WorldWideScience

Sample records for muscle oxygen utilization

  1. Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring muscle oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Piantadosi, C A

    2000-01-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a non-invasive method for monitoring oxygen availability and utilization by the tissues. In intact skeletal muscle, NIRS allows semi-quantitative measurements of haemoglobin plus myoglobin oxygenation (tissue O2 stores) and the haemoglobin volume. Specialized...... algorithms allow assessment of the oxidation-reduction (redox) state of the copper moiety (CuA) of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and, with the use of specific tracers, accurate assessment of regional blood flow. NIRS has demonstrated utility for monitoring changes in muscle oxygenation and blood flow...... during submaximal and maximal exercise and under pathophysiological conditions including cardiovascular disease and sepsis. During work, the extent to which skeletal muscles deoxygenate varies according to the type of muscle, type of exercise and blood flow response. In some instances, a strong...

  2. Limitations of skeletal muscle oxygen delivery and utilization during moderate-intensity exercise in moderately impaired patients with chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemeijer, V.M.; Spee, R.F.; Schoots, T.; Wijn, P.F.F.; Kemps, H.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The extent and speed of transient skeletal muscle deoxygenation during exercise onset in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are related to impairments of local O2 delivery and utilization. This study examined the physiological background of submaximal exercise performance in 19 moderately

  3. Biceps brachii muscle oxygenation in electrical muscle stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; Millet, Guillaume Y; Maffiuletti, Nicola A; Ferrari, Marco; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare between electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) and maximal voluntary (VOL) isometric contractions of the elbow flexors for changes in biceps brachii muscle oxygenation (tissue oxygenation index, TOI) and haemodynamics (total haemoglobin volume, tHb = oxygenated-Hb + deoxygenated-Hb) determined by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The biceps brachii muscle of 10 healthy men (23-39 years) was electrically stimulated at high frequency (75 Hz) via surface electrodes to evoke 50 intermittent (4-s contraction, 15-s relaxation) isometric contractions at maximum tolerated current level (EMS session). The contralateral arm performed 50 intermittent (4-s contraction, 15-s relaxation) maximal voluntary isometric contractions (VOL session) in a counterbalanced order separated by 2-3 weeks. Results indicated that although the torque produced during EMS was approximately 50% of VOL (P<0.05), there was no significant difference in the changes in TOI amplitude or TOI slope between EMS and VOL over the 50 contractions. However, the TOI amplitude divided by peak torque was approximately 50% lower for EMS than VOL (P<0.05), which indicates EMS was less efficient than VOL. This seems likely because of the difference in the muscles involved in the force production between conditions. Mean decrease in tHb amplitude during the contraction phases was significantly (P<0.05) greater for EMS than VOL from the 10th contraction onwards, suggesting that the muscle blood volume was lower in EMS than VOL. It is concluded that local oxygen demand of the biceps brachii sampled by NIRS is similar between VOL and EMS.

  4. Arterial and venous oxygen partial pressure and utilization factor η, resp., and 133Xe muscle clearance after UV irradiation of skin or blood of healthy persons and patients with occlusive arterial disease and psoriasis, resp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherf, H.P.; Strangfeld, D.; Meffert, H.; Glatzel, E.; Siewert, H.; Soennichsen, N.; Correns, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    In three teams of test persons series of UV irradiations of the skin (λ max 365 nm) and of the blood (λ max 254 nm) were performed, and moreover pseudoirradiations of the blood as placebo and infrared irradiations of the skin were carried out. UV irradiations of the blood increased the factor η (O 2 utilization) in all test persons. In healthy persons and patients with psoriasis UV irradiations of the skin involved a homogeneous, but less distinct effect, this was, however, not the case in patients with vascular diseases. According to the results of the 133 Xe muscle clearance the improved utilization of oxygen does not result from increased peripheral blood supply. (author)

  5. Influence on muscle oxygenation to EMG parameters at different skeletal muscle contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Song, Gaoqing

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of muscle oxygenation on EMG parameters during isometric and incremental exercises and to observe the relationship between EMG parameters and muscle oxygenation. Twelve rowers took part in the tests. Near infrared spectrometer was utilized for measurements of muscle oxygenation on lateral quadriceps. sEMG measurement is performed for EMG parameters during isometric and incremental exercises. Results indicated that Oxy-Hb decrease significantly correlated with IEMG, E/T ratio and frequency of impulse signal during 1/3 MVC and 2/3 MVC isometric exercise, and it is also correlated with IEMG, E/T ratio and frequency of impulse signal. Increase of IEMG occurred at the time after Oxy-Hb decrease during incremental exercise and highly correlated with BLa. It is concluded that no matter how heavy the intensity is, Oxy-Hb dissociation may play an important role in affecting EMG parameters of muscle fatigue during isometric exercise. 2) EMG parameters may be influenced by Oxy-Hb dissociation and blood lactate concentration during dynamic exercise.

  6. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Aleksander S.; Pittman, Roland N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po2 [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po...

  7. Muscle oxygenation and fascicle length during passive muscle stretching in ballet-trained subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, A; Fujita, E; Ikegawa, S; Kuno-Mizumura, M

    2011-07-01

    Muscle stretching transiently decreases muscle-blood flow corresponding to a muscle extension. It may disturb a balance between muscular oxygen demand and oxygen supply to muscles and reduce muscle oxygenation. However, muscle-stretching training may improve blood circulatory condition, resulting in the maintained muscle oxygenation during muscle stretching. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in muscle-blood volume (tHb) and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) during muscle stretching determined by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in ballet-trained (BT) and untrained (C) subjects. 11 BT women who regularly perform muscle stretching and 11 C women participated in this study. Fascicle lengths, tHb and TOI in the tibialis anterior muscle were measured during passive plantar flexion from ankle joint angles of 120° (baseline) to 140°, 160°, the maximal comfortable position without pain (CP), and the maximal position (MP). At 160°, the % fascicle-length change from baseline was significantly lower in the BT than the C group, however, for the changes in tHb and TOI the significant interaction effect between the 2 groups was not detected. On the other hand, although the increases in the fascicle length from baseline to CP and MP were greater in BT than C, the tHb and TOI reductions were comparable between groups. We concluded that it appears that BT can extend their muscles without excessive reduction in muscle-blood volume and muscle oxygenation at relatively same but absolutely greater muscle-stretching levels than C. The attenuation in these indices during high-level muscle stretching may be associated with the repetitive muscle stretching of long-term ballet training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Oxygen dependence of respiration in rat spinotrapezius muscle in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Roland N.

    2012-01-01

    The oxygen dependence of respiration in striated muscle in situ was studied by measuring the rate of decrease of interstitial Po2 [oxygen disappearance curve (ODC)] following rapid arrest of blood flow by pneumatic tissue compression, which ejected red blood cells from the muscle vessels and made the ODC independent from oxygen bound to hemoglobin. After the contribution of photo-consumption of oxygen by the method was evaluated and accounted for, the corrected ODCs were converted into the Po2 dependence of oxygen consumption, V̇o2, proportional to the rate of Po2 decrease. Fitting equations obtained from a model of heterogeneous intracellular Po2 were applied to recover the parameters describing respiration in muscle fibers, with a predicted sigmoidal shape for the dependence of V̇o2 on Po2. This curve consists of two regions connected by the point for critical Po2 of the cell (i.e., Po2 at the sarcolemma when the center of the cell becomes anoxic). The critical Po2 was below the Po2 for half-maximal respiratory rate (P50) for the cells. In six muscles at rest, the rate of oxygen consumption was 139 ± 6 nl O2/cm3·s and mitochondrial P50 was k = 10.5 ± 0.8 mmHg. The range of Po2 values inside the muscle fibers was found to be 4–5 mmHg at the critical Po2. The oxygen dependence of respiration can be studied in thin muscles under different experimental conditions. In resting muscle, the critical Po2 was substantially lower than the interstitial Po2 of 53 ± 2 mmHg, a finding that indicates that V̇o2 under this circumstance is independent of oxygen supply and is discordant with the conventional hypothesis of metabolic regulation of the oxygen supply to tissue. PMID:22523254

  9. The influence of flow redistribution on working rat muscle oxygenation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoofd, L.J.C.; Degens, H.

    2009-01-01

    We applied a theoretical model of muscle tissue O2 transport to investigate the effects of flow redistribution on rat soleus muscle oxygenation. The situation chosen was the anaerobic threshold where redistribution of flow is expected to have the largest impact. In the basic situation all

  10. Muscle mitochondrial capacity exceeds maximal oxygen delivery in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Gnaiger, Erich; Calbet, Jose A L

    2011-01-01

    Across a wide range of species and body mass a close matching exists between maximal conductive oxygen delivery and mitochondrial respiratory rate. In this study we investigated in humans how closely in-vivo maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2) max) is matched to state 3 muscle mitochondrial respira...

  11. Toe blood pressure and leg muscle oxygenation with body posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Velderrain, Armando; Cardno, Michael; Mateus, Jaime; Kumar, Ravindra; Schlabs, Thomas; Hargens, Alan R

    2011-05-01

    In 1980 Katkov and Chestukhin measured blood pressures and oxygenation invasively at various body tilt angles at different locations on the body, including the foot. To our knowledge, such measurements have not been performed noninvasively. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to measure toe blood pressure (TBP) and lower limb muscle oxygenation noninvasively at various body tilt angles, and to assess the use of a Finometer for noninvasive TBP measurements. Our noninvasive results are compared with those performed by Katkov and Chestukhin. We hypothesized that: 1) the Finometer provides a noninvasive measurement of TBP at different tilt angles; and 2) muscle oxygenation is highest with 0 and -6 degrees, and decreases with increased head-up tilt (HUT). There were 10 subjects who were exposed to different body tilt angles (-6, 0, 10, 30, 70, and 90 degrees). At each angle we measured TBP noninvasively with a Finometer and muscle tissue oxygenation by near infrared spectroscopy. We found a strong correlation between TBP using the Finometer and TBP predicted by adding the hydrostatic component due to body tilt to the standard arm blood pressure measurement. At 10, 30, 70, and 90 degrees both TBP and tissue oxygenation were significantly different from the 0 degree (supine) level. Oxygenation decreased and TBP increased with higher HUT angles. No differences were observed in TBP or oxygenation between -6 and 0 degree. The Finometer accurately measures TBP noninvasively with body tilt. Also, muscle oxygenation is highest at small HUT angles and decreases with increased HUT.

  12. Microvascular oxygen partial pressure during hyperbaric oxygen in diabetic rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Kohei; Yagishita, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Poole, David C; Kano, Yutaka

    2015-12-15

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) is a major therapeutic treatment for ischemic ulcerations that perforate skin and underlying muscle in diabetic patients. These lesions do not heal effectively, in part, because of the hypoxic microvascular O2 partial pressures (PmvO2 ) resulting from diabetes-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, which alters the dynamic balance between O2 delivery (Q̇o2) and utilization (V̇o2) rates. We tested the hypothesis that HBO in diabetic muscle would exacerbate the hyperoxic PmvO2 dynamics due, in part, to a reduction or slowing of the cardiovascular, sympathetic nervous, and respiratory system responses to acute HBO exposure. Adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly into diabetic (DIA: streptozotocin ip) and healthy (control) groups. A small animal hyperbaric chamber was pressurized with oxygen (100% O2) to 3.0 atmospheres absolute (ATA) at 0.2 ATA/min. Phosphorescence quenching techniques were used to measure PmvO2 in tibialis anterior muscle of anesthetized rats during HBO. Lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rate (RR) were measured electrophysiologically. During the normobaric hyperoxia and HBO, DIA tibialis anterior PmvO2 increased faster (mean response time, CONT 78 ± 8, DIA 55 ± 8 s, P < 0.05) than CONT. Subsequently, PmvO2 remained elevated at similar levels in CONT and DIA muscles until normobaric normoxic recovery where the DIA PmvO2 retained its hyperoxic level longer than CONT. Sympathetic nervous system and cardiac and respiratory responses to HBO were slower in DIA vs. CONT. Specifically the mean response times for RR (CONT: 6 ± 1 s, DIA: 29 ± 4 s, P < 0.05), HR (CONT: 16 ± 1 s, DIA: 45 ± 5 s, P < 0.05), and LSNA (CONT: 140 ± 16 s, DIA: 247 ± 34 s, P < 0.05) were greater following HBO onset in DIA than CONT. HBO treatment increases tibialis anterior muscle PmvO2 more rapidly and for a longer duration in DIA than CONT, but not to a greater level. Whereas respiratory, cardiovascular

  13. In-Situ Resource Utilization: Oxygen Production

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The leading option for extracting oxygen from the Mars atmospheric carbon dioxide is to use a solid oxide electrolyzer, which removes one oxygen atom from the CO2...

  14. Effect of pneumatic tourniquet on muscle oxygen tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavirta, S; Höckerstedt, K; Niinikoski, J

    1978-10-01

    Recent investigations suggest that circulation in a limb can be reduced with a tourniquet to less than 1 per cent of the control limb, or even completely occluded. The development of tissue oxygen tonometry with implanted silastic tubes has provided new possibilities for assessing muscle tissue oxygen tension. In the present work, this method was employed to register the effect of tourniquet blackade on the lower limb muscle PO2 in rabbits. The duration of the tourniquet blockade was 60, 120 and 180 minutes. The baseline muscle PO2 in the tibialis anterior muscle was 22.6 +/- 0.6 mmHg. During the tourniquet blockade the oxygen tension dropped to minimal values between 9.2 +/- 0.5 and 10.7 +/- 0.6 mmHg in these experimental groups, but the tissue microclimate never reached fully anoxic conditions. The rapid response of muscle PO2 to oxygen breathing after release of the blockade suggests that limb microcirculation tolerates tourniquet occlusion well.

  15. Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) will be the first in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration on Mars. Competitively...

  16. Impaired Muscle Oxygenation and Elevated Exercise Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients: Links With Vascular Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipla, Konstantina; Triantafyllou, Areti; Koletsos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Stavros; Sachpekidis, Vasileios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Gkaliagkousi, Eugenia; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Douma, Stella

    2017-08-01

    This study examined in vivo (1) skeletal muscle oxygenation and microvascular function, at rest and during handgrip exercise, and (2) their association with macrovascular function and exercise blood pressure (BP), in newly diagnosed, never-treated patients with hypertension and normotensive individuals. Ninety-one individuals (51 hypertensives and 40 normotensives) underwent office and 24-hour ambulatory BP, arterial stiffness, and central aortic BP assessment, followed by a 5-minute arterial occlusion and a 3-minute submaximal handgrip exercise. Changes in muscle oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin and tissue oxygen saturation were continuously monitored by near-infrared spectroscopy and beat-by-beat BP by Finapres. Hypertensives had higher ( P age and body mass index (BMI) adjusted). When exercising at the same submaximal intensity, hypertensives required a significantly greater ( P hypertension exhibit prominent reductions in in vivo indices of skeletal muscle oxidative capacity, suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction, and blunted muscle microvascular reactivity. These dysfunctions were associated with higher aortic systolic BP and arterial stiffness. Dysregulations in muscle oxygen delivery/utilization and microvascular stiffness, in hypertensive patients, partially contribute to their exaggerated BP during exercise. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. A theoretical model for oxygen transport in skeletal muscle under conditions of high oxygen demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, B J; Secomb, T W

    2001-11-01

    Oxygen transport from capillaries to exercising skeletal muscle is studied by use of a Krogh-type cylinder model. The goal is to predict oxygen consumption under conditions of high demand, on the basis of a consideration of transport processes occurring at the microvascular level. Effects of the decline in oxygen content of blood flowing along capillaries, intravascular resistance to oxygen diffusion, and myoglobin-facilitated diffusion are included. Parameter values are based on human skeletal muscle. The dependence of oxygen consumption on oxygen demand, perfusion, and capillary density are examined. When demand is moderate, the tissue is well oxygenated and consumption is slightly less than demand. When demand is high, capillary oxygen content declines rapidly with axial distance and radial oxygen transport is limited by diffusion resistance within the capillary and the tissue. Under these conditions, much of the tissue is hypoxic, consumption is substantially less than demand, and consumption is strongly dependent on capillary density. Predicted consumption rates are comparable with experimentally observed maximal rates of oxygen consumption.

  18. Ammonia producing engine utilizing oxygen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Jr., William Lanier; Coleman, Gerald Nelson [Petersborough, GB; Robel, Wade James [Peoria, IL

    2008-12-16

    A power system is provided having a power source, a first power source section with a first intake passage and a first exhaust passage, a second power source section with a second intake passage and a second exhaust passage, and an oxygen separator. The second intake passage may be fluidly isolated from the first intake passage.

  19. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison between maximal lengthening and shortening contractions for biceps brachii muscle oxygenation and hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalib, Makii; Lee, Hoseong; Millet, Guillaume Y; Ferrari, Marco; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2010-09-01

    Eccentric contractions (ECC) require lower systemic oxygen (O2) and induce greater symptoms of muscle damage than concentric contractions (CON); however, it is not known if local muscle oxygenation is lower in ECC than CON during and following exercise. This study compared between ECC and CON for changes in biceps brachii muscle oxygenation [tissue oxygenation index (TOI)] and hemodynamics [total hemoglobin volume (tHb)=oxygenated-Hb+deoxygenated-Hb], determined by near-infrared spectroscopy over 10 sets of 6 maximal contractions of the elbow flexors of 10 healthy subjects. This study also compared between ECC and CON for changes in TOI and tHb during a 10-s sustained and 30-repeated maximal isometric contraction (MVC) task measured immediately before and after and 1-3 days following exercise. The torque integral during ECC was greater (P<0.05) than that during CON by approximately 30%, and the decrease in TOI was smaller (P<0.05) by approximately 50% during ECC than CON. Increases in tHb during the relaxation phases were smaller (P<0.05) by approximately 100% for ECC than CON; however, the decreases in tHb during the contraction phases were not significantly different between sessions. These results suggest that ECC utilizes a lower muscle O2 relative to O2 supply compared with CON. Following exercise, greater (P<0.05) decreases in MVC strength and increases in plasma creatine kinase activity and muscle soreness were evident 1-3 days after ECC than CON. Torque integral, TOI, and tHb during the sustained and repeated MVC tasks decreased (P<0.01) only after ECC, suggesting that muscle O2 demand relative to O2 supply during the isometric tasks was decreased after ECC. This could mainly be due to a lower maximal muscle mass activated as a consequence of muscle damage; however, an increase in O2 supply due to microcirculation dysfunction and/or inflammatory vasodilatory responses after ECC is recognized.

  1. Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-26

    injection” protocol for myogenic cell transplantation throughout large volumes of muscles in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy patient: eighteen months follow-up...Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic Conditions Catherine L. Ward, Benjamin T. Corona...investigation was to determine if sodium percarbonate (SPO), an oxygen generating biomaterial, is capable of maintaining resting skeletal muscle

  2. A new method to measure local oxygen consumption in human skeletal muscle during dynamic exercise using near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binzoni, Tiziano; Cooper, Chris E; Wittekind, Anna L; Beneke, Ralph; Elwell, Clare E; Leung, Terence S; Van De Ville, Dimitri

    2010-01-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can readily report on changes in blood volume and oxygenation. However, it has proved more problematic to measure real-time changes in blood flow and oxygen consumption. Here we report the development of a novel method using NIRS to measure local oxygen consumption in human muscle. The method utilizes the blood volume changes induced by the muscle pump during rhythmically contracting exercising skeletal muscle. We found that the saturation of the blood during the contraction phase was lower than that during the relaxation phase. The calculated oxygen drop was then divided by the contraction time to generate a value for the muscle oxygen consumption in the optical region of interest. As a test we measured the muscle oxygen consumption in the human vastus lateralis during exercise on a cycle ergometer by 11 trained male athletes (32 ± 11 years old) at 40% and 110% peak aerobic power. We saw an increase from 13.78 µmol 100 g −1 min −1 to 19.72 µmol 100 g −1 min −1 with the increase in power. The measurements are theoretically exempt from usual NIRS confounders such as myoglobin and adipose tissue and could provide a useful tool for studying human physiology

  3. Effects of Fiber Type and Size on the Heterogeneity of Oxygen Distribution in Exercising Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Mac Gabhann, Feilim; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2012-01-01

    The process of oxygen delivery from capillary to muscle fiber is essential for a tissue with variable oxygen demand, such as skeletal muscle. Oxygen distribution in exercising skeletal muscle is regulated by convective oxygen transport in the blood vessels, oxygen diffusion and consumption in the tissue. Spatial heterogeneities in oxygen supply, such as microvascular architecture and hemodynamic variables, had been observed experimentally and their marked effects on oxygen exchange had been confirmed using mathematical models. In this study, we investigate the effects of heterogeneities in oxygen demand on tissue oxygenation distribution using a multiscale oxygen transport model. Muscles are composed of different ratios of the various fiber types. Each fiber type has characteristic values of several parameters, including fiber size, oxygen consumption, myoglobin concentration, and oxygen diffusivity. Using experimentally measured parameters for different fiber types and applying them to the rat extensor digitorum longus muscle, we evaluated the effects of heterogeneous fiber size and fiber type properties on the oxygen distribution profile. Our simulation results suggest a marked increase in spatial heterogeneity of oxygen due to fiber size distribution in a mixed muscle. Our simulations also suggest that the combined effects of fiber type properties, except size, do not contribute significantly to the tissue oxygen spatial heterogeneity. However, the incorporation of the difference in oxygen consumption rates of different fiber types alone causes higher oxygen heterogeneity compared to control cases with uniform fiber properties. In contrast, incorporating variation in other fiber type-specific properties, such as myoglobin concentration, causes little change in spatial tissue oxygenation profiles. PMID:23028531

  4. Muscle oxygenation of vastus lateralis and medialis muscles during alternating and pulsed current electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldayel, Abdulaziz; Muthalib, Makii; Jubeau, Marc; McGuigan, Michael; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2011-05-01

    This study compared between alternating and pulsed current electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) for muscle oxygenation and blood volume during isometric contractions. Nine healthy men (23-48 years) received alternating current EMS (2500 Hz) modulated at 75 Hz on the knee extensors of one leg, and pulsed current EMS (75 Hz) for the other leg separated by 2 weeks in a randomised, counter-balanced order. Pulse duration (400 μs), on-off ratio (5-15 s) and other stimulation parameters were matched between conditions and 30 isometric contractions were induced at the knee joint angle of 100° (0° full extension). Changes in tissue oxygenation index (∆TOI) and total hemoglobin volume (∆tHb) of vastus lateralis and medialis muscles over 30 contractions were assessed by a near-infrared spectroscopy, and were compared between conditions by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Peak torque produced during EMS increased over 30 contractions in response to the increase in the stimulation intensity for pulsed current, but not for the alternating current EMS. The torque during each isometric contraction was less stable in alternating than pulsed current EMS. The changes in ∆TOI amplitude during relaxation phases and ∆tHb amplitude were not significantly different between conditions. However, the decreases in ∆TOI amplitude during contraction phases from baseline were significantly (P < 0.05) greater for the pulsed current than alternating current from the 18th contraction (-15.6 ± 2.3 vs. -8.9 ± 1.8%) to 30th contraction (-10.7 ± 1.8 vs. -4.8 ± 1.5%). These results suggest that the muscles were less activated in the alternating current EMS when compared with the pulsed current EMS.

  5. Muscle oxygen kinetics at onset of intense dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, J; Krustrup, P; González-Alonso, J

    2000-01-01

    The present study examined the onset and the rate of rise of muscle oxidation during intense exercise in humans and whether oxygen availability limits muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise. Six subjects performed 3 min of intense one-legged knee-extensor exercise [65.3 +/-...

  6. Forearm muscle oxygenation during sustained isometric contractions in rock climbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kodejška

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bouldering and lead climbing are divergent disciplines of the sport of rock climbing. Bouldering moves are short and powerful, whilst sport climbing is longer and require a greater degree of endurance. Aim. The aim of this study was to compare forearm muscle oxygenation during sustained isometric contraction between lead climbers (LC and boulderers (BO. Methods. Eight BO and twelve LC completed maximal finger flexor strength test and sustained contractions to exhaustion at 60% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC. Differences between BO and LC in maximal strength, time to exhaustion, force time integral (FTI, and tissue oxygenation (SmO2 were assessed by t-test for independent samples. Results. LC showed significantly lower level of average tissue oxygenation (BO 38.9% SmO2, s = 7.4; LC 28.7% SmO2, s = 7.1 and maximal tissue deoxygenation (BO 25.6% SmO2, s = 8.2; LC 13.5% SmO2, s = 8.5. LC demonstrated significantly lower finger flexor strength (519 N, s = 72 than BO (621 N, s = 142. LC sustained a longer time of contraction (not significantly (BO 52.2 s, s = 11.5; LC 60.6 s, s = 13 and achieved a similar value of FTI (BO 17421 Ns, s = 4291; LO 17476 Ns, s = 5036 in the endurance test. Conclusions. The results showed lower deoxygenation during sustained contraction in BO than LC despite similar FTI, indicating different local metabolic pathways in both groups.

  7. A novel dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Yan, Jie; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Li, Hongyi; Li, Changji

    2013-01-01

    With the development of methods and skills of minimally invasive surgeries, equipments for doctors' training and practicing are in high demands. Especially for the cardiovascular surgeries, operators are requested to be familiar with the surgical environment of a beating heart. In this paper, we present a new dynamic cardiac simulator utilizing pneumatic artificial muscle to realize heartbeat. It's an artificial left ventricular of which the inner chamber is made of thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) with an anatomical structure of the real human heart. It is covered by another layer of material forming the artificial muscle which actuates the systole and diastole uniformly and omnidirectionally as the cardiac muscle does. Preliminary experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of the simulator. The results indicated that the pressure at the terminal of the aorta could be controlled within the range of normal human systolic pressure, which quantitatively validated the new actuating mode of the heart-beating is effective.

  8. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis...... to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. ....... that utilization of glycogen with different subcellular localizations during exhaustive arm and leg exercise differs and examined the influence of fibre type and carbohydrate availability on its subsequent resynthesis. When 10 elite endurance athletes (22 ± 1 years, VO2 max = 68 ± 5 ml kg-1 min-1, mean ± SD...

  9. Noninvasive optical quantification of absolute blood flow, blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate in exercising skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurley, Katelyn; Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates a method using novel hybrid diffuse optical spectroscopies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS)] to obtain continuous, noninvasive measurement of absolute blood flow (BF), blood oxygenation, and oxygen consumption rate (\\Vdot O2) in exercising skeletal muscle. Healthy subjects (n=9) performed a handgrip exercise to increase BF and \\Vdot O2 in forearm flexor muscles, while a hybrid optical probe on the skin surface directly monitored oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations ([HbO2], [Hb], and THC), tissue oxygen saturation (StO2), relative BF (rBF), and relative oxygen consumption rate (r\\Vdot O2). The rBF and r\\Vdot O2 signals were calibrated with absolute baseline BF and \\Vdot O2 obtained through venous and arterial occlusions, respectively. Known problems with muscle-fiber motion artifacts in optical measurements during exercise were mitigated using a novel gating algorithm that determined muscle contraction status based on control signals from a dynamometer. Results were consistent with previous findings in the literature. This study supports the application of NIRS/DCS technology to quantitatively evaluate hemodynamic and metabolic parameters in exercising skeletal muscle and holds promise for improving diagnosis and treatment evaluation for patients suffering from diseases affecting skeletal muscle and advancing fundamental understanding of muscle and exercise physiology.

  10. Oxygen mediates vascular smooth muscle relaxation in hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Dada

    Full Text Available The activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC by nitric oxide (NO and other ligands has been extensively investigated for many years. In the present study we considered the effect of molecular oxygen (O2 on sGC both as a direct ligand and its affect on other ligands by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP production, as an index of activity, as well as investigating smooth muscle relaxation under hypoxic conditions. Our isolated enzyme studies confirm the function of sGC is impaired under hypoxic conditions and produces cGMP in the presence of O2, importantly in the absence of NO. We also show that while O2 could partially affect the magnitude of sGC stimulation by NO when the latter was present in excess, activation by the NO independent, haem-dependent sGC stimulator 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl-1-benzylindazole (YC-1 was unaffected. Our in vitro investigation of smooth muscle relaxation confirmed that O2 alone in the form of a buffer bolus (equilibrated at 95% O2/5% CO2 had the ability to dilate vessels under hypoxic conditions and that this was dependent upon sGC and independent of eNOS. Our studies confirm that O2 can be a direct and important mediator of vasodilation through an increase in cGMP production. In the wider context, these observations are key to understanding the relative roles of O2 versus NO-induced sGC activation.

  11. Relationship between muscle oxygenation by NIRS and blood lactate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guodong [School of Physical Education, Jianghan University, Hubei Wuhan 430056 (China); Mao Zongzhen; Ye Yanjie; Lv Kunru, E-mail: xguodong@wipe.edu.cn [School of Health Sciences, Wuhan Institute of Physical Education, Hubei Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of muscle oxygenation in term of oxy-hemoglobin concentration change ({Delta}HbO{sub 2}) by NIRS and blood lactate (BLA) in local skeletal muscle and evaluate the capability of NIRS in the research of exercise physiology Twenty-three athlete in the national fin-swimming team took the increasing load training on the power bicycle while their {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA were simultaneously recorded. The initial powers used in the training were set as 100 w for males and 40 w for females. During the experiment, the power kept constant for 3 min before each abrupt increment of 30 w until the limit of the athlete's capability. Statistical analysis and data visualization were performed. Following the increasing load training, {Delta}HbO{sub 2} step-likely increased in the phase of aerobic metabolism but linearly decreased in the phase of anaerobic metabolism. The variation tendency of BLA was the same as {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and the concurrency of crucial turning points between {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA was revealed. This relationship between {Delta}HbO{sub 2} and BLA presented in the increasing load training suggested that {Delta}HbO{sub 2} might be capable for taking the place of the invasively measured parameter BLA. Considering that {Delta}HbO{sub 2} can be noninvasively measured by NIRS, {Delta}HbO{sub 2} has the potential in the evaluation of athletes' physiological function and training effect on the athletes and accordingly NIRS can be well used in this field.

  12. Relationship between muscle oxygenation by NIRS and blood lactate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Guodong; Mao Zongzhen; Ye Yanjie; Lv Kunru

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship of muscle oxygenation in term of oxy-hemoglobin concentration change (ΔHbO 2 ) by NIRS and blood lactate (BLA) in local skeletal muscle and evaluate the capability of NIRS in the research of exercise physiology Twenty-three athlete in the national fin-swimming team took the increasing load training on the power bicycle while their ΔHbO 2 and BLA were simultaneously recorded. The initial powers used in the training were set as 100 w for males and 40 w for females. During the experiment, the power kept constant for 3 min before each abrupt increment of 30 w until the limit of the athlete's capability. Statistical analysis and data visualization were performed. Following the increasing load training, ΔHbO 2 step-likely increased in the phase of aerobic metabolism but linearly decreased in the phase of anaerobic metabolism. The variation tendency of BLA was the same as ΔHbO 2 and the concurrency of crucial turning points between ΔHbO 2 and BLA was revealed. This relationship between ΔHbO 2 and BLA presented in the increasing load training suggested that ΔHbO 2 might be capable for taking the place of the invasively measured parameter BLA. Considering that ΔHbO 2 can be noninvasively measured by NIRS, ΔHbO 2 has the potential in the evaluation of athletes' physiological function and training effect on the athletes and accordingly NIRS can be well used in this field.

  13. Influence of glutamate-evoked pain and sustained elevated muscle activity on blood oxygenation in the human masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Arima, Taro; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Svensson, Peter; Castrillon, Eduardo

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of glutamate-evoked masseter muscle pain on intramuscular oxygenation during rest and sustained elevated muscle activity (SEMA). Seventeen healthy individuals participated in two sessions in which they were injected with glutamate and saline in random order. Each session was divided into three, 10-min periods. During the first (period 1) and the last (period 3) 10-min periods, participants performed five intercalated 1-min bouts of masseter SEMA with 1-min periods of 'rest'. At onset of the second 10-min period, glutamate (0.5 ml, 1 M; Ajinomoto, Tokyo, Japan) or isotonic saline (0.5 ml; 0.9%) was injected into the masseter muscle and the participants kept the muscle relaxed in a resting position for 10 min (period 2). The hemodynamic characteristics of the masseter muscle were recorded simultaneously during the experiment by a laser blood-oxygenation monitor. The results demonstrated that glutamate injections caused significant levels of self-reported pain in the masseter muscle; however, this nociceptive input did not have robust effects on intramuscular oxygenation during rest or SEMA tasks. Interestingly, these findings suggest an uncoupling between acute nociceptive activity and hemodynamic parameters in both resting and low-level active jaw muscles. Further studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological significance of blood-flow changes for persistent jaw-muscle pain conditions. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  14. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P ... +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset...

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen reduces edema and necrosis of skeletal muscle in compartment syndromes associated with hemorrhagic hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skyhar, M.J.; Hargens, A.R.; Strauss, M.B.; Gershuni, D.H.; Hart, G.B.; Akeson, W.H.

    1986-01-01

    This study examined the effect of exposures to hyperbaric oxygen on the development of the edema and necrosis of muscle that are associated with compartment syndromes that are complicated by hemorrhagic hypotension. A compartment syndrome (twenty millimeters of mercury for six hours) was induced by infusion of autologous plasma in the anterolateral compartment of the left hind limb of seven anesthetized dogs while the mean arterial blood pressure was maintained at sixty-five millimeters of mercury after 30 per cent loss of blood volume. These dogs were treated with hyperbaric oxygen (two atmospheres of pure oxygen) and were compared with six dogs that had an identical compartment syndrome and hypotensive condition but were not exposed to hyperbaric oxygen. Forty-eight hours later, edema was quantified by measuring the weights of the muscles (the pressurized muscle compared with the contralateral muscle), and necrosis of muscle was evaluated by measuring the uptake of technetium-99m stannous pyrophosphate. The ratio for edema was significantly (p = 0.01) greater in dogs that had not been exposed to hyperbaric oxygen (1.15 +/- 0.01) than in the dogs that had been treated with hyperbaric oxygen (1.01 +/- 0.03), and the ratio for necrosis of muscle was also significantly (p = 0.04) greater in dogs that had not had hyperbaric oxygen (1.96 +/- 0.41) than in those that had been treated with hyperbaric oxygen (1.05 +/- 0.11). Comparisons were also made with the muscles of four normal control dogs and separately with the muscles of six normotensive dogs that had an identical compartment syndrome and normal blood pressure and were not treated with hyperbaric oxygen

  16. Noninvasive detection of change in skeletal muscle oxygenation during incremental exercise with near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Luo, Qingming; Xu, Guodong; Li, Pengcheng

    2003-12-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been developed as a non-invasive method to assess O2 delivery, O2 consumption and blood flow, in diverse local muscle groups at rest and during exercise. The aim of this study was to investigate local O2 consumption in exercising muscle by use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Ten elite athletes of different sport items were tested in rest and during step incremental load exercise. Local variations of quadriceps muscles were investigated with our wireless NIRS blood oxygen monitor system. The results show that the changes of blood oxygen relate on the sport items, type of muscle, kinetic capacity et al. These results indicate that NIRS is a potential useful tool to detect local muscle oxygenation and blood flow profiles; therefore it might be easily applied for evaluating the effect of athletes training.

  17. Reduced muscle activation during exercise related to brain oxygenation and metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nielsen, Jannie; Overgaard, M

    2010-01-01

    Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate to th...... indicating that reduced cerebral oxygenation may play a role in the development of central fatigue and may be an exercise capacity limiting factor.......Maximal exercise may be limited by central fatigue defined as an inability of the central nervous system to fully recruit the involved muscles. This study evaluated whether a reduction in the cerebral oxygen-to-carbohydrate index (OCI) and in the cerebral mitochondrial oxygen tension relate...... of perceived exertion (RPE), arm maximal voluntary force (MVC), and voluntary activation of elbow flexor muscles assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Low intensity exercise did not produce any indication of central fatigue or marked cerebral metabolic deviations. Exercise in hypoxia (0.10) reduced...

  18. Blood pressure and calf muscle oxygen extraction during plantar flexion exercise in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, J Carter; Miller, Amanda J; Aziz, Faisal; Radtka, John F; Proctor, David N; Leuenberger, Urs A; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Muller, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic vascular disease that affects 200 million people worldwide. Although PAD primarily affects large arteries, it is also associated with microvascular dysfunction, an exaggerated blood pressure (BP) response to exercise, and high cardiovascular mortality. We hypothesized that fatiguing plantar flexion exercise that evokes claudication elicits a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation (SmO 2 ) and a higher rise in BP in PAD compared with age-matched healthy subjects, but low-intensity steady-state plantar flexion elicits similar responses between groups. In the first experiment, eight patients with PAD and eight healthy controls performed fatiguing plantar flexion exercise (from 0.5 to 7 kg for up to 14 min). In the second experiment, seven patients with PAD and seven healthy controls performed low-intensity plantar flexion exercise (2.0 kg for 14 min). BP, heart rate (HR), and SmO 2 were measured continuously using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). SmO 2 is the ratio of oxygenated hemoglobin to total hemoglobin, expressed as a percent. At fatigue, patients with PAD had a greater increase in mean arterial BP (18 ± 2 vs. vs. 10 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.029) and HR (14 ± 2 vs. 6 ± 2 beats/min, P = 0.033) and a greater reduction in SmO 2 (-54 ± 10 vs. -12 ± 4%, P = 0.001). However, both groups had similar physiological responses to low-intensity, nonpainful plantar flexion exercise. These data suggest that patients with PAD have altered oxygen uptake and/or utilization during fatiguing exercise coincident with an augmented BP response. NEW & NOTEWORTHY In this laboratory study, patients with peripheral artery disease performed plantar flexion exercise in the supine posture until symptoms of claudication occurred. Relative to age- and sex-matched healthy subjects we found that patients had a higher blood pressure response, a higher heart rate response, and a greater reduction in skeletal muscle oxygenation as

  19. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, Thomas; Lanner, Johanna T

    2016-12-01

    Reduced oxygen (O 2 ) levels (hypoxia) are present during embryogenesis and exposure to altitude and in pathologic conditions. During embryogenesis, myogenic progenitor cells reside in a hypoxic microenvironment, which may regulate their activity. Satellite cells are myogenic progenitor cells localized in a local environment, suggesting that the O 2 level could affect their activity during muscle regeneration. In this review, we present the idea that O 2 levels regulate myogenesis and muscle regeneration, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying myogenesis and muscle regeneration in hypoxia and depict therapeutic strategies using changes in O 2 levels to promote muscle regeneration. Severe hypoxia (≤1% O 2 ) appears detrimental for myogenic differentiation in vitro, whereas a 3-6% O 2 level could promote myogenesis. Hypoxia impairs the regenerative capacity of injured muscles. Although it remains to be explored, hypoxia may contribute to the muscle damage observed in patients with pathologies associated with hypoxia (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and peripheral arterial disease). Hypoxia affects satellite cell activity and myogenesis through mechanisms dependent and independent of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α. Finally, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and transplantation of hypoxia-conditioned myoblasts are beneficial procedures to enhance muscle regeneration in animals. These therapies may be clinically relevant to treatment of patients with severe muscle damage.-Chaillou, T. Lanner, J. T. Regulation of myogenesis and skeletal muscle regeneration: effects of oxygen levels on satellite cell activity. © FASEB.

  20. Optimization measurement of muscle oxygen saturation under isometric studies using FNIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, A. A. A.; Laili, M. H.; Salikin, M. S.; Rusop, M.

    2018-05-01

    Development of functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) technologies has advanced quantification signal using multiple wavelength and detector to investigate hemodynamic response in human muscle. These non-invasive technologies have been widely used to solve the propagation of light inside the tissues including the absorption, scattering coefficient and to quantify the oxygenation level of haemoglobin and myoglobin in human muscle. The goal of this paper is to optimize the measurement of muscle oxygen saturation during isometric exercise using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). The experiment was carried out on 15 sedentary healthy male volunteers. All volunteers are required to perform an isometric exercise at three assessment of muscular fatigue's level on flexor digitalis (FDS) muscle in the human forearm using fNIRS. The slopes of the signals have been highlighted to evaluate the muscle oxygen saturation of regional muscle fatigue. As a result, oxygen saturation slope from 10% exercise showed steeper than the first assessment at 30%-50% of fatigues level. The hemodynamic signal response showed significant value (p=0.04) at all three assessment of muscular fatigue's level which produce a p-value (p<0.05) measured by fNIRS. Thus, this highlighted parameter could be used to estimate fatigue's level of human and could open other possibilities to study muscle performance diagnosis.

  1. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels H; Relu, Mihai U; Hellsten, Ylva; Söderlund, Karin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-12-15

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake (VO2 ) and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P fibres, respectively. From 127 s of exercise, muscle VO2 was higher (P muscle VO2 response was slower (P muscle homogenate CP was lowered (P muscle lactate production was similar in CUR and CON (37.8 +/- 4.1 versus 35.2 +/- 6.2 mmol). Estimated total muscle ATP turnover was 19% higher (P fibres are less efficient than ST fibres in vivo at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle VO2 kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation.

  2. Oxygenation decreases elastin secretion from rat ductus arteriosus smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Shoji; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2015-08-01

    The ductus arteriosus (DA), a fetal arterial connection between the main pulmonary artery and the descending aorta, normally closes immediately after birth. The oxygen concentration in the blood rises after birth, and in the DA this increase in oxygen concentration causes functional closure, which is induced by smooth muscle contraction. Previous studies have demonstrated that hypoxia and/or oxygenation affect vascular remodeling of various vessels. Therefore, we hypothesized that the rise in oxygen concentration would affect the vascular structure of the DA due to production of proteins secreted from DA smooth muscle cells (SMC). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was used to comprehensively investigate the secreted proteins in the supernatant of rat DA SMC harvested under hypoxic conditions (1% oxygen) or under normoxic conditions (21% oxygen). We found that the rise in oxygen concentration reduced the secretion of elastin from DA SMC. On reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, the expression of elastin mRNA was not significantly changed in DA SMC from hypoxic to normoxic conditions. Given that elastin forms internal elastic lamina and elastic fibers in the vascular muscle layers, and that a rise in oxygen concentration reduced the secretion of elastin, this suggests that the rise in blood oxygen concentration after birth reduces the secretion of elastin, and therefore may play a role in DA structural remodeling after birth. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  3. EFFECT OF MODERATE ALTITUDE ON PERIPHERAL MUSCLE OXYGENATION DURING LEG RESISTANCE EXERCISE IN YOUNG MALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Training at moderate altitude (~1800m is often used by athletes to stimulate muscle hypoxia. However, limited date is available on peripheral muscle oxidative metabolism at this altitude (1800AL. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute exposure to 1800AL alters muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis muscle during resistance exercise. Twenty young active male subjects (aged 16 - 21 yr performed up to 50 repetitions of the parallel squat at 1800AL and near sea level (SL. They performed the exercise protocol within 3 h after arrival at 1800 AL. During the exercise, the changes in oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle, arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2, and heart rate were measured using near infrared continuous wave spectroscopy (NIRcws and pulse oximetry, respectively. Changes in OxyHb were expressed by Deff defined as the relative index of the maximum change ratio (% from the resting level. OxyHb in the vastus lateralis muscle decreased dramatically from the resting level immediately after the start of exercise at both altitudes. The Deff during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (60.4 ± 6.2 % than at near SL (74.4 ± 7.6 %. SpO2 during exercise was significantly (p < 0.001 lower at 1800AL (92.0 ± 1.7 % than at near SL (96.7 ± 1.2 %. Differences (SL - 1800AL in Deff during exercise correlated fairly strongly with differences in SpO2 during exercise (r = 0.660. These results suggested that acute exposure to moderate altitude caused a more dramatical decrease in peripheral muscle oxygenation during leg resistance exercise. It is salient to note, therefore , that peripheral muscle oxygenation status at moderate altitude could be evaluated using NIRcws and that moderate altitudes might be effectively used to apply hypoxic stress on peripheral muscles.

  4. Partial neuromuscular blockade in humans enhances muscle blood flow during exercise independently of muscle oxygen uptake and acetylcholine receptor blockade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Krustrup, Peter; Iaia, F Marcello

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one-legged k......This study examined the role of acetylcholine for skeletal muscle blood flow during exercise by use of the competitive neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium in combination with the acetylcholine receptor blocker glycopyrrone. Nine healthy male subjects performed a 10-min bout of one...... conductance during exercise, events that are not associated with either acetylcholine or an increased oxygen demand. The results do not support an essential role for acetylcholine, released form the neuromuscular junction, in exercise hyperaemia or for the enhanced blood flow during neuromuscular blockade....... The enhanced exercise hyperemia during partial neuromuscular blockade may be related to a greater recruitment of fast-twitch muscle fibres. Key words: blood flow, neuromuscular blockade, exercise, skeletal muscle....

  5. Measurement of oxygen consumption during muscle flaccidity exercise by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, K.; Fukawa, Y.

    2013-03-01

    Quantitative measurement oxygen consumption in the muscles is important to evaluate the effect of the exercise. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive method for measuring muscle oxygenation. However, measurement results are affected by blood volume change due to changes in the blood pressure. In order to evaluate changes in blood volume and to improve measurement accuracy, we proposed a calculation method of three-wavelength measurement with considering the scattering factor and the measurement with monitoring blood flow for measuring the temporal change of the oxygen concentration more precisely. We applied three-wavelength light source (680nm, 808nm and 830nm) for the continued wave measurement. Two detectors (targeted detector and the reference detector) were placed near the target muscle and apart from it. We measured the blood flow by controlling the intravascular pressure and the oxygen consumption with the handgrip exercise in the forearm. The measured results show that the scattering factor contains the artifact at the surface and the blood flow in the artery and the vein in the same phase. The artifact and the blood flow in the same phase are reduced from the oxygenated and the deoxygenated hemoglobin densities. Thus our proposed method is effective for reducing the influence of the artifact and the blood flow in the same phase from the oxygen consumption measurement. Further, it is shown that the oxygen consumption is measured more accurately by subtracting the blood flow measured by the reference detector.

  6. Oxygen diffusion coefficient in isolated chicken red and white skeletal muscle fibers in ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, V I; Belichenko, V M; Shoshenko, C A

    2000-09-01

    Oxygen diffusion from medium to cultured isolated muscle fibers from red gastrocnemius muscle (deep part) (RGM) and white pectoralis muscle (WPM) of embryonic and postnatal chickens (about 6 months) was explored. The intracellular effective O(2) diffusion coefficient (D(i)) in muscle fiber was calculated from a model of a cylindrical fiber with a uniform distribution of an oxygen sink based on these experimentally measured parameters: critical tension of O(2) (PO(2)) on the surface of a fiber, specific rate of O(2) consumption by a weight unit of muscle fibers (;VO(2)), and average diameter of muscle fibers. The results document the rapid hypertrophic growth of RGM fibers when compared to WPM fibers in the second half of the embryonic period and the higher values of;VO(2) and critical PO(2) during the ontogenetic period under study. The oxygen D(i) in RGM fibers of embryos and 1-day chickens was two to three times higher than observed for WPM fibers. For senior chickens, the oxygen D(i) value in RGM and WPM fibers does not differ. The D(i) of O(2) in both RGM and WPM fibers increased from 1.4-2.7 x 10(-8) to 90-95 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s with an ontogenetic increase in fiber diameter from 7. 5 to 67.0 microm. At all stages the oxygen D(i) values in RGM and WPM fibers are significantly lower than the O(2) diffusion coefficient in water: for 11-day embryos they are 889 and 1714 times lower and for adult individuals 25 and 27 times lower, respectively. Why oxygen D(i) values in RGM and WPM fibers are so low and why they are gradually increasing during the course of hypertrophic ontogenetic growth are still unclear. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  7. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared wi...

  8. Carbohydrate supercompensation and muscle glycogen utilization during exhaustive running in highly trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K; Pedersen, P K; Rose, P

    1990-01-01

    regimen (Norm), the other after a diet and training programme intended to increase muscle glycogen levels (Carb). Muscle glycogen concentration in the gastrocnemius muscle increased by 25% (P less than 0.05) from 581 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 50 to 722 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 34 after Carb. Running time...... (0.92, SEM 0.01 vs 0.89, SEM 0.01; P less than 0.05). Since muscle glycogen utilization was identical in the two tests, the indication of higher utilization of total carbohydrate appears to be related to a higher utilization of liver glycogen. We have concluded that glycogen depletion...

  9. Effect of cycling on oxygenation of relaxed neck/shoulder muscles in women with and without chronic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed

    2010-01-01

    Work-related neck/shoulder muscle pain has been associated with increased anaerobic muscle metabolism. Thus, interventions to enhance oxygenation of painful muscles seem relevant. While cycling with relaxed shoulders has been shown to result in acute neck/shoulder muscle pain reduction, the effect...... on tissue oxygenation remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate tissue oxygenation of the passive trapezius muscle during and after cycling in female workers with (MYA) and without (CON) trapezius myalgia. Eligible participants (n = 17 MYA, n = 8 CON) performed 20 min sub...... increases oxygenation of resting neck/shoulder muscles in women with and without trapezius myalgia, indicating acute positive effects of either neural or humoral factors on vascular beds of distant relaxed muscles. Although this beneficial response was observed in both groups, the post-exercise response...

  10. Asymmetry of quadriceps muscle oxygenation during elite short-track speed skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesford, Catherine Mary; Laing, Stewart J; Cardinale, Marco; Cooper, Chris E

    2012-03-01

    It has been suggested that, because of the low sitting position in short-track speed skating, muscle blood flow is restricted, leading to decreases in tissue oxygenation. Therefore, wearable wireless-enabled near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology was used to monitor changes in quadriceps muscle blood volume and oxygenation during a 500-m race simulation in short-track speed skaters. Six elite skaters, all of Olympic standard (age = 23 ± 1.8 yr, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 80.1 ± 5.7 kg, midthigh skinfold thickness = 7 ± 2 mm), were studied. Subjects completed a 500-m race simulation time trial (TT). Whole-body oxygen consumption was simultaneously measured with muscle oxygenation in right and left vastus lateralis as measured by NIRS. Mean time for race completion was 44.8 ± 0.4 s. VO2 peaked 20 s into the race. In contrast, muscle tissue oxygen saturation (TSI%) decreased and plateaued after 8 s. Linear regression analysis showed that right leg TSI% remained constant throughout the rest of the TT (slope value = 0.01), whereas left leg TSI% increased steadily (slope value = 0.16), leading to a significant asymmetry (P skating has implications for training and performance.

  11. Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krustrup, Peter; Secher, Niels; Relu, Mihai U.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake (VO2 ) and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W...... without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P ... at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle VO2 kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation....

  12. Contribution of Respiratory Muscle Oxygen Consumption to Breathing Limitation and Cyspnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Casan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available During exercise, the sustainable activity of large muscle groups is limited by oxygen delivery. The purpose of this study was to see whether the oxygen consumption of the respiratory muscles reaches a similar critical value under maximal resistive loading and hyperventilation. A secondary objective was to see whether dyspnea (estimated discomfort experienced with breathing using the Borg 0-10 scale and the oxygen consumption of the respiratory muscles are closely related across conditions. This would be expected if intramuscular sensory nerve fibres stimulated as a consequence of metabolic events contributed to this sensation. In six normal subjects the respiratory muscles were progressively activated by the addition of incremental inspiratory resistive loads to a maximum of 300 cm H20×s/L (SD=66.4, and incremental dead space to a maximum of 2638 mL (SD=452, associated with an increase in ventilation to 75.1 L/min (SD=29.79. Each increment was maintained for 5 mins to allow the measurement of oxygen uptake in a steady state. During resistive loading total oxygen consumption increased from 239 mL/min (SD=38.2 to 299 mL/min (SD=52.3 and dyspnea increased to "very severe" (Borg scale 7.5, SD=1.55. During dead space loading total oxygen consumption increased from 270 mL/min (SD=20.2 to 426 mL/min (SD=81.9 and dyspnea increased to "very severe" (7.1, SD=0.66. Oxygen cost of inspiratory muscle power was 25 mL/watt (95% confidence limits 16.7 to 34.3 with dead space loading and 91 mL/watt (95% confidence limits 54 to 128 with resistive loading. Oxygen consumption did not reach a critical common value in the two types of loading, 60 mL/min (SD 22.3 during maximal resistive loading and 156 mL/min (SD 82.4 during maximal dead space loading (P<0.05. Physiological factors limiting the respiratory muscles are not uniquely related to oxygen consumption and appear to be expressed through the activation of sensory structures, perceptually manifested as

  13. No impaired hemoglobin oxygenation in forearm muscles of patients with chronic CRPS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnekreef, Jaap J J; Oosterhof, Jan; Wolff, André P; Crul, Ben J P; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H G; Oostendorp, Rob A B

    2009-01-01

    Physiotherapy is considered an important treatment option in patients with upper limb complex regional pain syndrome type-1 (CRPS-1). In case of chronic CRPS-1, exercise therapy of the affected limb forms an important part of the physiotherapeutic program. We investigated whether muscle loading in chronic CRPS-1 patients is associated with impairments in muscle circulation of the forearm of the affected limb. Thirty patients with chronic CRPS-1 unilaterally affecting their upper limbs, and 30 age-matched and sex-matched control participants were included in this study. Local muscle blood flow and hemoglobin oxygenation were measured by near infrared spectroscopy within the muscles of the forearm at rest, after 1-minute isometric handgrip exercises, and after arterial occlusion. Main outcome parameters were: local muscle blood flow, O2 consumption (mVO2), and postischemic reoxygenation (ReOx). We found no differences in baseline muscle blood flow, mVO2, and ReOx between the affected CRPS-1, unaffected CRPS-1, and control arms. After exercise, mVO2 of the affected CRPS-1 arms was not different from the clinically unaffected CRPS-1 arms. Furthermore, in comparison with the control arms, unaffected CRPS-1 arms showed no difference in mVO2 or ReOx. Muscle loading does not seems to be related to impairments in muscle oxygen uptake in forearm muscles of upper limbs affected by chronic CRPS-1. Our results suggest that exercise therapy can be safely used in physiotherapeutic training programs for chronic CRPS-1 of the upper limb.

  14. Inspiratory Muscle Training and Arterial Blood Oxygen Saturation in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhshandeh Bavarsad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the problems of the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is the weakness of the respiratory muscles that causes oxygen desaturation at rest and activity and decreases exercise tolerance. Objectives This study aimed to investigate the effect of inspiratory muscle training on arterial oxygen saturation (SPO2. Patients and Methods Forty patients with mild to very severe COPD were recruited for this study, which is a randomized control trail. The patients were randomized to IMT (inspiratory muscle training and control group. Training was performed with Respivol (a kind of inspiratory muscle trainer for 8 weeks (15 min/d for 6 d/week. SPSS software version 16 was used to analyze the data by performing independent t test, paired t test, and Fisher exact test. Results Results showed that, after 8 weeks of inspiratory muscle training, there was a little increase (but not statistically significant improvement in SPO2 (from 92.6 ± 8.71 % to 95.13 ± 7.08 %, with P = 0.06, whereas it remained unchanged in the control group (from 96.0 ± 3.46 % to 96.4 ± 3.35 % with P = 0.51. No statistically significant difference was seen between the two groups (P > 0.05. Conclusions Although inspiratory muscles training can prevent desaturation, which is caused by activity, it fails to improve it.

  15. Low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Saltin, Bengt

    2010-01-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of i....... Additionally, prostanoids and/or NO appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise. Key words: Oxygen delivery, oxygen extraction, nitric oxide, prostanoids.......The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5 minute one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24+/-1 (+/-S.D.) W) without (CON) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion...... of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS; L-NMMA) and cyclooxygenase (COX; indomethacin) in order to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and prostanoids, respectively.. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50 % lower (P

  16. Influence of erythrocyte oxygenation and intravascular ATP on resting and exercising skeletal muscle blood flow in humans with mitochondrial myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Tina D; Vissing, John; González-Alonso, José

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen (O(2)) extraction is impaired in exercising skeletal muscle of humans with mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), but the muscle hemodynamic response to exercise has never been directly investigated. This study sought to examine the extent to which human skeletal muscle perfusion can incr...

  17. Skeletal muscle oxygen pressure fields in artificially ventilated, critically ill patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, N.; Jorfeldt, L.; Lewis, D.H.; Oedman, S.

    1980-01-01

    The MDO (Mehrdraht Dostmund Oberflaeche) oxygen electrode was used in a study of skeletal muscle oxygen pressure fields, presented as histograms, in critically ill patients artificially ventilated with gas mixtures of different oxygen concentrations. The histograms were compared with forearm blood flow measurements performed with strain gauge plethysmography. Local blood flow and permeability-surface area product (PS) were also studied by the simultaneous clearances of 133 xenon and 51 Cr-EDTA. The histogram distribution type was normal, i.e. approximately Gaussian, at arterial oxygen pressure levels between 10 and 18 kPa. At arterial oxygen pressures outside this range the histogram distribution types were abnormal, i.e. they showed a non-symmetrical distribution of oxygen pressure values, but their mean was approximately the same as in the normal histogram. However, there were significantly higher tissue oxygen pressure mean values in the patients (3.43 kPa) than in a group of healthy human volunteers (2.25 kPa). Mean forearm blood flow and the clearances of 133 xenon and 51 Cr-EDTA showed marked variations during the measurements both intraindividually and interindividually. Mean forearm blood flow and mean clearances of 133 xenon showed opposite trends compared with arterial oxygen pressures. Mean clearances of 51 Cr-EDTA and mean PS showed minor variations at the different arterial oxygen pressure levels. (author)

  18. CT assessment of muscle hypertrophy utilizing automatic contouring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, L.S.; Block, J.; Steiger, P.W.; Ellis, W.; Morris, J.; Genant, H.K.

    1986-01-01

    Quantitative CT was one method used to assess changes in density and area of thigh muscles in paraplegics before and after aerobic leg training. Muscle density and area were measured from the CT image by an automatic contouring algorithm. In the first three patients, total muscle density increased from 11.5% to 18.3% and area increased from 18.3% to 31.3%. In one patient who did not comply with the exercise regimen, only a 10% increase in muscle density and area was detected. This CT program is valuable in the assessment of composition and alteration of limb musculature in the treatment and follow-up of muscular disorders

  19. Brain and muscle oxygenation monitoring using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) during all-night sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxing; Khatami, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    The hemodynamic changes during natural human sleep are still not well understood. NIRS is ideally suited for monitoring the hemodynamic changes during sleep due to the properties of local measurement, totally safe application and good tolerance to motion. Several studies have been conducted using NIRS in both normal subjects and patients with various sleep disorders during sleep to characterize the hemodynamic changing patterns during different sleep stages and during different symptoms such as obstructive apneas. Here we assessed brain and muscle oxygenation changes in 7 healthy adults during all-night sleep with combined polysomnography measurement to test the notion if hemodynamic changes in sleep are indeed brain specific. We found that muscle and brain showed similar hemodynamic changes during sleep initiation. A decrease in HbO2 and tissue oxygenation index (TOI) while an increase in HHb was observed immediately after sleep onset, and an opposite trend was found after transition with progression to deeper slow-wave sleep (SWS) stage. Spontaneous low frequency oscillations (LFO) and very low frequency oscillations (VLFO) were smaller (Levene's test, psleep (LS) and rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep in both brain and muscle. Spectral analysis of the NIRS signals measured from brain and muscle also showed reductions in VLFO and LFO powers during SWS with respect to LS and REM sleep. These results indicate a systemic attenuation rather than local cerebral reduction of spontaneous hemodynamic activity in SWS. A systemic physiological mechanism may exist to regulate the hemodynamic changes in brain and muscle during sleep.

  20. Effect of race distance on muscle oxygenation in short-track speed skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesford, Catherine M; Laing, Stewart; Cardinale, Marco; Cooper, Chris E

    2013-01-01

    Previous work identified an asymmetry in tissue desaturation changes in the left and right quadriceps muscles during on-ice skating at maximal speed in males. The effect of changing race distance on the magnitude of desaturation or leg asymmetry is unknown. Six elite male skaters (age = 23 ± 1.8 yr, height = 1.8 ± 0.1 m, mass = 80.1 ± 5.7 kg, midthigh skinfold thickness = 7 ± 2 mm) and four elite female skaters (age = 21 ± 4 yr, height = 1.6 ± 0.1 m, mass = 65.2 ± 4.3 kg, midthigh skinfold thickness = 10 ± 1 mm) were studied. Subjects completed time trials over three race distances. Blood lactate concentration and O2 uptake measurements were combined with near-infrared spectroscopy measures of muscle oxygenation (TSI) and blood volume (tHb) in the right and left vastus lateralis. Neither race distance nor gender had a significant effect on the magnitude of maximal muscle desaturation (ΔTSI(max)). Pattern of local changes in tHb during individual laps was dependent upon subtle differences in skating technique used for the different race distances. Linear regression analysis revealed asymmetry between the right and left leg desaturation in males during the final stages of each race distance, but not in females. At all race distances, local muscle desaturation reached maximal values much more quickly than global VO(2peak). The use of wearable near-infrared spectroscopy devices enabled measurement of muscle oxygenation during competitive race simulation, thus providing unique insight into the effects of velocity and technique changes on local muscle oxygenation. This may have implications for training and race pacing in speed skating.

  1. Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

    2011-08-01

    This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

  2. Quantification of muscle oxygenation and flow of healthy volunteers during cuff occlusion of arm and leg flexor muscles and plantar flexion exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durduran, Turgut; Yu, Guoqiang; Zhou, Chao; Lech, Gwen; Chance, Britton; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-07-01

    A hybrid instrument combining near infrared and diffuse correlation spectroscopies was used to measure muscle oxygenation and blood flow dynamics during cuff occlusion and ischemia. Measurements were done on six healthy subjects on their arm and leg flexor muscles. Hemodynamic response was characterized for blood oxygen saturation, total hemoglobin concenration and relative blood flow speed. The characterization allowed us to define the normal response range as well as showing the feasibility of using a hybrid instrument for dynamic measurements.

  3. Blood flow and oxygenation in peritendinous tissue and calf muscle during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert Christopher; Langberg, H; Green, Sara Marie Ehrenreich

    2000-01-01

    1. Circulation around tendons may act as a shunt for muscle during exercise. The perfusion and oxygenation of Achilles' peritendinous tissue was measured in parallel with that of calf muscle during exercise to determine (1) whether blood flow is restricted in peritendinous tissue during exercise......, and (2) whether blood flow is coupled to oxidative metabolism. 2. Seven individuals performed dynamic plantar flexion from 1 to 9 W. Radial artery and popliteal venous blood were sampled for O2, peritendinous blood flow was determined by 133Xe-washout, calf blood flow by plethysmography, cardiac output...

  4. Microcomputer-based system for registration of oxygen tension in peripheral muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odman, S; Bratt, H; Erlandsson, I; Sjögren, L

    1986-01-01

    For registration of oxygen tension fields in peripheral muscle a microcomputer based system was designed on the M6800 microprocessor. The system was designed to record the signals from a multiwire oxygen electrode, MDO, which is a multiwire electrode for measuring oxygen on the surface of an organ. The system contained patient safety isolation unit built on optocopplers and the upper frequency limit was 0.64 Hz. Collected data were corrected for drift and temperature changes during the measurement by using pre- and after calibrations and a linear compensation technique. Measure drift of the electrodes were proved to be linear and thus the drift could be compensated for. The system was tested in an experiment on pig. To study the distribution of oxygen statistically mean, standard deviation, skewness and curtosis were calculated. To see changes or differences between histograms a Kolmogorv-Smirnov test was used.

  5. Factors determining the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2004-01-01

    Using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously [Korzeniewski and Mazat (1996) Biochem. J. 319, 143-148; Korzeniewski and Zoladz (2001) Biophys. Chem. 92, 17-34], we analyse the effect of several factors on the oxygen-uptake kinetics, especially on the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) and half-transition time t(1/2), at the onset of exercise in skeletal muscles. Computer simulations demonstrate that an increase in the total creatine pool [PCr+/-Cr] (where Cr stands for c...

  6. Physiological and pathophysiological reactive oxygen species as probed by EPR spectroscopy: the underutilized research window on muscle ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Abdel-Rahman, Engy; Mahmoud, Ali M; Khalifa, Abdulrahman M; Ali, Sameh S

    2016-08-15

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) play crucial roles in triggering, mediating and regulating physiological and pathophysiological signal transduction pathways within the cell. Within the cell, ROS efflux is firmly controlled both spatially and temporally, making the study of ROS dynamics a challenging task. Different approaches have been developed for ROS assessment; however, many of these assays are not capable of direct identification or determination of subcellular localization of different ROS. Here we highlight electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy as a powerful technique that is uniquely capable of addressing questions on ROS dynamics in different biological specimens and cellular compartments. Due to their critical importance in muscle functions and dysfunction, we discuss in some detail spin trapping of various ROS and focus on EPR detection of nitric oxide before highlighting how EPR can be utilized to probe biophysical characteristics of the environment surrounding a given stable radical. Despite the demonstrated ability of EPR spectroscopy to provide unique information on the identity, quantity, dynamics and environment of radical species, its applications in the field of muscle physiology, fatiguing and ageing are disproportionately infrequent. While reviewing the limited examples of successful EPR applications in muscle biology we conclude that the field would greatly benefit from more studies exploring ROS sources and kinetics by spin trapping, protein dynamics by site-directed spin labelling, and membrane dynamics and global redox changes by spin probing EPR approaches. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  7. (-)-Epicatechin administration and exercising skeletal muscle vascular control and microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Steven W; Inagaki, Tadakatsu; White, Michael J; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Holdsworth, Clark T; Sims, Gabrielle E; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2013-01-15

    Consumption of the dietary flavanol (-)-epicatechin (EPI) is associated with enhanced endothelial function and augmented skeletal muscle capillarity and mitochondrial volume density. The potential for EPI to improve peripheral vascular function and muscle oxygenation during exercise is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that EPI administration in healthy rats would improve treadmill exercise performance secondary to elevated skeletal muscle blood flow and vascular conductance [VC, blood flow/mean arterial pressure (MAP)] and improved skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation. Rats received water (control, n = 12) or 4 mg/kg EPI (n = 12) via oral gavage daily for 24 days. Exercise endurance capacity and peak O(2) uptake (Vo(2) peak) were measured via treadmill runs to exhaustion. MAP (arterial catheter) and blood flow (radiolabeled microspheres) were measured and VC was calculated during submaximal treadmill exercise (25 m/min, 5% grade). Spinotrapezius muscle microvascular O(2) pressure (Po(2mv)) was measured (phosphorescence quenching) during electrically induced twitch (1 Hz) contractions. In conscious rats, EPI administration resulted in lower (↓~5%) resting (P = 0.03) and exercising (P = 0.04) MAP. There were no differences in exercise endurance capacity, Vo(2) peak, total exercising hindlimb blood flow (control, 154 ± 13; and EPI, 159 ± 8 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1), P = 0.68), or VC (control, 1.13 ± 0.10; and EPI, 1.24 ± 0.08 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)·mmHg(-1), P = 0.21) between groups. Following anesthesia, EPI resulted in lower MAP (↓~16%) but did not impact resting Po(2mv) or any kinetics parameters (P > 0.05 for all) during muscle contractions compared with control. EPI administration (4 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) improved modestly cardiovascular function (i.e., ↓MAP) with no impact on exercise performance, total exercising skeletal muscle blood flow and VC, or contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in healthy rats.

  8. Effect of magnesium on reactive oxygen species production in the thigh muscles of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y X; Guo, Y M; Wang, Z

    2007-02-01

    1. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of magnesium (Mg) on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the thigh muscles of broiler chickens. A total of 96 1-d-old male Arbor Acre broiler chickens were randomly allocated into two groups, fed either on low-Mg or control diets containing about 1.2 g/kg or 2.4 g Mg/kg dry matter. 2. The low-Mg diet significantly increased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and decreased glutathione (GSH) in the thigh muscles of broiler chickens. ROS production in the thigh muscle homogenate was significantly higher in the low-Mg group than in the control group. Compared with the control, muscle Mg concentration of broiler chickens from the low-Mg group decreased by 9.5%. 3. Complex II and III activities of the mitochondrial electron transport chain in broilers on low-Mg diet increased by 23 and 35%, respectively. Significant negative correlations between ROS production and the activities of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) complexes were observed. 4. The low-Mg diet did not influence contents of iron (Fe) or calcium (Ca) in the thigh muscles of broiler chickens and did not influence unsaturated fatty acid composition (except C18:2) in the thigh muscles. 5. A low-Mg diet decreased Mg concentration in the thigh muscles of broiler chickens and then induced higher activities of mitochondrial ETC, consequently increasing ROS production. These results suggest that Mg modulates the oxidation-anti-oxidation system of the thigh muscles at least partly through affecting ROS production.

  9. O2 supplementation to secure the near-infrared spectroscopy determined brain and muscle oxygenation in vascular surgical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z; Secher, Niels H; Eiberg, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses three questions for securing tissue oxygenation in brain (rScO2) and muscle (SmO2) for 100 patients (age 71 ± 6 years; mean ± SD) undergoing vascular surgery: (i) Does preoxygenation (inhaling 100% oxygen before anesthesia) increase tissue oxygenation, (ii) Does inhalation...... of 70% oxygen during surgery prevent a critical reduction in rScO2 (patients and the intraoperative inspired oxygen fraction was set to 0.70 while tissue...... oxygenation was determined by INVOS 5100C. Preoxygenation increased rScO2 (from 65 ± 8 to 72 ± 9%; P patients. Following anesthesia and tracheal intubation an eventual change...

  10. Locomotor muscle fatigue does not alter oxygen uptake kinetics during high-intensity exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Hopker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The slow component (VO2sc that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre fatigue condition or rest for 33 minutes (control condition according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-second maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min-1. Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and VO2max determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue (P = 0.03, the VO2sc was not significantly different between the pre fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min-1 and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min-1 condition (P = 0.50. Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions (P = 0.48 but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition (P < 0.01 suggesting higher muscle recruitment. These results demonstrate experimentally that locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the VO2 kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the VO2sc is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  11. Low-level activity of the trunk extensor muscles causes electromyographic manifestations of fatigue in absence of decreased oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieën, J.H. van; Westebring van der; Putten, E.P.; Kingma, I.; Looze, M.P. de

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether trunk extensor fatigue occurs during low-level activity and whether this is associated with a drop in muscle tissue oxygenation. Electromyography (EMG) feedback was used to impose constant activity in a part of the trunk extensor muscles. We hypothesized

  12. Oscillation of tissue oxygen index in non-exercising muscle during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, T; Afroundeh, R; Shirakawa, K; Lian, C-S; Shibata, K; Xiao, Z; Yunoki, T

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how oscillation of tissue oxygen index (TOI) in non-exercising exercise is affected during high-intensity and low-intensity exercises. Three exercises were performed with exercise intensities of 30% and 70% peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) for 12 min and with exercise intensity of 70% Vo(2)peak for 30 s. TOI in non-exercising muscle (biceps brachii) during the exercises for 12 min was determined by nearinfrared spectroscopy. TOI in the non-exercising muscle during the exercises was analyzed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) to obtain power spectra density (PSD). The frequency at which maximal PSD appeared (Fmax) during the exercise with 70% Vo(2)peak for 12 min (0.00477 ± 0.00172 Hz) was significantly lower than that during the exercise with 30% Vo2peak for 12 min (0.00781 ± 0.00338 Hz). There were significant differences in blood pH and blood lactate between the exercise with 70% Vo(2)peak and the exercise with 30% Vo(2)peak. It is concluded that TOI in nonexercising muscle oscillates during low-intensity exercise as well as during high-intensity exercise and that the difference in Fmax between the two exercises is associated with the difference in increase in blood lactate derived from the exercise.

  13. Noninvasive measurement of lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction under cuff compression paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengyan; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, He; Zhao, Kai; Jin, Lixin; Zhang, Jue; Wang, Xiaoying; Fang, Jing

    2016-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of using a susceptibility-based MRI technique with asymmetric spin-echo (ASE) sequence to assess the lower extremity muscle oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) alternations under cuff compression paradigm. Approved by the local institutional human study committee, nine healthy young volunteers participated in this study. All the ASE scans were conducted using a 3 Tesla clinical MRI scanner during resting state (pre), 1-3 min (post1) and 3-5 min (post2) after a pressure of 50 mmHg above individual systolic blood pressure imposed on the thigh. Moreover, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements were performed on the same day under the same cuff compression protocol to verify the accuracy of this susceptibility-based method. In all volunteers, the mean MRI based OEF in gastrocnemius (GAS) muscle increased significantly from 0.28 ± 0.02 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.03 (post1, P measured 1-%HbO2 (percentage of deoxyhemoglobin concentration within total hemoglobin) in GAS rose significantly from 0.29 ± 0.03 (pre) to 0.31 ± 0.04 (post1, P measuring skeletal muscle oxygenation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Exercise-induced quadriceps muscle fatigue in men and women: effects of arterial oxygen content and respiratory muscle work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominelli, Paolo B; Molgat-Seon, Yannick; Griesdale, Donald E G; Peters, Carli M; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Sekhon, Mypinder; Dominelli, Giulio S; Henderson, William R; Foster, Glen E; Romer, Lee M; Koehle, Michael S; Sheel, A William

    2017-08-01

    High work of breathing and exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) can decrease O 2 delivery and exacerbate exercise-induced quadriceps fatigue in healthy men. Women have a higher work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles and develop EIAH. Despite a greater reduction in men's work of breathing, the attenuation of quadriceps fatigue was similar between the sexes. The degree of EIAH was similar between sexes, and regardless of sex, those who developed the greatest hypoxaemia during exercise demonstrated the most attenuation of quadriceps fatigue. Based on our previous finding that women have a greater relative oxygen cost of breathing, women appear to be especially susceptible to work of breathing-related changes in quadriceps muscle fatigue. Reducing the work of breathing or eliminating exercise-induced arterial hypoxaemia (EIAH) during exercise decreases the severity of quadriceps fatigue in men. Women have a greater work of breathing during exercise, dedicate a greater fraction of whole-body V̇O2 towards their respiratory muscles, and demonstrate EIAH, suggesting women may be especially susceptible to quadriceps fatigue. Healthy subjects (8 male, 8 female) completed three constant load exercise tests over 4 days. During the first (control) test, subjects exercised at ∼85% of maximum while arterial blood gases and work of breathing were assessed. Subsequent constant load exercise tests were iso-time and iso-work rate, but with EIAH prevented by inspiring hyperoxic gas or work of breathing reduced via a proportional assist ventilator (PAV). Quadriceps fatigue was assessed by measuring force in response to femoral nerve stimulation. For both sexes, quadriceps force was equally reduced after the control trial (-27 ± 2% baseline) and was attenuated with hyperoxia and PAV (-18 ± 1 and -17 ± 2% baseline, P Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  15. Skeletal muscle bioenergetics during all-out exercise: mechanistic insight into the oxygen uptake slow component and neuromuscular fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, Ryan M; Layec, Gwenael; Hureau, Thomas J; Amann, Markus; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-05-01

    Although all-out exercise protocols are commonly used, the physiological mechanisms underlying all-out exercise performance are still unclear, and an in-depth assessment of skeletal muscle bioenergetics is lacking. Therefore, phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS) was utilized to assess skeletal muscle bioenergetics during a 5-min all-out intermittent isometric knee-extensor protocol in eight healthy men. Metabolic perturbation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis rates, ATP cost of contraction, and mitochondrial capacity were determined from intramuscular concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr), inorganic phosphate (P i ), diprotonated phosphate ([Formula: see text]), and pH. Peripheral fatigue was determined by exercise-induced alterations in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (Q tw ) evoked by supramaximal electrical femoral nerve stimulation. The oxidative ATP synthesis rate (ATP OX ) attained and then maintained peak values throughout the protocol, despite an ~63% decrease in quadriceps maximal force production. ThusATP OX normalized to force production (ATP OX gain) significantly increased throughout the exercise (1st min: 0.02 ± 0.01, 5th min: 0.04 ± 0.01 mM·min -1 ·N -1 ), as did the ATP cost of contraction (1st min: 0.048 ± 0.019, 5th min: 0.052 ± 0.015 mM·min -1 ·N -1 ). Additionally, the pre- to postexercise change in Q tw (-52 ± 26%) was significantly correlated with the exercise-induced change in intramuscular pH ( r = 0.75) and [Formula: see text] concentration ( r = 0.77). In conclusion, the all-out exercise protocol utilized in the present study elicited a "slow component-like" increase in intramuscular ATP OX gain as well as a progressive increase in the phosphate cost of contraction. Furthermore, the development of peripheral fatigue was closely related to the perturbation of specific fatigue-inducing intramuscular factors (i.e., pH and [Formula: see text] concentration). NEW & NOTEWORTHY The physiological mechanisms

  16. 25(OHD3 Levels Relative to Muscle Strength and Maximum Oxygen Uptake in Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Książek Anna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D is mainly known for its effects on the bone and calcium metabolism. The discovery of Vitamin D receptors in many extraskeletal cells suggests that it may also play a significant role in other organs and systems. The aim of our study was to assess the relationship between 25(OHD3 levels, lower limb isokinetic strength and maximum oxygen uptake in well-trained professional football players. We enrolled 43 Polish premier league soccer players. The mean age was 22.7±5.3 years. Our study showed decreased serum 25(OHD3 levels in 74.4% of the professional players. The results also demonstrated a lack of statistically significant correlation between 25(OHD3 levels and lower limb muscle strength with the exception of peak torque of the left knee extensors at an angular velocity of 150°/s (r=0.41. No significant correlations were found between hand grip strength and maximum oxygen uptake. Based on our study we concluded that in well-trained professional soccer players, there was no correlation between serum levels of 25(OHD3 and muscle strength or maximum oxygen uptake.

  17. Metabolic control over the oxygen consumption flux in intact skeletal muscle: in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguzinski, Piotr; Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2006-12-01

    It has been postulated previously that a direct activation of all oxidative phosphorylation complexes in parallel with the activation of ATP usage and substrate dehydrogenation (the so-called each-step activation) is the main mechanism responsible for adjusting the rate of ATP production by mitochondria to the current energy demand during rest-to-work transition in intact skeletal muscle in vivo. The present in silico study, using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously, analyzes the impact of the each-step-activation mechanism on the distribution of control (defined within Metabolic Control Analysis) over the oxygen consumption flux among the components of the bioenergetic system in intact oxidative skeletal muscle at different energy demands. It is demonstrated that in the absence of each-step activation, the oxidative phosphorylation complexes take over from ATP usage most of the control over the respiration rate and oxidative ATP production at higher (but still physiological) energy demands. This leads to a saturation of oxidative phosphorylation, impossibility of a further acceleration of oxidative ATP synthesis, and dramatic drop in the phosphorylation potential. On the other hand, the each-step-activation mechanism allows maintenance of a high degree of the control exerted by ATP usage over the ATP turnover and oxygen consumption flux even at high energy demands and thus enables a potentially very large increase in ATP turnover. It is also shown that low oxygen concentration shifts the metabolic control from ATP usage to cytochrome oxidase and thus limits the oxidative ATP production.

  18. Exercise training induces similar elevations in the activity of oxoglutarate dehydrogenase and peak oxygen uptake in the human quadriceps muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomstrand, Eva; Krustrup, Peter; Søndergaard, Hans

    2011-01-01

    During exercise involving a small muscle mass, peak oxygen uptake is thought to be limited by peripheral factors, such as the degree of oxygen extraction from the blood and/or mitochondrial oxidative capacity. Previously, the maximal activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme oxoglutarate dehydrogenase has...

  19. Esmolol acutely alters oxygen supply-demand balance in exercising muscles of healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, David N; Luck, J Carter; Maman, Stephan R; Leuenberger, Urs A; Muller, Matthew D

    2018-04-01

    Beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists (β blockers) reduce systemic O 2 delivery and blood pressure (BP) during exercise, but the subsequent effects on O 2 extraction within the active limb muscles are unknown. In this study, we examined the effects of the fast-acting, β 1 selective blocker esmolol on systemic hemodynamics and leg muscle O 2 saturation (near infrared spectroscopy, NIRS) during submaximal leg ergometry. Our main hypothesis was that esmolol would augment exercise-induced reductions in leg muscle O 2 saturation. Eight healthy adults (6 men, 2 women; 23-67 year) performed light and moderate intensity bouts of recumbent leg cycling before (PRE), during (β 1 -blocked), and 45 min following (POST) intravenous infusion of esmolol. Oxygen uptake, heart rate (HR), BP, and O 2 saturation (SmO 2 ) of the vastus lateralis (VL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles were measured continuously. Esmolol attenuated the increases in HR and systolic BP during light (-12 ± 9 bpm and -26 ± 12 mmHg vs. PRE) and moderate intensity (-20 ± 10 bpm and -40 ± 18 mmHg vs. PRE) cycling (all P Exercise-induced reductions in SmO 2 occurred to a greater extent during the β 1 -blockade trial in both the VL (P = 0.001 vs. PRE) and MG muscles (P = 0.022 vs. PRE). HR, SBP and SmO 2 were restored during POST (all P exercising muscles of healthy humans. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  20. Locomotor Muscle Fatigue Does Not Alter Oxygen Uptake Kinetics during High-Intensity Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopker, James G; Caporaso, Giuseppe; Azzalin, Andrea; Carpenter, Roger; Marcora, Samuele M

    2016-01-01

    The [Formula: see text] slow component ([Formula: see text]) that develops during high-intensity aerobic exercise is thought to be strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue. We sought to experimentally test this hypothesis by pre-fatiguing the locomotor muscles used during subsequent high-intensity cycling exercise. Over two separate visits, eight healthy male participants were asked to either perform a non-metabolically stressful 100 intermittent drop-jumps protocol (pre-fatigue condition) or rest for 33 min (control condition) according to a random and counterbalanced order. Locomotor muscle fatigue was quantified with 6-s maximal sprints at a fixed pedaling cadence of 90 rev·min -1 . Oxygen kinetics and other responses (heart rate, capillary blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion, RPE) were measured during two subsequent bouts of 6 min cycling exercise at 50% of the delta between the lactate threshold and [Formula: see text] determined during a preliminary incremental exercise test. All tests were performed on the same cycle ergometer. Despite significant locomotor muscle fatigue ( P = 0.03), the [Formula: see text] was not significantly different between the pre-fatigue (464 ± 301 mL·min -1 ) and the control (556 ± 223 mL·min -1 ) condition ( P = 0.50). Blood lactate response was not significantly different between conditions ( P = 0.48) but RPE was significantly higher following the pre-fatiguing exercise protocol compared with the control condition ( P locomotor muscle fatigue does not significantly alter the [Formula: see text] kinetic response to high intensity aerobic exercise, and challenge the hypothesis that the [Formula: see text] is strongly associated with locomotor muscle fatigue.

  1. AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle during exercise: Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Alamo, David; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-09-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) are generated during exercise depending on intensity, duration and training status. A greater amount of RONS is released during repeated high-intensity sprint exercise and when the exercise is performed in hypoxia. By activating adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase (AMPK), RONS play a critical role in the regulation of muscle metabolism but also in the adaptive responses to exercise training. RONS may activate AMPK by direct an indirect mechanisms. Directly, RONS may activate or deactivate AMPK by modifying RONS-sensitive residues of the AMPK-α subunit. Indirectly, RONS may activate AMPK by reducing mitochondrial ATP synthesis, leading to an increased AMP:ATP ratio and subsequent Thr(172)-AMPK phosphorylation by the two main AMPK kinases: LKB1 and CaMKKβ. In presence of RONS the rate of Thr(172)-AMPK dephosphorylation is reduced. RONS may activate LKB1 through Sestrin2 and SIRT1 (NAD(+)/NADH.H(+)-dependent deacetylase). RONS may also activate CaMKKβ by direct modification of RONS sensitive motifs and, indirectly, by activating the ryanodine receptor (Ryr) to release Ca(2+). Both too high (hypoxia) and too low (ingestion of antioxidants) RONS levels may lead to Ser(485)-AMPKα1/Ser(491)-AMPKα2 phosphorylation causing inhibition of Thr(172)-AMPKα phosphorylation. Exercise training increases muscle antioxidant capacity. When the same high-intensity training is applied to arm and leg muscles, arm muscles show signs of increased oxidative stress and reduced mitochondrial biogenesis, which may be explained by differences in RONS-sensing mechanisms and basal antioxidant capacities between arm and leg muscles. Efficient adaptation to exercise training requires optimal exposure to pulses of RONS. Inappropriate training stimulus may lead to excessive RONS formation, oxidative inactivation of AMPK and reduced adaptation or even maladaptation. Theoretically, exercise programs should be designed taking into account the

  2. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ATP and phosphocreatine utilization in single human muscle fibres during the development of maximal power output at elevated muscle temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stuart R; Söderlund, Karin; Ferguson, Richard A

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of muscle temperature (Tm) on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine utilization in single muscle fibres during the development of maximal power output in humans. Six male participants performed a 6-s maximal sprint on a friction-braked cycle ergometer under both normal (Tm = 34.3 degrees C, s = 0.6) and elevated (T(m) = 37.3 degrees C, s = 0.2) muscle temperature conditions. During the elevated condition, muscle temperature of the legs was raised, passively, by hot water immersion followed by wrapping in electrically heated blankets. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and immediately after exercise. Freeze-dried single fibres were dissected, characterized according to myosin heavy chain composition, and analysed for ATP and phosphocreatine content. Single fibres were classified as: type I, IIA, IIAX25 (1 - 25% IIX isoform), IIAX50 (26 - 50% IIX), IIAX75 (51 - 75% IIX), or IIAX100 (76 - 100% IIX). Maximal power output and pedal rate were both greater (P < 0.05) during the elevated condition by 258 W (s = 110) and 22 rev . min(-1) (s = 6), respectively. In both conditions, phosphocreatine content decreased significantly in all fibre types, with a greater decrease during the elevated condition in type IIA fibres (P < 0.01). Adenosine triphosphate content was also reduced to a greater (P < 0.01) extent in type IIA fibres during the elevated condition. The results of the present study indicate that after passive elevation of muscle temperature, there was a greater decrease in ATP and phosphocreatine content in type IIA fibres than in the normal trial, which contributed to the higher maximal power output.

  4. Decreased muscle oxygenation and increased arterial blood flow in the non-exercising limb during leg exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroishi, Kiyoshi; Kime, Ryotaro; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Shimomura, Kousuke; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated arterial blood flow, muscle tissue oxygenation and muscle metabolism in the non-exercising limb during leg cycling exercise. Ten healthy male volunteers performed a graded leg cycling exercise at 0, 40, 80, 120 and 160 watts (W) for 5 min each. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI) of the non-exercising left forearm muscle was measured using a near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy (NIR(SRS)), and non-exercising forearm blood flow ((NONEX)FBF) in the brachial artery was also evaluated by a Doppler ultrasound system. We also determined O(2) consumption of the non-exercising forearm muscle (NONEXV(O)(2mus)) by the rate of decrease in O(2)Hb during arterial occlusion at each work rate. TOI was significantly decreased at 160 W (p exercising muscle may be reduced, even though (NONEX)FBF increases at high work rates during leg cycling exercise.

  5. Effects of exercise training on calf muscle oxygen extraction and blood flow in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Wesley B; Li, Zhe; Schenkel, Steven S; Chandra, Malavika; Busch, David R; Englund, Erin K; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Yodh, Arjun G; Floyd, Thomas F; Mohler, Emile R

    2017-12-01

    We employed near-infrared optical techniques, diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) to test the hypothesis that supervised exercise training increases skeletal muscle microvascular blood flow and oxygen extraction in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) who experience claudication. PAD patients ( n = 64) were randomly assigned to exercise and control groups. Patients in the exercise group received 3 mo of supervised exercise training. Calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction were optically monitored before, during, and after performance of a graded treadmill protocol at baseline and at 3 mo in both groups. Additionally, measurements of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and peak walking time (PWT) to maximal claudication were made during each patient visit. Supervised exercise training was found to increase the maximal calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction levels during treadmill exercise by 29% (13%, 50%) and 8% (1%, 12%), respectively [ P group population were significantly higher than corresponding changes in the control group ( P training also increased PWT by 49% (18%, 101%) ( P = 0.01). However, within statistical error, the ABI, resting calf muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction, and the recovery half-time for hemoglobin\\myoglobin desaturation following cessation of maximal exercise were not altered by exercise training. The concurrent monitoring of both blood flow and oxygen extraction with the hybrid DCS/FD-NIRS instrument revealed enhanced muscle oxidative metabolism during physical activity from exercise training, which could be an underlying mechanism for the observed improvement in PWT. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We report on noninvasive optical measurements of skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen extraction dynamics before/during/after treadmill exercise in peripheral artery disease patients who experience claudication. The measurements tracked the effects of a 3-mo supervised

  6. Diagnostic Utility of Auto-Antibodies in Inflammatory Muscle Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenbach, Y; Benveniste, O

    2015-01-01

    To date, there are four main groups of idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM): polymyositis (PM), dermatomyositis (DM), immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) and sporadic inclusion body myositis; based on clinical presentation and muscle pathology. Nevertheless, important phenotypical differences (either muscular and/or extra-muscular manifestations) within a group persist. In recent years, the titration of different myositis-specific (or associated) auto-antibodies as a diagnostic tool has increased. This is an important step forward since it may facilitate, at a viable cost, the differential diagnosis between IIM and other myopathies. We have now routine access to assays for the detection of different antibodies. For example, IMNM are related to the presence of anti-SRP or anti-HMGCR. PM is associated with anti-synthetase antibodies (anti-Jo-1, PL-7, PL-12, OJ, and EJ) and DM with anti-Mi-2, anti-SAE, anti-TIF-1-γ and anti-NXP2 (both associated with cancer) or anti-MDA5 antibodies (associated with interstitial lung disease). Today, over 30 myositis specific and associated antibodies have been characterised, and all groups of myositis may present one of those auto-antibodies. Most of them allow identification of homogenous patient groups, more precisely than the classical international classifications of myositis. This implies that classification criteria could be modified accordingly, since these auto-antibodies delineate groups of patients suffering from myositis with consistent clinical phenotype (muscular and extra-muscular manifestations), common prognostic (cancer association, presence of interstitial lung disease, mortality and risk of relapse) and treatment responses. Nevertheless, since numerous auto-antibodies have been recently characterised, the exact prevalence of myositis specific antibodies remains to be documented, and research of new auto-antibodies in the remaining seronegative group is still needed.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen in skeletal muscle of rats submitted to total acute left hindlimb ischemia: A research report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Luis Gustavo Campos; Dalio, Marcelo Bellini; Joviliano, Edwaldo Edner; Feres, Omar; Piccinato, Carlos Eli

    2015-01-01

    Determine the effect of hyperbaric oxygen treatment in skeletal muscle of rats submitted to total acute left hindlimb ischemia. An experimental study was designed using 48 Wistar rats divided into four groups (n = 12): Control; Ischemia (I)--total hindlimb ischemia for 270 minutes; Hyperbaric oxygen treatment during ischemia (HBO2)--total hindlimb ischemia for 270 minutes and hyperbaric oxygen during the first 90 minutes; Pre-treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (PHBO2)--90 minutes of hyperbaric oxygen treatment before total hindlimb ischemia for 270 minutes. Skeletal muscle injury was evaluated by measuring levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total creatine phosphokinase (CPK); muscular malondialdehyde (MDA), muscular glycogen, and serum ischemia-modified albumin (IMA). AST was significantly higher in I, HBO2 and PHBO2 compared with control (P = .001). There was no difference in LDH. CPK was significantly higher in I, HBO2 and PHBO2, compared with control (p = .014). MDA was significantly higher in PHBO2, compared with other groups (p = .042). Glycogen was significantly decreased in I, HBO2 and PHBO2, compared with control (p < .001). Hyperbaric oxygen treatment in acute total hindlimb ischemia exerted no protective effect on muscle injury, regardless of time of application. When applied prior to installation of total ischemia, hyperbaric oxygen treatment aggravated muscle injury.

  8. Comparison of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production of Ectothermic and Endothermic Fish Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Wiens

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently we demonstrated that the capacity of isolated muscle mitochondria to produce reactive oxygen species, measured as H2O2 efflux, is temperature-sensitive in isolated muscle mitochondria of ectothermic fish and the rat, a representative endothermic mammal. However, at physiological temperatures (15° and 37°C for the fish and rat, respectively, the fraction of total mitochondrial electron flux that generated H2O2, the fractional electron leak (FEL, was far lower in the rat than in fish. Those results suggested that the elevated body temperatures associated with endothermy may lead to a compensatory decrease in mitochondrial ROS production relative to respiratory capacity. To test this hypothesis we compare slow twitch (red muscle mitochondria from the endothermic Pacific bluefin tuna (Thunnus orientalis with mitochondria from three ectothermic fishes [rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss, common carp (Cyprinus carpio, and the lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens] and the rat. At a common assay temperature (25°C rates of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 efflux were similar in tuna and the other fishes. The thermal sensitivity of fish mitochondria was similar irrespective of ectothermy or endothermy. Comparing tuna to the rat at a common temperature, respiration rates were similar, or lower depending on mitochondrial substrates. FEL was not different across fish species at a common assay temperature (25°C but was markedly higher in fishes than in rat. Overall, endothermy and warming of Pacific Bluefin tuna red muscle may increase the potential for ROS production by muscle mitochondria but the evolution of endothermy in this species is not necessarily associated with a compensatory reduction of ROS production relative to the respiratory capacity of mitochondria.

  9. miR-182 Regulates Metabolic Homeostasis by Modulating Glucose Utilization in Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fiber-type specification and metabolic switch in skeletal muscle provides insights into energy metabolism in physiology and diseases. Here, we show that miR-182 is highly expressed in fast-twitch muscle and negatively correlates with blood glucose level. miR-182 knockout mice display muscle loss, fast-to-slow fiber-type switching, and impaired glucose metabolism. Mechanistic studies reveal that miR-182 modulates glucose utilization in muscle by targeting FoxO1 and PDK4, which control fuel selection via the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDHC. Short-term high-fat diet (HFD feeding reduces muscle miR-182 levels by tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, which contributes to the upregulation of FoxO1/PDK4. Restoration of miR-182 expression in HFD-fed mice induces a faster muscle phenotype, decreases muscle FoxO1/PDK4 levels, and improves glucose metabolism. Together, our work establishes miR-182 as a critical regulator that confers robust and precise controls on fuel usage and glucose homeostasis. Our study suggests that a metabolic shift toward a faster and more glycolytic phenotype is beneficial for glucose control.

  10. Oxygen drives skeletal muscle remodeling in an amphibious fish out of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giulia S; Turko, Andy J; Wright, Patricia A

    2018-04-24

    Skeletal muscle remodeling in response to terrestrial acclimation improves the locomotor performance of some amphibious fishes on land, but the cue for this remodeling is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that muscle remodeling in the amphibious Kryptolebias marmoratus on land is driven by higher O 2 availability in atmospheric air, and the alternative hypothesis that remodeling is induced by a different environmental or physiological condition fish experience on land. Fish were acclimated to 28 days of air, aquatic hyperoxia, hypercapnia, hypoxia, elevated temperature, or fasting conditions. Air, fasting, and hyperoxic conditions increased (>25%) the size of oxidative fibers in K. marmoratus while hypoxia had the reverse effect (23% decrease). Surprisingly, hyperoxia-acclimation also resulted in a transformation of the musculature to include large bands of oxidative-like muscle. Our results show that K. marmoratus is highly responsive to environmental O 2 levels and capitalize on O 2 -rich opportunities to enhance O 2 utilization by skeletal muscle. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Muscle oxygen changes following Sprint Interval Cycling training in elite field hockey players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Jones

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT. Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP and a control group (CON. The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2, tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb, total tissue haemoglobin (tHb and tissue oxygenation (TSI % were taken. In the EXP group (5.34 ± 0.14 to 5.50 ± 0.14 m.s(-1 but not the CON group (pre = 5.37 ± 0.27 to 5.39 ± 0.30 m.s(-1 significant changes were seen in the 30-15 IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%; ΔHHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 μM.cm; and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 μM.cm. No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24. NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes.

  12. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) regulates skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling via altered mitochondrial oxidation and reactive oxygen species production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Enxuan; Emanuelli, Brice; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Sirt3 is a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized in mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial function. Sirt3 expression in skeletal muscle is decreased in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and regulated by feeding, fasting, and caloric restriction. Sirt3 knockout...... mice exhibit decreased oxygen consumption and develop oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, leading to JNK activation and impaired insulin signaling. This effect is mimicked by knockdown of Sirt3 in cultured myoblasts, which exhibit reduced mitochondrial oxidation, increased reactive oxygen species......, activation of JNK, increased serine and decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and decreased insulin signaling. Thus, Sirt3 plays an important role in diabetes through regulation of mitochondrial oxidation, reactive oxygen species production, and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  13. Biosensors for EVA: Muscle Oxygen and pH During Walking, Running and Simulated Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. M. C.; Ellerby, G.; Scott, P.; Stroud, L.; Norcross, J.; Pesholov, B.; Zou, F.; Gernhardt, M.; Soller, B.

    2009-01-01

    During lunar excursions in the EVA suit, real-time measurement of metabolic rate is required to manage consumables and guide activities to ensure safe return to the base. Metabolic rate, or oxygen consumption (VO2), is normally measured from pulmonary parameters but cannot be determined with standard techniques in the oxygen-rich environment of a spacesuit. Our group developed novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) methods to calculate muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2), hematocrit, and pH, and we recently demonstrated that we can use our NIRS sensor to measure VO2 on the leg during cycling. Our NSBRI-funded project is looking to extend this methodology to examine activities which more appropriately represent EVA activities, such as walking and running and to better understand factors that determine the metabolic cost of exercise in both normal and lunar gravity. Our 4 year project specifically addresses risk: ExMC 4.18: Lack of adequate biomedical monitoring capability for Constellation EVA Suits and EPSP risk: Risk of compromised EVA performance and crew health due to inadequate EVA suit systems.

  14. Effects of pregnancy and fasting on muscle glucose utilization in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauguel, S; Leturque, A; Gilbert, M; Girard, J

    1988-05-01

    The effects of fasting on maternal glucose metabolism were investigated in nonpregnant and 29-day pregnant conscious rabbits. Pregnancy decreased the glucose metabolic index by 60% in maternal red postural muscles. Fasting induced similar modifications in nonpregnant rabbits and exaggerated the changes observed in fed pregnant animals. These data suggest that the decreased glucose utilization by maternal red muscles observed during pregnancy and fasting is related to the increase in circulating fat-derived substrates, because the fall in plasma insulin concentration is a specific adaptation to fasting.

  15. Changes in muscle tissue oxygenation during stagnant ischemia in septic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareznik, Roman; Knezevic, Rajko; Voga, Gorazd; Podbregar, Matej

    2006-01-01

    To determine changes in the rate of thenar muscles tissue deoxygenation during stagnant ischemia in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Prospective observational study in the medical ICU of a general hospital. Consecutive patients admitted to ICU with septic shock (n=6), severe sepsis (n=6), localized infection (n=3), and healthy volunteers (n=15). Upper limb ischemia was induced by rapid automatic pneumatic cuff inflation around upper arm. Thenar muscle tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) was measured continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy before and during upper limb ischemia. StO(2) before intervention was comparable in patients with septic shock, severe sepsis, or localized infection and healthy volunteers (89 [65, 92]% vs. 82 [72, 91]% vs. 87 [85, 92]% vs. 83 [79, 93]%, respectively; p>0.1). The rate of StO(2) decrease during stagnant ischemia after initial hemodynamic stabilization was slower in septic shock patients than in those with severe sepsis or localized infection and in controls (-7.0 [-3.6, -11.0] %/min vs. -10.4 [-7.8, -13.3] %/min vs. -19.5 [-12.3, -23.3] vs. -37.4 [-27.3, -56.2] %/min, respectively; p=0.041). At ICU discharge the rate of StO2 decrease did not differ between the septic shock, severe sepsis, and localized infection groups (-17.0 [-9.3, -28.9] %/min vs. -19.9 [-13.3, -23.6] %/min vs. -23.1 [-20.7, -26.2] %/min, respectively), but remained slower than in controls (p<0.01). The rate of StO2 decrease was correlated with Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (r=0.739, p<0.001). After hemodynamic stabilization thenar muscle tissue oxygen saturation during stagnant ischemia decreases slower in septic shock patients than in patients with severe sepsis or localized infection and in healthy volunteers. During ICU stay and improvement of sepsis the muscle tissue deoxygenation rate increases in survivors of both septic shock and severe sepsis and was correlated with SOFA score.

  16. Skeletal muscle-specific expression of PGC-1α-b, an exercise-responsive isoform, increases exercise capacity and peak oxygen uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Tadaishi

    Full Text Available Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max predicts mortality and is associated with endurance performance. Trained subjects have a high VO(2max due to a high cardiac output and high metabolic capacity of skeletal muscles. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, a nuclear receptor coactivator, promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, a fiber-type switch to oxidative fibers, and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. Because exercise training increases PGC-1α in skeletal muscle, PGC-1α-mediated changes may contribute to the improvement of exercise capacity and VO(2max. There are three isoforms of PGC-1α mRNA. PGC-1α-b protein, whose amino terminus is different from PGC-1α-a protein, is a predominant PGC-1α isoform in response to exercise. We investigated whether alterations of skeletal muscle metabolism by overexpression of PGC-1α-b in skeletal muscle, but not heart, would increase VO(2max and exercise capacity.Transgenic mice showed overexpression of PGC-1α-b protein in skeletal muscle but not in heart. Overexpression of PGC-1α-b promoted mitochondrial biogenesis 4-fold, increased the expression of fatty acid transporters, enhanced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle 1.4 to 2.7-fold, and promoted exercise capacity (expressed by maximum speed by 35% and peak oxygen uptake by 20%. Across a broad range of either the absolute exercise intensity, or the same relative exercise intensities, lipid oxidation was always higher in the transgenic mice than wild-type littermates, suggesting that lipid is the predominant fuel source for exercise in the transgenic mice. However, muscle glycogen usage during exercise was absent in the transgenic mice.Increased mitochondrial biogenesis, capillaries, and fatty acid transporters in skeletal muscles may contribute to improved exercise capacity via an increase in fatty acid utilization. Increases in PGC-1α-b protein or function might be a useful strategy for sedentary subjects to perform exercise

  17. Positron tomography investigation in humans of the local coupling among CBF, oxygen consumption and glucose utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, J C; Rougemont, D; Soussaline, F; Crouzel, C; Bousser, M G; Comar, D

    1983-06-01

    Positron tomography investigation of the local coupling among cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/) and glucose utilization (CMRGlc) was performed in 5 controls and 6 ischemic stroke patients, using oxygen 15 inhalation technique immediately followed by I.V. injection of /sup 18/F-Fluoro-Desoxyglucose (/sup 18/FDG). The normal couple among all 3 variables was demonstrated; but on the other hand significant disruption of either or both the CBF-CMRGlc and the CMRO/sub 2/-CMRGlc couples was found in all 6 stroke patients. Comments on these new findings were made.

  18. Primary bovine skeletal muscle cells enters apoptosis rapidly via the intrinsic pathway when available oxygen is removed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sissel Beate Rønning

    Full Text Available Muscle cells undergo changes post-mortem during the process of converting muscle into meat, and this complex process is far from revealed. Recent reports have suggested programmed cell death (apoptosis to be important in the very early period of converting muscle into meat. The dynamic balance that occurs between anti-apoptotic members, such as Bcl-2, and pro-apoptotic members (Bid, Bim helps determine whether the cell initiates apoptosis. In this study, we used primary bovine skeletal muscle cells, cultured in monolayers in vitro, to investigate if apoptosis is induced when oxygen is removed from the growth medium. Primary bovine muscle cells were differentiated to form myotubes, and anoxia was induced for 6h. The anoxic conditions significantly increased (P<0.05 the relative gene expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic markers (Aif, Bcl-2, Bid and Bim, and the PARK7 (P<0.05 and Grp75 (Hsp70 protein expressions were transiently increased. The anoxic conditions also led to a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which is an early apoptotic event, as well as cytochrome c release from the mitochondria. Finally, reorganization and degradation of cytoskeletal filaments occurred. These results suggest that muscle cells enters apoptosis via the intrinsic pathway rapidly when available oxygen in the muscle diminishes post-mortem.

  19. Muscle Oxygen Supply Impairment during Exercise in Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    TAGOUGUI, SEMAH; LECLAIR, ERWAN; FONTAINE, PIERRE; MATRAN, RÉGIS; MARAIS, GAELLE; AUCOUTURIER, JULIEN; DESCATOIRE, AURÉLIEN; VAMBERGUE, ANNE; OUSSAIDENE, KAHINA; BAQUET, GEORGES; HEYMAN, ELSA

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Aerobic fitness, as reflected by maximal oxygen (O2) uptake (V˙O2max), is impaired in poorly controlled patients with type 1 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying this impairment remain to be explored. This study sought to investigate whether type 1 diabetes and high levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) influence O2 supply including O2 delivery and release to active muscles during maximal exercise. Methods Two groups of patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes (T1D-A, n = 11, with adequate glycemic control, HbA1c 8%) were compared with healthy controls (CON-A, n = 11; CON-I, n = 12, respectively) matched for physical activity and body composition. Subjects performed exhaustive incremental exercise to determine V˙O2max. Throughout the exercise, near-infrared spectroscopy allowed investigation of changes in oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin in the vastus lateralis. Venous and arterialized capillary blood was sampled during exercise to assess arterial O2 transport and factors able to shift the oxyhemoglobin dissociation curve. Results Arterial O2 content was comparable between groups. However, changes in total hemoglobin (i.e., muscle blood volume) was significantly lower in T1D-I compared with that in CON-I. T1D-I also had impaired changes in deoxyhemoglobin levels and increase during high-intensity exercise despite normal erythrocyte 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels. Finally, V˙O2max was lower in T1D-I compared with that in CON-I. No differences were observed between T1D-A and CON-A. Conclusions Poorly controlled patients displayed lower V˙O2max and blunted muscle deoxyhemoglobin increase. The latter supports the hypotheses of increase in O2 affinity induced by hemoglobin glycation and/or of a disturbed balance between nutritive and nonnutritive muscle blood flow. Furthermore, reduced exercise muscle blood volume in poorly controlled patients may warn clinicians of microvascular dysfunction occurring even before overt

  20. Training-induced acceleration of oxygen uptake kinetics in skeletal muscle: the underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, J A; Korzeniewski, B; Grassi, B

    2006-11-01

    It is well known that the oxygen uptake kinetics during rest-to-work transition (V(O2) on-kinetics) in trained subjects is significantly faster than in untrained individuals. It was recently postulated that the main system variable that determines the transition time (t(1/2)) of the V(O2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscle, at a given moderate ATP usage/work intensity, and under the assumption that creatine kinase reaction works near thermodynamic equilibrium, is the absolute (in mM) decrease in [PCr] during rest-to-work transition. Therefore we postulate that the training-induced acceleration of the V(O2) on-kinetics is a marker of an improvement of absolute metabolic stability in skeletal muscles. The most frequently postulated factor responsible for enhancement of muscle metabolic stability is the training-induced increase in mitochondrial proteins. However, the mechanism proposed by Gollnick and Saltin (1982) can improve absolute metabolic stability only if training leads to a decrease in resting [ADP(free)]. This effect is not observed in many examples of training causing an acceleration of the V(O2) on-kinetics, especially in early stages of training. Additionally, this mechanism cannot account for the significant training-induced increase in the relative (expressed in % or as multiples of the resting values) metabolic stability at low work intensities, condition in which oxidative phosphorylation is not saturated with [ADP(free)]. Finally, it was reported that in the early stage of training, acceleration in the V(O2) on-kinetics and enhancement of muscle metabolic stability may precede adaptive responses in mitochondrial enzymes activities or mitochondria content. We postulate that the training-induced acceleration in the V(O2) on-kinetics and the improvement of the metabolite stability during moderate intensity exercise in the early stage of training is mostly caused by an intensification of the "parallel activation" of ATP consumption and ATP supply pathways

  1. Low Po2 conditions induce reactive oxygen species formation during contractions in single skeletal muscle fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiah, Amy; Roberts, William J.; Chien, Michael T.; Wagner, Peter D.; Hogan, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Contractions in whole skeletal muscle during hypoxia are known to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, identification of real-time ROS formation within isolated single skeletal muscle fibers has been challenging. Consequently, there is no convincing evidence showing increased ROS production in intact contracting fibers under low Po2 conditions. Therefore, we hypothesized that intracellular ROS generation in single contracting skeletal myofibers increases during low Po2 compared with a value approximating normal resting Po2. Dihydrofluorescein was loaded into single frog (Xenopus) fibers, and fluorescence was used to monitor ROS using confocal microscopy. Myofibers were exposed to two maximal tetanic contractile periods (1 contraction/3 s for 2 min, separated by a 60-min rest period), each consisting of one of the following treatments: high Po2 (30 Torr), low Po2 (3–5 Torr), high Po2 with ebselen (antioxidant), or low Po2 with ebselen. Ebselen (10 μM) was administered before the designated contractile period. ROS formation during low Po2 treatment was greater than during high Po2 treatment, and ebselen decreased ROS generation in both low- and high-Po2 conditions (P Po2. Force was reduced >30% for each condition except low Po2 with ebselen, which only decreased ∼15%. We concluded that single myofibers under low Po2 conditions develop accelerated and more oxidative stress than at Po2 = 30 Torr (normal human resting Po2). Ebselen decreases ROS formation in both low and high Po2, but only mitigates skeletal muscle fatigue during reduced Po2 conditions. PMID:23576612

  2. Maximal exercise and muscle oxygen extraction in acclimatizing lowlanders and high altitude natives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Sander, Mikael; van Hall, Gerrit

    2006-01-01

    , and is the focus of the present study. We have studied six lowlanders during maximal exercise at sea level (SL) and with acute (AH) exposure to 4,100 m altitude, and again after 2 (W2) and 8 weeks (W8) of altitude sojourn, where also eight high altitude native (Nat) Aymaras were studied. Fractional arterial muscle...... O(2) extraction at maximal exercise was 90.0+/-1.0% in the Danish lowlanders at sea level, and remained close to this value in all situations. In contrast to this, fractional arterial O(2) extraction was 83.2+/-2.8% in the high altitude natives, and did not change with the induction of normoxia....... The capillary oxygen conductance of the lower extremity, a measure of oxygen diffusing capacity, was decreased in the Danish lowlanders after 8 weeks of acclimatization, but was still higher than the value obtained from the high altitude natives. The values were (in ml min(-1) mmHg(-1)) 55.2+/-3.7 (SL), 48...

  3. The utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture for irradiated graphite incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, G.; Perotin, J.P.; Charlot, P.

    1992-01-01

    The authors demonstrate the interest of the utilization of a pressurized-graphite/water/oxygen mixture in the incineration of irradiated graphite. The aqueous phase comes in the form of a three-dimensional system that traps pressurized oxygen, the pulverulent solid being dispersed at the liquid/gas interfaces. These three-phasic formulations give the following advantages: reduction of the apparent viscosity of the mixture in comparison with a solid/liquid mixture at the same solid concentration; reduction of the solid/liquid interactions; self-pulverizability. thus promoting reduction of the flame length utilization of conventional burners; reduction of the flue gas flow rate; complete thermal destruction of graphite. (author)

  4. Dietary nitrate does not reduce oxygen cost of exercise or improve muscle mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabben, M.; Schmitz, J.P.J.; Ciapaite, J.; le Clercq, C.M.P.; van Riel, N.A.; Haak, H.R.; Nicolay, K.; de Coo, I.F.M.; Smeets, H.; Praet, S.F.; van Loon, L.J.; Prompers, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle weakness and exercise intol erance negatively affect the quality of life of patients with mitochondrial myopathy. Short-term dietary nitrate supplementation has been shown to improve exercise performance and reduce oxygen cost of exercise in healthy humans and trained athletes. We

  5. Factors determining the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) on-kinetics in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2004-05-01

    Using a computer model of oxidative phosphorylation developed previously [Korzeniewski and Mazat (1996) Biochem. J. 319, 143-148; Korzeniewski and Zoladz (2001) Biophys. Chem. 92, 17-34], we analyse the effect of several factors on the oxygen-uptake kinetics, especially on the oxygen consumption rate (VO2) and half-transition time t(1/2), at the onset of exercise in skeletal muscles. Computer simulations demonstrate that an increase in the total creatine pool [PCr+/-Cr] (where Cr stands for creatine and PCr for phosphocreatine) and in glycolytic ATP supply lengthen the half-transition time, whereas increase in mitochondrial content, in parallel activation of ATP supply and ATP usage, in oxygen concentration, in proton leak, in resting energy demand, in resting cytosolic pH and in initial alkalization decrease this parameter. Theoretical studies show that a decrease in the activity of creatine kinase (CK) [displacement of this enzyme from equilibrium during on-transient (rest-to-work transition)] accelerates the first stage of the VO2 on-transient, but slows down the second stage of this transient. It is also demonstrated that a prior exercise terminated a few minutes before the principal exercise shortens the transition time. Finally, it is shown that at a given ATP demand, and under conditions where CK works near the thermodynamic equilibrium, the half-transition time of VO2 kinetics is determined by the amount of PCr that has to be transformed into Cr during rest-to-work transition; therefore any factor that diminishes the difference in [PCr] between rest and work at a given energy demand will accelerate the VO2 on-kinetics. Our conclusions agree with the general idea formulated originally by Easterby [(1981) Biochem. J. 199, 155-161] that changes in metabolite concentrations determine the transition times between different steady states in metabolic systems.

  6. Prognostic value of brachioradialis muscle oxygen saturation index and vascular occlusion test in septic shock patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Corral, J; Claverias, L; Bodí, M; Pascual, S; Dubin, A; Gea, J; Rodriguez, A

    2016-05-01

    To compare rSO2 (muscle oxygen saturation index) static and dynamic variables obtained by NIRS (Near Infrared Spectroscopy) in brachioradialis muscle of septic shock patients and its prognostic implications. Prospective and observational study. Intensive care unit. Septic shock patients and healthy volunteers. The probe of a NIRS device (INVOS 5100) was placed on the brachioradialis muscle during a vascular occlusion test (VOT). Baseline, minimum and maximum rSO2 values, deoxygenation rate (DeOx), reoxygenation slope (ReOx) and delta value. Septic shock patients (n=35) had lower baseline rSO2 (63.8±12.2 vs. 69.3±3.3%, p<0.05), slower DeOx (-0.54±0.31 vs. -0.91±0.35%/s, p=0.001), slower ReOx (2.67±2.17 vs. 9.46±3.5%/s, p<0.001) and lower delta (3.25±5.71 vs. 15.1±3.9%, p<0.001) when compared to healthy subjects (n=20). Among septic shock patients, non-survivors showed lower baseline rSO2 (57.0±9.6 vs. 69.8±11.3%, p=0.001), lower minimum rSO2 (36.0±12.8 vs. 51.3±14.8%, p<0.01) and lower maximum rSO2 values (60.6±10.6 vs. 73.3±11.2%, p<0.01). Baseline rSO2 was a good mortality predictor (AUC 0.79; 95%CI: 0.63-0.94, p<0.01). Dynamic parameters obtained with VOT did not improve the results. Septic shock patients present an important alteration of microcirculation that can be evaluated by NIRS with prognostic implications. Monitoring microvascular reactivity in the brachioradialis muscle using VOT with our device does not seem to improve the prognostic value of baseline rSO2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamin-related protein inhibitor downregulates reactive oxygen species levels to indirectly suppress high glucose-induced hyperproliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maimaitijiang, Alimujiang; Zhuang, Xinyu; Jiang, Xiaofei; Li, Yong, E-mail: 11211220031@fudan.edu.cn

    2016-03-18

    Hyperproliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells is a pathogenic mechanism common in diabetic vascular complications and is a putatively important therapeutic target. This study investigated multiple levels of biology, including cellular and organellar changes, as well as perturbations in protein synthesis and morphology. Quantitative and qualitative analysis was utilized to assess the effect of mitochondrial dynamic changes and reactive oxygen species(ROS) levels on high-glucose-induced hyperproliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. The data demonstrated that the mitochondrial fission inhibitor Mdivi-1 and downregulation of ROS levels both effectively inhibited the high-glucose-induced hyperproliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Downregulation of ROS levels played a more direct role and ROS levels were also regulated by mitochondrial dynamics. Increased ROS levels induced excessive mitochondrial fission through dynamin-related protein (Drp 1), while Mdivi-1 suppressed the sensitivity of Drp1 to ROS levels, thus inhibiting excessive mitochondrial fission under high-glucose conditions. This study is the first to propose that mitochondrial dynamic changes and ROS levels interact with each other and regulate high-glucose-induced hyperproliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. This finding provides novel ideas in understanding the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular remodeling and intervention. - Highlights: • Mdivi-1 inhibits VSMC proliferation by lowering ROS level in high-glucose condition. • ROS may be able to induce mitochondrial fission through Drp1 regulation. • Mdivi-1 can suppress the sensitivity of Drp1 to ROS.

  8. Effects of photobiomodulation therapy (pulsed LASER 904 nm) on muscle oxygenation and performance in exercise-induced skeletal muscle fatigue in young women: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Murilo X.; Toma, Renata L.; Jones, Brett J. L.; Cyprien, Thomas P.; Tier, Matthew R.; Wallace, Cameron A.; Renno, Ana C. M.; Sabapathy, Surendran; Laakso, E.-Liisa

    2017-02-01

    Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMt) has been used to increase muscle performance and improve recovery when applied before exercise. We aimed to evaluate the effects of PBMt using LASER on muscle oxygenation and performance. The study was a randomized, participant and assessor-blinded, within-subject crossover trial with placebo control to test the viability of the methods. Five physically active young women were randomly assigned to either placebo, or active PBMt (12 diode cluster probe; 904 nm; 60 mW; 250 Hz; 43.2 J per site, 129.6 J total) in contact over rectus femoris (RF) muscle of the dominant limb immediately before an isokinetic fatigue protocol. A one-week wash-out period preceded cross-over. Electromyography and isokinetic performance measures were evaluated. Absolute concentrations of deoxygenated haemoglobin and myoglobin (deoxy[Hb + Mb]) of the RF, an index of local microvascular fractional O2 extraction, was monitored continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Total haemoglobin concentration as an indicator of microvascular haematocrit was calculated as the sum of the deoxy[Hb + Mb] and oxy[Hb + Mb] signals. PBMt pre-conditioning reduced time to peak torque when compared to placebo (P0.05). PBMt before exercise improves indicators of muscle performance, potentially by increasing local matching of bulk and microvascular O2 delivery relative to skeletal muscle O2 utilisation. Further work is required to understand the effect of PBMt on haemodynamic and metabolic characteristics of muscle.

  9. Changed activation, oxygenation, and pain response of chronically painful muscles to repetitive work after training interventions: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Karen; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Nielsen, Pernille Kofoed

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess changes in myalgic trapezius activation, muscle oxygenation, and pain intensity during repetitive and stressful work tasks in response to 10 weeks of training. In total, 39 women with a clinical diagnosis of trapezius myalgia were randomly...... levels of pain. SST lowered the relative EMG amplitude by 36%, and decreased pain during resting and working conditions by 52 and 38%, respectively, without affecting trapezius oxygenation. In conclusion, GFT performed as leg-bicycling decreased pain development during repetitive work tasks, possibly due...... assigned to: (1) general fitness training performed as leg-bicycling (GFT); (2) specific strength training of the neck/shoulder muscles (SST) or (3) reference intervention without physical exercise. Electromyographic activity (EMG), tissue oxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy), and pain intensity were...

  10. Differences in Muscle Oxygenation, Perceived Fatigue and Recovery between Long-Track and Short-Track Speed Skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinga, Florentina J; Konings, Marco J; Cooper, Chris E

    2016-01-01

    Due to the technical nature of speed skating, that is affecting physiological mechanisms such as oxygenation and blood flow, this sport provides a unique setting allowing us to uncover novel mechanistic insights of the physiological response to exercise in elite middle-distance and endurance sports. The present study aimed to examine the influence of skating mode (short-track vs. long-track) on muscle oxygenation, perceived fatigue, and recovery in elite speed skating. Muscle oxygenation of 12 talented short-track speed skaters was continuously monitored during a long-track (LT) and a short-track (ST) skating time-trial of maximal effort using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) on the m. vastus lateralis for both legs. Video captures were made of each testing session for further interpretation of the muscle oxygenation. To determine recovery, perceived exertion was measured 2 and 4 h after each testing sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA's were used for statistical analysis ( p skating (TSI%-slope: left = 0.050 ± 0.052, right = 0.001 ± 0.053, p skating modes in muscle oxygenation. Respectively, two ( ST = 5.8 ± 2.0; LT = 4.2 ± 1.5) and 4 h ( ST = 4.6 ± 1.9; LT = 3.1 ± 1.6) after the time-trials, a higher rate of perceived exertion was found for ST. Based on our results, ST seems more physiologically demanding, and longer periods of recovery are needed after training compared to LT. Technical aspects unique to the exercise mode seem to impact on oxygenation, affecting processes related to the regulation of exercise intensity such as fatigue and recovery.

  11. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne B; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity...... and changes in CS activity is often assumed. However, this relationship and absolute values of CS and maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) has never been assessed across different studies. A systematic PubMed search on literature published from 1983 to 2013 was performed. The search profile included: citrate...... and CS activity. 70 publications with 97 intervention groups were included. There was a positive (r = 0.45) correlation (P

  12. Vascular smooth muscle modulates endothelial control of vasoreactivity via reactive oxygen species production through myoendothelial communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Billaud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endothelial control of vascular smooth muscle plays a major role in the resulting vasoreactivity implicated in physiological or pathological circulatory processes. However, a comprehensive understanding of endothelial (EC/smooth muscle cells (SMC crosstalk is far from complete. Here, we have examined the role of gap junctions and reactive oxygen species (ROS in this crosstalk and we demonstrate an active contribution of SMC to endothelial control of vasomotor tone. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In small intrapulmonary arteries, quantitative RT-PCR, Western Blot analyses and immunofluorescent labeling evidenced connexin (Cx 37, 40 and 43 in EC and/or SMC. Functional experiments showed that the Cx-mimetic peptide targeted against Cx 37 and Cx 43 ((37,43Gap27 (1 reduced contractile and calcium responses to serotonin (5-HT simultaneously recorded in pulmonary arteries and (2 abolished the diffusion in SMC of carboxyfluorescein-AM loaded in EC. Similarly, contractile and calcium responses to 5-HT were decreased by superoxide dismutase and catalase which, catabolise superoxide anion and H(2O(2, respectively. Both Cx- and ROS-mediated effects on the responses to 5-HT were reversed by L-NAME, a NO synthase inhibitor or endothelium removal. Electronic paramagnetic resonance directly demonstrated that 5-HT-induced superoxide anion production originated from the SMC. Finally, whereas 5-HT increased NO production, it also decreased cyclic GMP content in isolated intact arteries. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate that agonist-induced ROS production in SMC targeting EC via myoendothelial gap junctions reduces endothelial NO-dependent control of pulmonary vasoreactivity. Such SMC modulation of endothelial control may represent a signaling pathway controlling vasoreactivity under not only physiological but also pathological conditions that often implicate excessive ROS production.

  13. Utility and reliability of non-invasive muscle function tests in high-fat-fed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Huenchullan, Sergio F; McLennan, Susan V; Ban, Linda A; Morsch, Marco; Twigg, Stephen M; Tam, Charmaine S

    2017-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Non-invasive muscle function tests have not been validated for use in the study of muscle performance in high-fat-fed mice. What is the main finding and its importance? This study shows that grip strength, hang wire and four-limb hanging tests are able to discriminate the muscle performance between chow-fed and high-fat-fed mice at different time points, with grip strength being reliable after 5, 10 and 20 weeks of dietary intervention. Non-invasive tests are commonly used for assessing muscle function in animal models. The value of these tests in obesity, a condition where muscle strength is reduced, is unclear. We investigated the utility of three non-invasive muscle function tests, namely grip strength (GS), hang wire (HW) and four-limb hanging (FLH), in C57BL/6 mice fed chow (chow group, n = 48) or a high-fat diet (HFD group, n = 48) for 20 weeks. Muscle function tests were performed at 5, 10 and 20 weeks. After 10 and 20 weeks, HFD mice had significantly reduced GS (in newtons; mean ± SD: 10 weeks chow, 1.89 ± 0.1 and HFD, 1.79 ± 0.1; 20 weeks chow, 1.99 ± 0.1 and HFD, 1.75 ± 0.1), FLH [in seconds per gram body weight; median (interquartile range): 10 weeks chow, 2552 (1337-4964) and HFD, 1230 (749-1994); 20 weeks chow, 2048 (765-3864) and HFD, 1036 (717-1855)] and HW reaches [n; median (interquartile range): 10 weeks chow, 4 (2-5) and HFD, 2 (1-3); 20 weeks chow, 3 (1-5) and HFD, 1 (0-2)] and higher falls [n; median (interquartile range): 10 weeks chow, 0 (0-2) and HFD, 3 (1-7); 20 weeks chow, 1 (0-4) and HFD, 8 (5-10)]. Grip strength was reliable in both dietary groups [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.5-0.8; P tests are valuable and reliable tools for assessment of muscle strength and function in high-fat-fed mice. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  14. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute with normal air on macrophage number and infiltration during rat skeletal muscle regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Fujita

    Full Text Available Use of mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute (2026.54 hPa with normal air is emerging as a common complementary treatment for severe muscle injury. Although hyperbaric oxygen at over 2 atmospheres absolute with 100% O2 promotes healing of skeletal muscle injury, it is not clear whether mild hyperbaric oxygen is equally effective. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the impact of hyperbaric oxygen at 1.25 atmospheres absolute (1266.59 hPa with normal air on muscle regeneration. The tibialis anterior muscle of male Wistar rats was injured by injection of bupivacaine hydrochloride, and rats were randomly assigned to a hyperbaric oxygen experimental group or to a non-hyperbaric oxygen control group. Immediately after the injection, rats were exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, and the treatment was continued for 28 days. The cross-sectional area of centrally nucleated muscle fibers was significantly larger in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 and 7 days after injury. The number of CD68- or CD68- and CD206-positive cells was significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. Additionally, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 24 h after injury. The number of Pax7- and MyoD- or MyoD- and myogenin-positive nuclei per mm2 and the expression levels of these proteins were significantly higher in rats exposed to hyperbaric oxygen than in controls 5 days after injury. These results suggest that mild hyperbaric oxygen promotes skeletal muscle regeneration in the early phase after injury, possibly due to reduced hypoxic conditions leading to accelerated macrophage infiltration and phenotype transition. In conclusion, mild hyperbaric oxygen less than 2 atmospheres absolute with normal air is an appropriate support therapy for severe muscle injuries.

  15. Differences in muscle oxygenation, perceived fatigue and recovery between long-track and short-track speed skating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Johanna Hettinga

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the technical nature of speed skating, that is affecting physiological mechanisms such as oxygenation and blood flow, this sport provides a unique setting allowing us to uncover novel mechanistic insights of the physiological response to exercise in elite middle-distance and endurance sports. The present study aimed to examine the influence of skating mode (short-track vs. long-track on muscle oxygenation, perceived fatigue, and recovery in elite speed skating. Muscle oxygenation of twelve talented short-track speed skaters was continuously monitored during a long-track (LT and a short-track (ST skating time-trials of maximal effort using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS on the m. vastus lateralis for both legs. Video captures were made of each testing session for further interpretation of the muscle oxygenation. To determine recovery, perceived exertion was measured two and four hours after each testing sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA’s were used for statistical analysis (p<.05. After a rapid desaturation in both legs directly after the start, an asymmetry in muscle oxygenation between both legs was found during LT (tissue saturation-index (TSI%-slope: left=0.053±0.032; right=0.023±0.020, p<.05 and ST speed skating (TSI%-slope: left=0.050±0,052, right=0.001 ±0.053, p<.05. Re-Resaturation of the right leg was relatively lower in ST compared to LT. For the left leg, no difference was found between skating modes in muscle oxygenation. Respectively, two (ST=5.8±2.0; LT=4.2±1.5 and four hours (ST=4.6±1.9; LT=3.1±1.6 after the time-trials, a higher rate of perceived exertion was found for ST. Based on our results, ST seems more physiologically demanding, and longer periods of recovery are needed after training compared to LT. Technical aspects unique to the exercise mode seem to impact on oxygenation, affecting processes related to the regulation of exercise intensity such as fatigue and recovery.

  16. Electrostimulation improves muscle perfusion but does not affect either muscle deoxygenation or pulmonary oxygen consumption kinetics during a heavy constant-load exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layec, Gwenael; Millet, Grégoire P; Jougla, Aurélie; Micallef, Jean-Paul; Bendahan, David

    2008-02-01

    Electromyostimulation (EMS) is commonly used as part of training programs. However, the exact effects at the muscle level are largely unknown and it has been recently hypothesized that the beneficial effect of EMS could be mediated by an improved muscle perfusion. In the present study, we investigated rates of changes in pulmonary oxygen consumption (VO(2p)) and muscle deoxygenation during a standardized exercise performed after an EMS warm-up session. We aimed at determining whether EMS could modify pulmonary O(2) uptake and muscle deoxygenation as a result of improved oxygen delivery. Nine subjects performed a 6-min heavy constant load cycling exercise bout preceded either by an EMS session (EMS) or under control conditions (CONT). VO(2p) and heart rate (HR) were measured while deoxy-(HHb), oxy-(HbO(2)) and total haemoglobin/myoglobin (Hb(tot)) relative contents were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. EMS significantly increased (P < 0.05) the Hb(tot) resting level illustrating a residual hyperaemia. The EMS priming exercise did not affect either the HHb time constant (17.7 +/- 14.2 s vs. 13.1 +/- 2.3 s under control conditions) or the VO(2p) kinetics (time-constant = 18.2 +/- 5.2 s vs. 15.4 +/- 4.6 s under control conditions). Likewise, the other VO(2p) parameters were unchanged. Our results further indicated that EMS warm-up improved muscle perfusion through a residual hyperaemia. However, neither VO(2p) nor [HHb] kinetics were modified accordingly. These results suggest that improved O(2) delivery by residual hyperaemia induced by EMS does not accelerate the rate of aerobic metabolism during heavy exercise at least in trained subjects.

  17. Utilization of stored elastic energy in leg extensor muscles by men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komi, P V; Bosco, C

    1978-01-01

    An alternating cycle of eccentric-concentric contractions in locomotion represents a sequence when storage and utilization of elastic energy takes place. It is possible that this storage capacity and its utilization depends on the imposed stretch loads in activated muscles, and that sex differences may be present in these phenomena. To investigate these assumed differences, subjects from both sexes and of good physical condition performed vertical jumps on the force-platform from the following experimental conditions: squatting jump (SJ) from a static starting position; counter-movement jump (CMJ) from a free standing position and with a preparatory counter-movement; drop jumps (DJ) from the various heights (20 to 100 cm) on to the platform followed immediately by a vertical jump. In all subjects the SJ, in which condition no appreciable storage of elastic energy takes place, produced the lowest height of rise of the whole body center of gravity (C.G.). The stretch load (drop height) influenced the performance so that height of rise of C. of G. increased when the drop height increased from 26 up to 62 cm (males) and from 20 to 50 cm (females). In all jumping conditions the men jumped higher than the women. However, examination of the utilization of elastic energy indicated that in CMJ the female subjects were able to utilize most (congruent to 90%) of the energy produced in the prestretching phase. Similarly, in DJ the overall change in positive energy over SJ condition was higher in women as compared to men. Thus the results suggest that although the leg extensor muscles of the men subjects could sustain much higher stretch loads, the females may be able to utilize a greater portion of the stored elastic energy in jumping activities.

  18. Arm and leg substrate utilization and muscle adaptation after prolonged low-intensity training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2010-01-01

    This review will focus on current data where substrate metabolism in arm and leg muscle is investigated and discuss the presence of higher carbohydrate oxidation and lactate release observed during arm compared with leg exercise. Furthermore, a basis for a possible difference in substrate partiti...... at comparable workloads. Finally, the influence and capacity of low-intensity training to influence metabolic fitness in the face of a limited effect on aerobic fitness will be challenged....... partitioning between endogenous and exogenous substrate during arm and leg exercise will be debated. Moreover the review will probe if differences between arm and leg muscle are merely a result of different training status rather than a qualitative difference in limb substrate regulation. Along this line...... the review will address the available studies on low-intensity training performed separately with arm or legs or as whole-body training to evaluate if this leads to different adaptations in arm and leg muscle resulting in different substrate utilization patterns during separate arm or leg exercise...

  19. Region-specific adaptations in determinants of rat skeletal muscle oxygenation to chronic hypoxia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wust, R.C.; Jaspers, R.T.; Heyst, A.F.J. van; Hopman, M.T.E.; Hoofd, L.J.C.; Laarse, W.J. van der; Degens, H.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic exposure to hypoxia is associated with muscle atrophy (i.e., a reduction in muscle fiber cross-sectional area), reduced oxidative capacity, and capillary growth. It is controversial whether these changes are muscle and fiber type specific. We hypothesized that different regions of the same

  20. A Mathematical Model of Oxygen Transport in Skeletal Muscle During Hindlimb Unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Laura; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    During hindlimb unloading (HU) dramatic fluid shifts occur within minutes of the suspension, leading to a less precise matching of blood flow to O2 demands of skeletal muscle. Vascular resistance directs blood away from certain muscles, such as the soleus (SOL). The muscle volume gradually reduces in these muscles so that eventually the relative blood flow returns to normal. It is generally believed that muscle volume change is not due to O2 depletion, but a consequence of disuse. However, the volume of the unloaded rat muscle declines over the course of weeks, whereas the redistribution of blood flow occurs immediately. Using a Krogh Cylinder Model, the distribution of O2 was predicted in two skeletal muscles: SOL and gastrocnemius (GAS). Effects of the muscle blood flow, volume, capillary density, and O2 uptake, are included to calculate the pO2 at rest and after 10 min and 15 days of unloading. The model predicts that 32 percent of the SOL muscle tissue has a pO2 1.25 mm Hg within 10 min, whereas the GAS maintains normal O2 levels, and that equilibrium is reached only as the SOL muscle cells degenerate. The results provide evidence that there is an inadequate O2 supply to the mitochondria in the SOL muscle after 10 min HU.

  1. Muscle Deoxygenation Causes Muscle Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, G.; Hargens, A. R.; Lehman, S.; Rempel, D.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the work place, and may be a harbinger for more disabling cumulative trauma disorders. Although the cause of fatigue is multifactorial, reduced blood flow and muscle oxygenation may be the primary factor in causing muscle fatigue during low intensity muscle exertion. Muscle fatigue is defined as a reduction in muscle force production, and also occurs among astronauts who are subjected to postural constraints while performing lengthy, repetitive tasks. The objectives of this research are to: 1) develop an objective tool to study the role of decreased muscle oxygenation on muscle force production, and 2) to evaluate muscle fatigue during prolonged glovebox work.

  2. Influence of Hypoxic Interval Training and Hyperoxic Recovery on Muscle Activation and Oxygenation in Connection with Double-Poling Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Zinner

    Full Text Available Here, we evaluated the influence of breathing oxygen at different partial pressures during recovery from exercise on performance at sea-level and a simulated altitude of 1800 m, as reflected in activation of different upper body muscles, and oxygenation of the m. triceps brachii. Ten well-trained, male endurance athletes (25.3±4.1 yrs; 179.2±4.5 cm; 74.2±3.4 kg performed four test trials, each involving three 3-min sessions on a double-poling ergometer with 3-min intervals of recovery. One trial was conducted entirely under normoxic (No and another under hypoxic conditions (Ho; FiO2 = 0.165. In the third and fourth trials, the exercise was performed in normoxia and hypoxia, respectively, with hyperoxic recovery (HOX; FiO2 = 1.00 in both cases. Arterial hemoglobin saturation was higher under the two HOX conditions than without HOX (p<0.05. Integrated muscle electrical activity was not influenced by the oxygen content (best d = 0.51. Furthermore, the only difference in tissue saturation index measured via near-infrared spectroscopy observed was between the recovery periods during the NoNo and HoHOX interventions (P<0.05, d = 0.93. In the case of HoHo the athletes' Pmean declined from the first to the third interval (P < 0.05, whereas Pmean was unaltered under the HoHOX, NoHOX and NoNo conditions. We conclude that the less pronounced decline in Pmean during 3 x 3-min double-poling sprints in normoxia and hypoxia with hyperoxic recovery is not related to changes in muscle activity or oxygenation. Moreover, we conclude that hyperoxia (FiO2 = 1.00 used in conjunction with hypoxic or normoxic work intervals may serve as an effective aid when inhaled during the subsequent recovery intervals.

  3. Underwater Near-Infrared Spectroscopy: Muscle Oxygen Changes in the Upper and Lower Extremities in Club Level Swimmers and Triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B; Cooper, C E

    2016-01-01

    To date, measurements of oxygen status during swim exercise have focused upon systemic aerobic capacity. The development of a portable, waterproof NIRS device makes possible a local measurement of muscle hemodynamics and oxygenation that could provide a novel insight into the physiological changes that occur during swim exercise. The purpose of this study was to observe changes in muscle oxygenation in the vastus lateralis (VL) and latissimus dorsi (LD) of club level swimmers and triathletes. Ten subjects, five club level swimmers and five club level triathletes (three men and seven women) were used for assessment. Swim group; mean±SD=age 21.2±1.6 years; height 170.6±7.5 cm; weight 62.8±6.9 kg; vastus lateralis skin fold 13.8±5.6 mm; latissimus dorsi skin fold 12.6±3.7. Triathlete group; mean±SD=age 44.0±10.5 years; height 171.6±7.0 cm; weight 68.6±12.7 kg; vastus lateralis skin fold 11.8±3.5 mm; latissimus dorsi skin fold 11.2±3.1. All subjects completed a maximal 200 m freestyle swim, with the PortaMon, a portable NIR device, attached to the subject's dominant side musculature. ΔTSI% between the vastus lateralis and latissimus dorsi were analysed using either paired (2-tailed) t-tests or Wilcoxon signed rank test. The level of significance for analysis was set at pswim significantly faster (p=0.04) than club level triathletes. Club level swimmers use both the upper and lower muscles to a similar extent during a maximal 200 m swim. Club level triathletes predominately use the upper body for propulsion during the same exercise. The data produced by NIRS in this study are the first of their kind and provide insight into muscle oxygenation changes during swim exercise which can indicate the contribution of one muscle compared to another. This also enables a greater understanding of the differences in swimming techniques seen between different cohorts of swimmers and potentially within individual swimmers.

  4. Utilizing the non-bridge oxygen model to predict the glass viscosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwansik; Sheng, Jiawei; Maeng, Sung Jun; Song, Myung Jae

    1998-01-01

    Viscosity is the most important process property of waste glass. Viscosity measurement is difficult and costs much. Non-bridging Oxygen (NBO) model which relates glass composition to viscosity had been developed for high level waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This research utilized this NBO model to predict the viscosity of KEPRI's 55 glasses. It was found that there was a linear relationship between the measured viscosity and the predicted viscosity. The NBO model could be used to predict glass viscosity in glass formulation development. However the precision of predicted viscosity is out of satisfaction because the composition ranges are very different between the SRS and KEPRI glasses. The modification of NBO calculation, which included modification of alkaline earth elements and TiO 2 , could not strikingly improve the precision of predicted values

  5. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise: role of subcellular localization and fibre type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik D; Saltin, Bengt; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis that utilization of glycogen with different subcellular localizations during exhaustive arm and leg exercise differs and examined the influence of fibre type and carbohydrate availability on its subsequent resynthesis. When 10 elite endurance athletes (22 ± 1 years, = 68 ± 5 ml kg−1 min−1, mean ± SD) performed one hour of exhaustive arm and leg exercise, transmission electron microscopy revealed more pronounced depletion of intramyofibrillar than of intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen. This phenomenon was the same for type I and II fibres, although at rest prior to exercise, the former contained more intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen than the latter. In highly glycogen-depleted fibres, the remaining small intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen particles were often found to cluster in groupings. In the recovery period, when the athletes received either a carbohydrate-rich meal or only water the impaired resynthesis of glycogen with water alone was associated primarily with intramyofibrillar glycogen. In conclusion, after prolonged high-intensity exercise the depletion of glycogen is dependent on subcellular localization. In addition, the localization of glycogen appears to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. PMID:21486810

  6. Changes in Whole-Body Oxygen Consumption and Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria During Linezolid-Induced Lactic Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protti, Alessandro; Ronchi, Dario; Bassi, Gabriele; Fortunato, Francesco; Bordoni, Andreina; Rizzuti, Tommaso; Fumagalli, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    To better clarify the pathogenesis of linezolid-induced lactic acidosis. Case report. ICU. A 64-year-old man who died with linezolid-induced lactic acidosis. Skeletal muscle was sampled at autopsy to study mitochondrial function. Lactic acidosis developed during continuous infusion of linezolid while oxygen consumption and oxygen extraction were diminishing from 172 to 52 mL/min/m and from 0.27 to 0.10, respectively. Activities of skeletal muscle respiratory chain complexes I, III, and IV, encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, were abnormally low, whereas activity of complex II, entirely encoded by nuclear DNA, was not. Protein studies confirmed stoichiometric imbalance between mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase subunits 1 and 2) and nuclear (succinate dehydrogenase A) DNA-encoded respiratory chain subunits. These findings were not explained by defects in mitochondrial DNA or transcription. There were no compensatory mitochondrial biogenesis (no induction of nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcript factor A) or adaptive unfolded protein response (reduced concentration of heat shock proteins 60 and 70). Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis is associated with diminished global oxygen consumption and extraction. These changes reflect selective inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis (probably translation) with secondary mitonuclear imbalance. One novel aspect of linezolid toxicity that needs to be confirmed is blunting of reactive mitochondrial biogenesis and unfolded protein response.

  7. From Oxygen Generation to Metals Production: In Situ Resource Utilization by Molten Oxide Electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetpal, Deepak; Ducret, Andrew C.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    For the exploration of other bodies in the solar system, electrochemical processing is arguably the most versatile technology for conversion of local resources into usable commodities: by electrolysis one can, in principle, produce (1) breathable oxygen, (2) silicon for the fabrication of solar cells, (3) various reactive metals for use as electrodes in advanced storage batteries, and (4) structural metals such as steel and aluminum. Even so, to date there has been no sustained effort to develop such processes, in part due to the inadequacy of the database. The objective here is to identify chemistries capable of sustaining molten oxide electrolysis in the cited applications and to examine the behavior of laboratory-scale cells designed to generate oxygen and to produce metal. The basic research includes the study of the underlying high-temperature physical chemistry of oxide melts representative of lunar regolith and of Martian soil. To move beyond empirical approaches to process development, the thermodynamic and transport properties of oxide melts are being studied to help set the limits of composition and temperature for the processing trials conducted in laboratory-scale electrolysis cells. The goal of this investigation is to deliver a working prototype cell that can use lunar regolith and Martian soil to produce breathable oxygen along with metal by-product. Additionally, the process can be generalized to permit adaptation to accommodate different feedstock chemistries, such as those that will be encountered on other bodies in the solar system. The expected results of this research include: (1) the identification of appropriate electrolyte chemistries; (2) the selection of candidate anode and cathode materials compatible with electrolytes named above; and (3) performance data from a laboratory-scale cell producing oxygen and metal. On the strength of these results it should be possible to assess the technical viability of molten oxide electrolysis for in

  8. Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) overexpression increases reactive oxygen species production and inhibits murine muscle satellite cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandiford, Shelley D E; Kennedy, Karen A M; Xie, Xiaojun; Pickering, J Geoffrey; Li, Shawn S C

    2014-01-11

    Dual oxidase maturation factor 1 (DUOXA1) has been associated with the maturation of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing enzyme, dual oxidase 1 (DUOX1) in the adult thyroid. However, ROS have also been implicated in the development of several tissues. We found that activated muscle satellite cells and primary myoblasts isolated from mice express robust levels of DUOXA1 and that its levels are altered as cells differentiate. To determine whether DUOXA1 levels affect muscle differentiation, we used an adenoviral construct (pCMV5-DUOXA1-GFP) to drive constitutive overexpression of this protein in primary myoblasts. High levels of DUOXA1 throughout myogenesis resulted in enhanced H2O2 production, fusion defects, reduced expression of early (myogenin) and late (myosin heavy chain) markers of differentiation, and elevated levels of apoptosis compared to control cells infected with an empty adenoviral vector (pCMV5-GFP). DUOXA1 knockdown (using a DUOXA1 shRNA construct) resulted in enhanced differentiation compared to cells subjected to a control shRNA, and subjecting DUOXA1 overexpressing cells to siRNAs targeting DUOX1 or apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) rescued the phenotype. This study represents the first to demonstrate the importance of DUOXA1 in skeletal muscle myoblasts and that DUOXA1 overexpression in muscle stem cells induces apoptosis and inhibits differentiation through DUOX1 and ASK1.

  9. Anti-skeletal muscle atrophy effect of Oenothera odorata root extract via reactive oxygen species-dependent signaling pathways in cellular and mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Kim, Wan-Joong; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Gelinsky, Michael; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy can be defined as a decrease of muscle volume caused by injury or lack of use. This condition is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in various muscular disorders. We acquired 2D and 3D images using micro-computed tomography in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of sciatic-denervated mice. We confirmed that sciatic denervation-small animal model reduced muscle volume. However, the intraperitoneal injection of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) delayed muscle atrophy compared to a control group. We also investigated the mechanism of muscle atrophy's relationship with ROS. EVP suppressed expression of SOD1, and increased expression of HSP70, in both H2O2-treated C2C12 myoblasts and sciatic-denervated mice. Moreover, EVP regulated apoptotic signals, including caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, and ceramide. These results indicate that EVP has a positive effect on reducing the effect of ROS on muscle atrophy.

  10. Selection criteria utilized for hyperbaric oxygen treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, N B; Dunford, R G; Kramer, C C; Norkool, D M

    1995-01-01

    Medical directors of North American hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) facilities were surveyed to assess selection criteria applied for treatment of acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning within the hyperbaric medicine community. Responses were received from 85% of the 208 facilities in the United States and Canada. Among responders, 89 monoplace and 58 multiplace chamber facilities treat acute CO poisoning, managing a total of 2,636 patients in 1992. A significant majority of facilities treat CO-exposed patients with coma (98%), transient loss of consciousness (LOC) (77%), ischemic changes on electrocardiogram (91%), focal neurologic deficits (94%), or abnormal psychometric testing (91%), regardless of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level. Although 92% would use HBO for a patient presenting with headache, nausea, and COHb 40%, only 62% of facilities utilize a specified minimum COHb level as the sole criterion for HBO therapy of an asymptomatic patient. When COHb is used as an independent criterion to determine HBO treatment, the level utilized varies widely between institutions. Half of responding facilities place limits on the delay to treatment for patients with only transient LOC. Time limits are applied less often in cases with persistent neurologic deficits. While variability exists, majority opinions can be derived for many patient selection criteria regarding the use of HBO in acute CO poisoning.

  11. Oxygen delivery and the restoration of the muscle energetic balance following exercise: implications for delayed muscle recovery in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layec, Gwenael; Hart, Corey R; Trinity, Joel D; Kwon, Oh-Sung; Rossman, Matthew J; Broxterman, Ryan M; Le Fur, Yann; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2017-07-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) experience a delayed recovery from skeletal muscle fatigue following exhaustive exercise that likely contributes to their progressive loss of mobility. As this phenomenon is not well understood, this study sought to examine postexercise peripheral oxygen (O 2 ) transport and muscle metabolism dynamics in patients with COPD, two important determinants of muscle recovery. Twenty-four subjects, 12 nonhypoxemic patients with COPD and 12 healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle, performed dynamic plantar flexion exercise at 40% of the maximal work rate (WR max ) with phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS), near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), and vascular Doppler ultrasound assessments. The mean response time of limb blood flow at the offset of exercise was significantly prolonged in patients with COPD (controls: 56 ± 27 s; COPD: 120 ± 87 s; P 0.05). The initial postexercise convective O 2 delivery (controls: 0.15 ± 0.06 l/min; COPD: 0.15 ± 0.06 l/min) and the corresponding oxidative adenosine triphosphate (ATP) demand (controls: 14 ± 6 mM/min; COPD: 14 ± 6 mM/min) in the calf were not significantly different between controls and patients with COPD ( P > 0.05). The phosphocreatine resynthesis time constant (controls: 46 ± 20 s; COPD: 49 ± 21 s), peak mitochondrial phosphorylation rate, and initial proton efflux were also not significantly different between groups ( P > 0.05). Therefore, despite perturbed peripheral hemodynamics, intracellular O 2 availability, proton efflux, and aerobic metabolism recovery in the skeletal muscle of nonhypoxemic patients with COPD are preserved following plantar flexion exercise and thus are unlikely to contribute to the delayed recovery from exercise in this population.

  12. Efficiency of Photosynthesis in a Chl d-Utilizing Cyanobacterium is Comparable to or Higher than that in Chl a-Utilizing Oxygenic Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, S. P.; Kiang, N. Y.; Blankenship, R. E.; Gunner, M. R.; Mauzerall, D.

    2011-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina uses chlorophyll d to carry out oxygenic photosynthesis in environments depleted in visible and enhanced in lower-energy, far-red light. However, the extent to which low photon energies limit the efficiency of oxygenic photochemistry in A. marina is not known. Here, we report the first direct measurements of the energy-storage efficiency of the photosynthetic light reactions in A. marina whole cells,and find it is comparable to or higher than that in typical, chlorophyll a-utilizing oxygenic species. This finding indicates that oxygenic photosynthesis is not fundamentally limited at the photon energies employed by A. marina, and therefore is potentially viable in even longer-wavelength light environments.

  13. Do interindividual differences in cardiac output during submaximal exercise explain differences in exercising muscle oxygenation and ratings of perceived exertion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Robert F; Jones, Joshua H; Hirai, Daniel M; Zelt, Joel T; Giles, Matthew D; Raleigh, James P; Quadrilatero, Joe; Gurd, Brendon J; Neder, J Alberto; Tschakovsky, Michael E

    2018-01-01

    Considerable interindividual differences in the Q˙-V˙O2 relationship during exercise have been documented but implications for submaximal exercise tolerance have not been considered. We tested the hypothesis that these interindividual differences were associated with differences in exercising muscle deoxygenation and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) across a range of submaximal exercise intensities. A total of 31 (21 ± 3 years) healthy recreationally active males performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion 24 h following a resting muscle biopsy. Cardiac output (Q˙ L/min; inert gas rebreathe), oxygen uptake (V˙O2 L/min; breath-by-breath pulmonary gas exchange), quadriceps saturation (near infrared spectroscopy) and exercise tolerance (6-20; Borg Scale RPE) were measured. The Q˙-V˙O2 relationship from 40 to 160 W was used to partition individuals post hoc into higher (n = 10; 6.3 ± 0.4) versus lower (n = 10; 3.7 ± 0.4, P exercise (all P > 0.4). Lower cardiac responders had greater leg (P = 0.027) and whole body (P = 0.03) RPE only at 185 W, but this represented a higher %peak V˙O2 in lower cardiac responders (87 ± 15% vs. 66 ± 12%, P = 0.005). Substantially lower Q˙-V˙O2 in the lower responder group did not result in altered RPE or exercising muscle deoxygenation. This suggests substantial recruitment of blood flow redistribution in the lower responder group as part of protecting matching of exercising muscle oxygen delivery to demand. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  14. Conversion rate of para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen: implications for PHIP gas storage and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    To determine the storability of para-hydrogen before reestablishment of the room temperature thermal equilibrium mixture. Para-hydrogen was produced at near 100% purity and mixed with different oxygen quantities to determine the rate of conversion to the thermal equilibrium mixture of 75: 25% (ortho: para) by detecting the ortho-hydrogen (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance using a 9.4 T imager. The para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen velocity constant, k, near room temperature (292 K) was determined to be 8.27 ± 1.30 L/mol · min(-1). This value was calculated utilizing four different oxygen fractions. Para-hydrogen conversion to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen can be minimized for long term storage with judicious removal of oxygen contamination. Prior calculated velocity rates were confirmed demonstrating a dependence on only the oxygen concentration.

  15. [Evaluation of heart impact in the 100 m extreme intensity sport using near-infrared non-invasive muscle oxygen detecting device and sports heart rate detection technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Yong; Long, Fei-Xiao; Fu, Lan-Ying; Li, Yue; Ding, Hai-Shu; Qu, An-Lian; Zhou, Xiao-Ping

    2010-02-01

    Using continuous two wavelength near-infrared technology to detect the variation in the consistency of oxygen hemoglobin in the muscle and the sports heart rate wireless real time collection technology, we devised the real time muscle tissue oxygenation and instantaneous heart rate experiment scheme and implemented it for the process of the 100 m run with two parameters given simultaneously. The experiment shows that the concentration of the oxygen hemoglobin in the muscle tissue continues decreasing after the end of the 100 m run, and the time interval between the moment when the concentration of the oxygen hemoglobin attains the minimum value and the moment when the athletes finish the 100 m run is (6.65 +/- 1.10) sec; while the heart rate continues increasing after the end of the 100 m run, and the time interval between the moment when the heart rate attains the maximum value and the moment when the athletes finish the 100 m run is (8.00 +/- 1.57) sec. The results show that the two wavelength near-infrared tissue oxygenation detection technology and the sports heart rate real time collection equipment can accurately measure the sports tissue oxygenation and the heart rate in the extreme intensity sport, and reveal the process of muscle oxygen transportation and consumption and its dynamic character with the heart rate in the extreme intensity sport.

  16. Validation of a novel wearable, wireless technology to estimate oxygen levels and lactate threshold power in the exercising muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzam, Parisa; Starkweather, Zack; Franceschini, Maria A

    2018-04-01

    There is a growing interest in monitoring muscle oxygen saturation (SmO 2 ), which is a localized measure of muscle oxidative metabolism and can be acquired continuously and noninvasively using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methods. Most NIRS systems are cumbersome, expensive, fiber coupled devices, with use limited to lab settings. A novel, low cost, wireless, wearable has been developed for use in athletic training. In this study, we evaluate the advantages and limitations of this new simple continuous-wave (CW) NIRS device with respect to a benchtop, frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FDNIRS) system. Oxygen saturation and hemoglobin/myoglobin concentration in the exercising muscles of 17 athletic individuals were measured simultaneously with the two systems, while subjects performed an incremental test on a stationary cycle ergometer. In addition, blood lactate concentration was measured at the end of each increment with a lactate analyzer. During exercise, the correlation coefficients of the SmO 2 and hemoglobin/myoglobin concentrations between the two systems were over 0.70. We also found both systems were insensitive to the presence of thin layers of varying absorption, mimicking different skin colors. Neither system was able to predict the athletes' lactate threshold power accurately by simply using SmO 2 thresholds. Instead, the proprietary software of the wearable device was able to predict the athletes' lactate threshold power within half of one power increment of the cycling test. These results indicate this novel wearable device may provide a physiological indicator of athlete's exertion. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Examiner's finger-mounted near-infrared spectroscopy is feasible to analyze cerebral and skeletal muscle oxygenation in conscious Chihuahuas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, Keisuke; Doi, Kimiaki; Mizuno, Risuke; Yokosuka, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    To measure regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) of hemoglobin and total hemoglobin index (HbI) in the brain (through the molera of the head) and skeletal muscle (musculus gracilis) of conscious Chihuahua dogs using an examiner's finger-mounted near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) device, Toccare, we investigated brain and skeletal muscle NIRS in 48 Chihuahuas without severe disease. To measure rSO2 and total HbI, a Toccare probe was placed on the molera of the head and musculus gracilis of each dog for real-time recording. Stable NIRS values were obtained within 10 s. We also examined the effect of anesthesia on rSO2 and total HbI of a Chihuahua. Cerebral rSO2 values (59%±7%) were significantly lower than those obtained at femoral regions (67%±6%), whereas total HbI values in the brain (0.38±0.09) were significantly higher than those of the musculus gracilis (0.20±0.05). Sedation with a combination of medetomidine and ketamine decreased cerebral rSO2 along with a corresponding reduction in heart rate. Sevoflurane anesthesia with 100% O2 maintained rSO2 in the brain with an even lower heart rate. In conclusions, we measured brain and skeletal muscle rSO2 of hemoglobin in conscious Chihuahuas using a newly developed NIRS device, Toccare, and found that changes in cerebral oxygenation levels were associated with administration of anesthetics.

  18. TCA cycle rewiring fosters metabolic adaptation to oxygen restriction in skeletal muscle from rodents and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, Daniele; Fania, Chiara; Torretta, Enrica; Viganò, Agnese; Moriggi, Manuela; Bravatà, Valentina; Caretti, Anna; Levett, Denny Z H; Grocott, Michael P W; Samaja, Michele; Cerretelli, Paolo; Gelfi, Cecilia

    2017-08-29

    In mammals, hypoxic stress management is under the control of the Hypoxia Inducible Factors, whose activity depends on the stabilization of their labile α subunit. In particular, the skeletal muscle appears to be able to react to changes in substrates and O 2 delivery by tuning its metabolism. The present study provides a comprehensive overview of skeletal muscle metabolic adaptation to hypoxia in mice and in human subjects exposed for 7/9 and 19 days to high altitude levels. The investigation was carried out combining proteomics, qRT-PCR mRNA transcripts analysis, and enzyme activities assessment in rodents, and protein detection by antigen antibody reactions in humans and rodents. Results indicate that the skeletal muscle react to a decreased O 2 delivery by rewiring the TCA cycle. The first TCA rewiring occurs in mice in 2-day hypoxia and is mediated by cytosolic malate whereas in 10-day hypoxia the rewiring is mediated by Idh1 and Fasn, supported by glutamine and HIF-2α increments. The combination of these specific anaplerotic steps can support energy demand despite HIFs degradation. These results were confirmed in human subjects, demonstrating that the TCA double rewiring represents an essential factor for the maintenance of muscle homeostasis during adaptation to hypoxia.

  19. A practical approach to assess leg muscle oxygenation during ramp-incremental cycle ergometry in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.C. Barroco

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is characterized by the inability of the cardiovascular system to maintain oxygen (O2 delivery (i.e., muscle blood flow in non-hypoxemic patients to meet O2 demands. The resulting increase in fractional O2 extraction can be non-invasively tracked by deoxygenated hemoglobin concentration (deoxi-Hb as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS. We aimed to establish a simplified approach to extract deoxi-Hb-based indices of impaired muscle O2 delivery during rapidly-incrementing exercise in heart failure. We continuously probed the right vastus lateralis muscle with continuous-wave NIRS during a ramp-incremental cardiopulmonary exercise test in 10 patients (left ventricular ejection fraction <35% and 10 age-matched healthy males. Deoxi-Hb is reported as % of total response (onset to peak exercise in relation to work rate. Patients showed lower maximum exercise capacity and O2 uptake-work rate than controls (P<0.05. The deoxi-Hb response profile as a function of work rate was S-shaped in all subjects, i.e., it presented three distinct phases. Increased muscle deoxygenation in patients compared to controls was demonstrated by: i a steeper mid-exercise deoxi-Hb-work rate slope (2.2±1.3 vs 1.0±0.3% peak/W, respectively; P<0.05, and ii late-exercise increase in deoxi-Hb, which contrasted with stable or decreasing deoxi-Hb in all controls. Steeper deoxi-Hb-work rate slope was associated with lower peak work rate in patients (r=–0.73; P=0.01. This simplified approach to deoxi-Hb interpretation might prove useful in clinical settings to quantify impairments in O2 delivery by NIRS during ramp-incremental exercise in individual heart failure patients.

  20. Comparative genomic analyses of copper transporters and cuproproteomes reveal evolutionary dynamics of copper utilization and its link to oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry G Ridge

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential trace element in many organisms and is utilized in all domains of life. It is often used as a cofactor of redox proteins, but is also a toxic metal ion. Intracellular copper must be carefully handled to prevent the formation of reactive oxygen species which pose a threat to DNA, lipids, and proteins. In this work, we examined patterns of copper utilization in prokaryotes by analyzing the occurrence of copper transporters and copper-containing proteins. Many organisms, including those that lack copper-dependent proteins, had copper exporters, likely to protect against copper ions that inadvertently enter the cell. We found that copper use is widespread among prokaryotes, but also identified several phyla that lack cuproproteins. This is in contrast to the use of other trace elements, such as selenium, which shows more scattered and reduced usage, yet larger selenoproteomes. Copper transporters had different patterns of occurrence than cuproproteins, suggesting that the pathways of copper utilization and copper detoxification are independent of each other. We present evidence that organisms living in oxygen-rich environments utilize copper, whereas the majority of anaerobic organisms do not. In addition, among copper users, cuproproteomes of aerobic organisms were larger than those of anaerobic organisms. Prokaryotic cuproproteomes were small and dominated by a single protein, cytochrome c oxidase. The data are consistent with the idea that proteins evolved to utilize copper following the oxygenation of the Earth.

  1. Nutrient utilization and oxygen production by Chlorella Vulgaris in a hybrid membrane bioreactor and algal membrane photobioreactor system

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Yasmeen Hani Kamal

    2017-02-17

    This work studied oxygen production and nutrient utilization by Chlorella Vulgaris at different organic/inorganic carbon (OC/IC) and ammonium/nitrate (NH4+-N/NO3--N) ratios to design a hybrid aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and membrane photobioreactor (MPBR) system. Specific oxygen production by C. vulgaris was enough to support the MBR if high growth is accomplished. Nearly 100% removal (or utilization) of PO43--P and IC was achieved under all conditions tested. Optimal growth was achieved at mixotrophic carbon conditions (0.353 d-1) and the highest NH4+-N concentration (0.357 d-1), with preferable NH4+-N utilization rather than NO3--N. The results indicate the potential of alternative process designs to treat domestic wastewater by coupling the hybrid MBR - MPBR systems.

  2. Nutrient utilization and oxygen production by Chlorella Vulgaris in a hybrid membrane bioreactor and algal membrane photobioreactor system

    KAUST Repository

    Najm, Yasmeen Hani Kamal; Jeong, Sanghyun; Leiknes, TorOve

    2017-01-01

    This work studied oxygen production and nutrient utilization by Chlorella Vulgaris at different organic/inorganic carbon (OC/IC) and ammonium/nitrate (NH4+-N/NO3--N) ratios to design a hybrid aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) and membrane photobioreactor (MPBR) system. Specific oxygen production by C. vulgaris was enough to support the MBR if high growth is accomplished. Nearly 100% removal (or utilization) of PO43--P and IC was achieved under all conditions tested. Optimal growth was achieved at mixotrophic carbon conditions (0.353 d-1) and the highest NH4+-N concentration (0.357 d-1), with preferable NH4+-N utilization rather than NO3--N. The results indicate the potential of alternative process designs to treat domestic wastewater by coupling the hybrid MBR - MPBR systems.

  3. THE CONTRIBUTION OF 'RESTING' BODY MUSCLES TO THE SLOW COMPONENT OF PULMONARY OXYGEN UPTAKE DURING HIGH-INTENSITY CYCLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan A. Ward

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen uptake (VO2 kinetics during moderate constant- workrate (WR exercise (>lactate-threshold (ӨL are well described as exponential. AboveӨL, these kinetics are more complex, consequent to the development of a delayed slow component (VO2sc, whose aetiology remains controversial. To assess the extent of the contribution to the VO2sc from arm muscles involved in postural stability during cycling, six healthy subjects completed an incremental cycle-ergometer test to the tolerable limit for estimation of ӨL and determination of peak VO2. They then completed two constant-WR tests at 90% of ӨL and two at 80% of ∆ (difference between ӨL and VO2peak. Gas exchange variables were derived breath-by-breath. Local oxygenation profiles of the vastus lateralis and biceps brachii muscles were assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, with maximal voluntary contractions (MVC of the relevant muscles being performed post-exercise to provide a frame of reference for normalising the exercise-related oxygenation responses across subjects. Above supra-ӨL, VO2 rose in an exponential-like fashion ("phase 2, with a delayed VO2sc subsequently developing. This was accompanied by an increase in [reduced haemoglobin] relative to baseline (∆[Hb], which attained 79 ± 13 % (mean, SD of MVC maximum in vastus lateralis at end-exercise and 52 ± 27 % in biceps brachii. Biceps brachii ∆[Hb] was significantly correlated with VO2 throughout the slow phase. In contrast, for sub- L exercise, VO2 rose exponentially to reach a steady state with a more modest increase in vastus lateralis ∆[Hb] (30 ± 11 %; biceps brachii ∆[Hb] was minimally affected (8 ± 2 %. That the intramuscular O2 desaturation profile in biceps brachii was proportional to that for VO2sc during supra-ӨL cycle ergometry is consistent with additional stabilizing arm work contributing to the VO2sc

  4. Skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake at rest and during exercise in humans: a PET study with nitric oxide and cyclooxygenase inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Saltin, Bengt; Kemppainen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide and prostanoids on microcirculation and oxygen uptake specifically in the active skeletal muscle by use of positron emission tomography (PET). Healthy males performed 3 five min bouts of light knee-extensor exercise. Skeletal...... muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake were measured at rest and during the exercise using PET with H(2)O(15) and (15)O(2) during: 1) control conditions; 2) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition by arterial infusion of L-NMMA and 3) combined NOS and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition by arterial infusion of L...

  5. Thermodynamic Considerations of Direct Oxygen Removal from Titanium by Utilizing the Deoxidation Capability of Rare Earth Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Toru H.; Zheng, Chenyi; Taninouchi, Yu-ki

    2018-06-01

    Oxygen removal from metallic Ti is extremely difficult and, currently, there is no commercial process for effectively deoxidizing Ti or its alloys. The oxygen concentration in Ti scraps is normally higher than that in virgin metals such as in Ti sponges produced by the Kroll process. When scraps are remelted with virgin metals for producing primary ingots of Ti or its alloys, the amount of scrap that can be used is limited owing to the accumulation of oxygen impurities. Future demands of an increase in Ti production and of mitigating environmental impacts require that the amount of scrap recycled as a feed material of Ti ingots should also increase. Therefore, it is important to develop methods for removing oxygen directly from Ti scraps. In this study, we evaluated the deoxidation limit for β-Ti using Y or light rare earth metals (La, Ce, Pr, or Nd) as a deoxidant. Thermodynamic considerations suggest that extra-low-oxygen Ti, with an oxygen concentration of 100 mass ppm or less can be obtained using a molten salt equilibrating with rare earth metals. The results presented herein also indicate that methods based on molten salt electrolysis for producing rare earth metals can be utilized for effectively and directly deoxidizing Ti scraps.

  6. Muscle utilization patterns vary by skill levels of the practitioners across specific yoga poses (asanas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Meng; Mooney, Kiersten; Balachandran, Anoop; Richards, Luca; Harriell, Kysha; Signorile, Joseph F

    2014-08-01

    To compare muscle activation patterns in 14 dominant side muscles during different yoga poses across three skill levels. Mixed repeated-measures descriptive study. University neuromuscular research laboratory, Miami, US. A group of 36 yoga practitioners (9 M/27 F; mean ± SD, 31.6 ± 12.6 years) with at least 3 months yoga practice experience. Each of the 11 surya namaskar poses A and B was performed separately for 15s and the surface electromyography for 14 muscles were recorded. Normalized root mean square of the electromyographic signal (NrmsEMG) for 14 muscles (5 upper body, 4 trunk, 5 lower body). There were significant main effects of pose for all fourteen muscles except middle trapezius (p<.02) and of skill level for the vastus medialis; p=.027). A significant skill level × pose interaction existed for five muscles (pectoralis major sternal head, anterior deltoid, medial deltoid, upper rectus abdominis and gastrocnemius lateralis; p<.05). Post hoc analyses using Bonferroni comparisons indicated that different poses activated specific muscle groups; however, this varied by skill level. Our results indicate that different poses can produce specific muscle activation patterns which may vary due to practitioners' skill levels. This information can be used in designing rehabilitation and training programs and for cuing during yoga training. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cross-bridge blocker BTS permits direct measurement of SR Ca2+ pump ATP utilization in toadfish swimbladder muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Iain S; Harwood, Claire L; Rome, Lawrence C

    2003-10-01

    Because the major processes involved in muscle contraction require rapid utilization of ATP, measurement of ATP utilization can provide important insights into the mechanisms of contraction. It is necessary, however, to differentiate between the contribution made by cross-bridges and that of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pumps. Specific and potent SR Ca2+ pump blockers have been used in skinned fibers to permit direct measurement of cross-bridge ATP utilization. Up to now, there was no analogous cross-bridge blocker. Recently, N-benzyl-p-toluene sulfonamide (BTS) was found to suppress force generation at micromolar concentrations. We tested whether BTS could be used to block cross-bridge ATP utilization, thereby permitting direct measurement of SR Ca2+ pump ATP utilization in saponin-skinned fibers. At 25 microM, BTS virtually eliminates force and cross-bridge ATP utilization (both BTS. At 25 microM, BTS had no effect on SR pump ATP utilization. Hence, we used BTS to make some of the first direct measurements of ATP utilization of intact SR over a physiological range of [Ca2+]at 15 degrees C. Curve fits to SR Ca2+ pump ATP utilization vs. pCa indicate that they have much lower Hill coefficients (1.49) than that describing cross-bridge force generation vs. pCa (approximately 5). Furthermore, we found that BTS also effectively eliminates force generation in bundles of intact swimbladder muscle, suggesting that it will be an important tool for studying integrated SR function during normal motor behavior.

  8. Effect of lowered oxygen in aquaculture on rainbow trout muscle quality investigated by a proteomic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Tune

    , this can help pinpointing which changes in the fish muscle are due to hypoxia and which are down to other stressors. This can aid the aquaculture industry when evaluating the type of stressors mostly affecting food quality, allowing an optimisation of rainbow trout handling accordingly....... it significantly reduces the quality of the major edible part of the fish. Fish in aquaculture are stressed by handling (e.g. sorting, crowding and transportation) prior to slaughter and it is well established that such stress leads to reduced textural quality of the fish. However, it is still unclear which...

  9. Skeletal Muscle Oxygen Saturation (StO2 Measured by Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in the Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mesquida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to current critical care management guidelines, the overall hemodynamic optimization process seeks to restore macrocirculatory oxygenation, pressure, and flow variables. However, there is increasing evidence demonstrating that, despite normalization of these global parameters, microcirculatory and regional perfusion alterations might occur, and persistence of these alterations has been associated with worse prognosis. Such observations have led to great interest in testing new technologies capable of evaluating the microcirculation. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS measures tissue oxygen saturation (StO2 and has been proposed as a noninvasive system for monitoring regional circulation. The present review aims to summarize the existing evidence on NIRS and its potential clinical utility in different scenarios of critically ill patients.

  10. Comparison of local adipose tissue content and SRS-derived NIRS muscle oxygenation measurements in 90 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Chris E; Penfold, Stacey-Marie; Elwell, Clare E; Angus, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Adipose content in the region over the vastus lateralis muscle was measured in a young (21.1 +/- 3.1 years old, mean +/- SD) population of males (n = 62) and females (n = 28). Three techniques were used: skinfold thickness, ultrasound and near infrared spectroscopy. All techniques closely correlated with each other and all showed a significantly larger adipose content in females and a limited overlap with the range of values in males. Spatially resolved near infrared spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) was then used to measure the tissue oxygenation index (TOI) at the same site. A source-detector separation of 4 cm was used to allow for significant light penetration into muscle tissue. TOI at rest was significantly higher in the female (65.3 +/- 7.0, mean +/- SD) than the male (61.9 +/- 5.1, mean +/- SD) group. There was a strong positive correlation between adipose content and TOI in male subjects. However, no correlation was seen in the female group. The possible optical and physiological explanations for these results are discussed.

  11. Potential mechanisms of carbon monoxide and high oxygen packaging in maintaining color stability of different bovine muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenglong; Zhang, Yimin; Yang, Xiaoyin; Liang, Rongrong; Mao, Yanwei; Hou, Xu; Lu, Xiao; Luo, Xin

    2014-06-01

    The objectives were to compare the effects of packaging methods on color stability, metmyoglobin-reducing-activity (MRA), total-reducing-activity and NADH concentration of different bovine muscles and to explore potential mechanisms in the enhanced color stability by carbon monoxide modified atmosphere packaging (CO-MAP, 0.4% CO/30% CO2/69.6% N2). Steaks from longissimus lumborum (LL), psoas major (PM) and longissimus thoracis (LT) packaged in CO-MAP, high-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging (HiOx-MAP, 80% O2/20% CO2) or vacuum packaging were stored for 0day, 4days, 9days, and 14days or stored for 9days then displayed in air for 0day, 1day, or 3days. The CO-MAP significantly increased red color stability of all muscles, and especially for PM. The PM and LT were more red than LL in CO-MAP, whereas PM had lowest redness in HiOx-MAP. The content of MetMb in CO-MAP was lower than in HiOx-MAP. Steaks in CO-MAP maintained a higher MRA compared with those in HiOx-MAP during storage. After opening packages, the red color of steaks in CO-MAP deteriorated more slowly compared with that of steaks in HiOx-MAP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of oxygenation on breath-by-breath response of the genioglossus muscle during occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauda, E B; Carroll, J L; McColley, S; Smith, P L

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the effect of different levels of O2 tension (hypoxia, normoxia, and hyperoxia) on the breath-by-breath onset and peak electromyographic (EMG) activity of the genioglossus (GG) muscle during a five-breath end-expiratory tracheal occlusion of 20- to 30-s duration. GG and diaphragmatic (DIA) EMG activity were measured with needle electrodes in eight anesthetized tracheotomized adult cats. In response to occlusion, the increase in the number of animals with GG EMG activity was different during hypoxia, normoxia, and hyperoxia (P = 0.003, Friedman). During hypoxia, eight of eight of the animals had GG EMG activity by the third occluded effort. In contrast, during normoxia, only four of eight and, during hyperoxia, only three of eight animals had GG EMG activity throughout the entire five-breath occlusion. Similarly, at release of the occlusion, more animals had persistent GG EMG activity on the postocclusion breaths during hypoxia than during normoxia or hyperoxia. Breath-by-breath augmentation of peak amplitude of the GG and DIA EMGs on each occluded effort was accentuated during hypoxia (P less than 0.01) and abolished during hyperoxia (P = 0.10). These results suggest that hypoxemia is a major determinant of the rapidity of onset, magnitude, and sustained activity of upper airway muscles during airway occlusion.

  13. Interleaved MRI/MRS study of muscle perfusion, oxygenation and high energy phosphate metabolism in normal subjects and Becker's myopathic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toussaint, J.F.; Brillault-Salvat, C.; Giacomini, E.; Bloch, G.; Duboc, D.; Jehenson, P.

    1998-01-01

    We present the first results of a study comparing patients suffering from Becker's myopathy and normal volunteers. We simultaneously assessed perfusion, oxygenation and high-energy phosphate metabolism using an interleaved NMR/NMRS approach. Muscle metabolism does not seem to differ in Becker's patients, except for myoglobin reoxygenation rates. (authors)

  14. Gluteal blood flow and oxygenation during electrical stimulation-induced muscle activation versus pressure relief movements in wheelchair users with a spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, C. A. J.; Zwinkels, M.; van Dijk, T.; de Groot, S.; Stolwijk-Swuste, J. M.; Janssen, T. W. J.

    Background: Prolonged high ischial tuberosities pressure (IT pressure), decreased regional blood flow (BF) and oxygenation (%SO2) are risk factors for developing pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Electrical stimulation (ES)-induced gluteal and hamstring muscle

  15. Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Measurement of the Effect of Leg Dominance on Muscle Oxygen Saturation During Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerby, Gwenn E. C.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Paunescu, Lelia Adelina; Pereira, Chelsea; Smith, Charles P.; Soller, Babs R.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of leg dominance on the symmetry of the biomechanics during cycling remains uncertain -- asymmetries have been observed in kinematics and kinetics, while symmetries were found in muscle activation. No studies have yet investigated the symmetry of muscle metabolism during cycling. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) provides a non-invasive method to investigate the metabolic responses of specific muscles during cycling. PURPOSE: To determine whether there was an effect of leg dominance on thigh muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) during incrementally loaded submaximal cycling using NIRS. METHODS: Eight right leg dominant, untrained subjects (5 men, 3 women; 31+/-2 yrs; 168.6+/-1.0 cm; 67.2+/-1.8 kg, mean +/- SE) volunteered to participate. Spectra were collected bilaterally from the vastus lateralis (VL) during supine rest and cycling. SmO2 was calculated using previously published methods. Subjects pedaled at 65 rpm while resistance to pedaling was increased in 0.5 kp increments from 0.5 kp every 3 min until the subject reached 80% of age-predicted maximal heart rate. SmO2 was averaged over 3 min for each completed stage. A two-way ANOVA was performed to test for leg differences. A priori contrasts were used to compare work levels to rest. RESULTS: VL SmO2 was not different between the dominant and non-dominant legs at rest and during exercise (p=0.57). How SmO2 changed with workload was also not different between legs (p=0.32). SmO2 at 0.5 kp (60.3+/-4.0, p=0.12) and 1.0 kp (59.5+/-4.0, p=0.10) was not different from rest (69.1+/-4.0). SmO2 at 1.5 kp (55.4 4.0, p=0.02), 2.0 kp (55.7+/-5.0, p=0.04), and 2.5 kp (43.4+/-7.9, p=0.01) was significantly lower than rest. CONCLUSION: VL SmO2 during cycling is not different between dominant and non-dominant legs and decreases with moderate workload in untrained cyclists. Assuming blood flow is directed equally to both legs, similar levels of oxygen extraction (as indicated by SmO2) suggests the metabolic load of

  16. Muscle and liver glycogen utilization during prolonged lift and carry exercise: male and female responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Thomas B; Sanders, Kimberly

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the use of carbohydrates by men and women during lift/carry exercise. Effects of menstrual cycle variation were examined in women. Twenty-five subjects (15 M, 10 F) were studied; age 25 ± 2y M, 26 ± 3y F, weight 85 ± 3 kg* M, 63 ± 3 kg F, and height 181 ± 2 cm* M, 161 ± 2 cm F (* P  Glycogen utilization was tracked with natural abundance C-13 NMR of quadriceps femoris and biceps brachialis muscles, and in the liver at rest and throughout the exercise period. Males completed more of the 180 min protocol than females [166 ± 9 min M, 112 ± 16 min* F (L), 88 ± 16 min** F (F) (* P  = 0.0036, ** P  glycogen depletion was similar between sexes and within females in L/F phases [4.7 ± 0.8 mmol/L-h M, 4.5 ± 2.4 mmol/L-h F (L), 10.3 ± 3.5 mmol/L-h F (F)]. Biceps glycogen depletion was greater in females [2.7 ± 0.9 mmol/L-h M, 10.3 ± 1.3 mmol/L-h* F (L), 16.8 ± 4.8 mmol/L-h** F (F) (* P  = 0.0004, ** P  = 0.0122)]. Resting glycogen levels were higher in females during the follicular phase ( P  = 0.0077). Liver glycogen depletion increased during exercise, but was not significant. We conclude that with non-normalized lift/carry exercise: (1) Based on their smaller size, women are less capable of completing and work their upper body harder than men. (2) Women and men work their lower body at similar levels. (3) Women store more quadriceps carbohydrate during the follicular phase. (4) The liver is not significantly challenged by this protocol. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  17. Calibration-free technique for the measurement of oxygen saturation changes in muscles of marine mammals and its proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Goenka, Chhavi; Booker, Marloes; Grange, Robert M. H.; Hindle, Allyson G.; Franco, Walfre

    2018-02-01

    Marine mammals possess impressive breath-holding capabilities made possible by physiological adjustments during dives. Studying marine mammals in their natural environment unravels vital information about these physiological adjustments particularly when we can monitor altered dive behavior in response to stressful situations such as human-induced oceanic disturbances, presence of predators and altered prey distributions. An important indicator of physiological status during submergence is the change in oxygen saturation in the muscles and blood of these mammals. In this work, we aim to investigate oxygen storage and consumption in the muscles of free-diving elephant seals when exposed to disturbances such as sonar or predator sounds while they are at sea. Optical oxygen sensors are a mature technology with multiple medical applications that provide a way to measure oxygenation changes in biological tissues in a minimally invasive manner. While these sensors are well calibrated and readily available for humans, they are still inadequate for marine mammals primarily due to a very small number of test candidates and therefore little data is available for validation and calibration. We propose a probe geometry and associated mathematical model for measuring muscle oxygenation in seals based on near infrared diffuse transport with no need for calibration. A prototype based on this concept has been designed and tested on humans and rats. We use the test results to discuss the advantages and limitations of the approach. We also detail the constraints on size, sensor location, electronics, light source properties and detector characteristics posed by the unique biology of seals.

  18. Utilization of exogenous ethanol by pea seedlings in an oxygen-free environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.F.; Zemlyanukhin, A.A.; Salam, A.M.M.

    1991-01-01

    The authors investigated the metabolism of exogenous [2- 14 C]-ethanol in pea seedlings (Pisum sativum L.) exposed to different gaseous media, viz.,air, helium, or CO 2 . The 14 C label from ethanol most actively entered amino acids (glutamic and aspartic acids, alanine, glycine, and serine) and organic acids (citrate, malate, succinate, and malonate). Conversion of ethanol to organic acids and separate amino acids (gamma-aminobutyric acid and valine) was intensified under conditions of oxygen stress. A high concentration of CO 2 stimulated transformations of ethanol into these two amino acids, but sharply inhibited overall entry of the label from exogenous ethanol into metabolites of the seedlings. Lengthening the time of exposure lowered this inhibition. Exogenous ethanol did not take part in stress accumulation of alanine in seedlings deprived of oxygen. It is concluded that ethanol participates actively in the metabolic response of pea plants to oxygen stress, and that CO 2 exerts strong modifying action on this response

  19. Apparent Km of mitochondria for oxygen computed from Vmax measured in permeabilized muscle fibers is lower in water enriched in oxygen by electrolysis than injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoll, Joffrey; Bouitbir, Jamal; Sirvent, Pascal; Klein, Alexis; Charton, Antoine; Jimenez, Liliana; Péronnet, François R; Geny, Bernard; Richard, Ruddy

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that oxygen (O2) diffusion could be favored in water enriched in O2 by a new electrolytic process because of O2 trapping in water superstructures (clathrates), which could reduce the local pressure/content relationships for O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along PO2 gradients. Mitochondrial respiration was compared in situ in saponin-skinned fibers isolated from the soleus muscles of Wistar rats, in solution enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process 1) at an O2 concentration decreasing from 240 µmol/L to 10 µmol/L (132 mmHg to 5 mmHg), with glutamate-malate or N, N, N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD)-ascorbate (with antimycin A) as substrates; and 2) at increasing adenosine diphosphate (ADP) concentration with glutamate-malate as substrate. As expected, maximal respiration decreased with O2 concentration and, when compared to glutamate-malate, the apparent Km O2 of mitochondria for O2 was significantly lower with TMPD-ascorbate with both waters. However, when compared to the water enriched in O2 by injection, the Km O2 was significantly lower with both electron donors in water enriched in O2 by electrolysis. This was not associated with any increase in the sensitivity of mitochondria to ADP; no significant difference was observed for the Km ADP between the two waters. In this experiment, a higher affinity of the mitochondria for O2 was observed in water enriched in O2 by electrolysis than by injection. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that O2 diffusion can be facilitated in water enriched in O2 by the electrolytic process.

  20. The Campylobacter jejuni RacRS system regulates fumarate utilization in a low oxygen environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stel, Anne-Xander; van Mourik, Andries; Heijmen-van Dijk, Linda; Parker, Craig T; Kelly, David J; van de Lest, Chris H A; van Putten, Jos P M; Wosten, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The natural environment of the human pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is the gastrointestinal tract of warm-blooded animals. In the gut, the availability of oxygen is limited; therefore, less efficient electron acceptors such as nitrate or fumarate are used by C. jejuni. The molecular mechanisms that

  1. Pain severity is associated with muscle strength and peak oxygen uptake in adults with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooten WM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available W Michael Hooten,1,2 Jolene M Smith,3 Jason S Eldrige,1 David A Olsen,3 W David Mauck,1 Susan M Moeschler11Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 3Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education, Rochester, MN, USABackground: The associations between pain, lower extremity strength, and aerobic conditioning have not been widely investigated in adults with fibromyalgia (FM. The principle objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between pain severity and knee strength in patients seeking treatment for FM. A secondary objective was to investigate the relationship between pain scores and aerobic conditioning.Methods: Three measures of knee strength (isokinetic extensor, isokinetic flexor, isometric extensor were quantified in the dominant leg of 69 adults with FM using a dynamometer at speeds of 60 degrees per second (60°/s and 180°/s. Peak oxygen uptake (VO2 was assessed using a cycle ergometer, and pain was assessed using the pain severity subscale of the Multidimensional Pain Inventory.Results: In univariable linear regression analyses using pain severity as the dependent variable, lesser values of isokinetic knee extensor strength at 60°/s (P=0.041 and 180°/s (P=0.010, isokinetic knee flexor strength at 60°/s (P=0.028 and 180°/s (P=0.003, and peak VO2 uptake (P=0.031 were predictive of greater pain severity scores. In multiple variable linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and opioid use, the following associations retained statistical significance; isokinetic knee extensor strength at 60°/s (P=0.020 and 180°/s (P=0.003, isokinetic knee flexor strength at 60°/s (P=0.015 and 180°/s (P=0.001, and peak VO2 uptake (P=0.014. However, no significant associations were found between pain severity and isometric knee extensor strength.Conclusion: The main findings from this study were that lesser values of isokinetic knee strength and peak VO

  2. Muscle tissue oxygenation, pressure, electrical, and mechanical responses during dynamic and static voluntary contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Pernille; Blangsted, Anne Katrine; Søgaard, Karen

    2006-01-01

    tension (rTO(2)) would be larger during dynamic (DYN) than intermittent static (IST) low force contractions; and that (2) oxygen tension would remain lower in the resting periods subsequent to DYN as compared to those following IST. Eight subjects performed elbow flexions with identical time......-tension products: (1) DYN as a 20 degrees elbow movement of 2 s concentric and 2 s eccentric followed by a 4 s rest; and (2) IST with a 4 s contraction followed by a 4 s rest. Each session was performed for 1 min at 10 and 20% of the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The force, bipolar surface EMG, MMG, IMP, rTO......, respectively), and a similar picture was seen for the eccentric phase. However, no differences were seen in rTO(2) in either the contraction or the rest periods. In a prolonged rest period (8 s) after the sessions, DYN but not IST showed rTO(2) above baseline level. In conclusion, rTO(2) in DYN and IST were...

  3. Assessment of muscle tissue oxygen saturation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orban, Jean-Christophe; Scarlatti, Audrey; Danin, Pierre-Eric; Dellamonica, Jean; Bernardin, Gilles; Ichai, Carole

    2015-12-01

    Pathophysiology of cardiac arrest corresponds to an ischemia-reperfusion syndrome with deep impairment of microcirculation. Muscular tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) is a noninvasive method of evaluation of microcirculation. Our study was aimed at assessing the prognosis value of muscular StO2 in patients admitted for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and treated with hypothermia. We conducted a prospective bicentric observational study including OHCA patients treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Baseline StO2, derived variables (desaturation and resaturation slopes), and lactate levels were compared at different times between patients with good and poor outcomes. Prognosis was assessed by the Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score at 6 months after admission (CPC 1-2, good outcome; CPC 3-5, poor outcome). Forty-four patients were included, 17 good and 27 poor outcomes at 6 months. At admission, StO2 and lactate levels were lower in good outcome patients. Desaturation and resaturation slopes did not differ between groups. After an OHCA treated with therapeutic hypothermia, StO2 was correlated with outcome. Further research is needed to better understand the pathophysiological process underlying our results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. O2 supplementation to secure the near-infrared spectroscopy determined brain and muscle oxygenation in vascular surgical patients: a presentation of 100 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Zillo Rokamp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses three questions for securing tissue oxygenation in brain (rScO2 and muscle (SmO2 for 100 patients (age 71 ± 6 yrs; mean ± SD undergoing vascular surgery: i Does preoxygenation (inhaling 100% oxygen before anesthesia increase tissue oxygenation, ii Does inhalation of 70% oxygen during surgery prevent a critical reduction in rScO2 (< 50%, and iii is a decrease in rScO2 and/or SmO2 related to reduced blood pressure and/or cardiac output? Intravenous anesthesia was provided to all patients and the intraoperative inspired oxygen fraction was set to 0.70 while tissue oxygenation was determined by INVOS 5100C. Preoxygenation increased rScO2 (from 65 ± 8% to 72 ± 9%; P < 0.05 and SmO2 (from 75 ± 9% to 78 ± 9%; P < 0.05 and during surgery rScO2 and SmO2 were maintained at the baseline level in most patients. Following anesthesia and tracheal intubation an eventual change in rScO2 correlated to cardiac output and cardiac stroke volume (coefficient of contingence=0.36; P=0.0003 rather to a change in mean arterial pressure and for five patients rScO2 was reduced to below 50%. We conclude that i increased oxygen delivery enhances tissue oxygenation, ii oxygen supports tissue oxygenation but does not prevent a critical reduction in cerebral oxygenation sufficiently, and iii an eventual decrease in tissue oxygenation seems related to a reduction in cardiac output rather than to hypotension.

  5. Analysis of Muscle Activity Utilizing Bench Presses in the AnyBody Simulation Modelling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqiu Ji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the AnyBody human modeling system with identical weights and varying grip distance (40.0 cm, 50.0 cm, and 60.0 cm, the stress distribution for the pectoralis and the muscle of upper extremity during a bench press was simulated, and the surface myoelectricity (EMG method was validated. Methods. The physical parameters driving the model of the human body were selected as weights of 35.0% (25.0 kg and grip distances. Conclusion. The validation of AnyBody software was proved as a high validity by using EMG test of four muscles’ activity compared to AnyBody software. During a bench press, the pectoralis major is the main muscle, the pectoralis major discharge increases with the height of barbell increases, and the pectoralis major discharge decreases as the short grip width increases. When the grip width equals the shoulder width, the value of pectoralis minor is lowest; when the grip width is smaller or larger than the shoulder width, the value is larger. As the short grip distance increases, the discharge of posterior deltoid muscle and triceps surface myoelectricity increases; thus, as the short grip distance increases, the deltoid muscle and triceps assist the pectoralis major during a bench press.

  6. Implantable power generation system utilizing muscle contractions excited by electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahara, Genta; Hijikata, Wataru; Tomioka, Kota; Shinshi, Tadahiko

    2016-06-01

    An implantable power generation system driven by muscle contractions for supplying power to active implantable medical devices, such as pacemakers and neurostimulators, is proposed. In this system, a muscle is intentionally contracted by an electrical stimulation in accordance with the demands of the active implantable medical device for electrical power. The proposed system, which comprises a small electromagnetic induction generator, electrodes with an electrical circuit for stimulation and a transmission device to convert the linear motion of the muscle contractions into rotational motion for the magneto rotor, generates electrical energy. In an ex vivo demonstration using the gastrocnemius muscle of a toad, which was 28 mm in length and weighed 1.3 g, the electrical energy generated by the prototype exceeded the energy consumed for electrical stimulation, with the net power being 111 µW. It was demonstrated that the proposed implantable power generation system has the potential to replace implantable batteries for active implantable medical devices. © IMechE 2016.

  7. Muscle contraction duration and fibre recruitment influence blood flow and oxygen consumption independent of contractile work during steady-state exercise in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer C; Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2012-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that, among conditions of matched contractile work, shorter contraction durations and greater muscle fibre recruitment result in augmented skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen consumption ( ) during steady-state exercise in humans. To do so, we measured forearm blood flow (FBF; Doppler ultrasound) during 4 min of rhythmic hand-grip exercise in 24 healthy young adults and calculated forearm oxygen consumption ( ) via blood samples obtained from a catheter placed in retrograde fashion into a deep vein draining the forearm muscle. In protocol 1 (n = 11), subjects performed rhythmic isometric hand-grip exercise at mild and moderate intensities during conditions in which time-tension index (isometric analogue of work) was held constant but contraction duration was manipulated. In this protocol, shorter contraction durations led to greater FBF (184 ± 25 versus 164 ± 25 ml min(-1)) and (23 ± 3 versus 17 ± 2 ml min(-1); both P flow. Our collective data indicate that, among matched workloads, shorter contraction duration and greater muscle fibre recruitment augment FBF and during mild-intensity forearm exercise, and that muscle blood flow is more closely related to metabolic cost ( ) rather than contractile work per se during steady-state exercise in humans.

  8. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  9. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  10. Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam; Manning, Matthew; Moody, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999–1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued

  11. Functional Assessment of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration Utilizing Homologous Extracellular Matrix as Scaffolding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Friedberg, T., and Oesch, F. Colorimetric quan- titation of trace amounts of sodium lauryl sulfate in the presence of nucleic acids and proteins. Anal Biochem...size. The muscle was rinsed with water and submerged in 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and agitated continuously. The SDS solution was changed twice...1. (A) Coomassie staining of sodium dodecyl sulfate –polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel. (B) Visual appearance of decellularized ECM. (C) Scanning

  12. Oxygen consumption and cytochrome exidase activity of axolotl limbs muscle tissue in restoration of regenerative ability suprressed by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teplits, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The rate of oxygen use and activity of cytochrome oxidase in a homogenate of mitochondria and nuclei of muscle tissue of axolotl limbs after suppression of their regenerative capability by x irradiation and their restoration was studied experimentally. With suppression of the regenative capability the use of oxygen was depressed. Cytochrome oxidase activity in the homogenate and mitochondria decreased compared to that of the intact limb, in the nuclei of muscle tissue it was the same or greater. With restoration of the regenerative capability of the limbs the respiration rate of the homogenate and the mitochondria increased, accompanied by increased cytochrome oxidase activity. In the nuclei the cytochrome oxidase activity did not change in the blastema stage and sharply decreased in the limb formation state. (E.T.)

  13. Oxygen consumption and cytochrome exidase activity of axolotl limbs muscle tissue in restoration of regenerative ability suppressed by X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplits, N A [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Biologii Razvitiya

    1975-01-01

    The rate of oxygen use and activity of cytochrome oxidase in a homogenate of mitochondria and nuclei of muscle tissue of axolotl limbs after suppression of their regenerative capability by x irradiation and their restoration was studied experimentally. With suppression of the regenative capability the use of oxygen was depressed. Cytochrome oxidase activity in the homogenate and mitochondria decreased compared to that of the intact limb, in the nuclei of muscle tissue it was the same or greater. With restoration of the regenerative capability of the limbs the respiration rate of the homogenate and the mitochondria increased, accompanied by increased cytochrome oxidase activity. In the nuclei the cytochrome oxidase activity did not change in the blastema stage and sharply decreased in the limb formation state.

  14. Apparent oxygen utilization rates calculated from tritium and helium-3 profiles at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. R. Stanley

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present three years of Apparent Oxygen Utilization Rates (AOUR estimated from oxygen and tracer data collected over the ocean thermocline at monthly resolution between 2003 and 2006 at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site. We estimate water ages by calculating a transit time distribution from tritium and helium-3 data. The vertically integrated AOUR over the upper 500 m, which is a regional estimate of export, during the three years is 3.1 ± 0.5 mol O2 m−2 yr−1. This is comparable to previous AOUR-based estimates of export production at the BATS site but is several times larger than export estimates derived from sediment traps or 234Th fluxes. We compare AOUR determined in this study to AOUR measured in the 1980s and show AOUR is significantly greater today than decades earlier because of changes in AOU, rather than changes in ventilation rates. The changes in AOU are likely a methodological artefact associated with problems with early oxygen measurements.

  15. Temperature and oxygen dependent metabolite utilization by Salmonella enterica serovars Derby and Mbandaka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Hayward

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is a zoonotic pathogen of clinical and veterinary significance, with over 2500 serovars. In previous work we compared two serovars displaying host associations inferred from isolation statistics. Here, to validate genome sequence data and to expand on the role of environmental metabolite constitution in host range determination we use a phenotypic microarray approach to assess the ability of these serovars to metabolise ~500 substrates at 25°C with oxygen (aerobic conditions to represent the ex vivo environment and at 37°C with and without oxygen (aerobic/anaerobic conditions to represent the in vivo environment. A total of 26 substrates elicited a significant difference in the rate of metabolism of which only one, D-galactonic acid-g-lactone, could be explained by the presence (S. Mbandaka or the absence (S. Derby of metabolic genes. We find that S. Mbandaka respires more efficiently at ambient temperatures and under aerobic conditions on 18 substrates including: glucosominic acid, saccharic acid, trehalose, fumaric acid, maltotriose, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-beta-D-mannosamine, fucose, L-serine and dihydroxy-acetone; whereas S. Derby is more metabolically competent anaerobically at 37°C for dipeptides, glutamine-glutamine, alanine-lysine, asparagine-glutamine and nitrogen sources glycine and nitrite. We conclude that the specific phenotype cannot be reliably predicted from the presence of metabolic genes directly relating to the metabolic pathways under study.

  16. Metal porphyrin intercalated reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite utilized for electrocatalytic oxygen reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyan Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report a simple and facile self-assembly method to successfully fabricate cationic metal porphyrin –MtTMPyP (Mt= Cobalt (II, Manganese (III, or Iron (III; TMPyP = 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis (N-methylpyridinium-4-yl porphyrin intercalated into the layer of graphene oxide (GO by the cooperative effects of electrostatic and π–π stacking interaction between positively charged metal porphyrin and negatively charged GO sheets. Followed by reduction with hydrazine vapor, a series of novel 2D MtTMPyP/rGOn were fabricated. The as-prepared 2D hybrids were fully characterized and tested as non-noble metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR in an alkaline medium. The MtTMPyP/rGOn hybrids, especially CoTMPyP/rGO5, demonstrated an improved electrocatalytic activity for ORR and a number of exchanged electrons close to 4-electron reaction, increased stability and excellent tolerance to methanol, showing a potential alternative catalyst for ORR in fuel cells and air batteries. Keywords: Metal porphyrin, Reduced graphene oxide, Intercalation, Oxygen reduction reaction, Catalyst

  17. Effective utilization of B20 blend with diethyl ether and ethanol as oxygenated additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upadrasta-Satya Vara-Prasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent times' fatty acid methyl ester popularly called as biodiesel has become more prominent alternate fuel for compression ignition engines based on a single fuel concept. Since, use of neat biodiesel on a large scale is raising certain difficulties and is being adopted in a blended form with petro-diesel fuel and B20 blend has become standardized. However, the HC and NOx emissions of B20 are still on the higher side. Present work aims at experimental evaluation of a single cylinder water-cooled diesel engine by adopting various proportions of ethanol and diethyl ether blends in order to improve performance and emission characteristics of B20 blend. Besides employing different amounts of ethanol and diethyl ether, simultaneous influence of injector nozzle hole size and fuel injection pressure are also investigated to arrive at an optimum configuration. Brake specific fuel consumption and hydrocarbon emissions values are lower with B20 and DEE 5 whereas B20 with DEE15 yielded lower NOx emissions. It is observed that addition of oxygenates have improved the combustion process and lower emissions are obtained. The present investigation revealed that blends with oxygenated additives having higher Cetane rating are superior to neat blend.

  18. Dissolved oxygen and dietary phosphorus modulate utilization and effluent partitioning of phosphorus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) aquaculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, Nichole K.; Sugiura, Shozo H.; Kehler, Thomas; Fletcher, John W.; Coloso, Relicardo M.; Weis, Peddrick; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2005-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is the limiting nutrient in freshwater primary production, and excessive levels cause premature eutrophication. P levels in aquaculture effluents are now tightly regulated. Increasing our understanding of waste P partitioning into soluble, particulate, and settleable fractions is important in the management of effluent P. When water supply is limited, dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) decreases below the optimum levels. Therefore, we studied effects of DO (6 and 10 mg/L) and dietary P (0.7 and 1.0% P) on rainbow trout growth, P utilization, and effluent P partitioning. Biomass increased by 40% after 3 weeks. DO at 10 mg/L significantly increased fish growth and feed efficiency, and increased the amount of P in the soluble fraction of the effluent. Soluble effluent P was greater in fish fed 1.0% P. DO increases fish growth and modulates P partitioning in aquaculture effluent. - Dissolved oxygen concentration not only influences fish growth rate, but also affects dietary phosphorus utilization by fish in intensive aquaculture

  19. Oxygen-coupled Redox Regulation of the Skeletal Muscle Ryanodine Receptor/Ca2+ Release Channel (RyR1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi-An; Wang, Benlian; Miyagi, Masaru; Hess, Douglas T.; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    In mammalian skeletal muscle, Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through the ryanodine receptor/Ca2+-release channel RyR1 can be enhanced by S-oxidation or S-nitrosylation of separate Cys residues, which are allosterically linked. S-Oxidation of RyR1 is coupled to muscle oxygen tension (pO2) through O2-dependent production of hydrogen peroxide by SR-resident NADPH oxidase 4. In isolated SR (SR vesicles), an average of six to eight Cys thiols/RyR1 monomer are reversibly oxidized at high (21% O2) versus low pO2 (1% O2), but their identity among the 100 Cys residues/RyR1 monomer is unknown. Here we use isotope-coded affinity tag labeling and mass spectrometry (yielding 93% coverage of RyR1 Cys residues) to identify 13 Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled S-oxidation in SR vesicles. Eight additional Cys residues are oxidized at high versus low pO2 only when NADPH levels are supplemented to enhance NADPH oxidase 4 activity. pO2-sensitive Cys residues were largely non-overlapping with those identified previously as hyperreactive by administration of exogenous reagents (three of 21) or as S-nitrosylated. Cys residues subject to pO2-coupled oxidation are distributed widely within the cytoplasmic domain of RyR1 in multiple functional domains implicated in RyR1 activity-regulating interactions with the L-type Ca2+ channel (dihydropyridine receptor) and FK506-binding protein 12 as well as in “hot spot” regions containing sites of mutation implicated in malignant hyperthermia and central core disease. pO2-coupled disulfide formation was identified, whereas neither S-glutathionylated nor sulfenamide-modified Cys residues were observed. Thus, physiological redox regulation of RyR1 by endogenously generated hydrogen peroxide is exerted through dynamic disulfide formation involving multiple Cys residues. PMID:23798702

  20. Subxyphoid pleural drain confers lesser impairment in respiratory muscle strength, oxygenation and lower chest pain after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancio, Andreia S A; Guizilini, Solange; Bolzan, Douglas W; Dauar, Renato B; Succi, José E; de Paola, Angelo A V; Carvalho, Antonio C de Camargo; Gomes, Walter J

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate respiratory muscle strength, oxygenation and chest pain in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) using internal thoracic artery grafts comparing pleural drain insertion site at the subxyphoid region versus the lateral region. Forty patients were randomized into two groups in accordance with the pleural drain site. Group II (n = 19) -pleural drain exteriorized in the intercostal space; group (SI) (n = 21) chest tube exteriorized at the subxyphoid region. All patients underwent assessment of respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory) on the pre, 1, 3 and 5 postoperative days (POD). Arterial blood gas analysis was collected on the pre and POD1. The chest pain sensation was measured 1, 3 and 5 POD. A significant decrease in respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory and expiratory) was seen in both groups until POD5 (P pleural drainage showed less decrease in respiratory muscle strength, better preservation of blood oxygenation and reduced thoracic pain compared to patients with intercostal drain on early OPCAB postoperative.

  1. Site of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in skeletal muscle of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its relationship with exercise oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puente-Maestu, Luis; Tejedor, Alberto; Lázaro, Alberto; de Miguel, Javier; Alvarez-Sala, Luis; González-Aragoneses, Federico; Simón, Carlos; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-09-01

    Exercise triggers skeletal muscle oxidative stress in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this research was to study the specific sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of patients with COPD and its relationship with local oxidative stress induced by exercise. Vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained in 16 patients with COPD (66 ± 10 yr; FEV(1), 54 ± 12% ref) and in 14 control subjects with normal lung function who required surgery because of lung cancer (65 ± 7 yr; FEV(1), 91 ± 14% ref) at rest and after exercise. In these biopsies we isolated mitochondria and mitochondrial membrane fragments and determined in vitro mitochondrial oxygen consumption (Mit$$\\stackrel{.}{\\hbox{ V }}$$o(2)) and ROS production before and after inhibition of complex I (rotenone), complex II (stigmatellin), and complex III (antimycin-A). We related the in vitro ROS production during state 3 respiration), which mostly corresponds to the mitochondria respiratory state during exercise, with skeletal muscle oxidative stress after exercise, as measured by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances.State 3 Mit$$\\stackrel{.}{\\hbox{ V }}$$o(2) was similar in patients with COPD and control subjects (191 ± 27 versus 229 ± 46 nmol/min/mg; P = 0.058), whereas H(2)O(2) production was higher in the former (147 ± 39 versus 51 ± 8 pmol/mg/h; P release by mitochondria in patients with COPD and in control subjects. The mitochondrial production of H(2)O(2) in state 3 respiration was related (r = 0.69; P < 0.001) to postexercise muscle thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels. Our results show that complex III is the main site of the enhanced mitochondrial H(2)O(2) production that occurs in skeletal muscle of patients with COPD, and the latter appears to contribute to muscle oxidative damage.

  2. The Utility of Routine Echocardiography in Newborn Infants with a Persistent Oxygen Requirement

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, N

    2018-05-01

    In the era of antenatal screening for congenital heart disease (CHD), infants presenting with an undiagnosed significant CHD are rare. However, term infants admitted with an initial diagnosis of TTN and a prolonged oxygen requirement often undergo an echocardiogram. We aimed to assess whether this practice yields any additional cases of undiagnosed CHD. We performed a retrospective chart review over a three year period [2013 – 2015] of term (> 36 weeks) infants admitted to the NICU for ≥ 5 days with a diagnosis of TTN and received an echocardiogram. The presence of CHD on the echocardiogram was assessed. Forty-seven infants were enrolled. The median age of echocardiogram was day four [2 – 8]. No infant had a diagnosis of significant CHD on the postnatal echocardiogram. A small muscular VSD was identified in two infants. Routine echocardiography for this cohort of infants to rule out major CHD appears to be unwarranted.

  3. Influence of blood flow occlusion on muscle oxygenation characteristics and the parameters of the power-duration relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broxterman, R M; Ade, C J; Craig, J C; Wilcox, S L; Schlup, S J; Barstow, T J

    2015-04-01

    It was previously (Monod H, Scherrer J. Ergonomics 8: 329-338, 1965) postulated that blood flow occlusion during exercise would reduce critical power (CP) to 0 Watts (W), while not altering the curvature constant (W'). We empirically assessed the influence of blood flow occlusion on CP, W', and muscle oxygenation characteristics. Ten healthy men (age: 24.8 ± 2.6 yr; height: 180 ± 5 cm; weight: 84.6 ± 10.1 kg) completed four constant-power handgrip exercise tests during both control blood flow (control) and blood flow occlusion (occlusion) for the determination of the power-duration relationship. Occlusion CP (-0.7 ± 0.4 W) was significantly (P < 0.001) lower than control CP (4.1 ± 0.7 W) and significantly (P < 0.001) lower than 0 W. Occlusion W' (808 ± 155 J) was significantly (P < 0.001) different from control W' (558 ± 129 J), and all 10 subjects demonstrated an increased occlusion W' with a mean increase of ∼49%. The present findings support the aerobic nature of CP. The findings also demonstrate that the amount of work that can be performed above CP is constant for a given condition, but can vary across conditions. Moreover, this amount of work that can be performed above CP does not appear to be the determinant of W', but rather a consequence of the depletion of intramuscular energy stores and/or the accumulation of fatigue-inducing metabolites, which limit exercise tolerance and determine W'. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Apparent Km of mitochondria for oxygen computed from Vmax measured in permeabilized muscle fibers is lower in water enriched in oxygen by electrolysis than injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoll J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Joffrey Zoll,1 Jamal Bouitbir,1 Pascal Sirvent,2 Alexis Klein,3 Antoine Charton,1,4 Liliana Jimenez,3 François R Péronnet,5 Bernard Geny,1 Ruddy Richard61Physiology Department, Faculty of Medicine and EA3072, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg, 2Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l’Exercice en Conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques, Clermont-Ferrand, 3Danone Research, Centre Daniel Carasso, Palaiseau, 4Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care and EA3072, Hôpital de Hautepierre, Université de Strasbourg, France; 5Kinesiology Department, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 6Department of Sport Medicine and Functional Explorations and INRA UMR 1019, Faculty of Medicine, Université d’Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, FranceBackground: It has been suggested that oxygen (O2 diffusion could be favored in water enriched in O2 by a new electrolytic process because of O2 trapping in water superstructures (clathrates, which could reduce the local pressure/content relationships for O2 and facilitate O2 diffusion along PO2 gradients.Materials and methods: Mitochondrial respiration was compared in situ in saponin-skinned fibers isolated from the soleus muscles of Wistar rats, in solution enriched in O2 by injection or the electrolytic process 1 at an O2 concentration decreasing from 240 µmol/L to 10 µmol/L (132 mmHg to 5 mmHg, with glutamate–malate or N, N, N', N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (TMPD–ascorbate (with antimycin A as substrates; and 2 at increasing adenosine diphosphate (ADP concentration with glutamate–malate as substrate.Results: As expected, maximal respiration decreased with O2 concentration and, when compared to glutamate–malate, the apparent Km O2 of mitochondria for O2 was significantly lower with TMPD–ascorbate with both waters. However, when compared to the water enriched in O2 by injection, the Km O2 was

  5. Blood gas analyzer utility in evaluating oxygen kinetics of the aqueous humor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ersan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To measure the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2 and carbon dioxide (PCO2 and the pH of aqueous humor (AH and arterial blood samples from rabbits using a blood gas analyzer. Methods: Twenty New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized intramuscularly with ketamine and xylazine and were then allowed to breathe room air. Using a gas blood analyzer, arterial blood and AH samples were analyzed for PO2, PCO2, and pH. Results: The mean arterial blood pressure was 87.14 ± 15.0 mmHg. The mean blood and AH PO2 were 95.18 ± 11.76 mmHg and 88.83 ± 9.92 mmHg, the mean blood and AH PCO2 were 25.86 ± 5.46 mmHg and 29.50 ± 5.36 mmHg, and the mean blood and AH pH were 7.38 ± 0.06 and 7.33 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusion: Conclusions: The blood gas analyzer was easily employed to evaluate the aqueous humor in rabbits. When comparing the results of studies evaluating aqueous PO2, care should be taken to determine the methods used in these studies.

  6. Triiodothyronine facilitates weaning from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation by improved mitochondrial substrate utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Files, Matthew D; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M; Ledee, Dolena R; Xu, Chun; Des Rosiers, Christine; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2014-03-20

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides a bridge to recovery after myocardial injury in infants and children, yet morbidity and mortality remain high. Weaning from the circuit requires adequate cardiac contractile function, which can be impaired by metabolic disturbances induced either by ischemia-reperfusion and/or by ECMO. We tested the hypothesis that although ECMO partially ameliorates metabolic abnormalities induced by ischemia-reperfusion, these abnormalities persist or recur with weaning. We also determined if thyroid hormone supplementation (triiodothyronine) during ECMO improves oxidative metabolism and cardiac function. Neonatal piglets underwent transient coronary ischemia to induce cardiac injury then were separated into 4 groups based on loading status. Piglets without coronary ischemia served as controls. We infused into the left coronary artery [2-(13)C]pyruvate and [(13)C6, (15)N]l-leucine to evaluate oxidative metabolism by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance methods. ECMO improved survival, increased oxidative substrate contribution through pyruvate dehydrogenase, reduced succinate and fumarate accumulation, and ameliorated ATP depletion induced by ischemia. The functional and metabolic benefit of ECMO was lost with weaning, yet triiodothyronine supplementation during ECMO restored function, increased relative pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, reduced succinate and fumarate, and preserved ATP stores. Although ECMO provides metabolic rest by decreasing energy demand, metabolic impairments persist, and are exacerbated with weaning. Treating ECMO-induced thyroid depression with triiodothyronine improves substrate flux, myocardial oxidative capacity and cardiac contractile function. This translational model suggests that metabolic targeting can improve weaning.

  7. Electrolysed reduced water decreases reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improves performance in broiler chickens exposed to medium-term chronic heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, M A K; Kikusato, M; Zulkifli, I; Toyomizu, M

    2013-01-01

    1. The present study was designed to achieve a reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and to improve the performance of broiler chickens exposed to chronic heat stress. 2. Chickens were given a control diet with normal drinking water, or diets supplemented with cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) or grape seed extract (GSE), or a control diet with electrolysed reduced water (ERW) for 19 d after hatch. Thereafter, chickens were exposed to a temperature of either 34°C continuously for a period of 5 d, or maintained at 24°C, on the same diets. 3. The control broilers exposed to 34°C showed decreased weight gain and feed consumption and slightly increased ROS production and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations in skeletal muscle. The chickens exposed to 34°C and supplemented with ERW showed significantly improved growth performance and lower ROS production and MDA contents in tissues than control broilers exposed to 34°C. Following heat exposure, CNSL chickens performed better with respect to weight gain and feed consumption, but still showed elevated ROS production and skeletal muscle oxidative damage. GSE chickens did not exhibit improved performance or reduced skeletal muscle oxidative damage. 4. In conclusion, this study suggests that ERW could partially inhibit ROS-induced oxidative damage to skeletal muscle and improve growth performance in broiler chickens under medium-term chronic heat treatment.

  8. The influence of stress on substrate utilization in skeletal muscle fibres of reindeer (Rangifer tarandus L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Essén-Gustavsson

    1984-05-01

    Full Text Available Moderate stress in connection with handling, sampling and herding of reindeer caused a very pronounced depletion of glycogen in mainly type IIA and IIB fibres. Also intramuscular triglyceride levels decreased but mainly in type I fibres. Muscle lactate levéls increased in all animals but not to the levels found in pigs exposed to stress or exertion. Reindeer muscles appeared to have a great capacity to oxidize both carbohydrates and lipids. All animals showed increased Cortisol, urea and AS AT values. A marked depletion of glycogen and lipids in many of the fibres may be a factor involved in the development of skeletal muscle degeneration in connection with mental stress and exertion as there seems to be a correlation between high ASAT values and substrate depleted musclefibres. A connection may therefore exist between high instramuscular substrate stores and the ability of a muscle to tolerate stress.Av stress påverkat substratutnyttjande i skelettmuskelfibrer hos renAbstract in Swedish / Sammanfattning: Måttlig stress betingad av hantering, provtagning och drivning av ren orsakade en mycket kraftig minskning av muskelglykogen i fråmst typ IIA och typ IIB fibrer. Aven triglycerider minskade framfor allt i typ I fibrer. Muskellaktatnivåerna okade i samtliga undersokta djur, men inte till nivåer som ses hos gris utsatta for stress eller fysisk anstrångning.Renens muskler uppvisade en mycket hog kapacitet att oxidera, forbranna, både kolhydrat och fett. Alla djur uppvisade forhojda Cortisol, urea och ASAT varden. Den mycket kraftiga tomningen av kolhydrat och fett i många muskelfibrer kan vara en faktor medverkande till muskeldegeneration i samband med mental stress och anstrangning då hoga ASAT-vården synes vara korrelerade till uttomda muskelfibrer. Ett samband mellan hog instramuskulår substratupplagring och formåga att tåla stress kan således foreligga.Stressin vaikuttaneen poron substraattihyvåk-sikåytto luurangon lihaksiston

  9. The relationship between exercise-induced muscle fatigue, arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion after 56 days local muscle unloading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Beijer, Åsa; Herrera, Frankyn; Zange, Jochen; Degens, Hans; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    In the light of the dynamic nature of habitual plantar flexor activity, we utilized an incremental isokinetic exercise test (IIET) to assess the work-related power deficit (WoRPD) as a measure for exercise-induced muscle fatigue before and after prolonged calf muscle unloading and in relation to arterial blood flow and muscle perfusion. Eleven male subjects (31 ± 6 years) wore the HEPHAISTOS unloading orthosis unilaterally for 56 days. It allows habitual ambulation while greatly reducing plantar flexor activity and torque production. Endpoint measurements encompassed arterial blood flow, measured in the femoral artery using Doppler ultrasound, oxygenation of the soleus muscle assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy, lactate concentrations determined in capillary blood and muscle activity using soleus muscle surface electromyography. Furthermore, soleus muscle biopsies were taken to investigate morphological muscle changes. After the intervention, maximal isokinetic torque was reduced by 23·4 ± 8·2% (Pflow, tissue oxygenation, lactate concentrations and EMG median frequency kinematics during the exercise test were comparable before and after the intervention, whereas the increase of RMS in response to IIET was less following the intervention (P = 0·03). In conclusion, following submaximal isokinetic muscle work exercise-induced muscle fatigue is unaffected after prolonged local muscle unloading. The observation that arterial blood flow was maintained may underlie the unchanged fatigability. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The relationship between skeletal muscle mitochondrial citrate synthase activity and whole body oxygen uptake adaptations in response to exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Andersen, Nynne Bjerre; Dela, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity and chan......Citrate synthase (CS) activity is a validated biomarker for mitochondrial density in skeletal muscle. CS activity is also used as a biochemical marker of the skeletal muscle oxidative adaptation to a training intervention, and a relationship between changes in whole body aerobic capacity...

  11. Estimation of Viable Biomass In Wastewater And Activated Sludge By Determination of ATP, Oxygen Utilization Rate And FDA Hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Poul-Erik; Eriksen, T.; Jensen, B.K.

    1992-01-01

    ATP content, oxygen utilization rate (OUR) and fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis were tested for the ability to express the amount of viable biomass in wastewater and activated sludge. The relationship between biomass and these activity parameters was established in growth cultures made...... with biomass, while FDA hydrolysis in the sludge failed to show any such correlation. Conversion factors of 3 mg ATP/g dw, 300 mg O2/h g dw and 0.4 A/h (mg dw/ml) for ATP, OUR and FDA methods, respectively, were calculated. When the methods were applied for in situ determinations in four different wastewater...... plants, it was found that ATP content and respiration rate estimated viable biomass to range from 81 to 293 mg dw/g SS for raw wastewater and from 67 to 187 mg dw/g SS for activated sludge with a rather weak correlation between ATP and respiration measurements. The FDA hydrolysis estimated viable biomass...

  12. Training induced decrease in oxygen cost of cycling is accompanied by down-regulation of SERCA expression in human vastus lateralis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczak, J; Karasinski, J; Zoladz, J A

    2008-09-01

    We have examined the effect of 5 week cycling endurance training program on the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase isoforms (SERCA1 and 2) and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) in the vastus lateralis muscle as well as on the oxygen uptake to power output ratio (VO2/PO) during incremental cycling. Fifteen untrained men performed an incremental cycling exercise until exhaustion before and after moderate intensity training. Muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis before and after training program. Training resulted in higher (P = 0.048) maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) as well as in higher power output reached at VO(2max) (P = 0.0001). Moreover, lower (P = 0.02) VO2/PO ratio determined during incremental moderate intensity cycling (i.e. 30-120 W) as well as lower (P = 0.003) VO2/PO ratio reached at VO(2max) were observed after the training. A significant down regulation of SERCA2 protein (P = 0.03) and tendency (P = 0.055) to lower SERCA1 content accompanied by lower (P<10(-4)) plasma thyroid hormone concentration, with no changes (P = 0.67) in MyHC composition in vastus lateralis muscle were found after training. We have concluded that the increase in mechanical efficiency of cycling occurring during first weeks of endurance training is not related to changes in MyHC composition but it may be due to down-regulation of SERCA pumps.

  13. Effects of small-sided games and high-intensity interval training on aerobic and repeated sprint performance and peripheral muscle oxygenation changes in elite junior basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delextrat, A; Gruet, M; Bieuzen, F

    2018-03-06

    The aim of the current study was to compare the effects of 6 weeks of small-sided game (SSG) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on aerobic fitness and muscle oxygenation during a repeated sprint (RS) sequence in elite male junior basketball players. Twenty participants (14.3 ± 0.5 years; 176.8 ± 12.5 cm; 74.5 ± 9.8 kg) performed pre- and post-tests interspersed by 6-weeks of SSG or HIIT training. Testing sessions consisted of the 30-15 Intermittent Fitness Test and a RS sequence (two bouts of 15-s). During RS, muscle oxygenation parameters (tissue saturation index (TSI, %), post-sprint muscle reoxygenation rate) were measured by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The results showed that both training interventions similarly improved maximal aerobic speed (VIFT, 3.4 and 4.1%, respectively for HIIT and SSG, Ptraining interventions also resulted in a greater ΔTSI during the second sprint (47.8% to 114%, Ptrainings are applicable methodologies to improve in-season aerobic and anaerobic fitness capacities in junior basketball players.

  14. Muscle oxygenation and glycolysis in females with trapezius myalgia during stress and repetitive work using microdialysis and NIRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Rosendal, Lars; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study female workers active in the labour market for differences between those with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and without (CON) during repetitive pegboard (PEG) and stress (STR) tasks regarding (1) relative muscle load, (2) trapezius muscle blood flow, (3...

  15. Muscle oxygenation and glycolysis in females with trapezius myalgia during stress and repetitive work using microdialysis and NIRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøgaard, Gisela; Rosendal, Lars; Kristiansen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study female workers active in the labour market for differences between those with trapezius myalgia (MYA) and without (CON) during repetitive pegboard (PEG) and stress (STR) tasks regarding (1) relative muscle load, (2) trapezius muscle blood flow, (3) metab...

  16. [Reduced muscular oxygen tension and nerve impulse transmission from antishock hose. Reduction of oxygen tension in the tibial muscle and impulse transmission in the peroneal nerve from pneumatic -1 pressure from antishock hose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, C; Völker, H U; Weber, F; Albert, U; Sterk, J; Helm, M; Gerngross, H; Thomas, A

    1998-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess, whether the pneumatic pressure of an antishock-trouser (AST) of 20-40 mm Hg induces a decreased oxygenation of the anterior tibial muscle and attenuates muscular response potential (MRP) of n. peronaeus profundus? Among 22 normotensive, healthy volunteers the AST were tested by applying pressure values between 0 and 100 mm Hg and measuring the intracompartmental pressure, the muscular oxygen pressure as well as the MRP by electroneurographic means within a period of 6 hours. The median initial intracompartmental pressure value of the m. tibialis anterior was 12.0 mm Hg (Q25%/Q75%: 8.9/17.3), the muscular oxygen pressure 14.8 mm Hg (Q25%/Q75%: 11.5/22.0). Transmission of the pneumatic AST-leg segment pressure to the muscle: 97.7% (Q25%/Q75%: 89.2/99.8). Already in the low AST pressure field (20-40 mm Hg) a severe hypoxia occurred in one case. A reduction of MRP was noticed at an AST pressure rate of 10 mm Hg. In 5 of 6 cases AST pressure values of 60 mm Hg led to pathological pO2-values within 5-20 minutes. Almost without exception AST-pressure rates < 60 mm Hg resulted in an anoxia of the muscle and loss of the MRP. We should demand that the AST are only applied with models where the pressure generated within the single segments can be controlled by pressure gauge. The application of the AST seems to be justified for polytraumatised in severe haemorrhagic shock where the risk of a local tissue ischemia with systemical consequences must deliberately be accepted.

  17. Contribution of proton leak to oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle during intense exercise is very low despite large contribution at rest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Korzeniewski

    Full Text Available A computer model was used to simulate the dependence of protonmotive force (Δp, proton leak and phenomenological (involving proton leak ATP/O2 ratio on work intensity in skeletal muscle. Δp, NADH and proton leak decreased with work intensity. The contribution of proton leak to oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text] decreased from about 60% at rest to about 3 and 1% at moderate and heavy/severe exercise, respectively, while the ATP/O2 ratio increased from 2.1 to 5.5 and 5.7. A two-fold increase in proton leak activity or its decrease to zero decreased/increased the ATP/O2 ratio by only about 3 and 1% during moderate and heavy/severe exercise, respectively. The low contribution of proton leak to [Formula: see text] in intensively working skeletal muscle was mostly caused by a huge increase in ATP usage intensity during rest-to-work transition, while OXPHOS, and thus oxidative ATP supply and [Formula: see text] related to it, was mostly stimulated by high each-step activation (ESA of OXPHOS complexes. The contribution of proton leak to [Formula: see text] and ATP/O2 ratio in isolated mitochondria should not be directly extrapolated to working muscle, as mitochondria lack ESA, at least in the absence of Ca2+, and therefore [Formula: see text] cannot be elevated as much as in intact muscle.

  18. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servais Stéphane

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. Results The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase. Conclusion This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  19. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Belouze, Maud; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Desplanches, Dominique; Sibille, Brigitte; Servais, Stéphane; Duchamp, Claude

    2010-04-28

    Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP) remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA) or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase). This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  20. Myosin heavy chain composition in the vastus lateralis muscle in relation to oxygen uptake and heart rate during cycling in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerczak, J; Nieckarz, Z; Karasinski, J; Zoladz, J A

    2014-04-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between fast myosin heavy chain (MyHC2) content in the vastus lateralis and the rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) and heart rate (HR) increase during an incremental exercise in 38, young, healthy men. Prior to the exercise test, muscle biopsies were taken in order to evaluate the MyHC composition. It was found that during cycling performed below the lactate threshold (LT), a positive relationship between MyHC2 and the intercept of the oxygen uptake and power output (VO2-PO) relationship existed (r=0.49, P=0.002), despite no correlation between MyHC2 and the slope value of the VO2-PO relationship (r= -0.18, P=0.29). During cycling performed above the LT, MyHC2 correlated positively with the magnitude of the nonlinearity in the VO2-PO relationship; i.e. with the accumulated VO2'excess' (r=0.44, P=0.006) and peak VO2'excess' (r=0.44, P=0.006), as well as with the slope of the HR-PO relationship (r=0.49, P=0.002). We have concluded that a greater MyHC2 content in the vastus lateralis is accompanied by a higher oxygen cost of cycling during exercise performed below the LT. This seems to be related to the higher energy cost of the non-cross-bridge activities in the muscles possessing a greater proportion of MyHC2 content. In the case of heavy-intensity exercise, a higher MyHC2 content in the vastus lateralis is accompanied by greater non-linearity in the VO2-PO relationship, as well as a steeper increase in HR in the function of an increase of PO. This relationship can be explained by greater disturbances in metabolic stability in type II muscle fibres during exercise, resulting in a decrease of muscle mechanical efficiency and greater increase of heart rate at a given power output. Therefore, MyHC composition has an impact on the oxygen cost of cycling both below and above the LT.

  1. Oxygen rocking aqueous batteries utilizing reversible topotactic oxygen insertion/extraction in iron-based perovskite oxides Ca1-xLaxFeO3-δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Kimura, Takeshi; Suga, Yosuke; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2012-08-01

    Developments of large-scale energy storages with not only low cost and high safety but also abundant metals are significantly demanded. While lithium ion batteries are the most successful method, they cannot satisfy all conditions. Here we show the principle of novel lithium-free secondary oxygen rocking aqueous batteries, in which oxygen shuttles between the cathode and anode composed of iron-based perovskite-related oxides Ca0.5La0.5FeOz (2.5 topotactic oxygen extraction and reinsertion during discharge and charge processes.

  2. Effect of high-oxygen atmosphere packaging on oxidative stability and sensory quality of two chicken muscles during chill storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongberg, Sisse; Wen, Jinzhu; Tørngren, Mari Ann

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stability and sensory quality of chicken breast (m. pectoralis) and thigh (m. peroneus longus) stored in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-O), non-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-N), or vacuum for up to 9 days at 5°C were investigated. Protein thiol concentration in breasts and t...

  3. Supplemental oxygen prevents exercise-induced oxidative stress in muscle-wasted patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helvoort, H.A.C. van; Heijdra, Y.F.; Heunks, L.M.A.; Meijer, P.L.; Ruitenbeek, W.; Thijs, H.M.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.

    2006-01-01

    RATIONALE: Although oxygen therapy is of clear benefit in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), recent studies have shown that short-term supplementary oxygen may increase oxidative stress and inflammation within the airways. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether systemic

  4. Postoperative inspiratory muscle training in addition to breathing exercises and early mobilization improves oxygenation in high-risk patients after lung cancer surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocki, Barbara Cristina; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Langer, Daniel; Souza, Domingos Savio R; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2016-05-01

    The aim was to investigate whether 2 weeks of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) could preserve respiratory muscle strength in high-risk patients referred for pulmonary resection on the suspicion of or confirmed lung cancer. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of the intervention on the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. The study was a single-centre, parallel-group, randomized trial with assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis. The intervention group (IG, n = 34) underwent 2 weeks of postoperative IMT twice daily with 2 × 30 breaths on a target intensity of 30% of maximal inspiratory pressure, in addition to standard postoperative physiotherapy. Standard physiotherapy in the control group (CG, n = 34) consisted of breathing exercises, coughing techniques and early mobilization. We measured respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory/expiratory pressure, MIP/MEP), functional performance (6-min walk test), spirometry and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), assessed the day before surgery and again 3-5 days and 2 weeks postoperatively. Postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated 2 weeks after surgery. The mean age was 70 ± 8 years and 57.5% were males. Thoracotomy was performed in 48.5% (n = 33) of cases. No effect of the intervention was found regarding MIP, MEP, lung volumes or functional performance at any time point. The overall incidence of pneumonia was 13% (n = 9), with no significant difference between groups [IG 6% (n = 2), CG 21% (n = 7), P = 0.14]. An improved SpO2 was found in the IG on the third and fourth postoperative days (Day 3: IG 93.8 ± 3.4 vs CG 91.9 ± 4.1%, P = 0.058; Day 4: IG 93.5 ± 3.5 vs CG 91 ± 3.9%, P = 0.02). We found no association between surgical procedure (thoracotomy versus thoracoscopy) and respiratory muscle strength, which was recovered in both groups 2 weeks after surgery. Two weeks of additional postoperative IMT, compared with standard physiotherapy alone, did not preserve

  5. Regional oxygen saturation index (rSO2) in brachioradialis and deltoid muscle. Correlation and prognosis in patients with respiratory sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Claverias, L; Marín, J; Magret, M; Rosich, S; Bodí, M; Trefler, S; Pascual, S; Gea, J

    2015-03-01

    To compare oxygen saturation index (rSO2) obtained simultaneously in two different brachial muscles. Prospective and observational study. Intensive care unit. Critically ill patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Two probes of NIRS device (INVOS 5100) were simultaneously placed on the brachioradialis (BR) and deltoid (D) muscles. rSO2 measurements were recorded at baseline (ICU admission) and at 24h. Demographic and clinical variables were registered. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to assess the association between continuous variables. The consistency of the correlation was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plot. The predictive value of the rSO2 for mortality was calculated by ROC curve. Nineteen patients were included with an ICU mortality of 21.1%. The rSO2 values at baseline and at 24h were significantly higher in D than in BR muscle. Values obtained simultaneously in both limbs showed a strong correlation and adequate consistency: BR (r=0.95; p0.001) but a wide limit of agreement. Non-survivors had rSO2 values significantly lower than survivors at all times of the study. No patient with rSO2 >60% in BR died, and only 17.6% died with an rSO2 value >60% in D. Both muscles showed consistent discriminatory power for mortality. Both BR and D muscles were appropriate for measuring rSO2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  6. A critical assessment of the occurrence and extend of oxygen contamination during anaerobic incubations utilizing commercially available vials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Brabandere, Loreto; Thamdrup, Bo; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2011-01-01

    contaminate the samples by oxygen diffusing from or through their plastic or rubber components. In this study, we investigated the sources and extent of oxygen contamination during anoxic incubations, and present solutions to minimize oxygen contamination. In particular, we investigated oxygen contamination...... in Labco® Exetainers, glass vials with a butyl rubber septum in the screw cap, which are frequently used in microbiological experiments. Our results show that significant oxygen contamination occurred at different stages during the incubation. Contamination occurred when Exetainers were either filled...... or incubated for more than16 h under oxic atmosphere, but also under an oxygen-free atmosphere due to diffusion of oxygen out of the butyl rubber septum. Therefore, to avoid oxygen contamination during incubations, we suggest (1) filling and incubating the incubation containers under anoxic atmosphere (glove...

  7. Interleukin-6 markedly decreases skeletal muscle protein turnover and increases nonmuscle amino acid utilization in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit; Steensberg, Adam; Fischer, Christian

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: IL-6 is a key modulator of immune function and suggested to be involved in skeletal muscle wasting as seen in sepsis. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine the role of IL-6 in human in vivo systemic and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism and protein turnover. SUBJECTS AND METHODS...... synthesis was more suppressed than breakdown, causing a small increase in net muscle protein breakdown. Furthermore, rhIL-6 decreased arterial amino acid concentration with 20-40%, despite the increase net release from muscle. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that IL-6 profoundly alters amino acid turnover....... A substantial decrease in plasma amino acids was observed with a concomitant 50% decrease in muscle protein turnover, however, modest increase in net muscle degradation. We hypothesize that the profound reduction in muscle protein turnover and modest increase in net degradation are primarily caused...

  8. Core-Shell Structuring of Pure Metallic Aerogels towards Highly Efficient Platinum Utilization for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bin; Hübner, René; Sasaki, Kotaro; Zhang, Yuanzhe; Su, Dong; Ziegler, Christoph; Vukmirovic, Miomir B; Rellinghaus, Bernd; Adzic, Radoslav R; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2018-03-05

    The development of core-shell structures remains a fundamental challenge for pure metallic aerogels. Here we report the synthesis of Pd x Au-Pt core-shell aerogels composed of an ultrathin Pt shell and a composition-tunable Pd x Au alloy core. The universality of this strategy ensures the extension of core compositions to Pd transition-metal alloys. The core-shell aerogels exhibited largely improved Pt utilization efficiencies for the oxygen reduction reaction and their activities show a volcano-type relationship as a function of the lattice parameter of the core substrate. The maximum mass and specific activities are 5.25 A mg Pt -1 and 2.53 mA cm -2 , which are 18.7 and 4.1 times higher than those of Pt/C, respectively, demonstrating the superiority of the core-shell metallic aerogels. The proposed core-based activity descriptor provides a new possible strategy for the design of future core-shell electrocatalysts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Oxygen rocking aqueous batteries utilizing reversible topotactic oxygen insertion/extraction in iron-based perovskite oxides Ca(1-x)La(x)FeO(3-δ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Kimura, Takeshi; Suga, Yosuke; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2012-01-01

    Developments of large-scale energy storages with not only low cost and high safety but also abundant metals are significantly demanded. While lithium ion batteries are the most successful method, they cannot satisfy all conditions. Here we show the principle of novel lithium-free secondary oxygen rocking aqueous batteries, in which oxygen shuttles between the cathode and anode composed of iron-based perovskite-related oxides Ca(0.5)La(0.5)FeO(z) (2.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.75 and 2.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0). Compound Ca(0.5)La(0.5)FeO(z) can undergo two kinds of reduction and reoxidation of Fe(4+)/Fe(3+) and Fe(3+)/Fe(2+), that are accompanied by reversible and repeatable topotactic oxygen extraction and reinsertion during discharge and charge processes.

  10. A short period of high-intensity interval training improves skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Jacobs, Robert A; Bonne, Thomas Christian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improvements in pulmonary V̇O2 kinetics following a short period of high-intensity training (HIT) would be associated with improved skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Ten untrained male volunteers (age: 26 ± 2; mean ± SD) performed six HIT...

  11. Reactive oxygen species and fatigue-induced prolonged low-frequency force depression in skeletal muscle fibres of rats, mice and SOD2 overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruton, Joseph D; Place, Nicolas; Yamada, Takashi; Silva, José P; Andrade, Francisco H; Dahlstedt, Anders J; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Katz, Abram; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Westerblad, Håkan

    2008-01-01

    Skeletal muscle often shows a delayed force recovery after fatiguing stimulation, especially at low stimulation frequencies. In this study we focus on the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this fatigue-induced prolonged low-frequency force depression. Intact, single muscle fibres were dissected from flexor digitorum brevis (FDB) muscles of rats and wild-type and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) overexpressing mice. Force and myoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)](i)) were measured. Fibres were stimulated at different frequencies before and 30 min after fatigue induced by repeated tetani. The results show a marked force decrease at low stimulation frequencies 30 min after fatiguing stimulation in all fibres. This decrease was associated with reduced tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type mouse fibres, whereas rat fibres and mouse SOD2 overexpressing fibres instead displayed a decreased myofibrillar Ca(2+) sensitivity. The SOD activity was approximately 50% lower in wild-type mouse than in rat FDB muscles. Myoplasmic ROS increased during repeated tetanic stimulation in rat fibres but not in wild-type mouse fibres. The decreased Ca(2+) sensitivity in rat fibres could be partially reversed by application of the reducing agent dithiothreitol, whereas the decrease in tetanic [Ca(2+)](i) in wild-type mouse fibres was not affected by dithiothreitol or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, we describe two different causes of fatigue-induced prolonged low-frequency force depression, which correlate to differences in SOD activity and ROS metabolism. These findings may have clinical implications since ROS-mediated impairments in myofibrillar function can be counteracted by reductants and antioxidants, whereas changes in SR Ca(2+) handling appear more resistant to interventions.

  12. Oxidative metabolism in muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, M; Binzoni, T; Quaresima, V

    1997-01-01

    Oxidative metabolism is the dominant source of energy for skeletal muscle. Near-infrared spectroscopy allows the non-invasive measurement of local oxygenation, blood flow and oxygen consumption. Although several muscle studies have been made using various near-infrared optical techniques, it is still difficult to interpret the local muscle metabolism properly. The main findings of near-infrared spectroscopy muscle studies in human physiology and clinical medicine are summarized. The advantage...

  13. A novel amino acid and metabolomics signature in mice overexpressing muscle uncoupling protein 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and is known to lower mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and promote fatty acid oxidation; however, the global impact of UCP3 activity on skeletal muscle and whole body metabolism has not been extensively studied. We utilized unt...

  14. The role of tissue oxygen tension in the control of local blood flow in the microcirculation of skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo, Thuc Anh

    2010-01-01

    In the microcirculation blood flow is highly regulated dependent on the metabolic activity of the tissues. Among several mechanisms, mechanisms involved in the coupling of changes in tissue oxygen tension due to changes in the metabolic activity of the tissue play an important role. In the systemic...... (inhibitor of KATP channels) in the superfusate abolished both vasodilatation and constriction to low and high oxygen superfusate, indicating that KATP channels are involved in both hypoxic vasodilatation and hyperoxic vasoconstriction. Red blood cells (RBCs) have been proposed to release ATP and...... as in the intact blood-perfused arteriole. This indicates that RBCs are not essential for hypoxic vasodilatation. In addition several potential pathways were evaluated. Application of DPCPX (inhibitor of adenosine A1 and A2 receptors) and L-NAME (inhibitor of NO-synthase) did not affect vasomotor responses to low...

  15. Muscle glycogen reduction in man: relationship between surface EMG activity and oxygen uptake kinetics during heavy exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Mark A; Schneider, Donald A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether muscle glycogen reduction prior to exercise would alter muscle fibre recruitment pattern and change either on-transient O2 uptake (VO2) kinetics or the VO2 slow component. Eight recreational cyclists (VO2peak, 55.6 +/- 1.3 ml kg (-1) min(-1)) were studied during 8 min of heavy constant-load cycling performed under control conditions (CON) and under conditions of reduced type I muscle glycogen content (GR). VO2 was measured breath-by-breath for the determination of VO2 kinetics using a double-exponential model with independent time delays. VO2 was higher in the GR trial compared to the CON trial as a result of augmented phase I and II amplitudes, with no difference between trials in the phase II time constant or the magnitude of the slow component. The mean power frequency (MPF) of electromyography activity for the vastus medialis increased over time during both trials, with a greater rate of increase observed in the GR trial compared to the CON trial. The results suggest that the recruitment of additional type II motor units contributed to the slow component in both trials. An increase in fat metabolism and augmented type II motor unit recruitment contributed to the higher VO2 in the GR trial. However, the greater rate of increase in the recruitment of type II motor units in the GR trial may not have been of sufficient magnitude to further elevate the slow component when VO2 was already high and approaching VO2peak .

  16. Effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia on oxygen delivery and utilization in cardiac surgical patients scheduled to undergo off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryaprakash, Sharadaprasad; Chakravarthy, Murali; Gautam, Mamatha; Gandhi, Anurag; Jawali, Vivek; Patil, Thimmannagowda; Jayaprakash, Krishnamoorthy; Pandey, Saurabh; Muniraju, Geetha

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA) on tissue oxygen delivery and utilization in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary referral heart hospital. A total of 25 patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients received thoracic epidural catheter in the most prominent inter-vertebral space between C7 and T3 on the day before operation. On the day of surgery, an arterial catheter and Swan Ganz catheter (capable of measuring cardiac index) was inserted. After administering full dose of local anesthetic in the epidural space, serial hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters were measured for 30 minute prior to administration of general anesthesia, with which the study was culminated. A significant decrease in oxygen delivery index with insignificant changes in oxygen extraction and consumption indices was observed. We conclude that TEA does not affect tissue oxygenation despite a decrease in arterial pressures and cardiac output.

  17. Effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia on oxygen delivery and utilization in cardiac surgical patients scheduled to undergo off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryaprakash Sharadaprasad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of thoracic epidural anesthesia (TEA on tissue oxygen delivery and utilization in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. This prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary referral heart hospital. A total of 25 patients undergoing elective off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled in this study. All patients received thoracic epidural catheter in the most prominent inter-vertebral space between C7 and T3 on the day before operation. On the day of surgery, an arterial catheter and Swan Ganz catheter (capable of measuring cardiac index was inserted. After administering full dose of local anesthetic in the epidural space, serial hemodynamic and oxygen transport parameters were measured for 30 minute prior to administration of general anesthesia, with which the study was culminated. A significant decrease in oxygen delivery index with insignificant changes in oxygen extraction and consumption indices was observed. We conclude that TEA does not affect tissue oxygenation despite a decrease in arterial pressures and cardiac output.

  18. Society of cardiovascular anesthesiologists: the effect of blood pressure regulation during aortic coarctation repair on brain, kidney, and muscle oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy: a randomized, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, Annelies; Bové, Thierry; François, Katrien; Jacobs, Stefan; Deblaere, Isabel; Wouters, Patrick; de Hert, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of 3 frequently used arterial blood pressure-regulating agents on brain (rScO2), renal (SrO2), and muscle (SmO2) oxygen saturation, during aortic coarctation repair in children. Based on the reported adverse effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on left-sided

  19. Quantitative determination of biological activity of botulinum toxins utilizing compound muscle action potentials (CMAP), and comparison of neuromuscular transmission blockage and muscle flaccidity among toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Yasushi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Motohide; Ishida, Setsuji; Harakawa, Tetsuhiro; Sakamoto, Takashi; Kaji, Ryuji; Kozaki, Shunji; Ginnaga, Akihiro

    2010-01-01

    The biological activity of various types of botulinum toxin has been evaluated using the mouse intraperitoneal LD(50) test (ip LD(50)). This method requires a large number of mice to precisely determine toxin activity, and so has posed a problem with regard to animal welfare. We have used a direct measure of neuromuscular transmission, the compound muscle action potential (CMAP), to evaluate the effect of different types of botulinum neurotoxin (NTX), and we compared the effects of these toxins to evaluate muscle relaxation by employing the digit abduction scoring (DAS) assay. This method can be used to measure a broad range of toxin activities the day after administration. Types A, C, C/D, and E NTX reduced the CMAP amplitude one day after administration at below 1 ip LD(50), an effect that cannot be detected using the mouse ip LD(50) assay. The method is useful not only for measuring toxin activity, but also for evaluating the characteristics of different types of NTX. The rat CMAP test is straightforward, highly reproducible, and can directly determine the efficacy of toxin preparations through their inhibition of neuromuscular transmission. Thus, this method may be suitable for pharmacology studies and the quality control of toxin preparations. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Review of the Reported Measures of Clinical Validity and Clinical Utility as Arguments for the Implementation of Pharmacogenetic Testing: A Case Study of Statin-Induced Muscle Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleen E. Jansen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances from pharmacogenetics (PGx have not been implemented into health care to the expected extent. One gap that will be addressed in this study is a lack of reporting on clinical validity and clinical utility of PGx-tests. A systematic review of current reporting in scientific literature was conducted on publications addressing PGx in the context of statins and muscle toxicity. Eighty-nine publications were included and information was selected on reported measures of effect, arguments, and accompanying conclusions. Most authors report associations to quantify the relationship between a genetic variation an outcome, such as adverse drug responses. Conclusions on the implementation of a PGx-test are generally based on these associations, without explicit mention of other measures relevant to evaluate the test's clinical validity and clinical utility. To gain insight in the clinical impact and select useful tests, additional outcomes are needed to estimate the clinical validity and utility, such as cost-effectiveness.

  1. The effect of age and unilateral leg immobilization for 2 weeks on substrate utilization during moderate intensity exercise in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Gram, Martin; Dybboe, Rie

    2016-01-01

    in older than in young men, and while young men demonstrated net leg glycerol release during exercise, older men showed net glycerol uptake. At baseline, IMTG, muscle pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity, protein content of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), acetyl-CoA carboxylase 2, AMP-activated......; 23 ± 1 years) and older (n = 15; 68 ± 1 years) men, while the contralateral leg served as control. After immobilization, the participants performed two-legged isolated knee-extensor exercise at 20 ± 1 Watt (∼50% Wattmax ) for 45 min with catheters inserted in the brachial artery and both femoral...... veins. Biopsy samples obtained from vastus lateralis muscles of both legs before and after exercise were used for analysis of substrates, protein content and enzyme activities. During exercise, leg substrate utilization (RQ) did not differ between groups or legs. Leg fatty acid (FA) uptake was greater...

  2. Myocardial blood flow and its transit time, oxygen utilization, and efficiency of highly endurance-trained human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kiviniemi, Antti; Noponen, Tommi; Luotolahti, Matti; Luoto, Pauliina; Oikonen, Vesa; Sipilä, Hannu T; Kopra, Jaakko; Mononen, Ilkka; Duncker, Dirk J; Knuuti, Juhani; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2014-07-01

    Highly endurance-trained athlete's heart represents the most extreme form of cardiac adaptation to physical stress, but its circulatory alterations remain obscure. In the present study, myocardial blood flow (MBF), blood mean transit time (MTT), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and consumption (MVO2), and efficiency of cardiac work were quantified in highly trained male endurance athletes and control subjects at rest and during supine cycling exercise using [(15)O]-labeled radiotracers and positron emission tomography. Heart rate and MBF were lower in athletes both at rest and during exercise. OEF increased in response to exercise in both groups, but was higher in athletes (70 ± 21 vs. 63 ± 11 % at rest and 86 ± 13 vs. 73 ± 10 % during exercise). MTT was longer and vascular resistance higher in athletes both at rest and during exercise, but arterial content of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (oxygen affinity) was unchanged. MVO2 per gram of myocardium trended (p = 0.08) lower in athletes both at rest and during exercise, while myocardial efficiency of work and MVO2 per beat were not different between groups. Arterial levels of free fatty acids were ~twofold higher in athletes likely leading to higher myocardial fatty acid oxidation and hence oxygen cost, which may have blunted the bradycardia-induced decrease in MVO2. Finally, the observed group differences in MBF, OEF, MTT and vascular resistance remained significant also after they were controlled for differences in MVO2. In conclusion, in highly endurance-trained human heart, increased myocardial blood transition time enables higher oxygen extraction levels with a lower myocardial blood flow and higher vascular resistance. These physiological adaptations to exercise training occur independently of the level of oxygen consumption and together with training-induced bradycardia may serve as mechanisms to increase functional reserve of the human heart.

  3. Functional coupling of glycolysis and phosphocreatine utilization in anoxic fish muscle. : An in vivo 31P NMR study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, A; Van den Thillart, G; Erkelens, Cees; Addink, A; Lugtenburg, J

    1990-01-01

    Three fish species with different strategies for anoxic survival (goldfish, tilapia, and common carp) were exposed to environmental anoxia (4, 3, and 1 h, respectively). The concentrations of high energy phosphate compounds and inorganic phosphate, besides the intracellular pH in the epaxial muscle

  4. Effects of basketball training on maximal oxygen uptake, muscle strength, and joint mobility in young basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakoudis, Efstratios; Vrabas, Ioannis S; Galazoulas, Christos; Stefanidis, Panagiotis; Metaxas, Thomas I; Mandroukas, Konstantinos

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of prolonged basketball skills training on maximal aerobic power, isokinetic strength, joint mobility, and body fat percentage, in young basketball players, and controls of the same age. Twenty basketball players and 18 control boys participated in the study. Basketball players participated both in their school's physical education program and in a children's basketball team training program. Controls participated only in their school's physical education program. All subjects were tested every 6 months (18 months total, 11(1/2), 12, 12(1/2), 13 years old) for VO(2)max, peak torque values of the quadriceps and hamstrings at 180 and 300 degrees x s(-1) and range of motion of the knee and hip joints. Body fat percentage was assessed at the beginning and the end of the experimental period. Results showed that the basketball group had lower heart rate values in all ages and higher VO(2) values in the initial test compared with the control in submaximal intensity. The VO(2)max was altered in both groups on the final test, when compared to the initial test. However, the basketball group had a higher VO(2)max on each of the 6-month follow-up measurements, compared to the control group (p trained group had significantly lower percentage body fat values, compared to controls. In conclusion, regular basketball training increased aerobic power and decreased body fat percentage of prepubescent boys, while it did not affect muscle strength and joint mobility of the lower limbs. The major implication suggested by the findings of the present study is that, in order to improve the basic physical components, specific training procedures should be incorporated during the basketball training sessions. It is recommended that all children should be involved in some type of cardiovascular and resistance training program.

  5. Tissue oxygenation in brain, muscle, and fat in a rat model of sleep apnea: differential effect of obstructive apneas and intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon; Planas, Anna M; Torres, Marta; Bonsignore, Maria R; Navajas, Daniel; Montserrat, Josep M

    2011-08-01

    To test the hypotheses that the dynamic changes in brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO(2)) in response to obstructive apneas or to intermittent hypoxia differ from those in other organs and that the changes in brain PtO(2) in response to obstructive apneas is a source of oxidative stress. Prospective controlled animal study. University laboratory. 98 Sprague-Dawley rats. Cerebral cortex, skeletal muscle, or visceral fat tissues were exposed in anesthetized animals subjected to either obstructive apneas or intermittent hypoxia (apneic and hypoxic events of 15 s each and 60 events/h) for 1 h. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) presented a stable pattern, with similar desaturations during both stimuli. The PtO(2) was measured by a microelectrode. During obstructive apneas, a fast increase in cerebral PtO(2) was observed (38.2 ± 3.4 vs. 54.8 ± 5.9 mm Hg) but not in the rest of tissues. This particular cerebral response was not found during intermittent hypoxia. The cerebral content of reduced glutathione was decreased after obstructive apneas (46.2% ± 15.2%) compared to controls (100.0% ± 14.7%), but not after intermittent hypoxia. This antioxidant consumption after obstructive apneas was accompanied by increased cerebral lipid peroxidation under this condition. No changes were observed for these markers in the other tissues. These results suggest that cerebral cortex could be protected in some way from hypoxic periods caused by obstructive apneas. The increased cerebral PtO(2) during obstructive apneas may, however, cause harmful effects (oxidative stress). The obstructive apnea model appears to be more adequate than the intermittent hypoxia model for studying brain changes associated with OSA.

  6. Oxygen consumption rate v. rate of energy utilization of fishes: a comparison and brief history of the two measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J A

    2016-01-01

    Accounting for energy use by fishes has been taking place for over 200 years. The original, and continuing gold standard for measuring energy use in terrestrial animals, is to account for the waste heat produced by all reactions of metabolism, a process referred to as direct calorimetry. Direct calorimetry is not easy or convenient in terrestrial animals and is extremely difficult in aquatic animals. Thus, the original and most subsequent measurements of metabolic activity in fishes have been measured via indirect calorimetry. Indirect calorimetry takes advantage of the fact that oxygen is consumed and carbon dioxide is produced during the catabolic conversion of foodstuffs or energy reserves to useful ATP energy. As measuring [CO2 ] in water is more challenging than measuring [O2 ], most indirect calorimetric studies on fishes have used the rate of O2 consumption. To relate measurements of O2 consumption back to actual energy usage requires knowledge of the substrate being oxidized. Many contemporary studies of O2 consumption by fishes do not attempt to relate this measurement back to actual energy usage. Thus, the rate of oxygen consumption (M˙O2 ) has become a measurement in its own right that is not necessarily synonymous with metabolic rate. Because all extant fishes are obligate aerobes (many fishes engage in substantial net anaerobiosis, but all require oxygen to complete their life cycle), this discrepancy does not appear to be of great concern to the fish biology community, and reports of fish oxygen consumption, without being related to energy, have proliferated. Unfortunately, under some circumstances, these measures can be quite different from one another. A review of the methodological history of the two measurements and a look towards the future are included. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. Performance of Regolith Feed Systems for Analog Field Tests of In-Situ Resource Utilization Oxygen Production Plants in Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ivan I.; Mueller, Robert P.; Mantovani, James G.; Zacny, Kris A.; Craft, Jack

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on practical aspects of mechanical auger and pneumatic regolith conveying system feeding In-Situ Resource Utilization Oxygen production plants. The subsystems of these feedstock delivery systems include an enclosed auger device, pneumatic venturi educator, jet-lift regolith transfer, innovative electro-cyclone gas-particle separation/filtration systems, and compressors capable of dealing with hot hydrogen and/or methane gas re-circulating in the system. Lessons learned from terrestrial laboratory, reduced gravity and field testing on Mauna Kea Volcano in Hawaii during NASA lunar analog field tests will be discussed and practical design tips will be presented.

  8. Mapping of calf muscle oxygenation and haemoglobin content during dynamic plantar flexion exercise by multi-channel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Quaresima, Valentina; Pifferi, Antonio; Biscotti, Giovanni; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Taroni, Paola; Ferrari, Marco; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2004-01-01

    A compact and fast multi-channel time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy system for tissue oximetry was developed. It employs semiconductor laser and fibre optics for delivery of optical signals. Photons are collected by eight 1 mm fibres and detected by a multianode photomultiplier. A time-correlated single photon counting board is used for the parallel acquisition of time-resolved reflectance curves. Estimate of the reduced scattering coefficient is achieved by fitting with a standard model of diffusion theory, while the modified Lambert-Beer law is used to assess the absorption coefficient. In vivo measurements were performed on five healthy volunteers to monitor spatial changes in calf muscle (medial and lateral gastrocnemius; MG, LG) oxygen saturation (SmO 2 ) and total haemoglobin concentration (tHb) during dynamic plantar flexion exercise performed at 50% of the maximal voluntary contraction. At rest SmO 2 was 73.0 ± 0.9 and 70.5 ± 1.7% in MG and LG, respectively (P = 0.045). At the end of the exercise, SmO 2 decreased (69.1 ± 1.8 and 63.8 ± 2.1% in MG and LG, respectively; P 2 and tHb

  9. Pro-inflammatory effects of interleukin-17A on vascular smooth muscle cells involve NAD(P)H- oxidase derived reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowski, Eweline; Bender, Bianca; Huppert, Jula; White, Robin; Luhmann, Heiko J; Kuhlmann, Christoph R W

    2011-01-01

    T cells are known for their contribution to the inflammatory element of atherosclerosis. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the Th17 derived cytokine IL-17 is involved in the pro-inflammatory response of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The aim of the present study was to examine whether reactive oxygen species (ROS) might be involved in this context. The effect of IL-17A on ROS generation was examined using the fluorescent dye 2'7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (H(2)DCF) in primary murine VSMC. IL-17A induced an increase in H(2)DCF fluorescence in VSMC, and this effect was blocked by the NAD(P)H-oxidase inhibitor apocynin and siRNA targeting Nox2. The p38-MAPK inhibitors SB203580 and SB202190 dose-dependently reduced the IL-17A induced ROS production. The IL-17A induced release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6, G-CSF, GM-CSF and MCP-1 from VSMC, as detected by the Luminex technology, was completely abolished by NAD(P)H-oxidase inhibition. Taken together, our data indicate that IL-17A causes the NAD(P)H-oxidase dependent generation of ROS leading to a pro-inflammatory activation of VSMC. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Lactate, Glucose and Oxygen Uptake in Human Brain During Recovery from Maximal Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kojiro, I.; Schmalbruch, I.K.; Quistorff, B.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake......Skeletal muscle, brain lactate uptake, brain oxygen uptake, energy metabolism, brain glucose uptake...

  11. Lack of phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase in mice does not promote fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasseva, Guergana; van der Veen, Jelske N; Lingrell, Susanne; Jacobs, René L; Vance, Dennis E; Vance, Jean E

    2016-02-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) converts phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to phosphatidylcholine (PC) in the liver. Mice lacking PEMT are protected from high-fat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, and exhibit increased whole-body energy expenditure and oxygen consumption. Since skeletal muscle is a major site of fatty acid oxidation and energy utilization, we determined if rates of fatty acid oxidation/oxygen consumption in muscle are higher in Pemt(-/-) mice than in Pemt(+/+) mice. Although PEMT is abundant in the liver, PEMT protein and activity were undetectable in four types of skeletal muscle. Moreover, amounts of PC and PE in the skeletal muscle were not altered by PEMT deficiency. Thus, we concluded that any influence of PEMT deficiency on skeletal muscle would be an indirect consequence of lack of PEMT in liver. Neither the in vivo rate of fatty acid uptake by muscle nor the rate of fatty acid oxidation in muscle explants and cultured myocytes depended upon Pemt genotype. Nor did PEMT deficiency increase oxygen consumption or respiratory function in skeletal muscle mitochondria. Thus, the increased whole body oxygen consumption in Pemt(-/-) mice, and resistance of these mice to diet-induced weight gain, are not primarily due to increased capacity of skeletal muscle for utilization of fatty acids as an energy source. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica. Reconstructing changes in surface water hydrography and silicic acid utilization in the late Pleistocene subarctic Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Edith

    2014-03-05

    Deglacial variations in upper ocean nutrient dynamics and stratification in high latitudes, as well as associated changes in thermohaline overturning circulation, are thought to have played a key role in changing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. This thesis examines the relationship between past changes in subarctic Pacific upper ocean stratification and nutrient (silicic acid) utilization, using oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica, for the first time at millennial-scale resolution and analyzed with a new and efficient instrumentation set-up. The isotopic data, presented in three manuscripts, show a consistent picture of millennial-scale variability in upper ocean stratification and silicic acid utilization during the last ∝50 ka BP, e.g. indicating that the subarctic Pacific was a source region for atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the last deglaciation (late Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Boelling/Alleroed). The presented results demonstrate the high potential of combined diatom oxygen and silicon stable isotope analysis especially for, but not restricted to, marine regions characterized by a low biogenic carbonate content like the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

  13. Study of cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization in the edematous area and ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter using positron emission tomography in brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yusuke

    1990-01-01

    We measured the cerebral blood flow and oxygen utilization of the peritumoral white matter and ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter in 50 patients with brain tumors using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The intraaxial tumors consisted of 34 cases (25 of gliomas, 6 of metastatic tumors, and 3 others), white the extraaxial tumors (all of meningiomas) were 16 cases. The cases were divided into 2 groups on the basis of the Xray CT scan findings. The cases of Edema (+) group showed moderate or large peritumoral edema in the white matter on the Xray CT scan, while Edema (-) group showed no or small edema. The method of PET study was the 15 O steady state inhalation technique by Frackoviak's method. ROIs (region of interest) were set on the peritumoral white matter and the ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter, and the mean CBF, OEF and CMRO2 values of the white and gray matter were calculated. In the Edema (+) group, the mean values of blood flow and oxygen utilization were low in the peritumoral white matter, and there were no obvious differences of values between intra and extraaxial tumors. But, the values in the ipsilateral hemispheric gray matter of intraaxial tumors were lower than those of extraaxial tumor. In the Edema (-) group, the mean values were almost normal in the white and gray matter, and there were no differences between intra and extraaxial tumors. The consideration about significance of the above stated results was discussed added with literature. (author)

  14. Oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica. Reconstructing changes in surface water hydrography and silicic acid utilization in the late Pleistocene subarctic Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Deglacial variations in upper ocean nutrient dynamics and stratification in high latitudes, as well as associated changes in thermohaline overturning circulation, are thought to have played a key role in changing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations. This thesis examines the relationship between past changes in subarctic Pacific upper ocean stratification and nutrient (silicic acid) utilization, using oxygen and silicon stable isotopes of diatom silica, for the first time at millennial-scale resolution and analyzed with a new and efficient instrumentation set-up. The isotopic data, presented in three manuscripts, show a consistent picture of millennial-scale variability in upper ocean stratification and silicic acid utilization during the last ∝50 ka BP, e.g. indicating that the subarctic Pacific was a source region for atmospheric CO 2 during the last deglaciation (late Heinrich Stadial 1 and the Boelling/Alleroed). The presented results demonstrate the high potential of combined diatom oxygen and silicon stable isotope analysis especially for, but not restricted to, marine regions characterized by a low biogenic carbonate content like the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean.

  15. Metabolic dynamics in skeletal muscle during acute reduction in blood flow and oxygen supply to mitochondria: in-silico studies using a multi-scale, top-down integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Ranjan K; Li, Yanjun; Kim, Jaeyeon; Beard, Daniel A; Saidel, Gerald M; Cabrera, Marco E

    2008-09-09

    Control mechanisms of cellular metabolism and energetics in skeletal muscle that may become evident in response to physiological stresses such as reduction in blood flow and oxygen supply to mitochondria can be quantitatively understood using a multi-scale computational model. The analysis of dynamic responses from such a model can provide insights into mechanisms of metabolic regulation that may not be evident from experimental studies. For the purpose, a physiologically-based, multi-scale computational model of skeletal muscle cellular metabolism and energetics was developed to describe dynamic responses of key chemical species and reaction fluxes to muscle ischemia. The model, which incorporates key transport and metabolic processes and subcellular compartmentalization, is based on dynamic mass balances of 30 chemical species in both capillary blood and tissue cells (cytosol and mitochondria) domains. The reaction fluxes in cytosol and mitochondria are expressed in terms of a general phenomenological Michaelis-Menten equation involving the compartmentalized energy controller ratios ATP/ADP and NADH/NAD(+). The unknown transport and reaction parameters in the model are estimated simultaneously by minimizing the differences between available in vivo experimental data on muscle ischemia and corresponding model outputs in coupled with the resting linear flux balance constraints using a robust, nonlinear, constrained-based, reduced gradient optimization algorithm. With the optimal parameter values, the model is able to simulate dynamic responses to reduced blood flow and oxygen supply to mitochondria associated with muscle ischemia of several key metabolite concentrations and metabolic fluxes in the subcellular cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments, some that can be measured and others that can not be measured with the current experimental techniques. The model can be applied to test complex hypotheses involving dynamic regulation of cellular metabolism and

  16. Layout designs of surface barrier coatings for boosting the capability of oxygen/vapor obstruction utilized in flexible electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Chun; Huang, Pei-Chen; He, Jing-Yan

    2018-04-01

    Organic light-emitting diode-based flexible and rollable displays have become a promising candidate for next-generation flexible electronics. For this reason, the design of surface multi-layered barriers should be optimized to enhance the long-term mechanical reliability of a flexible encapsulation that prevents the penetration of oxygen and vapor. In this study, finite element-based stress simulation was proposed to estimate the mechanical reliability of gas/vapor barrier design with low-k/silicon nitride (low-k/SiNx) stacking architecture. Consequently, stress-induced failure of critical thin films within the flexible display under various bending conditions must be considered. The feasibility of one pair SiO2/SiNx barrier design, which overcomes the complex lamination process, and the critical bending radius, which is decreased to 1.22 mm, were also examined. In addition, the influence of distance between neutral axes to the concerned layer surface dominated the induced-stress magnitude rather than the stress compliant mechanism provided from stacked low-k films.

  17. Utility of the tetrophosmine-99mTc in the determination of malignant tumours located in the muscle-skeletal system, preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, J.C.; Gonzalez, I.F.; Rico, G.; Linares, L.M.; Delgado C, E.; Baena, L.; Adame, G.; Gonzalez R, D.; Perez C, J.P.; Valencia, S.

    2005-01-01

    From its authorization by the FDA, as radiopharmaceutical to be used in studies of myocardial perfusion, multiple articles have appeared in the literature it prescribes that its validate the use of the tetrophosmine- 99m Tc in the valuation of different tumors, so much in the determination of malignancy, like in the evolution and in the response to the treatment. For that reason the objective of this protocol is to evaluate the utility of the tetrophosmine- 99m Tc in the determination of malignancy in non treated tumors located in the skeletal muscle system, in a population of 40 patients coming from the service of bony tumors of the National Center of Rehabilitation. For the time being its report the discoveries in 27 studies. (Author)

  18. A Comparative pO2 Probe and [18F]-Fluoro-Azomycinarabino-Furanoside ([18F]FAZA) PET Study Reveals Anesthesia-Induced Impairment of Oxygenation and Perfusion in Tumor and Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahling, Moritz; Fuchs, Kerstin; Thaiss, Wolfgang M; Maier, Florian C; Feger, Martina; Bukala, Daniel; Harant, Maren; Eichner, Martin; Reutershan, Jörg; Lang, Florian; Reischl, Gerald; Pichler, Bernd J; Kneilling, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    CT26 colon carcinoma-bearing mice were anesthetized with isoflurane (IF) or ketamine/xylazine (KX) while breathing air or oxygen (O2). We performed 10 min static PET scans 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after [18F]FAZA injection and calculated the [18F]FAZA-uptake and tumor-to-muscle ratios (T/M). In another experimental group, we placed a pO2 probe in the tumor as well as in the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the pO2 and perfusion. Ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice yielded up to 3.5-fold higher T/M-ratios compared to their isoflurane-anesthetized littermates 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after [18F]FAZA injection regardless of whether the mice breathed air or oxygen (3 h, KX-air: 7.1 vs. IF-air: 1.8, p = 0.0001, KX-O2: 4.4 vs. IF-O2: 1.4, p pO2 probe measurements yielded enhanced intra-tumoral pO2 values in air- and oxygen-breathing ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice compared to isoflurane-anesthetized mice (KX-air: 1.01 mmHg, IF-air: 0.45 mmHg; KX-O2 9.73 mmHg, IF-O2: 6.25 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation was significantly higher in air-breathing isoflurane-anesthetized (56.9 mmHg) than in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice (33.8 mmHg, p = 0.0003). [18F]FAZA tumor uptake was highest in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice regardless of whether the mice breathed air or oxygen. The generally lower [18F]FAZA whole-body uptake in isoflurane-anesthetized mice could be due to the higher muscle pO2-values in these mice compared to ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice. When performing preclinical in vivo hypoxia PET studies, oxygen should be avoided, and ketamine/xylazine-anesthesia might alleviate the identification of tumor hypoxia areals.

  19. Muscle glycogenolysis during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Ruderman, N B; Gavras, H

    1982-01-01

    glycogenolysis during exercise: contractions principally stimulate glycogenolysis early in exercise, and a direct effect of epinephrine on muscle is needed for continued glycogenolysis. In addition, epinephrine increased oxygen consumption and glucose uptake in both resting and electrically stimulated...

  20. Potentiation of cGMP signaling increases oxygen delivery and oxidative metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle of older but not young humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Egelund, Jon

    2015-01-01

    regulation remain unresolved. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is one of the main second messengers that mediate smooth muscle vasodilation and alterations in cGMP signaling could, therefore, be one mechanism by which skeletal muscle perfusion is impaired with advancing age. The current study aimed...... to evaluate the effect of inhibiting the main enzyme involved in cGMP degradation, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), on blood flow and O2 delivery in contracting skeletal muscle of young and older humans. A group of young (23 ± 1 years) and a group of older (72 ± 2 years) male human subjects performed submaximal...... in the older subjects correlated with the increase in leg O2 uptake (r (2) = 0.843). These findings suggest an insufficient O2 delivery to the contracting skeletal muscle of aged individuals and that reduced cGMP availability is a novel mechanism underlying impaired skeletal muscle perfusion with advancing age....

  1. Association between muscle atrophy/weakness and health care costs and utilization among patients receiving total knee replacement surgery: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen SY

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Yin Chen,1 Ning Wu,1 Yuan-Chi Lee,1 Yang Zhao21Health Economics and Epidemiology, Evidera, Lexington, Massachusetts, 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, New Jersey, USAPurpose: The aim of the study reported here was to examine health care resource utilization, costs, and risk of rehospitalization for total knee replacement (TKR patients with and without muscle atrophy/weakness (MAW.Patients and methods: Individuals aged 50–64 years with commercial insurance or 65+ years with Medicare Supplemental Insurance (Medicare who had a hospitalization for TKR between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2009 were identified from a large US claims database. First hospitalization for TKR was defined as the index stay. All patients were classified into three cohorts according to when MAW was diagnosed relative to TKR: pre-MAW, post-MAW, and no MAW. The association between MAW and health care costs over the 12-month post-index period and the probability of rehospitalization were assessed via multivariate regressions.Results: The study sample included 53,696 Medicare and 46,058 commercial insurance TKR patients. Controlling for cross-cohort differences, both the pre- and post-MAW cohorts had significantly higher total health care costs (Medicare US$4,201 and US$9,404 higher, commercial insurance US$2,737 and US$6,640 higher, respectively than the no MAW cohort (all P < 0.05. The post-MAW cohort in both populations was also more likely to have any all-cause or replacement-related rehospitalization compared with the no MAW cohort.Conclusion: Among US patients undergoing TKR, those with MAW had higher health care utilization and costs than patients without MAW.Keywords: rehospitalization, resource utilization, Medicare, health insurance, USA

  2. The rate of cerebral utilization of glucose, ketone bodies, and oxygen: a comparative in vivo study of infant and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlquist, G; Persson, B

    1976-11-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by means of Celabeled microspheres in infant (20-day-old) and adult (3-month-old) rats, anesthetised with Na-5-ethyl-5-(1-methylpropyl)2-thiobarbituric acid. Cerebral arteriovenous differences of acetoacetate, D-beta-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, lactate, and oxygen and brain DNA content were determined in other groups of similarly treated infant and adult animals fed or starved for 48 or 72 hr. The mean CBF values of 0.48+/-0.04 and 0.62+/-0.07 ml/(g X min), +/- SEM, in infant and adult animals, respectively, were not significantly different. CBF was unaffected by starvation. At any given arterial concentration the cerebral arteriovenous difference of acetoacetate was significantly higher in infant than adult rats. The same was true for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate at arterial concentrations above 1 mmol/liter. There was an approximately linear relationship between arterial concentration of acetoacetate and its cerebral arteriovenous difference in both infant and adult rats. A similar relationship was found for D-beta-hydroxybutyrate only in infant animals. In the fed state, the cerebral uptake of glucose and ketone bodies (micromoles per (mg DNA X min)) was not different in infant and adult rats. During starvation, cerebral uptake of ketone bodies expressed as micromoles per (mg DNA X min) was higher in infant than adult rats, indicating a higher rate of utilization of ketone bodies per cell in these animals. For glucose, no such difference was found in either fed or starved groups (Table 3). The average percentage of the total cerebral uptake of substrates (micromoles per min) accounted for by ketone bodies increased in both infant and adult rats during starvation. This percentage value was clearly higher in infant than adult rats during starvation. After 72 hr of starvation the values were 38.8% and 15.2% in infant and adult rats, respectively (Fig. 3). Calculated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), assuming complete

  3. Effect of physical training on mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species release in skeletal muscle in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Højlund, K; Vind, B F

    2010-01-01

    of obese participants with and without type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Type 2 diabetic men (n = 13) and control (n = 14) participants matched for age, BMI and physical activity completed 10 weeks of aerobic training. Pre- and post-training muscle biopsies were obtained before a euglycaemic...... in type 2 diabetic participants. Mitochondrial ROS release tended to be higher in participants with type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Aerobic training improves muscle respiration and intrinsic mitochondrial respiration in untrained obese participants with and without type 2 diabetes...

  4. Linking Seasonal Variations in the Spectral Slope of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) with Apparent Oxygen Utilization and Excess Nitrogen (DINxs) in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, N.; Barnes, R.; Nelson, N. B.

    2016-02-01

    The optically active or chromophoric fraction of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a topic of much interest to researchers due to its role in many biogeochemical processes in the global oceans. As CDOM effectively regulates the underwater light field, its influences on photosynthesis and primary productivity are significant. Despite recognition of its importance in biogeochemical cycles in natural waters, its chemical composition remains nebulous, due to photochemical processes, as well as spatial and temporal variations in composition. Understanding of CDOM composition and links to ocean processes is especially complex in pelagic, oligotrophic waters such as the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre. In this region, minimum CDOM concentrations have been observed and it is decoupled from both dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and from net primary production (NPP). As CDOM absorbance has been shown to influence estimates of NPP from remote sensing models in the subtropical gyres, and as it has the potential to serve as an invaluable tracer of ocean DOM cycling, a better understanding of links between the optical properties of CDOM and biogeochemical processes in the subtropical gyres is crucial. In this study, monthly depth profiles of CDOM absorbance (between 1m and 3000m) were measured for a period of five years at the Bermuda Atlantic Timeseries Site (BATS) in the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre to investigate seasonal variations and periodicity in CDOM optical properties. From this data, the spectral slope ratio (Sr) was calculated according to Helms et. al, 2008. Sr can be a useful tool in eliciting information about molecular weight, diagenetic state and microbial processes affecting CDOM composition, especially when coupled with other diagnostic parameters. In this study multivariate analysis techniques were utilized to examine links between Sr and ancillary parameters including apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) and excess nitrogen (DINxs) both of which can be a

  5. Increased reactive oxygen species production and lower abundance of complex I subunits and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B protein despite normal mitochondrial respiration in insulin-resistant human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J

    2010-10-01

    The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-resistant individuals who were otherwise healthy. Respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates were measured in vitro. Relative abundances of proteins detected by mass spectrometry were determined using a normalized spectral abundance factor method. NADH- and FADH(2)-linked maximal respiration rates were similar between lean and obese individuals. Rates of pyruvate and palmitoyl-DL-carnitine (both including malate) ROS production were significantly higher in obesity. Mitochondria from obese individuals maintained higher (more negative) extramitochondrial ATP free energy at low metabolic flux, suggesting that stronger mitochondrial thermodynamic driving forces may underlie the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B). We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance.

  6. Oxygen rocking aqueous batteries utilizing reversible topotactic oxygen insertion/extraction in iron-based perovskite oxides Ca1–xLaxFeO3−δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Kimura, Takeshi; Suga, Yosuke; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2012-01-01

    Developments of large-scale energy storages with not only low cost and high safety but also abundant metals are significantly demanded. While lithium ion batteries are the most successful method, they cannot satisfy all conditions. Here we show the principle of novel lithium-free secondary oxygen rocking aqueous batteries, in which oxygen shuttles between the cathode and anode composed of iron-based perovskite-related oxides Ca0.5La0.5FeOz (2.5 ≤ z ≤ 2.75 and 2.75 ≤ z ≤ 3.0). Compound Ca0.5La0.5FeOz can undergo two kinds of reduction and reoxidation of Fe4+/Fe3+ and Fe3+/Fe2+, that are accompanied by reversible and repeatable topotactic oxygen extraction and reinsertion during discharge and charge processes. PMID:22924108

  7. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) on the Moon: Moessbauer Spectroscopy as a Process Monitor for Oxygen Production. Results from a Field Test on Mauna Kea Volcano, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R.V.; Schroder, C.; Graff, T.G.; Sanders, G.B.; Lee, K.A.; Simon, T.M.; Larson, W.E.; Quinn, J.W.; Clark, L.D.; Caruso, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    Essential consumables like oxygen must to be produced from materials on the lunar surface to enable a sustained, long-term presence of humans on the Moon. The Outpost Precursor for ISRU and Modular Architecture (OPTIMA) field test on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, facilitated by the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) of the University of Hawaii at Hilo, was designed to test the implementation of three hardware concepts to extract oxygen from the lunar regolith: Precursor ISRU Lunar Oxygen Testbed (PILOT) developed by Lockheed Martin in Littleton, CO; Regolith & Environmental Science and Oxygen & Lunar Volatiles Extraction (RESOLVE) developed at the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, FL; and ROxygen developed at the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. The three concepts differ in design, but all rely on the same general principle: hydrogen reduction of metal cations (primarily Fe2+) bonded to oxygen to metal (e.g., Fe0) with the production of water. The hydrogen source is residual hydrogen in the fuel tanks of lunar landers. Electrolysis of the water produces oxygen and hydrogen (which is recycled). We used the miniaturized M ssbauer spectrometer MIMOS II to quantify the yield of this process on the basis of the quantity of Fe0 produced. Iron M ssbauer spectroscopy identifies iron-bearing phases, determines iron oxidation states, and quantifies the distribution of iron between mineral phases and oxidation states. The oxygen yield can be calculated by quantitative measurements of the distribution of Fe among oxidation states in the regolith before and after hydrogen reduction. A M ssbauer spectrometer can also be used as a prospecting tool to select the optimum feedstock for the oxygen production plants (e.g., high total Fe content and easily reduced phases). As a demonstration, a MIMOS II backscatter spectrometer (SPESI, Germany) was mounted on the Cratos rover (NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, OH), which is one of

  8. Muscle Cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talk to your provider about the risks and benefits of medicines. How can I prevent muscle cramps? To prevent muscle cramps, you can Stretch your muscles, especially before exercising. If you often get leg cramps at night, ...

  9. Physiological complexity of acute traumatic brain injury in patients treated with a brain oxygen protocol: utility of symbolic regression in predictive modeling of a dynamical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narotam, Pradeep K; Morrison, John F; Schmidt, Michael D; Nathoo, Narendra

    2014-04-01

    Predictive modeling of emergent behavior, inherent to complex physiological systems, requires the analysis of large complex clinical data streams currently being generated in the intensive care unit. Brain tissue oxygen protocols have yielded outcome benefits in traumatic brain injury (TBI), but the critical physiological thresholds for low brain oxygen have not been established for a dynamical patho-physiological system. High frequency, multi-modal clinical data sets from 29 patients with severe TBI who underwent multi-modality neuro-clinical care monitoring and treatment with a brain oxygen protocol were analyzed. The inter-relationship between acute physiological parameters was determined using symbolic regression (SR) as the computational framework. The mean patient age was 44.4±15 with a mean admission GCS of 6.6±3.9. Sixty-three percent sustained motor vehicle accidents and the most common pathology was intra-cerebral hemorrhage (50%). Hospital discharge mortality was 21%, poor outcome occurred in 24% of patients, and good outcome occurred in 56% of patients. Criticality for low brain oxygen was intracranial pressure (ICP) ≥22.8 mm Hg, for mortality at ICP≥37.1 mm Hg. The upper therapeutic threshold for cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was 75 mm Hg. Eubaric hyperoxia significantly impacted partial pressure of oxygen in brain tissue (PbtO2) at all ICP levels. Optimal brain temperature (Tbr) was 34-35°C, with an adverse effect when Tbr≥38°C. Survivors clustered at [Formula: see text] Hg vs. non-survivors [Formula: see text] 18 mm Hg. There were two mortality clusters for ICP: High ICP/low PbtO2 and low ICP/low PbtO2. Survivors maintained PbtO2 at all ranges of mean arterial pressure in contrast to non-survivors. The final SR equation for cerebral oxygenation is: [Formula: see text]. The SR-model of acute TBI advances new physiological thresholds or boundary conditions for acute TBI management: PbtO2≥25 mmHg; ICP≤22 mmHg; CPP≈60-75

  10. Tissue oxygen partial pressure in the tibialis anterior muscle in patients with claudication before, during and after a two-stage treadmill stress test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, F; Krüger, A; Pindur, G; Sternitzky, R; Franke, R P; Gori, T

    2014-01-01

    The role of the microcirculation in the pathophysiology and symptoms of peripheral arterial obliterative disease (PAOD) has been progressively emphasized during the past decades. Under resting conditions, already, the tissue oxygen partial pressure in the m. tibialis anterior (pO2im) is reduced to about 50% compared to healthy subjects. In the framework of this study the pO2im of patients with PAOD stage II according to Fontaine (n=16) in the m. tibialis anterior was measured under resting conditions and during walking on a treadmill in comparison to healthy subjects (n=10). Under resting conditions the pO2im only marginally differed between PAOD patients and healthy subjects. But during exercise the pO2im dropped significantly more severely in PAOD patients and a return to baseline values could only be reached when the treadmill was stopped and the patients stood still. The pO2im minima correlated clearly with the clinical symptom of calf pain. The data revealed that the pO2im values were lower in PAOD patients and dropped significantly faster during walking compared to the pO2im values in healthy subjects. The pO2im decrease correlated with the calf pain occurring when the pO2im values approached or fell below 10 mmHg.

  11. Relationship Between the Elevated Muscle FDG Uptake in the Distal Upper Extremities on PET/CT Scan and Prescan Utilization of Mobile Devices in Young Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xia; Wang, Xuemei; Zhuang, Hongming

    2018-03-01

    It is common to notice increased FDG activity in the muscles of the forearms or hands on PET/CT images. The purpose of this study was to determine relationship between the prevalence of increased FDG activity in the forearms or hands and using mobile devices prior to the FDG PET/CT study. A total of 443 young patients with ages between 5 and 19 years who underwent FDG PET/CT scan were included in this retrospective analysis. All patients had FDG PET/CT with their arms within the field of views. The images were reviewed for elevated activity in the muscles of the distal upper extremities (DUEs), which include forearms and hands. The preimaging questionnaire/interview records regarding using mobile devices prior to FDG PET/CT were also reviewed and compared with the imaging findings. Most patients (72.0% [319/443]) used mobile devices more than 60 minutes in the period of 24 hours prior to the FDG PET/CT study. Elevated uptake in the muscles in the DUEs was observed in 38.6% (123/319) of these patients. In contrast, among 124 patients who did not use the mobile devices or used the mobile device minimally prior to the study, only 6.5% (8/124) of them had elevated FDG activity in the DUEs. The difference persisted following stratification analysis for sex, age, and serum glucose level in our patient population. Increased FDG uptake in the muscles of the DUEs in young patients is commonly seen in those who used mobile devices prior to PET/CT study. Recommendation should be considered to reduce using mobile devices prior to FDG PET/CT study in young patient population.

  12. Experimental evidence against the mitochondrial theory of aging. A study of isolated human skeletal muscle mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ulla F.; Krustrup, Peter; Kjær, Michael

    2003-01-01

    age effects, ATP formation, BSA effects, collagen content, low temperature spectroscopy, oxygen uptakes, quadriceps muscle, respiration, specific enzyme activities......age effects, ATP formation, BSA effects, collagen content, low temperature spectroscopy, oxygen uptakes, quadriceps muscle, respiration, specific enzyme activities...

  13. Oxygen pathway modeling estimates high reactive oxygen species production above the highest permanent human habitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Cano

    Full Text Available The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS from the inner mitochondrial membrane is one of many fundamental processes governing the balance between health and disease. It is well known that ROS are necessary signaling molecules in gene expression, yet when expressed at high levels, ROS may cause oxidative stress and cell damage. Both hypoxia and hyperoxia may alter ROS production by changing mitochondrial Po2 (PmO2. Because PmO2 depends on the balance between O2 transport and utilization, we formulated an integrative mathematical model of O2 transport and utilization in skeletal muscle to predict conditions to cause abnormally high ROS generation. Simulations using data from healthy subjects during maximal exercise at sea level reveal little mitochondrial ROS production. However, altitude triggers high mitochondrial ROS production in muscle regions with high metabolic capacity but limited O2 delivery. This altitude roughly coincides with the highest location of permanent human habitation. Above 25,000 ft., more than 90% of exercising muscle is predicted to produce abnormally high levels of ROS, corresponding to the "death zone" in mountaineering.

  14. Oxygen toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. van der Westhuizen

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen has been discovered about 200 years ago. Since then the vital physiological involvement of oxygen in various biologi­cal processes, mainly energy production, has been established. However, in the body molecular oxygen can be converted to toxic oxygen metabolites such as superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, the hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. These toxic metabolites are produced mainly in the mitochondria, plasma membranes and endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Noninvasive Sensor for Measuring Muscle Metabolism During Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, B. R.; Yang, Y.; Lee, S. M. C.; Soyemi, O. O.; Wilson, C.; Hagan, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    The measurement of oxygen uptake (VO2) and lactate threshold (LT) are utilized to assess changes in aerobic capacity and the efficacy of exercise countermeasures in astronauts. During extravehicular activity (EVA), real-time knowledge of VO2 and relative work intensity can be used to monitor crew activity levels and organize tasks to reduce the cumulative effects of fatigue. Currently VO2 and LT are determined with complicated measurement techniques that require sampling of expired ventilatory gases, which may not be accurate in enclosed, oxygen-rich environments such as the EVA suit. The UMMS team has developed a novel near infrared spectroscopic (NIRS) system which noninvasively, simultaneously and continuously measures muscle oxygen tension, oxygen saturation, pH (pHm), and hematocrit from a small sensor placed on the leg. This system is unique in that it allows accurate, absolute measurement of these parameters in the thigh muscle by correcting spectra for the interference from skin pigment and fat. These parameters can be used to estimate VO2 and LT. A preliminary evaluation of the system s capabilities was performed in the NASA JSC Exercise Physiology Lab.

  16. The contraction induced increase in gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) and hexokinase II (HKII) in primary rat skeletal muscle cells is dependent on reactive oxygen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silveira, Leonardo R.; Pilegaard, Henriette; Kusuhara, Keiko

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for the contraction induced increase in expression of PGC-1alpha, HKII and UCP3 mRNA. Rat skeletal muscle cells were subjected to acute or repeated electrostimulation in the presence and absence of antioxidants. Contraction of muscle cells lead...... to an increased H2O2 formation, as measured by oxidation of H2HFF. Acute contraction of the muscle cells lead to a transient increase in PGC-1alpha and UCP3 mRNA by 172 and 65%, respectively (pantioxidants. Repeated contraction sessions induced...... a sustained elevation in PGC-1alpha and UCP3 mRNA and a transient increase in HKII (pantioxidant cocktail or with GPX+GSH. Incubation of cells for 10 days with ROS produced by xanthine oxidase/xanthine increased the level of PGC-1...

  17. Development and field testing of an alternative latrine design utilizing basic oxygen furnace slag as a treatment media for pathogen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimson, J.; Suhogusoff, A. V.; Blowes, D. W.; Hirata, R. A.; Ptacek, C. J.; Robertson, W. D.; Emelko, M. B.

    2009-05-01

    In densely-populated communities in developing countries, appropriate setback distances for pit latrines often cannot be met. An alternative latrine was designed that incorporates two permeable reactive media to treat pathogens and nitrate from effluent. Basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slag in contact with wastewater effluent elevates pH to levels (> 11) that inactivate pathogens. Saturated woodchip creates reducing conditions that encourage the growth of denitrifying bacteria which remove NO3-. The field application was constructed in Santo Antônio, a peri-urban community located 25 km south of the city of São Paulo, Brazil. A 2-m diameter pit was excavated to a depth of 4 m into the sandy-clay unsaturated zone. A geotextile liner was emplaced to create saturated conditions in the 0.5-m thick woodchip barrier. Above the woodchip barrier, a 1-m thick layer of BOF slag mixed with pea gravel and sand was emplaced. A series of filter layers, grading upward from coarse sand to fine gravel, where placed above the BOF layer, and gravel was also infilled around the outer perimeter of the excavation, to ensure O2 diffusion into the design, the formation of biofilm, and degradation of organic material. A control latrine, constructed with similar hydraulic characteristics and nonreactive materials, was constructed at a locality 100 m away, in the same geological materials. Total coliform, thermotolerant coliform, and E. coli are removed by approximately 4-5 log concentration units in less than one meter of vertical transport through the BOF slag media. In the control latrine, comparable reductions in these pathogenic indicators are observed over three meters of vertical transport. Removal of sulphur-reducing Clostridia, Clostridium perfrigens and somatic coliphage are also achieved in the alternative design, but initial concentrations in effluent are low. Some measurable concentrations of pathogen indicators are measured in lysimeters below the BOF layer, but are associated

  18. Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their breathing to dangerously low levels. Will I need oxygen when I sleep? Usually if you use supplemental oxygen during the ... your health care provider tells you you only need to use oxygen for exercise or sleep. Even if you feel “fine” off of your ...

  19. A new rechargeable sodium battery utilizing reversible topotactic oxygen extraction/insertion of CaFeO(z) (2.5 ≤ z ≤ 3) in an organic electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Mitsuhiro; Harimoto, Ryuji; Ogasawara, Yoshiyuki; Kido, Ryota; Sugahara, Akira; Kudo, Tetsuichi; Tochigi, Eita; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Mizuno, Noritaka

    2014-01-08

    At present, significant research efforts are being devoted both to identifying means of upgrading existing batteries, including lithium ion types, and also to developing alternate technologies, such as sodium ion, metal-air, and lithium-sulfur batteries. In addition, new battery systems incorporating novel electrode reactions are being identified. One such system utilizes the reaction of electrolyte ions with oxygen atoms reversibly extracted and reinserted topotactically from cathode materials. Batteries based on this system allow the use of various anode materials, such as lithium and sodium, without the requirement to develop new cathode intercalation materials. In the present study, this concept is employed and a new battery based on a CaFeO3 cathode with a sodium anode is demonstrated.

  20. Study on the reaction mechanism of oxygen-added enzymes for the effective utilization of unused sea weeds; Miriyo kaiso no shigenka ni kansuru sanso tenka sanso no hanno kiko ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    To effectively utilize unused sea weeds having ingestion obstructing activities for feed, the treatment by oxygen added enzyme has been investigated. Undaria pinnatifida was pasted and solidified with agar, to prepare the standard feed. Individuals of Holiotis discus hannai Ino were bred in the cistern. Extracts from ten kinds of sea weed distributed in the Sanriku Coast were added to the feed, which were compared with the standard feed to determine the ingestion obstructing activities. A testing method using cellulose painted aluminum sheet was also employed. All of the extracts from sea weeds having the ingestion obstructing activities exhibited the strong phenol reactions. The sensitivity of individuals of Holiotis discus hannai Ino depended greatly on the derived species and the chemical structures of phenolic substances. The {alpha}-hydroxymuconic acid semialdehyde (HMS), an enzyme decomposition product of catechol, provided no ingestion obstructing activity, and showed a little ingestion accelerating activity. This was considered to become ingestible through the biodegradation of phenolic substances. The HMS, a decomposition product of catechol 2,3-oxygen added enzyme derived from the petroleum decomposition bacteria, was prospective as a highly functional compound synthesizing material. 10 refs., 34 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  2. Muscle Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, H Lee; Hammers, David W

    2018-02-01

    SUMMARYMuscle cells are designed to generate force and movement. There are three types of mammalian muscles-skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and move them relative to each other. Cardiac muscle comprises the heart, which pumps blood through the vasculature. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are known as striated muscles, because the filaments of actin and myosin that power their contraction are organized into repeating arrays, called sarcomeres, that have a striated microscopic appearance. Smooth muscle does not contain sarcomeres but uses the contraction of filaments of actin and myosin to constrict blood vessels and move the contents of hollow organs in the body. Here, we review the principal molecular organization of the three types of muscle and their contractile regulation through signaling mechanisms and discuss their major structural and functional similarities that hint at the possible evolutionary relationships between the cell types. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  3. Measurement of forearm oxygen consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    1988-01-01

    The classical forearm technique widely used for studies of skeletal muscle metabolism requires arterial cannulation. To avoid arterial puncture it is becoming more common to arterialize blood from a contralateral hand vein by local heating. This modification and the classical method have produced...... blood flow and decreases skeletal muscle blood flow. This facilitates mixing of superficial blood with deep venous blood. Contralateral heating increased deep venous oxygen saturation and abolished the pronounced glucose-induced increase in oxygen consumption observed in the control experiments after...... contradictory results regarding the contribution of skeletal muscle to glucose-induced thermogenesis. The effect on forearm circulation and the metabolism of heating the contralateral hand was examined before and after an oral glucose load. The results suggest that contralateral heating increases subcutaneous...

  4. Opposing effects of nitric oxide and prostaglandin inhibition on muscle mitochondrial VO2 during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert C; Fuentes, Teresa; Hellsten, Ylva

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PG) together play a role in regulation blood flow during exercise. NO also regulates mitochondrial oxygen consumption through competitive binding to cytochrome c oxidase. Indomethacin both uncouples and inhibits the electron transport chain in a concentration......-dependent manner, and thus inhibition of NO and PG may regulate both muscle oxygen delivery and utilization. The purpose of this study was to examine the independent and combined effects of NO and PG blockade (L-NMMA and indomethacin respectively) on mitochondrial respiration in human muscle following knee...... extension (KE) exercise. Mitochondrial respiration was measured ex-vivo by high resolution respirometry in saponin-permeabilized fibers following 6 min KE in control (CON, n=8), arterial infusion of LNMMA (n=4) and Indo (n=4) followed by combined inhibition of NO and PG (L-NMMA + Indo, n=8). ADP...

  5. Comparison of pre-workout nitric oxide stimulating dietary supplements on skeletal muscle oxygen saturation, blood nitrate/nitrite, lipid peroxidation, and upper body exercise performance in resistance trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canale Robert E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared Glycine Propionyl-L-Carnitine (GlycoCarn® and three different pre-workout nutritional supplements on measures of skeletal muscle oxygen saturation (StO2, blood nitrate/nitrite (NOx, lactate (HLa, malondialdehyde (MDA, and exercise performance in men. Methods Using a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, 19 resistance trained men performed tests of muscular power (bench press throws and endurance (10 sets of bench press to muscular failure. A placebo, GlycoCarn®, or one of three dietary supplements (SUPP1, SUPP2, SUPP3 was consumed prior to exercise, with one week separating conditions. Blood was collected before receiving the condition and immediately after exercise. StO2 was measured during the endurance test using Near Infrared Spectroscopy. Heart rate (HR and rating of perceived exertion (RPE were determined at the end of each set. Results A condition effect was noted for StO2 at the start of exercise (p = 0.02, with GlycoCarn® higher than SUPP2. A condition effect was also noted for StO2 at the end of exercise (p = 0.003, with SUPP1 lower than all other conditions. No statistically significant interaction, condition, or time effects were noted for NOx or MDA (p > 0.05; however, MDA decreased 13.7% with GlycoCarn® and increased in all other conditions. Only a time effect was noted for HLa (p 0.05; however, GlycoCarn® resulted in a statistically insignificant greater total volume load compared to the placebo (3.3%, SUPP1 (4.2%, SUPP2 (2.5%, and SUPP3 (4.6%. Conclusion None of the products tested resulted in favorable changes in our chosen outcome measures, with the exception of GlycoCarn® in terms of higher StO2 at the start of exercise. GlycoCarn® resulted in a 13.7% decrease in MDA from pre- to post-exercise and yielded a non-significant but greater total volume load compared to all other conditions. These data indicate that 1 a single ingredient (GlycoCarn® can provide similar practical benefit

  6. Effect of repeated forearm muscle cooling on the adaptation of skeletal muscle metabolism in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Nishimura, Takayuki; Wijayanto, Titis; Watanuki, Shigeki; Tochihara, Yutaka

    2017-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of repeated cooling of forearm muscle on adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism. It is hypothesized that repeated decreases of muscle temperature would increase the oxygen consumption in hypothermic skeletal muscle. Sixteen healthy males participated in this study. Their right forearm muscles were locally cooled to 25 °C by cooling pads attached to the skin. This local cooling was repeated eight times on separate days for eight participants (experimental group), whereas eight controls received no cold exposure. To evaluate adaptation in skeletal muscle metabolism, a local cooling test was conducted before and after the repeated cooling period. Change in oxy-hemoglobin content in the flexor digitorum at rest and during a 25-s isometric handgrip (10% maximal voluntary construction) was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy at every 2 °C reduction in forearm muscle temperature. The arterial blood flow was occluded for 15 s by upper arm cuff inflation at rest and during the isometric handgrip. The oxygen consumption in the flexor digitorum muscle was evaluated by a slope of the oxy-hemoglobin change during the arterial occlusion. In the experimental group, resting oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle did not show any difference between pre- and post-intervention, whereas muscle oxygen consumption during the isometric handgrip was significantly higher in post-intervention than in pre-test from thermoneutral baseline to 31 °C muscle temperature ( P cooling might facilitate oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle. In summary, skeletal muscle metabolism during submaximal isometric handgrip was facilitated after repeated local muscle cooling.

  7. Mixed oxygen ion/electron-conducting ceramics for oxygen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Armstrong, B.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Mixed oxygen ion and electron-conducting ceramics are unique materials that can passively separate high purity oxygen from air. Oxygen ions move through a fully dense ceramic in response to an oxygen concentration gradient, charge-compensated by an electron flux in the opposite direction. Compositions in the system La{sub 1{minus}x}M{sub x}Co{sub 1{minus}y{minus}z}Fe{sub y}N{sub z}O{sub 3{minus}{delta}}, perovskites where M=Sr, Ca, and Ba, and N=Mn, Ni, Cu, Ti, and Al, have been prepared and their electrical, oxygen permeation, oxygen vacancy equilibria, and catalytic properties evaluated. Tubular forms, disks, and asymmetric membrane structures, a thin dense layer on a porous support of the same composition, have been fabricated for testing purposes. In an oxygen partial gradient, the passive oxygen flux through fully dense structures was highly dependent on composition. An increase in oxygen permeation with increased temperature is attributed to both enhanced oxygen vacancy mobility and higher vacancy populations. Highly acceptor-doped compositions resulted in oxygen ion mobilities more than an order of magnitude higher than yttria-stabilized zirconia. The mixed conducting ceramics have been utilized in a membrane reactor configuration to upgrade methane to ethane and ethylene. Conditions were established to balance selectivity and throughput in a catalytic membrane reactor constructed from mixed conducting ceramics.

  8. Your Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and you need to throw up. The muscles push the food back out of the stomach so it comes up ... body the power it needs to lift and push things. Muscles in your neck and the top part of your back aren't as large, but they are capable ...

  9. in Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen E. Spangenburg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Triglyceride storage is altered across various chronic health conditions necessitating various techniques to visualize and quantify lipid droplets (LDs. Here, we describe the utilization of the BODIPY (493/503 dye in skeletal muscle as a means to analyze LDs. We found that the dye was a convenient and simple approach to visualize LDs in both sectioned skeletal muscle and cultured adult single fibers. Furthermore, the dye was effective in both fixed and nonfixed cells, and the staining seemed unaffected by permeabilization. We believe that the use of the BODIPY (493/503 dye is an acceptable alternative and, under certain conditions, a simpler method for visualizing LDs stored within skeletal muscle.

  10. Expected utility without utility

    OpenAIRE

    Castagnoli, E.; Licalzi, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper advances an interpretation of Von Neumann–Morgenstern’s expected utility model for preferences over lotteries which does not require the notion of a cardinal utility over prizes and can be phrased entirely in the language of probability. According to it, the expected utility of a lottery can be read as the probability that this lottery outperforms another given independent lottery. The implications of this interpretation for some topics and models in decision theory are considered....

  11. Redox Control of Skeletal Muscle Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moal, Emmeran; Pialoux, Vincent; Juban, Gaëtan; Groussard, Carole; Zouhal, Hassane; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Mounier, Rémi

    2017-08-10

    Skeletal muscle shows high plasticity in response to external demand. Moreover, adult skeletal muscle is capable of complete regeneration after injury, due to the properties of muscle stem cells (MuSCs), the satellite cells, which follow a tightly regulated myogenic program to generate both new myofibers and new MuSCs for further needs. Although reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have long been associated with skeletal muscle physiology, their implication in the cell and molecular processes at work during muscle regeneration is more recent. This review focuses on redox regulation during skeletal muscle regeneration. An overview of the basics of ROS/RNS and antioxidant chemistry and biology occurring in skeletal muscle is first provided. Then, the comprehensive knowledge on redox regulation of MuSCs and their surrounding cell partners (macrophages, endothelial cells) during skeletal muscle regeneration is presented in normal muscle and in specific physiological (exercise-induced muscle damage, aging) and pathological (muscular dystrophies) contexts. Recent advances in the comprehension of these processes has led to the development of therapeutic assays using antioxidant supplementation, which result in inconsistent efficiency, underlying the need for new tools that are aimed at precisely deciphering and targeting ROS networks. This review should provide an overall insight of the redox regulation of skeletal muscle regeneration while highlighting the limits of the use of nonspecific antioxidants to improve muscle function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 276-310.

  12. Muscle cramps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower leg/calf Back of the thigh (hamstrings) Front of the thigh (quadriceps) Cramps in the ... Names Cramps - muscle Images Chest stretch Groin stretch Hamstring stretch Hip stretch Thigh stretch Triceps stretch References ...

  13. Muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People who cannot actively move one or more joints can do exercises using braces or splints . When ... A.M. Editorial team. Muscle Disorders Read more Neuromuscular Disorders Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Read more ...

  14. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  15. Critical evaluation of oxygen-uptake assessment in swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana; Figueiredo, Pedro; Pendergast, David; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Vilas-Boas, João P; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-03-01

    Swimming has become an important area of sport science research since the 1970s, with the bioenergetic factors assuming a fundamental performance-influencing role. The purpose of this study was to conduct a critical evaluation of the literature concerning oxygen-uptake (VO2) assessment in swimming, by describing the equipment and methods used and emphasizing the recent works conducted in ecological conditions. Particularly in swimming, due to the inherent technical constraints imposed by swimming in a water environment, assessment of VO2max was not accomplished until the 1960s. Later, the development of automated portable measurement devices allowed VO2max to be assessed more easily, even in ecological swimming conditions, but few studies have been conducted in swimming-pool conditions with portable breath-by-breath telemetric systems. An inverse relationship exists between the velocity corresponding to VO2max and the time a swimmer can sustain it at this velocity. The energy cost of swimming varies according to its association with velocity variability. As, in the end, the supply of oxygen (whose limitation may be due to central-O2 delivery and transportation to the working muscles-or peripheral factors-O2 diffusion and utilization in the muscles) is one of the critical factors that determine swimming performance, VO2 kinetics and its maximal values are critical in understanding swimmers' behavior in competition and to develop efficient training programs.

  16. Common Laundry Detergent Ingredient May Help Preserve Muscle Tissue After Severe Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Yoo JJ, Harrison BS, Christ GJ. Oxygen Generating Biomaterials Preserve Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis under Hypoxic and Ischemic ... scientific news and resources on diseases of the bones, joints, muscles, and skin from the NIAMS. Click ...

  17. Effect of inhaled terbutaline on substrate utilization and 300-kcal time trial performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders; Hostrup, Morten; Karlsson, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    . There was no difference between PLA and TER in net muscle glycogen utilization and lactate accumulation during the time trial. IMTG did not change with treatment or exercise. PDH-E1α Ser(293) and Ser(300) phosphorylation were lower (P...In a randomized double-blind crossover design, we investigated the effect of the beta2-agonist terbutaline on endurance performance and substrate utilization in nine moderately trained males (maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max): 58.9±3.1 mL min(-1) kg(-1)). Subjects performed 60 min of submaximal...... exercise (65-70% of VO2max) immediately followed by a 300-kcal time trial with inhalation of either terbutaline (TER) or placebo (PLA). Pulmonary gas exchange was measured during the submaximal exercise and muscle biopsies were collected before and after the exercise bouts. Time trial performance...

  18. Oxygen safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sure you have working smoke detectors and a working fire extinguisher in your home. If you move around the house with your oxygen, you may need more than one fire extinguisher in different locations. Smoking can be very dangerous. No one should smoke ...

  19. Oxygen regulation of nitrate uptake in denitrifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hernandez, D; Rowe, J J

    1987-01-01

    Oxygen had an immediate and reversible inhibitory effect on nitrate respiration by denitrifying cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Inhibition of nitrate utilization by oxygen appeared to be at the level of nitrate uptake, since nitrate reduction to nitrite in cell extracts was not affected by oxygen. The degree of oxygen inhibition was dependent on the concentration of oxygen, and increasing nitrate concentrations could not overcome the inhibition. The inhibitory effect of oxygen was maximal...

  20. Oxygen therapy - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathe increased amounts of oxygen to get normal levels of oxygen in their blood. Oxygen therapy provides babies with the extra oxygen. Information Oxygen is a gas that the cells in your body need to work properly. The ...

  1. Evaluación de parámetros fisiológicos en función de la saturación de oxigeno muscular en mujeres con sobrepeso y obesidad. [Evaluation physiological parameters depending on muscle oxygen saturation in overweight and obesity].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Alfonso Vasquez-Bonilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar parámetros fisiológicos para comparar y correlacionar en función de la saturación de oxigeno muscular y hemoglobina total medida con espectroscopia de infrarrojo cercano no invasivo. La muestra (n=17 mujeres se dividieron en 2 grupos: sobrepeso/obesidad y normopeso, se valoró la composición corporal, parámetros fisiológicos, saturación de oxigeno muscular e indicie de esfuerzo percibido durante la prueba de esfuerzo incremental máxima en un cicloergometro en base a cuatro zonas metabólicas establecidas: fatmax, umbral aeróbico, umbral anaeróbico y zona de consumo máximo de oxígeno. Los resultados se analizaron utilizando el método estadístico Anova de un factor y la correlación de pearsón. Los resultados encontrados en el grupo normopeso la saturación de oxigeno muscular tiene correlación positiva alta con el vo2max durante la zona fatmax y umbral aeróbico (r=0,72- p=0,04 (r=0,77 – p=0,02, la frecuencia cardíaca de entrenamiento (r= -0,87 – p=0,01 tiene correlación negativa muy alta en la zona umbral anaeróbico, en el grupo sobrepeso obesidad no se encontró ninguna correlación. En conclusión las mujeres con normopeso la saturación de oxigeno muscular medida con espectroscopia de infrarrojo cercano no invasivo puede ser un buen parámetro fisiológico para programar ejercicio en la zonas fatmax, umbral aeróbico y umbral anaeróbico, pero en las mujeres con sobrepeso y obesidad se necesitan más estudios. Abstract The objective of this study was to compare physiological parameters and correlate function of muscle oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin measured with near-infrared spectroscopy noninvasive. The sample (n = 17 women were divided into 2 groups: overweight / obese and normal weight, was measured body composition, physiological parameters, saturation of muscle oxygen and index of perceived exertion during testing maximum incremental exercise on a cycle ergometer

  2. Relation of Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells to Vascular Function in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Mor-Li; Shirihai, Orian S.; Holbrook, Monika; Xu, Guoquan; Kocherla, Marsha; Shah, Akash; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Kluge, Matthew A.; Frame, Alissa A.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; Vita, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown mitochondrial dysfunction and increased production of reactive oxygen species in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC’s) and endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus. Mitochondria oxygen consumption is coupled to ATP production and also occurs in an uncoupled fashion during formation of reactive oxygen species by components of the electron transport chain and other enzymatic sites. We therefore hypothesized that diabetes would be associated with higher total and uncoupled oxygen consumption in PBMC’s that would correlate with endothelial dysfunction. We developed a method to measure oxygen consumption in freshly isolated PBMC’s and applied it to 26 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 28 non-diabetic controls. Basal (192±47 vs. 161±44 pMoles/min, P=0.01), uncoupled (64±16 vs. 53±16 pMoles/min, P=0.007), and maximal (795±87 vs. 715±128 pMoles/min, P=0.01) oxygen consumption rates were higher in diabetic patients compared to controls. There were no significant correlations between oxygen consumption rates and endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation measured by vascular ultrasound. Non-endothelium-dependent nitroglycerin-mediated dilation was lower in diabetics (10.1±6.6 vs. 15.8±4.8%, P=0.03) and correlated with maximal oxygen consumption (R= −0.64, P=0.001). In summary, we found that diabetes mellitus is associated with a pattern of mitochondrial oxygen consumption consistent with higher production of reactive oxygen species. The correlation between oxygen consumption and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction that merits further study. Finally, the described method may have utility for assessment of mitochondrial function in larger scale observational and interventional studies in humans. PMID:24558030

  3. HYPERBARIC OXYGENATION AND AEROBIC PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irvine D. Prather

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuing desire to improve performance, particularly at the national and international levels, has led to the use of ergogenic aids. Ergogenic aids are defined as 'a procedure or agent that provides the athlete with a competitive edge beyond that obtained via normal training methods'. Random drug testing has been implemented in an effort to minimize an athlete's ability to gain an unfair advantage. However, other means of improving performance have been tried. Blood doping has been used to enhance endurance performance by improving oxygen delivery to working muscles. As oxygen is carried in combination with the hemoglobin, it seems logical that increasing the number of red blood cells (RBC's in the body would increase the oxygen carrying capacity to the tissues and result in improved performance. The first experiments of removing and then reinfusing blood showed a significant improvement in performance time

  4. Muscle fibre capillarization is a critical factor in muscle fibre hypertrophy during resistance exercise training in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Nederveen, Joshua P; Joanisse, Sophie; Leenders, Marika; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C; Parise, Gianni

    2017-04-01

    Adequate muscle fibre perfusion is critical for the maintenance of muscle mass; it is essential in the rapid delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to the muscle, stimulating muscle fibre growth. Muscle fibre capillarization is known to decrease substantially with advancing age. However, whether (relative) low muscle fibre capillarization negatively impacts the muscle hypertrophic response following resistance exercise training in older adults is unknown. Twenty-two healthy older men (71 ± 1 years) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance type exercise training. To assess the change in muscle fibre characteristics, percutaneous biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle were taken before and following 12 and 24 weeks of the intervention programme. A comparison was made between participants who had a relatively low type II muscle fibre capillary-to-fibre perimeter exchange index (CFPE; LOW group) and high type II muscle fibre CFPE (HIGH group) at baseline. Type I and type II muscle fibre size, satellite cell, capillary content and distance between satellite cells to the nearest capillary were determined by immunohistochemistry. Overall, type II muscle fibre size (from 5150 ± 234 to 6719 ± 446 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization, whereas muscle fibre size (from 5170 ± 390 to 7133 ± 314 µm 2 , P muscle fibre, P muscle fibre capillarization were observed in response to 12 and 24 weeks of resistance exercise training in both the LOW and HIGH group. Type II muscle fibre capillarization at baseline may be a critical factor for allowing muscle fibre hypertrophy to occur during prolonged resistance exercise training in older men. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  5. Performances in extreme environments: effects of hyper/hypobarism and hypogravity on skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Bosco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Many environmental factors may affect muscle plasticity but some have exclusive characteristics that allow them to play a key role to maintain the muscle capacity to generate force; these factors are: i the oxygen availability and ii the load applied to muscle fibres. Hyperbarism is a condition that occurs when a man is subjected to pressure increases. To keep the lungs from collapsing, the air is supplied to him under high pressure which exposes the blood in the lungs to high alveolar gas pressures. Under this condition, the PO2 become sufficiently increased, serious disorders may occur, such as modification of oxygen delivery and/or oxygen availability to permit regular muscle contraction. Also altitude hypobaric hypoxia induces modification of muscle capacity to generate work. Prolonged exposure to high altitude leads significant loss in body mass, thigh muscle mass, muscle fiber area and volume density of muscle mitochondria. Spaceflight results in a number of adaptations to skeletal muscle, including atrophy and early muscle fatigue. Muscle atrophy is observed in a wide range of muscles, with the most extensive loss occurring in the legs, because astronauts are no longer needed to support the body's weight. This review will describe the background on these topics suggesting the strategies to correct the specific muscle changes in presence of environmental stresses, such as the alteration in oxygen-derived signaling pathways or the metabolic consequence of microgravity that may indicate rational interventions to maintain muscle mass and function.

  6. Fat utilization during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn Wulff; Watt, Peter W.; Richter, Erik

    2001-01-01

    1. This study was carried out to test the hypothesis that the greater fat oxidation observed during exercise after adaptation to a high-fat diet is due to an increased uptake of fat originating from the bloodstream. 2. Of 13 male untrained subjects, seven consumed a fat-rich diet (62 % fat, 21...... % carbohydrate) and six consumed a carbohydrate-rich diet (20 % fat, 65 % carbohydrate). After 7 weeks of training and diet, 60 min of bicycle exercise was performed at 68 +/- 1 % of maximum oxygen uptake. During exercise [1-(13)C]palmitate was infused, arterial and venous femoral blood samples were collected......, and blood flow was determined by the thermodilution technique. Muscle biopsy samples were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and after exercise. 3. During exercise, the respiratory exchange ratio was significantly lower in subjects consuming the fat-rich diet (0.86 +/- 0.01, mean +/- S.E.M.) than...

  7. Cell fate determination in zebrafish embryonic and adult muscle development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tee, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    We are interested in how the genetic basis of muscle precursor cells determines the outcome of the muscle cell fate, and thus leading to disruption in muscle formation and maintenance. We utilized the zebrafish carrying mutations in both Axin1 and Apc1, resulting in overactivation of the

  8. Twitch interpolation technique in testing of maximal muscle strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, P M; Nørregaard, J; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim was to study the methodological aspects of the muscle twitch interpolation technique in estimating the maximal force of contraction in the quadriceps muscle utilizing commercial muscle testing equipment. Six healthy subjects participated in seven sets of experiments testing the effects...

  9. Oxygen Extraction from Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization. In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable. On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space. This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis (MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon, aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids, water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key

  10. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  11. Protonmotive force in muscle mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, D.A.; Haas, R.; Eguren, L.A.; Parks, J.K.; Eilert, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The protonmotive force (delta p) of muscle mitochondria was measured by estimating the distribution of 14C-labeled TPMP (trimethylphenylphosphonium iodide) and 14C-labeled acetate across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria. The matrix volume was simultaneously determined using 3H-labeled H2O and 3H-labeled mannitol and repeated drying to distinguish the label in these 2 compounds. Rapid separation of mitochondria from the incubation medium by centrifugation through silicone oil avoids the problems of potential anaerobic conditions associated with conventional centrifugation and large volumes of trapped media associated with filtration. The value for delta p (mean +/- SD) was 192+/- 26 mV in 30 determinations with rat muscle mitochondria during state 4. Measurement of oxygen consumption allowed calculation of membrane conductance (Cm,H+) which was 0.49 +/- 0.18 nmol of H+/min/mg protein/mV. The values for delta p and Cm,H+ are reported for a variety of experimental conditions and are consistent with Mitchell's chemiosmotic theory. Biopsy specimens obtained from human muscle gave state-4 delta p values of 197+/- 30 mV (n .5) and Cm,H+ values of 0.52 +/- 0.12 nmol of H+/min/mg/mV (n . 4). This delta p assay is the first described for coupled mammalian muscle mitochondria and will be useful in assessing membrane function

  12. Regulation of Blood Flow in Contracting Skeletal Muscle in Aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Peter Bergmann

    Oxygen delivery to skeletal muscle is regulated precisely to match the oxygen demand; however, with aging the regulation of oxygen delivery during exercise is impaired. The present thesis investigated mechanisms underlying the age-related impairment in regulation of blood flow and oxygen delivery......GMP) was used as intervention, and skeletal muscle blood flow, oxygen delivery, and functional sympatholysis was examined. The two studies included 53 healthy, habitually active, male subjects. All subjects participated in an experimental day in which femoral arterial blood flow and blood pressure were assessed...... that improving sympatholytic capacity by training may be a slower process in older than in young men. In conclusion, this thesis provides new important knowledge related to the regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in aging. Specifically, it demonstrates that changes in cGMP signaling is an underlying cause...

  13. Solar Energy Systems for Lunar Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.; Heller, Richard S.; Wong, Wayne A.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2010-01-01

    An evaluation of several solar concentrator-based systems for producing oxygen from lunar regolith was performed. The systems utilize a solar concentrator mirror to provide thermal energy for the oxygen production process. Thermal energy to power a Stirling heat engine and photovoltaics are compared for the production of electricity. The electricity produced is utilized to operate the equipment needed in the oxygen production process. The initial oxygen production method utilized in the analysis is hydrogen reduction of ilmenite. Utilizing this method of oxygen production a baseline system design was produced. This baseline system had an oxygen production rate of 0.6 kg/hr with a concentrator mirror size of 5 m. Variations were performed on the baseline design to show how changes in the system size and process (rate) affected the oxygen production rate. An evaluation of the power requirements for a carbothermal lunar regolith reduction reactor has also been conducted. The reactor had a total power requirement between 8,320 to 9,961 W when producing 1000 kg/year of oxygen. The solar concentrator used to provide the thermal power (over 82 percent of the total energy requirement) would have a diameter of less than 4 m.

  14. Single muscle fiber adaptations with marathon training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, Scott; Harber, Matthew; Creer, Andrew; Gallagher, Philip; Slivka, Dustin; Minchev, Kiril; Whitsett, David

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the effects of marathon training on single muscle fiber contractile function in a group of recreational runners. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the gastrocnemius muscle of seven individuals (22 +/- 1 yr, 177 +/- 3 cm, and 68 +/- 2 kg) before, after 13 wk of run training, and after 3 wk of taper. Slow-twitch myosin heavy chain [(MHC) I] and fast-twitch (MHC IIa) muscle fibers were analyzed for size, strength (P(o)), speed (V(o)), and power. The run training program led to the successful completion of a marathon (range 3 h 56 min to 5 h 35 min). Oxygen uptake during submaximal running and citrate synthase activity were improved (P training program. Muscle fiber size declined (P training. P(o) was maintained in both fiber types with training and increased (P 60% increase (P training and was unchanged in MHC IIa fibers. Peak power increased (P training with a further increase (P marathon training decreased slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscle fiber size but that it maintained or improved the functional profile of these fibers. A taper period before the marathon further improved the functional profile of the muscle, which was targeted to the fast-twitch muscle fibers.

  15. Adults with initial metabolic syndrome have altered muscle deoxygenation during incremental exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Alessandro da Costa; Barbosa, Thales Coelho; Kluser Sales, Allan Robson; de Souza, Marcio Nogueira; da Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas; Silva, Bruno Moreira

    2017-02-01

    Reduced aerobic power is independently associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) incidence and prevalence in adults. This study investigated whether muscle deoxygenation (proxy of microvascular O 2 extraction) during incremental exercise is altered in MetS and associated with reduced oxygen consumption ( V˙O 2peak ). Twelve men with initial MetS (no overt diseases and medication-naive; mean ± SD, age 38 ± 7 years) and 12 healthy controls (HCs) (34 ± 7 years) completed an incremental cycling test to exhaustion, in which pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange (metabolic analyzer), as well as vastus lateralis deoxygenation (near infrared spectroscopy), were measured. Subjects with MetS, in contrast to HCs, showed lower V˙O 2peak normalized to total lean mass, similar V˙O 2 response to exercise, and earlier break point (BP) in muscle deoxygenation. Consequently, deoxygenation slope from BP to peak exercise was greater. Furthermore, absolute V˙O 2peak was positively associated with BP in correlations adjusted for total lean mass. MetS, without overt diseases, altered kinetics of muscle deoxygenation during incremental exercise, particularly at high-intensity exercise. Therefore, the balance between utilization and delivery of O 2 within skeletal muscle is impaired early in MetS natural history, which may contribute to the reduction in aerobic power. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  16. Extraocular muscle function testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003397.htm Extraocular muscle function testing To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Extraocular muscle function testing examines the function of the eye muscles. ...

  17. Metabolic Adaptation to Muscle Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Marco E.; Coon, Jennifer E.; Kalhan, Satish C.; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Saidel, Gerald M.; Stanley, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Although all tissues in the body can adapt to varying physiological/pathological conditions, muscle is the most adaptable. To understand the significance of cellular events and their role in controlling metabolic adaptations in complex physiological systems, it is necessary to link cellular and system levels by means of mechanistic computational models. The main objective of this work is to improve understanding of the regulation of energy metabolism during skeletal/cardiac muscle ischemia by combining in vivo experiments and quantitative models of metabolism. Our main focus is to investigate factors affecting lactate metabolism (e.g., NADH/NAD) and the inter-regulation between carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism during a reduction in regional blood flow. A mechanistic mathematical model of energy metabolism has been developed to link cellular metabolic processes and their control mechanisms to tissue (skeletal muscle) and organ (heart) physiological responses. We applied this model to simulate the relationship between tissue oxygenation, redox state, and lactate metabolism in skeletal muscle. The model was validated using human data from published occlusion studies. Currently, we are investigating the difference in the responses to sudden vs. gradual onset ischemia in swine by combining in vivo experimental studies with computational models of myocardial energy metabolism during normal and ischemic conditions.

  18. Tbx15 controls skeletal muscle fibre-type determination and muscle metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin Y.; Singh, Manvendra K.; Ussar, Siegfried; Wetzel, Petra; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.; Kispert, Andreas; Kahn, C. Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is composed of both slow-twitch oxidative myofibers and fast-twitch glycolytic myofibers that differentially impact muscle metabolism, function and eventually whole-body physiology. Here we show that the mesodermal transcription factor T-box 15 (Tbx15) is highly and specifically expressed in glycolytic myofibers. Ablation of Tbx15 in vivo leads to a decrease in muscle size due to a decrease in the number of glycolytic fibres, associated with a small increase in the number of oxidative fibres. This shift in fibre composition results in muscles with slower myofiber contraction and relaxation, and also decreases whole-body oxygen consumption, reduces spontaneous activity, increases adiposity and glucose intolerance. Mechanistically, ablation of Tbx15 leads to activation of AMPK signalling and a decrease in Igf2 expression. Thus, Tbx15 is one of a limited number of transcription factors to be identified with a critical role in regulating glycolytic fibre identity and muscle metabolism. PMID:26299309

  19. Relationship between Human Aging Muscle and Oxidative System Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Doria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing is a complex process that in muscle is usually associated with a decrease in mass, strength, and velocity of contraction. One of the most striking effects of ageing on muscle is known as sarcopenia. This inevitable biological process is characterized by a general decline in the physiological and biochemical functions of the major systems. At the cellular level, aging is caused by a progressive decline in mitochondrial function that results in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by the addition of a single electron to the oxygen molecule. The aging process is characterized by an imbalance between an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species in the organism and the antioxidant defences as a whole. The goal of this review is to examine the results of existing studies on oxidative stress in aging human skeletal muscles, taking into account different physiological factors (sex, fibre composition, muscle type, and function.

  20. Myoglobin plasma level related to muscle mass and fiber composition: a clinical marker of muscle wasting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Marc-André; Kinscherf, Ralf; Krakowski-Roosen, Holger; Aulmann, Michael; Renk, Hanna; Künkele, Annette; Edler, Lutz; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Wulf

    2007-08-01

    Progressive muscle wasting is a central feature of cancer-related cachexia and has been recognized as a determinant of poor prognosis and quality of life. However, until now, no easily assessable clinical marker exists that allows to predict or to track muscle wasting. The present study evaluated the potential of myoglobin (MG) plasma levels to indicate wasting of large locomotor muscles and, moreover, to reflect the loss of MG-rich fiber types, which are most relevant for daily performance. In 17 cancer-cachectic patients (weight loss 22%) and 27 age- and gender-matched healthy controls, we determined plasma levels of MG and creatine kinase (CK), maximal quadriceps muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) by magnetic resonance imaging, muscle morphology and fiber composition in biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle, body cell mass (BCM) by impedance technique as well as maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max). In cachectic patients, plasma MG, muscle CSA, BCM, and VO(2)max were 30-35% below control levels. MG showed a significant positive correlation to total muscle CSA (r = 0.65, p max as an important functional readout. CK plasma levels appear to be less reliable because prolonged increases are observed in even subclinical myopathies or after exercise. Notably, cancer-related muscle wasting was not associated with increases in plasma MG or CK in this study.

  1. Significant and sustaining elevation of blood oxygen induced by Chinese cupping therapy as assessed by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Li, Yaoxian; Lin, Yu; Li, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Cupping therapy has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years to relieve muscle pain/tendency/fatigue and to cure or reduce symbols of other diseases. However, its therapeutic effect is sparsely interpreted in the language of modern physiology. To objectively evaluate its therapeutic effect, we focused on dry cupping treatment and utilized near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess the concentration change in oxy-hemoglobin ([HbO 2 ]), deoxy-hemoglobin ([Hb]), and blood volume in the course of cupping therapy over 13 volunteers on the infraspinatus muscle, where is usually applied for shoulder pains. Both a prominent drop in [Hb] and a significant elevation in [HbO 2 ] in the tissue surrounding the cupping site were observed during both cupping and post-treatment, manifesting the enhancement of oxygen uptake. This resulting promotion indicates potential positive therapeutic effect of cupping therapy in hemodynamics for facilitating muscular functions.

  2. Reactive oxygen species formation during tetanic contractions in single isolated Xenopus myofibers

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Li; Nogueira, Leonardo; Hogan, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Contracting skeletal muscle produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that have been shown to affect muscle function and adaptation. However, real-time measurement of ROS in contracting myofibers has proven to be difficult. We used amphibian (Xenopus laevis) muscle to test the hypothesis that ROS are formed during contractile activity in isolated single skeletal muscle fibers and that this contraction-induced ROS formation affects fatigue development. Single myofibers were loaded with 5 μM dihyd...

  3. Oxygenates in automotive fuels. Consequence analysis - preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandberg, Aa.; Saevbark, B.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygenates is used in gasoline due to several reasons. They are added as high-octane components in unleaded gasoline and as agents to reduce the emission of harmful substances. Oxygenates produced from biomass might constitute a coming market for alternative fuels. This preliminary study describes the prerequisites and consequences of such an oxygenate utilization. 39 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  4. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sF o ), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  5. Phosphorylation of human skeletal muscle myosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, M.E.; Lingley, M.D.; Stuart, D.S.; Hoffman-Goetz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the P-light chains (phosphorylatable light chains) in human skeletal muscle myosin was studied in vitro and in vivo under resting an d contracted conditions. biopsy samples from rested vastus lateralis muscle of male and female subjects were incubated in oxygenated physiological solution at 30 0 C. Samples frozen following a quiescent period showed the presence of only unphosphorylated P-light chains designated LC2f (light chain two of fast myosin) CL2s and LC2s'(light chains two of slow myosin). Treatment with caffeine (10 mM) or direct electrical stimulation resulted in the appearance of three additional bands which were identified as the phosphorylated forms of the P-light chains i.e. LC2f-P, LC2s-P and LC2s'-P. The presence of phosphate was confirmed by prior incubation with ( 30 P) orthophosphate. Muscle samples rapidly frozen from resting vastus lateralis muscle revealed the presence of unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P-light chains in approximately equal ratios. Muscle samples rapidly frozen following a maximal 10 second isometric contraction showed virtually only phosphorylated fast and slow P-light chains. These results reveal that the P-light chains in human fast and slow myosin may be rapidly phosphorylated, but the basal level of phosphorylation in rested human muscle considerably exceeds that observed in animal muscles studied in vitro or in situ

  6. Skeletal muscle fatigue and decreased efficiency: two sides of the same coin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Bruno; Rossiter, Harry B; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-04-01

    During high-intensity submaximal exercise, muscle fatigue and decreased efficiency are intertwined closely, and each contributes to exercise intolerance. Fatigue and muscle inefficiency share common mechanisms, for example, decreased "metabolic stability," muscle metabolite accumulation, decreased free energy of adenosine triphosphate breakdown, limited O2 or substrate availability, increased glycolysis, pH disturbance, increased muscle temperature, reactive oxygen species production, and altered motor unit recruitment patterns.

  7. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  8. Spatially monitoring oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems using optical oxygen sensing beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Acosta, Miguel A; Leach, Jennie B; Carrier, Rebecca L

    2013-04-21

    Capability of measuring and monitoring local oxygen concentration at the single cell level (tens of microns scale) is often desirable but difficult to achieve in cell culture. In this study, biocompatible oxygen sensing beads were prepared and tested for their potential for real-time monitoring and mapping of local oxygen concentration in 3D micro-patterned cell culture systems. Each oxygen sensing bead is composed of a silica core loaded with both an oxygen sensitive Ru(Ph2phen3)Cl2 dye and oxygen insensitive Nile blue reference dye, and a poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) shell rendering biocompatibility. Human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were cultivated on a series of PDMS and type I collagen based substrates patterned with micro-well arrays for 3 or 7 days, and then brought into contact with oxygen sensing beads. Using an image analysis algorithm to convert florescence intensity of beads to partial oxygen pressure in the culture system, tens of microns-size oxygen sensing beads enabled the spatial measurement of local oxygen concentration in the microfabricated system. Results generally indicated lower oxygen level inside wells than on top of wells, and local oxygen level dependence on structural features of cell culture surfaces. Interestingly, chemical composition of cell culture substrates also appeared to affect oxygen level, with type-I collagen based cell culture systems having lower oxygen concentration compared to PDMS based cell culture systems. In general, results suggest that oxygen sensing beads can be utilized to achieve real-time and local monitoring of micro-environment oxygen level in 3D microfabricated cell culture systems.

  9. Report on ISS Oxygen Production, Resupply, and Partial Pressure Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaezler, Ryan; Ghariani, Ahmed; Leonard, Daniel; Lehman, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The majority of oxygen used on International Space Station (ISS) is for metabolic support and denitrogenation procedures prior to Extra-Vehicular Activities. Oxygen is supplied by various visiting vehicles such as the Progress and Shuttle in addition to oxygen production capability on both the United States On-Orbit Segment (USOS) and Russian Segment (RS). To maintain a habitable atmosphere the oxygen partial pressure is controlled between upper and lower bounds. The full range of the allowable oxygen partial pressure along with the increased ISS cabin volume is utilized as a buffer allowing days to pass between oxygen production or direct addition of oxygen to the atmosphere from reserves. This paper summarizes amount of oxygen supplied and produced from all of the sources and describes past experience of managing oxygen partial pressure along with the range of management options available to the ISS.

  10. Microvascular oxygen extraction during maximal isometric contraction in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Fernandes Manfredi de Freitas

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: COPD presents decrease in oxidative metabolism with possible losses of cardiovascular adjustments, suggesting slow kinetics microvascular oxygen during intense exercise. Objective: To test the hypothesis that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients have lower muscle performance in physical exercise not dependent on central factors, but also greater muscle oxygen extraction, regardless of muscle mass. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 11 COPD patients and nine healthy subjects, male, paired for age. Spirometry and body composition by DEXA were evaluated. Muscular performance was assessed by maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC in isokinetic dynamometer and muscle oxygen extraction by the NIRS technique. Student t-test and Pearson correlation were applied. A significance level of p<0.05 was adopted. Results: Patients had moderate to severe COPD (FEV1 = 44.5 ± 9.6% predicted; SpO2 = 94.6 ± 1.6%. Lean leg mass was 8.3 ± 0.9 vs. 8.9 ± 1.0 kg (p =0.033, when comparing COPD and control patients, respectively. The decreased muscle oxygen saturation corrected by muscle mass was 53.2% higher (p=0.044 in the COPD group in MVIC-1 and 149.6% higher (p=0.006 in the MVIC-2. Microvascular extraction rate of oxygen corrected by muscle mass and total work was found to be 114.5% higher (p=0.043 in the COPD group in MVIC-1 and 210.5% higher (p=0.015 in the MVIC-2. Conclusion: COPD patients have low muscle performance and high oxygen extraction per muscle mass unit and per unit of work. The high oxygen extraction suggests that quantitative and qualitative mechanisms can be determinants of muscle performance in patients with COPD.

  11. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garetto, L P; Richter, Erik; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    glycogen was substantially repleted at the time (30 min postexercise) that glucose metabolism was examined. When rats were run at twice the previous rate (36 m/min), muscle glycogen was still substantially diminished 30 min after the run. At this time the previously noted increase in insulin sensitivity......Thirty minutes after a treadmill run, glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in perfused rat skeletal muscle are enhanced due to an increase in insulin sensitivity (Richter et al., J. Clin. Invest. 69: 785-793, 1982). The exercise used in these studies was of moderate intensity, and muscle...... was still observed in perfused muscle; however, glucose utilization was also increased in the absence of added insulin (1.5 vs. 4.2 mumol X g-1 X h-1). In contrast 2.5 h after the run, muscle glycogen had returned to near preexercise values, and only the insulin-induced increase in glucose utilization...

  12. Utility of the tetrophosmine-{sup 99m}Tc in the determination of malignant tumours located in the muscle-skeletal system, preliminary report; Utilidad de la tetrofosmina-{sup 99m}Tc en la determinacion de malignidad de tumores localizados en el sistema musculoesqueletico, reporte preliminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia R, J C; Gonzalez, I F; Rico, G; Linares, L M; Delgado C, E; Baena, L [Centro Nacional de Rehabilitacion, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Adame, G; Gonzalez R, D [MIYMSA, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Perez C, J P; Valencia, S [Hospital medica Sur, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    From its authorization by the FDA, as radiopharmaceutical to be used in studies of myocardial perfusion, multiple articles have appeared in the literature it prescribes that its validate the use of the tetrophosmine-{sup 99m}Tc in the valuation of different tumors, so much in the determination of malignancy, like in the evolution and in the response to the treatment. For that reason the objective of this protocol is to evaluate the utility of the tetrophosmine- {sup 99m}Tc in the determination of malignancy in non treated tumors located in the skeletal muscle system, in a population of 40 patients coming from the service of bony tumors of the National Center of Rehabilitation. For the time being its report the discoveries in 27 studies. (Author)

  13. Reduced serum myostatin concentrations associated with genetic muscle disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Peter M; Pogoryelova, Oksana; Palandra, Joe; Goldstein, Richard; Bennett, Donald; Fitz, Lori; Guglieri, Michela; Bettolo, Chiara Marini; Straub, Volker; Evangelista, Teresinha; Neubert, Hendrik; Lochmüller, Hanns; Morris, Carl

    2017-03-01

    Myostatin is a highly conserved protein secreted primarily from skeletal muscle that can potently suppress muscle growth. This ability to regulate skeletal muscle mass has sparked intense interest in the development of anti-myostatin therapies for a wide array of muscle disorders including sarcopenia, cachexia and genetic neuromuscular diseases. While a number of studies have examined the circulating myostatin concentrations in healthy and sarcopenic populations, very little data are available from inherited muscle disease patients. Here, we have measured the myostatin concentration in serum from seven genetic neuromuscular disorder patient populations using immunoaffinity LC-MS/MS. Average serum concentrations of myostatin in all seven muscle disease patient groups were significantly less than those measured in healthy controls. Furthermore, circulating myostatin concentrations correlated with clinical measures of disease progression for five of the muscle disease patient populations. These findings greatly expand the understanding of myostatin in neuromuscular disease and suggest its potential utility as a biomarker of disease progression.

  14. Deriving muscle fiber diameter from recorded single fiber potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, Ewa

    2017-12-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate muscle fiber diameters through analysis of single muscle fiber potentials (SFPs) recorded in the frontalis muscle of a healthy subject. Our previously developed analytical and graphic method to derive fiber diameter from the analysis of the negative peak duration and the amplitude of SFP, was applied to a sample of ten SFPs recorded in vivo. Muscle fiber diameters derived from the simulation method for the sample of frontalis muscle SFPs are consistent with anatomical data for this muscle. The results confirm the utility of proposed simulation method. Outlying data could be considered as the result of a contribution of other fibers to the potential recorded using an SFEMG electrode. Our graphic tool provides a rapid estimation of muscle fiber diameter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Human skeletal muscle mitochondrial capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, U F; Rasmussen, H N

    2000-04-01

    Under aerobic work, the oxygen consumption and major ATP production occur in the mitochondria and it is therefore a relevant question whether the in vivo rates can be accounted for by mitochondrial capacities measured in vitro. Mitochondria were isolated from human quadriceps muscle biopsies in yields of approximately 45%. The tissue content of total creatine, mitochondrial protein and different cytochromes was estimated. A number of activities were measured in functional assays of the mitochondria: pyruvate, ketoglutarate, glutamate and succinate dehydrogenases, palmitoyl-carnitine respiration, cytochrome oxidase, the respiratory chain and the ATP synthesis. The activities involved in carbohydrate oxidation could account for in vivo oxygen uptakes of 15-16 mmol O2 min-1 kg-1 or slightly above the value measured at maximal work rates in the knee-extensor model of Saltin and co-workers, i.e. without limitation from the cardiac output. This probably indicates that the maximal oxygen consumption of the muscle is limited by the mitochondrial capacities. The in vitro activities of fatty acid oxidation corresponded to only 39% of those of carbohydrate oxidation. The maximal rate of free energy production from aerobic metabolism of glycogen was calculated from the mitochondrial activities and estimates of the DeltaG or ATP hydrolysis and the efficiency of the actin-myosin reaction. The resultant value was 20 W kg-1 or approximately 70% of the maximal in vivo work rates of which 10-20% probably are sustained by the anaerobic ATP production. The lack of aerobic in vitro ATP synthesis might reflect termination of some critical interplay between cytoplasm and mitochondria.

  16. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2005-09-30

    The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in

  17. Similar mitochondrial activation kinetics in wild-type and creatine kinase-deficient fast-twitch muscle indicate significant Pi control of respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeneson, J.A.L.; Veld, ter F.; Schmitz, J.P.J.; Meyer, R.A.; Hilbers, P.A.J.; Nicolay, K.

    2011-01-01

    Past simulations of oxidative ATP metabolism in skeletal muscle have predicted that elimination of the creatine kinase (CK) reaction should result in dramatically faster oxygen consumption dynamics during transitions in ATP turnover rate. This hypothesis was investigated. Oxygen consumption of

  18. Enhanced muscle glucose metabolism after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1984-01-01

    Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase in the pr......Studies in the rat suggest that after voluntary exercise there are two phases of glycogen repletion in skeletal muscle (preceding study). In phase I glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis are enhanced both in the presence and absence of insulin, whereas in phase II only the increase...... in the stimulated leg closely mimicked that observed previously after voluntary exercise on a treadmill. With no insulin added to the perfusate, glucose incorporation into glycogen was markedly enhanced in muscles that were glycogen depleted as were the uptake of 2-deoxyglucose and 3-O-methylglucose. Likewise......, the stimulation of these processes by insulin was enhanced and continued to be so 2 h later when the muscles of the stimulated leg had substantially repleted their glycogen stores. The results suggest that the increases in insulin-mediated glucose utilization and glycogen synthesis in muscle after exercise...

  19. Healthy Muscles Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or lying down, and faster when you’re running or playing sports and your skeletal muscles need more blood to help them do their work. What can go wrong? Injuries Almost everyone has had sore muscles after exercising ...

  20. Estimating Utility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Channing; Simler, Kenneth R.

    2010-01-01

    A fundamental premise of absolute poverty lines is that they represent the same level of utility through time and space. Disturbingly, a series of recent studies in middle- and low-income economies show that even carefully derived poverty lines rarely satisfy this premise. This article proposes a......, with the current approach tending to systematically overestimate (underestimate) poverty in urban (rural) zones.......A fundamental premise of absolute poverty lines is that they represent the same level of utility through time and space. Disturbingly, a series of recent studies in middle- and low-income economies show that even carefully derived poverty lines rarely satisfy this premise. This article proposes...... an information-theoretic approach to estimating cost-of-basic-needs (CBN) poverty lines that are utility consistent. Applications to date illustrate that utility-consistent poverty measurements derived from the proposed approach and those derived from current CBN best practices often differ substantially...

  1. Radiation injury to skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persons, C.C.M.; Wondergem, J.; Leer, J.W.H.

    1997-01-01

    Radiotherapy of neoplasia has increased the mean life expectancy of cancer patients. On the other hand, more reports are published on morbidity of the treatment with regard to normal tissue. Studies on skeletal muscle injury specifically are scarce, but many clinical long term follow-up studies make note of side effects as muscle atrophy, fibrosis and limited function. Furthermore it is suggested that skeletal muscles of children are more prone to radiation injury than those of adult subjects. Effects of radiation on skeletal muscle were studied in rats. On hind limb of young (100 g) and adult (350 g) rats was irradiated with single doses (15-30 Gy), while the other served as control. Follow-up was up to 12 months post treatment. Muscular function in young rats was decreased significantly at 6 months post irradiation, but did not further decrease in the following 6 months. The amount of collagen, on the other hand, was not increased at 6 months, but became highly elevated at 12 months past treatment. This suggests that at 6 months, impaired muscular function may not be explained by increased fibrotic tissues. This is an agreement with results obtained in adult rats, where function was also impaired, without concomitant increase in collagen. In an earlier study, mitochondrial oxygen consumption was dose dependently decreased after irradiation, at 12 months, but not at 6 months post treatment. Furthermore, myosin-actin interaction was measured in skinned fibers. The first results of this study indicate changes in the interaction of contraction proteins, as early as 6 months post treatment. (authors)

  2. Biogeochemistry: Oxygen burrowed away

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meysman, F.J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Multicellular animals probably evolved at the seafloor after a rise in oceanic oxygen levels. Biogeochemical model simulations suggest that as these animals started to rework the seafloor, they triggered a negative feedback that reduced global oxygen.

  3. Oxygen transport membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof.......The present invention relates to a novel composite oxygen transport membrane as well as its preparation and uses thereof....

  4. Training-induced adaptation of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscles.

    OpenAIRE

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2003-01-01

    Muscle training/conditioning improves the adaptation of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscles to physical exercise. However, the mechanisms underlying this adaptation are still not understood fully. By quantitative analysis of the existing experimental results, we show that training-induced acceleration of oxygen-uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise and improvement of ATP/ADP stability due to physical training are mainly caused by an increase in the amount of mitochondrial protein...

  5. Age-related changes in oxygen and nutrient uptake by hindquarters in newborn pigs during cold-induced shivering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lossec, G; Lebreton, Y; Hulin, J C; Fillaut, M; Herpin, P

    1998-11-01

    Newborn pigs rely essentially on shivering thermogenesis in the cold. In order to understand the rapid postnatal enhancement of thermogenic capacities in piglets, the oxygen and nutrient uptake of hindquarters was measured in vivo in 1- (n = 6) and 5-day-old (n = 6) animals at thermal neutrality and during cold exposure. The hindquarters were considered to represent a skeletal muscle compartment. Indirect calorimetry and arterio-venous techniques were used. The cold challenge (23 C at 1 day old and 15 C at 5 days old for 90 min) induced a similar increase (+90 %) in regulatory heat production at both ages. Hindquarters blood flow was higher at 5 days than 1 day old at thermal neutrality (26 +/- 3 vs. 17 +/- 1 ml min-1 (100 g hindquarters)-1) and its increase in the cold was much more marked (+65 % at 5 days old vs. +25 % at 1 day old). Oxygen extraction by the hindquarters rose from 30-35 % at thermal neutrality to 65-70 % in the cold at both ages. The calculated contribution of skeletal muscle to total oxygen consumption averaged 34-40 % at thermal neutrality and 50-64 % in the cold and skeletal muscle was the major contributor to regulatory thermogenesis. Based on hindquarters glucose uptake and lactate release, carbohydrate appeared to be an important fuel for shivering. However, net uptake of fatty acids increased progressively during cold exposure at 5 days old. The enhancement in muscular blood supply and fatty acid utilization during shivering is probably related to the postnatal improvement in the thermoregulatory response of the piglet.

  6. Proterozoic atmospheric oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    This article is concerned with the evolution of atmospheric oxygen concentrations through the Proterozoic Eon. In particular, this article will seek to place the history of atmospheric oxygenation through the Proterozoic Eon in the context of the evolving physical environment including the history...... of continental growth and volcanic outgassing, as well as biogeochemical processing of elements within the oceans. The author will seek to explore constraints on the history of oxygenation and understand which processes have regulated oxygen through this eon....

  7. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  8. [Domiciliary oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kafi, S

    2010-09-01

    In Belgium, oxygen therapy is becoming more and more accessible. When oxygen is needed for short periods or for special indications as palliative care, an agreement between mutual insurance companies and pharmacists allows the practitioner the home installation of gazeous oxygen cylinder or of oxygen concentrator. When long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is indicated for patients with respiratory insufficiency, the pneumologist must first ask the INAMI the authorization to install one of the following modalities: oxygen concentrator with or without demand oxygen delivery cylinder and liquid oxygen. The goal of LTOT is to increase survival and quality of life. The principal and well accepted indication for LTOT is severe hypoxemia. The beneficial effects of oxygen therapy limited at night or on exertion are controversial. In order to increase patient's autonomy, oxygen can be prescribed for ambulation, respecting prescription's rules. At each step of oxygen therapy implementing (indication, choice of the device and follow-up) the patient under oxygen may benefit from a joint approach between the general practitioner and the chest specialist.

  9. Aircraft Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    An Oxygen Enriched Air System for the AV-8A Harrier (NADC-81198-60).” 70 Horch , T., et. al. “The F-16 Onboard Oxygen Generating System: Performance...Only and Safety Privileged). Horch , T., Miller, R., Bomar, J., Tedor, J., Holden, R., Ikels, K., & Lozano, P. (1983). The F-16 Onboard Oxygen

  10. Acetyl group availability influences phosphocreatine degradation even during intense muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, James A; Constantin-Teodosiu, Dumitru; Poucher, Simon M; Greenhaff, Paul L

    2004-12-15

    We previously established that activation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) using dichloroacetate (DCA) reduced the reliance on substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) at the onset of exercise, with normal and reduced blood flow. PDC activation also reduced fatigue development during contraction with reduced blood flow. Since these observations, several studies have re-evaluated our observations. One study demonstrated a performance benefit without a reduction in SLP, raising a question mark over PDC's role in the regulation of ATP regeneration and our interpretation of fatigue mechanisms. Using a model of muscle contraction similar to the conflicting study (i.e. tetanic rather than twitch stimulation), we re-examined this question. Using canine skeletal muscle, one group was infused with saline while the other was pretreated with 300 mg (kg body mass)(-1) DCA. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, peak tension (1 min) and after 6 min of tetanic electrical stimulation (75 ms on-925 ms off per second) and blood flow was limited to 25% of normal values observed during contraction. DCA reduced phosphocreatine (PCr) degradation by 40% during the first minute of contraction, but did not prevent the almost complete depletion of PCr stores at 6 min, while muscle fatigue did not differ between the two groups. During intermittent tetanic stimulation PCr degradation was 75% greater than with our previous 3 Hz twitch contraction protocol, despite a similar rate of oxygen consumption at 6 min. Thus, in the present study enhanced acetyl group availability altered the time course of PCr utilization but did not prevent the decline towards depletion. Consistent with our earlier conclusions, DCA pretreatment reduces muscle fatigue only when SLP is attenuated. The present study and our met-analysis indicates that enhanced acetyl group availability results in a readily measurable reduction in SLP when the initial rate of PCr utilization is approximately 1 mmol (kg dry mass)(-1

  11. Electrically and hybrid-induced muscle activations: effects of muscle size and fiber type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Stratton

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of three electrical stimulation (ES frequencies (10, 35, and 50 Hz on two muscle groups with different proportions of fast and slow twitch fibers (abductor pollicis brevis (APB and vastus lateralis (VL was explored. We evaluated the acute muscles’ responses individually and during hybrid activations (ES superimposed by voluntary activations. Surface electromyography (sEMG and force measurements were evaluated as outcomes. Ten healthy adults (mean age: 24.4 ± 2.5 years participated after signing an informed consent form approved by the university Institutional Review Board. Protocols were developed to: 1 compare EMG activities during each frequency for each muscle when generating 25% Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC force, and 2 compare EMG activities during each frequency when additional voluntary activation was superimposed over ES-induced 25% MVC to reach 50% and 75% MVC. Empirical mode decomposition (EMD was utilized to separate ES artifacts from voluntary muscle activation. For both muscles, higher stimulation frequency (35 and 50Hz induced higher electrical output detected at 25% of MVC, suggesting more recruitment with higher frequencies. Hybrid activation generated proportionally less electrical activity than ES alone. ES and voluntary activations appear to generate two different modes of muscle recruitment. ES may provoke muscle strength by activating more fatiguing fast acting fibers, but voluntary activation elicits more muscle coordination. Therefore, during the hybrid activation, less electrical activity may be detected due to recruitment of more fatigue-resistant deeper muscle fibers, not reachable by surface EMG.

  12. PEDF-derived peptide promotes skeletal muscle regeneration through its mitogenic effect on muscle progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tsung-Chuan; Chiang, Yi-Pin; Chuang, Chih-Kuang; Chen, Show-Li; Hsieh, Jui-Wen; Lan, Yu-Wen; Tsao, Yeou-Ping

    2015-08-01

    In response injury, intrinsic repair mechanisms are activated in skeletal muscle to replace the damaged muscle fibers with new muscle fibers. The regeneration process starts with the proliferation of satellite cells to give rise to myoblasts, which subsequently differentiate terminally into myofibers. Here, we investigated the promotion effect of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) on muscle regeneration. We report that PEDF and a synthetic PEDF-derived short peptide (PSP; residues Ser(93)-Leu(112)) induce satellite cell proliferation in vitro and promote muscle regeneration in vivo. Extensively, soleus muscle necrosis was induced in rats by bupivacaine, and an injectable alginate gel was used to release the PSP in the injured muscle. PSP delivery was found to stimulate satellite cell proliferation in damaged muscle and enhance the growth of regenerating myofibers, with complete regeneration of normal muscle mass by 2 wk. In cell culture, PEDF/PSP stimulated C2C12 myoblast proliferation, together with a rise in cyclin D1 expression. PEDF induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Akt, and STAT3 in C2C12 myoblasts. Blocking the activity of ERK, Akt, or STAT3 with pharmacological inhibitors attenuated the effects of PEDF/PSP on the induction of C2C12 cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine pulse-labeling demonstrated that PEDF/PSP stimulated primary rat satellite cell proliferation in myofibers in vitro. In summary, we report for the first time that PSP is capable of promoting the regeneration of skeletal muscle. The signaling mechanism involves the ERK, AKT, and STAT3 pathways. These results show the potential utility of this PEDF peptide for muscle regeneration. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Força muscular como determinante da eficiência do consumo de oxigênio e da máxima resposta metabólica ao exercício em pacientes com DPOC leve/moderada Muscle strength as a determinant of oxygen uptake efficiency and maximal metabolic response in patients with mild-to-moderate COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo de Tarso Guerrero Müller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar o comportamento de oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES, inclinação da eficiência do consumo de oxigênio com o do consumo de oxigênio no pico do exercício (VO2pico. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo transversal envolvendo 21 pacientes (15 homens com DPOC leve/moderada que foram submetidos a espirometria, dinamometria de preensão palmar (DIN, teste cardiopulmonar de exercício e medida de lactato no pico do exercício (LACpico. RESULTADOS: A média de peso foi 66,7 ± 13,6 kg, e a de idade foi 60,7 ± 7,8 anos. Com exceção de VEF1 e relação VEF1/CVF (75,8 ± 18,6 do previsto e 56,6 ± 8,8, respectivamente, as demais variáveis espirométricas foram normais, assim como DIN. As médias, em % do previsto, para VO2pico (93,1 ± 15,4, FC máxima (92,5 ± 10,4 e OUES (99,4 ± 24,4, assim como a da taxa de troca respiratória (1,2 ± 0,1, indicaram estresse metabólico e hemodinâmico importante. A correlação entre o VO2pico e a OUES foi elevada (r = 0,747; p OBJECTIVE: To compare the behavior of the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES with that of oxygen uptake at peak exertion (VO2peak. METHODS: This was a prospective cross-sectional study involving 21 patients (15 men with mild-to-moderate COPD undergoing spirometry, handgrip strength (HGS testing, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and determination of lactate at peak exertion (LACpeak. RESULTS: Mean weight was 66.7 ± 13.6 kg, and mean age was 60.7 ± 7.8 years. With the exception of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio (75.8 ± 18.6 of predicted and 56.6 ± 8.8, respectively, all spirometric variables were normal, as was HGS. The patients exhibited significant metabolic and hemodynamic stress, as evidenced by the means (% of predicted for VO2peak (93.1 ± 15.4, maximum HR (92.5 ± 10.4, and OUES (99.4 ± 24.4, as well as for the gas exchange rate (1.2 ± 0.1. The correlation between VO2peak and OUES was significant (r = 0.747; p < 0.0001. The correlation between HGS and VO2peak (r

  14. Oxygen configurations in silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelikowsky, James R.; Chadi, D. J.; Binggeli, N.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a transition state for oxygen in silica. This state is produced by the insertion of an oxygen molecule into the Si-O-Si bond, i.e., it consists of producing a Si-O-O-O-Si bond. This state allows molecular oxygen diffusion in silica without breaking the molecular O 2 bond and it is energetically more stable than a peroxy configuration. This configuration may allow for exchange of molecular oxygen with the oxygen in the silica framework. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  15. Etude de la relation entre la consommation maximale d'oxygene et ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus the limiting factors are variously attributed to the cardiac output, to muscle movement, hemoglobin, metabolism and muscle activity. ... Three protocols measurements of maximum oxygen consumption were made, two different protocols for the year with a member less than 50 revolutions per minute (1P50) and 100 ...

  16. Multiattribute Utility Theory without Expected Utility Foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiggelbout, A.M.; Wakker, P.P.

    1995-01-01

    Methods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities, and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute utilities.

  17. Multiattribute utility theory without expected utility foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, P.P.; Miyamoto, J.

    1996-01-01

    Methods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities, and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute utilities.

  18. Alpha-adrenergic receptors in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattigan, S; Appleby, G J; Edwards, S J

    1986-01-01

    Sarcolemma-enriched preparations from muscles rich in slow oxidative red fibres contained specific binding sites for the alpha 1 antagonist, prazosin (e.g. soleus Kd 0.13 nM, Bmax 29 fmol/mg protein). Binding sites for prazosin were almost absent from white muscle. Displacement of prazosin bindin...... adrenergic receptors are present on the sarcolemma of slow oxidative red fibres of rat skeletal muscle. The presence provides the mechanistic basis for apparent alpha-adrenergic effects to increase glucose and oxygen uptake in perfused rat hindquarter....

  19. Lactate Accumulation in Muscle and Blood during Submaximal Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-21

    exercise, fast and slow twitch fibers Short title: Lactate in muscle and blood P.A. Tesch, W.L. Daniels and D.S. Sharp Exercise Physiology Division, U.S...KIRBY, R.L. & BELCASTRO, A.N. 1978. Relationship between slow - twitch muscle fibres and lactic acid removal. Can J Appl Sports Sci 3:160-162. BRODAL, P...oxygen uptake (Karlsson 1971, Knuttgen & Saltin 1972). It is generally agreed that the main muscle fiber type to be recruited below this level is the slow

  20. The Emerging Role of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism as a Biological Target and Cellular Regulator of Cancer-Induced Muscle Wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James A.; Hardee, Justin P.; VanderVeen, Brandon N.

    2015-01-01

    While skeletal muscle mass is an established primary outcome related to understanding cancer cachexia mechanisms, considerable gaps exist in our understanding of muscle biochemical and functional properties that have recognized roles in systemic health. Skeletal muscle quality is a classification beyond mass, and is aligned with muscle’s metabolic capacity and substrate utilization flexibility. This supplies an additional role for the mitochondria in cancer-induced muscle wasting. While the historical assessment of mitochondria content and function during cancer-induced muscle loss was closely aligned with energy flux and wasting susceptibility, this understanding has expanded to link mitochondria dysfunction to cellular processes regulating myofiber wasting. The primary objective of this article is to highlight muscle mitochondria and oxidative metabolism as a biological target of cancer cachexia and also as a cellular regulator of cancer-induced muscle wasting. Initially, we examine the role of muscle metabolic phenotype and mitochondria content in cancer-induced wasting susceptibility. We then assess the evidence for cancer-induced regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, mitophagy, and oxidative stress. In addition, we discuss environments associated with cancer cachexia that can impact the regulation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. The article also examines the role of cytokine-mediated regulation of mitochondria function regulation, followed by the potential role of cancer-induced hypogonadism. Lastly, a role for decreased muscle use in cancer-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed. PMID:26593326

  1. A muscle stem cell for every muscle: variability of satellite cell biology among different muscle groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Matthew E.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2015-01-01

    The human body contains approximately 640 individual skeletal muscles. Despite the fact that all of these muscles are composed of striated muscle tissue, the biology of these muscles and their associated muscle stem cell populations are quite diverse. Skeletal muscles are affected differentially by various muscular dystrophies (MDs), such that certain genetic mutations specifically alter muscle function in only a subset of muscles. Additionally, defective muscle stem cells have been implicated in the pathology of some MDs. The biology of muscle stem cells varies depending on the muscles with which they are associated. Here we review the biology of skeletal muscle stem cell populations of eight different muscle groups. Understanding the biological variation of skeletal muscles and their resident stem cells could provide valuable insight into mechanisms underlying the susceptibility of certain muscles to myopathic disease. PMID:26500547

  2. Skeletal muscle O-GlcNAc transferase is important for muscle energy homeostasis and whole-body insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Hao; Munk, Alexander; Nielsen, Thomas Svava

    2018-01-01

    -GlcNAcylation, in skeletal muscle. METHODS: We assessed O-GlcNAcylation levels in skeletal muscle from obese, type 2 diabetic people, and we characterized muscle-specific OGT knockout (mKO) mice in metabolic cages and measured energy expenditure and substrate utilization pattern using indirect calorimetry. Whole body...... of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in obese, type 2 diabetic people compared with well-matched obese and lean controls. Muscle-specific OGT knockout mice were lean, and whole body energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity were increased in these mice, consistent with enhanced glucose uptake and elevated...

  3. Muscle glucose metabolism following exercise in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Garetto, L P; Goodman, M N

    1982-01-01

    Muscle glycogen stores are depleted during exercise and are rapidly repleted during the recovery period. To investigate the mechanism for this phenomenon, untrained male rats were run for 45 min on a motor-driven treadmill and the ability of their muscles to utilize glucose was then assessed during...... in glucose utilization enhanced by prior exercise appeared to be glucose transport across the cell membrane, as in neither control nor exercised rats did free glucose accumulate in the muscle cell. Following exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate the release of lactate into the perfusate was unaltered......; however its ability to stimulate the incorporation of [(14)C]glucose into glycogen in certain muscles was enhanced. Thus at a concentration of 75 muU/ml insulin stimulated glycogen synthesis eightfold more in the fast-twitch red fibers of the red gastrocnemius than it did in the same muscle...

  4. Running Economy from a Muscle Energetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Fletcher

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The economy of running has traditionally been quantified from the mass-specific oxygen uptake; however, because fuel substrate usage varies with exercise intensity, it is more accurate to express running economy in units of metabolic energy. Fundamentally, the understanding of the major factors that influence the energy cost of running (Erun can be obtained with this approach. Erun is determined by the energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction. Here, we approach the study of Erun from that perspective. The amount of energy needed for skeletal muscle contraction is dependent on the force, duration, shortening, shortening velocity, and length of the muscle. These factors therefore dictate the energy cost of running. It is understood that some determinants of the energy cost of running are not trainable: environmental factors, surface characteristics, and certain anthropometric features. Other factors affecting Erun are altered by training: other anthropometric features, muscle and tendon properties, and running mechanics. Here, the key features that dictate the energy cost during distance running are reviewed in the context of skeletal muscle energetics.

  5. The effect of adrenaline and high Ca2+ on the mechanical performance and oxygen consumption of the isolated perfused trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Dorte; Gesser, Hans

    2007-01-01

    In heart muscle from mammals, catecholamines frequently evoke an oxygen waste and reduce efficiency. It was examined if this also applies to fish in which heart muscle activity is often restricted by oxygen availability. In the isolated perfused heart from rainbow trout, adrenaline (0.5 micro...

  6. Oxygen delivery in irradiated normal tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiani, M.F.; Ansari, R. [Univ. of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States). School of Biomedical Engineering; Gaber, M.W. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2003-03-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure significantly alters the structure and function of microvascular networks, which regulate delivery of oxygen to tissue. In this study we use a hamster cremaster muscle model to study changes in microvascular network parameters and use a mathematical model to study the effects of these observed structural and microhemodynamic changes in microvascular networks on oxygen delivery to the tissue. Our experimental observations indicate that in microvascular networks while some parameters are significantly affected by irradiation (e.g. red blood cell (RBC) transit time), others remain at the control level (e.g. RBC path length) up to 180 days post-irradiation. The results from our mathematical model indicate that tissue oxygenation patterns are significantly different in irradiated normal tissue as compared to age-matched controls and the differences are apparent as early as 3 days post irradiation. However, oxygen delivery to irradiated tissue was not found to be significantly different from age matched controls at any time between 7 days to 6 months post-irradiation. These findings indicate that microvascular late effects in irradiated normal tissue may be due to factors other than compromised tissue oxygenation. (author)

  7. Skeletal muscle substrate metabolism during exercise: methodological considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Hall, Gerrit; González-Alonso, J; Sacchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    and the respiratory exchange ratio. However, if the aim is to quantify limb or muscle metabolism, invasive measurements have to be carried out, such as the determination of blood flow, arterio-venous (a-v) difference measurements for O2 and relevant substrates, and biopsies of the active muscle. As many substrates...... substrates. There are several methodological concerns to be aware of when studying the metabolic response to exercise in human subjects. These concerns include: (1) the muscle mass involved in the exercise is largely unknown (bicycle or treadmill). Moreover, whether the muscle sample obtained from a limb......; (3) the use of net limb glycerol release to estimate lipolysis is probably not valid (triacylglycerol utilization by muscle), since glycerol can be metabolized in skeletal muscle; (4) the precision of blood-borne substrate concentrations during exercise measured by a-v difference is hampered since...

  8. Localized bioimpedance to assess muscle injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nescolarde, L; Rosell-Ferrer, J; Yanguas, J; Lukaski, H; Alomar, X; Rodas, G

    2013-01-01

    Injuries to lower limb muscles are common among football players. Localized bioimpedance analysis (BIA) utilizes electrical measurements to assess soft tissue hydration and cell membrane integrity non-invasively. This study reports the effects of the severity of muscle injury and recovery on BIA variables. We made serial tetra-polar, phase-sensitive 50 kHz localized BIA measurements of quadriceps, hamstring and calf muscles of three male football players before and after injury and during recovery until return-to-play, to determine changes in BIA variables (resistance (R), reactance (Xc) and phase angle (PA)) in different degrees of muscle injury. Compared to non-injury values, R, Xc and PA decreased with increasing muscle injury severity: grade III (23.1%, 45.1% and 27.6%), grade II (20.6%, 31.6% and 13.3%) and grade I (11.9%, 23.5% and 12.1%). These findings indicate that decreases in R reflect localized fluid accumulation, and reductions in Xc and PA highlight disruption of cellular membrane integrity and injury. Localized BIA measurements of muscle groups enable the practical detection of soft tissue injury and its severity. (paper)

  9. Phosphorescence quenching microrespirometry of skeletal muscle in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Aleksander S.; Tevald, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an optical method for the evaluation of the oxygen consumption (V̇o2) in microscopic volumes of spinotrapezius muscle. Using phosphorescence quenching microscopy (PQM) for the measurement of interstitial Po2, together with rapid pneumatic compression of the organ, we recorded the oxygen disappearance curve (ODC) in the muscle of the anesthetized rats. A 0.6-mm diameter area in the tissue, preloaded with the phosphorescent oxygen probe, was excited once a second by a 532-nm Q-switched laser with pulse duration of 15 ns. Each of the evoked phosphorescence decays was analyzed to obtain a sequence of Po2 values that constituted the ODC. Following flow arrest and tissue compression, the interstitial Po2 decreased rapidly and the initial slope of the ODC was used to calculate the V̇o2. Special analysis of instrumental factors affecting the ODC was performed, and the resulting model was used for evaluation of V̇o2. The calculation was based on the observation of only a small amount of residual blood in the tissue after compression. The contribution of oxygen photoconsumption by PQM and oxygen inflow from external sources was evaluated in specially designed tests. The average oxygen consumption of the rat spinotrapezius muscle was V̇o2 = 123.4 ± 13.4 (SE) nl O2/cm3·s (N = 38, within 6 muscles) at a baseline interstitial Po2 of 50.8 ± 2.9 mmHg. This technique has opened the opportunity for monitoring respiration rates in microscopic volumes of functioning skeletal muscle. PMID:20971766

  10. The effect of elbow angle and external moment on load sharing of elbow muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praagman, M.; Chadwick, E.K.J.; van der Helm, F.C.T.; Veeger, H.E.J.

    2010-01-01

    To study elbow muscle load sharing we investigated the effect of external flexion-extension (FE) and pronation-supination (PS) moments and elbow angle on muscle activation and oxygen consumption (V̇O2).Two data sets were obtained. First, (n=6) electromyography (EMG) of elbow flexors (long and short

  11. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2017-10-03

    The invention relates to a commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane system for utilizing heat generated in reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes to generate steam, heat process fluid and/or provide energy to carry out endothermic chemical reactions. The system provides for improved thermal coupling of oxygen transport membrane tubes to steam generation tubes or process heater tubes or reactor tubes for efficient and effective radiant heat transfer.

  12. Proteomics of Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul

    2016-01-01

    , of altered protein expressions profiles and/or their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics offer enormous promise for investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and exercise-induced adaptation; however, skeletal muscle......Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and plays an important role in locomotion and whole body metabolism. It accounts for ~80% of insulin stimulated glucose disposal. Skeletal muscle insulin resistance, a primary feature of Type 2 diabetes, is caused by a decreased ability...... of muscle to respond to circulating insulin. Physical exercise improves insulin sensitivity and whole body metabolism and remains one of the most promising interventions for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance and exercise adaptations in skeletal muscle might be a cause, or consequence...

  13. Muscles, exercise and obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K; Febbraio, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    During the past decade, skeletal muscle has been identified as a secretory organ. Accordingly, we have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed and released by muscle fibres and exert either autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects should be classified as myokines....... The finding that the muscle secretome consists of several hundred secreted peptides provides a conceptual basis and a whole new paradigm for understanding how muscles communicate with other organs, such as adipose tissue, liver, pancreas, bones and brain. However, some myokines exert their effects within...... the muscle itself. Thus, myostatin, LIF, IL-6 and IL-7 are involved in muscle hypertrophy and myogenesis, whereas BDNF and IL-6 are involved in AMPK-mediated fat oxidation. IL-6 also appears to have systemic effects on the liver, adipose tissue and the immune system, and mediates crosstalk between intestinal...

  14. Ion measurements in premixed methane-oxygen flames

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad; Hourani, Nadim; Chahine, May; Selim, Hatem; Sarathy, Mani; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-01-01

    Mass Spectrometer (MBMS) is utilized to measure ion concentration profiles in premixed methane-oxygen-argon burner-stabilized flames. Lean, stoichiometric and rich flames at atmospheric pressure are used to study the dependence of ion chemistry

  15. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  16. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joong Sung

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  17. Response of skeletal muscle mitochondria to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppeler, Hans; Vogt, Michael; Weibel, Ewald R; Flück, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This review explores the current concepts relating the structural and functional modifications of skeletal muscle mitochondria to the molecular mechanisms activated when organisms are exposed to a hypoxic environment. In contrast to earlier assumptions it is now established that permanent or long-term exposure to severe environmental hypoxia decreases the mitochondrial content of muscle fibres. Oxidative muscle metabolism is shifted towards a higher reliance on carbohydrates as a fuel, and intramyocellular lipid substrate stores are reduced. Moreover, in muscle cells of mountaineers returning from the Himalayas, we find accumulations of lipofuscin, believed to be a mitochondrial degradation product. Low mitochondrial contents are also observed in high-altitude natives such as Sherpas. In these subjects high-altitude performance seems to be improved by better coupling between ATP demand and supply pathways as well as better metabolite homeostasis. The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been identified as a master regulator for the expression of genes involved in the hypoxia response, such as genes coding for glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HIF-1 achieves this by binding to hypoxia response elements in the promoter regions of these genes, whereby the increase of HIF-1 in hypoxia is the consequence of a reduced degradation of its dominant subunit HIF-1a. A further mechanism that seems implicated in the hypoxia response of muscle mitochondria is related to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria during oxidative phosphorylation. How exactly ROS interfere with HIF-1a as well as MAP kinase and other signalling pathways is debated. The current evidence suggests that mitochondria themselves could be important players in oxygen sensing.

  18. Oxygen Toxicity and Special Operations Forces Diving: Hidden and Dangerous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingelaar, Thijs T.; van Ooij, Pieter-Jan A. M.; van Hulst, Rob A.

    2017-01-01

    In Special Operations Forces (SOF) closed-circuit rebreathers with 100% oxygen are commonly utilized for covert diving operations. Exposure to high partial pressures of oxygen (PO2) could cause damage to the central nervous system (CNS) and pulmonary system. Longer exposure time and higher PO2 leads

  19. Accessory piriformis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Develi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Piriformis muscle originates from facies pelvica of sacrum and inserts on the trochanter major. It is one of the lateral rotator muscles of the hip and a landmark point in the gluteal region since n. ischiadicus descends to the thigh by passing close to the muscle. This contiguity may be associated with the irritation of the nerve which is known as piriformis syndrome. A rare anatomic variation of the muscle which observed on 74 years old male cadaver is discussed in this case report. [Cukurova Med J 2017; 42(1.000: 182-183

  20. The lumbrical muscle: a novel in situ system to evaluate adult skeletal muscle proteolysis and anticatabolic drugs for therapeutic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Figueiredo, Leonardo Bruno; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    The molecular regulation of skeletal muscle proteolysis and the pharmacological screening of anticatabolic drugs have been addressed by measuring tyrosine release from prepubertal rat skeletal muscles, which are thin enough to allow adequate in vitro diffusion of oxygen and substrates. However, the use of muscle at accelerated prepubertal growth has limited the analysis of adult muscle proteolysis or that associated with aging and neurodegenerative diseases. Here we established the adult rat lumbrical muscle (4/hindpaw; 8/rat) as a new in situ experimental model for dynamic measurement of skeletal muscle proteolysis. By incubating lumbrical muscles attached to their individual metatarsal bones in Tyrode solution, we showed that the muscle proteolysis rate of adult and aged rats (3-4 to 24 mo old) is 45-25% of that in prepubertal animals (1 mo old), which makes questionable the usual extrapolation of proteolysis from prepubertal to adult/senile muscles. While acute mechanical injury or 1- to 7-day denervation increased tyrosine release from adult lumbrical muscle by up to 60%, it was reduced by 20-28% after 2-h incubation with β-adrenoceptor agonists, forskolin or phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX. Using inhibitors of 26S-proteasome (MG132), lysosome (methylamine), or calpain (E64/leupeptin) systems, we showed that ubiquitin-proteasome is accountable for 40-50% of total lumbrical proteolysis of adult, middle-aged, and aged rats. In conclusion, the lumbrical model allows the analysis of muscle proteolysis rate from prepubertal to senile rats. By permitting eight simultaneous matched measurements per rat, the new model improves similar protocols performed in paired extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles from prepubertal rats, optimizing the pharmacological screening of drugs for anticatabolic purposes.

  1. Regulation of increased blood flow (hyperemia) to muscles during exercise: a hierarchy of competing physiological needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Michael J; Casey, Darren P

    2015-04-01

    This review focuses on how blood flow to contracting skeletal muscles is regulated during exercise in humans. The idea is that blood flow to the contracting muscles links oxygen in the atmosphere with the contracting muscles where it is consumed. In this context, we take a top down approach and review the basics of oxygen consumption at rest and during exercise in humans, how these values change with training, and the systemic hemodynamic adaptations that support them. We highlight the very high muscle blood flow responses to exercise discovered in the 1980s. We also discuss the vasodilating factors in the contracting muscles responsible for these very high flows. Finally, the competition between demand for blood flow by contracting muscles and maximum systemic cardiac output is discussed as a potential challenge to blood pressure regulation during heavy large muscle mass or whole body exercise in humans. At this time, no one dominant dilator mechanism accounts for exercise hyperemia. Additionally, complex interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and the microcirculation facilitate high levels of systemic oxygen extraction and permit just enough sympathetic control of blood flow to contracting muscles to regulate blood pressure during large muscle mass exercise in humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Aquatic respiration rate measurements at low oxygen concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Holtappels

    Full Text Available Despite its huge ecological importance, microbial oxygen respiration in pelagic waters is little studied, primarily due to methodological difficulties. Respiration measurements are challenging because of the required high resolution of oxygen concentration measurements. Recent improvements in oxygen sensing techniques bear great potential to overcome these limitations. Here we compare 3 different methods to measure oxygen consumption rates at low oxygen concentrations, utilizing amperometric Clark type sensors (STOX, optical sensors (optodes, and mass spectrometry in combination with (18-18O2 labeling. Oxygen concentrations and consumption rates agreed well between the different methods when applied in the same experimental setting. Oxygen consumption rates between 30 and 400 nmol L(-1 h(-1 were measured with high precision and relative standard errors of less than 3%. Rate detection limits in the range of 1 nmol L(-1 h(-1 were suitable for rate determinations in open ocean water and were lowest at the lowest applied O2 concentration.

  3. Utilities objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousin, Y.; Fabian, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    The policy of French and german utilities is to make use of nuclear energy as a long term, competitive and environmentally friendly power supply. The world electricity generation is due to double within the next 30 years. In the next 20 to 30 years the necessity of nuclear energy will be broadly recognized. More than for most industries, to deal properly with nuclear energy requires the combination of a consistent political will, of a proper institutional framework, of strong and legitimate control authorities, of a sophisticated industry and of operators with skilled management and human resources. One of the major risk facing nuclear energy is the loss of competitiveness. This can be achieved only through the combination of an optimized design, a consistent standardization, a proper industrial partnership and a stable long term strategy. Although the existing plants in Western Europe are already very safe, the policy is clearly to enhance the safety of the next generation of nuclear plants which are designing today. The French and German utilities have chosen an evolutionary approach based on experience and proven technologies, with an enhanced defense in depth and an objective of easier operation and maintenance. The cost objective is to maintain and improve what has been achieved in the best existing power plants in both countries. This calls for rational choices and optimized design to meet the safety objectives, a strong standardization policy, short construction times, high availability and enough flexibility to enable optimization of the fuel cycle throughout the lifetime of the plants. The conceptual design phase has proven that the French and German teams from industry and from the utilities are able to pursue both the safety and the cost objectives, basing their decision on a rational approach which could be accepted by the safety authorities. (J.S.)

  4. Thorium utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauger, D B [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)

    1978-01-01

    Some of the factors that provide incentive for the utilization of thorium in specific reactor types are explored and the constraints that stand in the way are pointed out. The properties of thorium and derived fuels are discussed, and test and reactor operating experience is reviewed. In addition, symbiotic systems of breeder and converter reactor are suggested as being particularly attractive systems for energy production. Throughout the discussion, the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor and Molten Salt Reactor are treated in some detail because they have been developed primarily for use with thorium fuel cycles.

  5. Japanese utilities' plutonium utilization program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Yuichiro.

    1996-01-01

    Japan's 10 utility companies are working and will continue to work towards establishing a fully closed nuclear fuel cycle. The key goals of which are: (1) reprocessing spent fuel; (2) recycling recovered uranium and plutonium; and (3) commercializing fast breeder technology by around the year 2030. This course of action by the Japanese electric power industry is in full accordance with Japan's national policy outlined in the government's report ''The Long-Term Program for Research, Development, and Nuclear Energy,'' which was published in June 1994. The Japanese civilian nuclear program is a long-term program that looks into the 21st century and beyond. It is quite true that sustaining the recycling option for energy security and the global environment demands a large investment. For it to be accepted by the public, safety must be the highest priority and will be pursued at a great cost if necessary. In its history, Japan has learned that as technology advances, costs will come down. The Japanese utility industry will continue investment in technology without compromising safety until the recycling option becomes more competitive with other options. This effort will be equally applied to the development of the commercial FBRs. The Japanese utility industry is confident that Japan's stable policy and strong objective to develop competitive and peaceful technology will contribute to the global economy and the environment without increasing the threat of plutonium proliferation

  6. Altered mitochondrial regulation in quadriceps muscles of patients with COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naimi, Ashley I; Bourbeau, Jean; Perrault, Helene

    2011-01-01

    Evidence exists for locomotor muscle impairment in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including fiber type alterations and reduced mitochondrial oxidative capacity. In this study high-resolution respirometry was used to quantify oxygen flux in permeabilized fibres from bi...

  7. Multiattribute Utility Theory without Expected Utility Foundations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Miyamoto (John); P.P. Wakker (Peter)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMethods for determining the form of utilities are needed for the implementation of utility theory in specific decisions. An important step forward was achieved when utility theorists characterized useful parametric families of utilities and simplifying decompositions of multiattribute

  8. A computational study of the effect of capillary network anastomoses and tortuosity on oxygen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, D; Popel, A S

    2000-09-21

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of capillary network anastomoses and tortuosity on oxygen transport in skeletal muscle, as well as the importance of muscle fibers in determining the arrangement of parallel capillaries. Countercurrent flow and random capillary blockage (e.g. by white blood cells) were also studied. A general computational model was constructed to simulate oxygen transport from a network of blood vessels within a rectangular volume of tissue. A geometric model of the capillary network structure, based on hexagonally packed muscle fibers, was constructed to produce networks of straight unbranched capillaries, capillaries with anastomoses, and capillaries with tortuosity, in order to examine the effects of these geometric properties. Quantities examined included the tissue oxygen tension and the capillary oxyhemoglobin saturation. The computational model included a two-phase simulation of blood flow. Appropriate parameters were chosen for working hamster cheek-pouch retractor muscle. Our calculations showed that the muscle-fiber geometry was important in reducing oxygen transport heterogeneity, as was countercurrent flow. Tortuosity was found to increase tissue oxygenation, especially when combined with anastomoses. In the absence of tortuosity, anastomoses had little effect on oxygen transport under normal conditions, but significantly improved transport when vessel blockages were present. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Peripheral endocannabinoids regulate skeletal muscle development and maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjiao Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As a principal tissue responsible for insulin-mediated glucose uptake, skeletal muscle is important for whole-body health. The role of peripheral endocannabinoids as regulators of skeletal muscle metabolism has recently gained a lot of interest, as endocannabinoid system disorders could cause peripheral insulin resistance. We investigated the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in skeletal muscle development and maintenance. Cultures of C2C12 cells, primary satellite cells and mouse skeletal muscle single fibers were used as model systems for our studies. We found an increase in cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 mRNA and endocannabinoid synthetic enzyme mRNA skeletal muscle cells during differentiation. We also found that activation of CB1 inhibited myoblast differentiation, expanded the number of satellite cells, and stimulated the fast-muscle oxidative phenotype. Our findings contribute to understanding of the role of the endocannabinoid system in skeletal muscle metabolism and muscle oxygen consumption, and also help to explain the effects of the peripheral endocannabinoid system on whole-body energy balance.

  10. Vasodilator interactions in skeletal muscle blood flow regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Nyberg, Michael Permin; Jensen, Lasse Gliemann

    2012-01-01

    During exercise, oxygen delivery to skeletal muscle is elevated to meet the increased oxygen demand. The increase in blood flow to skeletal muscle is achieved by vasodilators formed locally in the muscle tissue, either on the intraluminal or the extraluminal side of the blood vessels. A number...... vasodilators are both stimulated by several compounds, eg. adenosine, ATP, acetylcholine, bradykinin, and are affected by mechanically induced signals, such as shear stress. NO and prostacyclin have also been shown to interact in a redundant manner where one system can take over when formation of the other...... is compromised. Although numerous studies have examined the role of single and multiple pharmacological inhibition of different vasodilator systems, and important vasodilators and interactions have been identified, a large part of the exercise hyperemic response remains unexplained. It is plausible...

  11. Muscle phosphorylase kinase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, N; Orngreen, M C; Echaniz-Laguna, A

    2012-01-01

    To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD).......To examine metabolism during exercise in 2 patients with muscle phosphorylase kinase (PHK) deficiency and to further define the phenotype of this rare glycogen storage disease (GSD)....

  12. the sternalis muscle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-08-17

    Aug 17, 2009 ... CASE REPORT. CASE. 72. SA JOURNAL OF RADIOLOGY • August 2009. CASE R. Introduction ... tion is being given to imaging the medial breast, and the sternalis muscle will be revealed with increasing ... The origin of this muscle is uncertain, with pectoralis major, rectus abdominus and sternomastoid ...

  13. The hamstring muscle complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Made, A. D.; Wieldraaijer, T.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Kleipool, R. P.; Engebretsen, L.; van Dijk, C. N.; Golanó, P.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical appearance of the hamstring muscle complex was studied to provide hypotheses for the hamstring injury pattern and to provide reference values of origin dimensions, muscle length, tendon length, musculotendinous junction (MTJ) length as well as width and length of a tendinous

  14. Muscle as a secretory organ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent e...... proteins produced by skeletal muscle are dependent upon contraction. Therefore, it is likely that myokines may contribute in the mediation of the health benefits of exercise.......Skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the body. Skeletal muscles are primarily characterized by their mechanical activity required for posture, movement, and breathing, which depends on muscle fiber contractions. However, skeletal muscle is not just a component in our locomotor system. Recent...... evidence has identified skeletal muscle as a secretory organ. We have suggested that cytokines and other peptides that are produced, expressed, and released by muscle fibers and exert either autocrine, paracrine, or endocrine effects should be classified as "myokines." The muscle secretome consists...

  15. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  16. Oxygen enrichment incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Guk; Yang, Hee Chul; Park, Geun Il; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2000-10-01

    Oxygen enriched combustion technology has recently been used in waste incineration. To apply the oxygen enrichment on alpha-bearing waste incineration, which is being developed, a state-of-an-art review has been performed. The use of oxygen or oxygen-enriched air instead of air in incineration would result in increase of combustion efficiency and capacity, and reduction of off-gas product. Especially, the off-gas could be reduced below a quarter, which might reduce off-gas treatment facilities, and also increase an efficiency of off-gas treatment. However, the use of oxygen might also lead to local overheating and high nitrogen oxides (NOx) formation. To overcome these problems, an application of low NOx oxy-fuel burner and recycling of a part of off-gas to combustion chamber have been suggested

  17. Oxygen enrichment incineration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Guk; Yang, Hee Chul; Park, Geun Il; Kim, Joon Hyung

    2000-10-01

    Oxygen enriched combustion technology has recently been used in waste incineration. To apply the oxygen enrichment on alpha-bearing waste incineration, which is being developed, a state-of-an-art review has been performed. The use of oxygen or oxygen-enriched air instead of air in incineration would result in increase of combustion efficiency and capacity, and reduction of off-gas product. Especially, the off-gas could be reduced below a quarter, which might reduce off-gas treatment facilities, and also increase an efficiency of off-gas treatment. However, the use of oxygen might also lead to local overheating and high nitrogen oxides (NOx) formation. To overcome these problems, an application of low NOx oxy-fuel burner and recycling of a part of off-gas to combustion chamber have been suggested.

  18. Skeletal Muscle Neurovascular Coupling, Oxidative Capacity, and Microvascular Function with 'One Stop Shop' Near-infrared Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberry, Ryan; Chung, Susie; Nelson, Michael D

    2018-02-20

    Exercise represents a major hemodynamic stress that demands a highly coordinated neurovascular response in order to match oxygen delivery to metabolic demand. Reactive hyperemia (in response to a brief period of tissue ischemia) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and provides important insight into vascular health and vasodilatory capacity. Skeletal muscle oxidative capacity is equally important in health and disease, as it determines the energy supply for myocellular processes. Here, we describe a simple, non-invasive approach using near-infrared spectroscopy to assess each of these major clinical endpoints (reactive hyperemia, neurovascular coupling, and muscle oxidative capacity) during a single clinic or laboratory visit. Unlike Doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance images/spectroscopy, or invasive catheter-based flow measurements or muscle biopsies, our approach is less operator-dependent, low-cost, and completely non-invasive. Representative data from our lab taken together with summary data from previously published literature illustrate the utility of each of these end-points. Once this technique is mastered, application to clinical populations will provide important mechanistic insight into exercise intolerance and cardiovascular dysfunction.

  19. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A.; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J.; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I.; Scott, Bryan L.; Walker, Ashley E.; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V.; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M.; Thomas, Gail D.; Victor, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin’s rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived nitric oxide (NO) attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective—causing functional muscle ischemia—in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. Here, we report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase (PDE5A) inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD. PMID:23197572

  20. Tadalafil alleviates muscle ischemia in patients with Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth A; Barresi, Rita; Byrne, Barry J; Tsimerinov, Evgeny I; Scott, Bryan L; Walker, Ashley E; Gurudevan, Swaminatha V; Anene, Francine; Elashoff, Robert M; Thomas, Gail D; Victor, Ronald G

    2012-11-28

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive X-linked muscle wasting disease for which there is no treatment. Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), BMD is caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a structural cytoskeletal protein that also targets other proteins to the muscle sarcolemma. Among these is neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOSμ), which requires certain spectrin-like repeats in dystrophin's rod domain and the adaptor protein α-syntrophin to be targeted to the sarcolemma. When healthy skeletal muscle is subjected to exercise, sarcolemmal nNOSμ-derived NO attenuates local α-adrenergic vasoconstriction, thereby optimizing perfusion of muscle. We found previously that this protective mechanism is defective-causing functional muscle ischemia-in dystrophin-deficient muscles of the mdx mouse (a model of DMD) and of children with DMD, in whom nNOSμ is mislocalized to the cytosol instead of the sarcolemma. We report that this protective mechanism also is defective in men with BMD in whom the most common dystrophin mutations disrupt sarcolemmal targeting of nNOSμ. In these men, the vasoconstrictor response, measured as a decrease in muscle oxygenation, to reflex sympathetic activation is not appropriately attenuated during exercise of the dystrophic muscles. In a randomized placebo-controlled crossover trial, we show that functional muscle ischemia is alleviated and normal blood flow regulation is fully restored in the muscles of men with BMD by boosting NO-cGMP (guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate) signaling with a single dose of the drug tadalafil, a phosphodiesterase 5A inhibitor. These results further support an essential role for sarcolemmal nNOSμ in the normal modulation of sympathetic vasoconstriction in exercising human skeletal muscle and implicate the NO-cGMP pathway as a putative new target for treating BMD.

  1. A muscle model for hybrid muscle activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klauer Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To develop model-based control strategies for Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES in order to support weak voluntary muscle contractions, a hybrid model for describing joint motions induced by concurrent voluntary-and FES induced muscle activation is proposed. It is based on a Hammerstein model – as commonly used in feedback controlled FES – and exemplarily applied to describe the shoulder abduction joint angle. Main component of a Hammerstein muscle model is usually a static input nonlinearity depending on the stimulation intensity. To additionally incorporate voluntary contributions, we extended the static non-linearity by a second input describing the intensity of the voluntary contribution that is estimated by electromyography (EMG measurements – even during active FES. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN is used to describe the static input non-linearity. The output of the ANN drives a second-order linear dynamical system that describes the combined muscle activation and joint angle dynamics. The tunable parameters are adapted to the individual subject by a system identification approach using previously recorded I/O-data. The model has been validated in two healthy subjects yielding RMS values for the joint angle error of 3.56° and 3.44°, respectively.

  2. Production of an accelerated oxygen-14 beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; O'Neil, J.P.; Cerny, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 10 8 ions/s have been utilized for experiments. Development of oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 s and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has been built and is operational, and initial tests of accelerating an oxygen-14 beam have been performed

  3. Decrease in pulmonary function and oxygenation after lung resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocki, Barbara Cristina; Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Langer, Daniel; Souza, Domingos S R; Andreasen, Jan Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Respiratory deficits are common following curative intent lung cancer surgery and may reduce the patient's ability to be physically active. We evaluated the influence of surgery on pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and physical performance after lung resection. Pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory/expiratory pressure) and 6-min walk test (6MWT) were assessed pre-operatively, 2 weeks post-operatively and 6 months post-operatively in 80 patients (age 68±9 years). Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed in 58% of cases. Two weeks post-operatively, we found a significant decline in pulmonary function (forced vital capacity -0.6±0.6 L and forced expiratory volume in 1 s -0.43±0.4 L; both p<0.0001), 6MWT (-37.6±74.8 m; p<0.0001) and oxygenation (-2.9±4.7 units; p<0.001), while maximal inspiratory and maximal expiratory pressure were unaffected. At 6 months post-operatively, pulmonary function and oxygenation remained significantly decreased (p<0.001), whereas 6MWT was recovered. We conclude that lung resection has a significant short- and long-term impact on pulmonary function and oxygenation, but not on respiratory muscle strength. Future research should focus on mechanisms negatively influencing post-operative pulmonary function other than impaired respiratory muscle strength.

  4. Hypoxia Enhances Differentiation of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells toward the Smooth Muscle Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle differentiated adipose tissue-derived stem cells are a valuable resource for regeneration of gastrointestinal tissues, such as the gut and sphincters. Hypoxia has been shown to promote adipose tissue-derived stem cells proliferation and maintenance of pluripotency, but the influence of hypoxia on their smooth myogenic differentiation remains unexplored. This study investigated the phenotype and contractility of adipose-derived stem cells differentiated toward the smooth myogenic lineage under hypoxic conditions. Oxygen concentrations of 2%, 5%, 10%, and 20% were used during differentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the expression of smooth muscle cells-specific markers, including early marker smooth muscle alpha actin, middle markers calponin, caldesmon, and late marker smooth muscle myosin heavy chain. The specific contractile properties of cells were verified with both a single cell contraction assay and a gel contraction assay. Five percent oxygen concentration significantly increased the expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin, calponin, and myosin heavy chain in adipose-derived stem cell cultures after 2 weeks of induction (p < 0.01. Cells differentiated in 5% oxygen conditions showed greater contraction effect (p < 0.01. Hypoxia influences differentiation of smooth muscle cells from adipose stem cells and 5% oxygen was the optimal condition to generate smooth muscle cells that contract from adipose stem cells.

  5. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Sandra C. [Translational Sciences - Translational Medicine, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 220 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing [Cardiovascular and Metabolism Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 100 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gauthier, Marie-Soleil [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02140 (United States); Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper [Cardiovascular and Metabolism Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 100 Technology Square, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Dole, William P., E-mail: bill.dole@novartis.com [Translational Sciences - Translational Medicine, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Inc., 220 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). → ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. → ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. → Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNFα) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and peroxisome proliferator

  7. Plasticity of the Muscle Stem Cell Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinulovic, Ivana; Furrer, Regula; Handschin, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are adult muscle stem cells capable of repairing damaged and creating new muscle tissue throughout life. Their functionality is tightly controlled by a microenvironment composed of a wide variety of factors, such as numerous secreted molecules and different cell types, including blood vessels, oxygen, hormones, motor neurons, immune cells, cytokines, fibroblasts, growth factors, myofibers, myofiber metabolism, the extracellular matrix and tissue stiffness. This complex niche controls SC biology-quiescence, activation, proliferation, differentiation or renewal and return to quiescence. In this review, we attempt to give a brief overview of the most important players in the niche and their mutual interaction with SCs. We address the importance of the niche to SC behavior under physiological and pathological conditions, and finally survey the significance of an artificial niche both for basic and translational research purposes.

  8. Agonist muscle adaptation accompanied by antagonist muscle atrophy in the hindlimb of mice following stretch-shortening contraction training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Erik P; Naimo, Marshall A; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2017-02-02

    The vast majority of dynamometer-based animal models for investigation of the response to chronic muscle contraction exposure has been limited to analysis of isometric, lengthening, or shortening contractions in isolation. An exception to this has been the utilization of a rat model to study stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs), a sequence of consecutive isometric, lengthening, and shortening contractions common during daily activity and resistance-type exercise. However, the availability of diverse genetic strains of rats is limited. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to develop a dynamometer-based SSC training protocol to induce increased muscle mass and performance in plantarflexor muscles of mice. Young (3 months old) C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 1 month of plantarflexion SSC training. Hindlimb muscles were analyzed for muscle mass, quantitative morphology, myogenesis/myopathy relevant gene expression, and fiber type distribution. The main aim of the research was achieved when training induced a 2-fold increase in plantarflexion peak torque output and a 19% increase in muscle mass for the agonist plantaris (PLT) muscle. In establishing this model, several outcomes emerged which raised the value of the model past that of being a mere recapitulation of the rat model. An increase in the number of muscle fibers per transverse muscle section accounted for the PLT muscle mass gain while the antagonist tibialis anterior (TA) muscle atrophied by 30% with preferential atrophy of type IIb and IIx fibers. These alterations were accompanied by distinct gene expression profiles. The findings confirm the development of a stretch-shortening contraction training model for the PLT muscle of mice and demonstrate that increased cross-sectional fiber number can occur following high-intensity SSC training. Furthermore, the TA muscle atrophy provides direct evidence for the concept of muscle imbalance in phasic non-weight bearing muscles, a concept largely

  9. Muscles and their myokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-01-15

    In the past, the role of physical activity as a life-style modulating factor has been considered as that of a tool to balance energy intake. Although it is important to avoid obesity, physical inactivity should be discussed in a much broader context. There is accumulating epidemiological evidence that a physically active life plays an independent role in the protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, dementia and even depression. For most of the last century, researchers sought a link between muscle contraction and humoral changes in the form of an 'exercise factor', which could be released from skeletal muscle during contraction and mediate some of the exercise-induced metabolic changes in other organs such as the liver and the adipose tissue. We have suggested that cytokines or other peptides that are produced, expressed and released by muscle fibres and exert autocrine, paracrine or endocrine effects should be classified as 'myokines'. Given that skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body, our discovery that contracting skeletal muscle secretes proteins sets a novel paradigm: skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ producing and releasing myokines, which work in a hormone-like fashion, exerting specific endocrine effects on other organs. Other myokines work via paracrine mechanisms, exerting local effects on signalling pathways involved in muscle metabolism. It has been suggested that myokines may contribute to exercise-induced protection against several chronic diseases.

  10. Muscle metabolism during graded quadriceps exercise in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Jørn W; Stallknecht, Bente; Galbo, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    , oxidation of plasma free fatty acids increases and accordingly oxidation of other fat sources decreases. These findings are in contrast to whole body measurements performed during graded exercise involving a large muscle mass during which fat oxidation peaks at around 60% of .......The aim of the study was to examine local muscle metabolism in response to graded exercise when the involved muscle mass is too small to elicit marked hormonal changes and local blood flow restriction. Nine healthy overnight fasted male subjects performed knee extension exercise with both thighs...... intensity. In conclusion, in the presence of a high blood flow and oxygen supply and only small hormonal changes, total fat oxidation in muscle increases from rest to light exercise, but then remains constant with exercise intensity up to heavy exercise. However, with increasing exercise intensity...

  11. Exercise-induced metallothionein expression in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penkowa, Milena; Keller, Pernille; Keller, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    in both type I and II muscle fibres. This is the first report demonstrating that MT-I + II are significantly induced in human skeletal muscle fibres following exercise. As MT-I + II are antioxidant factors that protect various tissues during pathological conditions, the MT-I + II increases post exercise......Exercise induces free oxygen radicals that cause oxidative stress, and metallothioneins (MTs) are increased in states of oxidative stress and possess anti-apoptotic effects. We therefore studied expression of the antioxidant factors metallothionein I and II (MT-I + II) in muscle biopsies obtained...... in response to 3 h of bicycle exercise performed by healthy men and in resting controls. Both MT-I + II proteins and MT-II mRNA expression increased significantly in both type I and II muscle fibres after exercise. Moreover, 24 h after exercise the levels of MT-II mRNA and MT-I + II proteins were still highly...

  12. Utility training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaros, P.E.; Luxo, Armando; Bruant, Jacques

    1977-01-01

    The study of operational training systems for electro-nuclear utilities may be conducted through two different approaches. A first analytical approach consists of determining, for each position of a given organization chart, the necessary qualifications required and the corresponding complementary training to be provided. This approach applies preferentially to existing classical systems which are converted to nuclear operation with objectives of minimum structural changes and conservation of maximum efficiency. A second synthetical approach consists of determining the specific characteristics of nuclear plant operation, then, of deducting the training contingencies and the optimized organization chart of the plant, while taking into account, at each step, the parameters linked to local conditions. This last approach is studied in some detail in the present paper, taking advantage of its better suitability to the problems raised at the first stage of an electro-nuclear program development. In this respect, the possibility offered by this apprach to coordinate the training system of a given nuclear power station personnel with the overall problem of developing a skilled industrial labor force in the country, may lead to reconsideration of some usual priorities in the economy of operation of the nuclear power plant

  13. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyeon Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS. This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy.

  14. Effect of Oenothera odorata Root Extract on Microgravity and Disuse-Induced Muscle Atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Park, Ji-Hyung; Kabayama, Kazuya; Opitz, Joerg; Lee, Kwang Ho; Kim, Han-Sung; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle atrophy, a reduction of muscle mass, strength, and volume, results from reduced muscle use and plays a key role in various muscular diseases. In the microgravity environment of space especially, muscle atrophy is induced by muscle inactivity. Exposure to microgravity induces muscle atrophy through several biological effects, including associations with reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study used 3D-clinostat to investigate muscle atrophy caused by oxidative stress in vitro, and sciatic denervation was used to investigate muscle atrophy in vivo. We assessed the effect of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) on muscle atrophy. EVP helped recover cell viability in C2C12 myoblasts exposed to microgravity for 24 h and delayed muscle atrophy in sciatic denervated mice. However, the expressions of HSP70, SOD1, and ceramide in microgravity-exposed C2C12 myoblasts and in sciatic denervated mice were either decreased or completely inhibited. These results suggested that EVP can be expected to have a positive effect on muscle atrophy by disuse and microgravity. In addition, EVP helped characterize the antioxidant function in muscle atrophy.

  15. Effects of 45Ca on murine skeletal muscle. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, R.K.; Asotra, K.; Katoch, S.S.; Krishan, K.

    1983-01-01

    Swiss albino mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3.7x10 4 Bq and 7.4x10 4 Bq 45 Ca/g body weight. Mice of both dose groups were autopsied on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 28 and activities of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase bioassayed in diaphragm and gastrocnemius in 45 Ca-treated and normal mice. Alanine aminotransferase activity in the two muscles increased in response to 45 Ca administration suggesting a stepped up utilization of alanine in glucose generation. Aspartate aminotransferase levels, on the other hand, diminished in both the 45 Ca-treated muscles and are maintained at low values throughout the 28 day period of study. The results suggest an innate ability of skeletal muscle to selectively utilize either of the two glucogenic amino acids during radiation stress. The data are discussed in light of previous findings on glycogen accumulation in irradiated skeletal muscle. (author)

  16. Retrievable micro-inserts containing oxygen sensors for monitoring tissue oxygenation using EPR oximetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinguizli, M; Beghein, N; Gallez, B

    2008-01-01

    Tissue oxygenation is a crucial parameter in various physiopathological situations and can influence the therapeutic response of tumours. EPR oximetry is a reliable method for assessing and monitoring oxygen levels in vivo over long periods of time. Among the different paramagnetic oxygen sensors available for EPR oximetry, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc) is a serious candidate for in vivo applications because of its narrow linewidth and its high signal-to-noise ratio. To enhance the biocompatibility of the sensors, fluoropolymer Teflon AF2400 was used to make cylindrical micro-inserts containing LiPc crystals. This new micro-pellet design has several advantages for in vivo studies, including the possibility of being able to choose the implant size, a high sensor content, the facility of in vivo insertion and complete protection with preservation of the oxygen sensor's characteristics. The response to oxygen and the kinetics of this response were tested using in vivo EPR: no differences were observed between micro-inserts and uncoated LiPc crystals. Pellets implanted in vivo in muscles conserved their responsiveness over a long period of time (∼two months), which is much longer than the few days of stability observed using LiPc crystals without protection by the implant. Finally, evaluation of the biocompatibility of the implants revealed no inflammatory reaction around the implantation area

  17. Influence of exercise duration on cardiorespiratory responses, energy cost and tissue oxygenation within a 6 hour treadmill run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhervé, Hugo A; McLean, Scott; Birkenhead, Karen; Parr, David; Solomon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    The physiological mechanisms for alterations in oxygen utilization ([Formula: see text]) and the energy cost of running ( C r ) during prolonged running are not completely understood, and could be linked with alterations in muscle and cerebral tissue oxygenation. Eight trained ultramarathon runners (three women; mean ± SD; age 37 ± 7 yr; maximum [Formula: see text] 60 ± 15 mL min -1  kg -1 ) completed a 6 hr treadmill run (6TR), which consisted of four modules, including periods of moderate (3 min at 10 km h -1 , 10-CR) and heavy exercise intensities (6 min at 70% of maximum [Formula: see text], HILL), separated by three, 100 min periods of self-paced running (SP). We measured [Formula: see text], minute ventilation ([Formula: see text]), ventilatory efficiency ([Formula: see text]), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), C r , muscle and cerebral tissue saturation index (TSI) during the modules, and heart rate (HR) and perceived exertion (RPE) during the modules and SP. Participants ran 58.3 ± 10.5 km during 6TR. Speed decreased and HR and RPE increased during SP. Across the modules, HR and [Formula: see text] increased (10-CR), and RER decreased (10-CR and HILL). There were no significant changes in [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], C r , TSI and RPE across the modules. In the context of positive pacing (decreasing speed), increased cardiac drift and perceived exertion over the 6TR, we observed increased RER and increased HR at moderate and heavy exercise intensity, increased [Formula: see text] at moderate intensity, and no effect of exercise duration on ventilatory efficiency, energy cost of running and tissue oxygenation.

  18. Muscle Bioenergetic Considerations for Intrinsic Laryngeal Skeletal Muscle Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandage, Mary J.; Smith, Audrey G.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Intrinsic laryngeal skeletal muscle bioenergetics, the means by which muscles produce fuel for muscle metabolism, is an understudied aspect of laryngeal physiology with direct implications for voice habilitation and rehabilitation. The purpose of this review is to describe bioenergetic pathways identified in limb skeletal muscle and…

  19. Muscle contraction and force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Risbo, Jens; Pierzynowski, Stefan G.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction studies often focus solely on myofibres and the proteins known to be involved in the processes of sarcomere shortening and cross-bridge cycling, but skeletal muscle also comprises a very elaborate ancillary network of capillaries, which not only play a vital role in terms...... of nutrient delivery and waste product removal, but are also tethered to surrounding fibres by collagen "wires". This paper therefore addresses aspects of the ancillary network of skeletal muscle at both a microscopic and functional level in order to better understand its role holistically as a considerable...

  20. A survey on pneumatic muscle actuators modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Kelasidi, Eleni; Andrikopoulos, Georgios; Nikolakopoulos, George; Manesis, Stamatis

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to provide a survey on the most popular modeling approaches for Pneumatic Muscle Actuators (PMAs). PMAs are highly non-linear pneumatic actuators where their elongation is proportional to the interval pressure. During the last decade, there has been an increase in the industrial and scientific utilization of PMAs, due to their advantages such as high strength and small weight, while various types of PMAs with different technical characteristics have been appeared in...

  1. Regulation of exercise-induced lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Kiens, Bente

    2014-01-01

    Exercise increases the utilization of lipids in muscle. The sources of lipids are long-chain fatty acids taken up from the plasma and fatty acids released from stores of intramuscular triacylglycerol by the action of intramuscular lipases. In the present review, we focus on the role of fatty acid...... binding proteins, particularly fatty acid translocase/cluster of differentiation 36 (FAT/CD36), in the exercise- and contraction-induced increase in uptake of long-chain fatty acids in muscle. The FAT/CD36 translocates from intracellular depots to the surface membrane upon initiation of exercise/muscle...... triglyceride lipase in regulation of muscle lipolysis. Although the molecular regulation of the lipases in muscle is not understood, it is speculated that intramuscular lipolysis may be regulated in part by the availability of the plasma concentration of long-chain fatty acids....

  2. Muscle glycogen depletion and lactate concentration during downhill skiing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, P; Larsson, L; Eriksson, A; Karlsson, J

    1978-01-01

    Skilled and unskilled skiers were studied during downhill skiing. Muscle glycogen and muscle lactate concentrations in the vastus lateralis muscle were determined following different skiing conditions. Heavy glycogen utilization was found in the groups studied during a day of skiing. The skilled and unskilled skiers differed with respect to selective glycogen depletion pattern and the skilled subjects demonstrated greater depletion of slow twitch fibers than the unskilled subjects. Lactate concentrations ranged from approximately 5-26 mmoles x kg-1 wet muscle after approximately one minute of maximal skiing. This wide range was not found to be related to the level of skiing proficiency. However, skiing with varyingly angled boots, resulting in different knee angles, did affect lactate concentration. Lactate concentration was positively correlated to individual muscle fiber composition expressed as a percent of fast twitch fibers. The results suggest more pronounced involvement of aerobic energy metabolism in skilled skiers than in unskilled skiers.

  3. Painful unilateral temporalis muscle enlargement: reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsetos, Christos D; Bianchi, Michael A; Jaffery, Fizza; Koutzaki, Sirma; Zarella, Mark; Slater, Robert

    2014-06-01

    An instance of isolated unilateral temporalis muscle hypertrophy (reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy with fiber type 1 predominance) confirmed by muscle biopsy with histochemical fiber typing and image analysis in a 62 year-old man is reported. The patient presented with bruxism and a painful swelling of the temple. Absence of asymmetry or other abnormalities of the craniofacial skeleton was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and cephalometric analyses. The patient achieved symptomatic improvement only after undergoing botulinum toxin injections. Muscle biopsy is key in the diagnosis of reactive masticatory muscle hypertrophy and its distinction from masticatory muscle myopathy (hypertrophic branchial myopathy) and other non-reactive causes of painful asymmetric temporalis muscle enlargement.

  4. High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucian A. Lucia

    2005-11-15

    Project Objective: The objectives of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the physical and chemical characteristics of a partner mill pre- and post-oxygen delignified pulp and compare them to lab generated oxygen delignified pulps; (2) Apply the chemical selectivity enhancement system to the partner pre-oxygen delignified pulps under mill conditions (with and without any predetermined amounts of carryover) to determine how efficiently viscosity is preserved, how well selectivity is enhanced, if strength is improved, measure any yield differences and/or bleachability differences; and (3) Initiate a mill scale oxygen delignification run using the selectivity enhancement agent, collect the mill data, analyze it, and propose any future plans for implementation.

  5. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  6. Pathology of oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Autor, Anne Pomeroy

    1982-01-01

    This volume has been designed to provide those interested in oxygen toxicity with a working knowledge of advancement in the field with the intention that the topics described in each chapter will be immediately useful...

  7. Using oxygen at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at Home Tell your local fire department, electric company, and telephone company that you use oxygen in your home. They ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  8. Pathology of oxygen

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Autor, Anne Pomeroy

    1982-01-01

    .... The book is divided into three general sections. The first and smallest section of the book explains the molecular and biochemical basis of our current understanding of oxygen radical toxicity as well as the means by which normal aerobic cells...

  9. Noninvasive Cu-64-ATSM and PET/CT Assessment of Hypoxia in Rat Skeletal Muscles and Tendons During Muscle Contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, D.; Kjaer, M.; Madsen, J.

    2009-01-01

    the first PET/CT scan. Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated for the Achilles tendons and triceps surae muscles and were correlated to gene expression of HIF1 alpha and CAIII using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: Immediately after the contractions, uptake of Cu-64-ATSM......The purpose of the present study was to investigate exercise-related changes in oxygenation in rat skeletal muscles and tendons noninvasively with PET/CT and the hypoxia-selective tracer Cu-64-diacetyl bis(N-4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (ATSM) and to quantitatively study concomitant changes in gene...... expression of 2 hypoxia-related genes, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1 alpha) and carbonic anhydrase III (CAIII). Methods: Two groups of Wistar rats performed 1-leg contractions of the calf muscle by electrostimulation of the sciatic nerve. After 10 min of muscle contractions, Cu-64-ATSM was injected...

  10. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  11. Ekstrakorporal oxygenering ved legionellapneumoni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uslu, Bülent; Steensen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    We present a case report with a 49-year-old woman with legionella pneumonia and fulminant respiratory failure. Despite maximal conventional respirator treatment with positive pressure ventilation, 100% oxygen and pharmacological treatment in an intensive care unit, further deterioration with hypo......We present a case report with a 49-year-old woman with legionella pneumonia and fulminant respiratory failure. Despite maximal conventional respirator treatment with positive pressure ventilation, 100% oxygen and pharmacological treatment in an intensive care unit, further deterioration...

  12. Intraportal islet oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suszynski, Thomas M; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S; Papas, Klearchos K

    2014-05-01

    Islet transplantation (IT) is a promising therapy for the treatment of diabetes. The large number of islets required to achieve insulin independence limit its cost-effectiveness and the number of patients who can be treated. It is believed that >50% of islets are lost in the immediate post-IT period. Poor oxygenation in the early post-IT period is recognized as a possible reason for islet loss and dysfunction but has not been extensively studied. Several key variables affect oxygenation in this setting, including (1) local oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)), (2) islet oxygen consumption, (3) islet size (diameter, D), and (4) presence or absence of thrombosis on the islet surface. We discuss implications of oxygen-limiting conditions on intraportal islet viability and function. Of the 4 key variables, the islet size appears to be the most important determinant of the anoxic and nonfunctional islet volume fractions. Similarly, the effect of thrombus formation on the islet surface may be substantial. At the University of Minnesota, average size distribution data from clinical alloislet preparations (n = 10) indicate that >150-µm D islets account for only ~30% of the total islet number, but >85% of the total islet volume. This suggests that improved oxygen supply to the islets may have a profound impact on islet survivability and function since most of the β-cell volume is within large islets which are most susceptible to oxygen-limiting conditions. The assumption that the liver is a suitable islet transplant site from the standpoint of oxygenation should be reconsidered. © 2014 Diabetes Technology Society.

  13. Phosphorylation and function of DGAT1 in skeletal muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jinhai; Li, Yiran; Zou, Fei; Xu, Shimeng; Liu, Pingsheng

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant intramuscular triacylglycerol (TAG) storage in human skeletal muscle is closely related to insulin insensitivity. Excessive lipid storage can induce insulin resistance of skeletal muscle, and under severe conditions, lead to type 2 diabetes. The balance of interconversion between diacylglycerol and TAG greatly influences lipid storage and utilization. Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) plays a key role in this process, but its activation and phosphorylation requires further d...

  14. Oxygen Toxicity and Special Operations Forces Diving: Hidden and Dangerous

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs T. Wingelaar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In Special Operations Forces (SOF closed-circuit rebreathers with 100% oxygen are commonly utilized for covert diving operations. Exposure to high partial pressures of oxygen (PO2 could cause damage to the central nervous system (CNS and pulmonary system. Longer exposure time and higher PO2 leads to faster development of more serious pathology. Exposure to a PO2 above 1.4 ATA can cause CNS toxicity, leading to a wide range of neurologic complaints including convulsions. Pulmonary oxygen toxicity develops over time when exposed to a PO2 above 0.5 ATA and can lead to inflammation and fibrosis of lung tissue. Oxygen can also be toxic for the ocular system and may have systemic effects on the inflammatory system. Moreover, some of the effects of oxygen toxicity are irreversible. This paper describes the pathophysiology, epidemiology, signs and symptoms, risk factors and prediction models of oxygen toxicity, and their limitations on SOF diving.

  15. Singlet oxygen quenching by oxygen in tetraphenyl-porphyrin solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedic, Roman; Korinek, Miloslav; Molnar, Alexander; Svoboda, Antonin; Hala, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved measurement of singlet oxygen infrared phosphorescence is a powerful tool for determination of quantum yields and kinetics of its photosensitization. This technique was employed to investigate in detail the previously observed effect of singlet oxygen quenching by oxygen. The question whether the singlet oxygen is quenched by oxygen in ground or in excited state was addressed by study of two complementary dependencies of singlet oxygen lifetimes: on dissolved oxygen concentration and on excitation intensity. Oxygen concentration dependence study of meso-tetra(4-sulphonato)phenylporphyrin (TPPS 4 ) phosphorescence kinetics showed linearity of the dependence of TPPS 4 triplet state rate-constant. Corresponding bimolecular quenching constant of (1.5±0.1)x10 9 l/mol s was obtained. On the other hand, rate constants of singlet oxygen depopulation exhibit nonlinear dependence on oxygen concentration. Comparison of zero oxygen concentration-extrapolated value of singlet oxygen lifetime of (6.5±0.4) μs to (3.7±0.1) μs observed under air-saturated conditions indicates importance of the effect of quenching of singlet oxygen by oxygen. Upward-sloping dependencies of singlet oxygen depopulation rate-constant on excitation intensity evidence that singlet oxygen is predominantly quenched by oxygen in excited singlet state

  16. Muscles and their myokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2011-01-01

    In the past, the role of physical activity as a life-style modulating factor has been considered as that of a tool to balance energy intake. Although it is important to avoid obesity, physical inactivity should be discussed in a much broader context. There is accumulating epidemiological evidence...... or endocrine effects should be classified as 'myokines'. Given that skeletal muscle is the largest organ in the human body, our discovery that contracting skeletal muscle secretes proteins sets a novel paradigm: skeletal muscle is an endocrine organ producing and releasing myokines, which work in a hormone......-like fashion, exerting specific endocrine effects on other organs. Other myokines work via paracrine mechanisms, exerting local effects on signalling pathways involved in muscle metabolism. It has been suggested that myokines may contribute to exercise-induced protection against several chronic diseases....

  17. Pneumatic Muscle Actuator Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lilly, John

    2000-01-01

    This research is relevant to the Air Fore mission because pneumatic muscle actuation devices arc advantageous for certain types of robotics as well as for strength and/or mobility assistance for humans...

  18. Brain–muscle interface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... Clipboard: Brain–muscle interface: The next-generation BMI. Radhika Rajan Neeraj Jain ... Keywords. Assistive devices; brain–machine interface; motor cortex; paralysis; spinal cord injury ... Journal of Biosciences | News ...

  19. Water and Muscle Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Grazi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between water and the protein of the contractile machinery as well as the tendency of these proteins to form geometrically ordered structures provide a link between water and muscle contraction. Protein osmotic pressure is strictly related to the chemical potential of the contractile proteins, to the stiffness of muscle structures and to the viscosity of the sliding of the thin over the thick filaments. Muscle power output and the steady rate of contraction are linked by modulating a single parameter, a viscosity coefficient. Muscle operation is characterized by working strokes of much shorter length and much quicker than in the classical model. As a consequence the force delivered and the stiffness attained by attached cross-bridges is much larger than usually believed.

  20. Muscle function loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or head are damaged, you may have difficulty chewing and swallowing or closing your eyes. In these ... Medical Professional Muscle paralysis always requires immediate medical attention. If you notice gradual weakening or problems with ...

  1. Triglyceride metabolism in exercising muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Matthew J; Cheng, Yunsheng

    2017-10-01

    Triglycerides are stored within lipid droplets in skeletal muscle and can be hydrolyzed to produce fatty acids for energy production through β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While there was some controversy regarding the quantitative importance of intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) as a metabolic substrate, recent advances in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and confocal microscopy support earlier tracer and biopsy studies demonstrating a substantial contribution of IMTG to energy production, particularly during moderate-intensity endurance exercise. This review provides an update on the understanding of IMTG utilization during exercise, with a focus on describing the key regulatory proteins that control IMTG breakdown and how these proteins respond to acute exercise and in the adaptation to exercise training. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent Advances in Lipid Droplet Biology edited by Rosalind Coleman and Matthijs Hesselink. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbacher, Peter; Eckl, Peter

    2015-04-10

    It is well established that muscle contractions during exercise lead to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscle. These highly reactive molecules have many deleterious effects, such as a reduction of force generation and increased muscle atrophy. Since the discovery of exercise-induced oxidative stress several decades ago, evidence has accumulated that ROS produced during exercise also have positive effects by influencing cellular processes that lead to increased expression of antioxidants. These molecules are particularly elevated in regularly exercising muscle to prevent the negative effects of ROS by neutralizing the free radicals. In addition, ROS also seem to be involved in the exercise-induced adaptation of the muscle phenotype. This review provides an overview of the evidences to date on the effects of ROS in exercising muscle. These aspects include the sources of ROS, their positive and negative cellular effects, the role of antioxidants, and the present evidence on ROS-dependent adaptations of muscle cells in response to physical exercise.

  3. Reactive oxygen species, health and longevity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Emanuele Bianchi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are considered responsible of ageing in animal and humans. Mitochondria are both source and target of ROS. Various strategies to reduce ROS production have been considered to extend lifespan. Caloric restriction, exercise, and antioxidants are thought to be able to protect cells from structural and functional damage. However, there is evidence that ROS production has a detrimental effect on health, but at physiological levels are necessary to stimulate longevity. They play an important effect on secondary signal transduction stimulating innate immunology and mitochondriogenesis. During exercise at moderate intensity, skeletal muscles generate ROS that are necessary for the remodelling of the muscular cells. Physical inactivity determines excessive ROS production and muscle atrophy. Caloric restriction (CR can reduce ROS generation and improve longevity while antioxidant supplementation has shown a negative effect on longevity reducing the muscle adaptation to exercise and increasing mortality risk in patients with chronic diseases. The role of ROS in chronic diseases in also influenced by sex steroids that decrease in aging. The physiology of longevity is the result of integrated biological mechanisms that influence mitochondrial function and activity. The main objective of this review is to evaluate the effects of ROS on mitochondriogenesis and lifespan extension.

  4. Sleeve Muscle Actuator and Its Application in Transtibial Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hao; Shen, Xiangrong

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a new sleeve muscle actuator, and a transtibial prosthesis design powered by this novel actuator. Inspired by the functioning mechanism of the traditional pneumatic muscle actuator, the sleeve muscle actuator incorporates a cylindrical insert to the center of the pneumatic muscle, which eliminates the central portion of the internal volume. As a result of this change, the sleeve muscle provides multiple advantages over the traditional pneumatic muscle, including the increased force capacity over the entire range of motion, reduced energy consumption, and faster dynamic response. Furthermore, utilizing the load-bearing tube as the insert, the sleeve muscle enables an innovative “actuation-load bearing” structure, which has a potential of generating a highly compact actuation system suitable for prosthetic use. Utilizing this new actuator, the preliminary design of a transtibial prosthesis is presented, which is able to provide sufficient torque output and range of motion for a 75 Kg amputee user in level walking. PMID:24187262

  5. Skeletal Muscle Cell Induction from Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusaku Kodaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have the potential to differentiate into various types of cells including skeletal muscle cells. The approach of converting ESCs/iPSCs into skeletal muscle cells offers hope for patients afflicted with the skeletal muscle diseases such as the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Patient-derived iPSCs are an especially ideal cell source to obtain an unlimited number of myogenic cells that escape immune rejection after engraftment. Currently, there are several approaches to induce differentiation of ESCs and iPSCs to skeletal muscle. A key to the generation of skeletal muscle cells from ESCs/iPSCs is the mimicking of embryonic mesodermal induction followed by myogenic induction. Thus, current approaches of skeletal muscle cell induction of ESCs/iPSCs utilize techniques including overexpression of myogenic transcription factors such as MyoD or Pax3, using small molecules to induce mesodermal cells followed by myogenic progenitor cells, and utilizing epigenetic myogenic memory existing in muscle cell-derived iPSCs. This review summarizes the current methods used in myogenic differentiation and highlights areas of recent improvement.

  6. Myoglobin oxygen affinity in aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Traver J; Davis, Randall W

    2015-07-01

    Myoglobin (Mb) is an oxygen binding protein found in vertebrate skeletal muscle, where it facilitates intracellular transport and storage of oxygen. This protein has evolved to suit unique physiological needs in the muscle of diving vertebrates that express Mb at much greater concentrations than their terrestrial counterparts. In this study, we characterized Mb oxygen affinity (P50) from 25 species of aquatic and terrestrial birds and mammals. Among diving species, we tested for correlations between Mb P50 and routine dive duration. Across all species examined, Mb P50 ranged from 2.40 to 4.85 mmHg. The mean P50 of Mb from terrestrial ungulates was 3.72±0.15 mmHg (range 3.70-3.74 mmHg). The P50 of cetaceans was similar to terrestrial ungulates ranging from 3.54 to 3.82 mmHg, with the exception of the melon-headed whale, which had a significantly higher P50 of 4.85 mmHg. Among pinnipeds, the P50 ranged from 3.23 to 3.81 mmHg and showed a trend for higher oxygen affinity in species with longer dive durations. Among diving birds, the P50 ranged from 2.40 to 3.36 mmHg and also showed a trend of higher affinities in species with longer dive durations. In pinnipeds and birds, low Mb P50 was associated with species whose muscles are metabolically active under hypoxic conditions associated with aerobic dives. Given the broad range of potential globin oxygen affinities, Mb P50 from diverse vertebrate species appears constrained within a relatively narrow range. High Mb oxygen affinity within this range may be adaptive for some vertebrates that make prolonged dives. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Radiosensitivity of Hela cells in various O2 concentrations and consideration of oxygen effect in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Yoshikazu; Nyunoya, Koichiro

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells in vitro in various oxygen concentrations and the consideration of the utilization of oxygen effect in radiation therapy, based on the data of HeLa cells and tumor oxygen tension. Survival curves of HeLa cells are found to be exponential as a function of radiation dose and the radiosensitivity is dependent on oxygen tension of culture medium. Relative radiosensitivity decreases remarkably at low level of oxygen, especially under 9 mmHg pO 2 . The utilization of oxygen effect in radiation may be useful in hyperbaric oxygen inhalation and not useful under local tissue hypoxia induced by tourniquet application. Reoxygenation occurs with shrinkage of tumor after irradiation and this phenomenon will diminish the value of hyperbaric oxygen in radiation therapy. (author)

  8. Is Walking Capacity in Subjects with Multiple Sclerosis Primarily Related to Muscle Oxidative Capacity or Maximal Muscle Strength? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Walking capacity is reduced in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS. To develop effective exercise interventions to enhance walking capacity, it is important to determine the impact of factors, modifiable by exercise intervention (maximal muscle strength versus muscle oxidative capacity, on walking capacity. The purpose of this pilot study is to discriminate between the impact of maximal muscle strength versus muscle oxidative capacity on walking capacity in subjects with MS. Methods. From 24 patients with MS, muscle oxidative capacity was determined by calculation of exercise-onset oxygen uptake kinetics (mean response time during submaximal exercise bouts. Maximal muscle strength (isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque was assessed on dynamometer. All subjects completed a 6-minute walking test. Relationships between walking capacity (as a percentage of normal value and muscle strength (of knee flexors and extensors versus muscle oxidative capacity were assessed in multivariate regression analyses. Results. The expanded disability status score (EDSS showed a significant univariate correlation (r=-0.70, P<0.004 with walking capacity. In multivariate regression analyses, EDSS and mean response time, but not muscle strength, were independently related to walking capacity (P<0.05. Conclusions. Walking distance is, next to disability level and not taking neurologic symptoms/deficits into account, primarily related to muscle oxidative capacity in subjects with MS. Additional study is needed to further examine/verify these findings.

  9. Increased peripheral vascular disease risk progressively constrains perfusion adaptability in the skeletal muscle microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Joshua T.; Frisbee, Stephanie J.; Olfert, I. Mark; Chantler, Paul D.; Tabone, Lawrence E.; d'Audiffret, Alexandre C.; Shrader, Carl D.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Brooks, Steven D.; Brock, Robert W.; Lombard, Julian H.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the impact of progressive elevations in peripheral vascular disease (PVD) risk on microvascular function, we utilized eight rat models spanning “healthy” to “high PVD risk” and used a multiscale approach to interrogate microvascular function and outcomes: healthy: Sprague-Dawley rats (SDR) and lean Zucker rats (LZR); mild risk: SDR on high-salt diet (HSD) and SDR on high-fructose diet (HFD); moderate risk: reduced renal mass-hypertensive rats (RRM) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR); high risk: obese Zucker rats (OZR) and Dahl salt-sensitive rats (DSS). Vascular reactivity and biochemical analyses demonstrated that even mild elevations in PVD risk severely attenuated nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability and caused progressive shifts in arachidonic acid metabolism, increasing thromboxane A2 levels. With the introduction of hypertension, arteriolar myogenic activation and adrenergic constriction were increased. However, while functional hyperemia and fatigue resistance of in situ skeletal muscle were not impacted with mild or moderate PVD risk, blood oxygen handling suggested an increasingly heterogeneous perfusion within resting and contracting skeletal muscle. Analysis of in situ networks demonstrated an increasingly stable and heterogeneous distribution of perfusion at arteriolar bifurcations with elevated PVD risk, a phenomenon that was manifested first in the distal microcirculation and evolved proximally with increasing risk. The increased perfusion distribution heterogeneity and loss of flexibility throughout the microvascular network, the result of the combined effects on NO bioavailability, arachidonic acid metabolism, myogenic activation, and adrenergic constriction, may represent the most accurate predictor of the skeletal muscle microvasculopathy and poor health outcomes associated with chronic elevations in PVD risk. PMID:26702145

  10. Increased tissue oxygenation explains the attenuation of hyperemia upon repetitive pneumatic compression of the lower leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messere, Alessandro; Ceravolo, Gianluca; Franco, Walter; Maffiodo, Daniela; Ferraresi, Carlo; Roatta, Silvestro

    2017-12-01

    The rapid hyperemia evoked by muscle compression is short lived and was recently shown to undergo a rapid decrease even in spite of continuing mechanical stimulation. The present study aims at investigating the mechanisms underlying this attenuation, which include local metabolic mechanisms, desensitization of mechanosensitive pathways, and reduced efficacy of the muscle pump. In 10 healthy subjects, short sequences of mechanical compressions ( n = 3-6; 150 mmHg) of the lower leg were delivered at different interstimulus intervals (ranging from 20 to 160 s) through a customized pneumatic device. Hemodynamic monitoring included near-infrared spectroscopy, detecting tissue oxygenation and blood volume in calf muscles, and simultaneous echo-Doppler measurement of arterial (superficial femoral artery) and venous (femoral vein) blood flow. The results indicate that 1 ) a long-lasting (>100 s) increase in local tissue oxygenation follows compression-induced hyperemia, 2 ) compression-induced hyperemia exhibits different patterns of attenuation depending on the interstimulus interval, 3 ) the amplitude of the hyperemia is not correlated with the amount of blood volume displaced by the compression, and 4 ) the extent of attenuation negatively correlates with tissue oxygenation ( r  = -0,78, P < 0.05). Increased tissue oxygenation appears to be the key factor for the attenuation of hyperemia upon repetitive compressive stimulation. Tissue oxygenation monitoring is suggested as a useful integration in medical treatments aimed at improving local circulation by repetitive tissue compression. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study shows that 1 ) the hyperemia induced by muscle compression produces a long-lasting increase in tissue oxygenation, 2 ) the hyperemia produced by subsequent muscle compressions exhibits different patterns of attenuation at different interstimulus intervals, and 3 ) the extent of attenuation of the compression-induced hyperemia is proportional to the level of

  11. Production of an accelerated oxygen-14 beam

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, J; Cerny, J

    2003-01-01

    BEARS is an ongoing project to provide a light-ion radioactive-beam capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL. Light radioactive isotopes are produced at a 10 MeV proton medical cyclotron, transported 350 m via a high-speed gas transport capillary, cryogenically separated, and injected into the 88-Inch Cyclotron's ion source. The first radioactive beam successfully accelerated was carbon-11 and beams of intensity more than 10 sup 8 ions/s have been utilized for experiments. Development of oxygen-14 as the second BEARS beam presented considerable technical challenges, both due to its short half-life of 71 s and the radiation chemistry of oxygen in the target. The usual techniques developed for medical uses of oxygen-15 involve the addition of significant amounts of carrier oxygen, something that would overload the ion source. As a solution, oxygen-14 is produced as water in a carrier-free form, and is chemically converted in two steps to carbon dioxide, a form readily usable by the BEARS. This system has bee...

  12. Muscle glycogen and cell function--Location, location, location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, J

    2015-12-01

    The importance of glycogen, as a fuel during exercise, is a fundamental concept in exercise physiology. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not evenly distributed in skeletal muscle fibers, but rather localized in distinct pools. In this review, we present the available evidence regarding the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle and discuss this from the perspective of skeletal muscle fiber function. The distribution of glycogen in the defined pools within the skeletal muscle varies depending on exercise intensity, fiber phenotype, training status, and immobilization. Furthermore, these defined pools may serve specific functions in the cell. Specifically, reduced levels of these pools of glycogen are associated with reduced SR Ca(2+) release, muscle relaxation rate, and membrane excitability. Collectively, the available literature strongly demonstrates that the subcellular localization of glycogen has to be considered to fully understand the role of glycogen metabolism and signaling in skeletal muscle function. Here, we propose that the effect of low muscle glycogen on excitation-contraction coupling may serve as a built-in mechanism, which links the energetic state of the muscle fiber to energy utilization. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Closed Loop Control of Oxygen Delivery and Oxygen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    were used for this study and were connected via a USB cable to allow communication. The ventilator was modified to allow closed loop control of oxygen...connected via a USB cable to allow communication. The ventilator was modified to allow closed loop control of oxygen based on the oxygen saturation...2017-4119, 28 Aug 2017. oximetry (SpO2) and intermittent arterial blood sampling for arterial oxygen tension (partial pressure of oxygen [PaO2]) and

  14. A statistical model for predicting muscle performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Diane Leslie De Caix

    The objective of these studies was to develop a capability for predicting muscle performance and fatigue to be utilized for both space- and ground-based applications. To develop this predictive model, healthy test subjects performed a defined, repetitive dynamic exercise to failure using a Lordex spinal machine. Throughout the exercise, surface electromyography (SEMG) data were collected from the erector spinae using a Mega Electronics ME3000 muscle tester and surface electrodes placed on both sides of the back muscle. These data were analyzed using a 5th order Autoregressive (AR) model and statistical regression analysis. It was determined that an AR derived parameter, the mean average magnitude of AR poles, significantly correlated with the maximum number of repetitions (designated Rmax) that a test subject was able to perform. Using the mean average magnitude of AR poles, a test subject's performance to failure could be predicted as early as the sixth repetition of the exercise. This predictive model has the potential to provide a basis for improving post-space flight recovery, monitoring muscle atrophy in astronauts and assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures, monitoring astronaut performance and fatigue during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations, providing pre-flight assessment of the ability of an EVA crewmember to perform a given task, improving the design of training protocols and simulations for strenuous International Space Station assembly EVA, and enabling EVA work task sequences to be planned enhancing astronaut performance and safety. Potential ground-based, medical applications of the predictive model include monitoring muscle deterioration and performance resulting from illness, establishing safety guidelines in the industry for repetitive tasks, monitoring the stages of rehabilitation for muscle-related injuries sustained in sports and accidents, and enhancing athletic performance through improved training protocols while reducing

  15. Coupling between skeletal muscle fiber size and capillarization is maintained during healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnouin, Yoann; McPhee, Jamie S; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Bosutti, Alessandra; De Vito, Giuseppe; Jones, David A; Narici, Marco; Behin, Anthony; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Degens, Hans

    2017-08-01

    As muscle capillarization is related to the oxidative capacity of the muscle and the size of muscle fibres, capillary rarefaction may contribute to sarcopenia and functional impairment in older adults. Therefore, it is important to assess how ageing affects muscle capillarization and the interrelationship between fibre capillary supply with the oxidative capacity and size of the fibres. Muscle biopsies from healthy recreationally active young (22 years; 14 men and 5 women) and older (74 years; 22 men and 6 women) people were assessed for muscle capillarization and the distribution of capillaries with the method of capillary domains. Oxidative capacity of muscle fibres was assessed with quantitative histochemistry for succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. There was no significant age-related reduction in muscle fibre oxidative capacity. Despite 18% type II fibre atrophy (P = 0.019) and 23% fewer capillaries per fibre (P age and sex. Based on SDH, the maximal oxygen consumption supported by a capillary did not differ significantly between young and old people. The similar quantitative and qualitative distribution of capillaries within muscle from healthy recreationally active older people and young adults indicates that the age-related capillary rarefaction, which does occur, nevertheless maintains the coupling between skeletal muscle fibre size and capillarization during healthy ageing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Society on Sarcopenia, Cachexia and Wasting Disorders.

  16. Coronary and muscle blood flow during physical exercise in humans; heterogenic alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Majerczak, Joanna; Duda, Krzysztof; Chlopicki, Stefan

    2015-08-01

    In this review, we present the relation between power generation capabilities and pulmonary oxygen uptake during incremental cycling exercise in humans and the effect of exercise intensity on the oxygen cost of work. We also discuss the importance of oxygen delivery to the working muscles as a factor determining maximal oxygen uptake in humans. Subsequently, we outline the importance of coronary blood flow, myocardial oxygen uptake and myocardial metabolic stability for exercise tolerance. Finally, we describe mechanisms of endothelium-dependent regulation of coronary and skeletal muscle blood flow, dysregulation of which may impair exercise capacity and increase the cardiovascular risk of exercise. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

  17. Near infrared spectroscopy of human muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarrone, R.; Currà, A.; Cardillo, A.; Bonifazi, G.; Serranti, S.

    2018-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy is a powerful tool in research and industrial applications. Its properties of being rapid, non-invasive and not destructive make it a promising technique for qualitative as well as quantitative analysis in medicine. Recent advances in materials and fabrication techniques provided portable, performant, sensing spectrometers readily operated by user-friendly cabled or wireless systems. We used such a system to test whether infrared spectroscopy techniques, currently utilized in many areas as primary/secondary raw materials sector, cultural heritage, agricultural/food industry, environmental remote and proximal sensing, pharmaceutical industry, etc., could be applied in living humans to categorize muscles. We acquired muscles infrared spectra in the Vis-SWIR regions (350-2500 nm), utilizing an ASD FieldSpec 4 Standard-Res Spectroradiometer with a spectral sampling capability of 1.4 nm at 350-1000 nm and 1.1 nm at 1001-2500 nm. After a preliminary spectra pre-processing (i.e. signal scattering reduction), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was applied to identify similar spectral features presence and to realize their further grouping. Partial Least-Squares Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) was utilized to implement discrimination/prediction models. We studied 22 healthy subjects (age 25-89 years, 11 females), by acquiring Vis-SWIR spectra from the upper limb muscles (i.e. biceps, a forearm flexor, and triceps, a forearm extensor). Spectroscopy was performed in fixed limb postures (elbow angle approximately 90‡). We found that optical spectroscopy can be applied to study human tissues in vivo. Vis-SWIR spectra acquired from the arm detect muscles, distinguish flexors from extensors.

  18. Training-induced adaptation of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2003-08-15

    Muscle training/conditioning improves the adaptation of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscles to physical exercise. However, the mechanisms underlying this adaptation are still not understood fully. By quantitative analysis of the existing experimental results, we show that training-induced acceleration of oxygen-uptake kinetics at the onset of exercise and improvement of ATP/ADP stability due to physical training are mainly caused by an increase in the amount of mitochondrial proteins and by an intensification of the parallel activation of ATP usage and ATP supply (increase in direct stimulation of oxidative phosphorylation complexes accompanying stimulation of ATP consumption) during exercise.

  19. Oxygen Dependent Biocatalytic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard

    Enzyme catalysts have the potential to improve both the process economics and the environ-mental profile of many oxidation reactions especially in the fine- and specialty-chemical industry, due to their exquisite ability to perform stereo-, regio- and chemo-selective oxida-tions at ambient...... to aldehydes and ketones, oxyfunctionalization of C-H bonds, and epoxidation of C-C double bonds. Although oxygen dependent biocatalysis offers many possibilities, there are numerous chal-lenges to be overcome before an enzyme can be implemented in an industrial process. These challenges requires the combined...... far below their potential maximum catalytic rate at industrially relevant oxygen concentrations. Detailed knowledge of the en-zyme kinetics are therefore required in order to determine the best operating conditions and design oxygen supply to minimize processing costs. This is enabled...

  20. Oxygen therapy reduces postoperative tachycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stausholm, K; Kehlet, H; Rosenberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Concomitant hypoxaemia and tachycardia in the postoperative period is unfavourable for the myocardium. Since hypoxaemia per se may be involved in the pathogenesis of postoperative tachycardia, we have studied the effect of oxygen therapy on tachycardia in 12 patients randomly allocated to blinded...... air or oxygen by facemask on the second or third day after major surgery. Inclusion criteria were arterial hypoxaemia (oxygen saturation 90 beat.min-1). Each patient responded similarly to oxygen therapy: an increase in arterial oxygen saturation and a decrease...... in heart rate (p oxygen has a positive effect on the cardiac oxygen delivery and demand balance....

  1. Hyperbaric oxygen and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, R.; Hamilton-Farrell, M.R.; Kleij, A.J. van der

    2005-01-01

    Background: Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy is the inhalation of 100% oxygen at a pressure of at least 1.5 atmospheres absolute (150 kPa). It uses oxygen as a drug by dissolving it in the plasma and delivering it to the tissues independent of hemoglobin. For a variety of organ systems, HBO is known to promote new vessel growth into areas with reduced oxygen tension due to poor vascularity, and therewith promotes wound healing and recovery of radiation-injured tissue. Furthermore, tumors may be sensitized to irradiation by raising intratumoral oxygen tensions. Methods: A network of hyperbaric facilities exists in Europe, and a number of clinical studies are ongoing. The intergovernmental framework COST B14 action 'Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy' started in 1999. The main goal of the Working Group Oncology is preparation and actual implementation of prospective study protocols in the field of HBO and radiation oncology in Europe. Results: In this paper a short overview on HBO is given and the following randomized clinical studies are presented: (a) reirradiation of recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after HBO sensitization; (b) role of HBO in enhancing radiosensitivity on glioblastoma multiforme; (c) osseointegration in irradiated patients; adjunctive HBO to prevent implant failures; (d) the role of HBO in the treatment of late irradiation sequelae in the pelvic region. The two radiosensitization protocols (a, b) allow a time interval between HBO and subsequent irradiation of 10-20 min. Conclusion: Recruitment of centers and patients is being strongly encouraged, detailed information is given on www.oxynet.org. (orig.)

  2. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  3. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  4. OXYGEN MANAGEMENT DURING ALCOHOLIC FERMENTATION

    OpenAIRE

    MOENNE VARGAS, MARÍA ISABE

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen additions are a common practice in winemaking, as oxygen has a positive effect in fermentative kinetics, biomass synthesis and improvement of color, structure and :flavor in treated wines. However, most oxygen additions are carried out heuristically through pump-over operations solely on a know-how basis, which is difficult to manage in terms of the exact quantity of oxygen transferred to the fermenting must. It is important to estímate the amount of oxygen added because...

  5. Redox mechanism of reactive oxygen species in exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that regular exercise benefits health. However, unaccustomed and/or exhaustive exercise can generate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to oxidative stress-related tissue damage and impaired muscle contractility. ROS are produced in both aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Although mitochondria, NADPH oxidases and xanthine oxidase have all been identified as contributors to ROS production, the exact redox mechanisms underlying exercise-induced oxidative stress remain elusive. Interestingly, moderate exposure to ROS is necessary to induce the body’s adaptive responses such as the activation of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Dietary antioxidant manipulation can also reduce ROS levels and muscle fatigue, as well as enhance exercise recovery. To elucidate the complex role of ROS in exercise, this article updates on new findings of ROS origins within skeletal muscles associated with various types of exercises such as endurance, sprint and mountain climbing, corresponding antioxidant defense systems as well as dietary manipulation against damage caused by ROS.

  6. Respiratory muscle training for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Nathan; Solis-Moya, Arturo

    2018-05-24

    muscle training interventions varied dramatically, with frequency, intensity and duration ranging from thrice weekly to twice daily, 20% to 80% of maximal effort, and 10 to 30 minutes, respectively. Participant numbers ranged from 11 to 39 participants in the included studies; five studies were in adults only and four in a combination of children and adults.No significant improvement was reported in the primary outcome of pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in one second and forced vital capacity) (very low-quality evidence). Although no change was reported in exercise capacity as assessed by the maximum rate of oxygen use, a 10% improvement in exercise duration was found when working at 60% of maximal effort in one study (n = 20) (very low-quality evidence). In a further study (n = 18), when working at 80% of maximal effort, health-related quality of life improved in the mastery and emotion domains (very low-quality evidence). With regards to the review's secondary outcomes, one study (n = 11) found a significant change in intramural pressure, functional residual capacity and maximal inspiratory pressure following training (low-quality evidence). A further study (n = 22) reported that respiratory muscle endurance was significantly longer in the training group (P < 0.01). No studies reported on any other secondary outcomes. Meta-analyses could not be performed due to a lack of consistency and insufficient detail in reported outcome measures. There is insufficient evidence to suggest whether this intervention is beneficial or not. Healthcare practitioners should consider the use of respiratory muscle training on a case-by-case basis. Further research of reputable methodological quality is needed to determine the effectiveness of respiratory muscle training in people with cystic fibrosis. Researchers should consider the following clinical outcomes in future studies; respiratory muscle function, pulmonary function, exercise capacity, hospital admissions, and health

  7. The continuous inhalation of oxygen-15 for assessing regional oxygen extraction in the brain of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.; Chesler, D.A.; Ter-Pogossian, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    A non-invasive steady-state method for studying the regional accumulation of oxygen in the brain by continuously inhaling oxygen-15 has been investigated. Oxygen respiration by tissue results in the formation of water of metabolism which may be considered as the 'exhaust product' of respiration. In turn the steady-state distribution of this product may be related to that of oxygen utilization. It has been found in monkeys than an appreciable component of the signal, recorded over the head during the inhalation of 15 O 2 , was attributable to the local production of 15 O-labelled water of metabolism. In man the distribution of radioactivity recorded over the head during 15 O 2 inhalation clearly related to active cerebal tissue. Theoretically the respiration product is linearly dependent on the oxygen extraction ratio of the tissue, and at normal cerebal perfusion it is less sensitive to changes in blood flow. At low rates of perfusion a more linear dependence on flow is shown. The dual dependence on blood flow and oxygen extraction limited the interpretation of the cerebal distribution obtained with this technique. Means for obtaining more definitive measurements with this approach are discussed. (author)

  8. Tissue oxygenation and haemodynamics measurement with spatially resolved NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Scopesi, F.; Serra, G.; Sun, J. W.; Rolfe, P.

    2010-08-01

    We describe the use of Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) for the non-invasive investigation of changes in haemodynamics and oxygenation of human peripheral tissues. The goal was to measure spatial variations of tissue NIRS oxygenation variables, namely deoxy-haemoglobin (HHb), oxy-haemoglobin (HbO2), total haemoglobin (HbT), and thereby to evaluate the responses of the peripheral circulation to imposed physiological challenges. We present a skinfat- muscle heterogeneous tissue model with varying fat thickness up to 15mm and a Monte Carlo simulation of photon transport within this model. The mean partial path length and the mean photon visit depth in the muscle layer were derived for different source-detector spacing. We constructed NIRS instrumentation comprising of light-emitting diodes (LED) as light sources at four wavelengths, 735nm, 760nm, 810nm and 850nm and sensitive photodiodes (PD) as the detectors. Source-detector spacing was varied to perform measurements at different depths within forearm tissue. Changes in chromophore concentration in response to venous and arterial occlusion were calculated using the modified Lambert-Beer Law. Studies in fat and thin volunteers indicated greater sensitivity in the thinner subjects for the tissue oxygenation measurement in the muscle layer. These results were consistent with those found using Monte Carlo simulation. Overall, the results of this investigation demonstrate the usefulness of the NIRS instrument for deriving spatial information from biological tissues.

  9. Hydraulically actuated artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, M. A.; Tiwari, R.; Wajcs, K. B.; Moses, C.; Reveles, I.; Garcia, E.

    2012-04-01

    Hydraulic Artificial Muscles (HAMs) consisting of a polymer tube constrained by a nylon mesh are presented in this paper. Despite the actuation mechanism being similar to its popular counterpart, which are pneumatically actuated (PAM), HAMs have not been studied in depth. HAMs offer the advantage of compliance, large force to weight ratio, low maintenance, and low cost over traditional hydraulic cylinders. Muscle characterization for isometric and isobaric tests are discussed and compared to PAMs. A model incorporating the effect of mesh angle and friction have also been developed. In addition, differential swelling of the muscle on actuation has also been included in the model. An application of lab fabricated HAMs for a meso-scale robotic system is also presented.

  10. Foot muscles strengthener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris T. Glavač

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous experience in the correction of flat feet consisted of the use of insoles for shoes and exercises with toys, balls, rollers, inclined planes, etc. A device for strengthening foot muscles is designed for the correction of flat feet in children and, as its name suggests, for strengthening foot muscles in adults. The device is made of wood and metal, with a mechanism and technical solutions, enabling the implementation of specific exercises to activate muscles responsible for the formation of the foot arch. It is suitable for home use with controlled load quantities since it has calibrated springs. The device is patented with the Intellectual Property Office, Republic of Serbia, as a petty patent.

  11. Glycogen accumulation in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malhotra, R.K.; Kaul, R.; Malhotra, N.

    1989-01-01

    Alterations induced in glycogen content and phosphorylase activity have been studied in normal and irradiated minced muscle autografts on frog gastrocnemius at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 15 and 30 postgrafting. The changes observed in the glycogen content and phosphorylase activity conform to the degeneration and regeneration phases of muscle repair. An attempt has been made to explain the altered glycogen utilizing capacities of the frog skeletal muscle during its repair and regeneration. (author)

  12. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  13. Home Oxygen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cold it can hurt your skin. Keep a fire extinguisher close by, and let your fire department know that you have oxygen in your ... any symptoms of illness. Medicare, Medicaid, and Commercial Insurance Certain insurance policies may pay for all your ...

  14. Central oxygen pipeline failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgical intensive care unit (ICU), with two patients on full ventilation and ... uncertainty around the cause of the failure and the restoration, .... soon as its level also falls below three tons. Should ... (properly checked and closed prior to each anaesthetic). ... in use at the time of the central oxygen pipeline failure at Tygerberg.

  15. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is not a novel therapy in the true sense of the ... Intention-to-treat analysis showed benefit for ECMO, with a relative risk ... no doubt that VV-ECMO is an advance in medical technology, and that.

  16. Rectus abdominis muscle endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goker, A.

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by an abnormal existence of functional endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity, typically occuring within the pelvis of women in reproductive age. We report two cases with endometriosis of the abdominal wall; the first one in the rectus abdominis muscle and the second one in the surgical scar of previous caesarean incision along with the rectus abdominis muscle. Pre-operative evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging. The masses were dissected free from the surrounding tissue and excised with clear margins. Diagnosis of the excised lesions were verified by histopathology. (author)

  17. Skeletal muscle connective tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline

    in the structure of fibrous collagen and myofibers at high-resolution. The results demonstrate that the collagen composition in the extra cellular matrix of Gadus morhua fish muscle is much more complex than previously anticipated, as it contains type III, IV, V  and VI collagen in addition to type I. The vascular....... Consequently, functional structures, ensuring "tissue maintenance" must form a major role of connective tissue, in addition that is to the force transmitting structures one typically finds in muscle. Vascular structures have also been shown to change their mechanical properties with age and it has been shown...

  18. Ocean Ridges and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmuir, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    The history of oxygen and the fluxes and feedbacks that lead to its evolution through time remain poorly constrained. It is not clear whether oxygen has had discrete steady state levels at different times in Earth's history, or whether oxygen evolution is more progressive, with trigger points that lead to discrete changes in markers such as mass independent sulfur isotopes. Whatever this history may have been, ocean ridges play an important and poorly recognized part in the overall mass balance of oxidants and reductants that contribute to electron mass balance and the oxygen budget. One example is the current steady state O2 in the atmosphere. The carbon isotope data suggest that the fraction of carbon has increased in the Phanerozoic, and CO2 outgassing followed by organic matter burial should continually supply more O2 to the surface reservoirs. Why is O2 not then increasing? A traditional answer to this question would relate to variations in the fraction of burial of organic matter, but this fraction appears to have been relatively high throughout the Phanerozoic. Furthermore, subduction of carbon in the 1/5 organic/carbonate proportions would contribute further to an increasingly oxidized surface. What is needed is a flux of oxidized material out of the system. One solution would be a modern oxidized flux to the mantle. The current outgassing flux of CO2 is ~3.4*1012 moles per year. If 20% of that becomes stored organic carbon, that is a flux of .68*1012 moles per year of reduced carbon. The current flux of oxidized iron in subducting ocean crust is ~2*1012 moles per year of O2 equivalents, based on the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratios in old ocean crust compared to fresh basalts at the ridge axis. This flux more than accounts for the incremental oxidizing power produced by modern life. It also suggests a possible feedback through oxygenation of the ocean. A reduced deep ocean would inhibit oxidation of ocean crust, in which case there would be no subduction flux of oxidized

  19. Muscle force depends on the amount of transversal muscle loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Tobias; Till, Olaf; Stutzig, Norman; Günther, Michael; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2014-06-03

    Skeletal muscles are embedded in an environment of other muscles, connective tissue, and bones, which may transfer transversal forces to the muscle tissue, thereby compressing it. In a recent study we demonstrated that transversal loading of a muscle with 1.3Ncm(-2) reduces maximum isometric force (Fim) and rate of force development by approximately 5% and 25%, respectively. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of increasing transversal muscle loading on contraction dynamics. Therefore, we performed isometric experiments on rat M. gastrocnemius medialis (n=9) without and with five different transversal loads corresponding to increasing pressures of 1.3Ncm(-2) to 5.3Ncm(-2) at the contact area between muscle and load. Muscle loading was induced by a custom-made plunger which was able to move in transversal direction. Increasing transversal muscle loading resulted in an almost linear decrease in muscle force from 4.8±1.8% to 12.8±2% Fim. Compared to an unloaded isometric contraction, rate of force development decreased from 20.2±4.0% at 1.3Ncm(-2) muscle loading to 34.6±5.7% at 5.3Ncm(-2). Experimental observation of the impact of transversal muscle loading on contraction dynamics may help to better understand muscle tissue properties. Moreover, applying transversal loads to muscles opens a window to analyze three-dimensional muscle force generation. Data presented in this study may be important to develop and validate muscle models which enable simulation of muscle contractions under compression and enlighten the mechanisms behind. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oxygen diffusion in monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, D. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Nakamura, M.; Watson, E. B.

    2004-09-01

    We report measurements of oxygen diffusion in natural monazites under both dry, 1-atm conditions and hydrothermal conditions. For dry experiments, 18O-enriched CePO4 powder and monazite crystals were sealed in Ag-Pd capsules with a solid buffer (to buffer at NNO) and annealed in 1-atm furnaces. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels, where monazite grains were encapsulated with 18O-enriched water. Following the diffusion anneals, oxygen concentration profiles were measured with Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) using the reaction 18O(p,α)15N. Over the temperature range 850-1100 °C, the Arrhenius relation determined for dry diffusion experiments on monazite is given by: Under wet conditions at 100 MPa water pressure, over the temperature range 700-880 °C, oxygen diffusion can be described by the Arrhenius relationship: Oxygen diffusion under hydrothermal conditions has a significantly lower activation energy for diffusion than under dry conditions, as has been found the case for many other minerals, both silicate and nonsilicate. Given these differences in activation energies, the differences between dry and wet diffusion rates increase with lower temperatures; for example, at 600 °C, dry diffusion will be more than 4 orders of magnitude slower than diffusion under hydrothermal conditions. These disparate diffusivities will result in pronounced differences in the degree of retentivity of oxygen isotope signatures. For instance, under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust) and high lower-crustal temperatures (∼800 °C), monazite cores of 70-μm radii will preserve O isotope ratios for about 500,000 years; by comparison, they would be retained at this temperature under wet conditions for about 15,000 years.

  1. Nonlinear deformation of skeletal muscles in a passive state and in isotonic contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shil'ko, S. V.; Chernous, D. A.; Pleskachevskii, Yu. M.

    2012-07-01

    A procedure for a two-level modeling of deformation of skeletal muscles is offered. Based on a phenomenological model of an individual muscle fiber, consisting of a viscous, a contractive, and two nonlinearly elastic elements (the first level), various means for describing a skeletal muscle as a whole (the second, macroscopic level) are considered. A method for identification of a muscle model by utilizing experimental elongation diagrams in a passive state and in isotonic contraction is put forward. The results of a biomechanical analysis are compared with known experimental data for the isotonic and isometric activation regimes of tailor's muscle of a frog. It is established that preferable is the description of a muscle that takes into account the different lengths of muscle fibers and their twist.

  2. GH/IGF-I Transgene Expression on Muscle Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Robert J.

    1999-01-01

    We propose to test the hypothesis that the growth hormone/ insulin like growth factor-I axis through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms may provide long term muscle homeostasis under conditions of prolonged weightlessness. As a key alternative to hormone replacement therapy, ectopic production of hGH, growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), and IGF-I will be studied for its potential on muscle mass impact in transgenic mice under simulated microgravity. Expression of either hGH or IGF-I would provide a chronic source of a growth-promoting protein whose biosynthesis or secretion is shut down in space. Muscle expression of the IGF-I transgene has demonstrated about a 20% increase in hind limb muscle mass over control nontransgenic litter mates. These recent experiments, also establish the utility of hind-limb suspension in mice as a workable model to study atrophy in weight bearing muscles. Thus, transgenic mice will be used in hind-limb suspension models to determine the role of GH/IGF-I on maintenance of muscle mass and whether concentric exercises might act in synergy with hormone treatment. As a means to engineer and ensure long-term protein production that would be workable in humans, gene therapy technology will be used by to monitor muscle mass preservation during hind-limb suspension, after direct intramuscular injection of a genetically engineered muscle-specific vector expressing GHRH. Effects of this gene-based therapy will be assessed in both fast twitch (medial gastrocnemius) and slow twitch muscle (soleus). End-points include muscle size, ultrastructure, fiber type, and contractile function, in normal animals, hind limb suspension, and reambutation.

  3. Effects of oblique muscle surgery on the rectus muscle pulley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okanobu, Hirotaka; Kono, Reika; Ohtsuki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the position of rectus muscle pulleys in Japanese eyes and to evaluate the effect of oblique muscle surgery on rectus muscle pulleys. Quasi-coronal plane MRI was used to determine area centroids of the 4 rectus muscles. The area centroids of the rectus muscles were transformed to 2-dimensional coordinates to represent pulley positions. The effects of oblique muscle surgery on the rectus muscle pulley positions in the coronal plane were evaluated in 10 subjects with cyclovertical strabismus and, as a control, pulley locations in 7 normal Japanese subjects were calculated. The mean positions of the rectus muscle pulleys in the coronal plane did not significantly differ from previous reports on normal populations, including Caucasians. There were significant positional shifts of the individual horizontal and vertical rectus muscle pulleys in 3 (100%) patients with inferior oblique advancement, but not in eyes with inferior oblique recession and superior oblique tendon advancement surgery. The surgical cyclorotatory effect was significantly correlated with the change in the angle of inclination formed by the line connecting the vertical rectus muscles (p=0.0234), but weakly correlated with that of the horizontal rectus muscles. The most important factor that affects the pulley position is the amount of ocular torsion, not the difference in surgical procedure induced by oblique muscle surgery. (author)

  4. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The use of near-infrared spectroscopy in understanding skeletal muscle physiology: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marco; Muthalib, Makii; Quaresima, Valentina

    2011-11-28

    This article provides a snapshot of muscle near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) at the end of 2010 summarizing the recent literature, offering the present status and perspectives of the NIRS instrumentation and methods, describing the main NIRS studies on skeletal muscle physiology, posing open questions and outlining future directions. So far, different NIRS techniques (e.g. continuous-wave (CW) and spatially, time- and frequency-resolved spectroscopy) have been used for measuring muscle oxygenation during exercise. In the last four years, approximately 160 muscle NIRS articles have been published on different physiological aspects (primarily muscle oxygenation and haemodynamics) of several upper- and lower-limb muscle groups investigated by using mainly two-channel CW and spatially resolved spectroscopy commercial instruments. Unfortunately, in only 15 of these studies were the advantages of using multi-channel instruments exploited. There are still several open questions in the application of NIRS in muscle studies: (i) whether NIRS can be used in subjects with a large fat layer; (ii) the contribution of myoglobin desaturation to the NIRS signal during exercise; (iii) the effect of scattering changes during exercise; and (iv) the effect of changes in skin perfusion, particularly during prolonged exercise. Recommendations for instrumentation advancements and future muscle NIRS studies are provided.

  6. Insulin resistance for glucose metabolism in disused soleus muscle of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seider, M. J.; Nicholson, W. F.; Booth, F. W.

    1981-01-01

    Results of this study on mice provide the first direct evidence of insulin resistance for glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle that has undergone a previous period of reduced muscle usage. This lack of responsiveness to insulin developed in one day and in the presence of hypoinsulinemia. Future studies will utilize the model of hindlimb immobilization to determine the causes of these changes.

  7. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle P Blum

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle

  8. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  9. MRI appearance of muscle denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, S. [University Hospital of Wales, Department of Radiology, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Venkatanarasimha, N.; Walsh, M.A.; Hughes, P.M. [Derriford Hospital, Department of Radiology, Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-15

    Muscle denervation results from a variety of causes including trauma, neoplasia, neuropathies, infections, autoimmune processes and vasculitis. Traditionally, the diagnosis of muscle denervation was based on clinical examination and electromyography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers a distinct advantage over electromyography, not only in diagnosing muscle denervation, but also in determining its aetiology. MRI demonstrates characteristic signal intensity patterns depending on the stage of muscle denervation. The acute and subacutely denervated muscle shows a high signal intensity pattern on fluid sensitive sequences and normal signal intensity on T1-weighted MRI images. In chronic denervation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration demonstrate high signal changes on T1-weighted sequences in association with volume loss. The purpose of this review is to summarise the MRI appearance of denervated muscle, with special emphasis on the signal intensity patterns in acute and subacute muscle denervation. (orig.)

  10. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  11. Biothermal sensing of a torsional artificial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Ho; Kim, Tae Hyeob; Lima, Márcio D; Baughman, Ray H; Kim, Seon Jeong

    2016-02-14

    Biomolecule responsive materials have been studied intensively for use in biomedical applications as smart systems because of their unique property of responding to specific biomolecules under mild conditions. However, these materials have some challenging drawbacks that limit further practical application, including their speed of response and mechanical properties, because most are based on hydrogels. Here, we present a fast, mechanically robust biscrolled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn as a torsional artificial muscle through entrapping an enzyme linked to a thermally sensitive hydrogel, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), utilizing the exothermic catalytic reaction of the enzyme. The induced rotation reached an equilibrated angle in less than 2 min under mild temperature conditions (25-37 °C) while maintaining the mechanical properties originating from the carbon nanotubes. This biothermal sensing of a torsional artificial muscle offers a versatile platform for the recognition of various types of biomolecules by replacing the enzyme, because an exothermic reaction is a general property accompanying a biochemical transformation.

  12. Aberrant mitochondrial homeostasis in the skeletal muscle of sedentary older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Safdar

    Full Text Available The role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress has been extensively characterized in the aetiology of sarcopenia (aging-associated loss of muscle mass and muscle wasting as a result of muscle disuse. What remains less clear is whether the decline in skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity is purely a function of the aging process or if the sedentary lifestyle of older adult subjects has confounded previous reports. The objective of the present study was to investigate if a recreationally active lifestyle in older adults can conserve skeletal muscle strength and functionality, chronic systemic inflammation, mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity, and cellular antioxidant capacity. To that end, muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis of young and age-matched recreationally active older and sedentary older men and women (N = 10/group; female symbol = male symbol. We show that a physically active lifestyle is associated with the partial compensatory preservation of mitochondrial biogenesis, and cellular oxidative and antioxidant capacity in skeletal muscle of older adults. Conversely a sedentary lifestyle, associated with osteoarthritis-mediated physical inactivity, is associated with reduced mitochondrial function, dysregulation of cellular redox status and chronic systemic inflammation that renders the skeletal muscle intracellular environment prone to reactive oxygen species-mediated toxicity. We propose that an active lifestyle is an important determinant of quality of life and molecular progression of aging in skeletal muscle of the elderly, and is a viable therapy for attenuating and/or reversing skeletal muscle strength declines and mitochondrial abnormalities associated with aging.

  13. Vascular Function and Regulation of Blood Flow in Resting and Contracting Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin

    importance. The present work provides new insight in to vasodilator interactions important for exercise hyperemia and sheds light on mechanisms important for vascular function and regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow in essential hypertension (high blood pressure) and aging and identifies mechanisms......The precise matching of blood flow, oxygen delivery and metabolism is essential as it ensures that any increase in muscle work is precisely matched by increases in oxygen delivery. Therefore, understanding the control mechanisms of skeletal muscle blood flow regulation is of great biological...... in the regulation of exercise hyperemia. Furthermore, blood flow to contracting leg skeletal muscles is reduced both in essential hypertension and with aging. The potential difference in vasoactive system(s) responsible for the reduction in blood flow in the two conditions is in agreement with the suggestion...

  14. Monitoring Detrusor Oxygenation and Hemodynamics Noninvasively during Dysfunctional Voiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnab, Andrew J.; Stothers, Lynn S.; Shadgan, Babak

    2012-01-01

    The current literature indicates that lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs) related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have a heterogeneous pathophysiology. Pressure flow studies (UDSs) remain the gold standard evaluation methodology for such patients. However, as the function of the detrusor muscle depends on its vasculature and perfusion, the underlying causes of LUTS likely include abnormalities of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics, and available treatment options include agents thought to act on the detrusor smooth muscle and/or vasculature. Hence, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), an established optical methodology for monitoring changes in tissue oxygenation and hemodynamics, has relevance as a means of expanding knowledge related to the pathophysiology of BPH and potential treatment options. This methodological report describes how to conduct simultaneous NIRS monitoring of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics during UDS, outlines the clinical implications and practical applications of NIRS, explains the principles of physiologic interpretation of NIRS voiding data, and proposes an exploratory hypothesis that the pathophysiological causes underlying LUTS include detrusor dysfunction due to an abnormal hemodynamic response or the onset of oxygen debt during voiding. PMID:23019422

  15. Monitoring Detrusor Oxygenation and Hemodynamics Noninvasively during Dysfunctional Voiding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Macnab

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature indicates that lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTSs related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH have a heterogeneous pathophysiology. Pressure flow studies (UDSs remain the gold standard evaluation methodology for such patients. However, as the function of the detrusor muscle depends on its vasculature and perfusion, the underlying causes of LUTS likely include abnormalities of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics, and available treatment options include agents thought to act on the detrusor smooth muscle and/or vasculature. Hence, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, an established optical methodology for monitoring changes in tissue oxygenation and hemodynamics, has relevance as a means of expanding knowledge related to the pathophysiology of BPH and potential treatment options. This methodological report describes how to conduct simultaneous NIRS monitoring of detrusor oxygenation and hemodynamics during UDS, outlines the clinical implications and practical applications of NIRS, explains the principles of physiologic interpretation of NIRS voiding data, and proposes an exploratory hypothesis that the pathophysiological causes underlying LUTS include detrusor dysfunction due to an abnormal hemodynamic response or the onset of oxygen debt during voiding.

  16. Lipolysis in Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Annette Karen Lundbeck

    chemical structure of DAG. We took advantage of the fact that insulin sensitivity is increased after exercise, and that mice knocked out (KO) of HSL accumulate DAG after exercise, and measured insulin stimulated glucose uptake after treadmill running in skeletal muscle from HSL KO mice and wildtype control...

  17. Metabolic Diseases of Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here and still get the great care and treatment I received in Michigan.” MDA Is Here to Help You T he Muscular Dystrophy Association offers a vast array of services to help you and your family deal with metabolic diseases of muscle. The staff at your local MDA office is ...

  18. Nur77 coordinately regulates expression of genes linked to glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lily C; Zhang, Zidong; Pei, Liming; Saito, Tsugumichi; Tontonoz, Peter; Pilch, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Innervation is important for normal metabolism in skeletal muscle, including insulin-sensitive glucose uptake. However, the transcription factors that transduce signals from the neuromuscular junction to the nucleus and affect changes in metabolic gene expression are not well defined. We demonstrate here that the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 is a regulator of gene expression linked to glucose utilization in muscle. In vivo, Nur77 is preferentially expressed in glycolytic compared with oxidative muscle and is responsive to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Denervation of rat muscle compromises expression of Nur77 in parallel with that of numerous genes linked to glucose metabolism, including glucose transporter 4 and genes involved in glycolysis, glycogenolysis, and the glycerophosphate shuttle. Ectopic expression of Nur77, either in rat muscle or in C2C12 muscle cells, induces expression of a highly overlapping set of genes, including glucose transporter 4, muscle phosphofructokinase, and glycogen phosphorylase. Furthermore, selective knockdown of Nur77 in rat muscle by small hairpin RNA or genetic deletion of Nur77 in mice reduces the expression of a battery of genes involved in skeletal muscle glucose utilization in vivo. Finally, we show that Nur77 binds the promoter regions of multiple genes involved in glucose metabolism in muscle. These results identify Nur77 as a potential mediator of neuromuscular signaling in the control of metabolic gene expression.

  19. Energetic aspects of skeletal muscle contraction: implications of fiber types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rall, J A

    1985-01-01

    In this chapter fundamental energetic properties of skeletal muscles as elucidated from isolated muscle preparations are described. Implications of these intrinsic properties for the energetic characterization of different fiber types and for the understanding of locomotion have been considered. Emphasis was placed on the myriad of physical and chemical techniques that can be employed to understand muscle energetics and on the interrelationship of results from different techniques. The anaerobic initial processes which liberate energy during contraction and relaxation are discussed in detail. The high-energy phosphate (approximately P) utilized during contraction and relaxation can be distributed between actomyosin ATPase or cross-bridge cycling (70%) and the Ca2+ ATPase of the sacroplasmic reticulum (30%). Muscle shortening increases the rate of approximately P hydrolysis, and stretching a muscle during contraction suppresses the rate of approximately P hydrolysis. The economy of an isometric contraction is defined as the ratio of isometric mechanical response to energetic cost and is shown to be a fundamental intrinsic parameter describing muscle energetics. Economy of contraction varies across the animal kingdom by over three orders of magnitude and is different in different mammalian fiber types. In mammalian skeletal muscles differences in economy of contraction can be attributed mainly to differences in the specific actomyosin and Ca2+ ATPase of muscles. Furthermore, there is an inverse relationship between economy of contraction and maximum velocity of muscle shortening (Vmax) and maximum power output. This is a fundamental relationship. Muscles cannot be economical at developing and maintaining force and also exhibit rapid shortening. Interestingly, there appears to be a subtle system of unknown nature that modulates the Vmax and economy of contraction. Efficiency of a work-producing contraction is defined and contrasted to the economy of contraction

  20. Role of metabolic stress for enhancing muscle adaptations: Practical applications

    OpenAIRE

    de Freitas, Marcelo Conrado; Gerosa-Neto, Jose; Zanchi, Nelo Eidy; Lira, Fabio Santos; Rossi, Fabr?cio Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic stress is a physiological process that occurs during exercise in response to low energy that leads to metabolite accumulation [lactate, phosphate inorganic (Pi) and ions of hydrogen (H+)] in muscle cells. Traditional exercise protocol (i.e., Resistance training) has an important impact on the increase of metabolite accumulation, which influences hormonal release, hypoxia, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and cell swelling. Changes in acute exercise routines, such as intensit...

  1. Changes in skeletal muscle gene expression following clenbuterol administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McIntyre Lauren M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists (BA induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy, yet specific mechanisms that lead to this effect are not well understood. The objective of this research was to identify novel genes and physiological pathways that potentially facilitate BA induced skeletal muscle growth. The Affymetrix platform was utilized to identify gene expression changes in mouse skeletal muscle 24 hours and 10 days after administration of the BA clenbuterol. Results Administration of clenbuterol stimulated anabolic activity, as indicated by decreased blood urea nitrogen (BUN; P P Conclusion Global evaluation of gene expression after administration of clenbuterol identified changes in gene expression and overrepresented functional categories of genes that may regulate BA-induced muscle hypertrophy. Changes in mRNA abundance of multiple genes associated with myogenic differentiation may indicate an important effect of BA on proliferation, differentiation, and/or recruitment of satellite cells into muscle fibers to promote muscle hypertrophy. Increased mRNA abundance of genes involved in the initiation of translation suggests that increased levels of protein synthesis often associated with BA administration may result from a general up-regulation of translational initiators. Additionally, numerous other genes and physiological pathways were identified that will be important targets for further investigations of the hypertrophic effect of BA on skeletal muscle.

  2. OXIDATIVE STRESS IN MUSCLE GROWTH AND ADAPTATION TO PHYSICAL EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor Yurkevych

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In a few last decades oxidative stress detected in a variety of physiological processes where reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS play a central role. They are directly involved in oxidation of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. In certain concentrations they are necessary for cell division, proliferation and apoptosis. Contractile muscle tissue at aerobic conditions form high ROS flow that may modulate a variety of cell functions, for example proliferation. However, slight increase in ROS level provide hormetic effect which may participate in adaptation to heavy weight training resulted in hypertrophy and proliferation of skeletal muscle fibers. This review will discuss ROS types, sites of generation, strategies to increase force production and achieve skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

  3. Human brain activity associated with painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Lynn; Ono, Mayu; Koyama, Tetsuo; Oshiro, Yoshitetsu; Sumitani, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi; Shibata, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to elucidate the central processing of painful mechanical stimulation to muscle and bone by measuring blood oxygen level-dependent signal changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Methods Twelve healthy volunteers were enrolled. Mechanical pressure on muscle and bone were applied at the right lower leg by an algometer. Intensities were adjusted to cause weak and strong pain sensation at either target site in preliminary testing. Brain ac...

  4. Origin of photosynthetic oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerster, Richard; Dupuy, Jacques; Guerin de Montgareuil, Pierre

    From the comparison of isotopic exchange kinetics between C 18 O 2 and the water of algae suspensions or aerial leaves subjected to alternating darkness and light, it becomes possible to calculate the isotopic abundance of the CO 2 involved in the photochemical process; this value has been compared to those of the intracellular water and of the evolved O 2 . Kinetics of the appearance of 18 O in the oxygen produced by algae suspended in enriched water are also presented [fr

  5. Endurance training increases the efficiency of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Koziel, Agnieszka; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Celichowski, Jan; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-10-01

    Endurance training enhances mitochondrial oxidative capacity, but its effect on mitochondria functioning is poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of an 8-week endurance training on the bioenergetic functioning of rat skeletal muscle mitochondria under different assay temperatures (25, 35, and 42 °C) was investigated. The study was performed on 24 adult 4-month-old male Wistar rats, which were randomly assigned to either a treadmill training group (n = 12) or a sedentary control group (n = 12). In skeletal muscles, endurance training stimulated mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity. In isolated mitochondria, endurance training increased the phosphorylation rate and elevated levels of coenzyme Q. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial uncoupling, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed after training, which could explain the increased reactive oxygen species production (in nonphosphorylating mitochondria) and enhanced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency. At all studied temperatures, endurance training significantly augmented H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in nonphosphorylating mitochondria and decreased H2O2 production (and coenzyme Q reduction level) in phosphorylating mitochondria. Endurance training magnified the hyperthermia-induced increase in oxidative capacity and attenuated the hyperthermia-induced decline in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species formation of nonphosphorylating mitochondria via proton leak enhancement. Thus, endurance training induces both quantitative and qualitative changes in muscle mitochondria that are important for cell signaling as well as for maintaining muscle energy homeostasis, especially at high temperatures.

  6. Pentose utilization in yeasts: Physiology and biochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeppson, H.

    1996-04-01

    The fermentive performance of bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi was investigated in a pentose (xylose)-rich lignocellulosic hydrolyzate. The filamentous fungus Fusarium oxysporum and the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis were found to be very sensitive to the inhibiting hydrolyzate. Recombinant xylose-utilizing Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed very poor ethanol formation from xylose; xylitol being the major product formed. The highest ethanol yields were obtained with recombinant Escherichia coli KO11, however, for maximal ethanol yield detoxification of the hydrolyzate was required. The influence of oxygen on the regulation of carbohydrate metabolism in the xylose-fermenting yeast P. stipitis CBS 6054 was investigated. A low and well-controlled level of oxygenation has been found to be required for efficient ethanol formation from xylose by the xylose-fermenting yeasts. The requirement of oxygen is frequently ascribed to the apparent redox imbalance which develops under anaerobic conditions due to the difference in co-factor utilization of the two first enzymes in the xylose metabolism, further reflected in xylitol excretion. However, a low and well controlled level of oxygenation for maximal ethanol production from glucose was also demonstrated, suggesting that the oxygen requirement is not only due to the dual co-factor utilization, but also serves other purposes. Cyanide-insensitive and salicyl hydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration (CIR) was found in P. stipitis. CIR is suggested to act as a redox sink preventing xylitol formation in P. stipitis under oxygen-limited xylose fermentations. Xylitol metabolism by P. stipitis CBS 6054 was strictly respiratory and ethanol was not formed under any conditions. The absence of ethanol formation was not due to a lack of fermentative enzymes, since the addition of glucose to xylitol-pregrown cells resulted in ethanol formation. 277 refs, 5 figs, 7 tabs

  7. Increased oxidative metabolism and myoglobin expression in zebrafish muscle during chronic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Jaspers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish may be extremely hypoxia resistant. We investigated how muscle fibre size and oxidative capacity in zebrafish (Danio rerio adapt during severe chronic hypoxia. Zebrafish were kept for either 3 or 6 weeks under chronic constant hypoxia (CCH (10% air/90%N2 saturated water. We analyzed cross-sectional area (CSA, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, capillarization, myonuclear density, myoglobin (Mb concentration and Mb mRNA expression of high and low oxidative muscle fibres. After 3 weeks of CCH, CSA, SDH activity, Mb concentration, capillary and myonuclear density of both muscle fibre types were similar as under normoxia. In contrast, staining intensity for Mb mRNA of hypoxic high oxidative muscle fibres was 94% higher than that of normoxic controls (P<0.001. Between 3 and 6 weeks of CCH, CSA of high and low oxidative muscle fibres increased by 25 and 30%, respectively. This was similar to normoxic controls. Capillary and myonuclear density were not changed by CCH. However, in high oxidative muscle fibres of fish maintained under CCH, SDH activity, Mb concentration as well as Mb mRNA content were higher by 86%, 138% and 90%, respectively, than in muscle fibres of fish kept under normoxia (P<0.001. In low oxidative muscle fibres, SDH activity, Mb and Mb mRNA content were not significantly changed. Under normoxia, the calculated interstitial oxygen tension required to prevent anoxic cores in muscle fibres (PO2crit of high oxidative muscle fibres was between 1.0 and 1.7 mmHg. These values were similar at 3 and 6 weeks CCH. We conclude that high oxidative skeletal muscle fibres of zebrafish continue to grow and increase oxidative capacity during CCH. Oxygen supply to mitochondria in these fibres may be facilitated by an increased Mb concentration, which is regulated by an increase in Mb mRNA content per myonucleus.

  8. Oxygen injection facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Masamoto; Hirose, Yuki

    1998-01-01

    A compressor introduces air as a starting material and sends it to a dust removing device, a dehumidifying device and an adsorption/separation system disposed downstream. The facility of the present invention is disposed in the vicinity of an injection point and installed in a turbine building of a BWR type reactor having a pipeline of a feedwater system to be injected. The adsorbing/separation system comprises an adsorbing vessel and an automatic valve, and the adsorbing vessel is filled with an adsorbent for selectively adsorbing nitrogen. Zeolite is used as the adsorbent. Nitrogen in the air passing through the adsorbing vessel is adsorbed and removed under a pressurized condition, and a highly concentrated oxygen gas is formed. The direction of the steam of the adsorbed nitrogen is changed by an opening/closing switching operation of an automatic valve and released to the atmosphere (the pressure is released). Generated oxygen gas is stored under pressure in a tank, and injected to the pipeline of the feedwater system by an oxygen injection conduit by way of a flow rate control valve. In the adsorbing vessel, steps of adsorption, separation and storage under pressure are repeated successively. (I.N.)

  9. ITM oxygen for gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, P.A.; Foster, E.P. [Air Products and Chemicals Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Gunardson, H.H. [Air Products Canada Ltd., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    This paper described a newly developed air separation technology called Ionic Transport Membrane (ITM), which reduces the overall cost of the gasification process. The technology is well suited for advanced energy conversion processes such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) that require oxygen and use heavy carbonaceous feedstocks such as residual oils, bitumens, coke and coal. It is also well suited for traditional industrial applications for oxygen and distributed power. Air Products Canada Limited developed the ceramic membrane air separation technology that can reduce the cost of pure oxygen by more than 30 per cent. The separation technology achieves a capital cost reduction of 30 per cent and an energy reduction of 35 per cent over conventional cryogenic air separation. ITM is an electrochemical process that integrates well with the gasification process and an IGCC option for producing electricity from the waste heat generated from gasification. This paper described the integration of ITM technology with both the gasification and IGCC processes and showed the attractive economics of ITM. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs.

  10. Copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization-oxygenation of thiocarbonyl compounds using molecular oxygen: an efficient method for the preparation of oxygen isotopically labeled carbonyl compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Fumitoshi; Suenami, Aiko; Yoshida, Atsunori; Murai, Toshiaki

    2007-06-21

    A novel copper-catalyzed oxidative desulfurization reaction of thiocarbonyl compounds, using molecular oxygen as an oxidant and leading to formation of carbonyl compounds, has been developed, and the utility of the process is demonstrated by its application to the preparation of a carbonyl-18O labeled sialic acid derivative.

  11. Shoulder muscle fatigue during repetitive tasks as measured by electromyography and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sue A; Allread, W Gary; Le, Peter; Rose, Joseph; Marras, William S

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify shoulder muscle fatigue during repetitive exertions similar to motions found in automobile assembly tasks. Shoulder musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are a common and costly problem in automotive manufacturing. Ten subjects participated in the study. There were three independent variables: shoulder angle, frequency, and force. There were two types of dependent measures: percentage change in near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measures and change in electromyography (EMG) median frequency. The anterior deltoid and trapezius muscles were measured for both NIRS and EMG. Also, EMG was collected on the middle deltoid and biceps muscles. The results showed that oxygenated hemoglobin decreased significantly due to the main effects (shoulder angle, frequency, and force). The percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin had a significant interaction attributable to force and repetition for the anterior deltoid muscle, indicating that as repetition increased, the magnitude of the differences between the forces increased. The interaction of repetition and shoulder angle was also significant for the percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin. The median frequency decreased significantly for the main effects; however, no interactions were statistically significant. There was significant shoulder muscle fatigue as a function of shoulder angle, task frequency, and force level. Furthermore, percentage change in oxygenated hemoglobin had two statistically significant interactions, enhancing our understanding of these risk factors. Ergonomists should examine interactions of force and repetition as well as shoulder angle and repetition when evaluating the risk of shoulder MSDs.

  12. The effect of material characteristics of shoe soles on muscle activation and energy aspects during running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, B M; Stefanyshyn, D; Cole, G; Stergiou, P; Miller, J

    2003-04-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to determine group and individual differences in oxygen consumption during heel-toe running and (b) to quantify the differences in EMG activity for selected muscle groups of the lower extremities when running in shoes with different mechanical heel characteristics. Twenty male runners performed heel-toe running using two shoe conditions, one with a mainly elastic and a visco-elastic heel. Oxygen consumption was quantified during steady state runs of 6 min duration, running slightly above the aerobic threshold providing four pairs of oxygen consumption results for comparison. Muscle activity was quantified using bipolar surface EMG measurements from the tibialis anterior, medial gastrocnemius, vastus medialis and the hamstrings muscle groups. EMG data were sampled for 5 s every minute for the 6 min providing 30 trials. EMG data were compared for the different conditions using an ANOVA (alpha=0.05). The findings of this study showed that changes in the heel material characteristics of running shoes were associated with (a) subject specific changes in oxygen consumption and (b) subject and muscle specific changes in the intensities of muscle activation before heel strike in the lower extremities. It is suggested that further study of these phenomena will help understand many aspects of human locomotion, including work, performance, fatigue and possible injuries.

  13. Direct tissue oxygen monitoring by in vivo photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2014-03-01

    Tissue oxygen plays a critical role in maintaining tissue viability and in various diseases, including response to therapy. Images of oxygen distribution provide the history of tissue hypoxia and evidence of oxygen availability in the circulatory system. Currently available methods of direct measuring or imaging tissue oxygen all have significant limitations. Previously, we have reported a non-invasive in vivo imaging modality based on photoacoustic lifetime. The technique maps the excited triplet state of oxygen-sensitive dye, thus reflects the spatial and temporal distribution of tissue oxygen. We have applied PALI on tumor hypoxia in small animals, and the hypoxic region imaged by PALI is consistent with the site of the tumor imaged by ultrasound. Here, we present two studies of applying PALI to monitor changes of tissue oxygen by modulations. The first study involves an acute ischemia model using a thin thread tied around the hind limb of a normal mouse to reduce the blood flow. PALI images were acquired before, during, and after the restriction. The drop of muscle pO2 and recovery from hypoxia due to reperfusion were observed by PALI tracking the same region. The second study modulates tissue oxygen by controlling the percentage of oxygen the mouse inhales. We demonstrate that PALI is able to reflect the change of oxygen level with respect to both hyperbaric and hypobaric conditions. We expect this technique to be very attractive for a range of clinical applications in which tissue oxygen mapping would improve therapy decision making and treatment planning.

  14. Stellar Oxygen Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeremy

    1994-04-01

    This dissertation addresses several issues concerning stellar oxygen abundances. The 7774 {\\AA} O I triplet equivalent widths of Abia & Rebolo [1989, AJ, 347, 186] for metal-poor dwarfs are found to be systematically too high. I also argue that current effective temperatures used in halo star abundance studies may be ~150 K too low. New color-Teff relations are derived for metal-poor stars. Using the revised Teff values and improved equivalent widths for the 7774A O I triplet, the mean [O/Fe] ratio for a handful of halo stars is found to be +0.52 with no dependence on Teff or [Fe/H]. Possible cosmological implications of the hotter Teff scale are discussed along with additional evidence supporting the need for a higher temperature scale for metal-poor stars. Our Teff scale leads to a Spite Li plateau value of N(Li)=2.28 +/- 0.09. A conservative minimal primordial value of N(Li)=2.35 is inferred. If errors in the observations and models are considered, consistency with standard models of Big Bang nucleosynthesis is still achieved with this larger Li abundance. The revised Teff scale raises the observed B/Be ratio of HD 140283 from 10 to 12, making its value more comfortably consistent with the production of the observed B and Be by ordinary spallation. Our Teff values are found to be in good agreement with values predicted from both the Victoria and Yale isochrone color-Teff relations. Thus, it appears likely that no changes in globular cluster ages would result. Next, we examine the location of the break in the [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] plane in a quantitative fashion. Analysis of a relatively homogeneous data set does not favor any unique break point in the range -1.7 /= -3), in agreement with the new results for halo dwarfs. We find that the gap in the observed [O/H] distribution, noted by Wheeler et al. [1989, ARAA, 27, 279], persists despite the addition of more O data and may betray the occurrence of a hiatus in star formation between the end of halo formation and

  15. Oxygen diffusion in zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, E. B.; Cherniak, D. J.

    1997-05-01

    Oxygen diffusion in natural, non-metamict zircon was characterized under both dry and water-present conditions at temperatures ranging from 765°C to 1500°C. Dry experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure by encapsulating polished zircon samples with a fine powder of 18O-enriched quartz and annealing the sealed capsules in air. Hydrothermal runs were conducted in cold-seal pressure vessels (7-70 MPa) or a piston cylinder apparatus (400-1000 MPa) on zircon samples encapsulated with both 18O-enriched quartz and 18O water. Diffusive-uptake profiles of 18O were measured in all samples with a particle accelerator, using the 18O(p, α) 15N reaction. For dry experimental conditions at 1100-1500°C, the resulting oxygen diffusivities (24 in all) are well described by: D dry (m 2/s) = 1.33 × 10 -4exp(-53920/T) There is no suggestion of diffusive anisotropy. Under wet conditions at 925°C, oxygen diffusion shows little or no dependence upon P H 2O in the range 7-1000 MPa, and is insensitive to total pressure as well. The results of 27 wet experiments at 767-1160°C and 7-1000 MPa can be described a single Arrhenius relationship: D wet (m 2/s) = 5.5 × 10 -12exp(-25280/T) The insensitivity of oxygen diffusion to P H 2O means that applications to geologic problems can be pursued knowing only whether the system of interest was 'wet' (i.e., P H 2O > 7MPa ) or 'dry'. Under dry conditions (presumably rare in the crust), zircons are extremely retentive of their oxygen isotopic signatures, to the extent that δ 18O would be perturbed at the center of a 200 μm zircon only during an extraordinarily hot and protracted event (e.g., 65 Ma at 900°C). Under wet conditions, δ 18O may or may not be retained in the central regions of individual crystals, cores or overgrowth rims, depending upon the specific thermal history of the system.

  16. Decrease in pulmonary function and oxygenation after lung resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Cristina Brocki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory deficits are common following curative intent lung cancer surgery and may reduce the patient's ability to be physically active. We evaluated the influence of surgery on pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and physical performance after lung resection. Pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory/expiratory pressure and 6-min walk test (6MWT were assessed pre-operatively, 2 weeks post-operatively and 6 months post-operatively in 80 patients (age 68±9 years. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was performed in 58% of cases. Two weeks post-operatively, we found a significant decline in pulmonary function (forced vital capacity −0.6±0.6 L and forced expiratory volume in 1 s −0.43±0.4 L; both p<0.0001, 6MWT (−37.6±74.8 m; p<0.0001 and oxygenation (−2.9±4.7 units; p<0.001, while maximal inspiratory and maximal expiratory pressure were unaffected. At 6 months post-operatively, pulmonary function and oxygenation remained significantly decreased (p<0.001, whereas 6MWT was recovered. We conclude that lung resection has a significant short- and long-term impact on pulmonary function and oxygenation, but not on respiratory muscle strength. Future research should focus on mechanisms negatively influencing post-operative pulmonary function other than impaired respiratory muscle strength.

  17. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  18. Theory of oxygen isotope exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Otter, M.W.; Boukamp, Bernard A.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Transients for oxygen molecular mass numbers 32, 34 and 36 are derived which can be used for the interpretation of oxygen isotope exchange data based on measurement of concentrations of 16O2, 16O18O and 18O2 in the gas phase. Key parameters in the theory are the rate at which oxygen molecules are

  19. Comprehensive analysis of tropomyosin isoforms in skeletal muscles by top-down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yutong; Peng, Ying; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wei, Liming; Hacker, Timothy A; Larsson, Lars; Ge, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are heterogeneous in nature and are capable of performing various functions. Tropomyosin (Tpm) is a major component of the thin filament in skeletal muscles and plays an important role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation. Tpm is known to consist of multiple isoforms resulting from different encoding genes and alternative splicing, along with post-translational modifications. However, a systematic characterization of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles is still lacking. Therefore, we employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to identify and characterize Tpm isoforms present in different skeletal muscles from multiple species, including swine, rat, and human. Our study revealed that Tpm1.1 and Tpm2.2 are the two major Tpm isoforms in swine and rat skeletal muscles, whereas Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2, and Tpm3.12 are present in human skeletal muscles. Tandem MS was utilized to identify the sequences of the major Tpm isoforms. Furthermore, quantitative analysis revealed muscle-type specific differences in the abundance of un-modified and modified Tpm isoforms in rat and human skeletal muscles. This study represents the first systematic investigation of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles, which not only demonstrates the capabilities of top-down MS for the comprehensive characterization of skeletal myofilament proteins but also provides the basis for further studies on these Tpm isoforms in muscle-related diseases.