising chemopreventive supplement for preventing chemotherapy-induced skeletal muscle atrophy associated with cancer cachexia by suppressing muscle protein degradation, and inflammatory responses, as well as increasing IGF-1-mediated protein synthesis.

  1. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atrophy. Exercises may include ones done in a swimming pool to reduce the muscle workload, and other types ... a physical examination and ask about your medical history and symptoms, including: When did the muscle atrophy ...

  2. Anti-skeletal muscle atrophy effect of Oenothera odorata root extract via reactive oxygen species-dependent signaling pathways in cellular and mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Kim, Wan-Joong; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Gelinsky, Michael; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy can be defined as a decrease of muscle volume caused by injury or lack of use. This condition is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in various muscular disorders. We acquired 2D and 3D images using micro-computed tomography in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of sciatic-denervated mice. We confirmed that sciatic denervation-small animal model reduced muscle volume. However, the intraperitoneal injection of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) delayed muscle atrophy compared to a control group. We also investigated the mechanism of muscle atrophy's relationship with ROS. EVP suppressed expression of SOD1, and increased expression of HSP70, in both H2O2-treated C2C12 myoblasts and sciatic-denervated mice. Moreover, EVP regulated apoptotic signals, including caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, and ceramide. These results indicate that EVP has a positive effect on reducing the effect of ROS on muscle atrophy.

  3. 一种罕见的运动神经元病亚型:散发性面肩肱型脊肌萎缩症一例并文献复习%A rare subtype of Motor neuron disease: a case report of sporadic facioscapulohumeral spinal muscular atrophy and literature review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄立伟; 雷革胜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical feature and diagnosis of facioscapulohumeral spinal muscular atrophy.Methods The clinical data of a patient with facioscapulohumeral spinal muscular atrophy in 2006 was analyzed retrospectively.Results The patient developed muscular weakness invidiously in her twenty-six years old,and got worse progressively.The disease selectively affected muscles in face,should ergirdle and proximal arms in its early stage.Her serum muscle enzyme spectrum was normal.Electrophysiologic study and muscle biopsy showed lesions of neurogenic origin.Conclusion The clinical feature of facioscapulohumeral spinal muscular atrophy is much similar to FSH muscular dystrophy,a kind of myodystrophia.The disease can be diagnosed early by electrophysiologic study and muscle biopsy.%目的 探讨面肩肱型脊肌萎缩症的临床表现和早期诊断.方法 对我院2006年收治的1例患者临床资料结合文献进行回顾性分析.结果 该患者为青年女性,隐袭起病,进行性进展.初期表现为选择性累及颜面、肩胛带肌群和上肢近端肌群,早期血浆肌肉酶谱正常,电生理检查和肌肉活检均提示神经源性损害.结论 面肩肱型脊肌萎缩症与肌营养不良性面肩肱型肌萎缩临床上极为类似,应早期进行电生理和肌肉活检检查协助确诊.

  4. Muscle atrophy reversed by growth factor activation of satellite cells in a mouse muscle atrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hauerslev

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies comprise a large group of inherited disorders that lead to progressive muscle wasting. We wanted to investigate if targeting satellite cells can enhance muscle regeneration and thus increase muscle mass. We treated mice with hepatocyte growth factor and leukemia inhibitory factor under three conditions: normoxia, hypoxia and during myostatin deficiency. We found that hepatocyte growth factor treatment led to activation of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K protein synthesis pathway, up-regulation of the myognic transcription factors MyoD and myogenin, and subsequently the negative growth control factor, myostatin and atrophy markers MAFbx and MuRF1. Hypoxia-induced atrophy was partially restored by hepatocyte growth factor combined with leukemia inhibitory factor treatment. Dividing satellite cells were three-fold increased in the treatment group compared to control. Finally, we demonstrated that myostatin regulates satellite cell activation and myogenesis in vivo following treatment, consistent with previous findings in vitro. Our results suggest, not only a novel in vivo pharmacological treatment directed specifically at activating the satellite cells, but also a myostatin dependent mechanism that may contribute to the progressive muscle wasting seen in severely affected patients with muscular dystrophy and significant on-going regeneration. This treatment could potentially be applied to many conditions that feature muscle wasting to increase muscle bulk and strength.

  5. [Functional assessment for people unable to walk due to spinal muscular atrophy and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Translation and validation of the Egen Klassifikation 2 scale for the Spanish population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagoaga, Joaquín; Girabent-Farrés, Montserrat; Bagur-Calafat, Caritat; Febrer, Anna; Steffensen, Birgit F

    2015-05-16

    Introduccion. La escala Egen Klassifikation 2 (EK2), ampliacion de la escala EK, evalua la capacidad funcional de personas con atrofia muscular espinal (AME) y distrofia muscular de Duchenne (DMD) que estan en fase de silla de ruedas. Esta version es mas especifica para la AME que su antecesora. Objetivo. Analizar la validez y fiabilidad de la version española de dicha escala como instrumento de medicion de la capacidad funcional en pacientes afectos de AME y DMD que estan en silla de ruedas. Pacientes y metodos. Primeramente se realizo una traduccion-retrotraduccion al español de la version en ingles de la EK2 y, posteriormente, se estudio la fiabilidad de la version traducida. Para ello, se seleccionaron 39 pacientes, de edades comprendidas entre 4 y 60 años, que fueron valorados por dos observadores. Para evaluar la concordancia intraobservador se realizaron dos evaluaciones por un mismo observador, y para la interobservador, se realizo una tercera evaluacion por un segundo observador. Resultados. Los valores obtenidos referidos a la puntuacion total de los items de la escala (suma EK2) reflejan una fiabilidad intra e interobservador excelente, de 0,993 y 0,988, respectivamente. Asimismo, para cada uno de los items, la fiabilidad fue excelente, a excepcion de un item, en el que fue buena. Conclusiones. La version española de la escala EK2 es un instrumento valido y fiable para la poblacion española como herramienta de medicion de la capacidad funcional en pacientes con AME y DMD que estan en silla de ruedas.

  6. Mitochondrial morphology is altered in atrophied skeletal muscle of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc-Gaudet, Jean-Philippe; Picard, Martin; St-Jean Pelletier, Félix; Sgarioto, Nicolas; Auger, Marie-Joëlle; Vallée, Joanne; Robitaille, Richard; St-Pierre, David H; Gouspillou, Gilles

    2015-07-20

    Skeletal muscle aging is associated with a progressive decline in muscle mass and strength, a process termed sarcopenia. Evidence suggests that accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction plays a causal role in sarcopenia, which could be triggered by impaired mitophagy. Mitochondrial function, mitophagy and mitochondrial morphology are interconnected aspects of mitochondrial biology, and may coordinately be altered with aging. However, mitochondrial morphology has remained challenging to characterize in muscle, and whether sarcopenia is associated with abnormal mitochondrial morphology remains unknown. Therefore, we assessed the morphology of SubSarcolemmal (SS) and InterMyoFibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in skeletal muscle of young (8-12wk-old) and old (88-96wk-old) mice using a quantitative 2-dimensional transmission electron microscopy approach. We show that sarcopenia is associated with larger and less circular SS mitochondria. Likewise, aged IMF mitochondria were longer and more branched, suggesting increased fusion and/or decreased fission. Accordingly, although no difference in the content of proteins regulating mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, Opa1 and Drp1) was observed, a mitochondrial fusion index (Mfn2-to-Drp1 ratio) was significantly increased in aged muscles. Our results reveal that sarcopenia is associated with complex changes in mitochondrial morphology that could interfere with mitochondrial function and mitophagy, and thus contribute to aging-related accumulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and sarcopenia.

  7. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/−} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  8. Muscles in a mouse model of spinal muscular atrophy show profound defects in neuromuscular development even in the absence of failure in neuromuscular transmission or loss of motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Il; Mikesh, Michelle; Smith, Ian; Rimer, Mendell; Thompson, Wesley

    2011-08-15

    A mouse model of the devastating human disease "spinal muscular atrophy" (SMA) was used to investigate the severe muscle weakness and spasticity that precede the death of these animals near the end of the 2nd postnatal week. Counts of motor units to the soleus muscle as well as of axons in the soleus muscle nerve showed no loss of motor neurons. Similarly, neither immunostaining of neuromuscular junctions nor the measurement of the tension generated by nerve stimulation gave evidence of any significant impairment in neuromuscular transmission, even when animals were maintained up to 5days longer via a supplementary diet. However, the muscles were clearly weaker, generating less than half their normal tension. Weakness in 3 muscles examined in the study appears due to a severe but uniform reduction in muscle fiber size. The size reduction results from a failure of muscle fibers to grow during early postnatal development and, in soleus, to a reduction in number of fibers generated. Neuromuscular development is severely delayed in these mutant animals: expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, the elimination of polyneuronal innervation, the maturation in the shape of the AChR plaque, the arrival of SCs at the junctions and their coverage of the nerve terminal, the development of junctional folds. Thus, if SMA in this particular mouse is a disease of motor neurons, it can act in a manner that does not result in their death or disconnection from their targets but nonetheless alters many aspects of neuromuscular development.

  9. Identification of a Maleimide-Based Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK-3) Inhibitor, BIP-135, that Prolongs the Median Survival Time of Δ7 SMA KO Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po C; Gaisina, Irina N; El-Khodor, Bassem F; Ramboz, Sylvie; Makhortova, Nina R; Rubin, Lee L; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2012-01-18

    The discovery of upregulated glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) in various pathological conditions has led to the development of a host of chemically diverse small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors, such as BIP-135. GSK-3 inhibition emerged as an alternative therapeutic target for treating spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) when a number of GSK-3 inhibitors were shown to elevate survival motor neuron (SMN) levels in vitro and to rescue motor neurons when their intrinsic SMN level was diminished by SMN-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Despite their cellular potency, the in vivo efficacy of GSK-3 inhibitors has yet to be evaluated in an animal model of SMA. Herein, we disclose that a potent and reasonably selective GSK-3 inhibitor, namely BIP-135, was tested in a transgenic Δ7 SMA KO mouse model of SMA, and found to prolong the median survival of these animals. In addition, this compound was shown to elevate the SMN protein level in SMA patient-derived fibroblast cells as determined by western blot, and was neuroprotective in a cell-based, SMA-related model of oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. Estimulação elétrica neuromuscular de média freqüência (russa em cães com atrofia muscular induzida Medium frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation (russian in dogs with induced muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Pelizzari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A estimulação elétrica neuromuscular (EENM de média freqüência (Russa ou de Kotz pode ser empregada para a recuperação de massa muscular em animais apresentando atrofia muscular por desuso. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi empregar a EENM de média freqüência no quadríceps femoral de cães com atrofia muscular induzida, avaliando-se a ocorrência de ganho de massa. Foram utilizados oito cães em dois grupos denominados de GI ou controle e de GII ou tratado. Para a indução da atrofia muscular, a articulação fêmoro-tíbio-patelar esquerda foi imobilizada por 30 dias. Após 48 horas da remoção, foi realizada a EENM nos cães do grupo II, três vezes por semana, com intervalo de 48 horas cada sessão, pelo período de 60 dias. Foram avaliadas a mensuração da perimetria da coxa, da goniometria do joelho, as enzimas creatina-quinase (CK e morfometria das fibras musculares em cortes transversais do músculo vasto lateral, colhido mediante a biópsia muscular. A EENM foi empregada no músculo quadríceps femoral numa freqüência de 2.500Hz, largura de pulso de 50% e relação de tempo on/off de 1:2. Não houve diferença significativa quanto aos valores de perimetria da coxa e a atividade da enzima CK entre os grupos I e II. Na goniometria, houve diminuição significativa (PThe medium frequency neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES (Russa or Kotz is designed for recuperation of muscle mass in dogs with muscular atrophy in disuse. This study aims to utilize medium frequency NMES on the femoral quadriceps of dogs with induced muscular atrophy and evaluate the occurrence of gain in mass. Eight dogs in two groups denominated GI, or control, and GII, or treated were used. For the induction of muscular atrophy, the left femoral-tibial-patellar joint was immobilized for 30 days. NMES treatment began 48 hours after the removal of the immobilization device on dogs from group II and was carried out three times per week, with an

  11. Calcium-binding proteins in skeletal muscles of the mdx mice: potential role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertille, Adriana; de Carvalho, Candida Luiza Tonizza; Matsumura, Cintia Yuri; Neto, Humberto Santo; Marques, Maria Julia

    2010-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the most common hereditary diseases. Abnormal ion handling renders dystrophic muscle fibers more susceptible to necrosis and a rise in intracellular calcium is an important initiating event in dystrophic muscle pathogenesis. In the mdx mice, muscles are affected with different intensities and some muscles are spared. We investigated the levels of the calcium-binding proteins calsequestrin and calmodulin in the non-spared axial (sternomastoid and diaphragm), limb (tibialis anterior and soleus), cardiac and in the spared extraocular muscles (EOM) of control and mdx mice. Immunoblotting analysis showed a significant increase of the proteins in the spared mdx EOM and a significant decrease in the most affected diaphragm. Both proteins were comparable to the cardiac muscle controls. In limb and sternomastoid muscles, calmodulin and calsequestrin were affected differently. These results suggest that differential levels of the calcium-handling proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of myonecrosis in mdx muscles. Understanding the signaling mechanisms involving Ca(2+)-calmodulin activation and calsequestrin expression may be a valuable way to develop new therapeutic approaches to the dystrophinopaties.

  12. Differential requirement for utrophin in the induced pluripotent stem cell correction of muscle versus fat in muscular dystrophy mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Beck

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an incurable degenerative muscle disorder. We injected WT mouse induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs into mdx and mdx∶utrophin mutant blastocysts, which are predisposed to develop DMD with an increasing degree of severity (mdx <<< mdx∶utrophin. In mdx chimeras, iPSC-dystrophin was supplied to the muscle sarcolemma to effect corrections at morphological and functional levels. Dystrobrevin was observed in dystrophin-positive and, at a lesser extent, utrophin-positive areas. In the mdx∶utrophin mutant chimeras, although iPSC-dystrophin was also supplied to the muscle sarcolemma, mice still displayed poor skeletal muscle histopathology, and negligible levels of dystrobrevin in dystrophin- and utrophin-negative areas. Not only dystrophin-expressing tissues are affected by iPSCs. Mdx and mdx∶utrophin mice have reduced fat/body weight ratio, but iPSC injection normalized this parameter in both mdx and mdx∶utrophin chimeras, despite the fact that utrophin was compromised in the mdx∶utrophin chimeric fat. The results suggest that the presence of utrophin is required for the iPSC-corrections in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, the results highlight a potential (utrophin-independent non-cell autonomous role for iPSC-dystrophin in the corrections of non-muscle tissue like fat, which is intimately related to the muscle.

  13. Evaluation of Electrical Impedance as a Biomarker of Myostatin Inhibition in Wild Type and Muscular Dystrophy Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Sanchez

    Full Text Available Non-invasive and effort independent biomarkers are needed to better assess the effects of drug therapy on healthy muscle and that affected by muscular dystrophy (mdx. Here we evaluated the use of multi-frequency electrical impedance for this purpose with comparison to force and histological parameters.Eight wild-type (wt and 10 mdx mice were treated weekly with RAP-031 activin type IIB receptor at a dose of 10 mg kg-1 twice weekly for 16 weeks; the investigators were blinded to treatment and disease status. At the completion of treatment, impedance measurements, in situ force measurements, and histology analyses were performed.As compared to untreated animals, RAP-031 wt and mdx treated mice had greater body mass (18% and 17%, p 70 Hz, but not in the mdx animals. In contrast, maximum force normalized by muscle mass was unchanged in the wt animals and lower in the mdx animals by 21% (p < 0.01. Similarly, myofiber size was only non-significantly higher in treated versus untreated animals (8% p = 0.44 and 12% p = 0.31 for wt and mdx animals, respectively.Our findings demonstrate electrical impedance of muscle reproduce the functional and histological changes associated with myostatin pathway inhibition and do not reflect differences in muscle size or volume. This technique deserves further study in both animal and human therapeutic trials.

  14. Avaliação dos resultados do tratamento cirúrgico da escoliose na atrofia muscular espinhal tipo 2 Evaluación de los resultados del tratamiento quirúrgico de la escoliosis en la atrofia muscular espinal tipo 2 Results evaluation of surgical treatment of scoliosis in spinal muscular atrophy type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Munhoz da Rocha

    2011-01-01

    evaluaron el grado y el porcentaje de corrección de la deformidad y la oblicuidad pélvica después de la operación y la pérdida, además de las complicaciones y el impacto del tratamiento sobre la función respiratoria. RESULTADOS: El promedio de seguimiento fue 77,5 meses (6,4 años ± 58,9 meses (4,9 años, el ángulo de Cobb antes de la cirugía en promedio 76,1° ± 31,7° (35° a 144° y el postoperatorio fue 29,5° ± 23,2° (5° a 90°, con un promedio de corrección de 46,6° (61,29%. La oblicuidad pélvica promedio en el preoperatorio fue 15,1 ° ± 13,3° (variación de 0 ° a 37 ° y después de la operación 8,5° ± 9,9° (variación de 0° a 30°, con una corrección promedio de 6,5 ° (43,37%. Cinco pacientes presentaron complicaciones (41,6%. La Capacidad Ventilatoria Forzada (CVF preoperatoria promedio fue 62,9% ± 38,6% (variación de 23,3% a 89%, y 45,9% ± 25,0% (variación de 15% a 86,2% en la última evaluación. La disminución fue de 17% de la capacidad vital, con una reducción de 2,4% por año de seguimiento. CONCLUSIONES: El tratamiento quirúrgico de la escoliosis, en pacientes con AME, permite la corrección de la oblicuidad pélvica y restaurar el equilibrio sagital y coronal, liberando las manos para las actividades de la vida diaria. La función pulmonar se vio afectada positivamente por el tratamiento.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcome of surgical treatment of scoliosis in patients with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA type 2. METHODS: A retrospective study with 12 patients with SMA type 2 who underwent arthrodesis and instrumentation for scoliosis correction with more than two years of follow-up. The degree and rate of correction of deformity and pelvic obliquity postoperatively and loss in the last evaluation were evaluated, in addition to the complications and the impact of treatment on respiratory function. RESULTS: Mean follow-up was 77.5 months (6.4 years ± 58.9 months (4.9 years, Cobb angle before surgery averaged 76.1° ± 31.7

  15. Skin physiology in microgravity: a 3-month stay aboard ISS induces dermal atrophy and affects cutaneous muscle and hair follicles cycling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutelings, Thibaut; Nusgens, Betty V; Liu, Yi; Tavella, Sara; Ruggiu, Alessandra; Cancedda, Ranieri; Gabriel, Maude; Colige, Alain; Lambert, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Mice Drawer System (MDS) Tissue Sharing program was the longest rodent space mission ever performed. It provided 20 research teams with organs and tissues collected from mice having spent 3 months on the International Space Station (ISS). Our participation to this experiment aimed at investigating the impact of such prolonged exposure to extreme space conditions on mouse skin physiology. Mice were maintained in the MDS for 91 days aboard ISS (space group (S)). Skin specimens were collected shortly after landing for morphometric, biochemical, and transcriptomic analyses. An exact replicate of the experiment in the MDS was performed on ground (ground group (G)). A significant reduction of dermal thickness (-15%, P=0.05) was observed in S mice accompanied by an increased newly synthetized procollagen (+42%, P=0.03), likely reflecting an increased collagen turnover. Transcriptomic data suggested that the dermal atrophy might be related to an early degradation of defective newly formed procollagen molecules. Interestingly, numerous hair follicles in growing anagen phase were observed in the three S mice, validated by a high expression of specific hair follicles genes, while only one mouse in the G controls showed growing hairs. By microarray analysis of whole thickness skin, we observed a significant modulation of 434 genes in S versus G mice. A large proportion of the upregulated transcripts encoded proteins related to striated muscle homeostasis. These data suggest that a prolonged exposure to space conditions may induce skin atrophy, deregulate hair follicle cycle, and markedly affect the transcriptomic repertoire of the cutaneous striated muscle panniculus carnosus.

  16. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a genetic ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the most ...

  17. Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the ...

  18. Cytoplasmic retention of polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor ameliorates disease via autophagy in a mouse model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montie, Heather L; Cho, Maria S; Holder, Latia; Liu, Yuhong; Tsvetkov, Andrey S; Finkbeiner, Steven; Merry, Diane E

    2009-06-01

    The nucleus is the primary site of protein aggregation in many polyglutamine diseases, suggesting a central role in pathogenesis. In SBMA, the nucleus is further implicated by the critical role for disease of androgens, which promote the nuclear translocation of the mutant androgen receptor (AR). To clarify the importance of the nucleus in SBMA, we genetically manipulated the nuclear localization signal of the polyglutamine-expanded AR. Transgenic mice expressing this mutant AR displayed inefficient nuclear translocation and substantially improved motor function compared with SBMA mice. While we found that nuclear localization of polyglutamine-expanded AR is required for SBMA, we also discovered, using cell models of SBMA, that it is insufficient for both aggregation and toxicity and requires androgens for these disease features. Through our studies of cultured motor neurons, we further found that the autophagic pathway was able to degrade cytoplasmically retained expanded AR and represents an endogenous neuroprotective mechanism. Moreover, pharmacologic induction of autophagy rescued motor neurons from the toxic effects of even nuclear-residing mutant AR, suggesting a therapeutic role for autophagy in this nucleus-centric disease. Thus, our studies firmly establish that polyglutamine-expanded AR must reside within nuclei in the presence of its ligand to cause SBMA. They also highlight a mechanistic basis for the requirement for nuclear localization in SBMA neurotoxicity, namely the lack of mutant AR removal by the autophagic protein degradation pathway.

  19. Whole body periodic acceleration is an effective therapy to ameliorate muscular dystrophy in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Francisco; Perez, Claudio F; Liu, Min; Widrick, Jeffrey; Barton, Elisabeth R; Allen, Paul D; Adams, Jose A; Lopez, Jose R

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin in both skeletal and cardiac muscles. This leads to severe muscle degeneration, and dilated cardiomyopathy that produces patient death, which in most cases occurs before the end of the second decade. Several lines of evidence have shown that modulators of nitric oxide (NO) pathway can improve skeletal muscle and cardiac function in the mdx mouse, a mouse model for DMD. Whole body periodic acceleration (pGz) is produced by applying sinusoidal motion to supine humans and in standing conscious rodents in a headward-footward direction using a motion platform. It adds small pulses as a function of movement frequency to the circulation thereby increasing pulsatile shear stress to the vascular endothelium, which in turn increases production of NO. In this study, we examined the potential therapeutic properties of pGz for the treatment of skeletal muscle pathology observed in the mdx mouse. We found that pGz (480 cpm, 8 days, 1 hr per day) decreased intracellular Ca(2+) and Na(+) overload, diminished serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and reduced intracellular accumulation of Evans Blue. Furthermore, pGz increased muscle force generation and expression of both utrophin and the carboxy-terminal PDZ ligand of nNOS (CAPON). Likewise, pGz (120 cpm, 12 h) applied in vitro to skeletal muscle myotubes reduced Ca(2+) and Na(+) overload, diminished abnormal sarcolemmal Ca(2+) entry and increased phosphorylation of endothelial NOS. Overall, this study provides new insights into the potential therapeutic efficacy of pGz as a non-invasive and non-pharmacological approach for the treatment of DMD patients through activation of the NO pathway.

  20. Accuracy of marker analysis, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification to determine SMN2 copy number in patients with spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alías, Laura; Bernal, Sara; Barceló, Maria J; Also-Rallo, Eva; Martínez-Hernández, Rebeca; Rodríguez-Alvarez, Francisco J; Hernández-Chico, Concepción; Baiget, Montserrat; Tizzano, Eduardo F

    2011-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder caused by absence of or mutations in the survival motor neuron1 gene (SMN1). All SMA patients have a highly homologous copy of SMN1, the SMN2 gene. Severe (type I) SMA patients present one or two SMN2 copies, whereas milder chronic forms (type II-III) usually have three or four SMN2 copies. SMN2 dosage is important to stratify patients for motor function tests and clinical trials. Our aim was to compare three methods, marker analysis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction using the LightCycler instrument, and multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), to characterize their accuracy in quantifying SMN2 genes. We studied a group of 62 genetically confirmed SMA patients, 54 with homozygous absence of exons 7 and 8 of SMN1 and 8 with SMN2-SMN1 hybrid genes. A complete correlation using the three methods was observed in 32 patients (51.6%). In the remaining 30 patients, discordances between the three methods were found, including under or overestimation of SMN2 copies by marker analysis with respect to the quantitative methods (LightCycler and MLPA) because of lack of informativeness of markers, 3' deletions of SMN genes, and breakpoints in SMN2-SMN1 hybrid genes. The technical limitations and advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed. We conclude that the three methods complement each other in estimating the SMN2 copy number in most cases. However, MLPA offers additional information to characterize SMA cases with particular rearrangements such as partial deletions and hybrid genes.

  1. Immunoproteasome in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Graber, Ted G; Bratten, Wendy M; Ferrington, Deborah A; Thompson, LaDora V

    2014-04-01

    Increased proteasome activity has been implicated in the atrophy and deterioration associated with dystrophic muscles of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). While proteasome inhibitors show promise in the attenuation of muscle degeneration, proteasome inhibition-induced toxicity was a major drawback of this therapeutic strategy. Inhibitors that selectively target the proteasome subtype that is responsible for the loss in muscle mass and quality would reduce side effects and be less toxic. This study examined proteasome activity and subtype populations, along with muscle function, morphology and damage in wild-type (WT) mice and two murine models of DMD, dystrophin-deficient (MDX) and dystrophin- and utrophin-double-knockout (DKO) mice. We found that immunoproteasome content was increased in dystrophic muscles while the total proteasome content was unchanged among the three genotypes of mice. Proteasome proteolytic activity was elevated in dystrophic muscles, especially in DKO mice. These mice also exhibited more severe muscle atrophy than either WT or MDX mice. Muscle damage and regeneration, characterized by the activity of muscle creatine kinase in the blood and the percentage of central nuclei were equally increased in dystrophic mice. Accordingly, the overall muscle function was similarly reduced in both dystrophic mice compared with WT. These data demonstrated that there was transformation of standard proteasomes to immunoproteasomes in dystrophic muscles. In addition, DKO that showed greatest increase in proteasome activities also demonstrated more severe atrophy compared with MDX and WT. These results suggest a putative role for the immunoproteasome in muscle deterioration associated with DMD and provide a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Differential expression of microRNAs in thymic epithelial cells from Trypanosoma cruzi acutely-infected mice: putative role in thymic atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandra eLinhares-Lacerda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A common feature seen in acute infections is a severe atrophy of the thymus. This occurs in the murine model of acute Chagas disease. Moreover, in thymuses from Trypanosoma cruzi acutely infected mice, thymocytes exhibit an increase in the density of fibronectin and laminin integrin-type receptors, with an increase in migratory response ex-vivo. Thymic epithelial cells (TEC play a major role in the intrathymic T cell differentiation. To date, the consequences of molecular changes promoted by parasite infection upon thymus have not been elucidated. Considering the importance of microRNA for gene expression regulation, 85 microRNAs were analyzed in TEC from T. cruzi acutely infected mice. The infection significantly modulated 29 miRNAs and modulation of 9 was also dependent whether TEC sorted out from the thymus exhibited cortical or medullary phenotype. In silico analysis revealed that these miRNAs may control target mRNAs known to be responsible for chemotaxis, cell adhesion and cell death. Considering that we sorted TEC in the initial phase of thymocyte loss, it is conceivable that changes in TEC miRNA expression profile are functionally related to thymic atrophy, providing new clues to better understanding the mechanisms of the thymic involution seen in experimental Chagas disease.

  3. Enhanced autophagy as a potential mechanism for the improved physiological function by simvastatin in muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy has recently emerged as an important cellular process for the maintenance of skeletal muscle health and function. Excessive autophagy can trigger muscle catabolism, leading to atrophy. In contrast, reduced autophagic flux is a characteristic of several muscle diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common and severe inherited muscle disorder. Recent evidence demonstrates that enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by CYBB/NOX2 impairs autophagy in muscles from the dmd/mdx mouse, a genetic model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Statins decrease CYBB/NOX2 expression and activity and stimulate autophagy in skeletal muscle. Therefore, we treated dmd/mdx mice with simvastatin and showed decreased CYBB/NOX2-mediated oxidative stress and enhanced autophagy induction. This was accompanied by reduced muscle damage, inflammation and fibrosis, and increased muscle force production. Our data suggest that increased autophagy may be a potential mechanism by which simvastatin improves skeletal muscle health and function in muscular dystrophy.

  4. Relationship between muscular atrophy and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha%肌肉萎缩与过氧化体增殖活化受体辅γ助活化因子1α的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨殊; 文野

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor . Coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1a) can regulate numerous skeletal muscle functions including mitochondrial biogenesis, substrate oxidation, and muscle fibre type. Recently, PGC-1a has been found to prevent against muscular atrophy. OBJECTIVE: To summarize and discuss the relationship between PGC-1a and muscular atrophy. METHODS: A computer-based online retrieval of CNKI and Medline databases was performed by the first author to search papers published between 2000 and 2010 using the key words “muscle atrophy, PGC-1a, exercise” in Chinese or English. A total of 56 papers were retrieved. According to inclusion and exclusion criteria, 22 papers were included in the final analysis. These papers were summarized from PGC-1a and muscular atrophy, and exercise and PGC-1a. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Enhanced PGC-1a expression can enhance mitochondrial function and human sport ability, reduce oxidative stress and inhibit the expression of muscular atrophy specific gene. Therefore, exercise may inhibit muscular atrophy by regulating PGC-1a expression.%背景:过氧化体增殖活化受体γ 辅助活化因子1α(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγ coactivator 1α,PGC-1α)能调节骨骼肌的功能,包括有:线粒体的生物发生、底物氧化和肌纤维类型等,最近还有研究发现PGC-1α 能够预防肌肉的萎缩.目的:总结并讨论PGC-1α 与肌肉萎缩之间的关系.方法:由第一作者用计算机检索中国期刊全文数据库(CNKI:2000/2010)和Medline 数据库(2000/2010),关键词分别为"肌肉萎缩,PGC-1α,运动"和"muscle atrophy,PGC-1α,exercise".共检索到56 篇文章,按纳入和排除标准对文献进行筛选,共纳入22 篇文章.从PGC-1α 与肌肉萎缩、运动与PGC-1α 共2 个方面进行总结.结果与结论:PGC-1α 表达增强能提高线粒体功能、人体的运动能力、降低氧化应激和抑制肌肉萎缩特异性基因的表达.

  5. Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein 2 and Inflammation-Induced Skeletal Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxi; Kny, Melanie; Schmidt, Franziska; Hahn, Alexander; Wollersheim, Tobias; Kleber, Christian; Weber-Carstens, Steffen; Fielitz, Jens

    2017-02-01

    In sepsis, the disease course of critically ill patients is often complicated by muscle failure leading to ICU-acquired weakness. The myokine transforming growth factor-β1 increases during inflammation and mediates muscle atrophy in vivo. We observed that the transforming growth factor-β1 inhibitor, secreted frizzled-related protein 2, was down-regulated in skeletal muscle of ICU-acquired weakness patients. We hypothesized that secreted frizzled-related protein 2 reduction enhances transforming growth factor-β1-mediated effects and investigated the interrelationship between transforming growth factor-β1 and secreted frizzled-related protein 2 in inflammation-induced atrophy. Observational study and prospective animal trial. Two ICUs and research laboratory. Twenty-six critically ill patients with Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores greater than or equal to 8 underwent a skeletal muscle biopsy from the vastus lateralis at median day 5 in ICU. Four patients undergoing elective orthopedic surgery served as controls. To search for signaling pathways enriched in muscle of ICU-acquired weakness patients, a gene set enrichment analysis of our recently published gene expression profiles was performed. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze secreted frizzled-related protein 2 expression and protein content. A mouse model of inflammation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy due to polymicrobial sepsis and cultured myocytes were used for mechanistic analyses. None. Gene set enrichment analysis uncovered transforming growth factor-β1 signaling activation in vastus lateralis from ICU-acquired weakness patients. Muscular secreted frizzled-related protein 2 expression was reduced after 5 days in ICU. Likewise, muscular secreted frizzled-related protein 2 expression was decreased early and continuously in mice with inflammation-induced atrophy. In muscle, secreted frizzled-related protein 2

  6. Genetic initial study of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy in a family of Chongqing%重庆一脊髓延髓肌肉萎缩症家系的基因检测研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金鑫; 陈康宁; 史树贵; 张波; 胡俊

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect the androgen receptor( AR ) gene of 3 patients suspected spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy ( SBMA ) in a Chongqing family and confirm the gene mutation. Methods Routine examinations on nervous system, including nerve electrophysiology, electromyography were performed and serum CK was determined. After informed consent, venous blood was taken and genomic DNA was extracted by standard method. The CAG repeat region in the first exon of AR gene was amplified by PCR and sequenced directly. Results These 3 patients'nerve electrophysiological study showed obvious nervous original damage and their serum CK values were elevated significantly. In the pedigree, these 3 individuals were clinically found to be ill with SBMA and their CAG repeats numbers were 56 in 2 patients and the other one with 51 CAG repeats. Conclusion We confirmed the diagnosis of SBMA in these 3 patients according to gene detect and report the first genetically proven SBMA pedigree in southwest of China. AR gene testing is the most reliable diagnostic method. It would be helpful for the genetic counseling of SBMA if we continue to study pathopoiesis gene in the pedigree. It has important significance for therapy and precaution of SBMA.%目的 对重庆一家系中3例临床诊断脊髓延髓肌肉萎缩症(SBMA)的患者行基因检测,证实其为SBMA家系.方法 对3例患者进行神经系统查体,常规检测神经电生理、肌电图、血清肌酸激酶(CK)等.抽取患者静脉血5ml,抽提基因组DNA,聚合酶链反应(PCR)扩增雄激素受体(AR)基因第一外显子CAG重复片段,PCR产物经1.2%琼脂糖凝胶电泳,异常样本进行直接测序.结果 3例患者肌电图均显示神经源性损害,血清CK均增高,经AR基因检测,2例患者CAG重复次数为56次,1例CAG重复次数为51次.结论 AR基因检测是诊断SMBA最可靠的方法,继续对该家系的致病相关基因进行研究将对该病的治疗和预防有重要意义.

  7. Highly efficient in vivo delivery of PMO into regenerating myotubes and rescue in laminin-α2 chain-null congenital muscular dystrophy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Nagata, Tetsuya; Yokota, Toshifumi; Nakamura, Akinori; Wood, Matthew J A; Partridge, Terence; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-12-15

    Phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomer (PMO)-mediated exon skipping is among the more promising approaches to the treatment of several neuromuscular disorders including Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The main weakness of this approach arises from the low efficiency and sporadic nature of the delivery of charge-neutral PMO into muscle fibers, the mechanism of which is unknown. In this study, to test our hypothesis that muscle fibers take up PMO more efficiently during myotube formation, we induced synchronous muscle regeneration by injection of cardiotoxin into the tibialis anterior muscle of Dmd exon 52-deficient mdx52 and wild-type mice. Interestingly, by in situ hybridization, we detected PMO mainly in embryonic myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating fibers. In addition, we showed that PMO or 2'-O-methyl phosphorothioate is taken up efficiently into C2C12 myotubes when transfected 24-72 h after the induction of differentiation but is poorly taken up into undifferentiated C2C12 myoblasts suggesting efficient uptake of PMO in the early stages of C2C12 myotube formation. Next, we tested the therapeutic potential of PMO for laminin-α2 chain-null dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice: a model of merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A) with active muscle regeneration. We confirmed the recovery of laminin-α2 chain and slightly prolonged life span following skipping of the mutated exon 4 in dy(3K)/dy(3K) mice. These findings support the idea that PMO entry into fibers is dependent on a developmental stage in myogenesis rather than on dystrophinless muscle membranes and provide a platform for developing PMO-mediated therapies for a variety of muscular disorders, such as MDC1A, that involve active muscle regeneration.

  8. Multifocal motor neuropathy and progressive atrophy : Pathophysiological similarities and differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlam, L.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) share many clinical similarities. They are both characterized by progressive asymmetric muscle weakness with atrophy and fasciculations. Tendon reflexes are normally low or absent, although in some patients with MMN normal or e

  9. Mice deficient in small leucine-rich proteoglycans: novel in vivo models for osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, muscular dystrophy, and corneal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameye, Laurent; Young, Marian F

    2002-09-01

    Small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) are extracellular molecules that bind to TGFbetas and collagens and other matrix molecules. In