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Sample records for muscle mtorc1 signaling

  1. Differential response of skeletal muscles to mTORC1 signaling during atrophy and hypertrophy

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    2013-01-01

    suppressed phosphorylation of PKB/Akt via feedback inhibition by mTORC1 and subsequent increased expression of the E3 ubiquitin ligases MuRF1 and atrogin-1/MAFbx. In contrast, expression of both E3 ligases was not increased in soleus muscle suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms in this muscle. Conclusions Our study shows that the mTORC1- and the PKB/Akt-FoxO pathways are tightly interconnected and differentially regulated depending on the muscle type. These results indicate that long-term activation of the mTORC1 signaling axis is not a therapeutic option to promote muscle growth because of its strong feedback induction of the E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in protein degradation. PMID:23497627

  2. Key Markers of mTORC1-Dependent and mTORC1-Independent Signaling Pathways Regulating Protein Synthesis in Rat Soleus Muscle During Early Stages of Hindlimb Unloading.

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    Mirzoev, Timur; Tyganov, Sergey; Vilchinskaya, Natalia; Lomonosova, Yulia; Shenkman, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the amount of rRNA and phosphorylation status of the key markers of mTORC1-dependent (70s6k, 4E-BP1) and mTORC1-independent (GSK-3β, AMPK) signaling pathways controlling protein synthesis in rat soleus during early stages of mechanical unloading (hindlimb suspension (HS) for 1-, 3- and 7 days). The content of the key signaling molecules of various anabolic signaling pathways was determined by Western-blotting. The amount of 28S rRNA was evaluated by RT-PCR. The rate of protein synthesis was assessed using in-vivo SUnSET technique. HS for 3 and 7 days induced a significant (pprotein synthesis in soleus muscle in comparison with control. HS within 24 hours resulted in a significant (pprotein synthesis in rat soleus during early stages of simulated microgravity is associated with impaired ribosome biogenesis as well as reduced activity of mTORC1-independent signaling pathways. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Prolonged calorie restriction downregulates skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling independent of dietary protein intake and associated microRNA expression

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    Lee M Margolis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Short-term (5-10 days calorie restriction (CR downregulates muscle protein synthesis, with consumption of a high protein-based diet attenuating this decline. Benefit of increase protein intake is believed to be due to maintenance of amino acid-mediated anabolic signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, however, there is limited evidence to support this contention. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of prolonged CR and high protein diets on skeletal muscle mTORC1 signaling and expression of associated microRNA (miR. 12-wk old male Sprague Dawley rats consumed ad libitum (AL or calorie restricted (CR; 40% adequate (10%, AIN-93M or high (32% protein milk-based diets for 16 weeks. Body composition was determined using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and muscle protein content was calculated from muscle homogenate protein concentrations expressed relative to fat-free mass to estimate protein content. Western blot and RT-qPCR were used to determine mTORC1 signaling and mRNA and miR expression in fasted mixed gastrocnemius. Independent of dietary protein intake, muscle protein content was 38% lower (P < 0.05 in CR compared to AL. Phosphorylation and total Akt, mTOR, rpS6 and p70S6K were lower (P < 0.05 in CR versus AL, and total rpS6 was associated with muscle protein content (r = 0.64, r2 = 0.36. Skeletal muscle miR expression was not altered by either energy or protein intake. This study provides evidence that chronic CR attenuates muscle protein content by downregulating mTORC1 signaling. This response is independent of skeletal muscle miR and dietary protein.

  4. Severe energy deficit at high altitude inhibits skeletal muscle mTORC1-mediated anabolic signaling without increased ubiquitin proteasome activity.

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    Margolis, Lee M; Carbone, John W; Berryman, Claire E; Carrigan, Christopher T; Murphy, Nancy E; Ferrando, Arny A; Young, Andrew J; Pasiakos, Stefan M

    2018-06-07

    Muscle loss at high altitude (HA) is attributable to energy deficit and a potential dysregulation of anabolic signaling. Exercise and protein ingestion can attenuate the effects of energy deficit on muscle at sea level (SL). Whether these effects are observed when energy deficit occurs at HA is unknown. To address this, muscle obtained from lowlanders ( n = 8 males) at SL, acute HA (3 h, 4300 m), and chronic HA (21 d, -1766 kcal/d energy balance) before [baseline (Base)] and after 80 min of aerobic exercise followed by a 2-mile time trial [postexercise (Post)] and 3 h into recovery (Rec) after ingesting whey protein (25 g) were analyzed using standard molecular techniques. At SL, Post, and REC, p-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) Ser2448 , p-p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K) Ser424/421 , and p-ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) Ser235/236 were similar and higher ( P anabolic resistance that is exacerbated by energy deficit during acclimatization, with no change in proteolysis.-Margolis, L. M., Carbone, J. W., Berryman, C. E., Carrigan, C. T., Murphy, N. E., Ferrando, A. A., Young, A. J., Pasiakos, S. M. Severe energy deficit at high altitude inhibits skeletal muscle mTORC1-mediated anabolic signaling without increased ubiquitin proteasome activity.

  5. Moderate Autophagy Inhibits Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Senescence to Stabilize Progressed Atherosclerotic Plaque via the mTORC1/ULK1/ATG13 Signal Pathway

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    Zhenli Luo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of autophagy induced by rapamycin in the development of atherosclerosis plaque we established murine atherosclerosis model which was induced in ApoE−/− mice by high fat and cholesterol diet (HFD for 16 weeks. Rapamycin and 3-Methyladenine (MA were used as autophagy inducer and inhibitor respectively. The plaque areas in aortic artery were detected with HE and Oil Red O staining. Immunohistochemical staining were applied to investigate content of plaque respectively. In contrast to control and 3-MA groups, rapamycin could inhibit atherosclerosis progression. Rapamycin was able to increase collagen content and a-SMA distribution relatively, as well as decrease necrotic core area. Then we used MOVAS and culture with ox-LDL for 72 h to induce smooth muscle-derived foam cell model in vitro. Rapamycin and 3-MA were cultured together respectively. Flow cytometry assay and SA-β-Gal staining experiments were performed to detect survival and senescence of VSMCs. Western blot analysis were utilized to analyze the levels of protein expression. We found that rapamycin could promote ox-LDL-induced VSMCs autophagy survival and alleviate cellular senescence, in comparison to control and 3-MA groups. Western blot analysis showed that rapamycin could upregulate ULK1, ATG13 and downregulate mTORC1 and p53 protein expression.

  6. Dietary intervention in acne: Attenuation of increased mTORC1 signaling promoted by Western diet.

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    Melnik, Bodo

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the endocrine signaling of Western diet, a fundamental environmental factor involved in the pathogenesis of epidemic acne. Western nutrition is characterized by high calorie uptake, high glycemic load, high fat and meat intake, as well as increased consumption of insulin- and IGF-1-level elevating dairy proteins. Metabolic signals of Western diet are sensed by the nutrient-sensitive kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which integrates signals of cellular energy, growth factors (insulin, IGF-1) and protein-derived signals, predominantly leucine, provided in high amounts by milk proteins and meat. mTORC1 activates SREBP, the master transcription factor of lipogenesis. Leucine stimulates mTORC1-SREBP signaling and leucine is directly converted by sebocytes into fatty acids and sterols for sebaceous lipid synthesis. Over-activated mTORC1 increases androgen hormone secretion and most likely amplifies androgen-driven mTORC1 signaling of sebaceous follicles. Testosterone directly activates mTORC1. Future research should investigate the effects of isotretinoin on sebocyte mTORC1 activity. It is conceivable that isotretinoin may downregulate mTORC1 in sebocytes by upregulation of nuclear levels of FoxO1. The role of Western diet in acne can only be fully appreciated when all stimulatory inputs for maximal mTORC1 activation, i.e., glucose, insulin, IGF-1 and leucine, are adequately considered. Epidemic acne has to be recognized as an mTORC1-driven disease of civilization like obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. These new insights into Western diet-mediated mTORC1-hyperactivity provide a rational basis for dietary intervention in acne by attenuating mTORC1 signaling by reducing (1) total energy intake, (2) hyperglycemic carbohydrates, (3) insulinotropic dairy proteins and (4) leucine-rich meat and dairy proteins. The necessary dietary changes are opposed to the evolution of

  7. Intrahippocampal Glutamine Administration Inhibits mTORC1 Signaling and Impairs Long-Term Memory

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    Rozas, Natalia S.; Redell, John B.; Pita-Almenar, Juan D.; McKenna, James, III.; Moore, Anthony N.; Gambello, Michael J.; Dash, Pramod K.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1), a key regulator of protein synthesis and cellular growth, is also required for long-term memory formation. Stimulation of mTORC1 signaling is known to be dependent on the availability of energy and growth factors, as well as the presence of amino acids. In vitro studies using serum- and amino…

  8. Screen for chemical modulators of autophagy reveals novel therapeutic inhibitors of mTORC1 signaling.

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    Aruna D Balgi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a protein kinase that relays nutrient availability signals to control numerous cellular functions including autophagy, a process of cellular self-eating activated by nutrient depletion. Addressing the therapeutic potential of modulating mTORC1 signaling and autophagy in human disease requires active chemicals with pharmacologically desirable properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using an automated cell-based assay, we screened a collection of >3,500 chemicals and identified three approved drugs (perhexiline, niclosamide, amiodarone and one pharmacological reagent (rottlerin capable of rapidly increasing autophagosome content. Biochemical assays showed that the four compounds stimulate autophagy and inhibit mTORC1 signaling in cells maintained in nutrient-rich conditions. The compounds did not inhibit mTORC2, which also contains mTOR as a catalytic subunit, suggesting that they do not inhibit mTOR catalytic activity but rather inhibit signaling to mTORC1. mTORC1 inhibition and autophagosome accumulation induced by perhexiline, niclosamide or rottlerin were rapidly reversed upon drug withdrawal whereas amiodarone inhibited mTORC1 essentially irreversibly. TSC2, a negative regulator of mTORC1, was required for inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by rottlerin but not for mTORC1 inhibition by perhexiline, niclosamide and amiodarone. Transient exposure of immortalized mouse embryo fibroblasts to these drugs was not toxic in nutrient-rich conditions but led to rapid cell death by apoptosis in starvation conditions, by a mechanism determined in large part by the tuberous sclerosis complex protein TSC2, an upstream regulator of mTORC1. By contrast, transient exposure to the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin caused essentially irreversible mTORC1 inhibition, sustained inhibition of cell growth and no selective cell killing in starvation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The observation that drugs already

  9. Key mediators of intracellular amino acids signaling to mTORC1 activation.

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    Duan, Yehui; Li, Fengna; Tan, Kunrong; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Yinghui; Liu, Yingying; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tang, Yulong; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2015-05-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is activated by amino acids to promote cell growth via protein synthesis. Specifically, Ras-related guanosine triphosphatases (Rag GTPases) are activated by amino acids, and then translocate mTORC1 to the surface of late endosomes and lysosomes. Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb) resides on this surface and directly activates mTORC1. Apart from the presence of intracellular amino acids, Rag GTPases and Rheb, other mediators involved in intracellular amino acid signaling to mTORC1 activation include human vacuolar sorting protein-34 (hVps34) and mitogen-activating protein kinase kinase kinase kinase-3 (MAP4K3). Those molecular links between mTORC1 and its mediators form a complicate signaling network that controls cellular growth, proliferation, and metabolism. Moreover, it is speculated that amino acid signaling to mTORC1 may start from the lysosomal lumen. In this review, we discussed the function of these mediators in mTORC1 pathway and how these mediators are regulated by amino acids in details.

  10. Contraction mode itself does not determine the level of mTORC1 activity in rat skeletal muscle.

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    Ato, Satoru; Makanae, Yuhei; Kido, Kohei; Fujita, Satoshi

    2016-10-01

    Resistance training with eccentric contraction has been shown to augment muscle hypertrophy more than other contraction modes do (i.e., concentric and isometric contraction). However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of muscle contraction mode on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling using a standardized force-time integral (load (weight) × contraction time). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: eccentric contraction, concentric contraction, and isometric contraction. The right gastrocnemius muscle was exercised via percutaneous electrical stimulation-induced maximal contraction. In experiment 1, different modes of muscle contraction were exerted using the same number of reps in all groups, while in experiment 2, muscle contractions were exerted using a standardized force-time integral. Muscle samples were obtained immediately and 3 h after exercise. Phosphorylation of molecules associated with mTORC1 activity was assessed using western blot analysis. In experiment 1, the force-time integral was significantly different among contraction modes with a higher force-time integral for eccentric contraction compared to that for other contraction modes (P contraction compared to that for isometric contraction (P contraction than for other modes of contraction (P contraction was higher than isometric contraction (P contraction modes 3 h after exercise. Our results suggest that mTORC1 activity is not determined by differences in muscle contraction mode itself. Instead, mTORC1 activity is determined by differences in the force-time integral during muscle contraction. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  11. Leucine stimulates protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs by enhancing mTORC1 activation.

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    Suryawan, Agus; Jeyapalan, Asumthia S; Orellana, Renan A; Wilson, Fiona A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Davis, Teresa A

    2008-10-01

    Skeletal muscle in the neonate grows at a rapid rate due in part to an enhanced sensitivity to the postprandial rise in amino acids, particularly leucine. To elucidate the molecular mechanism by which leucine stimulates protein synthesis in neonatal muscle, overnight-fasted 7-day-old piglets were treated with rapamycin [an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex (mTORC)1] for 1 h and then infused with leucine for 1 h. Fractional rates of protein synthesis and activation of signaling components that lead to mRNA translation were determined in skeletal muscle. Rapamycin completely blocked leucine-induced muscle protein synthesis. Rapamycin markedly reduced raptor-mTOR association, an indicator of mTORC1 activation. Rapamycin blocked the leucine-induced phosphorylation of mTOR, S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) and formation of the eIF4E.eIF4G complex and increased eIF4E.4E-BP1 complex abundance. Rapamycin had no effect on the association of mTOR with rictor, a crucial component for mTORC2 activation, or G protein beta-subunit-like protein (GbetaL), a component of mTORC1 and mTORC2. Neither leucine nor rapamycin affected the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), PKB, or tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)2, signaling components that reside upstream of mTOR. Eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF)2 phosphorylation was not affected by leucine or rapamycin, although current dogma indicates that eEF2 phosphorylation is mTOR dependent. Together, these in vivo data suggest that leucine stimulates muscle protein synthesis in neonates by enhancing mTORC1 activation and its downstream effectors.

  12. mTORC1 is a critical mediator of oncogenic Semaphorin3A signaling

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    Yamada, Daisuke; Kawahara, Kohichi; Maeda, Takehiko, E-mail: maeda@nupals.ac.jp

    2016-08-05

    Aberration of signaling pathways by genetic mutations or alterations in the surrounding tissue environments can result in tumor development or metastasis. However, signaling molecules responsible for these processes have not been completely elucidated. Here, we used mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLC) to explore the mechanism by which the oncogenic activity of Semaphorin3A (Sema3A) signaling is regulated. Sema3A knockdown by shRNA did not affect apoptosis, but decreased cell proliferation in LLCs; both the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) level and glycolytic activity were also decreased. In addition, Sema3A knockdown sensitized cells to inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation by oligomycin, but conferred resistance to decreased cell viability induced by glucose starvation. Furthermore, recombinant SEMA3A rescued the attenuation of cell proliferation and glycolytic activity in LLCs after Sema3A knockdown, whereas mTORC1 inhibition by rapamycin completely counteracted this effect. These results demonstrate that Sema3A signaling exerts its oncogenic effect by promoting an mTORC1-mediated metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. -- Highlights: •Sema3A knockdown decreased proliferation of Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LLCs). •Sema3A knockdown decreased mTORC1 levels and glycolytic activity in LLCs. •Sema3A knockdown sensitized cells to inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. •Sema3A promotes shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis via mTORC1.

  13. E2F1 regulates cellular growth by mTORC1 signaling.

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    Sebastian Real

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During cell proliferation, growth must occur to maintain homeostatic cell size. Here we show that E2F1 is capable of inducing growth by regulating mTORC1 activity. The activation of cell growth and mTORC1 by E2F1 is dependent on both E2F1's ability to bind DNA and to regulate gene transcription, demonstrating that a gene induction expression program is required in this process. Unlike E2F1, E2F3 is unable to activate mTORC1, suggesting that growth activity could be restricted to individual E2F members. The effect of E2F1 on the activation of mTORC1 does not depend on Akt. Furthermore, over-expression of TSC2 does not interfere with the effect of E2F1, indicating that the E2F1-induced signal pathway can compensate for the inhibitory effect of TSC2 on Rheb. Immunolocalization studies demonstrate that E2F1 induces the translocation of mTORC1 to the late endosome vesicles, in a mechanism dependent of leucine. E2F1 and leucine, or insulin, together affect the activation of S6K stronger than alone suggesting that they are complementary in activating the signal pathway. From these studies, E2F1 emerges as a key protein that integrates cell division and growth, both of which are essential for cell proliferation.

  14. Nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in mouse skeletal muscle is limited by the mTORC1 repressor REDD1.

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    Gordon, Bradley S; Williamson, David L; Lang, Charles H; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R

    2015-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis requires signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Expression of the repressor of mTORC1 signaling, regulated in development and DNA damage 1 (REDD1), is elevated in muscle during various atrophic conditions and diminished under hypertrophic conditions. The question arises as to what extent REDD1 limits the nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis. The objective was to examine the role of REDD1 in limiting the response of muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling to a nutrient stimulus. Wild type REDD1 gene (REDD1(+/+)) and disruption in the REDD1 gene (REDD1(-/-)) mice were feed deprived for 16 h and randomized to remain feed deprived or refed for 15 or 60 min. The tibialis anterior was then removed for analysis of protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling. In feed-deprived mice, protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were significantly lower in REDD1(+/+) than in REDD1(-/-) mice. Thirty minutes after the start of refeeding, protein synthesis in REDD1(+/+) mice was stimulated by 28%, reaching a value similar to that observed in feed-deprived REDD1(-/-) mice, and was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), p70S6K1 (Thr389), and 4E-BP1 (Ser65) by 81%, 167%, and 207%, respectively. In refed REDD1(-/-) mice, phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), p70S6K1 (Thr389), and 4E-BP1 (Ser65) were significantly augmented above the values observed in refed REDD1(+/+) mice by 258%, 405%, and 401%, respectively, although protein synthesis was not coordinately increased. Seventy-five minutes after refeeding, REDD1 expression in REDD1(+/+) mice was reduced (∼15% of feed-deprived REDD1(+/+) values), and protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were not different between refed REDD1(+/+) mice and REDD1(-/-) mice. The results show that REDD1 expression limits protein synthesis in mouse skeletal muscle by inhibiting mTORC1 signaling during periods of feed

  15. Pharmacological inhibition of lysosomes activates the MTORC1 signaling pathway in chondrocytes in an autophagy-independent manner.

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    Newton, Phillip T; Vuppalapati, Karuna K; Bouderlique, Thibault; Chagin, Andrei S

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (serine/threonine kinase) complex 1 (MTORC1) is a protein-signaling complex at the fulcrum of anabolic and catabolic processes, which acts depending on wide-ranging environmental cues. It is generally accepted that lysosomes facilitate MTORC1 activation by generating an internal pool of amino acids. Amino acids activate MTORC1 by stimulating its translocation to the lysosomal membrane where it forms a super-complex involving the lysosomal-membrane-bound vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (v-ATPase) proton pump. This translocation and MTORC1 activation require functional lysosomes. Here we found that, in contrast to this well-accepted concept, in epiphyseal chondrocytes inhibition of lysosomal activity by v-ATPase inhibitors bafilomycin A1 or concanamycin A potently activated MTORC1 signaling. The activity of MTORC1 was visualized by phosphorylated forms of RPS6 (ribosomal protein S6) and EIF4EBP1, 2 well-known downstream targets of MTORC1. Maximal RPS6 phosphorylation was observed at 48-h treatment and reached as high as a 12-fold increase (p lysosomes. Thus, our data show that in epiphyseal chondrocytes lysosomes inhibit MTORC1 in a macroautophagy-independent manner and this inhibition likely depends on v-ATPase activity.

  16. Crosstalk between mTORC1 and cAMP Signaling

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    2016-09-01

    whether bidirectional inhibition of trafficking be- tween the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi would affect Gln-induced activation of mTORC1 (23). We...Shimizu N, Matsumoto K, Itoh M, Ishitani T. 2012. NLK positively regulates Wnt/β-catenin signalling by phosphorylating LEF1 in neural progenitor...L, Pan D, Edgar BA. 2003. Rheb promotes cell growth as a component of the insulin/ TOR signalling network . Nat Cell Biol 5: 566–571. Sengupta S

  17. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer

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    Melnik Bodo C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prostate cancer (PCa is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for the development of PCa. mTORC1 is a master regulator of protein synthesis, lipid synthesis and autophagy pathways that couple nutrient sensing to cell growth and cancer. This review provides evidence that PCa initiation and progression are promoted by cow´s milk, but not human milk, stimulation of mTORC1 signaling. Mammalian milk is presented as an endocrine signaling system, which activates mTORC1, promotes cell growth and proliferation and suppresses autophagy. Naturally, milk-mediated mTORC1 signaling is restricted only to the postnatal growth phase of mammals. However, persistent consumption of cow´s milk proteins in humans provide highly insulinotropic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs provided by milk´s fast hydrolysable whey proteins, which elevate postprandial plasma insulin levels, and increase hepatic IGF-1 plasma concentrations by casein-derived amino acids. BCAAs, insulin and IGF-1 are pivotal activating signals of mTORC1. Increased cow´s milk protein-mediated mTORC1 signaling along with constant exposure to commercial cow´s milk estrogens derived from pregnant cows may explain the observed association between high dairy consumption and increased risk of PCa in Westernized societies. As well-balanced mTORC1-signaling plays an important role in appropriate prostate morphogenesis and differentiation, exaggerated mTORC1-signaling by high cow´s milk consumption predominantly during critical growth phases of prostate development and

  18. The impact of cow's milk-mediated mTORC1-signaling in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is dependent on androgen receptor signaling and aberrations of the PI3K-Akt-mTORC1 pathway mediating excessive and sustained growth signaling. The nutrient-sensitive kinase mTORC1 is upregulated in nearly 100% of advanced human PCas. Oncogenic mTORC1 signaling activates key subsets of mRNAs that cooperate in distinct steps of PCa initiation and progression. Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy protein consumption as a major dietary risk factor for the development of PCa. mTORC1 is a master regulator of protein synthesis, lipid synthesis and autophagy pathways that couple nutrient sensing to cell growth and cancer. This review provides evidence that PCa initiation and progression are promoted by cow´s milk, but not human milk, stimulation of mTORC1 signaling. Mammalian milk is presented as an endocrine signaling system, which activates mTORC1, promotes cell growth and proliferation and suppresses autophagy. Naturally, milk-mediated mTORC1 signaling is restricted only to the postnatal growth phase of mammals. However, persistent consumption of cow´s milk proteins in humans provide highly insulinotropic branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) provided by milk´s fast hydrolysable whey proteins, which elevate postprandial plasma insulin levels, and increase hepatic IGF-1 plasma concentrations by casein-derived amino acids. BCAAs, insulin and IGF-1 are pivotal activating signals of mTORC1. Increased cow´s milk protein-mediated mTORC1 signaling along with constant exposure to commercial cow´s milk estrogens derived from pregnant cows may explain the observed association between high dairy consumption and increased risk of PCa in Westernized societies. As well-balanced mTORC1-signaling plays an important role in appropriate prostate morphogenesis and differentiation, exaggerated mTORC1-signaling by high cow´s milk consumption predominantly during critical growth phases of prostate development and differentiation may exert long

  19. Repletion of branched chain amino acids reverses mTORC1 signaling but not improved metabolism during dietary protein dilution

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    Adriano Maida

    2017-08-01

    Conclusions: Repletion of BCAAs in dietary PD is sufficient to oppose changes in somatic mTORC1 signaling but does not reverse the hepatic ISR nor induce insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes during dietary PD.

  20. Nitazoxanide stimulates autophagy and inhibits mTORC1 signaling and intracellular proliferation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Karen K Y Lam

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world today. M. tuberculosis hijacks the phagosome-lysosome trafficking pathway to escape clearance from infected macrophages. There is increasing evidence that manipulation of autophagy, a regulated catabolic trafficking pathway, can enhance killing of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, pharmacological agents that induce autophagy could be important in combating tuberculosis. We report that the antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide and its active metabolite tizoxanide strongly stimulate autophagy and inhibit signaling by mTORC1, a major negative regulator of autophagy. Analysis of 16 nitazoxanide analogues reveals similar strict structural requirements for activity in autophagosome induction, EGFP-LC3 processing and mTORC1 inhibition. Nitazoxanide can inhibit M. tuberculosis proliferation in vitro. Here we show that it inhibits M. tuberculosis proliferation more potently in infected human THP-1 cells and peripheral monocytes. We identify the human quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 as a nitazoxanide target and propose, based on experiments with cells expressing NQO1 or not, that NQO1 inhibition is partly responsible for mTORC1 inhibition and enhanced autophagy. The dual action of nitazoxanide on both the bacterium and the host cell response to infection may lead to improved tuberculosis treatment.

  1. Nitazoxanide stimulates autophagy and inhibits mTORC1 signaling and intracellular proliferation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Lam, Karen K Y; Zheng, Xingji; Forestieri, Roberto; Balgi, Aruna D; Nodwell, Matt; Vollett, Sarah; Anderson, Hilary J; Andersen, Raymond J; Av-Gay, Yossef; Roberge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world today. M. tuberculosis hijacks the phagosome-lysosome trafficking pathway to escape clearance from infected macrophages. There is increasing evidence that manipulation of autophagy, a regulated catabolic trafficking pathway, can enhance killing of M. tuberculosis. Therefore, pharmacological agents that induce autophagy could be important in combating tuberculosis. We report that the antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide and its active metabolite tizoxanide strongly stimulate autophagy and inhibit signaling by mTORC1, a major negative regulator of autophagy. Analysis of 16 nitazoxanide analogues reveals similar strict structural requirements for activity in autophagosome induction, EGFP-LC3 processing and mTORC1 inhibition. Nitazoxanide can inhibit M. tuberculosis proliferation in vitro. Here we show that it inhibits M. tuberculosis proliferation more potently in infected human THP-1 cells and peripheral monocytes. We identify the human quinone oxidoreductase NQO1 as a nitazoxanide target and propose, based on experiments with cells expressing NQO1 or not, that NQO1 inhibition is partly responsible for mTORC1 inhibition and enhanced autophagy. The dual action of nitazoxanide on both the bacterium and the host cell response to infection may lead to improved tuberculosis treatment.

  2. mTORC1 Is a Major Regulatory Node in the FGF21 Signaling Network in Adipocytes

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    Annabel Y. Minard

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available FGF21 improves the metabolic profile of obese animals through its actions on adipocytes. To elucidate the signaling network responsible for mediating these effects, we quantified dynamic changes in the adipocyte phosphoproteome following acute exposure to FGF21. FGF21 regulated a network of 821 phosphosites on 542 proteins. A major FGF21-regulated signaling node was mTORC1/S6K. In contrast to insulin, FGF21 activated mTORC1 via MAPK rather than through the canonical PI3K/AKT pathway. Activation of mTORC1/S6K by FGF21 was surprising because this is thought to contribute to deleterious metabolic effects such as obesity and insulin resistance. Rather, mTORC1 mediated many of the beneficial actions of FGF21 in vitro, including UCP1 and FGF21 induction, increased adiponectin secretion, and enhanced glucose uptake without any adverse effects on insulin action. This study provides a global view of FGF21 signaling and suggests that mTORC1 may act to facilitate FGF21-mediated health benefits in vivo.

  3. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor and mTORC1 signalling pathways interact to modulate glucose homeostasis in mice

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    Francisco J. Bermudez-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is an intercellular signalling mechanism that is present in the islets of Langerhans and plays a role in the modulation of insulin secretion and expansion of the β-cell mass. The downstream signalling pathways mediating these effects are poorly understood. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signalling is a key intracellular pathway involved in energy homeostasis and is known to importantly affect the physiology of pancreatic islets. We investigated the possible relationship between cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor signalling and the mTORC1 pathway in the endocrine pancreas of mice by using pharmacological analysis as well as mice genetically lacking the CB1 receptor or the downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase p70S6K1. In vitro static secretion experiments on islets, western blotting, and in vivo glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. The CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS at 0.1 µM while increasing phosphorylation of p70S6K1 and ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6 within the islets. Specific pharmacological blockade of mTORC1 by 3 nM rapamycin, as well as genetic deletion of p70S6K1, impaired the CB1-antagonist-mediated decrease in GSIS. In vivo experiments showed that 3 mg/kg body weight rimonabant decreased insulin levels and induced glucose intolerance in lean mice without altering peripheral insulin sensitivity; this effect was prevented by peripheral administration of low doses of rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg body weight, which increased insulin sensitivity. These findings suggest a functional interaction between the ECS and the mTORC1 pathway within the endocrine pancreas and at the whole-organism level, which could have implications for the development of new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic β-cell diseases.

  4. Phosphoproteomic profiling of in vivo signaling in liver by the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1.

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    Gokhan Demirkan

    Full Text Available Our understanding of signal transduction networks in the physiological context of an organism remains limited, partly due to the technical challenge of identifying serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from complex tissue samples. In the present study, we focused on signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1, which is at the center of a nutrient- and growth factor-responsive cell signaling network. Though studied extensively, the mechanisms involved in many mTORC1 biological functions remain poorly understood.We developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify, enrich and identify phosphopeptides from rat liver homogenates. Using the anticancer drug rapamycin, the only known target of which is mTORC1, we characterized signaling in liver from rats in which the complex was maximally activated by refeeding following 48 hr of starvation. Using protein and peptide fractionation methods, TiO(2 affinity purification of phosphopeptides and mass spectrometry, we reproducibly identified and quantified over four thousand phosphopeptides. Along with 5 known rapamycin-sensitive phosphorylation events, we identified 62 new rapamycin-responsive candidate phosphorylation sites. Among these were PRAS40, gephyrin, and AMP kinase 2. We observed similar proportions of increased and reduced phosphorylation in response to rapamycin. Gene ontology analysis revealed over-representation of mTOR pathway components among rapamycin-sensitive phosphopeptide candidates.In addition to identifying potential new mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation events, and providing information relevant to the biology of this signaling network, our experimental and analytical approaches indicate the feasibility of large-scale phosphoproteomic profiling of tissue samples to study physiological signaling events in vivo.

  5. Selective Activation of mTORC1 Signaling Recapitulates Microcephaly, Tuberous Sclerosis, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

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    Hidetoshi Kassai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been implicated in human neurological diseases such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, neurodegeneration, and autism. However, little is known about when and how mTOR is involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases, due to a lack of animal models that directly increase mTOR activity. Here, we generated transgenic mice expressing a gain-of-function mutant of mTOR in the forebrain in a temporally controlled manner. Selective activation of mTORC1 in embryonic stages induced cortical atrophy caused by prominent apoptosis of neuronal progenitors, associated with upregulation of HIF-1α. In striking contrast, activation of the mTORC1 pathway in adulthood resulted in cortical hypertrophy with fatal epileptic seizures, recapitulating human TSC. Activated mTORC1 in the adult cortex also promoted rapid accumulation of cytoplasmic inclusions and activation of microglial cells, indicative of progressive neurodegeneration. Our findings demonstrate that mTORC1 plays different roles in developmental and adult stages and contributes to human neurological diseases.

  6. The human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncoprotein activates mTORC1 signaling and increases protein synthesis.

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    Spangle, Jennifer M; Münger, Karl

    2010-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase acts as a cellular rheostat that integrates signals from a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways that sense growth factor and nutrient availability as well as intracellular energy status. It was previously reported that the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein may activate the S6 protein kinase (S6K) through binding and E6AP-mediated degradation of the mTOR inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) (Z. Lu, X. Hu, Y. Li, L. Zheng, Y. Zhou, H. Jiang, T. Ning, Z. Basang, C. Zhang, and Y. Ke, J. Biol. Chem. 279:35664-35670, 2004; L. Zheng, H. Ding, Z. Lu, Y. Li, Y. Pan, T. Ning, and Y. Ke, Genes Cells 13:285-294, 2008). Our results confirmed that HPV16 E6 expression causes an increase in mTORC1 activity through enhanced phosphorylation of mTOR and activation of downstream signaling pathways S6K and eukaryotic initiation factor binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). However, we did not detect a decrease in TSC2 levels in HPV16 E6-expressing cells. We discovered, however, that HPV16 E6 expression causes AKT activation through the upstream kinases PDK1 and mTORC2 under conditions of nutrient deprivation. We show that HPV16 E6 expression causes an increase in protein synthesis by enhancing translation initiation complex assembly at the 5' mRNA cap and an increase in cap-dependent translation. The increase in cap-dependent translation likely results from HPV16 E6-induced AKT/mTORC1 activation, as the assembly of the translation initiation complex and cap-dependent translation are rapamycin sensitive. Lastly, coexpression of the HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins does not affect HPV16 E6-induced activation of mTORC1 and cap-dependent translation. HPV16 E6-mediated activation of mTORC1 signaling and cap-dependent translation may be a mechanism to promote viral replication under conditions of limited nutrient supply in differentiated, HPV oncoprotein-expressing proliferating cells.

  7. SAD-A kinase controls islet β-cell size and function as a mediator of mTORC1 signaling.

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    Nie, Jia; Liu, Xiaolei; Lilley, Brendan N; Zhang, Hai; Pan, Y Albert; Kimball, Scot R; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Weiping; Wang, Li; Jefferson, Leonard S; Sanes, Joshua R; Han, Xiao; Shi, Yuguang

    2013-08-20

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in controlling islet β-cell function. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly elucidated. Synapses of amphids defective kinase-A (SAD-A) is a 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-related protein kinase that is exclusively expressed in pancreas and brain. In this study, we investigated a role of the kinase in regulating pancreatic β-cell morphology and function as a mediator of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. We show that global SAD-A deletion leads to defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and petite islets, which are reminiscent of the defects in mice with global deletion of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1, a downstream target of mTORC1. Consistent with these findings, selective deletion of SAD-A in pancreas decreased islet β-cell size, whereas SAD-A overexpression significantly increased the size of mouse insulinomas cell lines β-cells. In direct support of SAD-A as a unique mediator of mTORC1 signaling in islet β-cells, we demonstrate that glucose dramatically stimulated SAD-A protein translation in isolated mouse islets, which was potently inhibited by rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1. Moreover, the 5'-untranslated region of SAD-A mRNA is highly structured and requires mTORC1 signaling for its translation initiation. Together, these findings identified SAD-A as a unique pancreas-specific effector protein of mTORC1 signaling.

  8. Amino Acids Attenuate Insulin Action on Gluconeogenesis and Promote Fatty Acid Biosynthesis via mTORC1 Signaling Pathway in trout Hepatocytes

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    Weiwei Dai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Carnivores exhibit poor utilization of dietary carbohydrates and glucose intolerant phenotypes, yet it remains unclear what are the causal factors and underlying mechanisms. We aimed to evaluate excessive amino acids (AAs-induced effects on insulin signaling, fatty acid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism in rainbow trout and determine the potential involvement of mTORC1 and p38 MAPK pathway. Methods: We stimulated trout primary hepatocytes with different AA levels and employed acute administration of rapamycin to inhibit mTORC1 activation. Results: Increased AA levels enhanced the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1, S6, and insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1 on Ser302 but suppressed Akt and p38 phosphorylation; up-regulated the expression of genes related to gluconeogenesis and fatty acid biosynthesis. mTORC1 inhibition not only inhibited the phosphorylation of mTORC1 downstream targets, but also blunted IRS-1 Ser302 phosphorylation and restored excessive AAs-suppressed Akt phosphorylation. Rapamycin also inhibited fatty acid biosynthetic and gluconeogenic gene expression. Conclusion: High levels of AAs up-regulate hepatic fatty acid biosynthetic gene expression through an mTORC1-dependent manner, while attenuate insulin-mediated repression of gluconeogenesis through elevating IRS-1 Ser302 phosphorylation, which in turn impairs Akt activation and thereby weakening insulin action. We propose that p38 MAPK probably also involves in these AAs-induced metabolic changes.

  9. CDX2 Stimulates the Proliferation of Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Activating the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathways.

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    Fan, Hong-Bo; Zhai, Zhen-Ya; Li, Xiang-Guang; Gao, Chun-Qi; Yan, Hui-Chao; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Wang, Xiu-Qi

    2017-11-18

    Caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2) is expressed in intestinal epithelial cells and plays a role in gut development and homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation. However, whether CDX2 cooperates with the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways to stimulate cell proliferation remains unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of CDX2 on the proliferation of porcine jejunum epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) and the correlation between CDX2, the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways. CDX2 overexpression and knockdown cell culture models were established to explore the regulation of CDX2 on both pathways. Pathway-specific antagonists were used to verify the effects. The results showed that CDX2 overexpression increased IPEC-J2 cell proliferation and activated both the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways, and that CDX2 knockdown decreased cell proliferation and inhibited both pathways. Furthermore, the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin pathway-specific antagonist rapamycin and XAV939 (3,5,7,8-tetrahydro-2-[4-(trifluoromethyl)]-4H -thiopyrano[4,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one) both suppressed the proliferation of IPEC-J2 cells overexpressing CDX2, and that the combination of rapamycin and XAV939 had an additive effect. Regardless of whether the cells were treated with rapamycin or XAV939 alone or in combination, both mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways were down-regulated, accompanied by a decrease in CDX2 expression. Taken together, our data indicate that CDX2 stimulates porcine intestinal epithelial cell proliferation by activating the mTORC1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways.

  10. The mTORC1-Signaling Pathway and Hepatic Polyribosome Profile Are Enhanced after the Recovery of a Protein Restricted Diet by a Combination of Soy or Black Bean with Corn Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-Mota, Claudia C; Rodriguez-Gaytan, Cinthya; Adjibade, Pauline; Mazroui, Rachid; Gálvez, Amanda; Granados, Omar; Tovar, Armando R; Torres, Nimbe

    2016-09-20

    Between 6% and 11% of the world's population suffers from malnutrition or undernutrition associated with poverty, aging or long-term hospitalization. The present work examined the effect of different types of proteins on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTORC1)-signaling pathway in: (1) healthy; and (2) protein restricted rats. (1) In total, 200 rats were divided into eight groups and fed one of the following diets: 20% casein (C), soy (S), black bean (B), B + Corn (BCr), Pea (P), spirulina (Sp), sesame (Se) or Corn (Cr). Rats fed C or BCr had the highest body weight gain; rats fed BCr had the highest pS6K1/S6K1 ratio; rats fed B, BCr or P had the highest eIF4G expression; (2) In total, 84 rats were fed 0.5% C for 21 day and protein rehabilitated with different proteins. The S, soy + Corn (SCr) and BCr groups had the highest body weight gain. Rats fed SCr and BCr had the highest eIF4G expression and liver polysome formation. These findings suggest that the quality of the dietary proteins modulate the mTORC1-signaling pathway. In conclusion, the combination of BCr or SCr are the best proteins for dietary protein rehabilitation due to the significant increase in body weight, activation of the mTORC1-signaling pathway in liver and muscle, and liver polysome formation.

  11. Striatal Transcriptome and Interactome Analysis of Shank3-overexpressing Mice Reveals the Connectivity between Shank3 and mTORC1 Signaling

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    Yeunkum Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mania causes symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, elevated mood, reduced anxiety and decreased need for sleep, which suggests that the dysfunction of the striatum, a critical component of the brain motor and reward system, can be causally associated with mania. However, detailed molecular pathophysiology underlying the striatal dysfunction in mania remains largely unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify the molecular pathways showing alterations in the striatum of SH3 and multiple ankyrin repeat domains 3 (Shank3-overexpressing transgenic (TG mice that display manic-like behaviors. The results of transcriptome analysis suggested that mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling may be the primary molecular signature altered in the Shank3 TG striatum. Indeed, we found that striatal mTORC1 activity, as measured by mTOR S2448 phosphorylation, was significantly decreased in the Shank3 TG mice compared to wild-type (WT mice. To elucidate the potential underlying mechanism, we re-analyzed previously reported protein interactomes, and detected a high connectivity between Shank3 and several upstream regulators of mTORC1, such as tuberous sclerosis 1 (TSC1, TSC2 and Ras homolog enriched in striatum (Rhes, via 94 common interactors that we denominated “Shank3-mTORC1 interactome”. We noticed that, among the 94 common interactors, 11 proteins were related to actin filaments, the level of which was increased in the dorsal striatum of Shank3 TG mice. Furthermore, we could co-immunoprecipitate Shank3, Rhes and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family verprolin-homologous protein 1 (WAVE1 proteins from the striatal lysate of Shank3 TG mice. By comparing with the gene sets of psychiatric disorders, we also observed that the 94 proteins of Shank3-mTORC1 interactome were significantly associated with bipolar disorder (BD. Altogether, our results suggest a protein interaction-mediated connectivity between Shank3 and certain upstream

  12. MicroRNA-214 Reduces Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) Receptor Expression and Downstream mTORC1 Signaling in Renal Carcinoma Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Falguni; Dey, Nirmalya; Bera, Amit; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S.; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-01-01

    Elevated IGF-1/insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) autocrine/paracrine signaling in patients with renal cell carcinoma is associated with poor prognosis of the disease independent of their von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) status. Increased expression of IGF-1R in renal cancer cells correlates with their potency of tumor development and progression. The mechanism by which expression of IGF-1R is increased in renal carcinoma is not known. We report that VHL-deficient and VHL-positive renal cancer cells possess significantly decreased levels of mature, pre-, and pri-miR-214 than normal proximal tubular epithelial cells. We identified an miR-214 recognition element in the 3′UTR of IGF-1R mRNA and confirmed its responsiveness to miR-214. Overexpression of miR-214 decreased the IGF-1R protein levels, resulting in the inhibition of Akt kinase activity in both types of renal cancer cells. IGF-1 provoked phosphorylation and inactivation of PRAS40 in an Akt-dependent manner, leading to the activation of mTORC1 signal transduction to increase phosphorylation of S6 kinase and 4EBP-1. Phosphorylation-deficient mutants of PRAS40 and 4EBP-1 significantly inhibited IGF-1R-driven proliferation of renal cancer cells. Expression of miR-214 suppressed IGF-1R-induced phosphorylation of PRAS40, S6 kinase, and 4EBP-1, indicating inhibition of mTORC1 activity. Finally, miR-214 significantly blocked IGF-1R-forced renal cancer cell proliferation, which was reversed by expression of 3′UTR-less IGF-1R and constitutively active mTORC1. Together, our results identify a reciprocal regulation of IGF-1R levels and miR-214 expression in renal cancer cells independent of VHL status. Our data provide evidence for a novel mechanism for IGF-1R-driven renal cancer cell proliferation involving miR-214 and mTORC1. PMID:27226530

  13. Targeting tumour re-wiring by triple blockade of mTORC1, epidermal growth factor, and oestrogen receptor signalling pathways in endocrine-resistant breast cancer.

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    Ribas, Ricardo; Pancholi, Sunil; Rani, Aradhana; Schuster, Eugene; Guest, Stephanie K; Nikitorowicz-Buniak, Joanna; Simigdala, Nikiana; Thornhill, Allan; Avogadri-Connors, Francesca; Cutler, Richard E; Lalani, Alshad S; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen R; Martin, Lesley-Ann

    2018-06-08

    Endocrine therapies are the mainstay of treatment for oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive (ER + ) breast cancer (BC). However, resistance remains problematic largely due to enhanced cross-talk between ER and growth factor pathways, circumventing the need for steroid hormones. Previously, we reported the anti-proliferative effect of everolimus (RAD001-mTORC1 inhibitor) with endocrine therapy in resistance models; however, potential routes of escape from treatment via ERBB2/3 signalling were observed. We hypothesised that combined targeting of three cellular nodes (ER, ERBB, and mTORC1) may provide enhanced long-term clinical utility. A panel of ER + BC cell lines adapted to long-term oestrogen deprivation (LTED) and expressing ESR1 wt or ESR1 Y537S , modelling acquired resistance to an aromatase-inhibitor (AI), were treated in vitro with a combination of RAD001 and neratinib (pan-ERBB inhibitor) in the presence or absence of oestradiol (E2), tamoxifen (4-OHT), or fulvestrant (ICI182780). End points included proliferation, cell signalling, cell cycle, and effect on ER-mediated transactivation. An in-vivo model of AI resistance was treated with monotherapies and combinations to assess the efficacy in delaying tumour progression. RNA-seq analysis was performed to identify changes in global gene expression as a result of the indicated therapies. Here, we show RAD001 and neratinib (pan-ERBB inhibitor) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in proliferation, irrespective of the ESR1 mutation status. The combination of either agent with endocrine therapy further reduced proliferation but the maximum effect was observed with a triple combination of RAD001, neratinib, and endocrine therapy. In the absence of oestrogen, RAD001 caused a reduction in ER-mediated transcription in the majority of the cell lines, which associated with a decrease in recruitment of ER to an oestrogen-response element on the TFF1 promoter. Contrastingly, neratinib increased both ER

  14. C. elegans DAF-16/FOXO interacts with TGF-ß/BMP signaling to induce germline tumor formation via mTORC1 activation.

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    Wenjing Qi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 by reduced insulin/IGF signaling (IIS is considered to be beneficial in C. elegans due to its ability to extend lifespan and to enhance stress resistance. In the germline, cell-autonomous DAF-16 activity prevents stem cell proliferation, thus acting tumor-suppressive. In contrast, hypodermal DAF-16 causes a tumorous germline phenotype characterized by hyperproliferation of the germline stem cells and rupture of the adjacent basement membrane. Here we show that cross-talk between DAF-16 and the transforming growth factor ß (TGFß/bone morphogenic protein (BMP signaling pathway causes germline hyperplasia and results in disruption of the basement membrane. In addition to activating MADM/NRBP/hpo-11 gene alone, DAF-16 also directly interacts with both R-SMAD proteins SMA-2 and SMA-3 in the nucleus to regulate the expression of mTORC1 pathway. Knocking-down of BMP genes or each of the four target genes in the hypodermis was sufficient to inhibit germline proliferation, indicating a cell-non-autonomously controlled regulation of stem cell proliferation by somatic tissues. We propose the existence of two antagonistic DAF-16/FOXO functions, a cell-proliferative somatic and an anti-proliferative germline activity. Whereas germline hyperplasia under reduced IIS is inhibited by DAF-16 cell-autonomously, activation of somatic DAF-16 in the presence of active IIS promotes germline proliferation and eventually induces tumor-like germline growth. In summary, our results suggest a novel pathway crosstalk of DAF-16 and TGF-ß/BMP that can modulate mTORC1 at the transcriptional level to cause stem-cell hyperproliferation. Such cell-type specific differences may help explaining why human FOXO activity is considered to be tumor-suppressive in most contexts, but may become oncogenic, e.g. in chronic and acute myeloid leukemia.

  15. C. elegans DAF-16/FOXO interacts with TGF-ß/BMP signaling to induce germline tumor formation via mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenjing; Yan, Yijian; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Donner V Gromoff, Erika; Wang, Yimin; Maier, Wolfgang; Baumeister, Ralf

    2017-05-01

    Activation of the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 by reduced insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) is considered to be beneficial in C. elegans due to its ability to extend lifespan and to enhance stress resistance. In the germline, cell-autonomous DAF-16 activity prevents stem cell proliferation, thus acting tumor-suppressive. In contrast, hypodermal DAF-16 causes a tumorous germline phenotype characterized by hyperproliferation of the germline stem cells and rupture of the adjacent basement membrane. Here we show that cross-talk between DAF-16 and the transforming growth factor ß (TGFß)/bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling pathway causes germline hyperplasia and results in disruption of the basement membrane. In addition to activating MADM/NRBP/hpo-11 gene alone, DAF-16 also directly interacts with both R-SMAD proteins SMA-2 and SMA-3 in the nucleus to regulate the expression of mTORC1 pathway. Knocking-down of BMP genes or each of the four target genes in the hypodermis was sufficient to inhibit germline proliferation, indicating a cell-non-autonomously controlled regulation of stem cell proliferation by somatic tissues. We propose the existence of two antagonistic DAF-16/FOXO functions, a cell-proliferative somatic and an anti-proliferative germline activity. Whereas germline hyperplasia under reduced IIS is inhibited by DAF-16 cell-autonomously, activation of somatic DAF-16 in the presence of active IIS promotes germline proliferation and eventually induces tumor-like germline growth. In summary, our results suggest a novel pathway crosstalk of DAF-16 and TGF-ß/BMP that can modulate mTORC1 at the transcriptional level to cause stem-cell hyperproliferation. Such cell-type specific differences may help explaining why human FOXO activity is considered to be tumor-suppressive in most contexts, but may become oncogenic, e.g. in chronic and acute myeloid leukemia.

  16. MNK Controls mTORC1:Substrate Association through Regulation of TELO2 Binding with mTORC1

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    Michael C. Brown

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR integrates numerous stimuli and coordinates the adaptive response of many cellular processes. To accomplish this, mTOR associates with distinct co-factors that determine its signaling output. While many of these co-factors are known, in many cases their function and regulation remain opaque. The MAPK-interacting kinase (MNK contributes to rapamycin resistance in cancer cells. Here, we demonstrate that MNK sustains mTORC1 activity following rapamycin treatment and contributes to mTORC1 signaling following T cell activation and growth stimuli in cancer cells. We determine that MNK engages with mTORC1, promotes mTORC1 association with the phosphatidyl inositol 3′ kinase-related kinase (PIKK stabilizer, TELO2, and facilitates mTORC1:substrate binding. Moreover, our data suggest that DEPTOR, the endogenous inhibitor of mTOR, opposes mTORC1:substrate association by preventing TELO2:mTORC1 binding. Thus, MNK orchestrates counterbalancing forces that regulate mTORC1 enzymatic activity.

  17. The E3 ubiquitin ligase protein associated with Myc (Pam) regulates mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling in vivo through N- and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sangyeul; Kim, Sun; Bahl, Samira; Li, Lin; Burande, Clara F; Smith, Nicole; James, Marianne; Beauchamp, Roberta L; Bhide, Pradeep; DiAntonio, Aaron; Ramesh, Vijaya

    2012-08-31

    Pam and its homologs (the PHR protein family) are large E3 ubiquitin ligases that function to regulate synapse formation and growth in mammals, zebrafish, Drosophila, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Phr1-deficient mouse models (Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan), with deletions in the N-terminal putative guanine exchange factor region and the C-terminal ubiquitin ligase region, respectively) exhibit axon guidance/outgrowth defects and striking defects of major axon tracts in the CNS. Our earlier studies identified Pam to be associated with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) proteins, ubiquitinating TSC2 and regulating mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Here, we examine the potential involvement of the TSC/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) signaling pathway in Phr1-deficient mouse models. We observed attenuation of mTORC1 signaling in the brains of both Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mouse models. Our results establish that Pam regulates TSC/mTOR signaling in vitro and in vivo through two distinct domains. To further address whether Pam regulates mTORC1 through two functionally independent domains, we undertook heterozygous mutant crossing between Phr1(Δ8,9) and Phr1(Magellan) mice to generate a compound heterozygous model to determine whether these two domains can complement each other. mTORC1 signaling was not attenuated in the brains of double mutants (Phr1(Δ8,9/Mag)), confirming that Pam displays dual regulation of the mTORC1 pathway through two functional domains. Our results also suggest that although dysregulation of mTORC1 signaling may be responsible for the corpus callosum defects, other neurodevelopmental defects observed with Phr1 deficiency are independent of mTORC1 signaling. The ubiquitin ligase complex containing Pam-Fbxo45 likely targets additional synaptic and axonal proteins, which may explain the overlapping neurodevelopmental defects observed in Phr1 and Fbxo45 deficiency.

  18. The Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 Oncoprotein Activates mTORC1 Signaling and Increases Protein Synthesis ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Spangle, Jennifer M.; Münger, Karl

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase acts as a cellular rheostat that integrates signals from a variety of cellular signal transduction pathways that sense growth factor and nutrient availability as well as intracellular energy status. It was previously reported that the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 oncoprotein may activate the S6 protein kinase (S6K) through binding and E6AP-mediated degradation of the mTOR inhibitor tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) (Z. Lu, X. Hu, Y....

  19. Regulation of mTORC1 signaling by Src kinase activity is Akt1-independent in RSV-transformed cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vojtěchová, Martina; Turečková, Jolana; Kučerová, Dana; Šloncová, Eva; Vachtenheim, J.; Tuháčková, Zdena

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2008), s. 99-107 ISSN 1522-8002 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/04/0550 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Akt/PKB * mTOR C1 signaling pathway * Src Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.191, year: 2008

  20. Regulation of mTORC1 Signaling by Src Kinase Activity Is Akt1-Independent in RSV-Transformed Cells

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    Martina Vojtěchová

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Increased activity of the Src tyrosine protein kinase that has been observed in a large number of human malignancies appears to be a promising target for drug therapy. In the present study, a critical role of the Src activity in the deregulation of mTOR signaling pathway in Rous sarcoma virus (RSV-transformed hamster fibroblasts, H19 cells, was shown using these cells treated with the Src-specific inhibitor, SU6656, and clones of fibroblasts expressing either the active Src or the dominant-negative Src kinase-dead mutant. Disruption of the Src kinase activity results in substantial reduction of the phosphorylation and activity of the Akt/protein kinase B (PKB, phosphorylation of tuberin (TSC2, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, S6K1, ribosomal protein S6, and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 4E-BP1. The ectopic, active Akt1 that was expressed in Src-deficient cells significantly enhanced phosphorylation of TSC2 in these cells, but it failed to activate the inhibited components of the mTOR pathway that are downstream of TSC2. The data indicate that the Src kinase activity is essential for the activity of mTOR-dependent signaling pathway and suggest that mTOR targets may be controlled by Src independently of Akt1/TSC2 cascade in cells expressing hyperactive Src protein. These observations might have an implication in drug resistance to mTOR inhibitor-based cancer therapy in certain cell types.

  1. PGE2-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, Marc; Faes, Seraina; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PGE 2 activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE 2 induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE 2 induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE 2 directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE 2 -induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE 2 increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE 2 EP 4 receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE 2 increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE 2 -induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE 2 increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE 2 mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth

  2. Aging Reduces the Activation of the mTORC1 Pathway after Resistance Exercise and Protein Intake in Human Skeletal Muscle: Potential Role of REDD1 and Impaired Anabolic Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francaux, Marc; Demeulder, Bénédicte; Naslain, Damien; Fortin, Raphael; Lutz, Olivier; Caty, Gilles; Deldicque, Louise

    2016-01-15

    This study was designed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the anabolic resistance observed in elderly people. Nine young (22 ± 0.1 years) and 10 older (69 ± 1.7 years) volunteers performed a one-leg extension exercise consisting of 10 × 10 repetitions at 70% of their 3-RM, immediately after which they ingested 30 g of whey protein. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at rest in the fasted state and 30 min after protein ingestion in the non-exercised (Pro) and exercised (Pro+ex) legs. Plasma insulin levels were determined at the same time points. No age difference was measured in fasting insulin levels but the older subjects had a 50% higher concentration than the young subjects in the fed state (p young subjects. After Pro+ex, REDD1 expression tended to be higher (p = 0.087) in the older group while AMPK phosphorylation was not modified by any condition. In conclusion, we show that the activation of the mTORC1 pathway is reduced in skeletal muscle of older subjects after resistance exercise and protein ingestion compared with young subjects, which could be partially due to an increased expression of REDD1 and an impaired anabolic sensitivity.

  3. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo C. Melnik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1 essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; (2 glutamine; (3 palmitic acid; and (4 bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases.

  4. Milk—A Nutrient System of Mammalian Evolution Promoting mTORC1-Dependent Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C.

    2015-01-01

    Based on own translational research of the biochemical and hormonal effects of cow’s milk consumption in humans, this review presents milk as a signaling system of mammalian evolution that activates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the pivotal regulator of translation. Milk, a mammary gland-derived secretory product, is required for species-specific gene-nutrient interactions that promote appropriate growth and development of the newborn mammal. This signaling system is highly conserved and tightly controlled by the lactation genome. Milk is sufficient to activate mTORC1, the crucial regulator of protein, lipid, and nucleotide synthesis orchestrating anabolism, cell growth and proliferation. To fulfill its mTORC1-activating function, milk delivers four key metabolic messengers: (1) essential branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs); (2) glutamine; (3) palmitic acid; and (4) bioactive exosomal microRNAs, which in a synergistical fashion promote mTORC1-dependent translation. In all mammals except Neolithic humans, postnatal activation of mTORC1 by milk intake is restricted to the postnatal lactation period. It is of critical concern that persistent hyperactivation of mTORC1 is associated with aging and the development of age-related disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases. Persistent mTORC1 activation promotes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and drives an aimless quasi-program, which promotes aging and age-related diseases. PMID:26225961

  5. PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, Marc, E-mail: Marc.dufour@chuv.ch; Faes, Seraina, E-mail: Seraina.faes@chuv.ch; Dormond-Meuwly, Anne, E-mail: Anne.meuwly-Dormond@chuv.ch; Demartines, Nicolas, E-mail: Demartines@chuv.ch; Dormond, Olivier, E-mail: Olivier.dormond@chuv.ch

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • PGE{sub 2} activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE{sub 2} directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE{sub 2} EP{sub 4} receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE{sub 2} increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE{sub 2}-induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth.

  6. Dynamin-dependent amino acid endocytosis activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibutani, Shusaku; Okazaki, Hana; Iwata, Hiroyuki

    2017-11-03

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of protein synthesis and potential target for modifying cellular metabolism in various conditions, including cancer and aging. mTORC1 activity is tightly regulated by the availability of extracellular amino acids, and previous studies have revealed that amino acids in the extracellular fluid are transported to the lysosomal lumen. There, amino acids induce recruitment of cytoplasmic mTORC1 to the lysosome by the Rag GTPases, followed by mTORC1 activation by the small GTPase Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb). However, how the extracellular amino acids reach the lysosomal lumen and activate mTORC1 remains unclear. Here, we show that amino acid uptake by dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a critical role in mTORC1 activation. We found that mTORC1 is inactivated when endocytosis is inhibited by overexpression of a dominant-negative form of dynamin 2 or by pharmacological inhibition of dynamin or clathrin. Consistently, the recruitment of mTORC1 to the lysosome was suppressed by the dynamin inhibition. The activity and lysosomal recruitment of mTORC1 were rescued by increasing intracellular amino acids via cycloheximide exposure or by Rag overexpression, indicating that amino acid deprivation is the main cause of mTORC1 inactivation via the dynamin inhibition. We further show that endocytosis inhibition does not induce autophagy even though mTORC1 inactivation is known to strongly induce autophagy. These findings open new perspectives for the use of endocytosis inhibitors as potential agents that can effectively inhibit nutrient utilization and shut down the upstream signals that activate mTORC1. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Amino Acids Regulate mTORC1 by an Obligate Two-step Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia; Earnest, Svetlana; Iturraran, Erica N.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) coordinates cell growth with its nutritional, hormonal, energy, and stress status. Amino acids are critical regulators of mTORC1 that permit other inputs to mTORC1 activity. However, the roles of individual amino acids and their interactions in mTORC1 activation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that activation of mTORC1 by amino acids includes two discrete and separable steps: priming and activation. Sensitizing mTORC1 activation by priming amino acids is a prerequisite for subsequent stimulation of mTORC1 by activating amino acids. Priming is achieved by a group of amino acids that includes l-asparagine, l-glutamine, l-threonine, l-arginine, l-glycine, l-proline, l-serine, l-alanine, and l-glutamic acid. The group of activating amino acids is dominated by l-leucine but also includes l-methionine, l-isoleucine, and l-valine. l-Cysteine predominantly inhibits priming but not the activating step. Priming and activating steps differ in their requirements for amino acid concentration and duration of treatment. Priming and activating amino acids use mechanisms that are distinct both from each other and from growth factor signaling. Neither step requires intact tuberous sclerosis complex of proteins to activate mTORC1. Concerted action of priming and activating amino acids is required to localize mTORC1 to lysosomes and achieve its activation. PMID:27587390

  8. Aging Reduces the Activation of the mTORC1 Pathway after Resistance Exercise and Protein Intake in Human Skeletal Muscle: Potential Role of REDD1 and Impaired Anabolic Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Francaux

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the anabolic resistance observed in elderly people. Nine young (22 ± 0.1 years and 10 older (69 ± 1.7 years volunteers performed a one-leg extension exercise consisting of 10 × 10 repetitions at 70% of their 3-RM, immediately after which they ingested 30 g of whey protein. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at rest in the fasted state and 30 min after protein ingestion in the non-exercised (Pro and exercised (Pro+ex legs. Plasma insulin levels were determined at the same time points. No age difference was measured in fasting insulin levels but the older subjects had a 50% higher concentration than the young subjects in the fed state (p < 0.05. While no difference was observed in the fasted state, in response to exercise and protein ingestion, the phosphorylation state of PKB (p < 0.05 in Pro and Pro+ex and S6K1 (p = 0.059 in Pro; p = 0.066 in Pro+ex was lower in the older subjects compared with the young subjects. After Pro+ex, REDD1 expression tended to be higher (p = 0.087 in the older group while AMPK phosphorylation was not modified by any condition. In conclusion, we show that the activation of the mTORC1 pathway is reduced in skeletal muscle of older subjects after resistance exercise and protein ingestion compared with young subjects, which could be partially due to an increased expression of REDD1 and an impaired anabolic sensitivity.

  9. Deficiency in mTORC1-controlled C/EBP beta-mRNA translation improves metabolic health in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zidek, Laura M.; Ackermann, Tobias; Hartleben, Goetz; Eichwald, Sabrina; Kortman, Gertrud; Kiehntopf, Michael; Leutz, Achim; Sonenberg, Nahum; Wang, Zhao-Qi; von Maltzahn, Julia; Mueller, Christine; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of physiological adaptations in response to changes in nutrient supply. Major downstream targets of mTORC1 signalling are the mRNA translation regulators p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1p70) and the 4E-binding

  10. Lysosomal Regulation of mTORC1 by Amino Acids in Mammalian Cells

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    Yao Yao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a master regulator of cell growth in eukaryotic cells. The active mTORC1 promotes cellular anabolic processes including protein, pyrimidine, and lipid biosynthesis, and inhibits catabolic processes such as autophagy. Consistent with its growth-promoting functions, hyper-activation of mTORC1 signaling is one of the important pathomechanisms underlying major human health problems including diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The mTORC1 receives multiple upstream signals such as an abundance of amino acids and growth factors, thus it regulates a wide range of downstream events relevant to cell growth and proliferation control. The regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids is a fast-evolving field with its detailed mechanisms currently being revealed as the precise picture emerges. In this review, we summarize recent progress with respect to biochemical and biological findings in the regulation of mTORC1 signaling on the lysosomal membrane by amino acids.

  11. Sestrin2 inhibits mTORC1 through modulation of GATOR complexes

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    Kim, Jeong Sig; Ro, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Myungjin; Park, Hwan-Woo; Semple, Ian A.; Park, Haeli; Cho, Uhn-Soo; Wang, Wei; Guan, Kun-Liang; Karin, Michael; Lee, Jun Hee (Michigan); (UCSD)

    2015-03-30

    Sestrins are stress-inducible metabolic regulators that suppress a wide range of age- and obesity-associated pathologies, many of which are due to mTORC1 overactivation. Upon various stresses, the Sestrins inhibit mTORC1 activity through an indirect mechanism that is still unclear. GATORs are recently identified protein complexes that regulate the activity of RagB, a small GTPase essential for mTORC1 activation. GATOR1 is a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for RagB whereas GATOR2 functions as an inhibitor of GATOR1. However, how the GATORs are physiologically regulated is unknown. Here we show that Sestrin2 binds to GATOR2, and liberates GATOR1 from GATOR2-mediated inhibition. Released GATOR1 subsequently binds to and inactivates RagB, ultimately resulting in mTORC1 suppression. Consistent with this biochemical mechanism, genetic ablation of GATOR1 nullifies the mTORC1-inhibiting effect of Sestrin2 in both cell culture and Drosophila models. Collectively, we elucidate a new signaling cascade composed of Sestrin2-GATOR2-GATOR1-RagB that mediates stress-dependent suppression of mTORC1 activity.

  12. Resolvin D1 and D2 Reverse Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depression-Like Behaviors Through the mTORC1 Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyama, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yuka; Yoshikawa, Kotomi; Shimoda, Kento; Ide, Soichiro; Satoh, Masamichi; Minami, Masabumi

    2017-07-01

    Resolvin D1 and D2 are bioactive lipid mediators that are generated from docosahexaenoic acid. Although recent preclinical studies suggest that these compounds have antidepressant effects, their mechanisms of action remain unclear. We investigated mechanisms underlying the antidepressant effects of resolvin D1 and resolvin D2 in lipopolysaccharide (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced depression model mice using a tail suspension test. I.c.v. infusion of resolvin D1 (10 ng) and resolvin D2 (10 ng) produced antidepressant effects; these effects were significantly blocked by a resolvin D1 receptor antagonist WRW4 (10 µg, i.c.v.) and a resolvin D2 receptor antagonist O-1918 (10 µg, i.c.v.), respectively. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitor rapamycin (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor U0126 (5 µg, i.c.v.) significantly blocked the antidepressant effects of resolvin D1 and resolvin D2. An AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 (3 µg, i.c.v.) blocked the antidepressant effects of resolvin D1 significantly, but not of resolvin D2. Bilateral infusions of resolvin D1 (0.3 ng/side) or resolvin D2 (0.3 ng/side) into the medial prefrontal cortex or dentate gyrus of the hippocampus produced antidepressant effects. These findings demonstrate that resolvin D1 and resolvin D2 produce antidepressant effects via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway, and that the medial prefrontal cortex and dentate gyrus are important brain regions for these antidepressant effects. These compounds and their receptors may be promising targets for the development of novel rapid-acting antidepressants, like ketamine and scopolamine. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  13. Co-activation of AMPK and mTORC1 Induces Cytotoxicity in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

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    Pierre Sujobert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AMPK is a master regulator of cellular metabolism that exerts either oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity depending on context. Here, we report that the specific AMPK agonist GSK621 selectively kills acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells but spares normal hematopoietic progenitors. This differential sensitivity results from a unique synthetic lethal interaction involving concurrent activation of AMPK and mTORC1. Strikingly, the lethality of GSK621 in primary AML cells and AML cell lines is abrogated by chemical or genetic ablation of mTORC1 signaling. The same synthetic lethality between AMPK and mTORC1 activation is established in CD34-positive hematopoietic progenitors by constitutive activation of AKT or enhanced in AML cells by deletion of TSC2. Finally, cytotoxicity in AML cells from GSK621 involves the eIF2α/ATF4 signaling pathway that specifically results from mTORC1 activation. AMPK activation may represent a therapeutic opportunity in mTORC1-overactivated cancers.

  14. Hepatic mTORC1 controls locomotor activity, body temperature, and lipid metabolism through FGF21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Marion; Oppliger, Wolfgang; Albert, Verena; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Trapani, Francesca; Quagliata, Luca; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Terracciano, Luigi; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The liver is a key metabolic organ that controls whole-body physiology in response to nutrient availability. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a nutrient-activated kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism that is negatively regulated by the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1). To investigate the role of hepatic mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in whole-body physiology, we generated liver-specific Tsc1 (L-Tsc1 KO) knockout mice. L-Tsc1 KO mice displayed reduced locomotor activity, body temperature, and hepatic triglyceride content in a rapamycin-sensitive manner. Ectopic activation of mTORC1 also caused depletion of hepatic and plasma glutamine, leading to peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α)–dependent fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) expression in the liver. Injection of glutamine or knockdown of PGC-1α or FGF21 in the liver suppressed the behavioral and metabolic defects due to mTORC1 activation. Thus, mTORC1 in the liver controls whole-body physiology through PGC-1α and FGF21. Finally, mTORC1 signaling correlated with FGF21 expression in human liver tumors, suggesting that treatment of glutamine-addicted cancers with mTOR inhibitors might have beneficial effects at both the tumor and whole-body level. PMID:25082895

  15. Macrophage mTORC1 disruption reduces inflammation and insulin resistance in obese mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, Hongfeng; Westerterp, Marit; Wang, Chunjiong; Zhu, Yi; Ai, Ding

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory factors secreted by macrophages play an important role in obesity-related insulin resistance. Being at the crossroads of a nutrient-hormonal signalling network, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) controls important functions in the regulation of energy balance and

  16. Dual inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 perturbs cytoskeletal organization and impairs endothelial cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji-Tamura, Kiyomi; Ogawa, Minetaro

    2018-02-26

    Elongation of endothelial cells is an important process in vascular formation and is expected to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 impaired endothelial cell elongation, although the mechanism has not been well defined. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the mTORC1-specific inhibitor everolimus and the mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibitor KU0063794 on the cytoskeletal organization and morphology of endothelial cell lines. While both inhibitors equally inhibited cell proliferation, KU0063794 specifically caused abnormal accumulation of F-actin and disordered distribution of microtubules, thereby markedly impairing endothelial cell elongation and tube formation. The effects of KU0063794 were phenocopied by paclitaxel treatment, suggesting that KU0063794 might impair endothelial cell morphology through over-stabilization of microtubules. Although mTORC1 is a key signaling molecule in cell proliferation and has been considered a target for preventing angiogenesis, mTORC1 inhibitors have not been sufficient to suppress angiogenesis. Our results suggest that mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibition is more effective for anti-angiogenic therapy, as it impairs not only endothelial cell proliferation, but also endothelial cell elongation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanosensitive molecular networks involved in transducing resistance exercise-signals into muscle protein accretion

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    Emil Rindom

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Loss of skeletal muscle myofibrillar protein with disease and/or inactivity can severely deteriorate muscle strength and function. Strategies to counteract wasting of muscle myofibrillar protein are therefore desirable and invite for considerations on the potential superiority of specific modes of resistance exercise and/or the adequacy of low load resistance exercise regimens as well as underlying mechanisms. In this regard, delineation of the potentially mechanosensitive molecular mechanisms underlying muscle protein synthesis (MPS, may contribute to understanding on how differentiated resistance exercise can transduce a mechanical signal into stimulation of muscle accretion. Recent findings suggest specific upstream exercise-induced mechano-sensitive myocellular signaling pathways to converge on mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1, to influence MPS. This may e.g. implicate mechanical activation of signaling through a diacylglycerol kinase (DGKζ-phosphatidic acid (PA axis or implicate integrin deformation to signal through a Focal adhesion kinase (FAK-Tuberous Sclerosis Complex 2TSC2-Ras homolog enriched in brain (Rheb axis. Moreover, since initiation of translation is reliant on mRNA, it is also relevant to consider potentially mechanosensitive signaling pathways involved in muscle myofibrillar gene transcription and whether some of these pathways converge with those affecting mTORC1 activation for MPS. In this regard, recent findings suggest how mechanical stress may implicate integrin deformation and/or actin dynamics to signal through a Ras homolog gene family member A protein (RhoA-striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS axis or how it may implicate deformation of Notch to affect Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP signaling through a small mother of decapentaplegic (Smad axis.

  18. The cochaperone BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy under mechanical strain through spatial regulation of mTORC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathage, Barbara; Gehlert, Sebastian; Ulbricht, Anna; Lüdecke, Laura; Tapia, Victor E; Orfanos, Zacharias; Wenzel, Daniela; Bloch, Wilhelm; Volkmer, Rudolf; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Fürst, Dieter O; Höhfeld, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    The cochaperone BAG3 is a central protein homeostasis factor in mechanically strained mammalian cells. It mediates the degradation of unfolded and damaged forms of the actin-crosslinker filamin through chaperone-assisted selective autophagy (CASA). In addition, BAG3 stimulates filamin transcription in order to compensate autophagic disposal and to maintain the actin cytoskeleton under strain. Here we demonstrate that BAG3 coordinates protein synthesis and autophagy through spatial regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The cochaperone utilizes its WW domain to contact a proline-rich motif in the tuberous sclerosis protein TSC1 that functions as an mTORC1 inhibitor in association with TSC2. Interaction with BAG3 results in a recruitment of TSC complexes to actin stress fibers, where the complexes act on a subpopulation of mTOR-positive vesicles associated with the cytoskeleton. Local inhibition of mTORC1 is essential to initiate autophagy at sites of filamin unfolding and damage. At the same time, BAG3-mediated sequestration of TSC1/TSC2 relieves mTORC1 inhibition in the remaining cytoplasm, which stimulates protein translation. In human muscle, an exercise-induced association of TSC1 with the cytoskeleton coincides with mTORC1 activation in the cytoplasm. The spatial regulation of mTORC1 exerted by BAG3 apparently provides the basis for a simultaneous induction of autophagy and protein synthesis to maintain the proteome under mechanical strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. mTORC1 directly phosphorylates and regulates human MAF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Annemieke A; Robitaille, Aaron M; Buczynski-Ruchonnet, Diane; Hodroj, Wassim; Reina, Jaime H; Hall, Michael N; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-08-01

    mTORC1 is a central regulator of growth in response to nutrient availability, but few direct targets have been identified. RNA polymerase (pol) III produces a number of essential RNA molecules involved in protein synthesis, RNA maturation, and other processes. Its activity is highly regulated, and deregulation can lead to cell transformation. The human phosphoprotein MAF1 becomes dephosphorylated and represses pol III transcription after various stresses, but neither the significance of the phosphorylations nor the kinase involved is known. We find that human MAF1 is absolutely required for pol III repression in response to serum starvation or TORC1 inhibition by rapamycin or Torin1. The protein is phosphorylated mainly on residues S60, S68, and S75, and this inhibits its pol III repression function. The responsible kinase is mTORC1, which phosphorylates MAF1 directly. Our results describe molecular mechanisms by which mTORC1 controls human MAF1, a key repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription, and add a new branch to the signal transduction cascade immediately downstream of TORC1.

  20. mTORC1 Directly Phosphorylates and Regulates Human MAF1▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Annemieke A.; Robitaille, Aaron M.; Buczynski-Ruchonnet, Diane; Hodroj, Wassim; Reina, Jaime H.; Hall, Michael N.; Hernandez, Nouria

    2010-01-01

    mTORC1 is a central regulator of growth in response to nutrient availability, but few direct targets have been identified. RNA polymerase (pol) III produces a number of essential RNA molecules involved in protein synthesis, RNA maturation, and other processes. Its activity is highly regulated, and deregulation can lead to cell transformation. The human phosphoprotein MAF1 becomes dephosphorylated and represses pol III transcription after various stresses, but neither the significance of the phosphorylations nor the kinase involved is known. We find that human MAF1 is absolutely required for pol III repression in response to serum starvation or TORC1 inhibition by rapamycin or Torin1. The protein is phosphorylated mainly on residues S60, S68, and S75, and this inhibits its pol III repression function. The responsible kinase is mTORC1, which phosphorylates MAF1 directly. Our results describe molecular mechanisms by which mTORC1 controls human MAF1, a key repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription, and add a new branch to the signal transduction cascade immediately downstream of TORC1. PMID:20516213

  1. Amino Acid Activation of mTORC1 by a PB1-Domain-Driven Kinase Complex Cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Juan F; Duran, Angeles; Reina-Campos, Miguel; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Campos, Alex; Moscat, Jorge; Diaz-Meco, Maria T

    2015-08-25

    The mTORC1 complex is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient availability. The signaling adaptor p62 contributes to mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids and interacts with TRAF6, which is required for the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosome and the subsequent K63 polyubiquitination and activation of mTOR. However, the signal initiating these p62-driven processes was previously unknown. Here, we show that p62 is phosphorylated via a cascade that includes MEK3/6 and p38δ and is driven by the PB1-containing kinase MEKK3. This phosphorylation results in the recruitment of TRAF6 to p62, the ubiquitination and activation of mTOR, and the regulation of autophagy and cell proliferation. Genetic inactivation of MEKK3 or p38δ mimics that of p62 in that it leads to inhibited growth of PTEN-deficient prostate organoids. Analysis of human prostate cancer samples showed upregulation of these three components of the pathway, which correlated with enhanced mTORC1 activation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Amino Acid Activation of mTORC1 by a PB1-Domain-Driven Kinase Complex Cascade

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    Juan F. Linares

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The mTORC1 complex is central to the cellular response to changes in nutrient availability. The signaling adaptor p62 contributes to mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids and interacts with TRAF6, which is required for the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosome and the subsequent K63 polyubiquitination and activation of mTOR. However, the signal initiating these p62-driven processes was previously unknown. Here, we show that p62 is phosphorylated via a cascade that includes MEK3/6 and p38δ and is driven by the PB1-containing kinase MEKK3. This phosphorylation results in the recruitment of TRAF6 to p62, the ubiquitination and activation of mTOR, and the regulation of autophagy and cell proliferation. Genetic inactivation of MEKK3 or p38δ mimics that of p62 in that it leads to inhibited growth of PTEN-deficient prostate organoids. Analysis of human prostate cancer samples showed upregulation of these three components of the pathway, which correlated with enhanced mTORC1 activation.

  3. mTORC1 Inhibition Corrects Neurodevelopmental and Synaptic Alterations in a Human Stem Cell Model of Tuberous Sclerosis

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    Veronica Costa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperfunction of the mTORC1 pathway has been associated with idiopathic and syndromic forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD, including tuberous sclerosis, caused by loss of either TSC1 or TSC2. It remains largely unknown how developmental processes and biochemical signaling affected by mTORC1 dysregulation contribute to human neuronal dysfunction. Here, we have characterized multiple stages of neurogenesis and synapse formation in human neurons derived from TSC2-deleted pluripotent stem cells. Homozygous TSC2 deletion causes severe developmental abnormalities that recapitulate pathological hallmarks of cortical malformations in patients. Both TSC2+/− and TSC2−/− neurons display altered synaptic transmission paralleled by molecular changes in pathways associated with autism, suggesting the convergence of pathological mechanisms in ASD. Pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 corrects developmental abnormalities and synaptic dysfunction during independent developmental stages. Our results uncouple stage-specific roles of mTORC1 in human neuronal development and contribute to a better understanding of the onset of neuronal pathophysiology in tuberous sclerosis.

  4. Akt inhibition promotes ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to ApoA-I through suppressing mTORC1.

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    Fumin Dong

    Full Text Available ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1 plays an essential role in mediating cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I, a major housekeeping mechanism for cellular cholesterol homeostasis. After initial engagement with ABCA1, apoA-I directly interacts with the plasma membrane to acquire cholesterol. This apoA-I lipidation process is also known to require cellular signaling processes, presumably to support cholesterol trafficking to the plasma membrane. We report here that one of major signaling pathways in mammalian cells, Akt, is also involved. In several cell models that express ABCA1 including macrophages, pancreatic beta cells and hepatocytes, inhibition of Akt increases cholesterol efflux to apoA-I. Importantly, Akt inhibition has little effect on cells expressing non-functional mutant of ABCA1, implicating a specific role of Akt in ABCA1 function. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mTORC1, a major downstream target of Akt, is also a negative regulator of cholesterol efflux. In cells where mTORC1 is constitutively activated due to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 deletion, cholesterol efflux to apoA-I is no longer sensitive to Akt activity. This suggests that Akt suppresses cholesterol efflux through mTORC1 activation. Indeed, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or Torin-1 promotes cholesterol efflux. On the other hand, autophagy, one of the major pathways of cholesterol trafficking, is increased upon Akt inhibition. Furthermore, Akt inhibition disrupts lipid rafts, which is known to promote cholesterol efflux to apoA-I. We therefore conclude that Akt, through its downstream targets, mTORC1 and hence autophagy, negatively regulates cholesterol efflux to apoA-I.

  5. Noncanonical Pathway for Regulation of CCL2 Expression by an mTORC1-FOXK1 Axis Promotes Recruitment of Tumor-Associated Macrophages

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    Hirokazu Nakatsumi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2 plays pivotal roles in tumor formation, progression, and metastasis. Although CCL2 expression has been found to be dependent on the nuclear factor (NF-κB signaling pathway, the regulation of CCL2 production in tumor cells has remained unclear. We have identified a noncanonical pathway for regulation of CCL2 production that is mediated by mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 but independent of NF-κB. Multiple phosphoproteomics approaches identified the transcription factor forkhead box K1 (FOXK1 as a downstream target of mTORC1. Activation of mTORC1 induces dephosphorylation of FOXK1, resulting in transactivation of the CCL2 gene. Inhibition of the mTORC1-FOXK1 axis attenuated insulin-induced CCL2 production as well as the accumulation of tumor-associated monocytes-macrophages and tumor progression in mice. Our results suggest that FOXK1 directly links mTORC1 signaling and CCL2 expression in a manner independent of NF-κB and that CCL2 produced by this pathway contributes to tumor progression.

  6. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation is required for the stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis by essential amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Gundermann, David M; Walker, Dillon K; Glynn, Erin L; Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis during instances of amino acid surplus in humans is based solely on correlational data. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use a mechanistic approach specifically designed to determine whether increased mTORC1 activation is requisite for the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis following L-essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion in humans. Examination of muscle protein synthesis and signaling were performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from 8 young (25 ± 2 y) individuals who were studied prior to and following ingestion of 10 g of EAA during 2 separate trials in a randomized, counterbalanced design. The trials were identical except during 1 trial, participants were administered a single oral dose of a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to EAA ingestion. In response to EAA ingestion, an ~60% increase in muscle protein synthesis was observed during the control trial, concomitant with increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Thr(389)), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr(37/46)). In contrast, prior administration of rapamycin completely blocked the increase in muscle protein synthesis and blocked or attenuated activation of mTORC1-signaling proteins. The inhibition of muscle protein synthesis and signaling was not due to differences in either extracellular or intracellular amino acid availability, because these variables were similar between trials. These data support a fundamental role for mTORC1 activation as a key regulator of human muscle protein synthesis in response to increased EAA availability. This information will be useful in the development of evidence-based nutritional therapies targeting mTORC1 to counteract muscle wasting associated with numerous clinical conditions.

  7. Acquired resistance of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas to afatinib plus cetuximab is associated with activation of mTORC1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirazzoli, Valentina; Nebhan, Caroline; Song, Xiaoling; Wurtz, Anna; Walther, Zenta; Cai, Guoping; Zhao, Zhongming; Jia, Peilin; de Stanchina, Elisa; Shapiro, Erik M.; Gale, Molly; Yin, Ruonan; Horn, Leora; Carbone, David P.; Stephens, Philip J; Miller, Vincent; Gettinger, Scott; Pao, William; Politi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas (LUADs) who initially respond to first-generation TKIs develop resistance to these drugs. A combination of the irreversible TKI afatinib and the EGFR antibody cetuximab can be used to overcome resistance to first-generation TKIs; however, resistance to this drug combination eventually emerges. We identified activation of the mTORC1 signaling pathway as a mechanism of resistance to dual inhibition of EGFR in mouse models. Addition of rapamycin reversed resistance in vivo. Analysis of afatinib+cetuximab-resistant biopsy specimens revealed the presence of genomic alterations in genes that modulate mTORC1 signaling including NF2 and TSC1. These findings pinpoint enhanced mTORC1 activation as a mechanism of resistance to afatinib+cetuximab and identify genomic mechanisms that lead to activation of this pathway, revealing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating patients with resistance to these drugs. PMID:24813888

  8. LAPTM4b recruits the LAT1-4F2hc Leu transporter to lysosomes and promotes mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milkereit, Ruth; Persaud, Avinash; Vanoaica, Liviu; Guetg, Adriano; Verrey, Francois; Rotin, Daniela

    2015-05-22

    Mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1), a master regulator of cellular growth, is activated downstream of growth factors, energy signalling and intracellular essential amino acids (EAAs) such as Leu. mTORC1 activation occurs at the lysosomal membrane, and involves V-ATPase stimulation by intra-lysosomal EAA (inside-out activation), leading to activation of the Ragulator, RagA/B-GTP and mTORC1 via Rheb-GTP. How Leu enters the lysosomes is unknown. Here we identified the lysosomal protein LAPTM4b as a binding partner for the Leu transporter, LAT1-4F2hc (SLC7A5-SLAC3A2). We show that LAPTM4b recruits LAT1-4F2hc to lysosomes, leading to uptake of Leu into lysosomes, and is required for mTORC1 activation via V-ATPase following EAA or Leu stimulation. These results demonstrate a functional Leu transporter at the lysosome, and help explain the inside-out lysosomal activation of mTORC1 by Leu/EAA.

  9. The Molecular Basis for Load-Induced Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, George R.; West, Daniel W.D.; Baar, Keith

    2016-01-01

    In a mature (weight neutral) animal, an increase in muscle mass only occurs when the muscle is loaded sufficiently to cause an increase in myofibrillar protein balance. A tight relationship between muscle hypertrophy, acute increases in protein balance, and the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) was demonstrated 15 years ago. Since then, our understanding of the signals that regulate load-induced hypertrophy has evolved considerably. For example, we now know that mechanical load activates mTORC1 in the same way as growth factors, by moving TSC2 (a primary inhibitor of mTORC1) away from its target (the mTORC activator) Rheb. However, the kinase that phosphorylates and moves TSC2 is different in the two processes. Similarly, we have learned that a distinct pathway exists whereby amino acids activate mTORC1 by moving it to Rheb. While mTORC1 remains at the forefront of load-induced hypertrophy, the importance of other pathways that regulate muscle mass are becoming clearer. Myostatin, is best known for its control of developmental muscle size. However, new mechanisms to explain how loading regulates this process are suggesting that it could play an important role in hypertrophic muscle growth as well. Lastly, new mechanisms are highlighted for how β2 receptor agonists could be involved in load-induced muscle growth and why these agents are being developed as non-exercise-based therapies for muscle atrophy. Overall, the results highlight how studying the mechanism of load-induced skeletal muscle mass is leading the development of pharmaceutical interventions to promote muscle growth in those unwilling or unable to perform resistance exercise. PMID:25359125

  10. Resistance exercise-induced S6K1 kinase activity is not inhibited in human skeletal muscle despite prior activation of AMPK by high-intensity interval cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Apró, William; Moberg, Marcus; Hamilton, D. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Combining endurance and strength training in the same session has been reported to reduce the anabolic response to the latter form of exercise. The underlying mechanism, based primarily on results from rodent muscle, is proposed to involve AMPK-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. This hypot......Combining endurance and strength training in the same session has been reported to reduce the anabolic response to the latter form of exercise. The underlying mechanism, based primarily on results from rodent muscle, is proposed to involve AMPK-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 signaling...

  11. Chronic innate immune activation of TBK1 suppresses mTORC1 activity and dysregulates cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Maroof; Gonugunta, Vijay K; Dobbs, Nicole; Ali, Aktar; Palchik, Guillermo; Calvaruso, Maria A; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Yan, Nan

    2017-01-24

    Three-prime repair exonuclease 1 knockout (Trex1 -/- ) mice suffer from systemic inflammation caused largely by chronic activation of the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-stimulator of interferon genes-TANK-binding kinase-interferon regulatory factor 3 (cGAS-STING-TBK1-IRF3) signaling pathway. We showed previously that Trex1-deficient cells have reduced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we performed detailed metabolic analysis in Trex1 -/- mice and cells that revealed both cellular and systemic metabolic defects, including reduced mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolysis, energy expenditure, and fat metabolism. We also genetically separated the inflammatory and metabolic phenotypes by showing that Sting deficiency rescued both inflammatory and metabolic phenotypes, whereas Irf3 deficiency only rescued inflammation on the Trex1 -/- background, and many metabolic defects persist in Trex1 -/- Irf3 -/- cells and mice. We also showed that Leptin deficiency (ob/ob) increased lipogenesis and prolonged survival of Trex1 -/- mice without dampening inflammation. Mechanistically, we identified TBK1 as a key regulator of mTORC1 activity in Trex1 -/- cells. Together, our data demonstrate that chronic innate immune activation of TBK1 suppresses mTORC1 activity, leading to dysregulated cellular metabolism.

  12. IL-2- and IL-15-induced activation of the rapamycin-sensitive mTORC1 pathway in malignant CD4+ T lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal; Liu, Xiaobin; Kasprzycka, Monika

    2008-01-01

    We examined functional status, activation mechanisms, and biologic role of the mTORC1 signaling pathway in malignant CD4(+) T cells derived from the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Whereas the spontaneously growing CTCL-derived cell lines displayed persistent activation of the TORC1 as well as ...

  13. Comparative Analysis of Muscle Hypertrophy Models Reveals Divergent Gene Transcription Profiles and Points to Translational Regulation of Muscle Growth through Increased mTOR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo G. Pereira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle mass is a result of the balance between protein breakdown and protein synthesis. It has been shown that multiple conditions of muscle atrophy are characterized by the common regulation of a specific set of genes, termed atrogenes. It is not known whether various models of muscle hypertrophy are similarly regulated by a common transcriptional program. Here, we characterized gene expression changes in three different conditions of muscle growth, examining each condition during acute and chronic phases. Specifically, we compared the transcriptome of Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL muscles collected (1 during the rapid phase of postnatal growth at 2 and 4 weeks of age, (2 24 h or 3 weeks after constitutive activation of AKT, and (3 24 h or 3 weeks after overload hypertrophy caused by tenotomy of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. We observed an important overlap between significantly regulated genes when comparing each single condition at the two different timepoints. Furthermore, examining the transcriptional changes occurring 24 h after a hypertrophic stimulus, we identify an important role for genes linked to a stress response, despite the absence of muscle damage in the AKT model. However, when we compared all different growth conditions, we did not find a common transcriptional fingerprint. On the other hand, all conditions showed a marked increase in mTORC1 signaling and increased ribosome biogenesis, suggesting that muscle growth is characterized more by translational, than transcriptional regulation.

  14. mTORC1 Targets the Translational Repressor 4E-BP2, but Not S6 Kinase 1/2, to Regulate Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel W. Hartman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 integrates signals important for cell growth, and its dysregulation in neural stem cells (NSCs is implicated in several neurological disorders associated with abnormal neurogenesis and brain size. However, the function of mTORC1 on NSC self-renewal and the downstream regulatory mechanisms are ill defined. Here, we found that genetically decreasing mTORC1 activity in neonatal NSCs prevented their differentiation, resulting in reduced lineage expansion and aborted neuron production. Constitutive activation of the translational repressor 4E-BP1, which blocked cap-dependent translation, had similar effects and prevented hyperactive mTORC1 induction of NSC differentiation and promoted self-renewal. Although 4E-BP2 knockdown promoted NSC differentiation, p70 S6 kinase 1 and 2 (S6K1/S6K2 knockdown did not affect NSC differentiation but reduced NSC soma size and prevented hyperactive mTORC1-induced increase in soma size. These data demonstrate a crucial role of mTORC1 and 4E-BP for switching on and off cap-dependent translation in NSC differentiation.

  15. mTORC1-independent reduction of retinal protein synthesis in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Patrice E; Losiewicz, Mandy K; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R; Abcouwer, Steven F; Gardner, Thomas W

    2014-09-01

    Poorly controlled diabetes has long been known as a catabolic disorder with profound loss of muscle and fat body mass resulting from a simultaneous reduction in protein synthesis and enhanced protein degradation. By contrast, retinal structure is largely maintained during diabetes despite reduced Akt activity and increased rate of cell death. Therefore, we hypothesized that retinal protein turnover is regulated differently than in other insulin-sensitive tissues, such as skeletal muscle. Ins2(Akita) diabetic mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats exhibited marked reductions in retinal protein synthesis matched by a concomitant reduction in retinal protein degradation associated with preserved retinal mass and protein content. The reduction in protein synthesis depended on both hyperglycemia and insulin deficiency, but protein degradation was only reversed by normalization of hyperglycemia. The reduction in protein synthesis was associated with diminished protein translation efficiency but, surprisingly, not with reduced activity of the mTORC1/S6K1/4E-BP1 pathway. Instead, diabetes induced a specific reduction of mTORC2 complex activity. These findings reveal distinctive responses of diabetes-induced retinal protein turnover compared with muscle and liver that may provide a new means to ameliorate diabetic retinopathy. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  16. The mTORC1-4E-BP-eIF4E axis controls de novo Bcl6 protein synthesis in T cells and systemic autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Woelsung; Gupta, Sanjay; Ricker, Edd; Manni, Michela; Jessberger, Rolf; Chinenov, Yurii; Molina, Henrik; Pernis, Alessandra B

    2017-08-15

    Post-transcriptional modifications can control protein abundance, but the extent to which these alterations contribute to the expression of T helper (T H ) lineage-defining factors is unknown. Tight regulation of Bcl6 expression, an essential transcription factor for T follicular helper (T FH ) cells, is critical as aberrant T FH cell expansion is associated with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Here we show that lack of the SLE risk variant Def6 results in deregulation of Bcl6 protein synthesis in T cells as a result of enhanced activation of the mTORC1-4E-BP-eIF4E axis, secondary to aberrant assembly of a raptor-p62-TRAF6 complex. Proteomic analysis reveals that this pathway selectively controls the abundance of a subset of proteins. Rapamycin or raptor deletion ameliorates the aberrant T FH cell expansion in mice lacking Def6. Thus deregulation of mTORC1-dependent pathways controlling protein synthesis can result in T-cell dysfunction, indicating a mechanism by which mTORC1 can promote autoimmunity.Excessive expansion of the T follicular helper (T FH ) cell pool is associated with autoimmune disease and Def6 has been identified as an SLE risk variant. Here the authors show that Def6 limits proliferation of T FH cells in mice via alteration of mTORC1 signaling and inhibition of Bcl6 expression.

  17. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn; van Hall, Gerrit; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo, leucine, BCAA, or EAA (including the BCAA) in random order. Muscle biopsies were taken at rest, immediately after exercise, and following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Following 90 min of recovery the activity of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) was greater than at rest in all four trials (PlaceboBCAABCAA. However, after 180 min of recovery this difference between EAA and BCAA had disappeared, although with both these supplements the increases were still higher than with leucine (40%, P BCAA. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Insulin signaling and skeletal muscle atrophy and autophagy in transition dairy cows either overfed energy or fed a controlled energy diet prepartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, S; Abuelo, A; Nydam, D V; Leal Yepes, F A; Overton, T R; Wakshlag, J J

    2016-05-01

    During periods of negative energy balance, mobilization of muscle is a physiologic process providing energy and amino acids. This is important in transition dairy cows experiencing negative energy and protein balance postpartum. Overconsumption of energy during late pregnancy affects resting glucose and insulin concentrations peripartum and increases the risk for hyperketonemia postpartum, but the effects on muscle tissue are not fully understood. Skeletal muscle accounts for the majority of insulin-dependent glucose utilization in ruminants. Our objective was to study peripartal skeletal muscle insulin signaling as well as muscle accretion and atrophy in cows with excess energy consumption prepartum. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained 28 and 10 days prepartum, as well as 4 and 21 days postpartum from 24 Holstein cows. Biopsies were taken immediately before and 60 min after intravenous glucose challenge causing endogenous release of insulin. Gene expression of IGF-1, myostatin, and atrogin-1, as well as immunoblot analysis of atrogin-1, muRF1, ubiquitinated proteins, LC3, and phosphorylation of AKT, ERK and mTORC1 substrate 4EBP1 was performed. Excess energy consumption in late pregnancy did not lead to changes in insulin-dependent molecular regulation of muscle accretion or atrophy compared with the controlled energy group. In both groups, phosphorylation of AKT and mTORC1 substrate was significantly decreased postpartum whereas proteasome activity and macroautopagy were upregulated. This study showed that in addition to the proteasome pathway of muscle atrophy, macroautophagy is upregulated in postpartum negative energy and protein balance regardless of dietary energy strategy prepartum and was higher in cows overfed energy throughout the study period.

  19. Acidic tumor microenvironment abrogates the efficacy of mTORC1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faes, Seraina; Duval, Adrian P; Planche, Anne; Uldry, Emilie; Santoro, Tania; Pythoud, Catherine; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Horlbeck, Janine; Letovanec, Igor; Riggi, Nicolo; Demartines, Nicolas; Dormond, Olivier

    2016-12-05

    Blocking the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1) with chemical inhibitors such as rapamycin has shown limited clinical efficacy in cancer. The tumor microenvironment is characterized by an acidic pH which interferes with cancer therapies. The consequences of acidity on the anti-cancer efficacy of mTORC1 inhibitors have not been characterized and are thus the focus of our study. Cancer cell lines were treated with rapamycin in acidic or physiological conditions and cell proliferation was investigated. The effect of acidity on mTORC1 activity was determined by Western blot. The anticancer efficacy of rapamycin in combination with sodium bicarbonate to increase the intratumoral pH was tested in two different mouse models and compared to rapamycin treatment alone. Histological analysis was performed on tumor samples to evaluate proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. Exposing cancer cells to acidic pH in vitro significantly reduced the anti-proliferative effect of rapamycin. At the molecular level, acidity significantly decreased mTORC1 activity, suggesting that cancer cell proliferation is independent of mTORC1 in acidic conditions. In contrast, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or AKT were not affected by acidity, and blocking MAPK or AKT with a chemical inhibitor maintained an anti-proliferative effect at low pH. In tumor mouse models, the use of sodium bicarbonate increased mTORC1 activity in cancer cells and potentiated the anti-cancer efficacy of rapamycin. Combining sodium bicarbonate with rapamycin resulted in increased tumor necrosis, increased cancer cell apoptosis and decreased cancer cell proliferation as compared to single treatment. Taken together, these results emphasize the inefficacy of mTORC1 inhibitors in acidic conditions. They further highlight the potential of combining sodium bicarbonate with mTORC1 inhibitors to improve their anti-tumoral efficacy.

  20. Calcium signaling in smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Eubanks, David C; Werner, Matthias E; Heppner, Thomas J; Nelson, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Changes in intracellular Ca(2+) are central to the function of smooth muscle, which lines the walls of all hollow organs. These changes take a variety of forms, from sustained, cell-wide increases to temporally varying, localized changes. The nature of the Ca(2+) signal is a reflection of the source of Ca(2+) (extracellular or intracellular) and the molecular entity responsible for generating it. Depending on the specific channel involved and the detection technology employed, extracellular Ca(2+) entry may be detected optically as graded elevations in intracellular Ca(2+), junctional Ca(2+) transients, Ca(2+) flashes, or Ca(2+) sparklets, whereas release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores may manifest as Ca(2+) sparks, Ca(2+) puffs, or Ca(2+) waves. These diverse Ca(2+) signals collectively regulate a variety of functions. Some functions, such as contractility, are unique to smooth muscle; others are common to other excitable cells (e.g., modulation of membrane potential) and nonexcitable cells (e.g., regulation of gene expression).

  1. Dynamics of mTORC1 activation in response to amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manifava, Maria; Smith, Matthew; Rotondo, Sergio; Walker, Simon; Niewczas, Izabella; Zoncu, Roberto; Clark, Jonathan; Ktistakis, Nicholas T

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids are essential activators of mTORC1 via a complex containing RAG GTPases, RAGULATOR and the vacuolar ATPase. Sensing of amino acids causes translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes, an obligate step for activation. To examine the spatial and temporal dynamics of this translocation, we used live imaging of the mTORC1 component RAPTOR and a cell permeant fluorescent analogue of di-leucine methyl ester. Translocation to lysosomes is a transient event, occurring within 2 min of aa addition and peaking within 5 min. It is temporally coupled with fluorescent leucine appearance in lysosomes and is sustained in comparison to aa stimulation. Sestrin2 and the vacuolar ATPase are negative and positive regulators of mTORC1 activity in our experimental system. Of note, phosphorylation of canonical mTORC1 targets is delayed compared to lysosomal translocation suggesting a dynamic and transient passage of mTORC1 from the lysosomal surface before targetting its substrates elsewhere. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19960.001 PMID:27725083

  2. Cardiac mTORC1 Dysregulation Impacts Stress Adaptation and Survival in Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel D. Child

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Huntington’s disease (HD is a dominantly inherited neurological disorder caused by CAG-repeat expansion in exon 1 of Huntingtin (HTT. But in addition to the neurological disease, mutant HTT (mHTT, which is ubiquitously expressed, impairs other organ systems. Indeed, epidemiological and animal model studies suggest higher incidence of and mortality from heart disease in HD. Here, we show that the protein complex mTORC1 is dysregulated in two HD mouse models through a mechanism that requires intrinsic mHTT expression. Moreover, restoring cardiac mTORC1 activity with constitutively active Rheb prevents mortality and relieves the mHTT-induced block to hypertrophic adaptation to cardiac stress. Finally, we show that chronic mTORC1 dysregulation is due in part to mislocalization of endogenous Rheb. These data provide insight into the increased cardiac-related mortality of HD patients, with cardiac mHTT expression inhibiting mTORC1 activity, limiting heart growth, and decreasing the heart’s ability to compensate to chronic stress. : Child et al. demonstrate that mTORC1 dysregulation is a key molecular mechanism in the Huntington’s disease (HD heart phenotype. Impaired cardiac mTORC1 activity in HD mouse models requires intrinsic mHTT expression and explains the limited adaptation to cardiac stress. Keywords: Huntington’s disease, heart, mTOR, Rheb

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs

  4. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Song, Sang Heon [Department of Internal Medicine, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hwa Kyoung [Department of Anatomy, Pusan National University School of Korean Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sun Sik, E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr [Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  5. Aspirin disrupts the mTOR-Raptor complex and potentiates the anti-cancer activities of sorafenib via mTORC1 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Danni; Liu, Hongchun; Dai, Xiaoyang; Zheng, Xingling; Yan, Juan; Wei, Rongrui; Fu, Xuhong; Huang, Min; Shen, Aijun; Huang, Xun; Ding, Jian; Geng, Meiyu

    2017-10-10

    Aspirin is associated with a reduced risk of cancer and delayed progression of malignant disease. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mTOR signaling is believed to partially contribute to these anticancer effects, although the mechanism is unclear. In this study, we revealed the mechanism underlying the effects of aspirin on AMPK-mTOR signaling, and described a mechanism-based rationale for the use of aspirin in cancer therapy. We found that aspirin inhibited mTORC1 signaling through AMPK-dependent and -independent manners. Aspirin inhibited the AMPK-TSC pathway, thus resulting in the suppression of mTORC1 activity. In parallel, it directly disrupted the mTOR-raptor interaction. Additionally, the combination of aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic effects via inhibiting mTORC1 signaling and the PI3K/AKT, MAPK/ERK pathways. Aspirin and sorafenib showed synergetic anticancer efficacy in the SMMC-7721 model. Our study provides mechanistic insights and a mechanism-based rationale for the roles of aspirin in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A new functional role for mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in avian cone photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy Chia-Yu Huang

    Full Text Available In the retina, the L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs are responsible for neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and are under circadian regulation. Both the current densities and protein expression of L-VGCCs are significantly higher at night than during the day. However, the underlying mechanisms of circadian regulation of L-VGCCs in the retina are not completely understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC signaling pathway participated in the circadian phase-dependent modulation of L-VGCCs. The activities of the mTOR cascade, from mTORC1 to its downstream targets, displayed circadian oscillations throughout the course of a day. Disruption of mTORC1 signaling dampened the L-VGCC current densities, as well as the protein expression of L-VGCCs at night. The decrease of L-VGCCs at night by mTORC1 inhibition was in part due to a reduction of L-VGCCα1 subunit translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Finally, we showed that mTORC1 was downstream of the phosphatidylionositol 3 kinase-protein kinase B (PI3K-AKT signaling pathway. Taken together, mTORC1 signaling played a role in the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs, in part through regulation of ion channel trafficking and translocation, which brings to light a new functional role for mTORC1: the modulation of ion channel activities.

  7. Acquired Resistance of EGFR-Mutant Lung Adenocarcinomas to Afatinib plus Cetuximab Is Associated with Activation of mTORC1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Pirazzoli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas (LUADs who initially respond to first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs develop resistance to these drugs. A combination of the irreversible TKI afatinib and the EGFR antibody cetuximab can be used to overcome resistance to first-generation TKIs; however, resistance to this drug combination eventually emerges. We identified activation of the mTORC1 signaling pathway as a mechanism of resistance to dual inhibition of EGFR in mouse models. The addition of rapamycin reversed resistance in vivo. Analysis of afatinib-plus-cetuximab-resistant biopsy specimens revealed the presence of genomic alterations in genes that modulate mTORC1 signaling, including NF2 and TSC1. These findings pinpoint enhanced mTORC1 activation as a mechanism of resistance to afatinib plus cetuximab and identify genomic mechanisms that lead to activation of this pathway, revealing a potential therapeutic strategy for treating patients with resistance to these drugs.

  8. Preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a potent and selective inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2: distinct from rapamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Shripad V; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Crew, Andrew P; Cooke, Andy; Yao, Yan; Mantis, Christine; Kahler, Jennifer; Workman, Jennifer; Bittner, Mark; Dudkin, Lorina; Epstein, David M; Gibson, Neil W; Wild, Robert; Arnold, Lee D; Houghton, Peter J; Pachter, Jonathan A

    2011-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, and mTOR is a clinically validated target. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which regulate cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. Rapamycin and its analogues partially inhibit mTOR through allosteric binding to mTORC1, but not mTORC2, and have shown clinical utility in certain cancers. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a selective and potent dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 with biochemical IC(50) values of 22 nmol/L and 65 nmol/L, respectively. OSI-027 shows more than 100-fold selectivity for mTOR relative to PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ, and DNA-PK. OSI-027 inhibits phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates 4E-BP1 and S6K1 as well as the mTORC2 substrate AKT in diverse cancer models in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 and OXA-01 (close analogue of OSI-027) potently inhibit proliferation of several rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive nonengineered and engineered cancer cell lines and also, induce cell death in tumor cell lines with activated PI3K-AKT signaling. OSI-027 shows concentration-dependent pharmacodynamic effects on phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT in tumor tissue with resulting tumor growth inhibition. OSI-027 shows robust antitumor activity in several different human xenograft models representing various histologies. Furthermore, in COLO 205 and GEO colon cancer xenograft models, OSI-027 shows superior efficacy compared with rapamycin. Our results further support the important role of mTOR as a driver of tumor growth and establish OSI-027 as a potent anticancer agent. OSI-027 is currently in phase I clinical trials in cancer patients. ©2011 AACR

  9. Therapeutic potential of a dual mTORC1/2 inhibitor for the prevention of posterior capsule opacification: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Hao; Yang, Zhibo; Bai, Xue; Yang, Meirong; Fang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaonan; Guo, Qiqiang; Ning, Hong

    2018-04-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) serves a central role in regulating cell growth and survival, and has been demonstrated to be involved in the pathological progression of posterior capsule opacification (PCO). In the present study, the potency of PP242, a novel dual inhibitor of mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2), in the suppression of the growth of human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) was investigated. Using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 and a wound healing assay, it was demonstrated that PP242 inhibited the proliferation and migration of HLECs. In addition, western blot analysis indicated that PP242 completely inhibited mTORC1 and mTORC2 downstream signaling activities, whereas rapamycin only partially inhibited mTORC1 activity within LECs. Furthermore, PP242 treatment led to an upregulation of the expression levels of p53 and B cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2)‑associated X and downregulation of Bcl‑2. In addition, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that PP242 induced the cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase, which may have caused apoptosis and induced autophagy within the LECs. The results of the present study suggested that administration of PP242 may potentially offer a novel therapeutic approach for the prevention of PCO.

  10. Interleukin-6 myokine signaling in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Scheele, Camilla; Pedersen, Bente K

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a cytokine with pleiotropic functions in different tissues and organs. Skeletal muscle produces and releases significant levels of IL-6 after prolonged exercise and is therefore considered as a myokine. Muscle is also an important target of the cytokine. IL-6 signaling has b...

  11. Activation of mTORC1 by leucine is potentiated by branched-chain amino acids and even more so by essential amino acids following resistance exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Marcus; Apró, William; Ekblom, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis is stimulated by resistance exercise and intake of amino acids, in particular leucine. Moreover, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling by leucine is potentiated by the presence of other essential amino acids (EAA). However, the contribution...... of the branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to this effect is yet unknown. Here we compare the stimulatory role of leucine, BCAA, and EAA ingestion on anabolic signaling following exercise. Accordingly, eight trained volunteers completed four sessions of resistance exercise during which they ingested either placebo...

  12. mTORC1 directly phosphorylates and regulates human MAF1.

    OpenAIRE

    Michels Annemieke A; Robitaille Aaron M; Buczynski-Ruchonnet Diane; Hodroj Wassim; Reina Jaime H; Hall Michael N; Hernandez Nouria

    2010-01-01

    mTORC1 is a central regulator of growth in response to nutrient availability, but few direct targets have been identified. RNA polymerase (pol) III produces a number of essential RNA molecules involved in protein synthesis, RNA maturation, and other processes. Its activity is highly regulated, and deregulation can lead to cell transformation. The human phosphoprotein MAF1 becomes dephosphorylated and represses pol III transcription after various stresses, but neither the significance of the p...

  13. Dose-Dependent AMPK-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms of Berberine and Metformin Inhibition of mTORC1, ERK, DNA Synthesis and Proliferation in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ming

    Full Text Available Natural products represent a rich reservoir of potential small chemical molecules exhibiting anti-proliferative and chemopreventive properties. Here, we show that treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells (PANC-1, MiaPaCa-2 with the isoquinoline alkaloid berberine (0.3-6 µM inhibited DNA synthesis and proliferation of these cells and delay the progression of their cell cycle in G1. Berberine treatment also reduced (by 70% the growth of MiaPaCa-2 cell growth when implanted into the flanks of nu/nu mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that berberine decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP levels and induced potent AMPK activation, as shown by phosphorylation of AMPK α subunit at Thr-172 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79. Furthermore, berberine dose-dependently inhibited mTORC1 (phosphorylation of S6K at Thr389 and S6 at Ser240/244 and ERK activation in PDAC cells stimulated by insulin and neurotensin or fetal bovine serum. Knockdown of α1 and α2 catalytic subunit expression of AMPK reversed the inhibitory effect produced by treatment with low concentrations of berberine on mTORC1, ERK and DNA synthesis in PDAC cells. However, at higher concentrations, berberine inhibited mitogenic signaling (mTORC1 and ERK and DNA synthesis through an AMPK-independent mechanism. Similar results were obtained with metformin used at doses that induced either modest or pronounced reductions in intracellular ATP levels, which were virtually identical to the decreases in ATP levels obtained in response to berberine. We propose that berberine and metformin inhibit mitogenic signaling in PDAC cells through dose-dependent AMPK-dependent and independent pathways.

  14. Sleep deprivation impairs memory by attenuating mTORC1-dependent protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Jennifer C; Davis, Emily J; Peixoto, Lucia; Wimmer, Mathieu E; van Tilborg, Erik; Park, Alan J; Poplawski, Shane G; Chung, Caroline W; Havekes, Robbert; Huang, Jiayan; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe; Abel, Ted

    2016-04-26

    Sleep deprivation is a public health epidemic that causes wide-ranging deleterious consequences, including impaired memory and cognition. Protein synthesis in hippocampal neurons promotes memory and cognition. The kinase complex mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) stimulates protein synthesis by phosphorylating and inhibiting the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 2 (4EBP2). We investigated the involvement of the mTORC1-4EBP2 axis in the molecular mechanisms mediating the cognitive deficits caused by sleep deprivation in mice. Using an in vivo protein translation assay, we found that loss of sleep impaired protein synthesis in the hippocampus. Five hours of sleep loss attenuated both mTORC1-mediated phosphorylation of 4EBP2 and the interaction between eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and eIF4G in the hippocampi of sleep-deprived mice. Increasing the abundance of 4EBP2 in hippocampal excitatory neurons before sleep deprivation increased the abundance of phosphorylated 4EBP2, restored the amount of eIF4E-eIF4G interaction and hippocampal protein synthesis to that seen in mice that were not sleep-deprived, and prevented the hippocampus-dependent memory deficits associated with sleep loss. These findings collectively demonstrate that 4EBP2-regulated protein synthesis is a critical mediator of the memory deficits caused by sleep deprivation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Okada, Masato, E-mail: okadam@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Oncogene Research, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome-lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  16. The late endosome/lysosome-anchored p18-mTORC1 pathway controls terminal maturation of lysosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mori, Shunsuke; Soma-Nagae, Taeko; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► p18 is a membrane adaptor that anchors mTORC1 to late endosomes/lysosomes. ► We examine the role of the p18-mTORC1 pathway in lysosome biogenesis. ► The loss of p18 causes accumulation of intact late endosomes by arresting lysosome maturation. ► Inhibition of mTORC1 activity with rapamycin phenocopies the defects of p18 loss. ► The p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the terminal maturation of lysosomes. -- Abstract: The late endosome/lysosome membrane adaptor p18 (or LAMTOR1) serves as an anchor for the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and is required for its activation on lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes severe defects in cell growth as well as endosome dynamics, including membrane protein transport and lysosome biogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects on lysosome biogenesis remain unknown. Here, we show that the p18-mTORC1 pathway is crucial for terminal maturation of lysosomes. The loss of p18 causes aberrant intracellular distribution and abnormal sizes of late endosomes/lysosomes and an accumulation of late endosome specific components, including Rab7, RagC, and LAMP1; this suggests that intact late endosomes accumulate in the absence of p18. These defects are phenocopied by inhibiting mTORC1 activity with rapamycin. Loss of p18 also suppresses the integration of late endosomes and lysosomes, resulting in the defective degradation of tracer proteins. These results suggest that the p18-mTORC1 pathway plays crucial roles in the late stages of lysosomal maturation, potentially in late endosome–lysosome fusion, which is required for processing of various macromolecules.

  17. mTORC1 Coordinates Protein Synthesis and Immunoproteasome Formation via PRAS40 to Prevent Accumulation of Protein Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Young Sung; Kim, Kwan Hyun; Tschida, Barbara; Sachs, Zohar; Noble-Orcutt, Klara E; Moriarity, Branden S; Ai, Teng; Ding, Rui; Williams, Jessica; Chen, Liqiang; Largaespada, David; Kim, Do-Hyung

    2016-02-18

    Reduction of translational fidelity often occurs in cells with high rates of protein synthesis, generating defective ribosomal products. If not removed, such aberrant proteins can be a major source of cellular stress causing human diseases. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 promotes the formation of immunoproteasomes for efficient turnover of defective proteins and cell survival. mTORC1 sequesters precursors of immunoproteasome β subunits via PRAS40. When activated, mTORC1 phosphorylates PRAS40 to enhance protein synthesis and simultaneously to facilitate the assembly of the β subunits for forming immunoproteasomes. Consequently, the PRAS40 phosphorylations play crucial roles in clearing aberrant proteins that accumulate due to mTORC1 activation. Mutations of RAS, PTEN, and TSC1, which cause mTORC1 hyperactivation, enhance immunoproteasome formation in cells and tissues. Those mutations increase cellular dependence on immunoproteasomes for stress response and survival. These results define a mechanism by which mTORC1 couples elevated protein synthesis with immunoproteasome biogenesis to protect cells against protein stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rac1 Regulates the Activity of mTORC1 and mTORC2 and Controls Cellular Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saci, Abdelhafid; Cantley, Lewis C.; Carpenter, Christopher L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that exists in two separate complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that function to control cell size and growth in response to growth factors, nutrients, and cellular energy levels. Low molecular weight GTP-binding proteins of the Rheb and Rag families are key regulators of the mTORC1 complex, but regulation of mTORC2 is poorly understood. Here, we report that Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is a critical regulator of both mTORC1 and mTORC2 in response to growth-factor stimulation. Deletion of Rac1 in primary cells using an inducible-Cre/Lox approach inhibits basal and growth-factor activation of both mTORC1 and mTORC2. Rac1 appears to bind directly to mTOR and to mediate mTORC1 and mTORC2 localization at specific membranes. Binding of Rac1 to mTOR does not depend on the GTP-bound state of Rac1, but on the integrity of its C-terminal domain. This function of Rac1 provides a means to regulate mTORC1 and mTORC2 simultaneously. PMID:21474067

  19. Prostaglandin E2 activates the mTORC1 pathway through an EP4/cAMP/PKA- and EP1/Ca2+-mediated mechanism in the human pancreatic carcinoma cell line PANC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Hua; Young, Steven H; Sinnett-Smith, James; Chou, Caroline Ei Ne; Moro, Aune; Hertzer, Kathleen M; Hines, Oscar Joe; Rozengurt, Enrique; Eibl, Guido

    2015-11-15

    Obesity, a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, is associated with inflammation and insulin resistance. Proinflammatory prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and elevated insulin-like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1), related to insulin resistance, are shown to play critical roles in pancreatic cancer progression. We aimed to explore a potential cross talk between PGE2 signaling and the IGF-1/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in pancreatic cancer, which may be a key to unraveling the obesity-cancer link. In PANC-1 human pancreatic cancer cells, we showed that PGE2 stimulated mTORC1 activity independently of Akt, as evaluated by downstream signaling events. Subsequently, using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we demonstrated that PGE2-induced mTORC1 activation is mediated by the EP4/cAMP/PKA pathway, as well as an EP1/Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. The cooperative roles of the two pathways were supported by the maximal inhibition achieved with the combined pharmacological blockade, and the coexistence of highly expressed EP1 (mediating the Ca(2+) response) and EP2 or EP4 (mediating the cAMP/PKA pathway) in PANC-1 cells and in the prostate cancer line PC-3, which also robustly exhibited PGE2-induced mTORC1 activation, as identified from a screen in various cancer cell lines. Importantly, we showed a reinforcing interaction between PGE2 and IGF-1 on mTORC1 signaling, with an increase in IL-23 production as a cellular outcome. Our data reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism of PGE2-stimulated mTORC1 activation mediated by EP4/cAMP/PKA and EP1/Ca(2+) signaling, which may be of great importance in elucidating the promoting effects of obesity in pancreatic cancer. Ultimately, a precise understanding of these molecular links may provide novel targets for efficacious interventions devoid of adverse effects. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Selective targeting of the mTORC1/2 protein kinase complexes leads to antileukemic effects in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, K; Zheng, J; Arbini, A A; Zhang, C C; Scaglioni, P P

    2011-01-01

    The BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase promotes leukemogenesis through activation of several targets that include the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which target BCR/ABL, induce striking clinical responses. However, therapy with TKIs is associated with limitations such as drug intolerance, inability to universally eradicate the disease and emergence of BCR/ABL drug-resistant mutants. To overcome these limitations, we tested whether inhibition of the PI3K/target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway has antileukemic effect in primary hematopoietic stem cells and BA/F3 cells expressing the BCR/ABL oncoprotein. We determined that dual inhibition of PI3K/mTOR causes growth arrest and apoptosis leading to profound antileukemic effects both in vitro and in vivo. We also established that pharmacologic inhibition of the mTORC1/mTORC2 complexes is sufficient to cause these antileukemic effects. Our results support the development of inhibitors of the mTORC1/2 complexes for the therapy of leukemias that either express BCR/ABL or display deregulation of the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathway

  1. Multi-organ abnormalities and mTORC1 activation in zebrafish model of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hyung Kim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MADD is a severe mitochondrial disorder featuring multi-organ dysfunction. Mutations in either the ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH genes can cause MADD but very little is known about disease specific mechanisms due to a paucity of animal models. We report a novel zebrafish mutant dark xavier (dxa(vu463 that has an inactivating mutation in the etfa gene. dxa(vu463 recapitulates numerous pathological and biochemical features seen in patients with MADD including brain, liver, and kidney disease. Similar to children with MADD, homozygote mutant dxa(vu463 zebrafish have a spectrum of phenotypes ranging from moderate to severe. Interestingly, excessive maternal feeding significantly exacerbated the phenotype. Homozygous mutant dxa(vu463 zebrafish have swollen and hyperplastic neural progenitor cells, hepatocytes and kidney tubule cells as well as elevations in triacylglycerol, cerebroside sulfate and cholesterol levels. Their mitochondria were also greatly enlarged, lacked normal cristae, and were dysfunctional. We also found increased signaling of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 with enlarged cell size and proliferation. Treatment with rapamycin partially reversed these abnormalities. Our results indicate that etfa gene function is remarkably conserved in zebrafish as compared to humans with highly similar pathological, biochemical abnormalities to those reported in children with MADD. Altered mTORC1 signaling and maternal nutritional status may play critical roles in MADD disease progression and suggest novel treatment approaches that may ameliorate disease severity.

  2. Role of mTORC1 Controlling Proteostasis after Brain Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Perez-Alvarez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Intense efforts are being undertaken to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms triggered after brain ischemia and to develop effective pharmacological treatments. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are complex and not completely understood. One of the main problems is the fact that the ischemic damage is time-dependent and ranges from negligible to massive, involving different cell types such as neurons, astrocytes, microglia, endothelial cells, and some blood-derived cells (neutrophils, lymphocytes, etc.. Thus, approaching such a complicated cellular response generates a more complex combination of molecular mechanisms, in which cell death, cellular damage, stress and repair are intermixed. For this reason, animal and cellular model systems are needed in order to dissect and clarify which molecular mechanisms have to be promoted and/or blocked. Brain ischemia may be analyzed from two different perspectives: that of oxygen deprivation (hypoxic damage per se and that of deprivation of glucose/serum factors. For investigations of ischemic stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO is the preferred in vivo model, and uses two different approaches: transient (tMCAO, where reperfusion is permitted; or permanent (pMCAO. As a complement to this model, many laboratories expose different primary cortical neuron or neuronal cell lines to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. This ex vivo model permits the analysis of the impact of hypoxic damage and the specific response of different cell types implicated in vivo, such as neurons, glia or endothelial cells. Using in vivo and neuronal OGD models, it was recently established that mTORC1 (mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex-1, a protein complex downstream of PI3K-Akt pathway, is one of the players deregulated after ischemia and OGD. In addition, neuroprotective intervention either by estradiol or by specific AT2R agonists shows an important regulatory role for the mTORC1 activity, for instance regulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF levels. This evidence highlights the importance of understanding the role of mTORC1 in neuronal death/survival processes, as it could be a potential therapeutic target. This review summarizes the state-of-the-art of the complex kinase mTORC1 focusing in upstream and downstream pathways, their role in central nervous system and their relationship with autophagy, apoptosis and neuroprotection/neurodegeneration after ischemia/hypoxia.

  3. PDMP, a ceramide analogue, acts as an inhibitor of mTORC1 by inducing its translocation from lysosome to endoplasmic reticulum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ode, Takashi [Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A.; Terasawa, Kazue [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Inokuchi, Jin-ichi [Division of Glycopathology, Institute of Molecular Biomembrane and Glycobiology, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1, Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 981-8558 (Japan); Kobayashi, Toshihide [Lipid Biology Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); CNRS, UMR 7213, University of Strasbourg, 67401 Illkirch (France); Watabe, Tetsuro [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Izumi, Yuichi [Department of Periodontology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan); Hara-Yokoyama, Miki, E-mail: m.yokoyama.bch@tmd.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU), 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8510 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cell growth, metabolism, and cell differentiation. Recent studies have revealed that the recruitment of mTORC1 to lysosomes is essential for its activation. The ceramide analogue 1-phenyl-2-decanoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP), a well known glycosphingolipid synthesis inhibitor, also affects the structures and functions of various organelles, including lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We investigated whether PDMP regulates the mTORC1 activity through its effects on organellar behavior. PDMP induced the translocation of mTORC1 from late endosomes/lysosomes, leading to the dissociation of mTORC1 from its activator Rheb in MC3T3-E1 cells. Surprisingly, we found mTORC1 translocation to the ER upon PDMP treatment. This effect of PDMP was independent of its action as the inhibitor, since two stereoisomers of PDMP, with and without the inhibitor activity, showed essentially the same effect. We confirmed that PDMP inhibits the mTORC1 activity based on the decrease in the phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase, a downstream target of mTORC1, and the increase in LC3 puncta, reflecting autophagosome formation. Furthermore, PDMP inhibited the mTORC1-dependent osteoblastic cell proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Accordingly, the present results reveal a novel mechanism of PDMP, which inhibits the mTORC1 activity by inducing the translocation of mTOR from lysosomes to the ER. - Highlights: • The ceramide analogue, PDMP, suppressed the activation of mTORC1. • PDMP induced the translocation of mTOR from lysosomes to ER. • PDMP led to the dissociation of mTOR from its activator Rheb. • PDMP inhibited the mTORC1-dependent osteoblastic cell proliferation.

  4. La-related protein 1 (LARP1) represses terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) mRNA translation downstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Bruno; Zakaria, Chadi; Jia, J J

    2015-01-01

    is incompletely understood. Here, we report that LARP1 functions as a key repressor of TOP mRNA translation downstream of mTORC1. Our data show the following: (i) LARP1 associates with mTORC1 via RAPTOR; (ii) LARP1 interacts with TOP mRNAs in an mTORC1-dependent manner; (iii) LARP1 binds the 5′TOP motif...

  5. Targeting deregulated AMPK/mTORC1 pathways improves muscle function in myotonic dystrophy type I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhoff, Marielle; Rion, Nathalie; Chojnowska, Kathrin; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Eickhorst, Christopher; Erne, Beat; Frank, Stephan; Angelini, Corrado; Furling, Denis; Rüegg, Markus A; Sinnreich, Michael; Castets, Perrine

    2017-02-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1) is a disabling multisystemic disease that predominantly affects skeletal muscle. It is caused by expanded CTG repeats in the 3'-UTR of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene. RNA hairpins formed by elongated DMPK transcripts sequester RNA-binding proteins, leading to mis-splicing of numerous pre-mRNAs. Here, we have investigated whether DM1-associated muscle pathology is related to deregulation of central metabolic pathways, which may identify potential therapeutic targets for the disease. In a well-characterized mouse model for DM1 (HSALR mice), activation of AMPK signaling in muscle was impaired under starved conditions, while mTORC1 signaling remained active. In parallel, autophagic flux was perturbed in HSALR muscle and in cultured human DM1 myotubes. Pharmacological approaches targeting AMPK/mTORC1 signaling greatly ameliorated muscle function in HSALR mice. AICAR, an AMPK activator, led to a strong reduction of myotonia, which was accompanied by partial correction of misregulated alternative splicing. Rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor, improved muscle relaxation and increased muscle force in HSALR mice without affecting splicing. These findings highlight the involvement of AMPK/mTORC1 deregulation in DM1 muscle pathophysiology and may open potential avenues for the treatment of this disease.

  6. Regulation of Metabolic Signaling in Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth

    sensitivity in type I muscle fibers possibly reflects a superior effect of insulin on metabolic signaling compared to type II muscle fibers. This was investigated in the present thesis by examining muscle biopsies from lean and obese healthy subjects as well as patients with type 2 diabetes. From these muscle...

  7. Computational analysis of an autophagy/translation switch based on mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Szymańska

    Full Text Available We constructed a mechanistic, computational model for regulation of (macroautophagy and protein synthesis (at the level of translation. The model was formulated to study the system-level consequences of interactions among the following proteins: two key components of MTOR complex 1 (MTORC1, namely the protein kinase MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin and the scaffold protein RPTOR; the autophagy-initiating protein kinase ULK1; and the multimeric energy-sensing AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Inputs of the model include intrinsic AMPK kinase activity, which is taken as an adjustable surrogate parameter for cellular energy level or AMP:ATP ratio, and rapamycin dose, which controls MTORC1 activity. Outputs of the model include the phosphorylation level of the translational repressor EIF4EBP1, a substrate of MTORC1, and the phosphorylation level of AMBRA1 (activating molecule in BECN1-regulated autophagy, a substrate of ULK1 critical for autophagosome formation. The model incorporates reciprocal regulation of mTORC1 and ULK1 by AMPK, mutual inhibition of MTORC1 and ULK1, and ULK1-mediated negative feedback regulation of AMPK. Through analysis of the model, we find that these processes may be responsible, depending on conditions, for graded responses to stress inputs, for bistable switching between autophagy and protein synthesis, or relaxation oscillations, comprising alternating periods of autophagy and protein synthesis. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the prediction of oscillatory behavior is robust to changes of the parameter values of the model. The model provides testable predictions about the behavior of the AMPK-MTORC1-ULK1 network, which plays a central role in maintaining cellular energy and nutrient homeostasis.

  8. Leucine elicits myotube hypertrophy and enhances maximal contractile force in tissue engineered skeletal muscle in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Neil R W; Turner, Mark C; Farrington, Robert; Player, Darren J; Lewis, Mark P

    2017-10-01

    The amino acid leucine is thought to be important for skeletal muscle growth by virtue of its ability to acutely activate mTORC1 and enhance muscle protein synthesis, yet little data exist regarding its impact on skeletal muscle size and its ability to produce force. We utilized a tissue engineering approach in order to test whether supplementing culture medium with leucine could enhance mTORC1 signaling, myotube growth, and muscle function. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target proteins 4EBP-1 and rpS6 and myotube hypertrophy appeared to occur in a dose dependent manner, with 5 and 20 mM of leucine inducing similar effects, which were greater than those seen with 1 mM. Maximal contractile force was also elevated with leucine supplementation; however, although this did not appear to be enhanced with increasing leucine doses, this effect was completely ablated by co-incubation with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, showing that the augmented force production in the presence of leucine was mTOR sensitive. Finally, by using electrical stimulation to induce chronic (24 hr) contraction of engineered skeletal muscle constructs, we were able to show that the effects of leucine and muscle contraction are additive, since the two stimuli had cumulative effects on maximal contractile force production. These results extend our current knowledge of the efficacy of leucine as an anabolic nutritional aid showing for the first time that leucine supplementation may augment skeletal muscle functional capacity, and furthermore validates the use of engineered skeletal muscle for highly-controlled investigations into nutritional regulation of muscle physiology. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by wiley periodicals, Inc.

  9. Wnt Signaling in Skeletal Muscle Development and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Francesco; Le Grand, Fabien

    2018-01-01

    Wnt is a family of signaling molecules involved in embryogenesis, adult tissue repair, and cancer. They activate canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling cascades in target cells. Several studies, within the last decades, showed that several Wnt ligands are involved in myogenesis and both canonical and noncanonical Wnt pathways regulate muscle formation and the maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the roles of Wnt signaling during muscle development and an updated description of Wnt functions during muscle repair. Lastly, we discuss the crosstalk between Wnt and TGFβ signaling pathways in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Activation of lysosomal function in the course of autophagy via mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing; Tan, Shi-Hao; Nicolas, Valérie; Bauvy, Chantal; Yang, Nai-Di; Zhang, Jianbin; Xue, Yuan; Codogno, Patrice; Shen, Han-Ming

    2013-04-01

    Lysosome is a key subcellular organelle in the execution of the autophagic process and at present little is known whether lysosomal function is controlled in the process of autophagy. In this study, we first found that suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity by starvation or two mTOR catalytic inhibitors (PP242 and Torin1), but not by an allosteric inhibitor (rapamycin), leads to activation of lysosomal function. Second, we provided evidence that activation of lysosomal function is associated with the suppression of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but not mTORC2, and the mTORC1 localization to lysosomes is not directly correlated to its regulatory role in lysosomal function. Third, we examined the involvement of transcription factor EB (TFEB) and demonstrated that TFEB activation following mTORC1 suppression is necessary but not sufficient for lysosomal activation. Finally, Atg5 or Atg7 deletion or blockage of the autophagosome-lysosome fusion process effectively diminished lysosomal activation, suggesting that lysosomal activation occurring in the course of autophagy is dependent on autophagosome-lysosome fusion. Taken together, this study demonstrates that in the course of autophagy, lysosomal function is upregulated via a dual mechanism involving mTORC1 suppression and autophagosome-lysosome fusion.

  11. Metformin inhibition of mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells: Dependence on glucose concentration and role of AMPK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Kisfalvi, Krisztina; Kui, Robert [Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center, David Geffen School of Medicine and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rozengurt, Enrique, E-mail: erozengurt@mednet.ucla.edu [Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center, David Geffen School of Medicine and Molecular Biology Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin inhibits cancer cell growth but the mechanism(s) are not understood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that the potency of metformin is sharply dependent on glucose in the medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AMPK activation was enhanced in cancer cells incubated in physiological glucose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reciprocally, metformin potently inhibited mTORC1, DNA synthesis and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through AMPK. -- Abstract: Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, is emerging as a potential anticancer agent but the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that the potency of metformin induced AMPK activation, as shown by the phosphorylation of its substrates acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser{sup 79} and Raptor at Ser{sup 792}, was dramatically enhanced in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cultured in medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose (5 mM), as compared with parallel cultures in medium with glucose at 25 mM. In physiological glucose, metformin inhibited mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation of PDAC cells stimulated by crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors and insulin/IGF signaling systems, at concentrations (0.05-0.1 mM) that were 10-100-fold lower than those used in most previous reports. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of the {alpha}{sub 1} and {alpha}{sub 2} catalytic subunits of AMPK, we demonstrated that metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Our results emphasize the importance of using medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells and other cancer cell types.

  12. Metformin inhibition of mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation in pancreatic cancer cells: Dependence on glucose concentration and role of AMPK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinnett-Smith, James; Kisfalvi, Krisztina; Kui, Robert; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Metformin inhibits cancer cell growth but the mechanism(s) are not understood. ► We show that the potency of metformin is sharply dependent on glucose in the medium. ► AMPK activation was enhanced in cancer cells incubated in physiological glucose. ► Reciprocally, metformin potently inhibited mTORC1, DNA synthesis and proliferation. ► Metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through AMPK. -- Abstract: Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, is emerging as a potential anticancer agent but the mechanisms involved remain incompletely understood. Here, we demonstrate that the potency of metformin induced AMPK activation, as shown by the phosphorylation of its substrates acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser 79 and Raptor at Ser 792 , was dramatically enhanced in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells PANC-1 and MiaPaCa-2 cultured in medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose (5 mM), as compared with parallel cultures in medium with glucose at 25 mM. In physiological glucose, metformin inhibited mTORC1 activation, DNA synthesis and proliferation of PDAC cells stimulated by crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors and insulin/IGF signaling systems, at concentrations (0.05–0.1 mM) that were 10–100-fold lower than those used in most previous reports. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of the α 1 and α 2 catalytic subunits of AMPK, we demonstrated that metformin, at low concentrations, inhibited DNA synthesis through an AMPK-dependent mechanism. Our results emphasize the importance of using medium containing physiological concentrations of glucose to elucidate the anticancer mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells and other cancer cell types.

  13. Novel mTORC1 and 2 Signaling Pathways in Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    30 27 32 2K (g) 0.35 0.53 0.36 * 2K/TBW (%) 1.1 2.0 1.2 * Cyst volume (%) 0 40.1 14.6 * No of cysts/kidney 0 5.3 0.8 * Heart wt (g) 0.3 0.15 0.17...some delay in the project. There were no other delays in the project Changes that had a significant impact on expenditures Delays in hiring PRA... Heart wt (g) 0.3 0.15 0.17 15 BUN (mg/dL) 24 29 25 SCr (mg/dL) 0.22 0.33 0.2* 2K/TBW (%) Two kidney/total body weight, *pɘ.05 vs. Pkd1

  14. Dual mTORC1/C2 inhibitors suppress cellular geroconversion (a senescence program).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontieva, Olga V; Demidenko, Zoya N; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2015-09-15

    In proliferating cells, mTOR is active and promotes cell growth. When the cell cycle is arrested, then mTOR converts reversible arrest to senescence (geroconversion). Rapamycin and other rapalogs suppress geroconversion, maintaining quiescence instead. Here we showed that ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors (Torin1 and PP242), which inhibit both mTORC1 and TORC2, also suppressed geroconversion. Despite inhibition of proliferation (in proliferating cells), mTOR inhibitors preserved re-proliferative potential (RP) in arrested cells. In p21-arrested cells, Torin 1 and PP242 detectably suppressed geroconversion at concentrations as low as 1-3 nM and 10-30 nM, reaching maximal gerosuppression at 30 nM and 300 nM, respectively. Near-maximal gerosuppression coincided with inhibition of p-S6K(T389) and p-S6(S235/236). Dual mTOR inhibitors prevented senescent morphology and hypertrophy. Our study warrants investigation into whether low doses of dual mTOR inhibitors will prolong animal life span and delay age-related diseases. A new class of potential anti-aging drugs can be envisioned.

  15. Regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle: effects of exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzen, Andreas M.; Madsen, Agnete B.; Kleinert, Maximilian; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lundsgaard, Anne‐Marie; Jensen, Thomas E.; Richter, Erik A.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Kiens, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Key points Regulation of autophagy in human muscle in many aspects differs from the majority of previous reports based on studies in cell systems and rodent muscle.An acute bout of exercise and insulin stimulation reduce human muscle autophagosome content.An acute bout of exercise regulates autophagy by a local contraction‐induced mechanism.Exercise training increases the capacity for formation of autophagosomes in human muscle.AMPK activation during exercise seems insufficient to regulate autophagosome content in muscle, while mTORC1 signalling via ULK1 probably mediates the autophagy‐inhibiting effect of insulin. Abstract Studies in rodent muscle suggest that autophagy is regulated by acute exercise, exercise training and insulin stimulation. However, little is known about the regulation of autophagy in human skeletal muscle. Here we investigate the autophagic response to acute one‐legged exercise, one‐legged exercise training and subsequent insulin stimulation in exercised and non‐exercised human muscle. Acute one‐legged exercise decreased (Pexercise in human muscle. The decrease in LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio did not correlate with activation of 5′AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) trimer complexes in human muscle. Consistently, pharmacological AMPK activation with 5‐aminoimidazole‐4‐carboxamide riboside (AICAR) in mouse muscle did not affect the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. Four hours after exercise, insulin further reduced (Pexercised and non‐exercised leg in humans. This coincided with increased Ser‐757 phosphorylation of Unc51 like kinase 1 (ULK1), which is suggested as a mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) target. Accordingly, inhibition of mTOR signalling in mouse muscle prevented the ability of insulin to reduce the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio. In response to 3 weeks of one‐legged exercise training, the LC3‐II/LC3‐I ratio decreased (Pexercise and insulin stimulation reduce muscle autophagosome content, while exercise

  16. Regulation of PDH, GS and insulin signalling in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup

    of inflammation on resting and exercise-induced PDH regulation in human skeletal muscle and 4) The effect of IL-6 on PDH regulation in mouse skeletal muscle. Study I demonstrated that bed rest–induced insulin resistance was associated with reduced insulinstimulated GS activity and Akt signaling as well...

  17. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Protecting Skeletal Muscle with Protein and Amino Acid during Periods of Disuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfego Galvan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Habitual sedentary behavior increases risk of chronic disease, hospitalization and poor quality of life. Short-term bed rest or disuse accelerates the loss of muscle mass, function, and glucose tolerance. Optimizing nutritional practices and protein intake may reduce the consequences of disuse by preserving metabolic homeostasis and muscle mass and function. Most modes of physical inactivity have the potential to negatively impact the health of older adults more than their younger counterparts. Mechanistically, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis are negatively affected by disuse. This contributes to reduced muscle quality and is accompanied by impaired glucose regulation. Simply encouraging increased protein and/or energy consumption is a well-intentioned, but often impractical strategy to protect muscle health. Emerging evidence suggests that leucine supplemented meals may partially and temporarily protect skeletal muscle during disuse by preserving anabolism and mitigating reductions in mass, function and metabolic homeostasis.

  19. Simultaneous inhibition of mTOR-containing complex 1 (mTORC1) and MNK induces apoptosis of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzec, Michal Tomasz; Liu, Xiaobin; Wysocka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    mTOR kinase forms the mTORC1 complex by associating with raptor and other proteins and affects a number of key cell functions. mTORC1 activates p70S6kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and inhibits 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). In turn, p70S6K1 phosphorylates a S6 protein of the 40S ribosomal subunit (S6rp) and 4E...

  20. Compartmentalization of NO signaling cascade in skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchwalow, Igor B.; Minin, Evgeny A.; Samoilova, Vera E.; Boecker, Werner; Wellner, Maren; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Neumann, Joachim; Punkt, Karla

    2005-01-01

    Skeletal muscle functions regulated by NO are now firmly established. However, the literature on the compartmentalization of NO signaling in myocytes is highly controversial. To address this issue, we examined localization of enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling in the rat quadriceps muscle. Employing immunocytochemical labeling complemented with tyramide signal amplification and electron microscopy, we found NO synthase expressed not only in the sarcolemma, but also along contractile fibers, in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. The expression pattern of NO synthase in myocytes showed striking parallels with the enzymes engaged in L-arginine-NO-cGMP signaling (arginase, phosphodiesterase, and soluble guanylyl cyclase). Our findings are indicative of an autocrine fashion of NO signaling in skeletal muscles at both cellular and subcellular levels, and challenge the notion that the NO generation is restricted to the sarcolemma

  1. LARP1 functions as a molecular switch for mTORC1-mediated translation of an essential class of mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sungki; Freeberg, Mallory A; Han, Ting; Kamath, Avani; Yao, Yao; Fukuda, Tomoko; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Kim, John K; Inoki, Ken

    2017-06-26

    The RNA binding protein, LARP1, has been proposed to function downstream of mTORC1 to regulate the translation of 5'TOP mRNAs such as those encoding ribosome proteins (RP). However, the roles of LARP1 in the translation of 5'TOP mRNAs are controversial and its regulatory roles in mTORC1-mediated translation remain unclear. Here we show that LARP1 is a direct substrate of mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1. Deep sequencing of LARP1-bound mRNAs reveal that non-phosphorylated LARP1 interacts with both 5' and 3'UTRs of RP mRNAs and inhibits their translation. Importantly, phosphorylation of LARP1 by mTORC1 and Akt/S6K1 dissociates it from 5'UTRs and relieves its inhibitory activity on RP mRNA translation. Concomitantly, phosphorylated LARP1 scaffolds mTORC1 on the 3'UTRs of translationally-competent RP mRNAs to facilitate mTORC1-dependent induction of translation initiation. Thus, in response to cellular mTOR activity, LARP1 serves as a phosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch for turning off or on RP mRNA translation and subsequent ribosome biogenesis.

  2. mTORC1 Balances Cellular Amino Acid Supply with Demand for Protein Synthesis through Post-transcriptional Control of ATF4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonwoo Park

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 is a master regulator of cell growth that is commonly deregulated in human diseases. Here we find that mTORC1 controls a transcriptional program encoding amino acid transporters and metabolic enzymes through a mechanism also used to regulate protein synthesis. Bioinformatic analysis of mTORC1-responsive mRNAs identified a promoter element recognized by activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4, a key effector of the integrated stress response. ATF4 translation is normally induced by the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α through a mechanism that requires upstream open reading frames (uORFs in the ATF4 5′ UTR. mTORC1 also controls ATF4 translation through uORFs, but independently of changes in eIF2α phosphorylation. mTORC1 instead employs the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP family of translation repressors. These results link mTORC1-regulated demand for protein synthesis with an ATF4-regulated transcriptional program that controls the supply of amino acids to the translation machinery.

  3. mTORC1 Activator SLC38A9 Is Required to Efflux Essential Amino Acids from Lysosomes and Use Protein as a Nutrient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyant, Gregory A; Abu-Remaileh, Monther; Wolfson, Rachel L; Chen, Walter W; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Danai, Laura V; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Sabatini, David M

    2017-10-19

    The mTORC1 kinase is a master growth regulator that senses many environmental cues, including amino acids. Activation of mTORC1 by arginine requires SLC38A9, a poorly understood lysosomal membrane protein with homology to amino acid transporters. Here, we validate that SLC38A9 is an arginine sensor for the mTORC1 pathway, and we uncover an unexpectedly central role for SLC38A9 in amino acid homeostasis. SLC38A9 mediates the transport, in an arginine-regulated fashion, of many essential amino acids out of lysosomes, including leucine, which mTORC1 senses through the cytosolic Sestrin proteins. SLC38A9 is necessary for leucine generated via lysosomal proteolysis to exit lysosomes and activate mTORC1. Pancreatic cancer cells, which use macropinocytosed protein as a nutrient source, require SLC38A9 to form tumors. Thus, through SLC38A9, arginine serves as a lysosomal messenger that couples mTORC1 activation to the release from lysosomes of the essential amino acids needed to drive cell growth. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Activation by insulin and amino acids of signaling components leading to translation initiation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawan, Agus; Orellana, Renan A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Jeyapalan, Asumthia S; Fleming, Jillian R; Davis, Teresa A

    2007-12-01

    Insulin and amino acids act independently to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs, and the responses decrease with development. The purpose of this study was to compare the separate effects of fed levels of INS and AA on the activation of signaling components leading to translation initiation and how these responses change with development. Overnight-fasted 6- (n = 4/group) and 26-day-old (n = 6/ group) pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemiceuaminoacidemic conditions (controls), 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemichyperaminoacidemic clamps (AA), and 3) hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps (INS). INS, but not AA, increased the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) and tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2). Both INS and AA increased protein synthesis and the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1, and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and these responses were higher in 6-day-old compared with 26-day-old pigs. Both INS and AA decreased the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E and increased eIF4E binding to eIF4G; these effects were greater in 6-day-old than in 26-day-old pigs. Neither INS nor AA altered the composition of mTORC1 (raptor, mTOR, and GbetaL) or mTORC2 (rictor, mTOR, and GbetaL) complexes. Furthermore, neither INS, AA, nor age had any effect on the abundance of Rheb and the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results suggest that the activation by insulin and amino acids of signaling components leading to translation initiation is developmentally regulated and parallels the developmental decline in protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs.

  5. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Signalling role of skeletal muscle during exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catoire, M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract

    Upon acute exercise skeletal muscle is immediately and heavily recruited, while other organs appear to play only a minor role during exercise. These other organs show significant changes and improvements in function, although they are not directly targeted by

  7. GSK-3 directly regulates phospho-4EBP1 in renal cell carcinoma cell-line: an intrinsic subcellular mechanism for resistance to mTORC1 inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hiromi; Ichiyanagi, Osamu; Naito, Sei; Bilim, Vladimir N.; Tomita, Yoshihiko; Kato, Tomoyuki; Nagaoka, Akira; Tsuchiya, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway is aberrantly activated in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We previously demonstrated glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) positively regulated RCC proliferation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of GSK-3 in the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway and regulation of the downstream substrates, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K), and ribosomal protein S6 (S6RP). We used human RCC cell lines (ACHN, Caki1, and A498) and, as normal controls, human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell (HRPTEpC) and non-tumorous kidney tissues that were obtained surgically for treatment of RCC patients. Rapamycin-resistant ACHN (ACHN/RR) cells were generated with chronic exposure of ACHN to rapamycin ranging from 1nM finally to 1 μM. Cell viability, cell cycling and direct interaction between GSK-3β and 4EBP1 were evaluated with MTS assay, flowcytometry and in vitro kinase assay with recombinant GSK-3β and 4EBP1products, respectively. Protein expression and phosphorylation of molecules associated with the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 pathway were examined by immunoblotting. Effects of drug combination were determined as the combination index with CompuSyn software. Overexpression and phosphorylation of 4EBP1 and S6RP together with GSK-3 activation were observed in RCC cell lines, but not in human normal kidney cells and tissues. Cell proliferation, p4EBP1 and pS6RP were strongly suppressed by GSK-3 inhibition. Rapamycin and LY294002 sufficiently decreased pS6RP, but only moderately p4EBP1. In vitro kinase assays showed that recombinant GSK-3β phosphorylated recombinant 4EBP1, and the effect was blocked by GSK-3 inhibitors. Different from rapamycin, AR- A014418 remarkably inhibited cell proliferation, and rapidly suppressed p4EBP1 and pS6RP in ACHN and ACHN/RR (in 30 min to 1 h). AR- A014418 and rapamycin combination showed

  8. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... and insulin signalling transduction remain elusive. We believe that one of the reasons is that the role of intracellular compartmentalization as a regulator of metabolic pathways and signalling transduction has been rather ignored. This paper briefly reviews the literature to discuss the role of intracellular...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...

  9. The E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is a substrate of mTORC1 and regulates its activation by amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxhaj, Gerta; Caddye, Edward; Najafov, Ayaz; Houde, Vanessa P; Johnson, Catherine; Dissanayake, Kumara; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; Prescott, Alan R; MacKintosh, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The mechanistic Target of Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) senses intracellular amino acid levels through an intricate machinery, which includes the Rag GTPases, Ragulator and vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase). The membrane-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF2 is released into the cytosol upon its phosphorylation by Akt. In this study, we show that ZNRF2 interacts with mTOR on membranes, promoting the amino acid-stimulated translocation of mTORC1 to lysosomes and its activation in human cells. ZNRF2 also interacts with the V-ATPase and preserves lysosomal acidity. Moreover, knockdown of ZNRF2 decreases cell size and cell proliferation. Upon growth factor and amino acid stimulation, mTORC1 phosphorylates ZNRF2 on Ser145, and this phosphosite is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 6. Ser145 phosphorylation stimulates vesicle-to-cytosol translocation of ZNRF2 and forms a novel negative feedback on mTORC1. Our findings uncover ZNRF2 as a component of the amino acid sensing machinery that acts upstream of Rag-GTPases and the V-ATPase to activate mTORC1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12278.001 PMID:27244671

  10. Arctigenin functions as a selective agonist of estrogen receptor β to restrict mTORC1 activation and consequent Th17 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Tong, Bei; Yang, Yan; Luo, Jinque; Yuan, Xusheng; Wei, Zhifeng; Yue, Mengfan; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-12-20

    Arctigenin was previously proven to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation and thereby attenuate colitis in mice by down-regulating the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study was performed to address its underlying mechanism in view of estrogen receptor (ER). The specific antagonist PHTPP or siRNA of ERβ largely diminished the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the mTORC1 activation in T cell lines and primary CD4+ T cells under Th17-polarization condition, suggesting that arctigenin functioned in an ERβ-dependent manner. Moreover, arctigenin was recognized to be an agonist of ERβ, which could bind to ERβ with a moderate affinity, promote dissociation of ERβ/HSP90 complex and nuclear translocation and phosphorylation of ERβ, and increase the transcription activity. Following activation of ERβ, arctigenin inhibited the activity of mTORC1 by disruption of ERβ-raptor-mTOR complex assembly. Deficiency of ERβ markedly abolished arctigenin-mediated inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. In colitis mice, the activation of ERβ, inhibition of mTORC1 activation and Th17 response by arctigenin were abolished by PHTPP treatment. In conclusion, ERβ might be the target protein of arctigenin responsible for inhibition of mTORC1 activation and resultant prevention of Th17 cell differentiation and colitis development.

  11. Quantitative analysis of male germline stem cell differentiation reveals a role for the p53-mTORC1 pathway in spermatogonial maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Mulin; Ferder, Ianina C; Ohguchi, Yasuyo; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    p53 protects cells from DNA damage by inducing cell-cycle arrest upon encountering genomic stress. Among other pathways, p53 elicits such an effect by inhibiting mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), the master regulator of cell proliferation and growth. Although recent studies have indicated roles for both p53 and mTORC1 in stem cell maintenance, it remains unclear whether the p53-mTORC1 pathway is conserved to mediate this process under normal physiological conditions. Spermatogenesis is a classic stem cell-dependent process in which undifferentiated spermatogonia undergo self-renewal and differentiation to maintain the lifelong production of spermatozoa. To better understand this process, we have developed a novel flow cytometry (FACS)-based approach that isolates spermatogonia at consecutive differentiation stages. By using this as a tool, we show that genetic loss of p53 augments mTORC1 activity during early spermatogonial differentiation. Functionally, loss of p53 drives spermatogonia out of the undifferentiated state and causes a consistent expansion of early differentiating spermatogonia until the stage of preleptotene (premeiotic) spermatocyte. The frequency of early meiotic spermatocytes is, however, dramatically decreased. Thus, these data suggest that p53-mTORC1 pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of early spermatogonial differentiation. Moreover, our FACS approach could be a valuable tool in understanding spermatogonial differentiation.

  12. Second-hit mosaic mutation in mTORC1 repressor DEPDC5 causes focal cortical dysplasia-associated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribierre, Théo; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bacq, Alexandre; Baldassari, Sara; Marsan, Elise; Chipaux, Mathilde; Muraca, Giuseppe; Roussel, Delphine; Navarro, Vincent; Leguern, Eric; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2018-04-30

    DEP domain-containing 5 protein (DEPDC5) is a repressor of the recently recognized amino acid-sensing branch of the mTORC1 pathway. So far, its function in the brain remains largely unknown. Germline loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 have emerged as a major cause of familial refractory focal epilepsies, with case reports of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Remarkably, a fraction of patients also develop focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a neurodevelopmental cortical malformation. We therefore hypothesized that a somatic second-hit mutation arising during brain development may support the focal nature of the dysplasia. Here, using postoperative human tissue, we provide the proof of concept that a biallelic 2-hit - brain somatic and germline - mutational mechanism in DEPDC5 causes focal epilepsy with FCD. We discovered a mutation gradient with a higher rate of mosaicism in the seizure-onset zone than in the surrounding epileptogenic zone. Furthermore, we demonstrate the causality of a Depdc5 brain mosaic inactivation using CRISPR-Cas9 editing and in utero electroporation in a mouse model recapitulating focal epilepsy with FCD and SUDEP-like events. We further unveil a key role of Depdc5 in shaping dendrite and spine morphology of excitatory neurons. This study reveals promising therapeutic avenues for treating drug-resistant focal epilepsies with mTORC1-targeting molecules.

  13. Adaptation of signal transduction and muscle proteome in trained horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, Mireille Maria Elisabeth van

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the localization and activation of signaling proteins, known from human studies, in equine muscle were investigated under conditions of rest, after an acute bout of exercise and before and after a period of (intensified) training. Proteins of interest (protein kinase C (PKC),

  14. Redox Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: Role of Aging and Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Li Li

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contraction is associated with the production of ROS due to altered O[subscript 2] distribution and flux in the cell. Despite a highly efficient antioxidant defense, a small surplus of ROS, such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, may serve as signaling molecules to stimulate cellular adaptation to reach new homeostasis largely…

  15. Arctigenin functions as a selective agonist of estrogen receptor ? to restrict mTORC1 activation and consequent Th17 differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xin; Tong, Bei; Yang, Yan; Luo, Jinque; Yuan, Xusheng; Wei, Zhifeng; Yue, Mengfan; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin was previously proven to inhibit Th17 cell differentiation and thereby attenuate colitis in mice by down-regulating the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The present study was performed to address its underlying mechanism in view of estrogen receptor (ER). The specific antagonist PHTPP or siRNA of ER? largely diminished the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on the mTORC1 activation in T cell lines and primary CD4+ T cells under Th17-polarization condit...

  16. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hikaru; Ikegami, Ayaka; Kaneko, Chiaki; Kakuma, Hitomi; Nishi, Hisano; Tanaka, Noriko; Aoyama, Michiko; Usami, Makoto; Okimura, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH), prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex)-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs). Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR) mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  17. Dexamethasone and BCAA Failed to Modulate Muscle Mass and mTOR Signaling in GH-Deficient Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikaru Nishida

    Full Text Available Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs and IGF-I, the secretion of which is stimulated by growth hormone (GH, prevent muscle atrophy. mTOR plays a pivotal role in the protective actions of BCAA and IGF-1. The pathway by which BCAA activates mTOR is different from that of IGF-1, which suggests that BCAA and GH work independently. We tried to examine whether BCAA exerts a protective effect against dexamethasone (Dex-induced muscle atrophy independently of GH using GH-deficient spontaneous dwarf rats (SDRs. Unexpectedly, Dex did not induce muscle atrophy assessed by the measurement of cross-sectional area (CSA of the muscle fibers and did not increase atrogin-1, MuRF1 and REDD1 expressions, which are activated during protein degradation. Glucocorticoid (GR mRNA levels were higher in SDRs compared to GH-treated SDRs, indicating that the low expression of GR is not the reason of the defect of Dex's action in SDRs. BCAA did not stimulate the phosphorylation of p70S6K or 4E-BP1, which stimulate protein synthesis. BCAA did not decrease the mRNA level of atrogin-1 or MuRF1. These findings suggested that Dex failed to modulate muscle mass and that BCAA was unable to activate mTOR in SDRs because these phosphorylations of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 and the reductions of these mRNAs are regulated by mTOR. In contrast, after GH supplementation, these responses to Dex were normalized and muscle fiber CSA was decreased by Dex. BCAA prevented the Dex-induced decrease in CSA. BCAA increased the phosphorylation of p70S6K and decreased the Dex-induced elevations of atrogin-1 and Bnip3 mRNAs. However, the amount of mTORC1 components including mTOR was not decreased in the SDRs compared to the normal rats. These findings suggest that GH increases mTORC1 activity but not its content to recover the action of BCAA in SDRs and that GH is required for actions of Dex and BCAA in muscles.

  18. Identification of Palmitoleic Acid Controlled by mTOR Signaling as a Biomarker of Polymyositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyositis (PM is a chronic disease characterized by muscle pain, weakness, and increase in muscle-related enzymes, accompanied with inflammations in lymphocytes. However, it is not well understood how the molecular alternations in lymphocytes contribute to the development of polymyositis. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling is the central regulator of metabolism and inflammation in mammalian cells. Based on previous studies, we proposed that mTOR signaling may control inflammatory reactions via lipid metabolism. In this study, we aim to figure out the role of mTOR signaling in the development of polymyositis and identify novel biomarkers for the detection and therapy of polymyositis. After screening and validation, we found that palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, is highly regulated by mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTORC1 activity decreases palmitoleic acid level. Moreover, mTORC1 regulates the level of palmitoleic acid by controlling its de novo synthesis. Importantly, increased palmitoleic acid has been proven to be a marker of polymyositis. Our work identifies palmitoleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC as a biomarker of polymyositis and offers new targets to the clinical therapy.

  19. Influence of Unweighting on Insulin Signal Transduction in Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.

    2002-01-01

    Unweighting of the juvenile soleus muscle is characterized by an increased binding capacity for insulin relative to muscle mass due to sparing of the receptors during atrophy. Although carbohydrate metabolism and protein degradation in the unweighted muscle develop increased sensitivity to insulin in vivo, protein synthesis in vivo and system A amino acid transport in vitro do not appear to develop such an enhanced response. The long-term goal is to identify the precise nature of this apparent resistance in the insulin signal transduction pathway and to consider how reduced weight-bearing may elicit this effect, by evaluating specific components of the insulin signalling pathway. Because the insulin-signalling pathway has components in common with the signal transduction pathway for insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and potentially other growth factors, the study could have important implications in the role of weight-bearing function on muscle growth and development. Since the insulin signalling pathway diverges following activation of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase, the immediate specific aims will be to study the receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK) and those branches, which lead to phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and of Shc protein. To achieve these broader objectives, we will test in situ, by intramuscular injection, the responses of glucose transport, system A amino acid transport and protein synthesis to insulin analogues for which the receptor has either a weaker or much stronger binding affinity compared to insulin. Studies will include: (1) estimation of the ED(sub 50) for each analogue for these three processes; (2) the effect of duration (one to four days) of unweighting on the response of each process to all analogues tested; (3) the effect of unweighting and the analogues on IRTK activity; and (4) the comparative effects of unweighting and analogue binding on the tyrosine phosphorylation of IRTK, IRS-1, and Shc protein.

  20. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related...... to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups...... (P protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P

  1. Role of IGF-I Signaling in Muscle Bone Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D; Tahimic, Candice; Chang, Wenhan; Wang, Yongmei; Philippou, Anastassios; Barton, Elisabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle and bone rely on a number of growth factors to undergo development, modulate growth, and maintain physiological strength. A major player in these actions is insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). However, because this growth factor can directly enhance muscle mass and bone density, it alters the state of the musculoskeletal system indirectly through mechanical crosstalk between these two organ systems. Thus, there are clearly synergistic actions of IGF-I that extend beyond the direct activity through its receptor. This review will cover the production and signaling of IGF-I as it pertains to muscle and bone, the chemical and mechanical influences that arise from IGF-I activity, and the potential for therapeutic strategies based on IGF-I. PMID:26453498

  2. A complex interplay between PGC-1 co-activators and mTORC1 regulates hematopoietic recovery following 5-fluorouracil treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda Basu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In vitro stimulation of HSCs with growth factors generally leads to their depletion. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying expansion of HSCs in vivo following myeloablation could lead to successful expansion of HSCs ex vivo for therapeutic purposes. Current findings show that mTORC1 is activated in HSPCs following 5-fluorouracil treatment and that mTORC1 activation is dependent on mitochondrial ETC capacity of HSPCs. Moreover, expression of PGC-1 family members, proteins that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, in HSPCs following 5-fluorouracil treatment changes; also, these proteins play a stage specific role in hematopoietic recovery. While PRC regulates HSCs' expansion during early recovery phase, PGC-1α regulates progenitor cell proliferation and recovery of hematopoiesis during later phase. During early recovery phase, PRC expression, mitochondrial activity and mTORC1 activation are relatively higher in PGC-1α−/− HSCs compared to WT HSCs, and PGC-1α−/− HSCs show greater expansion. Administration of rapamycin, but not NAC, during early recovery phase improves WT HSC numbers but decreases PGC-1α−/− HSC numbers. The current findings demonstrate that mTOR activation can increase HSC numbers provided that the energy demand created by mTOR activation is successfully met. Thus, critical tuning between mTORC1 activation and mitochondrial ETC capacity is crucial for HSC maintenance/expansion in response to mitogenic stimulation.

  3. Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of SESTRIN1 controls mTORC1 and response to EZH2 inhibition in follicular lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oricchio, Elisa; Katanayeva, Natalya; Donaldson, Maria Christine; Sungalee, Stephanie; Pasion, Joyce P; Béguelin, Wendy; Battistello, Elena; Sanghvi, Viraj R; Jiang, Man; Jiang, Yanwen; Teater, Matt; Parmigiani, Anita; Budanov, Andrei V; Chan, Fong Chun; Shah, Sohrab P; Kridel, Robert; Melnick, Ari M; Ciriello, Giovanni; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2017-06-28

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is an incurable form of B cell lymphoma. Genomic studies have cataloged common genetic lesions in FL such as translocation t(14;18), frequent losses of chromosome 6q, and mutations in epigenetic regulators such as EZH2 Using a focused genetic screen, we identified SESTRIN1 as a relevant target of the 6q deletion and demonstrate tumor suppression by SESTRIN1 in vivo. Moreover, SESTRIN1 is a direct target of the lymphoma-specific EZH2 gain-of-function mutation ( EZH2 Y641X ). SESTRIN1 inactivation disrupts p53-mediated control of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and enables mRNA translation under genotoxic stress. SESTRIN1 loss represents an alternative to RRAGC mutations that maintain mTORC1 activity under nutrient starvation. The antitumor efficacy of pharmacological EZH2 inhibition depends on SESTRIN1, indicating that mTORC1 control is a critical function of EZH2 in lymphoma. Conversely, EZH2 Y641X mutant lymphomas show increased sensitivity to RapaLink-1, a bifunctional mTOR inhibitor. Hence, SESTRIN1 contributes to the genetic and epigenetic control of mTORC1 in lymphoma and influences responses to targeted therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Inhibition of mTORC1 Enhances the Translation of Chikungunya Proteins via the Activation of the MnK/eIF4E Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Stapleford, Kenneth; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Vignuzzi, Marco; Schwartz, Olivier; Albert, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), the causative agent of a major epidemic spanning five continents, is a positive stranded mRNA virus that replicates using the cell’s cap-dependent translation machinery. Despite viral infection inhibiting mTOR, a metabolic sensor controls cap-dependent translation, viral proteins are efficiently translated. Rapalog treatment, silencing of mtor or raptor genes, but not rictor, further enhanced CHIKV infection in culture cells. Using biochemical assays and real time imaging, we demonstrate that this effect is independent of autophagy or type I interferon production. Providing in vivo evidence for the relevance of our findings, mice treated with mTORC1 inhibitors exhibited increased lethality and showed a higher sensitivity to CHIKV. A systematic evaluation of the viral life cycle indicated that inhibition of mTORC1 has a specific positive effect on viral proteins, enhancing viral replication by increasing the translation of both structural and nonstructural proteins. Molecular analysis defined a role for phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and MAP kinase-activated protein kinase (MnKs) activation, leading to the hyper-phosphorylation of eIF4E. Finally, we demonstrated that in the context of CHIKV inhibition of mTORC1, viral replication is prioritized over host translation via a similar mechanism. Our study reveals an unexpected bypass pathway by which CHIKV protein translation overcomes viral induced mTORC1 inhibition. PMID:26317997

  5. Inhibition of mTORC1 Enhances the Translation of Chikungunya Proteins via the Activation of the MnK/eIF4E Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Emmanuel Joubert

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, the causative agent of a major epidemic spanning five continents, is a positive stranded mRNA virus that replicates using the cell's cap-dependent translation machinery. Despite viral infection inhibiting mTOR, a metabolic sensor controls cap-dependent translation, viral proteins are efficiently translated. Rapalog treatment, silencing of mtor or raptor genes, but not rictor, further enhanced CHIKV infection in culture cells. Using biochemical assays and real time imaging, we demonstrate that this effect is independent of autophagy or type I interferon production. Providing in vivo evidence for the relevance of our findings, mice treated with mTORC1 inhibitors exhibited increased lethality and showed a higher sensitivity to CHIKV. A systematic evaluation of the viral life cycle indicated that inhibition of mTORC1 has a specific positive effect on viral proteins, enhancing viral replication by increasing the translation of both structural and nonstructural proteins. Molecular analysis defined a role for phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K and MAP kinase-activated protein kinase (MnKs activation, leading to the hyper-phosphorylation of eIF4E. Finally, we demonstrated that in the context of CHIKV inhibition of mTORC1, viral replication is prioritized over host translation via a similar mechanism. Our study reveals an unexpected bypass pathway by which CHIKV protein translation overcomes viral induced mTORC1 inhibition.

  6. Reassessment of the role of TSC, mTORC1 and microRNAs in amino acids-meditated translational control of TOP mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Patursky-Polischuk

    Full Text Available TOP mRNAs encode components of the translational apparatus, and repression of their translation comprises one mechanism, by which cells encountering amino acid deprivation downregulate the biosynthesis of the protein synthesis machinery. This mode of regulation involves TSC as knockout of TSC1 or TSC2 rescued TOP mRNAs translation in amino acid-starved cells. The involvement of mTOR in translational control of TOP mRNAs is demonstrated by the ability of constitutively active mTOR to relieve the translational repression of TOP mRNA upon amino acid deprivation. Consistently, knockdown of this kinase as well as its inhibition by pharmacological means blocked amino acid-induced translational activation of these mRNAs. The signaling of amino acids to TOP mRNAs involves RagB, as overexpression of active RagB derepressed the translation of these mRNAs in amino acid-starved cells. Nonetheless, knockdown of raptor or rictor failed to suppress translational activation of TOP mRNAs by amino acids, suggesting that mTORC1 or mTORC2 plays a minor, if any, role in this mode of regulation. Finally, miR10a has previously been suggested to positively regulate the translation of TOP mRNAs. However, we show here that titration of this microRNA failed to downregulate the basal translation efficiency of TOP mRNAs. Moreover, Drosha knockdown or Dicer knockout, which carries out the first and second processing steps in microRNAs biosynthesis, respectively, failed to block the translational activation of TOP mRNAs by amino acid or serum stimulation. Evidently, these results are questioning the positive role of microRNAs in this mode of regulation.

  7. Arctigenin exerts anti-colitis efficacy through inhibiting the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells via an mTORC1-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Dou, Yannong; Yang, Yan; Bian, Difei; Luo, Jinque; Tong, Bei; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2015-08-15

    Arctigenin, the main effective constituent of Arctium lappa L. fruit, has previously been proven to dramatically attenuate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, a frequently used animal model of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). As Th1 and Th17 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of IBD, the present study addressed whether and how arctigenin exerted anti-colitis efficacy by interfering with the differentiation and activation of Th1/Th17 cells. In vitro, arctigenin was shown to markedly inhibit the differentiation of Th17 cells from naïve T cells, and moderately inhibit the differentiation of Th1 cells, which was accompanied by lowered phosphorylation of STAT3 and STAT4, respectively. In contrast, arctigenin was lack of marked effect on the differentiation of either Th2 or regulatory T cells. Furthermore, arctigenin was shown to suppress the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway in T cells as demonstrated by down-regulated phosphorylation of the downstream target genes p70S6K and RPS6, and it functioned independent of two well-known upstream kinases PI3K/AKT and ERK. Arctigenin was also able to inhibit the activity of mTORC1 by dissociating raptor from mTOR. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of arctigenin on T cell differentiation disappeared under a status of mTORC1 overactivation via knockdown of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2, a negative regulator of mTORC1) or pretreatment of leucine (an agonist of mTOR). In DSS-induced mice, the inhibition of Th1/Th17 responses and anti-colitis effect of arctigenin were abrogated by leucine treatment. In conclusion, arctigenin ameliorates colitis through down-regulating the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells via mTORC1 pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Signalling and the control of skeletal muscle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otto, Anthony; Patel, Ketan

    2010-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly adaptive to environmental stimuli and can alter its mass accordingly. This tissue is almost unique in that it can increase its size through two distinct mechanisms. It can grow through a cellular process mediated by cell fusion, or it can increase its size simply by increasing its protein content. Understanding how these processes are regulated is crucial for the development of potential therapies against debilitating skeletal muscle wasting diseases. Two key signalling molecules, Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF) and GDF-8/myostatin, have emerged in recent years to be potent regulators of skeletal muscle size. In this review we bring together recent data highlighting the important and novel aspects of both molecules and their signalling pathways, culminating in a discussion of the cellular and tissue phenotypic outcomes of their stimulation or antagonism. We emphasise the complex regulatory mechanisms and discuss the temporal and spatial differences that control their action, understanding of which is crucial to further their use as potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Signalling and the control of skeletal muscle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, Anthony [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom); Patel, Ketan, E-mail: ketan.patel@reading.ac.uk [School of Biological Sciences, Hopkins Building, University of Reading, Whiteknights Campus, Reading, Berkshire, RG6 6UB (United Kingdom)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal muscle is highly adaptive to environmental stimuli and can alter its mass accordingly. This tissue is almost unique in that it can increase its size through two distinct mechanisms. It can grow through a cellular process mediated by cell fusion, or it can increase its size simply by increasing its protein content. Understanding how these processes are regulated is crucial for the development of potential therapies against debilitating skeletal muscle wasting diseases. Two key signalling molecules, Insulin like Growth Factor (IGF) and GDF-8/myostatin, have emerged in recent years to be potent regulators of skeletal muscle size. In this review we bring together recent data highlighting the important and novel aspects of both molecules and their signalling pathways, culminating in a discussion of the cellular and tissue phenotypic outcomes of their stimulation or antagonism. We emphasise the complex regulatory mechanisms and discuss the temporal and spatial differences that control their action, understanding of which is crucial to further their use as potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Experimental muscle pain produces central modulation of proprioceptive signals arising from jaw muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, N F; Ro, J Y

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline, a well-established experimental model for muscle pain, on central processing of proprioceptive input from jaw muscle spindle afferents. Fifty-seven cells were recorded from the medial edge of the subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) and the adjacent parvicellular reticular formation from 11 adult cats. These cells were characterized as central units receiving jaw muscle spindle input based on their responses to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, muscle palpation and jaw stretch. Forty-five cells, which were successfully tested with 5% hypertonic saline, were categorized as either dynamic-static (DS) (n=25) or static (S) (n=20) neurons based on their responses to different speeds and amplitudes of jaw movement. Seventy-six percent of the cells tested with an ipsilateral injection of hypertonic saline showed a significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during opening and/or holding phases. The most remarkable saline-induced change was a significant reduction of MFR during the hold phase in S units (100%, 18/18 modulated). Sixty-nine percent of the DS units (11/16 modulated) also showed significant changes in MFRs limited to the hold phase. However, in the DS neurons, the MFRs increased in seven units and decreased in four units. Finally, five DS neurons showed significant changes of MFRs during both opening and holding phases. Injections of isotonic saline into the ipsilateral masseter muscle had little effect, but hypertonic saline injections made into the contralateral masseter muscle produced similar results to ipsilateral injections with hypertonic saline. These results unequivocally demonstrate that intramuscular injection with an algesic substance, sufficient to produce muscle pain, produces significant changes in the proprioceptive properties of the jaw movement-related neurons. Potential mechanisms involved in saline-induced changes in the

  11. Short-term pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate administration attenuates cachexia-induced alterations to muscle and liver in ApcMin/+ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narsale, Aditi A; Puppa, Melissa J; Hardee, Justin P; VanderVeen, Brandon N; Enos, Reilly T; Murphy, E Angela; Carson, James A

    2016-09-13

    Cancer cachexia is a complex wasting condition characterized by chronic inflammation, disrupted energy metabolism, and severe muscle wasting. While evidence in pre-clinical cancer cachexia models have determined that different systemic inflammatory inhibitors can attenuate several characteristics of cachexia, there is a limited understanding of their effects after cachexia has developed, and whether short-term administration is sufficient to reverse cachexia-induced signaling in distinctive target tissues. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is a thiol compound having anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties which can inhibit STAT3 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling in mice. This study examined the effect of short-term PDTC administration to ApcMin/+ mice on cachexia-induced disruption of skeletal muscle protein turnover and liver metabolic function. At 16 weeks of age ApcMin/+ mice initiating cachexia (7% BW loss) were administered PDTC (10mg/kg bw/d) for 2 weeks. Control ApcMin/+ mice continued to lose body weight during the treatment period, while mice receiving PDTC had no further body weight decrease. PDTC had no effect on either intestinal tumor burden or circulating IL-6. In muscle, PDTC rescued signaling disrupting protein turnover regulation. PDTC suppressed the cachexia induction of STAT3, increased mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis, and suppressed the induction of Atrogin-1 protein expression. Related to cachectic liver metabolic function, PDTC treatment attenuated glycogen and lipid content depletion independent to the activation of STAT3 and mTORC1 signaling. Overall, these results demonstrate short-term PDTC treatment to cachectic mice attenuated cancer-induced disruptions to muscle and liver signaling, and these changes were independent to altered tumor burden and circulating IL-6.

  12. Short-term pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate administration attenuates cachexia-induced alterations to muscle and liver in ApcMin/+ mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderVeen, Brandon N.; Enos, Reilly T.; Murphy, E. Angela; Carson, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cachexia is a complex wasting condition characterized by chronic inflammation, disrupted energy metabolism, and severe muscle wasting. While evidence in pre-clinical cancer cachexia models have determined that different systemic inflammatory inhibitors can attenuate several characteristics of cachexia, there is a limited understanding of their effects after cachexia has developed, and whether short-term administration is sufficient to reverse cachexia-induced signaling in distinctive target tissues. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is a thiol compound having anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties which can inhibit STAT3 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling in mice. This study examined the effect of short-term PDTC administration to ApcMin/+ mice on cachexia-induced disruption of skeletal muscle protein turnover and liver metabolic function. At 16 weeks of age ApcMin/+ mice initiating cachexia (7% BW loss) were administered PDTC (10mg/kg bw/d) for 2 weeks. Control ApcMin/+ mice continued to lose body weight during the treatment period, while mice receiving PDTC had no further body weight decrease. PDTC had no effect on either intestinal tumor burden or circulating IL-6. In muscle, PDTC rescued signaling disrupting protein turnover regulation. PDTC suppressed the cachexia induction of STAT3, increased mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis, and suppressed the induction of Atrogin-1 protein expression. Related to cachectic liver metabolic function, PDTC treatment attenuated glycogen and lipid content depletion independent to the activation of STAT3 and mTORC1 signaling. Overall, these results demonstrate short-term PDTC treatment to cachectic mice attenuated cancer-induced disruptions to muscle and liver signaling, and these changes were independent to altered tumor burden and circulating IL-6. PMID:27449092

  13. Sepsis attenuates the anabolic response to skeletal muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Lang, Charles H

    2015-04-01

    Electrically stimulated muscle contraction is a potential clinical therapy to treat sepsis-induced myopathy; however, whether sepsis alters contraction-induced anabolic signaling is unknown. Polymicrobial peritonitis was produced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in male C57BL/6 mice and time-matched, pair-fed controls (CON). At ∼24 h post-CLP, the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated via the sciatic nerve to evoke maximal muscle contractions, and the gastrocnemius was collected 2 h later. Protein synthesis was increased by muscle contraction in CON mice. Sepsis suppressed the rate of synthesis in both the nonstimulated (31%) and stimulated (57%) muscle versus CON. Contraction of muscle in CON mice increased the phosphorylation of mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] complex 1) substrates S6K1 (70-kd ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1) Thr (8-fold), S6K1 ThrSer (7-fold) and 4E-BP1 Ser (11-fold). Sepsis blunted the contraction-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr (67%), S6K1 ThrSer (46%), and 4E-BP1 Ser (85%). Conversely, sepsis did not appear to modulate protein elongation as eEF2 Thr phosphorylation was decreased similarly by muscle contraction in both groups. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was discordant following contraction in septic muscle; phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase ThrTyr and p38 ThrTyr was increased similarly in both CON and CLP mice, while sepsis prevented the contraction-induced phosphorylation of JNK ThrTyr and c-JUN Ser. The expression of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) mRNA in muscle was increased by sepsis, and contraction increased TNF-α to a greater extent in muscle from septic than CON mice. Injection of the mTOR inhibitor Torin2 in separate mice confirmed that contraction-induced increases in S6K1 and 4E-BP1 were mTOR mediated. These findings demonstrate that resistance to contraction-induced anabolic signaling occurs during sepsis and is predominantly mTORC1-dependent.

  14. Muscle biopsies off-set normal cellular signaling in surrounding musculature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Thomas O; Hauerslev, Simon; Dahlqvist, Julia R

    2013-01-01

    muscle tissue for at least 3 weeks after the biopsy was performed and magnetic resonance imaging suggests that an effect of a biopsy may persist for at least 5 months. Cellular signaling after a biopsy resembles what is seen in severe limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I with respect to protein......Studies of muscle physiology and muscular disorders often require muscle biopsies to answer questions about muscle biology. In this context, we have often wondered if muscle biopsies, especially if performed repeatedly, would affect interpretation of muscle morphology and cellular signaling. We...... hypothesized that muscle morphology and cellular signaling involved in myogenesis/regeneration and protein turnover can be changed by a previous muscle biopsy in close proximity to the area under investigation. Here we report a case where a past biopsy or biopsies affect cellular signaling of the surrounding...

  15. Delivering key signals to the machine: seeking the electric signal that muscles emanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, A Y Bani; Maslan, M N; Izamshah, R; Mohamad, I S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limitation of electric power generation in the human body, present human-machine interfaces have not been successful because of the nature of standard electronics circuit designs, which do not consider the specifications of signals that resulted from the skin. In general, the outcomes and applications of human-machine interfaces are limited to custom-designed subsystems, such as neuroprosthesis. We seek to model the bio dynamical of sub skin into equivalent mathematical definitions, descriptions, and theorems. Within the human skin, there are networks of nerves that permit the skin to function as a multi dimension transducer. We investigate the nature of structural skin. Apart from multiple networks of nerves, there are other segments within the skin such as minute muscles. We identify the segments that are active when there is an electromyography activity. When the nervous system is firing signals, the muscle is being stimulated. We evaluate the phenomena of biodynamic of the muscles that is concerned with the electromyography activity of the nervous system. In effect, we design a relationship between the human somatosensory and synthetic systems sensory as the union of a complete set of the new domain of the functional system. This classifies electromyogram waveforms linked to intent thought of an operator. The system will become the basis for delivering key signals to machine such that the machine is under operator's intent, hence slavery

  16. Wnt and β-Catenin Signaling and Skeletal Muscle Myogenesis in Response to Muscle Damage and Resistance Exercise and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Newmire

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The factors that regulate skeletal muscle hypertrophy in human adults in response to resistance training (RT has largely focused on endogenous endocrine responses. However, the endocrine response to RT as having an obligatory role in muscle hypertrophy has come under scrutiny, as other mechanisms and pathways seem to also be involved in up-regulating muscle protein synthesis (MPS. Skeletal muscle myogenesis is a multifactorial process of tissue growth and repair in response to resistance training is regulated by many factors.  As a result, satellite cell-fused myogenesis is a possible factor in skeletal muscle regeneration and hypertrophy in response to RT.  The Wnt family ligands interact with various receptors and activate different downstream signaling pathways and have been classified as either canonical (β-catenin dependent or non-canonical (β-catenin independent.  Wnt is secreted from numerous tissues in a paracrine fashion. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly-regulated and intricate pathway that is essential to skeletal muscle myogenesis.  The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway may influence satellite cells to myogenic commitment, differentiation, and fusion into muscle fibers in response to injury or trauma, self-renewal, and normal basal turnover.  The current literature has shown that, in response mechanical overload from acute resistance exercise and chronic resistance training, that the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is stimulated which may actuate the process of muscle repair and hypertrophy in response to exercise-induced muscle damage. The purpose of this review is to elaborate on the Wnt/β-catenin signaling  pathway, the current literature investigating the relationship of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and its effects on myogenesis is response to muscle damage and resistance exercise and training.      Keywords: skeletal muscle, hypertrophy, myogenesis, cell signaling, protein synthesis, resistance

  17. Repletion of branched chain amino acids reverses mTORC1 signaling but not improved metabolism during dietary protein dilution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maida, Adriano; Chan, Jessica S K; Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dietary protein dilution (PD) has been associated with metabolic advantages such as improved glucose homeostasis and increased energy expenditure. This phenotype involves liver-induced release of FGF21 in response to amino acid insufficiency; however, it has remained unclear whether...... dietary dilution of specific amino acids (AAs) is also required. Circulating branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are sensitive to protein intake, elevated in the serum of obese humans and mice and thought to promote insulin resistance. We tested whether replenishment of dietary BCAAs to an AA-diluted (AAD......) diet is sufficient to reverse the glucoregulatory benefits of dietary PD. METHODS: We conducted AA profiling of serum from healthy humans and lean and high fat-fed or New Zealand obese (NZO) mice following dietary PD. We fed wildtype and NZO mice one of three amino acid defined diets: control, total...

  18. IL-6 signaling blockade increases inflammation but does not affect muscle function in the mdx mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostek Matthew C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that modulates inflammatory responses and plays critical roles in muscle maintenance and remodeling. In the mouse model (mdx of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, IL-6 and muscle inflammation are elevated, which is believed to contribute to the chronic inflammation and failure of muscle regeneration in DMD. The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of blocking IL-6 signaling on the muscle phenotype including muscle weakness and pathology in the mdx mouse. Methods A monoclonal antibody against the IL-6 receptor (IL-6r mAb that blocks local and systemic IL-6 signaling was administered to mdx and BL-10 mice for 5 weeks and muscle function, histology, and inflammation were examined. Results IL-6r mAb treatment increased mdx muscle inflammation including total inflammation score and ICAM-1 positive lumens in muscles. There was no significant improvement in muscle strength nor muscle pathology due to IL-6r mAb treatment in mdx mice. Conclusions These results showed that instead of reducing inflammation, IL-6 signaling blockade for 5 weeks caused an increase in muscle inflammation, with no significant change in indices related to muscle regeneration and muscle function. The results suggest a potential anti-inflammatory instead of the original hypothesized pro-inflammatory role of IL-6 signaling in the mdx mice.

  19. Notch Signaling Mediates Skeletal Muscle Atrophy in Cancer Cachexia Caused by Osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia is mediated by the interaction between muscle stem cells and various tumor factors. Although Notch signaling has been known as a key regulator of both cancer development and muscle stem cell activity, the potential involvement of Notch signaling in cancer cachexia and concomitant muscle atrophy has yet to be elucidated. The murine K7M2 osteosarcoma cell line was used to generate an orthotopic model of sarcoma-associated cachexia, and the role of Notch signaling was evaluated. Skeletal muscle atrophy was observed in the sarcoma-bearing mice, and Notch signaling was highly active in both tumor tissues and the atrophic skeletal muscles. Systemic inhibition of Notch signaling reduced muscle atrophy. In vitro coculture of osteosarcoma cells with muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs isolated from normal mice resulted in decreased myogenic potential of MDSCs, while the application of Notch inhibitor was able to rescue this repressed myogenic potential. We further observed that Notch-activating factors reside in the exosomes of osteosarcoma cells, which activate Notch signaling in MDSCs and subsequently repress myogenesis. Our results revealed that signaling between tumor and muscle via the Notch pathway may play an important role in mediating the skeletal muscle atrophy seen in cancer cachexia.

  20. Leucine signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2012-03-15

    Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy and meat consumption, staples of the Western diet, as major risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This paper presents a new concept and comprehensive review of leucine-mediated cell signaling explaining the pathogenesis of T2D and obesity by leucine-induced over-stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1, a pivotal nutrient-sensitive kinase, promotes growth and cell proliferation in response to glucose, energy, growth factors and amino acids. Dairy proteins and meat stimulate insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling and provide high amounts of leucine, a primary and independent stimulator for mTORC1 activation. The downstream target of mTORC1, the kinase S6K1, induces insulin resistance by phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1, thereby increasing the metabolic burden of β-cells. Moreover, leucine-mediated mTORC1-S6K1-signaling plays an important role in adipogenesis, thus increasing the risk of obesity-mediated insulin resistance. High consumption of leucine-rich proteins explains exaggerated mTORC1-dependent insulin secretion, increased β-cell growth and β-cell proliferation promoting an early onset of replicative β-cell senescence with subsequent β-cell apoptosis. Disturbances of β-cell mass regulation with increased β-cell proliferation and apoptosis as well as insulin resistance are hallmarks of T2D, which are all associated with hyperactivation of mTORC1. In contrast, the anti-diabetic drug metformin antagonizes leucine-mediated mTORC1 signaling. Plant-derived polyphenols and flavonoids are identified as natural inhibitors of mTORC1 and exert anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery in obesity reduces increased plasma levels of leucine and other branched-chain amino acids. Attenuation of leucine-mediated mTORC1 signaling by defining appropriate upper limits of the daily intake of leucine-rich animal and dairy

  1. S6K1 Is Required for Increasing Skeletal Muscle Force during Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marabita, Manuela; Baraldo, Martina; Solagna, Francesca; Ceelen, Judith Johanna Maria; Sartori, Roberta; Nolte, Hendrik; Nemazanyy, Ivan; Pyronnet, Stéphane; Kruger, Marcus; Pende, Mario; Blaauw, Bert

    2016-10-04

    Loss of skeletal muscle mass and force aggravates age-related sarcopenia and numerous pathologies, such as cancer and diabetes. The AKT-mTORC1 pathway plays a major role in stimulating adult muscle growth; however, the functional role of its downstream mediators in vivo is unknown. Here, we show that simultaneous inhibition of mTOR signaling to both S6K1 and 4E-BP1 is sufficient to reduce AKT-induced muscle growth and render it insensitive to the mTORC1-inhibitor rapamycin. Surprisingly, lack of mTOR signaling to 4E-BP1 only, or deletion of S6K1 alone, is not sufficient to reduce muscle hypertrophy or alter its sensitivity to rapamycin. However, we report that, while not required for muscle growth, S6K1 is essential for maintaining muscle structure and force production. Hypertrophy in the absence of S6K1 is characterized by compromised ribosome biogenesis and the formation of p62-positive protein aggregates. These findings identify S6K1 as a crucial player for maintaining muscle function during hypertrophy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cigarette Smoke and Estrogen Signaling in Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalem Sathish

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Cigarette smoke (CS in active smokers and second-hand smoke exposure exacerbate respiratory disorders such as asthma and chronic bronchitis. While women are known to experience a more asthmatic response to CS than emphysema in men, there is limited information on the mechanisms of CS-induced airway dysfunction. We hypothesize that CS interferes with a normal (protective bronchodilatory role of estrogens, thus worsening airway contractility. Methods: We tested effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on 17β-estradiol (E2 signaling in enzymatically-dissociated bronchial airway smooth muscle (ASM obtained from lung samples of non-smoking female patients undergoing thoracic surgery. Results: In fura-2 loaded ASM cells, CSE increased intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i responses to 10µM histamine. Acute exposure to physiological concentrations of E2 decreased [Ca2+]i responses. However, in 24h exposed CSE cells, although expression of estrogen receptors was increased, the effect of E2 on [Ca2+]i was blunted. Acute E2 exposure also decreased store-operated Ca2+ entry and inhibited stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1 phosphorylation: effects blunted by CSE. Acute exposure to E2 increased cAMP, but less so in 24h CSE-exposed cells. 24h CSE exposure increased S-nitrosylation of ERα. Furthermore, 24h CSE-exposed bronchial rings showed increased bronchoconstrictor agonist responses that were not reduced as effectively by E2 compared to non-CSE controls. Conclusion: These data suggest that CS induces dysregulation of estrogen signaling in ASM, which could contribute to increased airway contractility in women exposed to CS.

  3. Deficient leukemia inhibitory factor signaling in muscle precursor cells from patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Brandt, Claus; Schultz, Ninna S

    2012-01-01

    The cytokine leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) is expressed by skeletal muscle and induces proliferation of muscle precursor cells, an important feature of skeletal muscle maintenance and repair. We hypothesized that muscle precursor cells from patients with type 2 diabetes had a deficient response...... nor proliferation rate was affected. In conclusion, although LIF and LIFR proteins were increased in muscle tissue and myoblasts from diabetic patients, LIF signaling and LIF-stimulated cell proliferation were impaired in diabetic myoblasts, suggesting a novel mechanism by which muscle function......RNA knockdown of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 in myoblast cultures established from healthy individuals and patients with type 2 diabetes. Myoblast proliferation rate was assessed by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. LIF and LIFR proteins were increased in both muscle tissue and cultured myoblasts...

  4. The effect of caffeine on skeletal muscle anabolic signaling and hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy M; Mortensen, Xavier M; Ashby, Conrad K; Harris, Alexander M; Kump, Karson J; Laird, David W; Adams, Aaron J; Bray, Jeremy K; Chen, Ting; Thomson, David M

    2017-06-01

    Caffeine is a widely consumed stimulant with the potential to enhance physical performance through multiple mechanisms. However, recent in vitro findings have suggested that caffeine may block skeletal muscle anabolic signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mediated inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. This could negatively affect protein synthesis and the capacity for muscle growth. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the effect of caffeine on in vivo AMPK and mTOR pathway signaling, protein synthesis, and muscle growth. In cultured C2C12 muscle cells, physiological levels of caffeine failed to impact mTOR activation or myoblast proliferation or differentiation. We found that caffeine administration to mice did not significantly enhance the phosphorylation of AMPK or inhibit signaling proteins downstream of mTOR (p70S6k, S6, or 4EBP1) or protein synthesis after a bout of electrically stimulated contractions. Skeletal muscle-specific knockout of LKB1, the primary AMPK activator in skeletal muscle, on the other hand, eliminated AMPK activation by contractions and enhanced S6k, S6, and 4EBP1 activation before and after contractions. In rats, the addition of caffeine did not affect plantaris hypertrophy induced by the tenotomy of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. In conclusion, caffeine administration does not impair skeletal muscle load-induced mTOR signaling, protein synthesis, or muscle hypertrophy.

  5. The dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor AZD8055 inhibits head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qiang; Song, Xin-mao; Ji, Yang-yang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Lin-gen, E-mail: drlingenxu@126.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •AZD8055 induces significant cytotoxic effects in cultured HNSCC cells. •AZD8055 blocks mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation in cultured HNSCC cells. •JNK activation is required for AZD8055-induced HNSCC cell death. •AZD8055 inhibits Hep-2 cell growth in vivo, and was more efficient than rapamycin. -- Abstract: The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell survival and proliferation, and is constitutively activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus mTOR is an important target for drug development in this disease. Here we tested the anti-tumor ability of AZD8055, the novel mTOR inhibitor, in HNSCC cells. AZD8055 induced dramatic cell death of HNSCC lines (Hep-2 and SCC-9) through autophagy. AZD8055 blocked both mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2 activation without affecting Erk in cultured HNSCC cells. Meanwhile, AZD8055 induced significant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, which was also required for cancer cell death. JNK inhibition by its inhibitors (SP 600125 and JNK-IN-8), or by RNA interference (RNAi) alleviated AZD8055-induced cell death. Finally, AZD8055 markedly increased the survival of Hep-2 transplanted mice through a significant reduction of tumor growth, without apparent toxicity, and its anti-tumor ability was more potent than rapamycin. Meanwhile, AZD8055 administration activated JNK while blocking mTORC1/2 in Hep-2 tumor engrafts. Our current results strongly suggest that AZD8055 may be further investigated for HNSCC treatment in clinical trials.

  6. Activated protein synthesis and suppressed protein breakdown signaling in skeletal muscle of critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob G; Nedergaard, Anders; Reitelseder, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass is controlled by myostatin and Akt-dependent signaling on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and forkhead box O (FoxO) pathways, but it is unknown how these pathways are regulated in critically ill human muscle. To describe factors invol...... involved in muscle mass regulation, we investigated the phosphorylation and expression of key factors in these protein synthesis and breakdown signaling pathways in thigh skeletal muscle of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with healthy controls....

  7. Activated protein synthesis and suppressed protein breakdown signaling in skeletal muscle of critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Jakob G; Nedergaard, Anders; Reitelseder, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass is controlled by myostatin and Akt-dependent signaling on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase kinase 3ß (GSK3ß) and forkhead box O (FoxO) pathways, but it is unknown how these pathways are regulated in critically ill human muscle. To describe factors invol...... involved in muscle mass regulation, we investigated the phosphorylation and expression of key factors in these protein synthesis and breakdown signaling pathways in thigh skeletal muscle of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU) patients compared with healthy controls....

  8. Anabolic sensitivity of postprandial muscle protein synthesis to the ingestion of a protein-dense food is reduced in overweight and obese young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Joseph W; Sukiennik, Richard A; Nallabelli, Julian; Emmons, Russell S; van Vliet, Stephan; Young, Justin R; Ulanov, Alexander V; Li, Zhong; Paluska, Scott A; De Lisio, Michael; Burd, Nicholas A

    2016-10-01

    Excess body fat diminishes muscle protein synthesis rates in response to hyperinsulinemic-hyperaminoacidemic clamps. However, muscle protein synthetic responses after the ingestion of a protein-dense food source across a range of body mass indexes (BMIs) have not been compared. We compared the myofibrillar protein synthetic response and underlying nutrient-sensing mechanisms after the ingestion of lean pork between obese, overweight, and healthy-weight adults. Ten healthy-weight [HW; BMI (in kg/m 2 ): 22.7 ± 0.4], 10 overweight (OW; BMI: 27.1 ± 0.5), and 10 obese (OB; BMI: 35.9 ± 1.3) adults received primed continuous l-[ring- 13 C 6 ]phenylalanine infusions. Blood and muscle biopsy samples were collected before and after the ingestion of 170 g pork (36 g protein and 3 g fat) to assess skeletal muscle anabolic signaling, amino acid transporters [large neutral and small neutral amino acid transporters (LAT1, SNAT2) and CD98], and myofibrillar protein synthesis. At baseline, OW and OB groups showed greater relative amounts of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) protein than the HW group. Pork ingestion increased mTORC1 phosphorylation only in the HW group (P = 0.001). LAT1 and SNAT2 protein content increased during the postprandial period in all groups (time effect, P anabolic signals, that reduces muscle sensitivity to food ingestion. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02613767. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Molecular Signals and Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Wilson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle affords a considerable degree of adaptability not seen in other bodily tissues. The mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are highly dependent on loading conditions. The extent of skeletal muscle plasticity is distinctly highlighted by a loss of muscle mass, or atrophy, after a period of reduced weight-bearing activity, for example during periods of extended bed rest, space flight and in spinal cord injury. On the other hand, increased mechanical loading, or resistance training, induces muscle growth, or hypertrophy. Endurance exercise performance is also dependent on the adaptability of skeletal muscle, especially muscles that contribute to posture, locomotion and the mechanics of breathing.  However, the molecular pathways governing skeletal muscle adaptations are yet to be satisfactorily delineated and require further investigation. Researchers in the areas of exercise physiology, physiotherapy and sports medicine are endeavoring to translate experimental knowledge into effective, innovative treatments and regimens in order to improve physical performance and health in both elite athletes and the general community. The efficacy of the translation of molecular biological paradigms in experimental exercise physiology has long been underappreciated. Indeed, molecular biology tools can now be used to answer questions regarding skeletal muscle adaptation in response to exercise and provide new frameworks to improve physical performance. Furthermore, transgenic animal models, knockout animal models and in vivo studies provide tools to test questions concerned with how exercise initiates adaptive changes in gene expression. In light of these perceived deficiencies, an attempt is made here to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise. An examination will be made of the functional capacity of skeletal muscle to respond to a variety of exercise conditions, namely

  10. Molecular Signals and Skeletal Muscle Adaptation to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Wilson

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The phenotypic plasticity of skeletal muscle affords a considerable degree of adaptability not seen in other bodily tissues. The mechanical properties of skeletal muscle are highly dependent on loading conditions. The extent of skeletal muscle plasticity is distinctly highlighted by a loss of muscle mass, or atrophy, after a period of reduced weight-bearing activity, for example during periods of extended bed rest, space flight and in spinal cord injury. On the other hand, increased mechanical loading, or resistance training, induces muscle growth, or hypertrophy. Endurance exercise performance is also dependent on the adaptability of skeletal muscle, especially muscles that contribute to posture, locomotion and the mechanics of breathing. However, the molecular pathways governing skeletal muscle adaptations are yet to be satisfactorily delineated and require further investigation. Researchers in the areas of exercise physiology, physiotherapy and sports medicine are endeavoring to translate experimental knowledge into effective, innovative treatments and regimens in order to improve physical performance and health in both elite athletes and the general community. The efficacy of the translation of molecular biological paradigms in experimental exercise physiology has long been underappreciated. Indeed, molecular biology tools can now be used to answer questions regarding skeletal muscle adaptation in response to exercise and provide new frameworks to improve physical performance. Furthermore, transgenic animal models, knockout animal models and in vivo studies provide tools to test questions concerned with how exercise initiates adaptive changes in gene expression. In light of these perceived deficiencies, an attempt is made here to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle adaptation to exercise. An examination will be made of the functional capacity of skeletal muscle to respond to a variety of exercise conditions, namely

  11. Detecting and Predicting Muscle Fatigue during Typing By SEMG Signal Processing and Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Ghoochani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Repetitive strain injuries are one of the most prevalent problems in occupational diseases. Repetition, vibration and bad postures of the extremities are physical risk factors related to work that can cause chronic musculoskeletal disorders. Repetitive work on a computer with low level contraction requires the posture to be maintained for a long time, which can cause muscle fatigue. Muscle fatigue in shoulders and neck is one of the most prevalent problems reported with computer users especially during typing. Surface electromyography (SEMG signals are used for detecting muscle fatigue as a non-invasive method. Material and Methods: Nine healthy females volunteered for signal recoding during typing. EMG signals were recorded from the trapezius muscle, which is subjected to muscle fatigue during typing.  After signal analysis and feature extraction, detecting and predicting muscle fatigue was performed by using the MLP artificial neural network. Results: Recorded signals were analyzed in time and frequency domains for feature extraction. Results of classification showed that the MLP neural network can detect and predict muscle fatigue during typing with 80.79 % ± 1.04% accuracy. Conclusion: Intelligent classification and prediction of muscle fatigue can have many applications in human factors engineering (ergonomics, rehabilitation engineering and biofeedback equipment for mitigating the injuries of repetitive works.

  12. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Ingestion Stimulates Muscle Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis following Resistance Exercise in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Jackman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ingestion of intact protein or essential amino acids (EAA stimulates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1 signaling and muscle protein synthesis (MPS following resistance exercise. The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of myofibrillar-MPS to ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs only (i.e., without concurrent ingestion of other EAA, intact protein, or other macronutrients following resistance exercise in humans. Ten young (20.1 ± 1.3 years, resistance-trained men completed two trials, ingesting either 5.6 g BCAA or a placebo (PLA drink immediately after resistance exercise. Myofibrillar-MPS was measured during exercise recovery with a primed, constant infusion of L-[ring13C6] phenylalanine and collection of muscle biopsies pre and 4 h-post drink ingestion. Blood samples were collected at time-points before and after drink ingestion. Western blotting was used to measure the phosphorylation status of mTORC1 signaling proteins in biopsies collected pre, 1-, and 4 h-post drink. The percentage increase from baseline in plasma leucine (300 ± 96%, isoleucine (300 ± 88%, and valine (144 ± 59% concentrations peaked 0.5 h-post drink in BCAA. A greater phosphorylation status of S6K1Thr389 (P = 0.017 and PRAS40 (P = 0.037 was observed in BCAA than PLA at 1 h-post drink ingestion. Myofibrillar-MPS was 22% higher (P = 0.012 in BCAA (0.110 ± 0.009%/h than PLA (0.090 ± 0.006%/h. Phenylalanine Ra was ~6% lower in BCAA (18.00 ± 4.31 μmol·kgBM−1 than PLA (21.75 ± 4.89 μmol·kgBM−1; P = 0.028 after drink ingestion. We conclude that ingesting BCAAs alone increases the post-exercise stimulation of myofibrillar-MPS and phosphorylation status mTORC1 signaling.

  13. Concurrent inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 by WYE-687 inhibits renal cell carcinoma cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Pan

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORin renal cell carcinoma (RCC represents a valuable oncotarget for treatment. We here tested the potential anti-RCC activity by a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor WYE-687in vitro and in vivo.WYE-687 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative to established RCC cell lines (786-O and A498 and primary human RCC cells. Yet, it was non-cytotoxic toHK-2 tubular epithelial cells.WYE-687 provoked caspase-dependent apoptosis in the RCC cells. At the molecular level, WYE-687 almost completely blocked mTORC1 (p-S6K1 and p-S6 and mTORC2 (p-Akt Ser 473 activation in both 786-Ocells and primary human RCC cells, where it downregulated both hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α and HIF-2α expression. Significantly, oral administration of WYE-687 potently suppressed786-O tumor xenograft growth in nude mice. mTORC1/2 activation and HIF-1α/2α expression were also remarkably downregulated in WYE-687-treated tumor tissues. Thus, our preclinical results imply that WYE-687 may have important translational value for the treatment of RCC.

  14. Inhibitions of mTORC1 and 4EBP-1 are key events orchestrated by Rottlerin in SK-Mel-28 cell killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveri, E; Maellaro, E; Valacchi, G; Ietta, F; Muscettola, M; Maioli, E

    2016-09-28

    Earlier studies demonstrated that Rottlerin exerts a time- and dose-dependent antiproliferative effect on SK-Mel-28 melanoma cells during 24 h of treatment, but cytotoxicity due to cell death began only after a 48 h exposure. In the current study, in order to identify the type of cell death in this cell line, which is notoriously refractory to most anticancer therapies, and to clarify the underlying mechanisms of this delayed outcome, we searched for apoptotic, necrotic/necroptotic and autophagic traits in Rottlerin-exposed cells. Although SK-Mel-28 cells are both apoptosis and autophagy competent, Western blotting analysis, caspase activity assay, nuclear imaging and the effects of autophagy, apoptosis and necroptosis inhibitors, indicated that Rottlerin cytotoxicity was due to none of the aforementioned death mechanisms. Nevertheless, in growth arrested cells, the death did occur after a prolonged treatment and most likely ensued from the observed blockage of protein synthesis that reached levels expected to be incompatible with cell survival. From a mechanistic point of view, we ascribed this effect to the documented inhibition of mTORC1 activity; mTORC1 inhibition on the one hand led to a not deadly, rather protective autophagic response but, on the other hand caused a near complete arrest of protein synthesis. Interestingly, no cytotoxicity was found towards normal skin fibroblasts, which only resulted mildly growth arrested by the drug. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Alterations of cAMP-dependent signaling in dystrophic skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger eRudolf

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autonomic regulation processes in striated muscles are largely mediated by cAMP/PKA-signaling. In order to achieve specificity of signaling its spatial-temporal compartmentation plays a critical role. We discuss here how specificity of cAMP/PKA-signaling can be achieved in skeletal muscle by spatio-temporal compartmentation. While a microdomain containing PKA type I in the region of the neuromuscular junction is important for post-synaptic, activity-dependent stabilization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, PKA type I and II microdomains in the sarcomeric part of skeletal muscle are likely to play different roles, including the regulation of muscle homeostasis. These microdomains are due to specific A-kinase anchoring proteins, like rapsyn and myospryn. Importantly, recent evidence indicates that compartmentation of the cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling pathway and pharmacological activation of cAMP production are aberrant in different skeletal muscles disorders. Thus, we discuss here their potential as targets for palliative treatment of certain forms of dystrophy and myasthenia. Under physiological conditions, the neuropeptide, α-calcitonin-related peptide, as well as beta-adrenergic agonists are the most-mentioned natural triggers for activating cAMP/PKA signaling in skeletal muscle. While the precise domains and functions of these first messengers are still under investigation, agonists of β2-adrenoceptors clearly exhibit anabolic activity under normal conditions and reduce protein degradation during atrophic periods. Past and recent studies suggest direct sympathetic innervation of skeletal muscle fibers. In summary, the organization and roles of cAMP-dependent signaling in skeletal muscle are increasingly understood, revealing crucial functions in processes like nerve-muscle interaction and muscle trophicity.

  16. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expression and signalling in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ signalling is proposed to play an important role in skeletal muscle function during exercise. Here, we examined the expression of multifunctional Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) in human skeletal muscle and show that CaMKII and CaMKK, but not CaMKI or CaMKIV, are expressed...

  17. Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation Controlled by Surface Electromyographic Signals Produced by Volitional Activation of the Same Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Søren; Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Andersen, Ole Trier

    1997-01-01

    In order to use the volitional electromyography (EMG) as a control signal for the stimulation of the same muscle, it is necessary to eliminate the stimulation artifacts and the muscle responses caused by the stimulation. The stimulation artifacts, caused by the electric field in skin and tissue...

  18. Skeletal muscle morphology and regulatory signalling in endurance-trained and sedentary individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U. R.; Agergaard, J.; Couppe, C.

    2017-01-01

    Muscle mass in humans is inversely associated with circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines, but the interaction between ageing and training on muscle composition and the intra-muscular signalling behind inflammation and contractile protein synthesis and degradation is unknown. We studied 15 ...

  19. Regulation of slow and fast muscle myofibrillogenesis by Wnt/beta-catenin and myostatin signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tee, J.M.; van Rooijen, C.R.; Boonen, R.A.C.M.; Zivkovic, D.

    2009-01-01

    Deviation from proper muscle development or homeostasis results in various myopathic conditions. Employing genetic as well as chemical intervention, we provide evidence that a tight regulation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is essential for muscle fiber growth and maintenance. In zebrafish embryos,

  20. Analysis of Muscle Fatigue Progression using Cyclostationary Property of Surface Electromyography Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Venugopal, G; Ramakrishnan, S

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of neuromuscular fatigue finds various applications ranging from clinical studies to biomechanics. Surface electromyography (sEMG) signals are widely used for these studies due to its non-invasiveness. During cyclic dynamic contractions, these signals are nonstationary and cyclostationary. In recent years, several nonstationary methods have been employed for the muscle fatigue analysis. However, cyclostationary based approach is not well established for the assessment of muscle fatigue. In this work, cyclostationarity associated with the biceps brachii muscle fatigue progression is analyzed using sEMG signals and Spectral Correlation Density (SCD) functions. Signals are recorded from fifty healthy adult volunteers during dynamic contractions under a prescribed protocol. These signals are preprocessed and are divided into three segments, namely, non-fatigue, first muscle discomfort and fatigue zones. Then SCD is estimated using fast Fourier transform accumulation method. Further, Cyclic Frequency Spectral Density (CFSD) is calculated from the SCD spectrum. Two features, namely, cyclic frequency spectral area (CFSA) and cyclic frequency spectral entropy (CFSE) are proposed to study the progression of muscle fatigue. Additionally, degree of cyclostationarity (DCS) is computed to quantify the amount of cyclostationarity present in the signals. Results show that there is a progressive increase in cyclostationary during the progression of muscle fatigue. CFSA shows an increasing trend in muscle fatiguing contraction. However, CFSE shows a decreasing trend. It is observed that when the muscle progresses from non-fatigue to fatigue condition, the mean DCS of fifty subjects increases from 0.016 to 0.99. All the extracted features found to be distinct and statistically significant in the three zones of muscle contraction (p < 0.05). It appears that these SCD features could be useful in the automated analysis of sEMG signals for different neuromuscular conditions.

  1. Exercise increases human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via coordinated increases in microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Frøsig, Christian; Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    and increased similarly in both legs during the clamp and L-NMMA had no effect on these insulin-stimulated signaling pathways. Therefore, acute exercise increases insulin sensitivity of muscle by a coordinated increase in insulin-stimulated microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling at the level of TBC1D4...... and glycogen synthase in muscle. This secures improved glucose delivery on the one hand and increased ability to take up and dispose of the delivered glucose on the other hand....

  2. Role of the middle ear muscle apparatus in mechanisms of speech signal discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, B. S.; Bazarov, V. G.; Sachenko, S. V.

    1980-01-01

    A method of impedance reflexometry was used to examine 101 students with hearing impairment in order to clarify the interrelation between speech discrimination and the state of the middle ear muscles. Ability to discriminate speech signals depends to some extent on the functional state of intraaural muscles. Speech discrimination was greatly impaired in the absence of stapedial muscle acoustic reflex, in the presence of low thresholds of stimulation and in very small values of reflex amplitude increase. Discrimination was not impeded in positive AR, high values of relative thresholds and normal increase of reflex amplitude in response to speech signals with augmenting intensity.

  3. Effects of contraction mode and stimulation frequency on electrical stimulation-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Yuki; Himori, Koichi; Tatebayashi, Daisuke; Yamada, Ryotaro; Ogasawara, Riki; Yamada, Takashi

    2018-02-01

    We compared the skeletal muscle hypertrophy resulting from isometric (Iso) or eccentric (Ecc) electrical stimulation (ES) training with different stimulation frequencies. Male Wistar rats were assigned to the Iso and Ecc groups. These were divided into three further subgroups that were stimulated at 10 Hz (Iso-10 and Ecc-10), 30 Hz (Iso-30 and Ecc-30), or 100 Hz (Iso-100 and Ecc-100). In experiment 1, the left plantarflexor muscles were stimulated every other day for 3 wk. In experiment 2, mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling was investigated 6 h after one bout of ES. The contralateral right muscle served as a control (non-ES). Ecc contractions comprised forced dorsiflexion combined with ES. The peak torque and torque-time integral during ES were higher in the Ecc group than that in the Iso group in all stimulation frequencies examined. The gastrocnemius muscle weight normalized to body weight in ES side was increased compared with the non-ES side by 6, 7, and 17% in the Ecc-30, Iso-100, and Ecc-100 groups, respectively, with a greater gain in Ecc-100 than the Ecc-30 and Iso-100 groups. The p70S6K (Thr389) phosphorylation level was higher in the Ecc-30 and -100 than in the Iso-30 and -100 groups, respectively. The peak torque and torque-time integral were highly correlated with the magnitude of increase in muscle mass and the phosphorylation of p70S6K. These data suggest that ES-induced muscle hypertrophy and mTORC1 activity are determined by loading intensity and volume during muscle contraction independent of the contraction mode. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Eccentric contraction and high-frequency stimulation (HFS) are regarded as an effective way to increase muscle mass by electrical stimulation (ES) training. However, little is known about whether muscle hypertrophy is affected by contraction mode and stimulation frequency in ES training. Here, we provide the evidence that muscle hypertrophy and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity are

  4. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroide, N; Bousson, V; Mambre, L; Vicaut, E; Laredo, J D; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients.

  5. Muscle MRI STIR signal intensity and atrophy are correlated to focal lower limb neuropathy severity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroide, N.; Mambre, L.; Kubis, Nathalie [Service de Physiologie Clinique-Explorations Fonctionnelles, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Bousson, V.; Laredo, J.D. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); Radiologie Osteo-articulaire, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Vicaut, E. [Universite Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cite France, Paris (France); URC, AP-HP, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2014-09-26

    The objective is to determine if muscle MRI is useful for assessing neuropathy severity. Clinical, MRI and electromyography (EMG) examinations were performed in 17 patients with focal lower limb neuropathies. MRI Short Tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) signal intensity, amyotrophy, and muscle fatty infiltration measured after T1-weighted image acquisition, EMG spontaneous activity (SA), and maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) were graded using semiquantitative scores and quantitative scores for STIR signal intensity and were correlated to the Medical Research Council (MRC) score for testing muscle strength. Within this population, subgroups were selected according to severity (mild versus severe), duration (subacute versus chronic), and topography (distal versus proximal) of the neuropathy. EMG SA and MVC MRI amyotrophy and quantitative scoring of muscle STIR intensity were correlated with the MRC score. Moreover, MRI amyotrophy was significantly increased in severe, chronic, and proximal neuropathies along with fatty infiltration in chronic lesions. Muscle MRI atrophy and quantitative evaluation of signal intensity were correlated to MRC score in our study. Semiquantitative evaluation of muscle STIR signal was sensitive enough for detection of topography of the nerve lesion but was not suitable to assess severity. Muscle MRI could support EMG in chronic and proximal neuropathy, which showed poor sensitivity in these patients. (orig.)

  6. Activin signaling targeted by insulin/dFOXO regulates aging and muscle proteostasis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Bai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reduced insulin/IGF signaling increases lifespan in many animals. To understand how insulin/IGF mediates lifespan in Drosophila, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing analysis with the insulin/IGF regulated transcription factor dFOXO in long-lived insulin/IGF signaling genotypes. Dawdle, an Activin ligand, is bound and repressed by dFOXO when reduced insulin/IGF extends lifespan. Reduced Activin signaling improves performance and protein homeostasis in muscles of aged flies. Activin signaling through the Smad binding element inhibits the transcription of Autophagy-specific gene 8a (Atg8a within muscle, a factor controlling the rate of autophagy. Expression of Atg8a within muscle is sufficient to increase lifespan. These data reveal how insulin signaling can regulate aging through control of Activin signaling that in turn controls autophagy, representing a potentially conserved molecular basis for longevity assurance. While reduced Activin within muscle autonomously retards functional aging of this tissue, these effects in muscle also reduce secretion of insulin-like peptides at a distance from the brain. Reduced insulin secretion from the brain may subsequently reinforce longevity assurance through decreased systemic insulin/IGF signaling.

  7. cAMP signaling in skeletal muscle adaptation: hypertrophy, metabolism, and regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Randi

    2012-01-01

    Among organ systems, skeletal muscle is perhaps the most structurally specialized. The remarkable subcellular architecture of this tissue allows it to empower movement with instructions from motor neurons. Despite this high degree of specialization, skeletal muscle also has intrinsic signaling mechanisms that allow adaptation to long-term changes in demand and regeneration after acute damage. The second messenger adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) not only elicits acute changes within myofibers during exercise but also contributes to myofiber size and metabolic phenotype in the long term. Strikingly, sustained activation of cAMP signaling leads to pronounced hypertrophic responses in skeletal myofibers through largely elusive molecular mechanisms. These pathways can promote hypertrophy and combat atrophy in animal models of disorders including muscular dystrophy, age-related atrophy, denervation injury, disuse atrophy, cancer cachexia, and sepsis. cAMP also participates in muscle development and regeneration mediated by muscle precursor cells; thus, downstream signaling pathways may potentially be harnessed to promote muscle regeneration in patients with acute damage or muscular dystrophy. In this review, we summarize studies implicating cAMP signaling in skeletal muscle adaptation. We also highlight ligands that induce cAMP signaling and downstream effectors that are promising pharmacological targets. PMID:22354781

  8. Analysis of Small Muscle Movement Effects on EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    different conditions are recorded in this experiment. These conditions are the resting state, left finger keyboard press, right finger keyboard...51 4.3.2. Right and Left Finger Keyboard Press Conditions ..................................... 57 4.4. Detection of Hand...solving Gamma 30 Hz and higher Blending of multiple brain functions ; Muscle related artifacts 2.2. EEG Artifacts EEG recordings are intended to

  9. mTORC1 activity as a determinant of cancer risk--rationalizing the cancer-preventive effects of adiponectin, metformin, rapamycin, and low-protein vegan diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F

    2011-10-01

    Increased plasma levels of adiponectin, metformin therapy of diabetes, rapamycin administration in transplant patients, and lifelong consumption of low-protein plant-based diets have all been linked to decreased risk for various cancers. These benefits may be mediated, at least in part, by down-regulated activity of the mTORC1 complex, a key regulator of protein translation. By boosting the effective availability of the translation initiator eIF4E, mTORC1 activity promotes the translation of a number of "weak" mRNAs that code for proteins, often up-regulated in cancer, that promote cellular proliferation, invasiveness, and angiogenesis, and that abet cancer promotion and chemoresistance by opposing apoptosis. Measures which inhibit eIF4E activity, either directly or indirectly, may have utility not only for cancer prevention, but also for the treatment of many cancers in which eIF4E drives malignancy. Since eIF4E is overexpressed in many cancers, strategies which target eIF4E directly--some of which are now being assessed clinically--may have the broadest efficacy in this regard. Many of the "weak" mRNAs coding for proteins that promote malignant behavior or chemoresistance are regulated transcriptionally by NF-kappaB and/or Stat3, which are active in a high proportion of cancers; thus, regimens concurrently targeting eIF4E, NF-kappaB, and Stat3 may suppress these proteins at both the transcriptional and translational levels, potentially achieving a very marked reduction in their expression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, Hai-zhou; Weng, Xiao-chuan; Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin; Sun, Peng; Liu, Li-li; Chen, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment

  11. The novel mTORC1/2 dual inhibitor INK-128 suppresses survival and proliferation of primary and transformed human pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Hai-zhou [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Weng, Xiao-chuan [Department of Anesthesiology, Hangzhou Xia-sha Hospital, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Pan, Hong-ming; Pan, Qin [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Sun, Peng [Department of Medical Oncology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou 510060 (China); Liu, Li-li [Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310016 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinhangzhou126@126.com [Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary Surgery, First People’s Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou 310006 (China)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • INK-128 inhibits the survival and growth of human pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. • INK-128 blocks mTORC1/2 activation simultaneously in pancreatic cancer cells. • INK-128 down-regulates cyclin D1 and causes pancreatic cancer cell cycle arrest. • INK-128 significantly increases sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. - Abstract: Pancreatic cancer has one of worst prognosis among all human malignancies around the world, the development of novel and more efficient anti-cancer agents against this disease is urgent. In the current study, we tested the potential effect of INK-128, a novel mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 and 2 (mTORC1/2) dual inhibitor, against pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrated that INK-128 concentration- and time-dependently inhibited the survival and growth of pancreatic cancer cells (both primary cells and transformed cells). INK-128 induced pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis and necrosis simultaneously. Further, INK-128 dramatically inhibited phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and Akt at Ser 473 in pancreatic cancer cells. Meanwhile, it downregulated cyclin D1 expression and caused cell cycle arrest. Finally, we found that a low concentration of INK-128 significantly increased the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Together, our in vitro results suggest that INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-cancer agent or chemo-adjuvant for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  12. Influence of age on leptin induced skeletal muscle signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guadalupe Grau, Amelia; Larsen, Steen; Guerra, Borja

    2014-01-01

    transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC), combined with the leptin signaling inhibitors suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in human...

  13. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C.; Kirschenbaum, Alexander; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Qin, Weiping; Bauman, William A.; Cardozo, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. → Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. → Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. → Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  14. Nandrolone reduces activation of Notch signaling in denervated muscle associated with increased Numb expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin-Hua [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Yao, Shen; Qiao, Rui-Fang; Levine, Alice C. [Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Kirschenbaum, Alexander [Department of Urology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Qin, Weiping [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Bauman, William A. [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Cardozo, Christopher P., E-mail: chris.cardozo@mssm.edu [Center of Excellence for the Medical Consequences of Spinal Cord Injury, James J. Peter VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Department of Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Nerve transection increased Notch signaling in paralyzed muscle. {yields} Nandrolone prevented denervation-induced Notch signaling. {yields} Nandrolone induced the expression of an inhibitor of the Notch signaling, Numb. {yields} Reduction of denervation-induced Notch signaling by nandrolone is likely through upregulation of Numb. -- Abstract: Nandrolone, an anabolic steroid, slows denervation-atrophy in rat muscle. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this effect are not well understood. Androgens and anabolic steroids activate Notch signaling in animal models of aging and thereby mitigate sarcopenia. To explore the molecular mechanisms by which nandrolone prevents denervation-atrophy, we investigated the effects of nandrolone on Notch signaling in denervated rat gastrocnemius muscle. Denervation significantly increased Notch activity reflected by elevated levels of nuclear Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and expression of Hey1 (a Notch target gene). Activation was greatest at 7 and 35 days after denervation but remained present at 56 days after denervation. Activation of Notch in denervated muscle was prevented by nandrolone associated with upregulated expression of Numb mRNA and protein. These data demonstrate that denervation activates Notch signaling, and that nandrolone abrogates this response associated with increased expression of Numb, suggesting a potential mechanism by which nandrolone reduces denervation-atrophy.

  15. Severe energy deficit upregulates leptin receptors, leptin signaling, and PTP1B in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Suarez, Ismael; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; de La Calle-Herrero, Jaime; Losa-Reyna, Jose; Martin-Rincon, Marcos; Morales-Alamo, David; Santana, Alfredo; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Calbet, Jose A L

    2017-11-01

    In obesity, leptin receptors (OBR) and leptin signaling in skeletal muscle are downregulated. To determine whether OBR and leptin signaling are upregulated with a severe energy deficit, 15 overweight men were assessed before the intervention (PRE), after 4 days of caloric restriction (3.2 kcal·kg body wt -1 ·day -1 ) in combination with prolonged exercise (CRE; 8 h walking + 45 min single-arm cranking/day) to induce an energy deficit of ~5,500 kcal/day, and following 3 days of control diet (isoenergetic) and reduced exercise (CD). During CRE, the diet consisted solely of whey protein ( n = 8) or sucrose ( n = 7; 0.8 g·kg body wt -1 ·day -1 ). Muscle biopsies were obtained from the exercised and the nonexercised deltoid muscles and from the vastus lateralis. From PRE to CRE, serum glucose, insulin, and leptin were reduced. OBR expression was augmented in all examined muscles associated with increased maximal fat oxidation. Compared with PRE, after CD, phospho-Tyr 1141 OBR, phospho-Tyr 985 OBR, JAK2, and phospho-Tyr 1007/1008 JAK2 protein expression were increased in all muscles, whereas STAT3 and phospho-Tyr 705 STAT3 were increased only in the arms. The expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) in skeletal muscle was increased by 18 and 45% after CRE and CD, respectively ( P < 0.05). Suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) tended to increase in the legs and decrease in the arm muscles (ANOVA interaction: P < 0.05). Myosin heavy chain I isoform was associated with OBR protein expression ( r  = -0.75), phospho-Tyr 985 OBR ( r  = 0.88), and phospho-Tyr 705 STAT3/STAT3 ( r = 0.74). In summary, despite increased PTP1B expression, skeletal muscle OBR and signaling are upregulated by a severe energy deficit with greater response in the arm than in the legs likely due to SOCS3 upregulation in the leg muscles. NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study shows that the skeletal muscle leptin receptors and their corresponding signaling cascade are upregulated in

  16. Extraocular muscle regeneration in zebrafish requires late signals from Insulin-like growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saera-Vila, Alfonso; Louie, Ke'ale W; Sha, Cuilee; Kelly, Ryan M; Kish, Phillip E; Kahana, Alon

    2018-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (Igfs) are key regulators of key biological processes such as embryonic development, growth, and tissue repair and regeneration. The role of Igf in myogenesis is well documented and, in zebrafish, promotes fin and heart regeneration. However, the mechanism of action of Igf in muscle repair and regeneration is not well understood. Using adult zebrafish extraocular muscle (EOM) regeneration as an experimental model, we show that Igf1 receptor blockage using either chemical inhibitors (BMS754807 and NVP-AEW541) or translation-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) reduced EOM regeneration. Zebrafish EOMs regeneration depends on myocyte dedifferentiation, which is driven by early epigenetic reprogramming and requires autophagy activation and cell cycle reentry. Inhibition of Igf signaling had no effect on either autophagy activation or cell proliferation, indicating that Igf signaling was not involved in the early reprogramming steps of regeneration. Instead, blocking Igf signaling produced hypercellularity of regenerating EOMs and diminished myosin expression, resulting in lack of mature differentiated muscle fibers even many days after injury, indicating that Igf was involved in late re-differentiation steps. Although it is considered the main mediator of myogenic Igf actions, Akt activation decreased in regenerating EOMs, suggesting that alternative signaling pathways mediate Igf activity in muscle regeneration. In conclusion, Igf signaling is critical for re-differentiation of reprogrammed myoblasts during late steps of zebrafish EOM regeneration, suggesting a regulatory mechanism for determining regenerated muscle size and timing of differentiation, and a potential target for regenerative therapy.

  17. Low birthweight is associated with specific changes in muscle insulin-signalling protein expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozanne, SE; Jensen, CB; Tingey, KJ

    2005-01-01

    muscle in a human cohort and a rat model. METHODS: We recruited 20 young men with low birthweight (mean birthweight 2702+/-202 g) and 20 age-matched control subjects (mean birthweight 3801+/-99 g). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle and protein expression of selected insulin......-signalling proteins was determined. Rats used for this study were male offspring born to dams fed a standard (20%) protein diet or a low (8%) protein diet during pregnancy and lactation. Protein expression was determined in soleus muscle from adult offspring. RESULTS: Low-birthweight subjects showed reduced muscle...... expression of protein kinase C (PKC)zeta, p85alpha, p110beta and GLUT4. PKCzeta, GLUT4 and p85 were also reduced in the muscle of rats fed a low-protein diet. Other proteins studied were unchanged in low-birthweight humans and in rats fed a low-protein diet when compared with control groups. CONCLUSIONS...

  18. Activated protein synthesis and suppressed protein breakdown signaling in skeletal muscle of critically ill patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob G Jespersen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Skeletal muscle mass is controlled by myostatin and Akt-dependent signaling on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β and forkhead box O (FoxO pathways, but it is unknown how these pathways are regulated in critically ill human muscle. To describe factors involved in muscle mass regulation, we investigated the phosphorylation and expression of key factors in these protein synthesis and breakdown signaling pathways in thigh skeletal muscle of critically ill intensive care unit (ICU patients compared with healthy controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ICU patients were systemically inflamed, moderately hyperglycemic, received insulin therapy, and showed a tendency to lower plasma branched chain amino acids compared with controls. Using Western blotting we measured Akt, GSK3β, mTOR, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6k, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1, and muscle ring finger protein 1 (MuRF1; and by RT-PCR we determined mRNA expression of, among others, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1, FoxO 1, 3 and 4, atrogin1, MuRF1, interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α and myostatin. Unexpectedly, in critically ill ICU patients Akt-mTOR-S6k signaling was substantially higher compared with controls. FoxO1 mRNA was higher in patients, whereas FoxO3, atrogin1 and myostatin mRNAs and MuRF1 protein were lower compared with controls. A moderate correlation (r2=0.36, p<0.05 between insulin infusion dose and phosphorylated Akt was demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We present for the first time muscle protein turnover signaling in critically ill ICU patients, and we show signaling pathway activity towards a stimulation of muscle protein synthesis and a somewhat inhibited proteolysis.

  19. R-spondin1 Controls Muscle Cell Fusion through Dual Regulation of Antagonistic Wnt Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriane Lacour

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wnt-mediated signals are involved in many important steps in mammalian regeneration. In multiple cell types, the R-spondin (Rspo family of secreted proteins potently activates the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here, we identify Rspo1 as a mediator of skeletal muscle tissue repair. First, we show that deletion of Rspo1 results in global alteration of muscle regeneration kinetics following acute injury. We find that muscle progenitor cells lacking Rspo1 show delayed differentiation due to reduced activation of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Furthermore, muscle cells lacking Rspo1 have a fusion phenotype leading to larger myotubes containing supernumerary nuclei both in vitro and in vivo. The increase in muscle fusion was dependent on downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin and upregulation of non-canonical Wnt7a/Fzd7/Rac1 signaling. We conclude that reciprocal control of antagonistic Wnt signaling pathways by Rspo1 in muscle stem cell progeny is a key step ensuring normal tissue architecture restoration following acute damage.

  20. Differential Role of Insulin/IGF-1 Receptor Signaling in Muscle Growth and Glucose Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian T. O’Neill

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 are major regulators of muscle protein and glucose homeostasis. To determine how these pathways interact, we generated mice with muscle-specific knockout of IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R and insulin receptor (IR. These MIGIRKO mice showed >60% decrease in muscle mass. Despite a complete lack of insulin/IGF-1 signaling in muscle, MIGIRKO mice displayed normal glucose and insulin tolerance. Indeed, MIGIRKO mice showed fasting hypoglycemia and increased basal glucose uptake. This was secondary to decreased TBC1D1 resulting in increased Glut4 and Glut1 membrane localization. Interestingly, overexpression of a dominant-negative IGF1R in muscle induced glucose intolerance in MIGIRKO animals. Thus, loss of insulin/IGF-1 signaling impairs muscle growth, but not whole-body glucose tolerance due to increased membrane localization of glucose transporters. Nonetheless, presence of a dominant-negative receptor, even in the absence of functional IR/IGF1R, induces glucose intolerance, indicating that interactions between these receptors and other proteins in muscle can impair glucose homeostasis.

  1. Fuzzy approximate entropy analysis of chaotic and natural complex systems: detecting muscle fatigue using electromyography signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong-Bo; Guo, Jing-Yi; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2010-04-01

    In the present contribution, a complexity measure is proposed to assess surface electromyography (EMG) in the study of muscle fatigue during sustained, isometric muscle contractions. Approximate entropy (ApEn) is believed to provide quantitative information about the complexity of experimental data that is often corrupted with noise, short data length, and in many cases, has inherent dynamics that exhibit both deterministic and stochastic behaviors. We developed an improved ApEn measure, i.e., fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn), which utilizes the fuzzy membership function to define the vectors' similarity. Tests were conducted on independent, identically distributed (i.i.d.) Gaussian and uniform noises, a chirp signal, MIX processes, Rossler equation, and Henon map. Compared with the standard ApEn, the fApEn showed better monotonicity, relative consistency, and more robustness to noise when characterizing signals with different complexities. Performance analysis on experimental EMG signals demonstrated that the fApEn significantly decreased during the development of muscle fatigue, which is a similar trend to that of the mean frequency (MNF) of the EMG signal, while the standard ApEn failed to detect this change. Moreover, fApEn of EMG demonstrated a better robustness to the length of the analysis window in comparison with the MNF of EMG. The results suggest that the fApEn of an EMG signal may potentially become a new reliable method for muscle fatigue assessment and be applicable to other short noisy physiological signal analysis.

  2. Calcineurin signaling and PGC-1alpha expression are suppressed during muscle atrophy due to diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wilson, Tiffany K; Reddy, Ramesh N; Bailey, James L; Zheng, Bin; Ordas, Ronald; Gooch, Jennifer L; Price, S Russ

    2010-08-01

    PGC-1alpha is a transcriptional coactivator that controls energy homeostasis through regulation of glucose and oxidative metabolism. Both PGC-1alpha expression and oxidative capacity are decreased in skeletal muscle of patients and animals undergoing atrophy, suggesting that PGC-1alpha participates in the regulation of muscle mass. PGC-1alpha gene expression is controlled by calcium- and cAMP-sensitive pathways. However, the mechanism regulating PGC-1alpha in skeletal muscle during atrophy remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the mechanism responsible for decreased PGC-1alpha expression using a rodent streptozotocin (STZ) model of chronic diabetes and atrophy. After 21days, the levels of PGC-1alpha protein and mRNA were decreased. We examined the activation state of CREB, a potent activator of PGC-1alpha transcription, and found that phospho-CREB was paradoxically high in muscle of STZ-rats, suggesting that the cAMP pathway was not involved in PGC-1alpha regulation. In contrast, expression of calcineurin (Cn), a calcium-dependent phosphatase, was suppressed in the same muscles. PGC-1alpha expression is regulated by two Cn substrates, MEF2 and NFATc. Therefore, we examined MEF2 and NFATc activity in muscles from STZ-rats. Target genes MRF4 and MCIP1.4 mRNAs were both significantly reduced, consistent with reduced Cn signaling. Moreover, levels of MRF4, MCIP1.4, and PGC-1alpha were also decreased in muscles of CnAalpha-/- and CnAbeta-/- mice without diabetes indicating that decreased Cn signaling, rather than changes in other calcium- or cAMP-sensitive pathways, were responsible for decreased PGC-1alpha expression. These findings demonstrate that Cn activity is a major determinant of PGC-1alpha expression in skeletal muscle during diabetes and possibly other conditions associated with loss of muscle mass.

  3. Calcineurin signaling and PGC-1α expression are suppressed during muscle atrophy due to diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Wilson, Tiffany K.; Reddy, Ramesh N.; Bailey, James L.; Zheng, Bin; Ordas, Ronald; Gooch, Jennifer L.; Price, S. Russ

    2010-01-01

    PGC-1α is a transcriptional coactivator that controls energy homeostasis through regulation of glucose and oxidative metabolism. Both PGC-1α expression and oxidative capacity are decreased in skeletal muscle of patients and animals undergoing atrophy, suggesting that PGC-1α participates in the regulation of muscle mass. PGC-1α gene expression is controlled by calcium- and cAMP-sensitive pathways. However, the mechanism regulating PGC-1α in skeletal muscle during atrophy remains unclear. Therefore, we examined the mechanism responsible for decreased PGC-1α expression using a rodent streptozotocin (STZ) model of chronic diabetes and atrophy. After 21d, the levels of PGC-1α protein and mRNA were decreased. We examined the activation state of CREB, a potent activator of PGC-1α transcription, and found that phospho-CREB was paradoxically high in muscle of STZ-rats, suggesting that the cAMP pathway was not involved in PGC-1α regulation. In contrast, expression of calcineurin (Cn), a calcium-dependent phosphatase, was suppressed in the same muscles. PGC-1α expression is regulated by two Cn substrates, MEF2 and NFATc. Therefore, we examined MEF2 and NFATc activity in muscles from STZ-rats. Target genes MRF4 and MCIP1.4 were both significantly reduced, consistent with reduced Cn signaling. Moreover, levels of MRF4, MCIP1.4, and PGC-1α were also decreased in muscles of CnAα-/- and CnAβ-/- mice without diabetes indicating that decreased Cn signaling, rather than changes in other calcium- or cAMP-sensitive pathways, were responsible for decreased PGC-1α expression. These findings demonstrate that Cn activity is a major determinant of PGC-1α expression in skeletal muscle during diabetes and possibly other conditions associated with loss of muscle mass. PMID:20359506

  4. Elevated toll-like receptor 4 expression and signaling in muscle from insulin-resistant subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyna, Sara M; Ghosh, Sangeeta; Tantiwong, Puntip; Meka, C S Reddy; Eagan, Phyllis; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Cersosimo, Eugenio; Defronzo, Ralph A; Coletta, Dawn K; Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Musi, Nicolas

    2008-10-01

    OBJECTIVE- Tall-like receptor (TLR)4 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of free fatty acid (FFA)-induced insulin resistance by activating inflammatory pathways, including inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB)/nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB). However, it is not known whether insulin-resistant subjects have abnormal TLR4 signaling. We examined whether insulin-resistant subjects have abnormal TLR4 expression and TLR4-driven (IkappaB/NFkappaB) signaling in skeletal muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- TLR4 gene expression and protein content were measured in muscle biopsies in 7 lean, 8 obese, and 14 type 2 diabetic subjects. A primary human myotube culture system was used to examine whether FFAs stimulate IkappaB/NFkappaB via TLR4 and whether FFAs increase TLR4 expression/content in muscle. RESULTS- Obese and type 2 diabetic subjects had significantly elevated TLR4 gene expression and protein content in muscle. TLR4 muscle protein content correlated with the severity of insulin resistance. Obese and type 2 diabetic subjects also had lower IkappaBalpha content, an indication of elevated IkappaB/NFkappaB signaling. The increase in TLR4 and NFkappaB signaling was accompanied by elevated expression of the NFkappaB-regulated genes interleukin (IL)-6 and superoxide dismutase (SOD)2. In primary human myotubes, acute palmitate treatment stimulated IkappaB/NFkappaB, and blockade of TLR4 prevented the ability of palmitate to stimulate the IkappaB/NFkappaB pathway. Increased TLR4 content and gene expression observed in muscle from insulin-resistant subjects were reproduced by treating myotubes from lean, normal-glucose-tolerant subjects with palmitate. Palmitate also increased IL-6 and SOD2 gene expression, and this effect was prevented by inhibiting NFkappaB. CONCLUSIONS- Abnormal TLR4 expression and signaling, possibly caused by elevated plasma FFA levels, may contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in humans.

  5. Notch signal reception is required in vascular smooth muscle cells for ductus arteriosus closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Luke T.; Norton, Christine R.; Gridley, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Summary The ductus arteriosus is an arterial vessel that shunts blood flow away from the lungs during fetal life, but normally occludes after birth to establish the adult circulation pattern. Failure of the ductus arteriosus to close after birth is termed patent ductus arteriosus, and is one of the most common congenital heart defects. Our previous work demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cell expression of the Jag1 gene, which encodes a ligand for Notch family receptors, is essential for postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. However, it was not known what cell population was responsible for receiving the Jag1-mediated signal. Here we show, using smooth muscle cell-specific deletion of the Rbpj gene, which encodes a transcription factor that mediates all canonical Notch signaling, that Notch signal reception in the vascular smooth muscle cell compartment is required for ductus arteriosus closure. These data indicate that homotypic vascular smooth muscle cell interactions are required for proper contractile smooth muscle cell differentiation and postnatal closure of the ductus arteriosus in mice. PMID:26742650

  6. Functional Neuromuscular Stimulation Controlled by Surface Electromyographic Signals Produced by the Volitional Activation of the Same Muscle:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Søren; Fin, Biering-Sørensen; Andersen, Ole Trier

    1997-01-01

    Using the voluntary EMG as a control signal for the stimulation of the same muscle necessitates elimination of stimulus artifacts and the muscle response caused by the stimulation. The stimulus artifacts are easily eliminated by shutting down the amplifier during stimulation. The muscle response ...

  7. FHL1 activates myostatin signalling in skeletal muscle and promotes atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, P; Lee, JY; lori, O; Wells, D

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin is a TGFβ family ligand that reduces muscle mass. In cancer cells, TGFβ signalling is increased by the protein FHL1. Consequently, FHL1 may promote signalling by myostatin. We therefore tested the ability of FHL1 to regulate myostatin function. FHL1 increased the myostatin activity on a SMAD reporter and increased myostatin dependent myotube wasting. In mice, independent expression of myostatin reduced fibre diameter whereas FHL1 increased fibre diameter, both consistent with previo...

  8. Postnatal changes in electromyographic signals during piglet growth, and in relation to muscle fibre types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ninette Kieme; Ravn, L.S.; Guy, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses non-invasive evoked surface electromyography (SEMG) to investigate postnatal muscle development in pigs, and to assess any correlation between recorded signal parameters and muscle fibre types in two different skeletal muscles. Four litters (n=43) of Large White x Landrace pigs were...... used. Evoked SEMG mesurements were taken on days 2, 5, 14, 26, 60 and 151 post partum from m. Longissimus dorsi (LD) and on days 14, 26, 60 and 151 post partum from m. Biceps femoris (BF). A third of each litter was slaughtered at days 27, 61 and 153 post partum. Biopsy samples for LD and BF were taken...... to categorize day 5 post partum, whilst for BF significant increases occurred from days 14 to 26 post partum. Fibre type development in both muscles showed a significant decrease in type IIA fibre number (Ptype IIB fibre number (P

  9. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    muscle cells (VSMCs) through activation of endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigat...

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor triggers signaling cascades mediating vascular smooth muscle cell migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taher, Taher E. I.; Derksen, Patrick W. B.; de Boer, Onno J.; Spaargaren, Marcel; Teeling, Peter; van der Wal, Allard C.; Pals, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    A key event in neointima formation and atherogenesis is the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima. This is controlled by cytokines and extracellular matix (ECM) components within the microenvironment of the diseased vessel wall. At present, these signals have only been

  11. Towards estimation of respiratory muscle effort with respiratory inductance plethysmography signals and complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Chen; Hsiao, Tzu-Chien

    2018-07-01

    Respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) sensor is an inexpensive, non-invasive, easy-to-use transducer for collecting respiratory movement data. Studies have reported that the RIP signal's amplitude and frequency can be used to discriminate respiratory diseases. However, with the conventional approach of RIP data analysis, respiratory muscle effort cannot be estimated. In this paper, the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort through RIP signal was proposed. A complementary ensemble empirical mode decomposition method was used, to extract hidden signals from the RIP signals based on the frequency bands of the activities of different respiratory muscles. To validate the proposed method, an experiment to collect subjects' RIP signal under thoracic breathing (TB) and abdominal breathing (AB) was conducted. The experimental results for both the TB and AB indicate that the proposed method can be used to loosely estimate the activities of thoracic muscles, abdominal muscles, and diaphragm. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  12. Active Bio-sensor System, Compatible with Arm Muscle Movement or Blinking Signals in BCI Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Mehrkanoon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a bionic active sensor system for the BCI application. Proposed system involves analog and digital parts. Two types of accurate sensors are used to pickup the blinking and muscle movement signals. A precision micro-power instrumentation amplifier with the adjustable gain, a sixth order low pass active filter with cutoff frequency 0.1 Hz, and a sixth order band pas filter with the bandwidth of 2-6 Hz are constructed to provide the clean blinking and arm muscle movement signals. TMS320C25 DSP processor is used for independent and unique command signals which are prepared for BCI application by a power amplifier and driver.

  13. BMAL1-dependent regulation of the mTOR signaling pathway delays aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapre, Rohini V; Kondratova, Anna A; Patel, Sonal; Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Wrobel, Michelle; Antoch, Marina P; Kondratov, Roman V

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock, an internal time-keeping system, has been linked with control of aging, but molecular mechanisms of regulation are not known. BMAL1 is a transcriptional factor and core component of the circadian clock; BMAL1 deficiency is associated with premature aging and reduced lifespan. Here we report that activity of mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) is increased upon BMAL1 deficiency both in vivo and in cell culture. Increased mTOR signaling is associated with accelerated aging; in accordance with that, treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin increased lifespan of Bmal1-/- mice by 50%. Our data suggest that BMAL1 is a negative regulator of mTORC1 signaling. We propose that the circadian clock controls the activity of the mTOR pathway through BMAL1-dependent mechanisms and this regulation is important for control of aging and metabolism.

  14. Effects of age and sedentary lifestyle on skeletal muscle NF-kappaB signaling in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W; Cooke, Matthew B; Manini, Todd M; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a critical signaling molecule of disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. However, few studies have carefully investigated whether similar pathways are modulated with physical activity and age. The present study examined lean mass, maximal force production, and skeletal muscle NF-kappaB signaling in 41 men categorized as sedentary (OS, N = 13, 63.85 +/- 6.59 year), physically active (OA, N = 14, 60.71 +/- 5.54 year), or young and sedentary (YS, N = 14, 21.35 +/- 3.84 year). Muscle tissue from the vastus lateralis was assayed for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of the beta subunit of IkB kinase (IKKbeta), cytosolic protein content of phosphorylated inhibitor of kappa B alpha (pIKBalpha), and nuclear content of NF-kappaB subunits p50 and p65. When compared with YS, OS demonstrated age-related muscle atrophy and reduced isokinetic knee extension torque. Physical activity in older individuals preserved maximal isokinetic knee extension torque. OS muscle contained 50% more pIKBalpha than OA and 61% more pIKBalpha than YS. Furthermore, nuclear p65 was significantly elevated in OS compared with YS. OS muscle did not differ from either of the other two groups for nuclear p50 or for mRNA expression of IKKbeta. These results indicate that skeletal muscle content of nuclear-bound p65 is elevated by age in humans. The elevation in nuclear-bound p65 appears to be at least partially due to significant increases in pIKBalpha. A sedentary lifestyle appears to play some role in increased IKBalpha; however, further research is needed to identify downstream effects of this increase.

  15. Effects of Age and Sedentary Lifestyle on Skeletal Muscle NF-κB Signaling in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buford, Thomas W.; Cooke, Matthew B.; Manini, Todd M.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2010-01-01

    Background. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is a critical signaling molecule of disuse-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. However, few studies have carefully investigated whether similar pathways are modulated with physical activity and age. Methods. The present study examined lean mass, maximal force production, and skeletal muscle NF-κB signaling in 41 men categorized as sedentary (OS, N = 13, 63.85 ± 6.59 year), physically active (OA, N = 14, 60.71 ± 5.54 year), or young and sedentary (YS, N = 14, 21.35 ± 3.84 year). Muscle tissue from the vastus lateralis was assayed for messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of the β subunit of IkB kinase (IKKβ), cytosolic protein content of phosphorylated inhibitor of kappa B alpha (pIKBα), and nuclear content of NF-κB subunits p50 and p65. Results. When compared with YS, OS demonstrated age-related muscle atrophy and reduced isokinetic knee extension torque. Physical activity in older individuals preserved maximal isokinetic knee extension torque. OS muscle contained 50% more pIKBα than OA and 61% more pIKBα than YS. Furthermore, nuclear p65 was significantly elevated in OS compared with YS. OS muscle did not differ from either of the other two groups for nuclear p50 or for mRNA expression of IKKβ. Conclusions. These results indicate that skeletal muscle content of nuclear-bound p65 is elevated by age in humans. The elevation in nuclear-bound p65 appears to be at least partially due to significant increases in pIKBα. A sedentary lifestyle appears to play some role in increased IKBα; however, further research is needed to identify downstream effects of this increase. PMID:20045871

  16. Reduced Notch signalling leads to postnatal skeletal muscle hypertrophy in Pofut1cax/cax mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jaam, Bilal; Heu, Katy; Pennarubia, Florian; Segelle, Alexandre; Magnol, Laetitia; Germot, Agnès; Legardinier, Sébastien; Blanquet, Véronique; Maftah, Abderrahman

    2016-09-01

    Postnatal skeletal muscle growth results from the activation of satellite cells and/or an increase in protein synthesis. The Notch signalling pathway maintains satellite cells in a quiescent state, and once activated, sustains their proliferation and commitment towards differentiation. In mammals, POFUT1-mediated O-fucosylation regulates the interactions between NOTCH receptors and ligands of the DELTA/JAGGED family, thus initiating the activation of canonical Notch signalling. Here, we analysed the consequences of downregulated expression of the Pofut1 gene on postnatal muscle growth in mutant Pofut1(cax/cax) (cax, compact axial skeleton) mice and differentiation of their satellite cell-derived myoblasts (SCDMs). Pofut1(cax/cax) mice exhibited muscle hypertrophy, no hyperplasia and a decrease in satellite cell numbers compared with wild-type C3H mice. In agreement with these observations, Pofut1(cax/cax) SCDMs differentiated earlier concomitant with reduced Pax7 expression and decrease in PAX7(+)/MYOD(-) progenitor cells. In vitro binding assays showed a reduced interaction of DELTA-LIKE 1 ligand (DLL1) with NOTCH receptors expressed at the cell surface of SCDMs, leading to a decreased Notch signalling as seen by the quantification of cleaved NICD and Notch target genes. These results demonstrated that POFUT1-mediated O-fucosylation of NOTCH receptors regulates myogenic cell differentiation and affects postnatal muscle growth in mice. © 2016 The Authors.

  17. Regulation of muscle stem cell functions: a focus on the p38 MAPK signaling pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Segales

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Formation of skeletal muscle fibers (myogenesis during development and after tissue injury in the adult constitutes an excellent paradigm to investigate the mechanisms whereby environmental cues control gene expression programs in muscle stem cells (satellite cells by acting on transcriptional and epigenetic effectors. Here we will review the molecular mechanisms implicated in the transition of satellite cells throughout the distinct myogenic stages (i.e., activation from quiescence, proliferation, differentiation and self-renewal. We will also discuss recent findings on the causes underlying satellite cell functional decline with aging. In particular, our review will focus on the epigenetic changes underlying fate decisions and on how the p38 MAPK signaling pathway integrates the environmental signals at the chromatin to build up satellite cell adaptive responses during the process of muscle regeneration, and how these responses are altered in aging. A better comprehension of the signaling pathways connecting external and intrinsic factors will illuminate the path for improving muscle regeneration in the aged.

  18. Wnt signaling balances specification of the cardiac and pharyngeal muscle fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Amrita; Holowiecki, Andrew; Song, Yuntao Charlie; Waxman, Joshua S.

    2017-01-01

    Canonical Wnt/β-catenin (Wnt) signaling plays multiple conserved roles during fate specification of cardiac progenitors in developing vertebrate embryos. Although lineage analysis in ascidians and mice has indicated there is a close relationship between the cardiac second heart field (SHF) and pharyngeal muscle (PM) progenitors, the signals underlying directional fate decisions of the cells within the cardio-pharyngeal muscle field in vertebrates are not yet understood. Here, we examined the temporal requirements of Wnt signaling in cardiac and PM development. In contrast to a previous report in chicken embryos that suggested Wnt inhibits PM development during somitogenesis, we find that in zebrafish embryos Wnt signaling is sufficient to repress PM development during anterior-posterior patterning. Importantly, the temporal sensitivity of dorso-anterior PMs to increased Wnt signaling largely overlaps with when Wnt signaling promotes specification of the adjacent cardiac progenitors. Furthermore, we find that excess early Wnt signaling can cell autonomously promote expansion of the first heart field (FHF) progenitors at the expense of PM and SHF within the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM). Our study provides insight into an antagonistic developmental mechanism that balances the sizes of the adjacent cardiac and PM progenitor fields in early vertebrate embryos. PMID:28087459

  19. Age-related differences in lean mass, protein synthesis and skeletal muscle markers of proteolysis after bed rest and exercise rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Ruth E; Brunker, Lucille B; Agergaard, Jakob; Barrows, Katherine M; Briggs, Robert A; Kwon, Oh Sung; Young, Laura M; Hopkins, Paul N; Volpi, Elena; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Drummond, Micah J

    2015-09-15

    Bed rest-induced muscle loss and impaired muscle recovery may contribute to age-related sarcopenia. It is unknown if there are age-related differences in muscle mass and muscle anabolic and catabolic responses to bed rest. A secondary objective was to determine if rehabilitation could reverse bed rest responses. Nine older and fourteen young adults participated in a 5-day bed rest challenge (BED REST). This was followed by 8 weeks of high intensity resistance exercise (REHAB). Leg lean mass (via dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and strength were determined. Muscle biopsies were collected during a constant stable isotope infusion in the postabsorptive state and after essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion on three occasions: before (PRE), after bed rest and after rehabilitation. Samples were assessed for protein synthesis, mTORC1 signalling, REDD1/2 expression and molecular markers related to muscle proteolysis (MURF1, MAFBX, AMPKα, LC3II/I, Beclin1). We found that leg lean mass and strength decreased in older but not younger adults after bedrest (P protein synthesis increased before bed rest in both age groups (P protein synthesis rates and increased MAFBX mRNA, p-AMPKα and the LC3II/I ratio (P protein synthesis and a marginal increase in proteolytic markers. Finally, rehabilitation restored bed rest-induced deficits in lean mass and strength in older adults. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  20. Augmentation of Muscle Blood Flow by Ultrasound Cavitation Is Mediated by ATP and Purinergic Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcik, J Todd; Davidson, Brian P; Xie, Aris; Wu, Melinda D; Yadava, Mrinal; Qi, Yue; Liang, Sherry; Chon, Chae Ryung; Ammi, Azzdine Y; Field, Joshua; Harmann, Leanne; Chilian, William M; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2017-03-28

    Augmentation of tissue blood flow by therapeutic ultrasound is thought to rely on convective shear. Microbubble contrast agents that undergo ultrasound-mediated cavitation markedly amplify these effects. We hypothesized that purinergic signaling is responsible for shear-dependent increases in muscle perfusion during therapeutic cavitation. Unilateral exposure of the proximal hindlimb of mice (with or without ischemia produced by iliac ligation) to therapeutic ultrasound (1.3 MHz, mechanical index 1.3) was performed for 10 minutes after intravenous injection of 2×10 8 lipid microbubbles. Microvascular perfusion was evaluated by low-power contrast ultrasound perfusion imaging. In vivo muscle ATP release and in vitro ATP release from endothelial cells or erythrocytes were assessed by a luciferin-luciferase assay. Purinergic signaling pathways were assessed by studying interventions that (1) accelerated ATP degradation; (2) inhibited P2Y receptors, adenosine receptors, or K ATP channels; or (3) inhibited downstream signaling pathways involving endothelial nitric oxide synthase or prostanoid production (indomethacin). Augmentation in muscle perfusion by ultrasound cavitation was assessed in a proof-of-concept clinical trial in 12 subjects with stable sickle cell disease. Therapeutic ultrasound cavitation increased muscle perfusion by 7-fold in normal mice, reversed tissue ischemia for up to 24 hours in the murine model of peripheral artery disease, and doubled muscle perfusion in patients with sickle cell disease. Augmentation in flow extended well beyond the region of ultrasound exposure. Ultrasound cavitation produced an ≈40-fold focal and sustained increase in ATP, the source of which included both endothelial cells and erythrocytes. Inhibitory studies indicated that ATP was a critical mediator of flow augmentation that acts primarily through either P2Y receptors or adenosine produced by ectonucleotidase activity. Combined indomethacin and inhibition of

  1. Inhibition of Stat3 signaling ameliorates atrophy of the soleus muscles in mice lacking the vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Suchitra D

    2017-01-25

    Although skeletal muscle wasting has long been observed as a clinical outcome of impaired vitamin D signaling, precise molecular mechanisms that mediate the loss of muscle mass in the absence of vitamin D signaling are less clear. To determine the molecular consequences of vitamin D signaling, we analyzed the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling, a known contributor to various muscle wasting pathologies, in skeletal muscles. We isolated soleus (slow) and tibialis anterior (fast) muscles from mice lacking the vitamin D receptor (VDR -/- ) and used western blot analysis, quantitative RTPCR, and pharmacological intervention to analyze muscle atrophy in VDR -/- mice. We found that slow and fast subsets of muscles of the VDR -/- mice displayed elevated levels of phosphorylated Stat3 accompanied by an increase in Myostatin expression and signaling. Consequently, we observed reduced activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling components, ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) and ribosomal S6 protein (rpS6), that regulate protein synthesis and cell size, respectively. Concomitantly, we observed an increase in atrophy regulators and a block in autophagic gene expression. An examination of the upstream regulation of Stat3 levels in VDR -/- muscles revealed an increase in IL-6 protein expression in the soleus, but not in the tibialis anterior muscles. To investigate the involvement of satellite cells (SCs) in atrophy in VDR -/- mice, we found that there was no significant deficit in SC numbers in VDR -/- muscles compared to the wild type. Unlike its expression within VDR -/- fibers, Myostatin levels in VDR -/- SCs from bulk muscles were similar to those of wild type. However, VDR -/- SCs induced to differentiate in culture displayed increased p-Stat3 signaling and Myostatin expression. Finally, VDR -/- mice injected with a Stat3 inhibitor displayed reduced Myostatin expression and function and restored active p70S6K and rpS6

  2. Excessive Leucine-mTORC1-Signalling of Cow Milk-Based Infant Formula: The Missing Link to Understand Early Childhood Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2012-01-01

    Increased protein supply by feeding cow-milk-based infant formula in comparison to lower protein content of human milk is a well-recognized major risk factor of childhood obesity. However, there is yet no conclusive biochemical concept explaining the mechanisms of formula-induced childhood obesity. It is the intention of this article to provide the biochemical link between leucine-mediated signalling of mammalian milk proteins and adipogenesis as well as early adipogenic programming. Leucine has been identified as the predominant signal transducer of mammalian milk, which stimulates the nutrient-sensitive kinase mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Leucine thus functions as a maternal-neonatal relay for mTORC1-dependent neonatal β-cell proliferation and insulin secretion. The mTORC1 target S6K1 plays a pivotal role in stimulation of mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into adipocytes and to induce insulin resistance. It is of most critical concern that infant formulas provide higher amounts of leucine in comparison to human milk. Exaggerated leucine-mediated mTORC1-S6K1 signalling induced by infant formulas may thus explain increased adipogenesis and generation of lifelong elevated adipocyte numbers. Attenuation of mTORC1 signalling of infant formula by leucine restriction to physiologic lower levels of human milk offers a great chance for the prevention of childhood obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases.

  3. Light-Triggered Soft Artificial Muscles: Molecular-Level Amplification of Actuation Control Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Michael P M; Baker, Anna B; Iredale, Robert J; Naficy, Sina; Bond, Ian P; Faul, Charl F J; Rossiter, Jonathan M; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Weaver, Paul M

    2017-08-23

    The principle of control signal amplification is found in all actuation systems, from engineered devices through to the operation of biological muscles. However, current engineering approaches require the use of hard and bulky external switches or valves, incompatible with both the properties of emerging soft artificial muscle technology and those of the bioinspired robotic systems they enable. To address this deficiency a biomimetic molecular-level approach is developed that employs light, with its excellent spatial and temporal control properties, to actuate soft, pH-responsive hydrogel artificial muscles. Although this actuation is triggered by light, it is largely powered by the resulting excitation and runaway chemical reaction of a light-sensitive acid autocatalytic solution in which the actuator is immersed. This process produces actuation strains of up to 45% and a three-fold chemical amplification of the controlling light-trigger, realising a new strategy for the creation of highly functional soft actuating systems.

  4. Alterations in Notch signalling in skeletal muscles from mdx and dko dystrophic mice and patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Jarrod E; Trieu, Jennifer; Chee, Annabel; Naim, Timur; Gehrig, Stefan M; Lamon, Séverine; Angelini, Corrado; Russell, Aaron P; Lynch, Gordon S

    2014-04-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? The Notch signalling pathway plays an important role in muscle regeneration, and activation of the pathway has been shown to enhance muscle regeneration in aged mice. It is unknown whether Notch activation will have a similarly beneficial effect on muscle regeneration in the context of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). What is the main finding and its importance? Although expression of Notch signalling components is altered in both mouse models of DMD and in human DMD patients, activation of the Notch signalling pathway does not confer any functional benefit on muscles from dystrophic mice, suggesting that other signalling pathways may be more fruitful targets for manipulation in treating DMD. Abstract In Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), muscle damage and impaired regeneration lead to progressive muscle wasting, weakness and premature death. The Notch signalling pathway represents a central regulator of gene expression and is critical for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptotic signalling during all stages of embryonic muscle development. Notch activation improves muscle regeneration in aged mice, but its potential to restore regeneration and function in muscular dystrophy is unknown. We performed a comprehensive examination of several genes involved in Notch signalling in muscles from dystrophin-deficient mdx and dko (utrophin- and dystrophin-null) mice and DMD patients. A reduction of Notch1 and Hes1 mRNA in tibialis anterior muscles of dko mice and quadriceps muscles of DMD patients and a reduction of Hes1 mRNA in the diaphragm of the mdx mice were observed, with other targets being inconsistent across species. Activation and inhibition of Notch signalling, followed by measures of muscle regeneration and function, were performed in the mouse models of DMD. Notch activation had no effect on functional regeneration in C57BL/10, mdx or dko mice. Notch inhibition significantly depressed the

  5. Cancer and Chemotherapy Contribute to Muscle Loss by Activating Common Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Rafael; Mandili, Giorgia; Witzmann, Frank A.; Novelli, Francesco; Zimmers, Teresa A.; Bonetto, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cachexia represents one of the primary complications of colorectal cancer due to its effects on depletion of muscle and fat. Evidence suggests that chemotherapeutic regimens, such as Folfiri, contribute to cachexia-related symptoms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cachexia signature in different conditions associated with severe muscle wasting, namely Colon-26 (C26) and Folfiri-associated cachexia. Using a quantitative LC-MS/MS approach, we identified significant changes in 386 proteins in the quadriceps muscle of Folfiri-treated mice, and 269 proteins differentially expressed in the C26 hosts (p < 0.05; −1.5 ≥ fold change ≥ +1.5). Comparative analysis isolated 240 proteins that were modulated in common, with a large majority (218) that were down-regulated in both experimental settings. Interestingly, metabolic (47.08%) and structural (21.25%) proteins were the most represented. Pathway analysis revealed mitochondrial dysfunctions in both experimental conditions, also consistent with reduced expression of mediators of mitochondrial fusion (OPA-1, mitofusin-2), fission (DRP-1) and biogenesis (Cytochrome C, PGC-1α). Alterations of oxidative phosphorylation within the TCA cycle, fatty acid metabolism, and Ca2+ signaling were also detected. Overall, the proteomic signature in the presence of both chemotherapy and cancer suggests the activation of mechanisms associated with movement disorders, necrosis, muscle cell death, muscle weakness and muscle damage. Conversely, this is consistent with the inhibition of pathways that regulate nucleotide and fatty acid metabolism, synthesis of ATP, muscle and heart function, as well as ROS scavenging. Interestingly, strong up-regulation of pro-inflammatory acute-phase proteins and a more coordinated modulation of mitochondrial and lipidic metabolisms were observed in the muscle of the C26 hosts that were different from the Folfiri-treated animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that both cancer

  6. The role of Sema3–Npn-1 signaling during diaphragm innervation and muscle development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huettl, Rosa-Eva; Hanuschick, Philipp; Amend, Anna-Lena; Alberton, Paolo; Aszodi, Attila; Huber, Andrea B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Correct innervation of the main respiratory muscle in mammals, namely the thoracic diaphragm, is a crucial pre-requisite for the functionality of this muscle and the viability of the entire organism. Systemic impairment of Sema3A–Npn-1 (Npn-1 is also known as NRP1) signaling causes excessive branching of phrenic nerves in the diaphragm and into the central tendon region, where the majority of misguided axons innervate ectopic musculature. To elucidate whether these ectopic muscles are a result of misguidance of myoblast precursors due to the loss of Sema3A–Npn-1 signaling, we conditionally ablated Npn-1 in somatic motor neurons, which led to a similar phenotype of phrenic nerve defasciculation and, intriguingly, also formation of innervated ectopic muscles. We therefore hypothesize that ectopic myocyte fusion is caused by additional factors released by misprojecting growth cones. Slit2 and its Robo receptors are expressed by phrenic motor axons and migrating myoblasts, respectively, during innervation of the diaphragm. In vitro analyses revealed a chemoattractant effect of Slit2 on primary diaphragm myoblasts. Thus, we postulate that factors released by motor neuron growth cones have an influence on the migration properties of myoblasts during establishment of the diaphragm. PMID:27466379

  7. Mitochondria mediate tumor necrosis factor-alpha/NF-kappaB signaling in skeletal muscle myotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. P.; Atkins, C. M.; Sweatt, J. D.; Reid, M. B.; Hamilton, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is implicated in muscle atrophy and weakness associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Recently, we reported that TNF-alpha directly induces muscle protein degradation in differentiated skeletal muscle myotubes, where it rapidly activates nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). We also have found that protein loss induced by TNF-alpha is NF-kappaB dependent. In the present study, we analyzed the signaling pathway by which TNF-alpha activates NF-kappaB in myotubes differentiated from C2C12 and rat primary myoblasts. We found that activation of NF-kappaB by TNF-alpha was blocked by rotenone or amytal, inhibitors of complex I of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. On the other hand, antimycin A, an inhibitor of complex III, enhanced TNF-alpha activation of NK-kappaB. These results suggest a key role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating NF-kappaB activation in muscle. In addition, we found that TNF-alpha stimulated protein kinase C (PKC) activity. However, other signal transduction mediators including ceramide, Ca2+, phospholipase A2 (PLA2), and nitric oxide (NO) do not appear to be involved in the activation of NF-kappaB.

  8. Comparison of algorithms to quantify muscle fatigue in upper limb muscles based on sEMG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Lorenz; Hofmann, Ulrich G

    2016-11-01

    This work compared the performance of six different fatigue detection algorithms quantifying muscle fatigue based on electromyographic signals. Surface electromyography (sEMG) was obtained by an experiment from upper arm contractions at three different load levels from twelve volunteers. Fatigue detection algorithms mean frequency (MNF), spectral moments ratio (SMR), the wavelet method WIRM1551, sample entropy (SampEn), fuzzy approximate entropy (fApEn) and recurrence quantification analysis (RQA%DET) were calculated. The resulting fatigue signals were compared considering the disturbances incorporated in fatiguing situations as well as according to the possibility to differentiate the load levels based on the fatigue signals. Furthermore we investigated the influence of the electrode locations on the fatigue detection quality and whether an optimized channel set is reasonable. The results of the MNF, SMR, WIRM1551 and fApEn algorithms fell close together. Due to the small amount of subjects in this study significant differences could not be found. In terms of disturbances the SMR algorithm showed a slight tendency to out-perform the others. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Real-time muscle state estimation from EMG signals during isometric contractions using Kalman filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegaldo, Luciano L

    2017-12-01

    State-space control of myoelectric devices and real-time visualization of muscle forces in virtual rehabilitation require measuring or estimating muscle dynamic states: neuromuscular activation, tendon force and muscle length. This paper investigates whether regular (KF) and extended Kalman filters (eKF), derived directly from Hill-type muscle mechanics equations, can be used as real-time muscle state estimators for isometric contractions using raw electromyography signals (EMG) as the only available measurement. The estimators' amplitude error, computational cost, filtering lags and smoothness are compared with usual EMG-driven analysis, performed offline, by integrating the nonlinear Hill-type muscle model differential equations (offline simulations-OS). EMG activity of the three triceps surae components (soleus, gastrocnemius medialis and gastrocnemius lateralis), in three torque levels, was collected for ten subjects. The actualization interval (AI) between two updates of the KF and eKF was also varied. The results show that computational costs are significantly reduced (70x for KF and 17[Formula: see text] for eKF). The filtering lags presented sharp linear relationships with the AI (0-300 ms), depending on the state and activation level. Under maximum excitation, amplitude errors varied in the range 10-24% for activation, 5-8% for tendon force and 1.4-1.8% for muscle length, reducing linearly with the excitation level. Smoothness, measured by the ratio between the average standard variations of KF/eKF and OS estimations, was greatly reduced for activation but converged exponentially to 1 for the other states by increasing AI. Compared to regular KF, extended KF does not seem to improve estimation accuracy significantly. Depending on the particular application requirements, the most appropriate KF actualization interval can be selected.

  10. Synemin acts as a regulator of signalling molecules during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenlin; Parlakian, Ara; Coletti, Dario; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Hourdé, Christophe; Joanne, Pierre; Gao-Li, Jacqueline; Blanc, Jocelyne; Ferry, Arnaud; Paulin, Denise; Xue, Zhigang; Agbulut, Onnik

    2014-11-01

    Synemin, a type IV intermediate filament (IF) protein, forms a bridge between IFs and cellular membranes. As an A-kinase-anchoring protein, it also provides temporal and spatial targeting of protein kinase A (PKA). However, little is known about its functional roles in either process. To better understand its functions in muscle tissue, we generated synemin-deficient (Synm(-) (/-)) mice. Synm(-) (/-) mice displayed normal development and fertility but showed a mild degeneration and regeneration phenotype in myofibres and defects in sarcolemma membranes. Following mechanical overload, Synm(-) (/-) mice muscles showed a higher hypertrophic capacity with increased maximal force and fatigue resistance compared with control mice. At the molecular level, increased remodelling capacity was accompanied by decreased myostatin (also known as GDF8) and atrogin (also known as FBXO32) expression, and increased follistatin expression. Furthermore, the activity of muscle-mass control molecules (the PKA RIIα subunit, p70S6K and CREB1) was increased in mutant mice. Finally, analysis of muscle satellite cell behaviour suggested that the absence of synemin could affect the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of these cells. Taken together, our results show that synemin is necessary to maintain membrane integrity and regulates signalling molecules during muscle hypertrophy. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirvent, P., E-mail: pascal.sirvent@univ-bpclermont.fr [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, EA 3533, Laboratoire des Adaptations Métaboliques à l' Exercice en conditions Physiologiques et Pathologiques (AME2P), BP 80026, F-63171 Aubière cedex (France); Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Hillaire-Buys, D. [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France); Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J. [U1046, INSERM, Université Montpellier 1 and Université Montpellier 2, 34295 Montpellier (France); CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier (France)

    2012-03-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  12. Muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling impairment in patients treated with statins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirvent, P.; Fabre, O.; Bordenave, S.; Hillaire-Buys, D.; Raynaud De Mauverger, E.; Lacampagne, A.; Mercier, J.

    2012-01-01

    The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. To date, the patho-physiological mechanisms of statin myotoxicity are still not clearly understood. In previous studies, we showed that acute application in vitro of simvastatin caused impairment of mitochondrial function and dysfunction of calcium homeostasis in human and rat healthy muscle samples. We thus evaluated in the present study, mitochondrial function and calcium signaling in muscles of patients treated with statins, who present or not muscle symptoms, by oxygraphy and recording of calcium sparks, respectively. Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration that involved mainly the complex I of the respiratory chain and altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks. The muscle problems observed in statin-treated patients appear thus to be related to impairment of mitochondrial function and muscle calcium homeostasis, confirming the results we previously reported in vitro. -- Highlights: ► The most common and problematic side effect of statins is myopathy. ► Patients treated with statins showed impairment of mitochondrial respiration. ► Statins-treated patients showed altered frequency and amplitude of calcium sparks.

  13. Muscle-type Identity of Proprioceptors Specified by Spatially Restricted Signals from Limb Mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliak, Sebastian; Norovich, Amy L; Yamagata, Masahito; Sanes, Joshua R; Jessell, Thomas M

    2016-01-28

    The selectivity with which proprioceptive sensory neurons innervate their central and peripheral targets implies that they exhibit distinctions in muscle-type identity. The molecular correlates of proprioceptor identity and its origins remain largely unknown, however. In screens to define muscle-type proprioceptor character, we find all-or-none differences in gene expression for proprioceptors that control antagonistic muscles at a single hindlimb joint. Analysis of three of these genes, cadherin13 (cdh13), semaphorin5a (sema5a), and cartilage-acidic protein-1 (crtac1), reveals expression in proprioceptor subsets that supply muscle groups located at restricted dorsoventral and proximodistal domains of the limb. Genetically altering the dorsoventral character of the limb mesenchyme elicits a change in the profile of proprioceptor cdh13, sema5a, and crtac1 expression. These findings indicate that proprioceptors acquire aspects of their muscle-type identity in response to mesenchymal signals expressed in restricted proximodistal and dorsoventral domains of the developing limb. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Muscle-type identity of proprioceptors specified by spatially-restricted signals from limb mesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliak, Sebastian; Norovich, Amy L.; Yamagata, Masahito; Sanes, Joshua R.; Jessell, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity with which proprioceptive sensory neurons innervate their central and peripheral targets implies that they exhibit distinctions in muscle-type identity. The molecular correlates of proprioceptor identity and its origins remain largely unknown, however. In screens to define muscle-type proprioceptor character we find all-or-none differences in gene expression for proprioceptors that control antagonistic muscles at a single hindlimb joint. Analysis of three of these genes, cadherin13 (cdh13), semaphorin5a (sema5a) and cartilage-acidic protein-1 (crtac1), reveals expression in proprioceptor subsets that supply muscle-groups located at restricted dorso-ventral and proximo-distal domains of the limb. Genetically altering the dorso-ventral character of the limb mesenchyme elicits a change in the profile of proprioceptor cdh13, sema5a and crtac1 expression. These findings indicate that proprioceptors acquire aspects of their muscle-type identity in response to mesenchymal signals expressed in restricted proximo-distal and dorso-ventral domains of the developing limb. PMID:26824659

  15. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine D. Shives

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a (+ sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6 and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  16. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shives, Katherine D; Massey, Aaron R; May, Nicholas A; Morrison, Thomas E; Beckham, J David

    2016-10-18

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a (+) sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7 GpppN m 5' cap with 2'- O -methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP) pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E) interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6) and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  17. mTOR signaling promotes stem cell activation via counterbalancing BMP-mediated suppression during hair regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhili; Lei, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Huishan; Liu, Shuang; Chen, Qi; Hu, Huimin; Wang, Xinyue; Ning, Lina; Cao, Yujing; Zhao, Tongbiao; Zhou, Jiaxi; Chen, Ting; Duan, Enkui

    2015-02-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo cycles of degeneration (catagen), rest (telogen), and regeneration (anagen) phases. Anagen begins when the hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) obtain sufficient activation cues to overcome suppressive signals, mainly the BMP pathway, from their niche cells. Here, we unveil that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is activated in HFSCs, which coincides with the HFSC activation at the telogen-to-anagen transition. By using both an inducible conditional gene targeting strategy and a pharmacological inhibition method to ablate or inhibit mTOR signaling in adult skin epithelium before anagen initiation, we demonstrate that HFs that cannot respond to mTOR signaling display significantly delayed HFSC activation and extended telogen. Unexpectedly, BMP signaling activity is dramatically prolonged in mTOR signaling-deficient HFs. Through both gain- and loss-of-function studies in vitro, we show that mTORC1 signaling negatively affects BMP signaling, which serves as a main mechanism whereby mTORC1 signaling facilitates HFSC activation. Indeed, in vivo suppression of BMP by its antagonist Noggin rescues the HFSC activation defect in mTORC1-null skin. Our findings reveal a critical role for mTOR signaling in regulating stem cell activation through counterbalancing BMP-mediated repression during hair regeneration. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Longitudinal, lateral and transverse axes of forearm muscles influence the crosstalk in the mechanomyographic signals during isometric wrist postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Anamul; Sundaraj, Kenneth; Ahmad, R Badlishah; Sundaraj, Sebastian; Ahamed, Nizam Uddin; Ali, Md Asraf

    2014-01-01

    In mechanomyography (MMG), crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity. The aim of the present study was two-fold: i) to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG) signals from the longitudinal (Lo), lateral (La) and transverse (Tr) axes of the extensor digitorum (ED), extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscles during isometric wrist flexion (WF) and extension (WE), radial (RD) and ulnar (UD) deviations; and ii) to analyze whether the three-directional MMG signals influence the level of crosstalk between the muscle groups during these wrist postures. Twenty, healthy right-handed men (mean ± SD: age = 26.7±3.83 y; height = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass = 72.79±14.36 kg) participated in this study. During each wrist posture, the MMG signals propagated through the axes of the muscles were detected using three separate tri-axial accelerometers. The x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis of the sensor were placed in the Lo, La, and Tr directions with respect to muscle fibers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the proportion of crosstalk between the different muscle groups. The average level of crosstalk in the MMG signals generated by the muscle groups ranged from: 34.28-69.69% for the Lo axis, 27.32-52.55% for the La axis and 11.38-25.55% for the Tr axis for all participants and their wrist postures. The Tr axes between the muscle groups showed significantly smaller crosstalk values for all wrist postures [F (2, 38) = 14-63, pmovement research, especially for the examination of muscle mechanics during various types of the wrist postures.

  19. miRNA targeted signaling pathway in the early stage of denervated fast and slow muscle atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Denervation often results in skeletal muscle atrophy. Different mechanisms seem to be involved in the determination between denervated slow and fast skeletal muscle atrophy. At the epigenetic level, miRNAs are thought to be highly involved in the pathophysiological progress of denervated muscles. We used miRNA microarrays to determine miRNA expression profiles from a typical slow muscle (soleus muscle and a typical fast muscle (tibialis anterior muscle at an early denervation stage in a rat model. Results showed that miR-206, miR-195, miR-23a, and miR-30e might be key factors in the transformation process from slow to fast muscle in denervated slow muscles. Additionally, certain miRNA molecules (miR-214, miR-221, miR-222, miR-152, miR-320, and Let-7e could be key regulatory factors in the denervated atrophy process involved in fast muscle. Analysis of signaling pathway networks revealed the miRNA molecules that were responsible for regulating certain signaling pathways, which were the final targets (e.g., p38 MAPK pathway; Pax3/Pax7 regulates Utrophin and follistatin by HDAC4; IGF1/PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway regulates atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression via FoxO phosphorylation. Our results provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of denervated skeletal muscle pathophysiology.

  20. GH receptor signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in human subjects following exposure to an intravenous GH bolus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jens O L; Jessen, Niels; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates muscle and fat metabolism, which impacts on body composition and insulin sensitivity, but the underlying GH signaling pathways have not been studied in vivo in humans. We investigated GH signaling in biopsies from muscle and abdominal fat obtained 30 (n = 3) or 60 (n...... was measured by in vitro phosphorylation of PI. STAT5 DNA binding activity was assessed with EMSA, and the expression of IGF-I and SOCS mRNA was measured by real-time RT-PCR. GH induced a 52% increase in circulating FFA levels with peak values after 155 min (P = 0.03). Tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT5...... tended to increase after GH in muscle and fat, respectively. We conclude that 1) STAT5 is acutely activated in human muscle and fat after a GH bolus, but additional downstream GH signaling was significant only in fat; 2) the direct GH effects in muscle need further characterization; and 3) this human...

  1. Leucine signaling in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes and obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence points to increased dairy and meat consumption, staples of the Western diet, as major risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). This paper presents a new concept and comprehensive review of leucine-mediated cell signaling explaining the pathogenesis of T2D and obesity by leucine-induced over-stimulation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1, a pivotal nutrient-sensitive kinase, promotes growth and cell proliferation in response t...

  2. AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle during exercise: Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Alamo, David; Calbet, Jose A L

    2016-09-01

    intrinsic properties of different skeletal muscles, the specific RONS induction and the subsequent signaling responses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Denervation and high-fat diet reduce insulin signaling in T-tubules in skeletal muscle of living mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M; Ploug, Thorkil; Ai, Hua

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates muscle glucose transport by translocation of GLUT4 to sarcolemma and T-tubules. Despite muscle glucose uptake playing a major role in insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, the temporal and spatial changes in insulin signaling and GLUT4 translocation during these co...

  4. Redox signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology: A focus on hydrogen peroxide and vascular smooth muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hyun Byon

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress represents excessive intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Besides having a critical impact on the development and progression of vascular pathologies including atherosclerosis and diabetic vasculopathy, oxidative stress also regulates physiological signaling processes. As a cell permeable ROS generated by cellular metabolism involved in intracellular signaling, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 exerts tremendous impact on cardiovascular pathophysiology. Under pathological conditions, increased oxidase activities and/or impaired antioxidant systems results in uncontrolled production of ROS. In a pro-oxidant environment, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC undergo phenotypic changes which can lead to the development of vascular dysfunction such as vascular inflammation and calcification. Investigations are ongoing to elucidate the mechanisms for cardiovascular disorders induced by oxidative stress. This review mainly focuses on the role of H2O2 in regulating physiological and pathological signals in VSMC.

  5. MicroRNA in Skeletal Muscle: Its Crucial Roles in Signal Proteins, Mus cle Fiber Type, and Muscle Protein Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu Lan

    2017-01-01

    Pork is one of the most economical sources of animal protein for human consumption. Meat quality is an important economic trait for the swine industry, which is primarily determined by prenatal muscle development and postnatal growth. Identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle development is a key priority. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that have emerged as key regulators of skeletal muscle development. A number of muscle-related miRNAs have been identified by functional gain and loss experiments in mouse model. However, determining miRNA-mRNA interactions involved in pig skeletal muscle still remains a significant challenge. For a comprehensive understanding of miRNA-mediated mechanisms underlying muscle development, miRNAome analyses of pig skeletal muscle have been performed by deep sequencing. Additionally, porcine miRNA single nucleotide polymorphisms have been implicated in muscle fiber types and meat quality. The present review provides an overview of current knowledge on recently identified miRNAs involved in myogenesis, muscle fiber type and muscle protein metabolism. Undoubtedly, further systematic understanding of the functions of miRNAs in pig skeletal muscle development will be helpful to expand the knowledge of basic skeletal muscle biology and be beneficial for the genetic improvement of meat quality traits. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Urotensin II inhibits skeletal muscle glucose transport signaling pathways via the NADPH oxidase pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Wang

    Full Text Available Our previous studies have demonstrated that the urotensin (UII and its receptor are up-regulated in the skeletal muscle of mice with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but the significance of UII in skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of UII on NADPH oxidase and glucose transport signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle of mice with T2DM and in C2C12 mouse myotube cells. KK/upj-AY/J mice (KK mice were divided into the following groups: KK group, with saline treatment for 2 weeks; KK+ urantide group, with daily 30 µg/kg body weight injections over the same time period of urantide, a potent urotensin II antagonist peptide; Non-diabetic C57BL/6J mice were used as normal controls. After urantide treatment, mice were subjected to an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test, in addition to measurements of the levels of ROS, NADPH oxidase and the phosphorylated AKT, PKC and ERK. C2C12 cells were incubated with serum-free DMEM for 24 hours before conducting the experiments, and then administrated with 100 nM UII for 2 hours or 24 hours. Urantide treatment improved glucose tolerance, decreased the translocation of the NADPH subunits p40-phox and p47-phox, and increased levels of the phosphorylated PKC, AKT and ERK. In contrast, UII treatment increased ROS production and p47-phox and p67-phox translocation, and decreased the phosphorylated AKT, ERK1/2 and p38MAPK; Apocynin abrogated this effect. In conclusion, UII increased ROS production by NADPH oxidase, leading to the inhibition of signaling pathways involving glucose transport, such as AKT/PKC/ERK. Our data imply a role for UII at the molecular level in glucose homeostasis, and possibly in skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM.

  7. Acute swelling of the limbs: magnetic resonance pictorial review of fascial and muscle signal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revelon, Geraldine [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Rahmouni, Alain [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Jazaerli, Nedal [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Godeau, Bertrand [Department of Internal Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Chosidow, Olivier [Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Authier, Jerome [Department of Pathology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Mathieu, Didier [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Roujeau, Jean-Claude [Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France); Vasile, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Henri Mondor, 51 Avenue du Marechal De Lattre De Tassigny, 94000 Creteil (France)

    1999-04-01

    Objective: This pictorial review analyzes the magnetic resonance (MR) fascial/muscular changes in 69 patients referred as emergencies with acute swelling of the limbs (ASL) from various causes. Methods and material: A prospective MR imaging (MRI) study of 69 patients referred as emergencies for ASL was performed. Our population consisted of 45 patients with skin and soft-tissue infections (cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis, and pyomyositis), six patients with soft-tissue inflammatory diseases (dermatomyositis, graft-versus-host disease), 11 patients with acute deep venous thrombosis, three patients with rhabdomyolysis, one patient with acute denervation and three other patients with rare diseases. Hematomas, tumorous or infectious bone involvement and soft-tissue tumors were excluded. All studies included spin echo T1-weighted images and spin echo T2-weighted images. Gadolinium-enhanced spin echo T1-weighted images were obtained when an abscess was suspected on T2-weighted images. Selective fat-saturated T1- and T2-weighted sequences were also used. MRI analysis was performed to obtain a compartmentalized anatomical approach according to the location of signal abnormalities in subcutaneous fat, superficial and deep fascia and muscle. Results: In all patients with ASL, MRI demonstrated soft-tissue abnormalities involving subcutaneous fat, superficial fascia, deep fascia, or muscle. Although MR findings were non-specific, MRI appears sensitive for detecting subtle fascial and muscle signal changes. Conclusions: In skin and soft-tissue infections, MRI can be helpful for therapeutic management by determining the depth of soft-tissue involvement, particularly within fasciae and muscles, which is partly related to the severity of cellulitis with severe systemic manifestations. MRI can also aid the surgeon in diagnosing abscesses. In inflammatory diseases, MRI can determine the best site for biopsy and also monitor therapeutic response.

  8. Antenatal corticosteroids alter insulin signaling pathways in fetal baboon skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Cynthia L; Moreira, Alvaro G; McGill-Vargas, Lisa L; Anzueto, Diana G; Nathanielsz, Peter; Musi, Nicolas

    2014-05-01

    We hypothesize that prenatal exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs) negatively alters the insulin signal transduction pathway and has differing effects on the fetus according to gestational age (GA) at exposure. Twenty-three fetal baboons were delivered from 23 healthy, nondiabetic mothers. Twelve preterm (0.67 GA) and 11 near-term (0.95 GA) baboons were killed immediately after delivery. Half of the pregnant baboons at each gestation received two doses of i.m. betamethasone 24 h apart (170 μg/kg) before delivery, while the other half received no intervention. Vastus lateralis muscle was obtained from postnatal animals to measure the protein content and gene expression of insulin receptor β (IRβ; INSR), IRβ Tyr 1361 phosphorylation (pIRβ), IR substrate 1 (IRS1), IRS1 tyrosine phosphorylation (pIRS1), p85 subunit of PI3-kinase, AKT (protein kinase B), phospho-AKT Ser473 (pAKT), AKT1, AKT2, and glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT4). Skeletal muscle from preterm baboons exposed to GCs had markedly reduced protein content of AKT and AKT1 (respectively, 73 and 72% from 0.67 GA control, P<0.001); IRβ and pIRβ were also decreased (respectively, 94 and 85%, P<0.01) in the muscle of premature GC-exposed fetuses but not in term fetuses. GLUT1 and GLUT4 tended to increase with GC exposure in preterm animals (P=0.09), while GLUT4 increased sixfold in term animals after exposure to GC (P<0.05). In conclusion, exposure to a single course of antenatal GCs during fetal life alters the insulin signaling pathway in fetal muscle in a manner dependent on the stage of gestation.

  9. Hip orthosis powered by pneumatic artificial muscle: voluntary activation in absence of myoelectrical signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Breno Gontijo; Vimieiro, Claysson Bruno Santos; Nagem, Danilo Alves Pinto; Pinotti, Marcos

    2008-04-01

    Powered orthosis is a special class of gait assist device that employs a mechanical or electromechanical actuator to enhance movement of hip, knee, or ankle articulations. Pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) has been suggested as a pneumatic actuator because its performance is similar to biological muscle. The electromyography (EMG) signal interpretation is the most popular and simplest method to establish the patient voluntary control of the orthosis. However, this technique is not suitable for patients presenting neurological lesions causing absence or very low quality of EMG signal. For those cases, an alternative control strategy should be provided. The aim of the present study is to develop a gait assistance orthosis for lower limb powered by PAMs controlled by a voluntary activation method based on the angular behavior of hip joint. In the present study, an orthosis that has been molded in a patient was employed and, by taking her anthropometric parameters and movement constraints, the adaptation of the existing orthosis to the powered orthosis was planned. A control system was devised allowing voluntary control of a powered orthosis suitable for patients presenting neurological lesions causing absence or very low quality of EMG signal. A pilot clinical study was reported where a patient, victim of poliovirus, successfully tested a hip orthosis especially modified for the gait test evaluation in the parallel bar system. The hip orthosis design and the control circuitry parameters were able to be set to provide satisfactory and comfortable use of the orthosis during the gait cycle.

  10. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  11. Analysis of progression of fatigue conditions in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography signals and complexity based features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthick, P A; Makaram, Navaneethakrishna; Ramakrishnan, S

    2014-01-01

    Muscle fatigue is a neuromuscular condition where muscle performance decreases due to sustained or intense contraction. It is experienced by both normal and abnormal subjects. In this work, an attempt has been made to analyze the progression of muscle fatigue in biceps brachii muscles using surface electromyography (sEMG) signals. The sEMG signals are recorded from fifty healthy volunteers during dynamic contractions under well defined protocol. The acquired signals are preprocessed and segmented in to six equal parts for further analysis. The features, such as activity, mobility, complexity, sample entropy and spectral entropy are extracted from all six zones. The results are found showing that the extracted features except complexity feature have significant variations in differentiating non-fatigue and fatigue zone respectively. Thus, it appears that, these features are useful in automated analysis of various neuromuscular activities in normal and pathological conditions.

  12. The Vicious Cycle of Myostatin Signaling in Sarcopenic Obesity: Myostatin Role in Skeletal Muscle Growth, Insulin Signaling and Implications for Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consitt, L A; Clark, B C

    2018-01-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle (sarcopenia) is a major health concern as it is associated with physical disability, metabolic impairments, and increased mortality. The coexistence of sarcopenia with obesity, termed 'sarcopenic obesity', contributes to skeletal muscle insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes, a disease prevalent with advancing age. Despite this knowledge, the mechanisms contributing to sarcopenic obesity remain poorly understood, preventing the development of targeted therapeutics. This article will discuss the clinical and physiological consequences of sarcopenic obesity and propose myostatin as a potential candidate contributing to this condition. A special emphasis will be placed on examining the role of myostatin signaling in impairing both skeletal muscle growth and insulin signaling. In addition, the role of myostatin in regulating muscle-to fat cross talk, further exacerbating metabolic dysfunction in the elderly, will be highlighted. Lastly, we discuss how this knowledge has implications for the design of myostatin-inhibitor clinical trials.

  13. Notch signaling regulates platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, S.; Hansson, E.M.; Tikka, S.; Lanner, F.; Sahlgren, C.; Farnebo, F.; Baumann, M.; Kalimo, H.; Lendahl, U.

    2008-01-01

    Notch signaling is critically important for proper architecture of the vascular system, and mutations in NOTCH3 are associated with CADASIL, a stroke and dementia syndrome with vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) dysfunction. In this report, we link Notch signaling to platelet-derived growth factor

  14. S1P receptor signalling and RGS proteins; expression and function in vascular smooth muscle cells and transfected CHO cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks-Balk, Mariëlle C.; van Loenen, Pieter B.; Hajji, Najat; Michel, Martin C.; Peters, Stephan L. M.; Alewijnse, Astrid E.

    2009-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signalling via G protein-coupled receptors is important for the regulation of cell function and differentiation. Specific Regulators of G protein Signalling (RGS) proteins modulate the function of these receptors in many cell types including vascular smooth muscle cells

  15. Human muscle fiber type-specific insulin signaling: Impact of obesity and type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Pedersen, Andreas J T; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue composed of different fiber types. Studies suggest that insulin-mediated glucose metabolism is different between muscle fiber types. We hypothesized that differences are due to fiber-type specific expression/regulation of insulin signaling elements and....../or metabolic enzymes. Pools of type I and II fibers were prepared from biopsies of the vastus lateralis muscles from lean, obese and type 2 diabetic subjects before and after a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Type I fibers compared to type II fibers have higher protein levels of the insulin receptor, GLUT4......, hexokinase II, glycogen synthase (GS), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH-E1α) and a lower protein content of Akt2, TBC1D4 and TBC1D1. In type I fibers compared to type II fibers, the phosphorylation-response to insulin was similar (TBC1D4, TBC1D1 and GS) or decreased (Akt and PDH-E1α). Phosphorylation...

  16. MUSCLE OR MOTIVATION? A STOP SIGNAL STUDY ON THE EFFECTS OF SEQUENTIAL COGNITIVE CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde M. Huizenga

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Performance in cognitive control tasks deteriorates when these tasks are performed together with other tasks that also require cognitive control, that is, if simultaneous cognitive control is required. Surprisingly, this decrease in performance is also observed if tasks are preceded by other cognitive control tasks, that is, if sequential cognitive control is required. The common explanation for the latter finding is that previous acts of cognitive control deplete a common resource, just like a muscle becomes fatigued after repeated use. An alternative explanation however has also been put forward, namely that repeated acts of cognitive control reduce the motivation to match allocated resources to required resources. In this paper we formalize these two accounts, the muscle and the motivation account, and show that they yield differential predictions on the interaction between simultaneous and sequential cognitive control. Such an interaction is not predicted by the muscle account, whereas it is predicted by the motivation account.These predictions were tested in a paradigm where participants had to perform a series of stop-signal tasks, these tasks varied both in their demands on simultaneous control and in their demands on sequential control. This paradigm, combined with a multilevel analysis, offered the possibility to test the differential predictions directly. Results of two studies indicate that an interaction between simultaneous and sequential cognitive control is present. Therefore it is concluded that effects of sequential cognitive control are best explained by the motivation account.

  17. Calcitonin Receptor Signaling Inhibits Muscle Stem Cells from Escaping the Quiescent State and the Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Yamaguchi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin receptor (Calcr is expressed in adult muscle stem cells (muscle satellite cells [MuSCs]. To elucidate the role of Calcr, we conditionally depleted Calcr from adult MuSCs and found that impaired regeneration after muscle injury correlated with the decreased number of MuSCs in Calcr-conditional knockout (cKO mice. Calcr signaling maintained MuSC dormancy via the cAMP-PKA pathway but had no impact on myogenic differentiation of MuSCs in an undifferentiated state. The abnormal quiescent state in Calcr-cKO mice resulted in a reduction of the MuSC pool by apoptosis. Furthermore, MuSCs were found outside their niche in Calcr-cKO mice, demonstrating cell relocation. This emergence from the sublaminar niche was prevented by the Calcr-cAMP-PKA and Calcr-cAMP-Epac pathways downstream of Calcr. Altogether, the findings demonstrated that Calcr exerts its effect specifically by keeping MuSCs in a quiescent state and in their location, maintaining the MuSC pool.

  18. Impact of fasting on growth hormone signaling and action in muscle and fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Louise; Dalman, Lisa; Norrelund, Helene

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Whether GH promotes IGF-I production or lipolysis depends on nutritional status, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of fasting on GH-mediated changes in substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and signaling pathways. DESIGN: We conducted...... a randomized crossover study. SUBJECTS: Ten healthy men (age 24.3 +/- 0.6 yr, body mass index 23.1 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2)) participated. INTERVENTION: A GH bolus administered 1) postabsorptively and 2) in the fasting state (37.5 h). Skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were taken, and a hyperinsulinemic...... signaling protein 3 and IGF-I mRNA. RESULTS: Fasting was associated with reduced MCR of GH (P

  19. The role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during immobilization in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae-Sung; Anderson, Garrett B.; Dooley, Matthew S.; Hornberger, Troy A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The maintenance of skeletal muscle mass contributes substantially to health and to issues associated with the quality of life. It has been well recognized that skeletal muscle mass is regulated by mechanically induced changes in protein synthesis, and that signaling by mTOR is necessary for an increase in protein synthesis and the hypertrophy that occurs in response to increased mechanical loading. However, the role of mTOR signaling in the regulation of protein synthesis and muscle mass during decreased mechanical loading remains largely undefined. In order to define the role of mTOR signaling, we employed a mouse model of hindlimb immobilization along with pharmacological, mechanical and genetic means to modulate mTOR signaling. The results first showed that immobilization induced a decrease in the global rates of protein synthesis and muscle mass. Interestingly, immobilization also induced an increase in mTOR signaling, eIF4F complex formation and cap-dependent translation. Blocking mTOR signaling during immobilization with rapamycin not only impaired the increase in eIF4F complex formation, but also augmented the decreases in global protein synthesis and muscle mass. On the other hand, stimulating immobilized muscles with isometric contractions enhanced mTOR signaling and rescued the immobilization-induced decrease in global protein synthesis through a rapamycin-sensitive mechanism that was independent of ribosome biogenesis. Unexpectedly, the effects of isometric contractions were also independent of eIF4F complex formation. Similar to isometric contractions, overexpression of Rheb in immobilized muscles enhanced mTOR signaling, cap-dependent translation and global protein synthesis, and prevented the reduction in fiber size. Therefore, we conclude that the activation of mTOR signaling is both necessary and sufficient to alleviate the decreases in protein synthesis and muscle mass that occur during immobilization. Furthermore, these results indicate

  20. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Ju [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Soo Yeon [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seong Su [University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kim, Chan Woo [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Sandeep [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Park, Byeoung Soo [Nanotoxtech Co., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Eun [Division of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo Pyo [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hanjoong, E-mail: hjo@emory.edu [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hyun, E-mail: pyh012@sch.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  1. Effects of cortisol and dexamethasone on insulin signalling pathways in skeletal muscle of the ovine fetus during late gestation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanita K Jellyman

    Full Text Available Before birth, glucocorticoids retard growth, although the extent to which this is mediated by changes in insulin signalling pathways in the skeletal muscle of the fetus is unknown. The current study determined the effects of endogenous and synthetic glucocorticoid exposure on insulin signalling proteins in skeletal muscle of fetal sheep during late gestation. Experimental manipulation of fetal plasma glucocorticoid concentration was achieved by fetal cortisol infusion and maternal dexamethasone treatment. Cortisol infusion significantly increased muscle protein levels of Akt2 and phosphorylated Akt at Ser473, and decreased protein levels of phosphorylated forms of mTOR at Ser2448 and S6K at Thr389. Muscle GLUT4 protein expression was significantly higher in fetuses whose mothers were treated with dexamethasone compared to those treated with saline. There were no significant effects of glucocorticoid exposure on muscle protein abundance of IR-β, IGF-1R, PKCζ, Akt1, calpastatin or muscle glycogen content. The present study demonstrated that components of the insulin signalling pathway in skeletal muscle of the ovine fetus are influenced differentially by naturally occurring and synthetic glucocorticoids. These findings may provide a mechanism by which elevated concentrations of endogenous glucocorticoids retard fetal growth.

  2. Role of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase subunits in skeletal muscle mammalian target of rapamycin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, Atul S.; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Long, Yun Chau

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy-sensing protein in skeletal muscle. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) mediates translation initiation and protein synthesis through ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1). AMPK...... activation reduces muscle protein synthesis by down-regulating mTOR signaling, whereas insulin mediates mTOR signaling via Akt activation. We hypothesized that AMPK-mediated inhibitory effects on mTOR signaling depend on catalytic alpha2 and regulatory gamma3 subunits. Extensor digitorum longus muscle from...... (Thr37/46) (P mTOR targets, suggesting mTOR signaling is blocked by prior AMPK activation. The AICAR-induced inhibition was partly rescued...

  3. Sphingosine-1-phosphate enhances satellite cell activation in dystrophic muscles through a S1PR2/STAT3 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Loh

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P activates a widely expressed family of G protein-coupled receptors, serves as a muscle trophic factor and activates muscle stem cells called satellite cells (SCs through unknown mechanisms. Here we show that muscle injury induces dynamic changes in S1P signaling and metabolism in vivo. These changes include early and profound induction of the gene encoding the S1P biosynthetic enzyme SphK1, followed by induction of the catabolic enzyme sphingosine phosphate lyase (SPL 3 days later. These changes correlate with a transient increase in circulating S1P levels after muscle injury. We show a specific requirement for SphK1 to support efficient muscle regeneration and SC proliferation and differentiation. Mdx mice, which serve as a model for muscular dystrophy (MD, were found to be S1P-deficient and exhibited muscle SPL upregulation, suggesting that S1P catabolism is enhanced in dystrophic muscle. Pharmacological SPL inhibition increased muscle S1P levels, improved mdx muscle regeneration and enhanced SC proliferation via S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2-dependent inhibition of Rac1, thereby activating Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3, a central player in inflammatory signaling. STAT3 activation resulted in p21 and p27 downregulation in a S1PR2-dependent fashion in myoblasts. Our findings suggest that S1P promotes SC progression through the cell cycle by repression of cell cycle inhibitors via S1PR2/STAT3-dependent signaling and that SPL inhibition may provide a therapeutic strategy for MD.

  4. Protein kinase N2 regulates AMP kinase signaling and insulin responsiveness of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Maxwell A; Riedl, Isabelle; Massart, Julie; Åhlin, Marcus; Zierath, Juleen R

    2017-10-01

    Insulin resistance is central to the development of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders. Because skeletal muscle is responsible for the majority of whole body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, regulation of glucose metabolism in this tissue is of particular importance. Although Rho GTPases and many of their affecters influence skeletal muscle metabolism, there is a paucity of information on the protein kinase N (PKN) family of serine/threonine protein kinases. We investigated the impact of PKN2 on insulin signaling and glucose metabolism in primary human skeletal muscle cells in vitro and mouse tibialis anterior muscle in vivo. PKN2 knockdown in vitro decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, incorporation into glycogen, and oxidation. PKN2 siRNA increased 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling while stimulating fatty acid oxidation and incorporation into triglycerides and decreasing protein synthesis. At the transcriptional level, PKN2 knockdown increased expression of PGC-1α and SREBP-1c and their target genes. In mature skeletal muscle, in vivo PKN2 knockdown decreased glucose uptake and increased AMPK phosphorylation. Thus, PKN2 alters key signaling pathways and transcriptional networks to regulate glucose and lipid metabolism. Identification of PKN2 as a novel regulator of insulin and AMPK signaling may provide an avenue for manipulation of skeletal muscle metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Nitric oxide agents impair insulin-mediated signal transduction in rat skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragoobirsingh Dalip

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence demonstrates that exogenously administered nitric oxide (NO can induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. We have investigated the modulatory effects of two NO donors, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine (SNAP and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO on the early events in insulin signaling in rat skeletal myocytes. Results Skeletal muscle cells from 6–8 week old Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with SNAP or GSNO (25 ng/ml in the presence or absence of glucose (25 mM and insulin (100 nM. Cellular insulin receptor-β levels and tyrosine phosphorylation in IRS-1 were significantly reduced, while serine phosphorylation in IRS-1 was significantly increased in these cells, when compared to the insulin-stimulated control. Reversal to near normal levels was achieved using the NO scavenger, 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO. Conclusion These data suggest that NO is a potent modulator of insulin-mediated signal transduction and may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. Longitudinal, lateral and transverse axes of forearm muscles influence the crosstalk in the mechanomyographic signals during isometric wrist postures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Anamul Islam

    Full Text Available In mechanomyography (MMG, crosstalk refers to the contamination of the signal from the muscle of interest by the signal from another muscle or muscle group that is in close proximity.The aim of the present study was two-fold: i to quantify the level of crosstalk in the mechanomyographic (MMG signals from the longitudinal (Lo, lateral (La and transverse (Tr axes of the extensor digitorum (ED, extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU and flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU muscles during isometric wrist flexion (WF and extension (WE, radial (RD and ulnar (UD deviations; and ii to analyze whether the three-directional MMG signals influence the level of crosstalk between the muscle groups during these wrist postures.Twenty, healthy right-handed men (mean ± SD: age = 26.7±3.83 y; height = 174.47±6.3 cm; mass = 72.79±14.36 kg participated in this study. During each wrist posture, the MMG signals propagated through the axes of the muscles were detected using three separate tri-axial accelerometers. The x-axis, y-axis, and z-axis of the sensor were placed in the Lo, La, and Tr directions with respect to muscle fibers. The peak cross-correlations were used to quantify the proportion of crosstalk between the different muscle groups.The average level of crosstalk in the MMG signals generated by the muscle groups ranged from: 34.28-69.69% for the Lo axis, 27.32-52.55% for the La axis and 11.38-25.55% for the Tr axis for all participants and their wrist postures. The Tr axes between the muscle groups showed significantly smaller crosstalk values for all wrist postures [F (2, 38 = 14-63, p<0.05, η2 = 0.416-0.769].The results may be applied in the field of human movement research, especially for the examination of muscle mechanics during various types of the wrist postures.

  7. Analysis of respiratory and muscle activity by means of cross information function between ventilatory and myographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J F; Mañanas, M A; Hoyer, D; Topor, Z L; Bruce, E N

    2004-01-01

    Analysis of respiratory muscle activity is a promising technique for the study of pulmonary diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Evaluation of interactions between muscles is very useful in order to determine the muscular pattern during an exercise. These interactions have already been assessed by means of different linear techniques like cross-spectrum, magnitude squared coherence or cross-correlation. The aim of this work is to evaluate interactions between respiratory and myographic signals through nonlinear analysis by means of cross mutual information function (CMIF), and finding out what information can be extracted from it. Some parameters are defined and calculated from CMIF between ventilatory and myographic signals of three respiratory muscles. Finally, differences in certain parameters were obtained between OSAS patients and healthy subjects indicating different respiratory muscle couplings.

  8. Potential role of insulin signaling on vascular smooth muscle cell migration, proliferation, and inflammation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, Eugenio; Xu, Xiaojing; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-02-15

    To investigate the role of insulin signaling pathways in migration, proliferation, and inflammation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we examined the expression of active components of the phosphatidyl inositol 3 (PI-3) kinase (p-Akt) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (p-Erk) in primary cultures of VSMCs from human coronary arteries. VSMCs were treated in a dose-response manner with insulin (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM) for 20 min, and Akt and Erk phosphorylation were measured by Western blot analysis. In separate experiments, we evaluated the effect of 200 μM palmitate, in the presence and absence of 8 μM pioglitazone, on insulin-stimulated (100 nM for 20 min) Akt and Erk phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of Akt and Erk in VSMCs exhibited a dose dependency with a three- to fourfold increase, respectively, at the highest dose (100 nM). In the presence of palmitate, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was completely abolished, and there was a threefold increase in p-Erk. With addition of pioglitazone, the phosphorylation of Akt by insulin remained unchanged, whereas insulin-stimulated Erk phosphorylation was reduced by pioglitazone. These data in VSMCs indicate that high palmitate decreases insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and stimulates MAPK, whereas preexposure peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone preserves Akt phosphorylation and simultaneously attenuates MAPK signaling. Our results suggest that metabolic and mitogenic insulin signals have different sensitivity, are independently regulated, and may play a role in arterial smooth muscle cells migration, proliferation, and inflammation in conditions of acute hyperinsulinemia.

  9. Autophagic signaling and proteolytic enzyme activity in cardiac and skeletal muscle of spontaneously hypertensive rats following chronic aerobic exercise.

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    Elliott M McMillan

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a cardiovascular disease associated with deleterious effects in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Autophagy is a degradative process essential to muscle health. Acute exercise can alter autophagic signaling. Therefore, we aimed to characterize the effects of chronic endurance exercise on autophagy in skeletal and cardiac muscle of normotensive and hypertensive rats. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR were assigned to a sedentary condition or 6 weeks of treadmill running. White gastrocnemius (WG of hypertensive rats had higher (p<0.05 caspase-3 and proteasome activity, as well as elevated calpain activity. In addition, skeletal muscle of hypertensive animals had elevated (p<0.05 ATG7 and LC3I protein, LAMP2 mRNA, and cathepsin activity, indicative of enhanced autophagic signaling. Interestingly, chronic exercise training increased (p<0.05 Beclin-1, LC3, and p62 mRNA as well as proteasome activity, but reduced (p<0.05 Beclin-1 and ATG7 protein, as well as decreased (p<0.05 caspase-3, calpain, and cathepsin activity. Left ventricle (LV of hypertensive rats had reduced (p<0.05 AMPKα and LC3II protein, as well as elevated (p<0.05 p-AKT, p-p70S6K, LC3I and p62 protein, which collectively suggest reduced autophagic signaling. Exercise training had little effect on autophagy-related signaling factors in LV; however, exercise training increased (p<0.05 proteasome activity but reduced (p<0.05 caspase-3 and calpain activity. Our results suggest that autophagic signaling is altered in skeletal and cardiac muscle of hypertensive animals. Regular aerobic exercise can effectively alter the proteolytic environment in both cardiac and skeletal muscle, as well as influence several autophagy-related factors in skeletal muscle of normotensive and hypertensive rats.

  10. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B

    2001-01-01

    To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... phosphorylation in control subjects and IGT relatives, with a tendency for reduced phosphorylation in IGT relatives (P = 0.12). In conclusion, aberrant phosphorylation/activity of IRS-1, PI 3-kinase, and Akt is observed in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes with IGT. However...... resistance in skeletal muscle from relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes....

  11. Phosphoinositides in Ca(2+) signaling and excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle: an old player and newcomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernoch, Laszlo; Jacquemond, Vincent

    2015-12-01

    Since the postulate, 30 years ago, that phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P 2) as the precursor of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P 3) would be critical for skeletal muscle excitation-contraction (EC) coupling, the issue of whether phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs) may have something to do with Ca(2+) signaling in muscle raised limited interest, if any. In recent years however, the PtdInsP world has expanded considerably with new functions for PtdIns(4,5)P 2 but also with functions for the other members of the PtdInsP family. In this context, the discovery that genetic deficiency in a PtdInsP phosphatase has dramatic consequences on Ca(2+) homeostasis in skeletal muscle came unanticipated and opened up new perspectives in regards to how PtdInsPs modulate muscle Ca(2+) signaling under normal and disease conditions. This review intends to make an update of the established, the questioned, and the unknown regarding the role of PtdInsPs in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) homeostasis and EC coupling, with very specific emphasis given to Ca(2+) signals in differentiated skeletal muscle fibers.

  12. Altered mitochondrial quality control signaling in muscle of old gastric cancer patients with cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzetti, Emanuele; Lorenzi, Maria; Landi, Francesco; Picca, Anna; Rosa, Fausto; Tanganelli, Fabiana; Galli, Marco; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista; Pacelli, Fabio; Cesari, Matteo; Bernabei, Roberto; Calvani, Riccardo; Bossola, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the loss of muscle featuring both aging and cancer cachexia (CC). Whether mitochondrial quality control (MQC) is altered in skeletal myocytes of old patients with CC is unclear. The present investigation therefore sought to preliminarily characterize MQC pathways in muscle of old gastric cancer patients with cachexia. The study followed a case-control cross-sectional design. Intraoperative biopsies of the rectus abdominis muscle were obtained from 18 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (nine with CC and nine non-cachectic) and nine controls, and assayed for the expression of a set of MQC mediators. The mitofusin 2 expression was reduced in cancer patients compared with controls, independent of CC. Fission protein 1 was instead up-regulated in CC patients relative to the other groups. The mitophagy regulators PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 and Parkin were both down-regulated in cancer patients compared with controls. The ratio between the protein content of the lipidated and non-lipidated forms of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B was lower in CC patients relative to controls and non-cachectic cancer patients. Finally, the expression of autophagy-associated protein 7, lysosome-associated membrane protein 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and mitochondrial transcription factor A was unvarying among groups. Collectively, our findings indicate that, in old patients with gastric cancer, cachexia is associated with derangements of the muscular MQC axis at several checkpoints: mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial tagging for disposal, and mitophagy signaling. Further investigations are needed to corroborate these preliminary findings and determine whether MQC pathways may become target for future interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced insulin signaling in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue following gastric bypass surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Peter Hjorth; Bojsen-Moller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) leads to increased peripheral insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of RYGB on expression and regulation of proteins involved in regulation of peripheral glucose metabolism. Skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies from glucose...... tolerant and type 2 diabetic subjects at fasting and during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp before as well as 1 week, 3 and 12 months after RYGB were analyzed for relevant insulin effector proteins/signaling components. Improvement in peripheral insulin sensitivity mainly occurred at 12 months post-surgery...... and glycogen synthase activity were enhanced 12 months post-surgery. In adipose tissue, protein expression of GLUT4, Akt2, TBC1D4 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), phosphorylated levels of AMP-activated protein kinase and ACC as well as insulin-induced changes in phosphorylation of Akt and TBC1D4 were enhanced...

  14. Role of ERK/MAPK in endothelin receptor signaling in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Qing-wen; Edvinsson, Lars; Xu, Cang-Bao

    2009-01-01

    muscle cells (VSMCs) through activation of endothelin type A (ETA) and type B (ETB) receptors. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are involved in ET-1-induced VSMC contraction and proliferation. This study was designed to investigate...... agonist, Sarafotoxin 6c (S6c) caused a time-dependent ERK1/2 activation with a maximal effect by less than 20% of the ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2. Increase in bosentan concentration up to 10 microM further inhibited ET-1-induced activation of ERK1/2 and had a stronger inhibitory effect than BQ123...

  15. Muscle atrophy in patients wirh ckd results from fgf23/klotho-mediated supression of insulin/igf-i signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Kido

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle atrophy is a significant consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD that increases a patient’s risk of mortality and decrease their quality of life. In CKD patients, the circulation levels of FGF23 are significantly increased, but the exact pathological significance of the increase and relationship between FGF23 and muscle atrophy are not clear. Because of Klohto, acts as a co-receptor of FGF23 is detectable in limited tissues including in kidney and brain, but not in skeletal muscles. In contrast, recently reports indicated that the extracellular domain of klohto is cleavage for some reason on the cell surface and detected in the blood in animals. In this study, we attempted to identify the causative factors responsible for the shedding of Klotho, and whether both FGF23 and Klohto induced muscle atrophy via reduction of insulin/IGF-I signaling. We first investigated by treating kidney cells with various factors related in pathological factors in CKD. As a result, we found that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs, an accumulated in patients with CKD and diabetes mellitus, increases shedding of Klohto in kidney cells. It is common knowledge that insulin/IGF-I signaling is necessary for normal skeletal growth. As a result, we showed that both FGF23 and Klohto inhibited differentiation of cultured skeletal muscle cells through down-regulation of insulin/IGF-I signaling. These observations suggested a divergent role of FGF23 and soluble klohto in the regulation of skeletal muscle differentiation and thereby muscle atrophy under pathological conditioned in CKD patients. Our results further imply that FGF23/Klohto may serve a new therapeutic target for CKD-induced muscle atrophy.

  16. Mixed lactate and caffeine compound increases satellite cell activity and anabolic signals for muscle hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yoshimi; Tsukamoto, Hayato; Yokokawa, Takumi; Hirotsu, Keisuke; Shimazu, Mariko; Uchida, Kenji; Tomi, Hironori; Higashida, Kazuhiko; Iwanaka, Nobumasa; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2015-03-15

    We examined whether a mixed lactate and caffeine compound (LC) could effectively elicit proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells or activate anabolic signals in skeletal muscles. We cultured C2C12 cells with either lactate or LC for 6 h. We found that lactate significantly increased myogenin and follistatin protein levels and phosphorylation of P70S6K while decreasing the levels of myostatin relative to the control. LC significantly increased protein levels of Pax7, MyoD, and Ki67 in addition to myogenin, relative to control. LC also significantly increased follistatin expression relative to control and stimulated phosphorylation of mTOR and P70S6K. In an in vivo study, male F344/DuCrlCrlj rats were assigned to control (Sed, n = 10), exercise (Ex, n = 12), and LC supplementation (LCEx, n = 13) groups. LC was orally administered daily. The LCEx and Ex groups were exercised on a treadmill, running for 30 min at low intensity every other day for 4 wk. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in the mass of the gastrocnemius (GA) and tibialis anterior (TA) relative to both the Sed and Ex groups. Furthermore, the LCEx group showed a significant increase in the total DNA content of TA compared with the Sed group. The LCEx group experienced a significant increase in myogenin and follistatin expression of GA relative to the Ex group. These results suggest that administration of LC can effectively increase muscle mass concomitant with elevated numbers of myonuclei, even with low-intensity exercise training, via activated satellite cells and anabolic signals. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. ALS skeletal muscle shows enhanced TGF-β signaling, fibrosis and induction of fibro/adipogenic progenitor markers.

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    David Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease in which upper and lower motoneurons degenerate leading to muscle wasting, paralysis and eventually death from respiratory failure. Several studies indicate that skeletal muscle contributes to disease progression; however the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Fibrosis is a common feature in skeletal muscle under chronic damage conditions such as those caused by muscular dystrophies or denervation. However, the exact mechanisms of fibrosis induction and the cellular bases of this pathological response are unknown. We show that extracellular matrix (ECM components are augmented in skeletal muscles of symptomatic hSOD1G93A mice, a widely used murine model of ALS. These mice also show increased TGF-β1 mRNA levels, total Smad3 protein levels and p-Smad3 positive nuclei. Furthermore, platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α (PDGFRα, Tcf4 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA levels are augmented in the skeletal muscle of symptomatic hSOD1G93A mice. Additionally, the fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs, which are the main producers of ECM constituents, are also increased in these pathogenic conditions. Therefore, FAPs and ECM components are more abundant in symptomatic stages of the disease than in pre-symptomatic stages. We present evidence that fibrosis observed in skeletal muscle of symptomatic hSOD1G93A mice is accompanied with an induction of TGF-β signaling, and also that FAPs might be involved in triggering a fibrotic response. Co-localization of p-Smad3 positive cells together with PDGFRα was observed in the interstitial cells of skeletal muscles from symptomatic hSOD1G93A mice. Finally, the targeting of pro-fibrotic factors such as TGF-β, CTGF/CCN2 and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF signaling pathway might be a suitable therapeutic approach to improve muscle function in several degenerative diseases.

  18. Skeletal muscle and hepatic insulin signaling is maintained in heat-stressed lactating Holstein cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, G; Cole, L C; Zhao, L D; Skrzypek, M V; Sanders, S R; Rhoads, M L; Baumgard, L H; Rhoads, R P

    2016-05-01

    period, but the phosphorylation ratio (abundance of phosphorylated protein:abundance of total protein) of AKT was decreased in P2 for TNPF animals, but not during WFHS. These results indicate that mild systemic insulin resistance during HS may be related to reduced nutrient intake but skeletal muscle and liver insulin signaling remains unchanged. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Leucine minimizes denervation-induced skeletal muscle atrophy of rats through akt/mtor signaling pathways

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    Carolina Barbosa Ribeiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of leucine treatment (0.30 mM on muscle weight and signaling of myoproteins related to synthesis and degradation pathways of soleus muscle following seven days of complete sciatic nerve lesion.Wistar rats (n=24 of 3 to 4 months of age (192 ± 23 g were used. The animals were randomly distributed into four experimental groups (n=6/group: control, treated with leucine (L, denervated (D and denervated treated with leucine (DL.Dependent measures were proteins levels of AKT, AMPK, mTOR, and ACC performed by Western blot. Leucine induced a reduction in the phosphorylation of AMPK (p<0.05 by 16% in the L and by 68% in the DL groups as compared with control group. Denervation increased AMPK by 24% in the D group as compared with the control group (p<0.05. AKT was also modulated by denervation and leucine treatment, highlighted by the elevation of AKT phosphorylation in the D (65%, L (98% and DL (146% groups as compared with the control group (p<0.05. AKT phosphorylation was 49% higher in the D group as compared with the DL group.Furthermore, denervation decreased mTOR phosphorylation by 29% in the D group as compared with the control group. However, leucine treatment induced an increase of 49% in the phosphorylation of mTOR in the L group as compared with the control group, and an increase of 154% in the DL as compared with the D group ( p<0.05. ACC phosphorylation was 20% greater in the D group than the control group. Furthermore, ACC in the soleus was 22% lower in the in the L group and 50% lower in the DL group than the respective control group (p<0.05.In conclusion, leucine treatment minimized the deleterious effects of denervation on rat soleus muscle by increasing anabolic (AKT and mTOR and decreasing catabolic (AMPK pathways. These results may be interesting for muscle recovery following acute denervation, which may contribute to musculoskeletal rehabilitation after denervation.

  20. Calpain 3 and CaMKIIβ signaling are required to induce HSP70 necessary for adaptive muscle growth after atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramerova, Irina; Torres, Jorge A; Eskin, Ascia; Nelson, Stanley F; Spencer, Melissa J

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Mutations in CAPN3 cause autosomal recessive limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. Calpain 3 (CAPN3) is a calcium dependent protease residing in the myofibrillar, cytosolic and triad fractions of skeletal muscle. At the triad, it colocalizes with calcium calmodulin kinase IIβ (CaMKIIβ). CAPN3 knock out mice (C3KO) show reduced triad integrity and blunted CaMKIIβ signaling, which correlates with impaired transcriptional activation of myofibrillar and oxidative metabolism genes in response to running exercise. These data suggest a role for CAPN3 and CaMKIIβ in gene regulation that takes place during adaptation to endurance exercise. To assess whether CAPN3- CaMKIIβ signaling influences skeletal muscle remodeling in other contexts, we subjected C3KO and wild type mice to hindlimb unloading and reloading and assessed CaMKIIβ signaling and gene expression by RNA-sequencing. After induced atrophy followed by 4 days of reloading, both CaMKIIβ activation and expression of inflammatory and cellular stress genes were increased. C3KO muscles failed to activate CaMKIIβ signaling, did not activate the same pattern of gene expression and demonstrated impaired growth at 4 days of reloading. Moreover, C3KO muscles failed to activate inducible HSP70, which was previously shown to be indispensible for the inflammatory response needed to promote muscle recovery. Likewise, C3KO showed diminished immune cell infiltration and decreased expression of pro-myogenic genes. These data support a role for CaMKIIβ signaling in induction of HSP70 and promotion of the inflammatory response during muscle growth and remodeling that occurs after atrophy, suggesting that CaMKIIβ regulates remodeling in multiple contexts: endurance exercise and growth after atrophy. PMID:29528394

  1. Angiotensin II Evokes Angiogenic Signals within Skeletal Muscle through Co-ordinated Effects on Skeletal Myocytes and Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Jennifer L.; Liu, Sammy T. K.; Slopack, Dara; Shariati, Khashayar; Hasanee, Adam; Olenich, Sara; Olfert, I. Mark; Haas, Tara L.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle overload induces the expression of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, leading to new capillary growth. We found that the overload-induced increase in angiogenesis, as well as increases in VEGF, MMP-2 and MT1-MMP transcripts were abrogated in muscle VEGF KO mice, highlighting the critical role of myocyte-derived VEGF in controlling this process. The upstream mediators that contribute to overload-induced expression of VEGF have yet to be ascertained. We found that muscle overload increased angiotensinogen expression, a precursor of angiotensin (Ang) II, and that Ang II signaling played an important role in basal VEGF production in C2C12 cells. Furthermore, matrix-bound VEGF released from myoblasts induced the activation of endothelial cells, as evidenced by elevated endothelial cell phospho-p38 levels. We also found that exogenous Ang II elevates VEGF expression, as well as MMP-2 transcript levels in C2C12 myotubes. Interestingly, these responses also were observed in skeletal muscle endothelial cells in response to Ang II treatment, indicating that these cells also can respond directly to the stimulus. The involvement of Ang II in muscle overload-induced angiogenesis was assessed. We found that blockade of AT1R-dependent Ang II signaling using losartan did not attenuate capillary growth. Surprisingly, increased levels of VEGF protein were detected in overloaded muscle from losartan-treated rats. Similarly, we observed elevated VEGF production in cultured endothelial cells treated with losartan alone or in combination with Ang II. These studies conclusively establish the requirement for muscle derived VEGF in overload-induced angiogenesis and highlight a role for Ang II in basal VEGF production in skeletal muscle. However, while Ang II signaling is activated following overload and plays a role in muscle VEGF production, inhibition of this pathway is not sufficient to halt overload

  2. Exercise-Induced Hypertrophic and Oxidative Signaling Pathways and Myokine Expression in Fast Muscle of Adult Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Rovira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a plastic tissue that undergoes cellular and metabolic adaptations under conditions of increased contractile activity such as exercise. Using adult zebrafish as an exercise model, we previously demonstrated that swimming training stimulates hypertrophy and vascularization of fast muscle fibers, consistent with the known muscle growth-promoting effects of exercise and with the resulting increased aerobic capacity of this tissue. Here we investigated the potential involvement of factors and signaling mechanisms that could be responsible for exercise-induced fast muscle remodeling in adult zebrafish. By subjecting zebrafish to swimming-induced exercise, we observed an increase in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and Mef2 protein levels in fast muscle. We also observed an increase in the protein levels of the mitotic marker phosphorylated histone H3 that correlated with an increase in the protein expression levels of Pax7, a satellite-like cell marker. Furthermore, the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK was also increased by exercise, in parallel with an increase in the mRNA expression levels of pgc1α and also of pparda, a β-oxidation marker. Changes in the mRNA expression levels of slow and fast myosin markers further supported the notion of an exercise-induced aerobic phenotype in zebrafish fast muscle. The mRNA expression levels of il6, il6r, apln, aplnra and aplnrb, sparc, decorin and igf1, myokines known in mammals to be produced in response to exercise and to signal through mTOR/AMPK pathways, among others, were increased in fast muscle of exercised zebrafish. These results support the notion that exercise increases skeletal muscle growth and myogenesis in adult zebrafish through the coordinated activation of the mTOR-MEF2 and AMPK-PGC1α signaling pathways. These results, coupled with altered expression of markers for oxidative metabolism and fast-to-slow fiber-type switch, also suggest

  3. Triiodothyronine Potentiates Vasorelaxation via PKG/VASP Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Sherin Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Vascular relaxation caused by Triiodothyronine (T3 involves direct activation of endothelial cells (EC and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC. Activation of protein kinase G (PKG has risen as a novel contributor to the vasorelaxation mechanism triggered by numerous stimuli. We hypothesize that T3-induced vasorelaxation involves PKG/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP signaling pathway in VSMC. Methods: Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC and VSMC were treated with T3 for short (2 to 60 minutes and long term (24 hours. Nitric oxide (NO production was measured using DAF-FM. Expression of protein targets was determined using western blot. For functional studies, rat aortas were isolated and treated with T3 for 20 minutes and mounted in a wire myograph. Relaxation was measured by a concentration-dependent response to acetylcholine (ACh and sodium nitroprusside (SNP. Results: Aortas stimulated with T3 exhibited augmented sensitivity to ACh and SNP-induced relaxation, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent responses, respectively. T3 directly increased vasorelaxation, which was abolished in the presence of a PKG inhibitor. T3 markedly induced phosphorylation of Akt, eNOS and consequently increased NO production in EC. Likewise, T3 induced phosphorylation of VASP at serine 239 via the PKG pathway in VSMC. Conclusion: Our findings have uncovered a PKG/VASP signaling pathway in VSMC as a key molecular mechanism underlying T3-induced vascular relaxation.

  4. Triiodothyronine Potentiates Vasorelaxation via PKG/VASP Signaling in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Sherin; Zhang, Kuo; Tang, Yi-Da; Gerdes, A Martin; Carrillo-Sepulveda, Maria Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Vascular relaxation caused by Triiodothyronine (T3) involves direct activation of endothelial cells (EC) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Activation of protein kinase G (PKG) has risen as a novel contributor to the vasorelaxation mechanism triggered by numerous stimuli. We hypothesize that T3-induced vasorelaxation involves PKG/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) signaling pathway in VSMC. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) and VSMC were treated with T3 for short (2 to 60 minutes) and long term (24 hours). Nitric oxide (NO) production was measured using DAF-FM. Expression of protein targets was determined using western blot. For functional studies, rat aortas were isolated and treated with T3 for 20 minutes and mounted in a wire myograph. Relaxation was measured by a concentration-dependent response to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Aortas stimulated with T3 exhibited augmented sensitivity to ACh and SNP-induced relaxation, endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent responses, respectively. T3 directly increased vasorelaxation, which was abolished in the presence of a PKG inhibitor. T3 markedly induced phosphorylation of Akt, eNOS and consequently increased NO production in EC. Likewise, T3 induced phosphorylation of VASP at serine 239 via the PKG pathway in VSMC. Our findings have uncovered a PKG/VASP signaling pathway in VSMC as a key molecular mechanism underlying T3-induced vascular relaxation. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Ultrasensitive, passive and wearable sensors for monitoring human muscle motion and physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Feng; Yi, Changrui; Liu, Shichang; Wang, Yan; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Xu, Xuming; Wang, Li

    2016-03-15

    Flexible sensors have attracted more and more attention as a fundamental part of anthropomorphic robot research, medical diagnosis and physical health monitoring. Here, we constructed an ultrasensitive and passive flexible sensor with the advantages of low cost, lightness and wearability, electric safety and reliability. The fundamental mechanism of the sensor is based on triboelectric effect inducing electrostatic charges on the surfaces between two different materials. Just like a plate capacitor, current will be generated while the distance or size of the parallel capacitors changes caused by the small mechanical disturbance upon it and therefore the output current/voltage will be produced. Typically, the passive sensor unambiguously monitors muscle motions including hand motion from stretch-clench-stretch, mouth motion from open-bite-open, blink and respiration. Moreover, this sensor records the details of the consecutive phases in a cardiac cycle of the apex cardiogram, and identify the peaks including percussion wave, tidal wave and diastolic wave of the radial pulse wave. To record subtle human physiological signals including radial pulsilogram and apex cardiogram with excellent signal/noise ratio, stability and reproducibility, the sensor shows great potential in the applications of medical diagnosis and daily health monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Sirtuin-3 (Sirt3) regulates skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signaling via altered mitochondrial oxidation and reactive oxygen species production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jing, Enxuan; Emanuelli, Brice; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2011-01-01

    Sirt3 is a member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized in mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial function. Sirt3 expression in skeletal muscle is decreased in models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes and regulated by feeding, fasting, and caloric restriction. Sirt3 knockout...... mice exhibit decreased oxygen consumption and develop oxidative stress in skeletal muscle, leading to JNK activation and impaired insulin signaling. This effect is mimicked by knockdown of Sirt3 in cultured myoblasts, which exhibit reduced mitochondrial oxidation, increased reactive oxygen species......, activation of JNK, increased serine and decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, and decreased insulin signaling. Thus, Sirt3 plays an important role in diabetes through regulation of mitochondrial oxidation, reactive oxygen species production, and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  7. Triptolide inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell proliferation in rat airway smooth muscle cells by suppressing Smad signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ming; Lv, Zhiqiang; Huang, Linjie [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China); Zhang, Wei [Department of Geratology, the Second People' s Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518000 (China); Lin, Xiaoling; Shi, Jianting; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Ruiyun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China); Jiang, Shanping, E-mail: shanpingjiang@126.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Institute for Respiratory disease of Sun Yat-sen University, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province 510120 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Background: We have reported that triptolide can inhibit airway remodeling in a murine model of asthma via TGF-β1/Smad signaling. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effect of triptolide on airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) proliferation and the possible mechanism. Methods: Rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized, then pretreated with different concentration of triptolide before stimulated by TGF-β1. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay. Flow cytometry was used to study the influence of triptolide on cell cycle and apoptosis. Signal proteins (Smad2, Smad3 and Smad7) were detected by western blotting analysis. Results: Triptolide significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced ASMC proliferation (P<0.05). The cell cycle was blocked at G1/S-interphase by triptolide dose dependently. No pro-apoptotic effects were detected under the concentration of triptolide we used. Western blotting analysis showed TGF-β1 induced Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation was inhibited by triptolide pretreatment, and the level of Smad7 was increased by triptolide pretreatment. Conclusions: Triptolide may function as an inhibitor of asthma airway remodeling by suppressing ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway. - Highlights: • In this study, rat airway smooth muscle cells were cultured and made synchronized. • Triptolide inhibited TGF-β1-induced airway smooth muscle cells proliferation. • Triptolide inhibited ASMCs proliferation via negative regulation of Smad signaling pathway.

  8. Retraction: Myostatin Induces Degradation of Sarcomeric Proteins through a Smad3 Signaling Mechanism During Skeletal Muscle Wasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokireddy, Sudarsanareddy; McFarlane, Craig; Ge, Xiaojia; Zhang, Huoming; Sze, Siu Kwan; Sharma, Mridula

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination-mediated proteolysis is a hallmark of skeletal muscle wasting manifested in response to negative growth factors, including myostatin. Thus, the characterization of signaling mechanisms that induce the ubiquitination of intracellular and sarcomeric proteins during skeletal muscle wasting is of great importance. We have recently characterized myostatin as a potent negative regulator of myogenesis and further demonstrated that elevated levels of myostatin in circulation results in the up-regulation of the muscle-specific E3 ligases, Atrogin-1 and muscle ring finger protein 1 (MuRF1). However, the exact signaling mechanisms by which myostatin regulates the expression of Atrogin-1 and MuRF1, as well as the proteins targeted for degradation in response to excess myostatin, remain to be elucidated. In this report, we have demonstrated that myostatin signals through Smad3 (mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3) to activate forkhead box O1 and Atrogin-1 expression, which further promotes the ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation of critical sarcomeric proteins. Smad3 signaling was dispensable for myostatin-dependent overexpression of MuRF1. Although down-regulation of Atrogin-1 expression rescued approximately 80% of sarcomeric protein loss induced by myostatin, only about 20% rescue was seen when MuRF1 was silenced, implicating that Atrogin-1 is the predominant E3 ligase through which myostatin manifests skeletal muscle wasting. Furthermore, we have highlighted that Atrogin-1 not only associates with myosin heavy and light chain, but it also ubiquitinates these sarcomeric proteins. Based on presented data we propose a model whereby myostatin induces skeletal muscle wasting through targeting sarcomeric proteins via Smad3-mediated up-regulation of Atrogin-1 and forkhead box O1. PMID:21964591

  9. Estrogen receptor beta signaling inhibits PDGF induced human airway smooth muscle proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambhore, Nilesh Sudhakar; Katragadda, Rathnavali; Raju Kalidhindi, Rama Satyanarayana; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S; Sathish, Venkatachalem

    2018-04-20

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell hyperplasia driven by persistent inflammation is a hallmark feature of remodeling in asthma. Sex steroid signaling in the lungs is of considerable interest, given epidemiological data showing more asthma in pre-menopausal women and aging men. Our previous studies demonstrated that estrogen receptor (ER) expression increases in asthmatic human ASM; however, very limited data are available regarding differential roles of ERα vs. ERβ isoforms in human ASM cell proliferation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of selective ERα and ERβ modulators on platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated ASM proliferation and the mechanisms involved. Asthmatic and non-asthmatic primary human ASM cells were treated with PDGF, 17β-estradiol, ERα-agonist and/or ERβ-agonist and/or G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 30 (GPR30/GPER) agonist and proliferation was measured using MTT and CyQuant assays followed by cell cycle analysis. Transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) ERα and ERβ significantly altered the human ASM proliferation. The specificity of siRNA transfection was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene and protein expression of cell cycle-related antigens (PCNA and Ki67) and C/EBP were measured by RT-PCR and Western analysis, along with cell signaling proteins. PDGF significantly increased ASM proliferation in non-asthmatic and asthmatic cells. Treatment with PPT showed no significant effect on PDGF-induced proliferation, whereas WAY interestingly suppressed proliferation via inhibition of ERK1/2, Akt, and p38 signaling. PDGF-induced gene expression of PCNA, Ki67 and C/EBP in human ASM was significantly lower in cells pre-treated with WAY. Furthermore, WAY also inhibited PDGF-activated PCNA, C/EBP, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-E. Overall, we demonstrate ER isoform-specific signaling in the context of ASM proliferation. Activation of ERβ can diminish remodeling in human ASM by inhibiting pro-proliferative signaling pathways

  10. Increased arterial smooth muscle Ca2+ signaling, vasoconstriction, and myogenic reactivity in Milan hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Cristina I.; Karashima, Eiji; Raina, Hema; Zulian, Alessandra; Wier, Withrow G.; Hamlyn, John M.; Ferrari, Patrizia; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    2012-01-01

    The Milan hypertensive strain (MHS) rats are a genetic model of hypertension with adducin gene polymorphisms linked to enhanced renal tubular Na+ reabsorption. Recently we demonstrated that Ca2+ signaling is augmented in freshly isolated mesenteric artery myocytes from MHS rats. This is associated with greatly enhanced expression of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger-1 (NCX1), C-type transient receptor potential (TRPC6) protein, and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA2) compared with arteries from Milan normotensive strain (MNS) rats. Here, we test the hypothesis that the enhanced Ca2+ signaling in MHS arterial smooth muscle is directly reflected in augmented vasoconstriction [myogenic and phenylephrine (PE)-evoked responses] in isolated mesenteric small arteries. Systolic blood pressure was higher in MHS (145 ± 1 mmHg) than in MNS (112 ± 1 mmHg; P arteries from MHS rats had significantly augmented myogenic tone and reactivity and enhanced constriction to low-dose (1–100 nM) PE. Isolated MHS arterial myocytes exhibited approximately twofold increased peak Ca2+ signals in response to 5 μM PE or ATP in the absence and presence of extracellular Ca2+. These augmented responses are consistent with increased vasoconstrictor-evoked sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release and increased Ca2+ entry, respectively. The increased SR Ca2+ release correlates with a doubling of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 1 and tripling of SERCA2 expression. Pressurized MHS arteries also exhibited a ∼70% increase in 100 nM ouabain-induced vasoconstriction compared with MNS arteries. These functional alterations reveal that, in a genetic model of hypertension linked to renal dysfunction, multiple mechanisms within the arterial myocytes contribute to enhanced Ca2+ signaling and myogenic and vasoconstrictor-induced arterial constriction. MHS rats have elevated plasma levels of endogenous ouabain, which may initiate the protein upregulation and enhanced Ca2+ signaling. These

  11. Minimal dose of milk protein concentrate to enhance the anabolic signalling response to a single bout of resistance exercise; a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Cameron J; Zeng, Nina; D'Souza, Randall F; Mitchell, Sarah M; Aasen, Kirsten; Fanning, Aaron C; Poppitt, Sally D; Cameron-Smith, David

    2017-01-01

    Resistance training is a potent stimulus to induce muscle hypertrophy. Supplemental protein intake is known to enhance gains in muscle mass through activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, which initiates protein translation. While the optimal dose of high quality protein to promote post exercise anabolism in young or older men has been investigated, little is known about the minimum doses of protein required to potentiate the resistance exercise activation of anabolic signalling in middle aged men. Twenty healthy men (46.3 ± 5.7 years, BMI: 23.9 ± 6.6 kg/m 2 ) completed a single bout of unilateral resistance exercise consisting of 4 sets of leg extension and press at 80% of 1 repetition maximum. Participants were randomised to consume either formulated milk product containing 9 g milk protein (FMP) or an isoenergetic carbohydrate placebo (CHO) immediately post exercise, in a double blind fashion. A single muscle biopsy was collected at pre-exercise baseline and then bilateral biopsies were collected 90 and 240 min after beverage consumption. P70S6K Thr389 phosphorylation was increased with exercise irrespective of group, P70S6K Thr421/Ser424 was increased with exercise only in the FMP group at 240 min. Likewise, rpS6 Ser235/236 phosphorylation was increased with exercise irrespective of group, rpS6 Ser240/244 increased to a greater extent following exercise in the FMP group. mRNA expression of the amino acid transporter, LAT1/ SLC7A5 increased with both exercise and beverage consumption irrespective of group. PAT1/ SLC36A1 , CAT1/ SLC7A1 and SNAT2/ SLC38A2 mRNA increased only after exercise regardless of group. Nine grams of milk protein is sufficient to augment some measures of downstream mTORC1 signalling after resistance exercise but does not potentiate exercise induced increases in amino acid transporter expression. Formulated products containing nine grams of milk protein would be expected stimulate muscle

  12. Effect of Acute Exercise on AMPK Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Coletta, Dawn K.; Wajcberg, Estela; Balbontin, Gabriela B.; Reyna, Sara M.; Barrientes, John; Eagan, Phyllis A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.; Cersosimo, Eugenio; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Sakamoto, Kei; Musi, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by exercise induces several cellular processes in muscle. Exercise activation of AMPK is unaffected in lean (BMI ~25 kg/m2) subjects with type 2 diabetes. However, most type 2 diabetic subjects are obese (BMI >30 kg/m2), and exercise stimulation of AMPK is blunted in obese rodents. We examined whether obese type 2 diabetic subjects have impaired exercise stimulation of AMPK, at different signaling levels, spanning from the upstream kinase, LKB1, to the putative AMPK targets, AS160 and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor coactivator (PGC)-1α, involved in glucose transport regulation and mitochondrial biogenesis, respectively. Twelve type 2 diabetic, eight obese, and eight lean subjects exercised on a cycle ergometer for 40 min. Muscle biopsies were done before, during, and after exercise. Subjects underwent this protocol on two occasions, at low (50% VO2max) and moderate (70% VO2max) intensities, with a 4–6 week interval. Exercise had no effect on LKB1 activity. Exercise had a time- and intensity-dependent effect to increase AMPK activity and AS160 phosphorylation. Obese and type 2 diabetic subjects had attenuated exercise-stimulated AMPK activity and AS160 phosphorylation. Type 2 diabetic subjects had reduced basal PGC-1 gene expression but normal exercise-induced increases in PGC-1 expression. Our findings suggest that obese type 2 diabetic subjects may need to exercise at higher intensity to stimulate the AMPK-AS160 axis to the same level as lean subjects. PMID:17327455

  13. LPS Promotes Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation Through the TLR4/Rac1/Akt Signalling Pathway

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    Qianran Yin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a potent activator of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs proliferation, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we knocked down Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1 expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA in order to investigate the effects and possible mechanisms of LPS-induced VSMCs proliferation. Methods: VSMCs proliferation was monitored by 5-ethynyl-2’-deoxyuridine staining, and Rac1 activity was measured via Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. mRNAs encoding proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, smooth muscle 22α (SM22α, myosin heavy chain (MYH and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1 were detected by qRT-PCR. The expression of total Akt, p-Akt (308, p-Akt (473, SM22α, MYH and TRPC1 protein was analysed by Western blot. Results: Treatment with TLR4 siRNA (siTLR4 or Rac1 siRNA (siRac1 significantly decreased LPS-induced VSMCs proliferation. Moreover, LPS-induced activation of Rac1 through TLR4 was observed. Western blot analysis revealed that transfection with siTLR4 or siRac1 inhibited LPS-induced Akt phosphorylation. We discovered that LPS stimulated VSMCs proliferation via phenotypic modulation and that this effect was partially inhibited by pre-treatment with siTLR4 or siRac1. Further, TLR4 and Rac1 are involved in LPS-induced activation of TRPC1. Conclusion: This study suggests that LPS exerts an effect on VSMCs proliferation and that the TLR4/Rac1/Akt signalling pathway mediates this effect.

  14. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Signaling in Trigeminal Ganglion Contributes to Mechanical Hypersensitivity in Masseter Muscle During Temporomandibular Joint Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Reio; Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Urata, Kentaro; Lee, Jun; Maruno, Mitsuru; Soma, Kumi; Okada, Shinji; Gionhaku, Nobuhito; Iwata, Koichi

    To determine the involvement of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) signaling in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter muscle during temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. A total of 55 male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Following injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant into the TMJ, the mechanical sensitivities of the masseter muscle and the overlying facial skin were measured. Satellite glial cell (SGC) activation and TNFα expression in the TG were investigated immunohistochemically, and the effects of their inhibition on the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter muscle were also examined. Student t test or two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni multiple comparisons test were used for statistical analyses. P < .05 was considered to reflect statistical significance. Mechanical allodynia in the masseter muscle was induced without any inflammatory cell infiltration in the muscle after TMJ inflammation. SGC activation and an increased number of TNFα-immunoreactive cells were induced in the TG following TMJ inflammation. Intra-TG administration of an inhibitor of SGC activity or of TNFα-neutralizing antibody depressed both the increased number of TG cells encircled by activated SGCs and the mechanical hypersensitivity of the masseter following TMJ inflammation. These findings suggest that persistent masseter hypersensitivity associated with TMJ inflammation was mediated by SGC-TG neuron interactions via TNFα signaling in the TG.

  15. Alcohol impairs skeletal muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in a time-dependent manner following electrically stimulated muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Lang, Charles H

    2014-11-15

    Alcohol (EtOH) decreases protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated signaling and blunts the anabolic response to growth factors in skeletal muscle. The purpose of the current investigation was to determine whether acute EtOH intoxication antagonizes the contraction-induced increase in protein synthesis and mTOR signaling in skeletal muscle. Fasted male mice were injected intraperitoneally with 3 g/kg EtOH or saline (control), and the right hindlimb was electrically stimulated (10 sets of 6 contractions). The gastrocnemius muscle complex was collected 30 min, 4 h, or 12 h after stimulation. EtOH decreased in vivo basal protein synthesis (PS) in the nonstimulated muscle compared with time-matched Controls at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. In Control, but not EtOH, PS was decreased 15% after 30 min. In contrast, PS was increased in Control 4 h poststimulation but remained unchanged in EtOH. Last, stimulation increased PS 10% in Control and EtOH at 12 h, even though the absolute rate remained reduced by EtOH. The stimulation-induced increase in the phosphorylation of S6K1 Thr(421)/Ser(424) (20-52%), S6K1 Thr(389) (45-57%), and its substrate rpS6 Ser(240/244) (37-72%) was blunted by EtOH at 30 min, 4 h, and 12 h. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 Ser(65) was also attenuated by EtOH (61%) at 4 h. Conversely, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase Thr(202)/Tyr(204) was increased by stimulation in Control and EtOH mice at 30 min but only in Control at 4 h. Our data indicate that acute EtOH intoxication suppresses muscle protein synthesis for at least 12 h and greatly impairs contraction-induced changes in synthesis and mTOR signaling. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Catabolic signaling pathways, atrogenes, and ubiquitinated proteins are regulated by the nutritional status in the muscle of the fine flounder.

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    Eduardo N Fuentes

    Full Text Available A description of the intracellular mechanisms that modulate skeletal muscle atrophy in early vertebrates is still lacking. In this context, we used the fine flounder, a unique and intriguing fish model, which exhibits remarkably slow growth due to low production of muscle-derived IGF-I, a key growth factor that has been widely acknowledged to prevent and revert muscle atrophy. Key components of the atrophy system were examined in this species using a detailed time-course of sampling points, including two contrasting nutritional periods. Under basal conditions high amounts of the atrogenes MuRF-1 and Atrogin-1 were observed. During fasting, the activation of the P38/MAPK and Akt/FoxO signaling pathways decreased; whereas, the activation of the IκBα/NFκB pathway increased. These changes in signal transduction activation were concomitant with a strong increase in MuRF-1, Atrogin-1, and protein ubiquitination. During short-term refeeding, the P38/MAPK and Akt/FoxO signaling pathways were strongly activated, whereas the activation of the IκBα/NFκB pathway decreased significantly. The expression of both atrogenes, as well as the ubiquitination of proteins, dropped significantly during the first hour of refeeding, indicating a strong anti-atrophic condition during the onset of refeeding. During long-term refeeding, Akt remained activated at higher than basal levels until the end of refeeding, and Atrogin-1 expression remained significantly lower during this period. This study shows that the components of the atrophy system in skeletal muscle appeared early in the evolution of vertebrates and some mechanisms have been conserved, whereas others have not. These results represent an important achievement for the area of fish muscle physiology, showing an integrative view of the atrophy system in a non-mammalian species and contributing to novel insights on the molecular basis of muscle growth regulation in earlier vertebrates.

  17. Skeletal muscle-derived progenitors capable of differentiating into cardiomyocytes proliferate through myostatin-independent TGF-β family signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Tetsuya; Ueyama, Tomomi; Ashihara, Eishi; Tateishi, Kento; Asada, Satoshi; Nakajima, Norio; Isodono, Koji; Takahashi, Tomosaburo; Matsubara, Hiroaki; Oh, Hidemasa

    2008-01-01

    The existence of skeletal muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) has been suggested in mammals; however, the signaling pathways controlling MDSC proliferation remain largely unknown. Here we report the isolation of myosphere-derived progenitor cells (MDPCs) that can give rise to beating cardiomyocytes from adult skeletal muscle. We identified that follistatin, an antagonist of TGF-β family members, was predominantly expressed in MDPCs, whereas myostatin was mainly expressed in myogenic cells and mature skeletal muscle. Although follistatin enhanced the replicative growth of MDPCs through Smad2/3 inactivation and cell cycle progression, disruption of myostatin did not increase the MDPC proliferation. By contrast, inhibition of activin A (ActA) or growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11) signaling dramatically increased MDPC proliferation via down-regulation of p21 and increases in the levels of cdk2/4 and cyclin D1. Thus, follistatin may be an effective progenitor-enhancing agent neutralizing ActA and GDF11 signaling to regulate the growth of MDPCs in skeletal muscle

  18. NRIP is newly identified as a Z-disc protein, activating calmodulin signaling for skeletal muscle contraction and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Hsiung; Chen, Wen-Pin; Yan, Wan-Lun; Huang, Yuan-Chun; Chang, Szu-Wei; Fu, Wen-Mei; Su, Ming-Jai; Yu, I-Shing; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Yan, Yu-Ting; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear receptor interaction protein (NRIP, also known as DCAF6 and IQWD1) is a Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin-binding protein. In this study, we newly identify NRIP as a Z-disc protein in skeletal muscle. NRIP-knockout mice were generated and found to have reduced muscle strength, susceptibility to fatigue and impaired adaptive exercise performance. The mechanisms of NRIP-regulated muscle contraction depend on NRIP being downstream of Ca(2+) signaling, where it stimulates activation of both 'calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic 1' (CaN-NFATc1; also known as NFATC1) and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) through interaction with calmodulin (CaM), resulting in the induction of mitochondrial activity and the expression of genes encoding the slow class of myosin, and in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis through the internal Ca(2+) stores of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Moreover, NRIP-knockout mice have a delayed regenerative capacity. The amount of NRIP can be enhanced after muscle injury and is responsible for muscle regeneration, which is associated with the increased expression of myogenin, desmin and embryonic myosin heavy chain during myogenesis, as well as for myotube formation. In conclusion, NRIP is a novel Z-disc protein that is important for skeletal muscle strength and regenerative capacity. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Angiotensin-II-induced Muscle Wasting is Mediated by 25-Hydroxycholesterol via GSK3β Signaling Pathway

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    Congcong Shen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available While angiotensin II (ang II has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac cachexia (CC, the molecules that mediate ang II's wasting effect have not been identified. It is known TNF-α level is increased in patients with CC, and TNF-α release is triggered by ang II. We therefore hypothesized that ang II induced muscle wasting is mediated by TNF-α. Ang II infusion led to skeletal muscle wasting in wild type (WT but not in TNF alpha type 1 receptor knockout (TNFR1KO mice, suggesting that ang II induced muscle loss is mediated by TNF-α through its type 1 receptor. Microarray analysis identified cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (Ch25h as the down stream target of TNF-α. Intraperitoneal injection of 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-OHC, the product of Ch25h, resulted in muscle loss in C57BL/6 mice, accompanied by increased expression of atrogin-1, MuRF1 and suppression of IGF-1/Akt signaling pathway. The identification of 25-OHC as an inducer of muscle wasting has implications for the development of specific treatment strategies in preventing muscle loss.

  20. A mathematical model of heat flow in a thermopile for measuring muscle heat production: implications for design and signal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, C J

    2015-09-01

    Contracting muscles produce heat which largely arises from the biochemical reactions that provide the energy for contraction. Measurements of muscle heat production have made, and continue to make, important contributions to our understanding of the bases of contraction. Most measurements of muscle heat production are made using a thermopile, consisting of a series of thermocouples arranged so that alternate thermocouples are in thermal contact with the muscle and with an isothermal reference. In this study, a mathematical model was constructed of a muscle lying on a thermopile consisting of antimony-bismuth thermocouples sandwiched between polymer sheets. The validity of the model was demonstrated by its ability to accurately predict thermopile outputs in response to applying heat to the thermopile surface, to generating heat in the thermocouples using the Peltier effect and to adding heat capacity on the thermopile surface. The model was then used to show how practical changes to thermopile construction could minimise response time and thermopile heat capacity and allow measurement of very low rates of heat production. The impulse response of a muscle-thermopile system was generated using the model and used to illustrate how a measured signal can be deconvolved with the impulse response to correct for lag introduced by the thermopile.

  1. Ca2+-Dependent Regulations and Signaling in Skeletal Muscle: From Electro-Mechanical Coupling to Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) plays a pivotal role in almost all cellular processes and ensures the functionality of an organism. In skeletal muscle fibers, Ca2+ is critically involved in the innervation of skeletal muscle fibers that results in the exertion of an action potential along the muscle fiber membrane, the prerequisite for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore and among others, Ca2+ regulates also intracellular processes, such as myosin-actin cross bridging, protein synthesis, protein degradation and fiber type shifting by the control of Ca2+-sensitive proteases and transcription factors, as well as mitochondrial adaptations, plasticity and respiration. These data highlight the overwhelming significance of Ca2+ ions for the integrity of skeletal muscle tissue. In this review, we address the major functions of Ca2+ ions in adult muscle but also highlight recent findings of critical Ca2+-dependent mechanisms essential for skeletal muscle-regulation and maintenance. PMID:25569087

  2. BMP-2 Overexpression Augments Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Motility by Upregulating Myosin Va via Erk Signaling

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    Ming Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The disruption of physiologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC migration initiates atherosclerosis development. The biochemical mechanisms leading to dysfunctional VSMC motility remain unknown. Recently, cytokine BMP-2 has been implicated in various vascular physiologic and pathologic processes. However, whether BMP-2 has any effect upon VSMC motility, or by what manner, has never been investigated. Methods. VSMCs were adenovirally transfected to genetically overexpress BMP-2. VSMC motility was detected by modified Boyden chamber assay, confocal time-lapse video assay, and a colony wounding assay. Gene chip array and RT-PCR were employed to identify genes potentially regulated by BMP-2. Western blot and real-time PCR detected the expression of myosin Va and the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (Erk1/2. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed myosin Va expression locale. Intracellular Ca2+ oscillations were recorded. Results. VSMC migration was augmented in VSMCs overexpressing BMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. siRNA-mediated knockdown of myosin Va inhibited VSMC motility. Both myosin Va mRNA and protein expression significantly increased after BMP-2 administration and were inhibited by Erk1/2 inhibitor U0126. BMP-2 induced Ca2+ oscillations, generated largely by a “cytosolic oscillator”. Conclusion. BMP-2 significantly increased VSMCs migration and myosin Va expression, via the Erk signaling pathway and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations. We provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, and inhibition of BMP-2-induced myosin Va expression may represent a potential therapeutic strategy.

  3. MTOR signaling and ubiquitin-proteosome gene expression in the preservation of fat free mass following high protein, calorie restricted weight loss

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    McIver Cassandra M

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Caloric restriction is one of the most efficient ways to promote weight loss and is known to activate protective metabolic pathways. Frequently reported with weight loss is the undesirable consequence of fat free (lean muscle mass loss. Weight loss diets with increased dietary protein intake are popular and may provide additional benefits through preservation of fat free mass compared to a standard protein, high carbohydrate diet. However, the precise mechanism by which a high protein diet may mitigate dietary weight loss induced reductions in fat free mass has not been fully elucidated. Maintenance of fat free mass is dependent upon nutrient stimulation of protein synthesis via the mTOR complex, although during caloric restriction a decrease (atrophy in skeletal muscle may be driven by a homeostatic shift favouring protein catabolism. This review evaluates the relationship between the macronutrient composition of calorie restricted diets and weight loss using metabolic indicators. Specifically we evaluate the effect of increased dietary protein intake and caloric restricted diets on gene expression in skeletal muscle, particularly focusing on biosynthesis, degradation and the expression of genes in the ubiquitin-proteosome (UPP and mTOR signaling pathways, including MuRF-1, MAFbx/atrogin-1, mTORC1, and S6K1.

  4. Vasopressin activates Akt/mTOR pathway in smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Daniela K.; Brenet, Marianne; Muñoz, Vanessa C.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Villanueva, Carolina I. [Department of Physiology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); Figueroa, Carlos D. [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); González, Carlos B., E-mail: cbgonzal@uach.cl [Department of Physiology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia 509-9200 (Chile); Department of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •AVP induces mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells cultured in high glucose concentration. •The mTOR phosphorylation is mediated by the PI3K/Akt pathway activation. •The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation inhibited autophagy and stimulated cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex is a key regulator of autophagy, cell growth and proliferation. Here, we studied the effects of arginine vasopressin (AVP) on mTOR activation in vascular smooth muscle cells cultured in high glucose concentration. AVP induced the mTOR phosphorylation in A-10 cells grown in high glucose, in contrast to cells cultured in normal glucose; wherein, only basal phosphorylation was observed. The AVP-induced mTOR phosphorylation was inhibited by a PI3K inhibitor. Moreover, the AVP-induced mTOR activation inhibited autophagy and increased thymidine incorporation in cells grown in high glucose. This increase was abolished by rapamycin which inhibits the mTORC1 complex formation. Our results suggest that AVP stimulates mTOR phosphorylation by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway and, subsequently, inhibits autophagy and raises cell proliferation in A-10 cells maintained in high glucose concentration.

  5. Community effect triggers terminal differentiation of myogenic cells derived from muscle satellite cells by quenching Smad signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Michiko [Department of Regenerative Medicine, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 35 Gengo, Morioka, Oobu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Aging Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsurumai-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550 (Japan); Mukai, Atsushi; Shiomi, Kosuke [Department of Regenerative Medicine, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 35 Gengo, Morioka, Oobu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan); Song, Si-Yong [Institute of Neuroscience, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Kagawa, Tokushima Bunri University, 1314-1 Shido, Sanuki-shi, Kagawa 769-2193 (Japan); Hashimoto, Naohiro, E-mail: nao@ncgg.go.jp [Department of Regenerative Medicine, National Institute for Longevity Sciences, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, 35 Gengo, Morioka, Oobu, Aichi 474-8522 (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    A high concentration of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulates myogenic progenitor cells to undergo heterotopic osteogenic differentiation. However, the physiological role of the Smad signaling pathway during terminal muscle differentiation has not been resolved. We report here that Smad1/5/8 was phosphorylated and activated in undifferentiated growing mouse myogenic progenitor Ric10 cells without exposure to any exogenous BMPs. The amount of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 was severely reduced during precocious myogenic differentiation under the high cell density culture condition even in growth medium supplemented with a high concentration of serum. Inhibition of the Smad signaling pathway by dorsomorphin, an inhibitor of Smad activation, or noggin, a specific antagonist of BMP, induced precocious terminal differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells in a cell density-dependent fashion even in growth medium. In addition, Smad1/5/8 was transiently activated in proliferating myogenic progenitor cells during muscle regeneration in rats. The present results indicate that the Smad signaling pathway is involved in a critical switch between growth and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, precocious cell density-dependent myogenic differentiation suggests that a community effect triggers the terminal muscle differentiation of myogenic cells by quenching the Smad signaling.

  6. Community effect triggers terminal differentiation of myogenic cells derived from muscle satellite cells by quenching Smad signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Michiko; Mukai, Atsushi; Shiomi, Kosuke; Song, Si-Yong; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2011-01-01

    A high concentration of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) stimulates myogenic progenitor cells to undergo heterotopic osteogenic differentiation. However, the physiological role of the Smad signaling pathway during terminal muscle differentiation has not been resolved. We report here that Smad1/5/8 was phosphorylated and activated in undifferentiated growing mouse myogenic progenitor Ric10 cells without exposure to any exogenous BMPs. The amount of phosphorylated Smad1/5/8 was severely reduced during precocious myogenic differentiation under the high cell density culture condition even in growth medium supplemented with a high concentration of serum. Inhibition of the Smad signaling pathway by dorsomorphin, an inhibitor of Smad activation, or noggin, a specific antagonist of BMP, induced precocious terminal differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells in a cell density-dependent fashion even in growth medium. In addition, Smad1/5/8 was transiently activated in proliferating myogenic progenitor cells during muscle regeneration in rats. The present results indicate that the Smad signaling pathway is involved in a critical switch between growth and differentiation of myogenic progenitor cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, precocious cell density-dependent myogenic differentiation suggests that a community effect triggers the terminal muscle differentiation of myogenic cells by quenching the Smad signaling.

  7. Cannabinoid signalling inhibits sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release and regulates excitation–contraction coupling in mammalian skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Tamás; Bodnár, Dóra; Tóth, Adrienn; Vincze, János; Fodor, János; Reischl, Barbara; Kovács, Adrienn; Ruzsnavszky, Olga; Dienes, Beatrix; Szentesi, Péter; Friedrich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Key points Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although the exact regulatory role of its receptors (CB1 cannabinoid receptor; CB1R) in the excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) of mammalian skeletal muscle remains unknown.We found that CB1R activation or its knockout did not affect muscle force directly, whereas its activation decreased the Ca2+‐sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and made the muscle fibres more prone to fatigue.We demonstrate that CB1Rs are not connected to the inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate pathway either in myotubes or in adult muscle fibres.By contrast, CB1Rs constitutively inhibit sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase during ECC in a Gi/o protein‐mediated way in adult skeletal muscle fibres but not in myotubes.These results help with our understanding of the physiological effects and pathological consequences of CB1R activation in skeletal muscle and may be useful in the development of new cannabinoid drugs. Abstract Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although it is unknown whether it affects the muscles directly or modulates only the motor control of the central nervous system. Although the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R), which are responsible for the psychoactive effects of the drug in the brain, have recently been demonstrated in skeletal muscle, it is unclear how CB1R‐mediated signalling affects the contraction and Ca²⁺ homeostasis of mammalian skeletal muscle. In the present study, we demonstrate that in vitro CB1R activation increased muscle fatigability and decreased the Ca2+‐sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, whereas it did not alter the amplitude of single twitch contractions. In myotubes, CB1R agonists neither evoked, nor influenced inositol 1,4,5‐trisphosphate (IP3)‐mediated Ca2+ transients, nor did they alter excitation–contraction coupling. By contrast, in isolated muscle fibres of wild‐type mice, although CB1R agonists did not evoke IP3

  8. Cannabinoid signalling inhibits sarcoplasmic Ca2+ release and regulates excitation-contraction coupling in mammalian skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Tamás; Bodnár, Dóra; Tóth, Adrienn; Vincze, János; Fodor, János; Reischl, Barbara; Kovács, Adrienn; Ruzsnavszky, Olga; Dienes, Beatrix; Szentesi, Péter; Friedrich, Oliver; Csernoch, László

    2016-12-15

    Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although the exact regulatory role of its receptors (CB1 cannabinoid receptor; CB1R) in the excitation-contraction coupling (ECC) of mammalian skeletal muscle remains unknown. We found that CB1R activation or its knockout did not affect muscle force directly, whereas its activation decreased the Ca 2+ -sensitivity of the contractile apparatus and made the muscle fibres more prone to fatigue. We demonstrate that CB1Rs are not connected to the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway either in myotubes or in adult muscle fibres. By contrast, CB1Rs constitutively inhibit sarcoplasmic Ca 2+ release and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ ATPase during ECC in a G i/o protein-mediated way in adult skeletal muscle fibres but not in myotubes. These results help with our understanding of the physiological effects and pathological consequences of CB1R activation in skeletal muscle and may be useful in the development of new cannabinoid drugs. Marijuana was found to cause muscle weakness, although it is unknown whether it affects the muscles directly or modulates only the motor control of the central nervous system. Although the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R), which are responsible for the psychoactive effects of the drug in the brain, have recently been demonstrated in skeletal muscle, it is unclear how CB1R-mediated signalling affects the contraction and Ca²⁺ homeostasis of mammalian skeletal muscle. In the present study, we demonstrate that in vitro CB1R activation increased muscle fatigability and decreased the Ca 2+ -sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, whereas it did not alter the amplitude of single twitch contractions. In myotubes, CB1R agonists neither evoked, nor influenced inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP 3 )-mediated Ca 2+ transients, nor did they alter excitation-contraction coupling. By contrast, in isolated muscle fibres of wild-type mice, although CB1R agonists did not evoke IP 3 -mediated Ca 2

  9. Insulin and GH signaling in human skeletal muscle in vivo following exogenous GH exposure: impact of an oral glucose load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Krusenstjerna-Hafstrøm

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available GH induces acute insulin resistance in skeletal muscle in vivo, which in rodent models has been attributed to crosstalk between GH and insulin signaling pathways. Our objective was to characterize time course changes in signaling pathways for GH and insulin in human skeletal muscle in vivo following GH exposure in the presence and absence of an oral glucose load.Eight young men were studied in a single-blinded randomized crossover design on 3 occasions: 1 after an intravenous GH bolus 2 after an intravenous GH bolus plus an oral glucose load (OGTT, and 3 after intravenous saline plus OGTT. Muscle biopsies were taken at t = 0, 30, 60, and 120. Blood was sampled at frequent intervals for assessment of GH, insulin, glucose, and free fatty acids (FFA.GH increased AUC(glucose after an OGTT (p<0.05 without significant changes in serum insulin levels. GH induced phosphorylation of STAT5 independently of the OGTT. Conversely, the OGTT induced acute phosphorylation of the insulin signaling proteins Akt (ser(473 and thr(308, and AS160.The combination of OGTT and GH suppressed Akt activation, whereas the downstream expression of AS160 was amplified by GH. WE CONCLUDED THE FOLLOWING: 1 A physiological GH bolus activates STAT5 signaling pathways in skeletal muscle irrespective of ambient glucose and insulin levels 2 Insulin resistance induced by GH occurs without a distinct suppression of insulin signaling proteins 3 The accentuation of the glucose-stimulated activation of AS 160 by GH does however indicate a potential crosstalk between insulin and GH.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00477997.

  10. Insulin signaling in skeletal muscle of HIV‐infected patients in response to endurance and strength training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Christa; Mathur, Neha; Hvid, Thine

    2013-01-01

    . Euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with muscle biopsies were performed before and after the training interventions. Fifteen age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched HIV-negative men served as a sedentary baseline group. Phosphorylation and total protein expression of insulin signaling molecules as well...... hexokinase II (HKII) protein. HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and defects in insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt(thr308). Endurance and strength training increase insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in these patients......Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy have decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Both endurance and resistance training improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle of HIV-infected patients, but the mechanisms are unknown. This study aims...

  11. Muscle-type identity of proprioceptors specified by spatially-restricted signals from limb mesenchyme

    OpenAIRE

    Poliak, Sebastian; Norovich, Amy L.; Yamagata, Masahito; Sanes, Joshua R.; Jessell, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    The selectivity with which proprioceptive sensory neurons innervate their central and peripheral targets implies that they exhibit distinctions in muscle-type identity. The molecular correlates of proprioceptor identity and its origins remain largely unknown, however. In screens to define muscle-type proprioceptor character we find all-or-none differences in gene expression for proprioceptors that control antagonistic muscles at a single hindlimb joint. Analysis of three of these genes, cadhe...

  12. Rac1 signalling towards GLUT4/glucose uptake in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiu, Tim T; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Sylow, Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Small Rho family GTPases are important regulators of cellular traffic. Emerging evidence now implicates Rac1 and Rac-dependent actin reorganisation in insulin-induced recruitment of glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) to the cell surface of muscle cells and mature skeletal muscle. This review summarises...... the current thinking on the regulation of Rac1 by insulin, the role of Rac-dependent cortical actin remodelling in GLUT4 traffic, and the impact of Rac1 towards insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  13. Protective Effect of Unacylated Ghrelin on Compression-Induced Skeletal Muscle Injury Mediated by SIRT1-Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix N. Ugwu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Unacylated ghrelin, the predominant form of circulating ghrelin, protects myotubes from cell death, which is a known attribute of pressure ulcers. In this study, we investigated whether unacylated ghrelin protects skeletal muscle from pressure-induced deep tissue injury by abolishing necroptosis and apoptosis signaling and whether these effects were mediated by SIRT1 pathway. Fifteen adult Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to receive saline or unacylated ghrelin with or without EX527 (a SIRT1 inhibitor. Animals underwent two 6-h compression cycles with 100 mmHg static pressure applied over the mid-tibialis region of the right limb whereas the left uncompressed limb served as the intra-animal control. Muscle tissues underneath the compression region, and at the similar region of the opposite uncompressed limb, were collected for analysis. Unacylated ghrelin attenuated the compression-induced muscle pathohistological alterations including rounding contour of myofibers, extensive nucleus accumulation in the interstitial space, and increased interstitial space. Unacylated ghrelin abolished the increase in necroptosis proteins including RIP1 and RIP3 and attenuated the elevation of apoptotic proteins including p53, Bax, and AIF in the compressed muscle. Furthermore, unacylated ghrelin opposed the compression-induced phosphorylation and acetylation of p65 subunit of NF-kB. The anti-apoptotic effect of unacylated ghrelin was shown by a decrease in apoptotic DNA fragmentation and terminal dUTP nick-end labeling index in the compressed muscle. The protective effects of unacylated ghrelin vanished when co-treated with EX527. Our findings demonstrated that unacylated ghrelin protected skeletal muscle from compression-induced injury. The myoprotective effects of unacylated ghrelin on pressure-induced tissue injury were associated with SIRT1 signaling.

  14. Maternal obesity-impaired insulin signaling in sheep and induced lipid accumulation and fibrosis in skeletal muscle of offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xu; Huang, Yan; Zhao, Jun-Xing; Long, Nathan M; Uthlaut, Adam B; Zhu, Mei-Jun; Ford, Stephen P; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Du, Min

    2011-07-01

    The prevalence of maternal obesity is increasing rapidly in recent decades. We previously showed that maternal obesity affected skeletal muscle development during the fetal stage. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal obesity on the skeletal muscle properties of offspring. Ewes were fed a control diet (100% energy requirement, Con) or an obesogenic diet (150% energy requirement, OB) from 2 mo before pregnancy to weaning. After weaning, the offspring lambs were fed a maintenance diet until 19 mo of age and then ad libitum for 12 wk to measure feed intake. At 22 mo old, the longissimus dorsi (LD) muscle was biopsied. The downstream insulin signaling was lower in OB than Con lambs as shown by reduction in the phosphorylation of protein kinase B, mammalian target of rapamycin, and 4-E binding protein 1. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of protein kinase C and insulin receptor substrate 1 was higher in OB compared to Con lambs. More intramuscular adipocytes were observed in OB compared to Con offspring muscle, and the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma, an adipocyte marker, was also higher, which was consistent with the higher intramuscular triglyceride content. Both fatty acid transport protein 1 and cluster of differentiation 36 (also known as fatty acid translocase) were increased in the OB group. In addition, higher collagen content was also detected in OB compared to Con offspring. In conclusion, our data show that offspring from obese mothers had impaired insulin signaling in muscle compared with control lambs, which correlates with increased intramuscular triglycerides and higher expression of fatty acid transporters. These data clearly show that maternal obesity impairs the function of the skeletal muscle of offspring, supporting the fetal programming of adult metabolic diseases.

  15. Acute effects of different diet compositions on skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obese individuals during caloric restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cecilia C.L.; Adochio, Rebecca L.; Leitner, J. Wayne; Abeyta, Ian M.; Draznin, Boris; Cornier, Marc-Andre

    2012-01-01

    Objective The cellular effects of restricting fat versus carbohydrate during a low-calorie diet are unclear. The aim of this study was to examine acute effects of energy and macronutrient restriction on skeletal muscle insulin signalling in obesity. Materials/Methods Eighteen obese individuals without diabetes underwent euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and skeletal muscle biopsy after: (a) 5 days of eucaloric diet (30% fat, 50% carbohydrate), and (b) 5 days of a 30% calorie-restricted diet, either low fat/high carbohydrate (LF/HC: 20% fat, 60% carbohydrate) or high-fat/low carbohydrate (HF/LC: 50% fat, 30% carbohydrate). Results Weight, body composition, and insulin sensitivity were similar between groups after eucaloric diet. Weight loss was similar between groups after hypocaloric diet, 1.3 ± 1.3 kg (pdiet. Skeletal muscle of the LF/HC group had increased insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1, decreased insulin-stimulated Ser 307 phosphorylation of IRS-1, and increased IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol (PI)3-kinase activity. Conversely, insulin stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylated IRS-1 was absent and serine 307 phosphorylation of IRS-1 was increased on HF/LC, with blunting of IRS-1-associated PI3-kinase activity. Conclusion Acute caloric restriction with a LF/HC diet alters skeletal muscle insulin signalling in a way that improves insulin sensitivity, while acute caloric restriction with a HF/LC diet induces changes compatible with insulin resistance. In both cases, ex vivo changes in skeletal muscle insulin signalling appear prior to changes in whole body insulin sensitivity. PMID:23174405

  16. The neuropeptide catestatin promotes vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xiaoxia [Department of Cardiology, People' s Hospital, Peking University, No. 11 South Avenue, Xi Zhi Men Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China); Zhou, Chunyan, E-mail: chunyanzhou@bjmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Sun, Ningling, E-mail: nlsun@263.net [Department of Cardiology, People' s Hospital, Peking University, No. 11 South Avenue, Xi Zhi Men Xicheng District, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Catestatin stimulates proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} Catestatin provokes sustained increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+}. {yields} Catestatin produces increased activation of calcineurin and promotes NFATc1 translocation into the nucleus. -- Abstract: The Chromogranin A-derived neuropeptide catestatin is an endogenous nicotinic cholinergic antagonist that acts as a pleiotropic hormone. Since catestatin shares several functions with other members derived from the chromogranin/secretogranin protein family and other neuropeptides which exert proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we therefore hypothesized that catestatin would regulate VSMC proliferation. The present study demonstrates that catestatin caused a dose-dependent induction of proliferation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells and furthermore evoked a sustained increase in intracellular calcium. This subsequently leaded to enhanced activation of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin and resulted in an activation of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), initiating transcription of proliferative genes. In addition, cyclosporin A (CsA), a potent inhibitor of calcineurin, abrogated catestatin-mediated effect on VSMCs, indicating that the calcineurin-NFAT signaling is strongly required for catestatin-induced growth of VSMCs. The present study establishes catestatin as a novel proliferative cytokine on vascular smooth muscle cells and this effect is mediated by the Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathway.

  17. Exercise training improves blood flow to contracting skeletal muscle of older men via enhanced cGMP signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, Peter Bergmann; Smith Jørgensen, Tue; Egelund, Jon

    2018-01-01

    Physical activity has the potential to offset age-related impairments in the regulation of blood flow and O2 delivery to the exercising muscles; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect of physical activity remain poorly understood. The present study examined the role of cGMP in training...... a period of aerobic high-intensity exercise training. To determine the role of cGMP signaling, pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) was performed. Before training, inhibition of PDE5 increased (P... group; however, these effects of PDE5 inhibition were not detected after training. These findings suggest a role for enhanced cGMP signaling in the training-induced improvement of regulation of blood flow in contracting skeletal muscle of older men....

  18. Effect of mild intermittent hypoxia on glucose tolerance, muscle morphology and AMPK-PGC-1alpha signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Yu; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Kao, Chung-Lan; Lee, Shin-Da; Wu, Ming-Chieh; Mallikarjuna, K; Liao, Yi-Hung; Ivy, John L; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-28

    The main goal of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of daily 8-hour mild intermittent hypoxia (14-15% O2) on glucose tolerance and muscle morphology of Sprague-Dawley rats. The involvement of AMPK-PGC-1alpha-VEGF signaling pathways in the skeletal muscle was also determined during the first 8 hours of hypoxia. We found that mRNA levels of VEGF and PGC-1alpha were significantly increased above control after 8-h mild hypoxia without a change in AMPK phosphorylation. After 8 weeks of mild intermittent hypoxia treatment, plasma glucose and insulin levels in oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), epididymal fat mass, and body weight were significantly lower compared to the control group. While soleus muscle weight was not changed, capillary and fiber densities in the hypoxia group were 33% and 35% above the control suggesting reorganization of muscle fibers. In conclusion, our data provide strong evidence that long-term mild intermittent hypoxia decreases the diffusion distance of glucose and insulin across muscle fibers, and decreases adiposity in rats. These changes may account for the improved glucose tolerance observed following the 8-week hypoxia treatment, and provides grounds for investigating the development of a mild non-pharmacological intervention in the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  19. Roles of TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway in pathogenesis and development of gluteal muscle contracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xintao; Ma, Yukun; You, Tian; Tian, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Honglei; Zhu, Qi; Zhang, Wentao

    2015-02-01

    Gluteal muscle contracture (GMC) is a chronic fibrotic disease of gluteal muscles which is characterized by excessive deposition of collagen in the extracellular matrix. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-βs have been shown to play an important role in the progression of GMC. However, the underlying mechanisms are not entirely clear. We sought to explore the expression of TGF-β/Smad pathway proteins and their downstream targets in gluteal muscle contracture disease. The expression levels of collagens type I/III, TGF-β1, Smad2/3/4/7 and PAI-1 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) in gluteal muscle contraction (GMC) patients were measured using immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot assays. The expressions of collagens type I/III and TGF-β1 were significantly increased in the contraction band compared with unaffected muscle. In addition, R-Smad phosphorylation and Smad4 protein expression in the contraction band were also elevated, while the expression of Smad7 was significantly decreased in the fibrotic muscle of the GMC patients compared to the unaffected adjacent muscle. The protein and mRNA levels of PAI-1 were also remarkably increased in the contraction band compared with adjacent muscle. Immunohistochemical analysis also demonstrated that the expression levels of TGF-β1 and PAI-1 were higher in contraction band than those in the adjacent muscle. Our data confirm the stimulating effects of the TGF-β/Smad pathway in gluteal muscle contracture disease and reveal the internal changes of TGF-β/Smad pathway proteins and their corresponding targets in gluteal muscle contracture patients.

  20. Insulin signaling in skeletal muscle and liver of neonatal pigs during endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepsis has been associated with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and nitric oxide (NO) overproduction, insulin resistance, and a profound suppression of muscle protein synthesis. However, lesser suppression of muscle protein synthesis in neonatal pigs occurs in response to endotoxin (LPS) whe...

  1. Molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of angiotensin II-induced muscle wasting: potential therapeutic targets for cardiac cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Tadashi; Tabony, A. Michael; Galvez, Sarah; Mitch, William E.; Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Cachexia is a serious complication of many chronic diseases, such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Many factors are involved in the development of cachexia, and there is increasing evidence that angiotensin II (Ang II), the main effector molecule of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), plays an important role in this process. Patients with advanced CHF or CKD often have increased Ang II levels and cachexia, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor treatment improves weight loss. In rodent models, an increase in systemic Ang II leads to weight loss through increased protein breakdown, reduced protein synthesis in skeletal muscle and decreased appetite. Ang II activates the ubiquitin-proteasome system via generation of reactive oxygen species and via inhibition of the insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Ang II inhibits 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and disrupts normal energy balance. Ang II also increases cytokines and circulating hormones such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, serum amyloid-A, glucocorticoids and myostatin, which regulate muscle protein synthesis and degradation. Ang II acts on hypothalamic neurons to regulate orexigenic/anorexigenic neuropeptides, such as neuropeptide-Y, orexin and corticotropin-releasing hormone, leading to reduced appetite. Also, Ang II may regulate skeletal muscle regenerative processes. Several clinical studies have indicated that blockade of Ang II signaling via ACE inhibitors or Ang II type 1 receptor blockers prevents weight loss and improves muscle strength. Thus the RAS is a promising target for the treatment of muscle atrophy in patients with CHF and CKD. PMID:23769949

  2. Skeletal muscle myoblasts possess a stretch-responsive local angiotensin signalling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Adam P W; Baker, Jeff; De Lisio, Michael; Parise, Gianni

    2011-06-01

    A paucity of information exists regarding the presence of local renin-angiotensin systems (RASs) in skeletal muscle and associated muscle stem cells. Skeletal muscle and muscle stem cells were isolated from C57BL/6 mice and examined for the presence of a local RAS using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blotting and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Furthermore, the effect of mechanical stimulation on RAS member gene expression was analysed. Whole skeletal muscle, primary myoblasts and C2C12 derived myoblasts and myotubes differentially expressed members of the RAS including angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 (AT(1)) and type 2 (AT(2)). Renin transcripts were never detected, however, mRNA for the 'renin-like' enzyme cathepsin D was observed and Ang I and Ang II were identified in cell culture supernatants from proliferating myoblasts. AT(1) appeared to co-localise with polymerised actin filaments in proliferating myoblasts and was primarily found in the nucleus of terminally differentiated myotubes. Furthermore, mechanical stretch of proliferating and differentiating C2C12 cells differentially induced mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, AT(1) and AT(2). Proliferating and differentiated muscle stem cells possess a local stress-responsive RAS in vitro. The precise function of a local RAS in myoblasts remains unknown. However, evidence presented here suggests that Ang II may be a regulator of skeletal muscle myoblasts.

  3. Exercise-intensity dependent alterations in plasma redox status do not reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lewan; Trewin, Adam; Levinger, Itamar; Shaw, Christopher S; Stepto, Nigel K

    2018-04-01

    Redox homeostasis and redox-sensitive protein signaling play a role in exercise-induced adaptation. The effects of sprint-interval exercise (SIE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) and continuous moderate-intensity exercise (CMIE), on post-exercise plasma redox status are unclear. Furthermore, whether post-exercise plasma redox status reflects skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling is unknown. In a randomized crossover design, eight healthy adults performed a cycling session of HIIE (5×4min at 75% W max ), SIE (4×30s Wingate's), and CMIE work-matched to HIIE (30min at 50% of W max ). Plasma hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and catalase activity were measured immediately post, 1h, 2h and 3h post-exercise. Plasma redox status biomarkers were correlated with phosphorylation of skeletal muscle p38-MAPK, JNK, NF-κB, and IκBα protein content immediately and 3h post-exercise. Plasma catalase activity was greater with SIE (56.6±3.8Uml -1 ) compared to CMIE (42.7±3.2, pexercise plasma TBARS and SOD activity significantly (pexercise protocol. A significant positive correlation was detected between plasma catalase activity and skeletal muscle p38-MAPK phosphorylation 3h post-exercise (r=0.40, p=0.04). No other correlations were detected (all p>0.05). Low-volume SIE elicited greater post-exercise plasma catalase activity compared to HIIE and CMIE, and greater H 2 O 2 compared to CMIE. Plasma redox status did not, however, adequately reflect skeletal muscle redox-sensitive protein signaling. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Fasting Increases Human Skeletal Muscle Net Phenylalanine Release and This Is Associated with Decreased mTOR Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Andreas Buch; Christensen, Britt; Nellemann, Birgitte; Clasen, Berthil Frederik Forrest; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Jørgensen, Jens Otto Lunde; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Aim Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a key regulator of cell growth. Methods Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days. Results Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation. Conclusions Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth. PMID:25020061

  5. Fasting increases human skeletal muscle net phenylalanine release and this is associated with decreased mTOR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikkel Holm Vendelbo

    Full Text Available Fasting is characterised by profound changes in energy metabolism including progressive loss of body proteins. The underlying mechanisms are however unknown and we therefore determined the effects of a 72-hour-fast on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, a key regulator of cell growth.Eight healthy male volunteers were studied twice: in the postabsorptive state and following 72 hours of fasting. Regional muscle amino acid kinetics was measured in the forearm using amino acid tracers. Signaling to protein synthesis and breakdown were assessed in skeletal muscle biopsies obtained during non-insulin and insulin stimulated conditions on both examination days.Fasting significantly increased forearm net phenylalanine release and tended to decrease phenylalanine rate of disappearance. mTOR phosphorylation was decreased by ∼50% following fasting, together with reduced downstream phosphorylation of 4EBP1, ULK1 and rpS6. In addition, the insulin stimulated increase in mTOR and rpS6 phosphorylation was significantly reduced after fasting indicating insulin resistance in this part of the signaling pathway. Autophagy initiation is in part regulated by mTOR through ULK1 and fasting increased expression of the autophagic marker LC3B-II by ∼30%. p62 is degraded during autophagy but was increased by ∼10% during fasting making interpretation of autophagic flux problematic. MAFbx and MURF1 ubiquitin ligases remained unaltered after fasting indicating no change in protesomal protein degradation.Our results show that during fasting increased net phenylalanine release in skeletal muscle is associated to reduced mTOR activation and concomitant decreased downstream signaling to cell growth.

  6. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galtier, F.; Mura, T.; Raynaud de Mauverger, E.; Chevassus, H.; Farret, A.; Gagnol, J.-P.; Costa, F.; Dupuy, A.

    2012-01-01

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca 2+ homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca 2+ spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P 2+ sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca 2+ spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca 2+ spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK increase was associated with alterations in Ca2+ sparks and mitochondrial function.

  7. Anti-skeletal muscle atrophy effect of Oenothera odorata root extract via reactive oxygen species-dependent signaling pathways in cellular and mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Hyeon; Kim, Wan-Joong; Lee, Myung-Hun; Kim, Sun-Young; Seo, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Han-Sung; Gelinsky, Michael; Kim, Tack-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy can be defined as a decrease of muscle volume caused by injury or lack of use. This condition is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in various muscular disorders. We acquired 2D and 3D images using micro-computed tomography in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles of sciatic-denervated mice. We confirmed that sciatic denervation-small animal model reduced muscle volume. However, the intraperitoneal injection of Oenothera odorata root extract (EVP) delayed muscle atrophy compared to a control group. We also investigated the mechanism of muscle atrophy's relationship with ROS. EVP suppressed expression of SOD1, and increased expression of HSP70, in both H2O2-treated C2C12 myoblasts and sciatic-denervated mice. Moreover, EVP regulated apoptotic signals, including caspase-3, Bax, Bcl-2, and ceramide. These results indicate that EVP has a positive effect on reducing the effect of ROS on muscle atrophy.

  8. Racl Signaling Is Required for Insulin-Stimulated Glucose Uptake and Is Dysregulated in Insulin-Resistant Murine and Human Skeletal Muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, L.; Jensen, T. E.; Kleinert, M.

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase Racl is required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation in cultured muscle cells. However, involvement of Racl and its downstream signaling in glucose transport in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant mature skeletal muscle has not previously been i...

  9. IL-6 and IGF-1 signaling within and between muscle and bone: how important is the mTOR pathway for bone metabolism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.D.; Jaspers, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) play an important role in the adaptation of both muscle and bone to mechanical stimuli. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of IL-6 and IGF-1 in bone and muscle metabolism, and the intracellular signaling pathways that are well

  10. IL-6 and IGF-1 Signaling within, and between, Muscle and Bone: How Important is the mTOR Pathway for Bone Metabolism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.D.; Jaspers, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) play an important role in the adaptation of both muscle and bone to mechanical stimuli. Here, we provide an overview of the functions of IL-6 and IGF-1 in bone and muscle metabolism, and the intracellular signaling pathways that are well

  11. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein nell1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culiat, Cymbeline T.

    2018-03-20

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  12. Multiple signalling pathways redundantly control glucose transporter GLUT4 gene transcription in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgia, Marta; Elbenhardt Jensen, Thomas; Cusinato, Marzia

    2009-01-01

    on pharmacological evidence. Here, we have used a more specific genetic approach to establish the relative role of the three pathways in fast and slow muscles. Plasmids coding for protein inhibitors of CaMKII or calcineurin were co-transfected in vivo with a GLUT4 enhancer-reporter construct either in normal mice...... or in mice expressing a dominant negative AMPK mutant. GLUT4 reporter activity was not inhibited in the slow soleus muscle by blocking either CaMKII or calcineurin alone, but was inhibited by blocking both pathways. GLUT4 reporter activity was likewise unchanged in the soleus of dnAMPK mice......, but was significantly reduce by incapacitation of either CaMKII or calcineurin in these mice. On the other hand, in the fast tibialis anterior muscle, calcineurin appears to exert a prominent role in the control of GLUT4 reporter activity, independent of CaMKII and AMPK. The results point to a muscle type...

  13. Methods for promoting wound healing and muscle regeneration with the cell signaling protein Nell1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culiat, Cymbeline T [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-03-22

    The present invention provides methods for promoting wound healing and treating muscle atrophy in a mammal in need. The method comprises administering to the mammal a Nell1 protein or a Nell1 nucleic acid molecule.

  14. Thyroid Hormone Signaling in Male Mouse Skeletal Muscle Is Largely Independent of D2 in Myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneck-de-Castro, Joao P.; Fonseca, Tatiana L.; Ignacio, Daniele L.; Fernandes, Gustavo W.; Andrade-Feraud, Cristina M.; Lartey, Lattoya J.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Ribeiro, Miriam O.; Gereben, Balazs

    2015-01-01

    The type 2 deiodinase (D2) activates the prohormone T4 to T3. D2 is expressed in skeletal muscle (SKM), and its global inactivation (GLOB-D2KO mice) reportedly leads to skeletal muscle hypothyroidism and impaired differentiation. Here floxed Dio2 mice were crossed with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the myosin light chain 1f (cre-MLC) to disrupt D2 expression in the late developmental stages of skeletal myocytes (SKM-D2KO). This led to a loss of approximately 50% in D2 activity in neonatal and adult SKM-D2KO skeletal muscle and about 75% in isolated SKM-D2KO myocytes. To test the impact of Dio2 disruption, we measured soleus T3 content and found it to be normal. We also looked at the expression of T3-responsive genes in skeletal muscle, ie, myosin heavy chain I, α-actin, myosin light chain, tropomyosin, and serca 1 and 2, which was preserved in neonatal SKM-D2KO hindlimb muscles, at a time that coincides with a peak of D2 activity in control animals. In adult soleus the baseline level of D2 activity was about 6-fold lower, and in the SKM-D2KO soleus, the expression of only one of five T3-responsive genes was reduced. Despite this, adult SKM-D2KO animals performed indistinguishably from controls on a treadmill test, running for approximately 16 minutes and reached a speed of about 23 m/min; muscle strength was about 0.3 mN/m·g body weight in SKM-D2KO and control ankle muscles. In conclusion, there are multiple sources of D2 in the mouse SKM, and its role is limited in postnatal skeletal muscle fibers. PMID:26214036

  15. Prior acetaminophen consumption impacts the early adaptive cellular response of human skeletal muscle to resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Lugos, Andrew C; Patel, Shivam H; Ormsby, Jordan C; Curtis, Donald P; Fry, Christopher S; Carroll, Chad C; Dickinson, Jared M

    2018-04-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is a powerful stimulus for skeletal muscle adaptation. Previous data demonstrate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-inhibiting drugs alter the cellular mechanisms regulating the adaptive response of skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine whether prior consumption of the COX inhibitor acetaminophen (APAP) alters the immediate adaptive cellular response in human skeletal muscle after RE. In a double-blinded, randomized, crossover design, healthy young men ( n = 8, 25 ± 1 yr) performed two trials of unilateral knee extension RE (8 sets, 10 reps, 65% max strength). Subjects ingested either APAP (1,000 mg/6 h) or placebo (PLA) for 24 h before RE (final dose consumed immediately after RE). Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis) were collected at rest and 1 h and 3 h after exercise. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 signaling was assessed through immunoblot and immunohistochemistry, and mRNA expression of myogenic genes was examined via RT-qPCR. At 1 h p-rpS6 Ser240/244 was increased in both groups but to a greater extent in PLA. At 3 h p-S6K1 Thr389 was elevated only in PLA. Furthermore, localization of mTOR to the lysosome (LAMP2) in myosin heavy chain (MHC) II fibers increased 3 h after exercise only in PLA. mTOR-LAMP2 colocalization in MHC I fibers was greater in PLA vs. APAP 1 h after exercise. Myostatin mRNA expression was reduced 1 h after exercise only in PLA. MYF6 mRNA expression was increased 1 h and 3 h after exercise only in APAP. APAP consumption appears to alter the early adaptive cellular response of skeletal muscle to RE. These findings further highlight the mechanisms through which COX-inhibiting drugs impact the adaptive response of skeletal muscle to exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The extent to which the cellular reaction to acetaminophen impacts the mechanisms regulating the adaptive response of human skeletal muscle to resistance exercise is not well understood. Consumption of acetaminophen before

  16. High fructose-mediated attenuation of insulin receptor signaling does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Islam; Poulose, Ninu; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Segar, Lakshman

    2016-11-15

    Insulin resistance is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis. Although high fructose is known to induce insulin resistance, it remains unclear as to how fructose regulates insulin receptor signaling and proliferative phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which play a major role in atherosclerosis. Using human aortic VSMCs, we investigated the effects of high fructose treatment on insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serine phosphorylation, insulin versus platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phosphorylation of Akt, S6 ribosomal protein, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cell cycle proteins. In comparison with PDGF (a potent mitogen), neither fructose nor insulin enhanced VSMC proliferation and cyclin D1 expression. d-[ 14 C(U)]fructose uptake studies revealed a progressive increase in fructose uptake in a time-dependent manner. Concentration-dependent studies with high fructose (5-25mM) showed marked increases in IRS-1 serine phosphorylation, a key adapter protein in insulin receptor signaling. Accordingly, high fructose treatment led to significant diminutions in insulin-induced phosphorylation of downstream signaling components including Akt and S6. In addition, high fructose significantly diminished insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation. Nevertheless, high fructose did not affect PDGF-induced key proliferative signaling events including phosphorylation of Akt, S6, and ERK and expression of cyclin D1 protein. Together, high fructose dysregulates IRS-1 phosphorylation state and proximal insulin receptor signaling in VSMCs, but does not affect PDGF-induced proliferative signaling. These findings suggest that systemic insulin resistance rather than VSMC-specific dysregulation of insulin receptor signaling by high fructose may play a major role in enhancing atherosclerosis and neointimal hyperplasia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduced AMPK-ACC and mTOR signaling in muscle from older men, and effect of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengyao; Verdijk, Lex B; Sakamoto, Kei; Ely, Brian; van Loon, Luc J C; Musi, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key energy-sensitive enzyme that controls numerous metabolic and cellular processes. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is another energy/nutrient-sensitive kinase that controls protein synthesis and cell growth. In this study we determined whether older versus younger men have alterations in the AMPK and mTOR pathways in skeletal muscle, and examined the effect of a long term resistance type exercise training program on these signaling intermediaries. Older men had decreased AMPKα2 activity and lower phosphorylation of AMPK and its downstream signaling substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). mTOR phosphylation also was reduced in muscle from older men. Exercise training increased AMPKα1 activity in older men, however, AMPKα2 activity, and the phosphorylation of AMPK, ACC and mTOR, were not affected. In conclusion, older men have alterations in the AMPK-ACC and mTOR pathways in muscle. In addition, prolonged resistance type exercise training induces an isoform-selective up regulation of AMPK activity. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. The Effect of Physiological Stimuli on Sarcopenia; Impact of Notch and Wnt Signaling on Impaired Aged Skeletal Muscle Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Susan Tsivitse; Cooley, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function that is associated with sarcopenia can result in ultimate consequences such as decreased quality of life. The causes of sarcopenia are multifactorial and include environmental and biological factors. The purpose of this review is to synthesize what the literature reveals in regards to the cellular regulation of sarcopenia, including impaired muscle regenerative capacity in the aged, and to discuss if physiological stimuli have the potential to slow the loss of myogenic potential that is associated with sarcopenia. In addition, this review article will discuss the effect of aging on Notch and Wnt signaling, and whether physiological stimuli have the ability to restore Notch and Wnt signaling resulting in rejuvenated aged muscle repair. The intention of this summary is to bring awareness to the benefits of consistent physiological stimulus (exercise) to combating sarcopenia as well as proclaiming the usefulness of contraction-induced injury models to studying the effects of local and systemic influences on aged myogenic capability. PMID:22701343

  19. Multi-tasking role of the mechanosensing protein Ankrd2 in the signaling network of striated muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Belgrano

    Full Text Available Ankrd2 (also known as Arpp together with Ankrd1/CARP and DARP are members of the MARP mechanosensing proteins that form a complex with titin (N2A/calpain 3 protease/myopalladin. In muscle, Ankrd2 is located in the I-band of the sarcomere and moves to the nucleus of adjacent myofibers on muscle injury. In myoblasts it is predominantly in the nucleus and on differentiation shifts from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In agreement with its role as a sensor it interacts both with sarcomeric proteins and transcription factors.Expression profiling of endogenous Ankrd2 silenced in human myotubes was undertaken to elucidate its role as an intermediary in cell signaling pathways. Silencing Ankrd2 expression altered the expression of genes involved in both intercellular communication (cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, endocytosis, focal adhesion, tight junction, gap junction and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and intracellular communication (calcium, insulin, MAPK, p53, TGF-β and Wnt signaling. The significance of Ankrd2 in cell signaling was strengthened by the fact that we were able to show for the first time that Nkx2.5 and p53 are upstream effectors of the Ankrd2 gene and that Ankrd1/CARP, another MARP member, can modulate the transcriptional ability of MyoD on the Ankrd2 promoter. Another novel finding was the interaction between Ankrd2 and proteins with PDZ and SH3 domains, further supporting its role in signaling. It is noteworthy that we demonstrated that transcription factors PAX6, LHX2, NFIL3 and MECP2, were able to bind both the Ankrd2 protein and its promoter indicating the presence of a regulatory feedback loop mechanism.In conclusion we demonstrate that Ankrd2 is a potent regulator in muscle cells affecting a multitude of pathways and processes.

  20. Citrulline directly modulates muscle protein synthesis via the PI3K/MAPK/4E-BP1 pathway in a malnourished state: evidence from in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Plénier, Servane; Goron, Arthur; Sotiropoulos, Athanassia; Archambault, Eliane; Guihenneuc, Chantal; Walrand, Stéphane; Salles, Jérome; Jourdan, Marion; Neveux, Nathalie; Cynober, Luc; Moinard, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Citrulline (CIT) is an endogenous amino acid produced by the intestine. Recent literature has consistently shown CIT to be an activator of muscle protein synthesis (MPS). However, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. Our working hypothesis was that CIT might regulate muscle homeostasis directly through the mTORC1/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Because CIT undergoes both interorgan and intraorgan trafficking and metabolism, we combined three approaches: in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. Using a model of malnourished aged rats, CIT supplementation activated the phosphorylation of S6K1 and 4E-BP1 in muscle. Interestingly, the increase in S6K1 phosphorylation was positively correlated (P < 0.05) with plasma CIT concentration. In a model of isolated incubated skeletal muscle from malnourished rats, CIT enhanced MPS (from 30 to 80% CIT vs. Ctrl, P < 0.05), and the CIT effect was abolished in the presence of wortmannin, rapamycin, and PD-98059. In vitro, on myotubes in culture, CIT led to a 2.5-fold increase in S6K1 phosphorylation and a 1.5-fold increase in 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Both rapamycin and PD-98059 inhibited the CIT effect on S6K1, whereas only LY-294002 inhibited the CIT effect on both S6K1 and 4E-BP1. These findings show that CIT is a signaling agent for muscle homeostasis, suggesting a new role of the intestine in muscle mass control. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Insulin signal transduction in skeletal muscle from glucose-intolerant relatives of type 2 diabetic patients [corrected

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, H; Song, X M; Jensen, C B

    2001-01-01

    before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. IGT relatives were insulin-resistant in oxidative and nonoxidative pathways for glucose metabolism. In vivo insulin infusion increased skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) tyrosine phosphorylation (P = 0.01) and phosphatidylinositide......To determine whether defects in the insulin signal transduction cascade are present in skeletal muscle from prediabetic individuals, we excised biopsies from eight glucose-intolerant male first-degree relatives of patients with type 2 diabetes (IGT relatives) and nine matched control subjects...... 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) activity (phosphotyrosine and IRS-1 associated) in control subjects (P increase in insulin action on IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation was lower in IGT relatives versus control subjects (P

  2. Effect of birth weight and 12 weeks of exercise training on exercise-induced AMPK signaling in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Hingst, Janne Rasmuss; Frederiksen, Nicklas

    2013-01-01

    . We investigated 21 LBW and 21 normal birth weight (NBW) subjects during 1 hour of acute exercise performed at the same relative workload before and after 12 weeks of exercise training. Multiple skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained before and after exercise. Protein levels and phosphorylation status......Subjects with a low birth weight (LBW) display increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). We hypothesized that this is associated with defects in muscle adaptations following acute and regular physical activity, evident by impairments in the exercise-induced activation of AMPK signaling...... were determined by Western blotting. AMPK activities were measured using activity assays. Protein levels of AMPK isoforms a1 and ¿1 were significantly increased while ¿3 levels decreased with training independent of group. The LBW group had higher exercise-induced AMPK Thr(172) phosphorylation before...

  3. Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Friedrichsen, Martin; Andersen, Nicoline Resen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects.......We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects....

  4. RNA Sequencing Identifies Upregulated Kyphoscoliosis Peptidase and Phosphatidic Acid Signaling Pathways in Muscle Hypertrophy Generated by Transgenic Expression of Myostatin Propeptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanxin Miao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin (MSTN, a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph, and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24. In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky, which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4 were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  5. RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

    2015-04-09

    Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition.

  6. Evidence towards improved estimation of respiratory muscle effort from diaphragm mechanomyographic signals with cardiac vibration interference using sample entropy with fixed tolerance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Sarlabous

    Full Text Available The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn, that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference.

  7. Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein Interacts with Thioesterase Superfamily Member 2 to Attenuate Insulin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Baran A.; Tarun, Akansha; D’Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J.; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F.; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D.; Cohen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenc...

  8. PARP-1 modulation of mTOR signaling in response to a DNA alkylating agent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Ethier

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is widely involved in cell death responses. Depending on the degree of injury and on cell type, PARP activation may lead to autophagy, apoptosis or necrosis. In HEK293 cells exposed to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanine (MNNG, we show that PARP-1 activation triggers a necrotic cell death response. The massive poly(ADP-ribose (PAR synthesis following PARP-1 activation leads to the modulation of mTORC1 pathway. Shortly after MNNG exposure, NAD⁺ and ATP levels decrease, while AMP levels drastically increase. We characterized at the molecular level the consequences of these altered nucleotide levels. First, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is activated and the mTORC1 pathway is inhibited by the phosphorylation of Raptor, in an attempt to preserve cellular energy. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 target S6 is decreased as well as the phosphorylation of the mTORC2 component Rictor on Thr1135. Finally, Akt phosphorylation on Ser473 is lost and then, cell death by necrosis occurs. Inhibition of PARP-1 with the potent PARP inhibitor AG14361 prevents all of these events. Moreover, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC can also abrogate all the signaling events caused by MNNG exposure suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS production is involved in PARP-1 activation and modulation of mTOR signaling. In this study, we show that PARP-1 activation and PAR synthesis affect the energetic status of cells, inhibit the mTORC1 signaling pathway and possibly modulate the mTORC2 complex affecting cell fate. These results provide new evidence that cell death by necrosis is orchestrated by the balance between several signaling pathways, and that PARP-1 and PAR take part in these events.

  9. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Fluckey, James D; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2017-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and associated cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms are undefined in the lymphatics. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels from MetSyn or LPS-injected rats exhibited impaired intrinsic contractile activity and associated inflammatory changes. Hence, we hypothesized that insulin resistance in lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) affects cell bioenergetics and signaling pathways that consequently alter contractility. LMCs were treated with different concentrations of insulin or glucose or both at various time points to determine insulin resistance. Onset of insulin resistance significantly impaired glucose uptake, mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates, glycolysis, lactic acid, and ATP production in LMCs. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia also impaired the PI3K/Akt while enhancing the ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathways in LMCs. Increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and VCAM-1 levels in insulin-resistant LMCs indicated activation of inflammatory mechanisms. In addition, increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain-20, a key regulator of lymphatic muscle contraction, was observed in insulin-resistant LMCs. Therefore, our data elucidate the mechanisms of insulin resistance in LMCs and provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia promote insulin resistance and impair lymphatic contractile status by reducing glucose uptake, altering cellular metabolic pathways, and activating inflammatory signaling cascades.-Lee, Y., Fluckey, J. D., Chakraborty, S., Muthuchamy, M. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle. © FASEB.

  10. Akt and Rac1 signalling are jointly required for insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and downregulated in insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylow, Lykke; Kleinert, Maximilian; Pehmøller, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle plays a major role in regulating whole body glucose metabolism. Akt and Rac1 are important regulators of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. However the relative role of each pathway and how they interact is not understood. Here we delineate how Akt and Rac1...... pathways signal to increase glucose transport independently of each other and are simultaneously downregulated in insulin resistant muscle. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 and Akt signalling was used to determine the contribution of each pathway to insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscles....... The actin filament-depolymerizing agent LatrunculinB was combined with pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 or Akt, to examine whether either pathway mediates its effect via the actin cytoskeleton. Akt and Rac1 signalling were investigated under each condition, as well as upon Akt2 knockout and in ob/ob mice...

  11. Labor Inhibits Placental Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAGER, Susanne; AYE, Irving L.M.H.; GACCIOLI, Francesca; RAMIREZ, Vanessa I.; JANSSON, Thomas; POWELL, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Labor induces a myriad of changes in placental gene expression. These changes may represent a physiological adaptation inhibiting placental cellular processes associated with a high demand for oxygen and energy (e.g., protein synthesis and active transport) thereby promoting oxygen and glucose transfer to the fetus. We hypothesized that mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, a positive regulator of trophoblast protein synthesis and amino acid transport, is inhibited by labor. Methods Placental tissue was collected from healthy, term pregnancies (n=15 no-labor; n=12 labor). Activation of Caspase-1, IRS1/Akt, STAT, mTOR, and inflammatory signaling pathways was determined by Western blot. NFκB p65 and PPARγ DNA binding activity was measured in isolated nuclei. Results Labor increased Caspase-1 activation and mTOR complex 2 signaling, as measured by phosphorylation of Akt (S473). However, mTORC1 signaling was inhibited in response to labor as evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of mTOR (S2448) and 4EBP1 (T37/46 and T70). Labor also decreased NFκB and PPARγ DNA binding activity, while having no effect on IRS1 or STAT signaling pathway. Discussion and conclusion Several placental signaling pathways are affected by labor, which has implications for experimental design in studies of placental signaling. Inhibition of placental mTORC1 signaling in response to labor may serve to down-regulate protein synthesis and amino acid transport, processes that account for a large share of placental oxygen and glucose consumption. We speculate that this response preserves glucose and oxygen for transfer to the fetus during the stressful events of labor. PMID:25454472

  12. mTORC2 and AMPK differentially regulate muscle triglyceride content via Perilipin 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Parker, Benjamin L; Chaudhuri, Rima

    2016-01-01

    culture. RESULTS: Ric mKO mice exhibited a greater reliance on fat as an energy substrate, a re-partitioning of lean to fat mass and an increase in intramyocellular triglyceride (IMTG) content, along with increases in several lipid metabolites in muscle. Unbiased proteomics revealed an increase......OBJECTIVE: We have recently shown that acute inhibition of both mTOR complexes (mTORC1 and mTORC2) increases whole-body lipid utilization, while mTORC1 inhibition had no effect. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that mTORC2 regulates lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle. METHODS: Body composition...... in the expression of the lipid droplet binding protein Perilipin 3 (PLIN3) in muscle from Ric mKO mice. This was associated with increased AMPK activity in Ric mKO muscle. Reducing AMPK kinase activity decreased muscle PLIN3 expression and IMTG content. AMPK agonism, in turn, increased PLIN3 expression in a FoxO1...

  13. Skeletal muscle signaling and the heart rate and blood pressure response to exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Svendsen, Jesper H; Ersbøll, Mads

    2013-01-01

    Endurance training lowers heart rate and blood pressure responses to exercise, but the mechanisms and consequences remain unclear. To determine the role of skeletal muscle for the cardioventilatory response to exercise, 8 healthy young men were studied before and after 5 weeks of 1-legged knee-ex...... was ≈ 15 bpm lower during exercise with the trained leg (P...

  14. Oxytocin receptors expressed and coupled to Ca2+ signalling in a human vascular smooth muscle cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, H; Hirasawa, A; Horie, K; Saita, Y; Iida, E; Honda, K; Tsujimoto, G

    1996-03-01

    1. In a human vascular smooth muscle cell line (HVSMC), binding experiments with [3H]-arginine8-vasopressin (AVP) have shown the existence of a homogeneous population of binding sites with affinity (Kd value) of 0.65 nM and a maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 122 fmol mg-1 protein. 2. Nonlabelled compounds compete for [3H]-AVP binding in the HVSMC membrane with an order of potency of oxytocin > lyspressin > or = AVP > Thr4, Gly7-oxytocin > (beta-mercapto-beta-beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl-O-Me Tyr2, Arg8) vasopressin > desmopressin > OPC21268 > OPC31260. This order was markedly different from that observed in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (A10), a well-established V1A receptor system. 3. In HVSMC both oxytocin and AVP increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production and [Ca2+]i response, but the efficacy of the responses was greater for oxytocin than AVP. 4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay detected only oxytocin receptor but not V1A or V2 receptors in HVSMC, whereas only V1A receptors were found in A10 cells. 5. In conclusion, in HVSMC only oxytocin receptors are expressed among the vasopressin receptor family, and they coupled to phosphatidyl inositol (PI) turnover/Ca2+ signalling. This unexpected observation should provide new insight into the functional role of the oxytocin receptor in a human vascular smooth muscle cell line.

  15. High concentration of branched-chain amino acids promotes oxidative stress, inflammation and migration of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via mTORC1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenyukh, Olha; Civantos, Esther; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Sánchez, Maria Soledad; Vázquez, Clotilde; Peiró, Concepción; Egido, Jesús; Mas, Sebastián

    2017-03-01

    Leucine, isoleucine and valine are essential aminoacids termed branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) due to its aliphatic side-chain. In several pathological and physiological conditions increased BCAA plasma concentrations have been described. Elevated BCAA levels predict insulin resistance development. Moreover, BCAA levels higher than 2mmol/L are neurotoxic by inducing microglial activation in maple syrup urine disease. However, there are no studies about the direct effects of BCAA in circulating cells. We have explored whether BCAA could promote oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. In cultured PBMCs, 10mmol/L BCAA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via both NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria, and activated Akt-mTOR signalling. By using several inhibitors and activators of these molecular pathways we have described that mTOR activation by BCAA is linked to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. BCAA stimulated the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB, which resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 or CD40L, and the migration of PBMCs. In conclusion, elevated BCAA blood levels can promote the activation of circulating PBMCs, by a mechanism that involving ROS production and NF-κB pathway activation. These data suggest that high concentrations of BCAA could exert deleterious effects on circulating blood cells and therefore contribute to the pro-inflammatory and oxidative status observed in several pathophysiological conditions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Acylcarnitines as markers of exercise-associated fuel partitioning, xenometabolism, and potential signals to muscle afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Light, Alan R; Hoppel, Charles L; Campbell, Caitlin; Chandler, Carol J; Burnett, Dustin J; Souza, Elaine C; Casazza, Gretchen A; Hughen, Ronald W; Keim, Nancy L; Newman, John W; Hunter, Gary R; Fernandez, Jose R; Garvey, W Timothy; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Fiehn, Oliver; Adams, Sean H

    2017-01-01

    that a weight-loss/fitness intervention alters plasma xenometabolites [i.e. cis-3,4-methylene-heptanoylcarnitine and γ-butyrobetaine (a co-metabolite possibly derived in part from gut bacteria)], suggesting that host metabolic health regulated gut microbe metabolism. Finally, we considered whether acylcarnitine metabolites signal to muscle-innervating afferents; palmitoylcarnitine at concentrations as low as 1-10 μm activated a subset (∼2.5-5%) of these neurons ex vivo. This supports the hypothesis that in addition to tracking exercise-associated shifts in fuel metabolism, muscle acylcarnitines act as signals of exertion to short-loop somatosensory-motor circuits or to the brain. © 2016 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  17. Reversal of muscle atrophy by Zhimu and Huangbai herb pair via activation of IGF-1/Akt and autophagy signal in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Pengwei; Zhang, Jinbao; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Mixia; Song, Lili; Lu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Fengqi; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Yanjun; Wei, Hongjun; Li, Hongyan

    2016-03-01

    Muscle atrophy is the prominent clinical feature of cancer-induced cachexia. Zhimu and Huangbai herb pair (ZBHP) has been used since ancient China times and have been phytochemically investigated for constituents that might cause anti-cancer, diabetes, and their complication. In this study, the effects and mechanisms of ZBHP on reversal of muscle atrophy were explored. C57BL/6 mice implanted with colon-26 adenocarcinoma were chosen to develop cancer cachexia for evaluating the effects of ZBHP on reversal of muscle atrophy. The body weight, survival time, inflammatory cytokines, and pathological changes of muscle were monitored. In addition, IGF-1/Akt and autophagy pathway members were analyzed to interpret the mechanism of drug response. The function and morphology of skeletal muscle in cachexia model were significantly disturbed, and the survival time was shortened. Consistently, inflammatory cytokines and muscle atrophy-related atrogin-1, MuRF1, and FOXO3 were significantly increased, and IGF-1/Akt and autophagy signal pathways were depressed. Treatment with ZBHP significantly alleviated tumor-free body weight reduction and cachexia-induced changes in cytokines and prolonged survival. ZBHP treatment not only inhibited the muscle atrophy-related genes but also activated the IGF-1/Akt and autophagy signal pathways to facilitate the protein synthesis. The results revealed that ZBHP treatment could inhibit the muscle atrophy induced by cancer cachexia and prolong the survival time, and ZBHP may be of value as a pharmacological alternative in treatment of cancer cachexia.

  18. Effect of a high dose of simvastatin on muscle mitochondrial metabolism and calcium signaling in healthy volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtier, F., E-mail: f-galtier@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); CPID, Faculté de Pharmacie, 15 Av. Charles Flahault, BP 14491, 34093 Montpellier Cedex 5, Montpellier (France); Mura, T., E-mail: t-mura@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Raynaud de Mauverger, E., E-mail: eric.raynaud-de-mauverger@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Université Montpellier 1, 5 bd Henri IV CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier Cedex 2 (France); Université Montpellier 2, Place Eugène Bataillon, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, U1046, 371 Avenue du Doyen G. Giraud, CHU Arnaud de Villeneuve, Bâtiment INSERM Crastes de Paulet, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Chevassus, H., E-mail: h-chevassus@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Farret, A., E-mail: a-farret@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Gagnol, J.-P., E-mail: jp-gagnol@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Costa, F., E-mail: francoisecosta@sfr.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); INSERM, CIC 1001, 80 Avenue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Dupuy, A., E-mail: am-dupuy@chu-montpellier.fr [CHRU Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); and others

    2012-09-15

    Statin use may be limited by muscle side effects. Although incompletely understood to date, their pathophysiology may involve oxidative stress and impairments of mitochondrial function and of muscle Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis. In order to simultaneously assess these mechanisms, 24 male healthy volunteers were randomized to receive either simvastatin for 80 mg daily or placebo for 8 weeks. Blood and urine samples and a stress test were performed at baseline and at follow-up, and mitochondrial respiration and Ca{sup 2+} spark properties were evaluated on a muscle biopsy 4 days before the second stress test. Simvastatin-treated subjects were separated according to their median creatine kinase (CK) increase. Simvastatin treatment induced a significant elevation of aspartate amino transferase (3.38 ± 5.68 vs − 1.15 ± 4.32 UI/L, P < 0.001) and CK (− 24.3 ± 99.1 ± 189.3vs 48.3 UI/L, P = 0.01) and a trend to an elevation of isoprostanes (193 ± 408 vs12 ± 53 pmol/mmol creatinine, P = 0.09) with no global change in mitochondrial respiration, lactate/pyruvate ratio or Ca{sup 2+} sparks. However, among statin-treated subjects, those with the highest CK increase displayed a significantly lower Vmax rotenone succinate and an increase in Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude vs both subjects with the lowest CK increase and placebo-treated subjects. Moreover, Ca{sup 2+} spark amplitude was positively correlated with treatment-induced CK increase in the whole group (r = 0.71, P = 0.0045). In conclusion, this study further supports that statin induced muscular toxicity may be related to alterations in mitochondrial respiration and muscle calcium homeostasis independently of underlying disease or concomitant medication. -- Highlights: ► Statin use may be limited by side effects, particularly myopathy. ► Statins might impair mitochondrial function and muscle Ca2+ signaling in muscle. ► This was tested among healthy volunteers receiving simvastatin 80 mg daily for 8 weeks. ► CK

  19. Nicotine signals through muscle-type and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in both human bronchial epithelial cells and airway fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luketich James D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-neuronal cells, including those derived from lung, are reported to express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR. We examined nAChR subunit expression in short-term cultures of human airway cells derived from a series of never smokers, ex-smokers, and active smokers. Methods and Results At the mRNA level, human bronchial epithelial (HBE cells and airway fibroblasts expressed a range of nAChR subunits. In multiple cultures of both cell types, mRNA was detected for subunits that constitute functional muscle-type and neuronal-type pentomeric receptors. Two immortalized cell lines derived from HBE cells also expressed muscle-type and neuronal-type nAChR subunits. Airway fibroblasts expressed mRNA for three muscle-type subunits (α1, δ, and ε significantly more often than HBE cells. Immunoblotting of HBE cell and airway fibroblast extracts confirmed that mRNA for many nAChR subunits is translated into detectable levels of protein, and evidence of glycosylation of nAChRs was observed. Some minor differences in nAChR expression were found based on smoking status in fibroblasts or HBE cells. Nicotine triggered calcium influx in the immortalized HBE cell line BEAS2B, which was blocked by α-bungarotoxin and to a lesser extent by hexamethonium. Activation of PKC and MAPK p38, but not MAPK p42/44, was observed in BEAS2B cells exposed to nicotine. In contrast, nicotine could activate p42/44 in airway fibroblasts within five minutes of exposure. Conclusions These results suggest that muscle-type and neuronal-type nAChRs are functional in airway fibroblasts and HBE cells, that prior tobacco exposure does not appear to be an important variable in nAChR expression, and that distinct signaling pathways are observed in response to nicotine.

  20. TIF-IA-dependent regulation of ribosome synthesis in drosophila muscle is required to maintain systemic insulin signaling and larval growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Ghosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The conserved TOR kinase signaling network links nutrient availability to cell, tissue and body growth in animals. One important growth-regulatory target of TOR signaling is ribosome biogenesis. Studies in yeast and mammalian cell culture have described how TOR controls rRNA synthesis-a limiting step in ribosome biogenesis-via the RNA Polymerase I transcription factor TIF-IA. However, the contribution of TOR-dependent ribosome synthesis to tissue and body growth in animals is less clear. Here we show in Drosophila larvae that ribosome synthesis in muscle is required non-autonomously to maintain normal body growth and development. We find that amino acid starvation and TOR inhibition lead to reduced levels of TIF-IA, and decreased rRNA synthesis in larval muscle. When we mimic this decrease in muscle ribosome synthesis using RNAi-mediated knockdown of TIF-IA, we observe delayed larval development and reduced body growth. This reduction in growth is caused by lowered systemic insulin signaling via two endocrine responses: reduced expression of Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs from the brain and increased expression of Imp-L2-a secreted factor that binds and inhibits dILP activity-from muscle. We also observed that maintaining TIF-IA levels in muscle could partially reverse the starvation-mediated suppression of systemic insulin signaling. Finally, we show that activation of TOR specifically in muscle can increase overall body size and this effect requires TIF-IA function. These data suggest that muscle ribosome synthesis functions as a nutrient-dependent checkpoint for overall body growth: in nutrient rich conditions, TOR is required to maintain levels of TIF-IA and ribosome synthesis to promote high levels of systemic insulin, but under conditions of starvation stress, reduced muscle ribosome synthesis triggers an endocrine response that limits systemic insulin signaling to restrict growth and maintain homeostasis.

  1. Effect of Peroral Administration of Chromium on Insulin Signaling Pathway in Skeletal Muscle Tissue of Holstein Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Ljubomir; Pantelić, Marija; Prodanović, Radiša; Vujanac, Ivan; Đurić, Miloje; Tepavčević, Snežana; Vranješ-Đurić, Sanja; Korićanac, Goran; Kirovski, Danijela

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of peroral administration of chromium-enriched yeast on glucose tolerance in Holstein calves, assessed by insulin signaling pathway molecule determination and intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT). Twenty-four Holstein calves, aged 1 month, were chosen for the study and divided into two groups: the PoCr group (n = 12) that perorally received 0.04 mg of Cr/kg of body mass daily, for 70 days, and the NCr group (n = 12) that received no chromium supplementation. Skeletal tissue samples from each calf were obtained on day 0 and day 70 of the experiment. Chromium supplementation increased protein content of the insulin β-subunit receptor, phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 at Tyrosine 632, phosphorylation of Akt at Serine 473, glucose transporter-4, and AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle tissue, while phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 at Serine 307 was not affected by chromium treatment. Results obtained during IVGTT, which was conducted on days 0, 30, 50, and 70, suggested an increased insulin sensitivity and, consequently, a better utilization of glucose in the PoCr group. Lower basal concentrations of glucose and insulin in the PoCr group on days 30 and 70 were also obtained. Our results indicate that chromium supplementation improves glucose utilization in calves by enhancing insulin intracellular signaling in the skeletal muscle tissue.

  2. PM2.5 promotes human bronchial smooth muscle cell migration via the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiuqin; Hong, Wei; Hao, Binwei; Peng, Gongyong; Huang, Lingmei; Zhao, Zhuxiang; Zhou, Yumin; Zheng, Mengning; Li, Chenglong; Liang, Chunxiao; Yi, Erkang; Pu, Jinding; Li, Bing; Ran, Pixin

    2018-03-02

    The contribution of airway remodeling in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been well documented, with airway smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration playing a role in the remodeling process. Here, we aimed to verify the effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) on human bronchial smooth muscle cell (HBSMC) migration and to explore the underlying signaling pathways. HBSMC apoptosis, proliferation and migration were measured using flow cytometry, cell counting and transwell migration assays, respectively. The role of the hedgehog pathway in cell migration was assessed by western blotting to measure the expression of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Gli1 and Snail. Furthermore, siRNA was used to knock down Gli1 or Snail expression. PM2.5 induced HBSMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, although certain concentrations of PM2.5 did not induce HBSMC proliferation or apoptosis. Interestingly, cell migration was stimulated by PM2.5 doses far below those that induced apoptosis. Additional experiments revealed that these PM2.5 doses enhanced the expression of Shh, Gli1 and Snail in HBSMCs. Furthermore, PM2.5-induced cell migration and protein expression were enhanced by recombinant Shh and attenuated by cyclopamine. Similar results were obtained by knocking down Gli1 or Snail. These findings suggest that PM2.5, which may exert its effects through the Shh signaling pathway, is necessary for the migration of HBSMCs. These data define a novel role for PM2.5 in airway remodeling in COPD.

  3. Skeletal muscle wasting with disuse atrophy is multi-dimensional: the response and interaction of myonuclei, satellite cells and signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Elisabeth Brooks

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of skeletal muscle is essential for health and survival. There are marked losses of skeletal muscle mass as well as strength and physiological function under conditions of low mechanical load, such as space flight, as well as ground based models such as bed rest, immobilisation, disuse and various animal models. Disuse atrophy is caused by mechanical unloading of muscle and this leads to reduced muscle mass without fibre attrition. Skeletal muscle stem cells (satellite cells and myonuclei are integrally involved in skeletal muscle responses to environmental changes that induce atrophy. Myonuclear domain size is influenced differently in fast and slow twitch muscle, but also by different models of muscle wasting, a factor that is not yet understood. Although the myonuclear domain is 3-dimensional this is rarely considered. Apoptosis as a mechanism for myonuclear loss with atrophy is controversial, whereas cell death of satellite cells has not been considered. Molecular signals such as myostatin/SMAD pathway, MAFbx and MuRF1 E3 ligases of the ubiquitin proteasome pathway and IGF1-AKT-mTOR pathway are 3 distinctly different contributors to skeletal muscle protein adaptation to disuse. Molecular signalling pathways activated in muscle fibres by disuse are rarely considered within satellite cells themselves despite similar exposure to unloading or low mechanical load. These molecular pathways interact with each other during atrophy and also when various interventions are applied that could alleviate atrophy. Re-applying mechanical load is an obvious method to restore muscle mass, however how nutrient supplementation (e.g. amino acids may further enhance recovery (or reduce atrophy despite unloading or ageing is currently of great interest. Satellite cells are particularly responsive to myostatin and to growth factors. Recently, the hibernating squirrel has been identified as an innovative model to study resistance to atrophy.

  4. GH signaling in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue in healthy human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Poul Frølund; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Pedersen, Steen Bønnelykke

    2014-01-01

    in women when compared with men (P=0.01). IGF1, SOCS1, SOCS2, SOCS3, and CISH mRNA expression increased significantly in muscle after 120 min in all subjects with no impact of age and gender. GH-induced pSTAT5b correlated inversely with lean body mass (LBM; r=-0.56, P=0.01) and positively with the CISH m...

  5. Androgen receptor and nutrient signaling pathways coordinate the demand for increased amino acid transport during prostate cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Bailey, Charles G; Ng, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    was sufficient to decrease cell growth and mTORC1 signaling in prostate cancer cells. These cells maintained levels of amino acid influx through androgen receptor-mediated regulation of LAT3 expression and ATF4 regulation of LAT1 expression after amino acid deprivation. These responses remained intact in primary......L-Type amino acid transporters such as LAT1 and LAT3 mediate the uptake of essential amino acids. Here, we report that prostate cancer cells coordinate the expression of LAT1 and LAT3 to maintain sufficient levels of leucine needed for mTORC1 signaling and cell growth. Inhibiting LAT function...... prostate cancer, as indicated by high levels of LAT3 in primary disease, and by increased levels of LAT1 after hormone ablation and in metastatic lesions. Taken together, our results show how prostate cancer cells respond to demands for increased essential amino acids by coordinately activating amino acid...

  6. Diminished skeletal muscle microRNA expression with aging is associated with attenuated muscle plasticity and inhibition of IGF-1 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Older individuals have a reduced capacity to induce muscle hypertrophy with resistance exercise (RE), which may contribute to the age-induced loss of muscle mass and function, sarcopenia. We tested the novel hypothesis that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) may contribute to reduced muscle plastic...

  7. Phenothiourea sensitizes zebrafish cranial neural crest and extraocular muscle development to changes in retinoic acid and IGF signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda L Bohnsack

    Full Text Available 1-Phenyl 2-thiourea (PTU is a tyrosinase inhibitor commonly used to block pigmentation and aid visualization of zebrafish development. At the standard concentration of 0.003% (200 µM, PTU inhibits melanogenesis and reportedly has minimal other effects on zebrafish embryogenesis. We found that 0.003% PTU altered retinoic acid and insulin-like growth factor (IGF regulation of neural crest and mesodermal components of craniofacial development. Reduction of retinoic acid synthesis by the pan-aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor diethylbenzaldehyde, only when combined with 0.003% PTU, resulted in extraocular muscle disorganization. PTU also decreased retinoic acid-induced teratogenic effects on pharyngeal arch and jaw cartilage despite morphologically normal appearing PTU-treated controls. Furthermore, 0.003% PTU in combination with inhibition of IGF signaling through either morpholino knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of tyrosine kinase receptor phosphorylation, disrupted jaw development and extraocular muscle organization. PTU in and of itself inhibited neural crest development at higher concentrations (0.03% and had the greatest inhibitory effect when added prior to 22 hours post fertilization (hpf. Addition of 0.003% PTU between 4 and 20 hpf decreased thyroxine (T4 in thyroid follicles in the nasopharynx of 96 hpf embryos. Treatment with exogenous triiodothyronine (T3 and T4 improved, but did not completely rescue, PTU-induced neural crest defects. Thus, PTU should be used with caution when studying zebrafish embryogenesis as it alters the threshold of different signaling pathways important during craniofacial development. The effects of PTU on neural crest development are partially caused by thyroid hormone signaling.

  8. Potentiation of cGMP signaling increases oxygen delivery and oxidative metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle of older but not young humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Egelund, Jon

    2015-01-01

    regulation remain unresolved. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is one of the main second messengers that mediate smooth muscle vasodilation and alterations in cGMP signaling could, therefore, be one mechanism by which skeletal muscle perfusion is impaired with advancing age. The current study aimed...... to evaluate the effect of inhibiting the main enzyme involved in cGMP degradation, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), on blood flow and O2 delivery in contracting skeletal muscle of young and older humans. A group of young (23 ± 1 years) and a group of older (72 ± 2 years) male human subjects performed submaximal...... in the older subjects correlated with the increase in leg O2 uptake (r (2) = 0.843). These findings suggest an insufficient O2 delivery to the contracting skeletal muscle of aged individuals and that reduced cGMP availability is a novel mechanism underlying impaired skeletal muscle perfusion with advancing age....

  9. Protective Effects of Sonic Hedgehog Against Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury in Mouse Skeletal Muscle via AKT/mTOR/p70S6K Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Zeng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Skeletal muscle ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is a common and severe disease. Sonic hedgehog (Shh plays a critical role in post-natal skeletal muscle regeneration. In the present study, the role of Shh in skeletal muscle I/R injury and the mechanisms involved were investigated. Methods: The expression of Shh, AKT/mTOR/p70S6K and apoptosis pathway components were evaluated following tourniquet-induced skeletal muscle I/R injury. Then, mice were subjected to systemic administration of cyclopamine or one-shot treatment of a plasmid encoding the human Shh gene (phShh to examine the effects of Shh on I/R injury. Moreover, mice were subjected to systemic administration of NVP-BEZ235 to investigate the role of the AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathway in Shh-triggered skeletal muscle protection. Results: We found that the levels of Shh, AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathway components and Cleaved Caspase 3 and the Bax/Bcl2 ratio initially increased and then decreased at different time points post-I/R injury. Moreover, Shh protected skeletal muscle against I/R injury by alleviating muscle destruction, reducing interstitial fibrosis and inhibiting apoptosis, and these protective effects were abrogated when the AKT/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was inhibited. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that Shh signaling exerts a protective role through the AKT/mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway during skeletal muscle I/R injury. Thus, Shh signaling may be a therapeutic target for protecting skeletal muscle from I/R injury.

  10. Effect of emodin on mobility signal transduction system of gallbladder smooth muscle in Guinea pig with cholelithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bang-Jiang; Shen, Jun-Yi; Zhang, Hua; Zhou, Shuang; Lyu, Chuan-Zhu; Xie, Yi-Qiang

    2016-10-01

    To study the effect of emodin on protein and gene expressions of the massagers in mobility signal transduction system of cholecyst smooth muscle cells in guinea pig with cholesterol calculus. The guinea pigs were randomly divided into 4 groups, such as control group, gall-stone (GS) group, emodin group and ursodeoxycholic acid (UA) group. Cholesterol calculus models were induced in guinea pigs of GS, emodin and UA groups by lithogenic diet, while emodin or UA were given to the corresponding group for 7 weeks. The histomorphological and ultrastructure change of gallbladder were detected by microscope and electron microscope, the content of plasma cholecystokinin (CCK) and [Ca 2+ ] i were analyzed successively by radioimmunoassay and flow cytometry. The protein and mRNA of Gsα, Giα and Cap in cholecyst cells were determined by western blotting and real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Emodin or UA can relieve pathogenic changes in epithelial cells and muscle cells in gallbladder of guinea pig with cholesterol calculus by microscope and transmission electron microscope. In the cholecyst cells of GS group, CCK levels in plasma and [Ca 2+ ] i decreased, the protein and mRNA of GS were down-regulated, the protein and mRNA of Gi and Cap were up-regulated. Emodin significantly decreased the formative rate of gallstone, improved the pathogenic change in epithelial cells and muscle cells, increased CCK levels in plasma and [Ca 2+ ] i in cholecyst cells, enhanced the protein and mRNA of Gs in cholecyst cells, reduced the protein and mRNA of Gi and Cap in cholecyst cells in guinea pig with cholesterol calculus. The dysfunction of gallbladder contraction gives rise to the disorders of mobility signal transduction system in cholecyst smooth muscle cells, including low content of plasma CCK and [Ca 2+ ] i in cholecyst cells, abnormal protein and mRNA of Gs, Gi and Cap. Emodin can enhance the contractibility of gallbladder and alleviate cholestasis by regulating plasma

  11. The nanostructure of myoendothelial junctions contributes to signal rectification between endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasen, Jens Christian; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Micro-anatomical structures in tissues have potential physiological effects. In arteries and arterioles smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells are separated by the internal elastic lamina, but the two cell layers often make contact through micro protrusions called myoendothelial junctions. Cross...... types and the myoendothelial junction. The model is implemented as a 2D axi-symmetrical model and solved using the finite element method. We have simulated diffusion of Ca(2+) and IP(3) between the two cell types and we show that the micro-anatomical structure of the myoendothelial junction in itself...

  12. Impact of adrenaline and metabolic stress on exercise-induced intracellular signaling and PGC-1α mRNA response in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Hostrup, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that elevated plasma adrenaline or metabolic stress enhances exercise-induced PGC-1α mRNA and intracellular signaling in human muscle. Trained (VO2-max: 53.8 ± 1.8 mL min(-1) kg(-1)) male subjects completed four different exercise protocols (work load of the legs...... exercise than at rest in all protocols, and higher (P adrenaline nor muscle metabolic stress determines the magnitude of PGC-1α mRNA response in human muscle. Furthermore, higher exercise-induced changes in AMPK, p38, and CREB...

  13. RhoA/ROCK signaling regulates smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling via the JNK pathway and vimentin cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lian; Dai, Fan; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Chao; Wang, Yuqin; Yao, Wenjuan

    2018-05-20

    The RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway regulates cell morphology, adhesion, proliferation, and migration. In this study, we investigated the regulatory role of RhoA/ROCK signaling on PDGF-BB-mediated smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and vascular remodeling and clarified the molecular mechanisms behind these effects. PDGF-BB treatment induced the activation of RhoA, ROCK, PDGF-Rβ, and the expression of PDGF-Rβ in HA-VSMCs (human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells). PDGF-Rβ inhibition and RhoA suppression blocked PDGF-BB-induced RhoA activation and ROCK induction. In addition, PDGF-BB-mediated cell proliferation and migration were suppressed by PDGF-Rβ inhibition, RhoA suppression, and ROCK inhibition, suggesting that PDGF-BB promotes phenotypic modulation of HA-VSMCs by activating the RhoA/ROCK pathway via the PDGF receptor. Moreover, suppressing both ROCK1 and ROCK2 blocked cell cycle progression from G0/G1 to S phase by decreasing the transcription and protein expression of cyclin D1, CDK2, and CDK4 via JNK/c-Jun pathway, thus reducing cell proliferation in PDGF-BB-treated HA-VSMCs. ROCK1 deletion, rather than ROCK2 suppression, significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration by reducing the expression of vimentin and preventing the remodeling of vimentin and phospho-vimentin. Furthermore, ROCK1 deletion suppressed vimentin by inhibiting the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 and the nuclear translocation of Smad4. These findings suggested that ROCK1 and ROCK2 might play different roles in PDGF-BB-mediated cell proliferation and migration in HA-VSMCs. In addition, PDGF-BB and its receptor participated in neointima formation and vascular remodeling by promoting cell cycle protein expression via the JNK pathway and enhancing vimentin expression in a rat balloon injury model; effects that were inhibited by treatment with fasudil. Together, the results of this study reveal a novel mechanism through which RhoA/ROCK signaling regulates smooth muscle phenotypic modulation and

  14. Snake venom VEGF Vammin induces a highly efficient angiogenic response in skeletal muscle via VEGFR-2/NRP specific signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toivanen, Pyry I; Nieminen, Tiina; Laakkonen, Johanna P; Heikura, Tommi; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2017-07-17

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors (VEGFs) are promising molecules for the treatment of ischemic diseases by pro-angiogenic therapy. Snake venom VEGFs are a novel subgroup with unique receptor binding profiles and as such are potential new therapeutic agents. We determined the ligand-receptor interactions, gene regulation and angiogenic properties of Vipera ammodytes venom VEGF, Vammin, and compared it to the canonical angiogenic factor VEGF-A to evaluate the use of Vammin for therapeutic angiogenesis. Vammin efficiently induced VEGFR-2 mediated proliferation and expression of genes associated with proliferation, migration and angiogenesis. VEGF-A 165 and especially VEGF-A 109 induced less pronounced effects. Vammin regulates a number of signaling pathways by inducing the expression of NR4A family nuclear receptors and regulators of calcium signaling and MAP kinase pathways. Interestingly, MARC1, which encodes an enzyme discovered to catalyze reduction of nitrate to NO, was identified as a novel VEGFR-2 regulated gene. In rabbit skeletal muscle adenoviral delivery of Vammin induced prominent angiogenic responses. Both the vector dose and the co-receptor binding of the ligand were critical parameters controlling the type of angiogenic response from sprouting angiogenesis to vessel enlargement. Vammin induced VEGFR-2/NRP-1 mediated signaling more effectively than VEGF-A, consequently it is a promising candidate for development of pro-angiogenic therapies.

  15. TLR4-NOX4-AP-1 signaling mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced CXCR6 expression in human aortic smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Devang N.; Bailey, Steven R.; Gresham, John K.; Schuchman, David B.; Shelhamer, James H.; Goldstein, Barry J.; Foxwell, Brian M.; Stemerman, Michael B.; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Valente, Anthony J.; Mummidi, Srinivas; Chandrasekar, Bysani

    2006-01-01

    CXCL16 is a transmembrane non-ELR CXC chemokine that signals via CXCR6 to induce aortic smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. While bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to stimulate CXCL16 expression in SMC, its effects on CXCR6 are not known. Here, we demonstrate that LPS upregulates CXCR6 mRNA, protein, and surface expression in human ASMC. Inhibition of TLR4 with neutralizing antibodies or specific siRNA interference blocked LPS-mediated CXCR6 expression. LPS stimulated both AP-1 (c-Fos, c-Jun) and NF-κB (p50 and p65) activation, but only inhibition of AP-1 attenuated LPS-induced CXCR6 expression. Using dominant negative expression vectors and siRNA interference, we demonstrate that LPS induces AP-1 activation via MyD88, TRAF6, ERK1/2, and JNK signaling pathways. Furthermore, the flavoprotein inhibitor diphenyleniodonium chloride significantly attenuated LPS-mediated AP-1-dependent CXCR6 expression, as did inhibition of NOX4 NADPH oxidase by siRNA. Finally, CXCR6 knockdown inhibited CXCL16-induced ASMC proliferation. These results demonstrate that LPS-TLR4-NOX4-AP-1 signaling can induce CXCR6 expression in ASMC, and suggest that the CXCL16-CXCR6 axis may be an important proinflammatory pathway in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis

  16. Gestational diabetes is characterized by reduced mitochondrial protein expression and altered calcium signaling proteins in skeletal muscle.

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    Kristen E Boyle

    Full Text Available The rising prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM affects up to 18% of pregnant women with immediate and long-term metabolic consequences for both mother and infant. Abnormal glucose uptake and lipid oxidation are hallmark features of GDM prompting us to use an exploratory proteomics approach to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying differences in skeletal muscle metabolism between obese pregnant women with GDM (OGDM and obese pregnant women with normal glucose tolerance (ONGT. Functional validation was performed in a second cohort of obese OGDM and ONGT pregnant women. Quantitative proteomic analysis in rectus abdominus skeletal muscle tissue collected at delivery revealed reduced protein content of mitochondrial complex I (C-I subunits (NDUFS3, NDUFV2 and altered content of proteins involved in calcium homeostasis/signaling (calcineurin A, α1-syntrophin, annexin A4 in OGDM (n = 6 vs. ONGT (n = 6. Follow-up analyses showed reduced enzymatic activity of mitochondrial complexes C-I, C-III, and C-IV (-60-75% in the OGDM (n = 8 compared with ONGT (n = 10 subjects, though no differences were observed for mitochondrial complex protein content. Upstream regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation were not different between groups. However, AMPK phosphorylation was dramatically reduced by 75% in the OGDM women. These data suggest that GDM is associated with reduced skeletal muscle oxidative phosphorylation and disordered calcium homeostasis. These relationships deserve further attention as they may represent novel risk factors for development of GDM and may have implications on the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on both treatment strategies for GDM and for prevention of type 2 diabetes postpartum.

  17. Leptin signaling in skeletal muscle after bed rest in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Borja; Ponce-Gonzalez, Jesus Gustavo; Morales-Alamo, David

    2014-01-01

    . Leptin receptor isoforms (OB-Rs), suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) protein expression and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation were analyzed by Western blot. RESULTS: After bed rest basal insulin concentration.......4-fold after bed rest (P PTP1B in the deltoid. PTP1B was increased by 90% with bed rest in the vastus lateralis (P ... between the increase in vastus lateralis PTP1B and the increase in both basal insulin concentrations (r = 0.66, P

  18. Muscle Signaling in Exercise Intolerance: Insights from the McArdle Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Nogales-Gadea, Gisela; García-Consuegra, Inés; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Rufián-Vázquez, Laura; Pérez, Laura M; Andreu, Antoni L; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel Angel; Pinós, Tomàs; Lucia, Alejandro; Morán, María

    2016-08-01

    We recently generated a knock-in mouse model (PYGM p.R50X/p.R50X) of the McArdle disease (myophosphorylase deficiency). One mechanistic approach to unveil the molecular alterations caused by myophosphorylase deficiency, which is arguably the paradigm of "exercise intolerance," is to compare the skeletal muscle tissue of McArdle, heterozygous, and healthy (wild-type [wt]) mice. We analyzed in quadriceps muscle of p.R50X/p.R50X (n = 4), p.R50X/wt (n = 6), and wt/wt mice (n = 5) (all male, 8 wk old) molecular markers of energy-sensing pathways, oxidative phosphorylation and autophagy/proteasome systems, oxidative damage, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca handling. We found a significant group effect for total adenosine monophosphate-(AMP)-activated protein kinase (tAMPK) and ratio of phosphorylated (pAMPK)/tAMPK (P = 0.012 and 0.033), with higher mean values in p.R50X/p.R50X mice versus the other two groups. The absence of a massive accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins, autophagosomes, or lysosomes in p.R50X/p.R50X mice suggested no major alterations in autophagy/proteasome systems. Citrate synthase activity was lower in p.R50X/p.R50X mice versus the other two groups (P = 0.036), but no statistical effect existed for respiratory chain complexes. We found higher levels of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified proteins in p.R50X/p.R50X and p.R50X/wt mice compared with the wt/wt group (P = 0.011). Sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase 1 levels detected at 110 kDa tended to be higher in p.R50X/p.R50X and p.R50X/wt mice compared with wt/wt animals (P = 0.076), but their enzyme activity was normal. We also found an accumulation of phosphorylated sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum ATPase 1 in p.R50X/p.R50X animals. Myophosphorylase deficiency causes alterations in sensory energetic pathways together with some evidence of oxidative damage and alterations in Ca handling but with no major alterations in oxidative phosphorylation capacity or autophagy/ubiquitination pathways, which suggests that

  19. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Gene expression in skeletal muscle biopsies from people with type 2 diabetes and relatives: differential regulation of insulin signaling pathways.

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    Jane Palsgaard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene expression alterations have previously been associated with type 2 diabetes, however whether these changes are primary causes or secondary effects of type 2 diabetes is not known. As healthy first degree relatives of people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, they provide a good model in the search for primary causes of the disease. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle biopsies from Caucasian males with type 2 diabetes, healthy first degree relatives, and healthy controls. Gene expression was measured using Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 Arrays covering the entire human genome. These arrays have not previously been used for this type of study. We show for the first time that genes involved in insulin signaling are significantly upregulated in first degree relatives and significantly downregulated in people with type 2 diabetes. On the individual gene level, 11 genes showed altered expression levels in first degree relatives compared to controls, among others KIF1B and GDF8 (myostatin. LDHB was found to have a decreased expression in both groups compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We hypothesize that increased expression of insulin signaling molecules in first degree relatives of people with type 2 diabetes, work in concert with increased levels of insulin as a compensatory mechanism, counter-acting otherwise reduced insulin signaling activity, protecting these individuals from severe insulin resistance. This compensation is lost in people with type 2 diabetes where expression of insulin signaling molecules is reduced.

  1. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-dependent Ca2+ signaling mediates delayed myogenesis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy fetal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassinelli, Letizia; Colleoni, Federica; Parolini, Daniele; Giovanella, Umberto; Maciotta, Simona; Colombo, Augusto; Meregalli, Mirella; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-02-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder characterized by muscle wasting and premature death. The defective gene is dystrophin, a structural protein, absence of which causes membrane fragility and myofiber necrosis. Several lines of evidence showed that in adult DMD patients dystrophin is involved in signaling pathways that regulate calcium homeostasis and differentiation programs. However, secondary aspects of the disease, such as inflammation and fibrosis development, might represent a bias in the analysis. Because fetal muscle is not influenced by gravity and does not suffer from mechanical load and/or inflammation, we investigated 12-week-old fetal DMD skeletal muscles, highlighting for the first time early alterations in signaling pathways mediated by the absence of dystrophin itself. We found that PLC/IP3/IP3R/Ryr1/Ca(2+) signaling is widely active in fetal DMD skeletal muscles and, through the calcium-dependent PKCα protein, exerts a fundamental regulatory role in delaying myogenesis and in myofiber commitment. These data provide new insights into the origin of DMD pathology during muscle development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Altered Regulation of Contraction-Induced Akt/mTOR/p70S6k Pathway Signaling in Skeletal Muscle of the Obese Zucker Rat

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    Anjaiah Katta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased muscle loading results in the phosphorylation of the 70 kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6k, and this event is strongly correlated with the degree of muscle adaptation following resistance exercise. Whether insulin resistance or the comorbidities associated with this disorder may affect the ability of skeletal muscle to activate p70S6k signaling following an exercise stimulus remains unclear. Here, we compare the contraction-induced activation of p70S6k signaling in the plantaris muscles of lean and insulin resistant obese Zucker rats following a single bout of increased contractile loading. Compared to lean animals, the basal phosphorylation of p70S6k (Thr389; 37.2% and Thr421/Ser424; 101.4%, Akt (Thr308; 25.1%, and mTOR (Ser2448; 63.0% was higher in obese animals. Contraction increased the phosphorylation of p70S6k (Thr389, Akt (Ser473, and mTOR (Ser2448 in both models however the magnitude and kinetics of activation differed between models. These results suggest that contraction-induced activation of p70S6k signaling is altered in the muscle of the insulin resistant obese Zucker rat.

  3. Light-load resistance exercise increases muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy signaling in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agergaard, Jakob; Bülow, Jacob; Jensen, Jacob K

    2017-01-01

    to 13 h of supine rest. After 2.5 h of rest, unilateral LL-RE, consisting of leg extensions (10 sets, 36 repetitions) at 16% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), was conducted. Subsequently, the subjects were randomized to oral intake of 4 g of whey protein per hour (PULSE, n = 10), 28 g of whey protein at 0 h...... and 12 g of whey protein at 7 h postexercise (BOLUS, n = 10), or 4 g of maltodextrin per hour (placebo, n = 10). Quadriceps muscle biopsies were taken at 0, 3, 7, and 10 h postexercise from the resting and the exercised leg of each subject. Myofibrillar FSR and activity of select targets from...... persisted in the placebo group only. Levels of phosphorylated (T37/46) eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 increased throughout the postexercise period in the exercised leg in the placebo and BOLUS groups and peaked at 7 h. In all three groups, phosphorylated (T56) eukaryotic...

  4. Zinc stimulates glucose oxidation and glycemic control by modulating the insulin signaling pathway in human and mouse skeletal muscle cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Shaghayegh; Adulcikas, John; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh; Myers, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    Zinc is a metal ion that is an essential cell signaling molecule. Highlighting this, zinc is an insulin mimetic, activating cellular pathways that regulate cellular homeostasis and physiological responses. Previous studies have linked dysfunctional zinc signaling with several disease states including cancer, obesity, cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The present study evaluated the insulin-like effects of zinc on cell signaling molecules including tyrosine, PRSA40, Akt, ERK1/2, SHP-2, GSK-3β and p38, and glucose oxidation in human and mouse skeletal muscle cells. Insulin and zinc independently led to the phosphorylation of these proteins over a 60-minute time course in both mouse and human skeletal muscle cells. Similarly, utilizing a protein array we identified that zinc could active the phosphorylation of p38, ERK1/2 and GSK-3B in human and ERK1/2 and GSK-3B in mouse skeletal muscle cells. Glucose oxidation assays were performed on skeletal muscle cells treated with insulin, zinc, or a combination of both and resulted in a significant induction of glucose consumption in mouse (pzinc alone. Insulin, as expected, increased glucose oxidation in mouse (pzinc and insulin did not augment glucose consumption in these cells. Zinc acts as an insulin mimetic, activating key molecules implicated in cell signaling to maintain glucose homeostasis in mouse and human skeletal muscle cells. Zinc is an important metal ion implicated in several biological processes. The role of zinc as an insulin memetic in activating key signaling molecules involved in glucose homeostasis could provide opportunities to utilize this ion therapeutically in treating disorders associated with dysfunctional zinc signaling.

  5. Signalling pathways regulating muscle mass in ageing skeletal muscle. The role of the IGF1-Akt-mTOR-FoxO pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandri, M.; Barberi, L.; Bijlsma, A.Y.; Blaauw, B.; Dyar, K.A.; Milan, G.; Mammucari, C.; Meskers, C.G.M.; Pallafacchina, G.; Paoli, A.; Pion, D.; Roceri, M.; Romanello, V.; Serrano, A.L.; Toniolo, L.; Larsson, L.; Maier, A.B.; Munoz-Canoves, P.; Musaro, A.; Pende, M.; Reggiani, C.; Rizzuto, R.; Schiaffino, S.

    2013-01-01

    During ageing skeletal muscles undergo a process of structural and functional remodelling that leads to sarcopenia, a syndrome characterized by loss of muscle mass and force and a major cause of physical frailty. To determine the causes of sarcopenia and identify potential targets for interventions

  6. Mast cell chymase induces smooth muscle cell apoptosis by disrupting NF-κB-mediated survival signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskinen, Markus J.; Heikkilae, Hanna M.; Speer, Mei Y.; Hakala, Jukka K.; Laine, Mika; Kovanen, Petri T.; Lindstedt, Ken A.

    2006-01-01

    Chymase released from activated mast cells induces apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in vitro by degrading the pericellular matrix component fibronectin, so causing disruption of focal adhesion complexes and Akt dephosphorylation, which are necessary for cell adhesion and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of chymase-mediated apoptosis downstream of Akt have remained elusive. Here, we show by means of RT-PCR, Western blotting, EMSA, immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy, that chymase induces SMC apoptosis by disrupting NF-κB-mediated survival signaling. Following chymase treatment, the translocation of active NF-κB/p65 to the nucleus was partly abolished and the amount of nuclear p65 was reduced. Pretreatment of SMCs with chymase also inhibited LPS- and IL-1β-induced nuclear translocation of p65. The chymase-induced degradation of p65 was mediated by active caspases. Loss of NF-κB-mediated transactivation resulted in downregulation of bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression, leading to mitochondrial swelling and release of cytochrome c. The apoptotic process involved activation of both caspase 9 and caspase 8. The results reveal that, by disrupting the NF-κB-mediated survival-signaling pathway, activated chymase-secreting mast cells can mediate apoptosis of cultured arterial SMCs. Since activated mast cells colocalize with apoptotic SMCs in vulnerable areas of human atherosclerotic plaques, they may participate in the weakening and rupture of atherosclerotic plaques

  7. Nitric oxide signaling pathway regulates potassium chloride cotransporter-1 mRNA expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fulvio, M; Lauf, P K; Adragna, N C

    2001-11-30

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) express at least two mRNAs for K-Cl cotransporters (KCC): KCC1 and KCC3. cGMP-dependent protein kinase I regulates KCC3 mRNA expression in these cells. Here, we show evidence implicating the nitric oxide (NO)/cGMP signaling pathway in the expression of KCC1 mRNA, considered to be the major cell volume regulator. VSMCs, expressing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and PKG-I isoforms showed a time- and concentration-dependent increase in KCC1 mRNA levels after treatment with sodium nitroprusside as demonstrated by semiquantitative RT-PCR. sGC-dependent regulation of KCC1 mRNA expression was confirmed using YC-1, a NO-independent sGC stimulator. The sGC inhibitor LY83583 blocked the effects of sodium nitroprusside and YC-1. Moreover, 8-Br-cGMP increased KCC1 mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The 8-Br-cGMP effect was partially blocked by KT5823 but not by actinomycin D. However, actinomycin D and cycloheximide increased basal KCC1 mRNA in an additive manner, suggesting different mechanisms of action for both drugs. These findings suggest that in VSMCs, the NO/cGMP-signaling pathway participates in KCC1 mRNA regulation at the post-transcriptional level.

  8. Reversal of muscle atrophy by Zhimu-Huangbai herb-pair via Akt/mTOR/FoxO3 signal pathway in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbao Zhang

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle atrophy is one of the serious complications of diabetes. Zhimu-Huangbai herb-pair (ZB is widely used in Chinese traditional medicine formulas for treating Xiaoke (known as diabetes and its complications. However, the effect of ZB on reversal of muscle atrophy and the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this research, we investigated the effect and possible mechanisms of ZB on skeletal muscle atrophy in diabetic mice. Animal model of diabetic muscle atrophy was developed by high fat diet (HFD feeding plus streptozotocin (STZ injection. After oral adminstration of ZB for 6 weeks, the effects of ZB on reversal of muscle atrophy and the underlying mechanisms were evaluated by biochemical, histological and western blot methods. The skeletal muscle weight, strength, and cross-sectional area of diabetic mice were significantly increased by ZB treatment. Biochemical results showed that ZB treatment reduced the serum glucose level, and elevated the serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and insulin levels significantly compared with untreated diabetic group. The western blot results showed that ZB activated the mTOR signal pathway, shown as increased phosphorylations (p- of Akt, mTOR, Raptor, S6K1 and reduced Foxo3 expression compared with the model group. ZB could reverse muscle atrophy in diabetic mice. This may be through activation of mTOR signaling pathway that promotes protein synthesis, and inactivation foxo3 protein that inhibits protein degradation. These findings suggested that ZB may be considered as a potential candidate drug in treatment of diabetic muscle atrophy.

  9. Contraction-induced changes in skeletal muscle Na(+), K(+) pump mRNA expression - importance of exercise intensity and Ca(2+)-mediated signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Kusuhara, K; Hellsten, Ylva

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Aim: To investigate if exercise intensity and Ca(2+) signalling regulate Na(+), K(+) pump mRNA expression in skeletal muscle. Methods: The importance of exercise intensity was evaluated by having trained and untrained humans perform intense intermittent and prolonged exercise. The import...

  10. Muscle Contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, H Lee; Hammers, David W

    2018-02-01

    SUMMARYMuscle cells are designed to generate force and movement. There are three types of mammalian muscles-skeletal, cardiac, and smooth. Skeletal muscles are attached to bones and move them relative to each other. Cardiac muscle comprises the heart, which pumps blood through the vasculature. Skeletal and cardiac muscles are known as striated muscles, because the filaments of actin and myosin that power their contraction are organized into repeating arrays, called sarcomeres, that have a striated microscopic appearance. Smooth muscle does not contain sarcomeres but uses the contraction of filaments of actin and myosin to constrict blood vessels and move the contents of hollow organs in the body. Here, we review the principal molecular organization of the three types of muscle and their contractile regulation through signaling mechanisms and discuss their major structural and functional similarities that hint at the possible evolutionary relationships between the cell types. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoori, Simon [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Breitenstein, Stefan [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Surgery, Clinic for Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Winterthur (Switzerland); Doert, Aleksis [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Pozdniakova, Viktoria [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stavanger (Norway); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey, England (United Kingdom); Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  12. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoori, Simon; Froehlich, Johannes M.; Breitenstein, Stefan; Doert, Aleksis; Pozdniakova, Viktoria; Koh, Dow-Mu; Gutzeit, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  13. Cellular function and signaling pathways of vascular smooth muscle cells modulated by sphingosine 1-phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuji Machida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P plays important roles in cardiovascular pathophysiology. S1P1 and/or S1P3, rather than S1P2 receptors, seem to be predominantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, while S1P2 and/or S1P3, rather than S1P1 receptors, seem to be predominantly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs. S1P has multiple actions, such as proliferation, inhibition or stimulation of migration, and vasoconstriction or release of vasoactive mediators. S1P induces an increase of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in many cell types, including VSMCs. Activation of S1P3 seems to play an important role in Ca2+ mobilization. S1P induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression in VSMCs via both S1P2 and S1P3 receptors. S1P2 receptor activation in VSMCs inhibits inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression. At the local site of vascular injury, vasoactive mediators such as prostaglandins and NO produced by VSMCs are considered primarily as a defensive and compensatory mechanism for the lack of endothelial function to prevent further pathology. Therefore, selective S1P2 receptor antagonists may have the potential to be therapeutic agents, in view of their antagonism of iNOS inhibition by S1P. Further progress in studies of the precise mechanisms of S1P may provide useful knowledge for the development of new S1P-related drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Glutamate alleviates muscle protein loss by modulating TLR4, NODs, Akt/FOXO and mTOR signaling pathways in LPS-challenged piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Kang

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted to study the effect of the glutamate (Glu on muscle protein loss through toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4, nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs, Akt/Forkhead Box O (Akt/FOXO and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathways in LPS-challenged piglets. Twenty-four weaned piglets were assigned into four treatments: (1 Control; (2 LPS+0% Glu; (3 LPS + 1.0% Glu; (4 LPS + 2.0% Glu. The experiment was lasted for 28 days. On d 28, the piglets in the LPS challenged groups were injected with LPS on 100 μg/kg body weight (BW, and the piglets in the control group were injected with the same volume of 0.9% NaCl solution. After 4 h LPS or saline injection, the piglets were slaughtered and the muscle samples were collected. Glu supplementation increased the protein/DNA ratio in gastrocnemius muscle, and the protein content in longissimus dorsi (LD muscle after LPS challenge (P<0.05. In addition, Glu supplementation decreased TLR4, IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK 1, receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase (RIPK 2, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB mRNA expression in gastrocnemius muscle (P<0.05, MyD88 mRNA expression in LD muscle, and FOXO1 mRNA expression in LD muscle (P<0.05. Moreover, Glu supplementation increased p-Akt/t-Akt ratio (P<0.05 in gastrocnemius muscle, and p-4EBP1/t-4EBP1 ratio in both gastrocnemius and LD muscles (P<0.05. Glu supplementation in the piglets' diets might be an effective strategy to alleviate LPS-induced muscle protein loss, which might be due to suppressing the mRNA expression of TLR4 and NODs signaling-related genes, and modulating Akt/FOXO and mTOR signaling pathways.

  15. LKB1-AMPK signaling in muscle from obese insulin-resistant Zucker rats and effects of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Ivy, John L; Christ-Roberts, Christine; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Musi, Nicolas

    2006-05-01

    AMPK is a key regulator of fat and carbohydrate metabolism. It has been postulated that defects in AMPK signaling could be responsible for some of the metabolic abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we examined whether insulin-resistant obese Zucker rats have abnormalities in the AMPK pathway. We compared AMPK and ACC phosphorylation and the protein content of the upstream AMPK kinase LKB1 and the AMPK-regulated transcriptional coactivator PPARgamma coactivator-1 (PGC-1) in gastrocnemius of sedentary obese Zucker rats and sedentary lean Zucker rats. We also examined whether 7 wk of exercise training on a treadmill reversed abnormalities in the AMPK pathway in obese Zucker rats. In the obese rats, AMPK phosphorylation was reduced by 45% compared with lean rats. Protein expression of the AMPK kinase LKB1 was also reduced in the muscle from obese rats by 43%. In obese rats, phosphorylation of ACC and protein expression of PGC-1alpha, two AMPK-regulated proteins, tended to be reduced by 50 (P = 0.07) and 35% (P = 0.1), respectively. There were no differences in AMPKalpha1, -alpha2, -beta1, -beta2, and -gamma3 protein content between lean and obese rats. Training caused a 1.5-fold increase in AMPKalpha1 protein content in the obese rats, although there was no effect of training on AMPK phosphorylation and the other AMPK isoforms. Furthermore, training also significantly increased LKB1 and PGC-1alpha protein content 2.8- and 2.5-fold, respectively, in the obese rats. LKB1 protein strongly correlated with hexokinase II activity (r = 0.75, P = 0.001), citrate synthase activity (r = 0.54, P = 0.02), and PGC-1alpha protein content (r = 0.81, P < 0.001). In summary, obese insulin-resistant rodents have abnormalities in the LKB1-AMPK-PGC-1 pathway in muscle, and these abnormalities can be restored by training.

  16. Leucine supplementation stimulates protein synthesis and reduces degradation signal activation in muscle of newborn pigs during acute endotoxemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepsis disrupts skeletal muscle proteostasis and mitigates the anabolic response to leucine (Leu) in muscle of mature animals. We have shown that Leu stimulates muscle protein synthesis (PS) in healthy neonatal piglets. To determine if supplemental Leu can stimulate PS and reduce protein degradation...

  17. Impact of β-adrenergic signaling in PGC-1α-mediated adaptations in mouse skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; Nielsen, Lene; Buch, Bjørg Thiellesen

    2018-01-01

    muscle with exercise training. Muscle was obtained from muscle specific PGC-1α knockout (MKO) mice and LOX/LOX 1) 3h after a single exercise bout with or without prior injection of propranolol or 3h after a single injection of clenbuterol and 2) after 5 weeks of wheel running exercise training...

  18. The influence of foot arch on ankle joint torques andon sEMG signal amplitude in selected lower leg muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żebrowska Kinga

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study sought to assess the influence of proper foot arch on electromyographic activity of selected lower limb muscles. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of foot arch on the activity of selected muscles and to determine whether electromyography might help to identify types of flat feet resulting from muscle- or ligament-related causes.

  19. Prolonged activation of S6K1 does not suppress IRS or PI-3 kinase signaling during muscle cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacKenzie Matthew G

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myogenesis in C2C12 cells requires the activation of the PI3K/mTOR signaling pathways. Since mTOR signaling can feedback through S6K1 to inhibit the activation of PI3K, the aim of this work was to assess whether feedback from S6K1 played a role in myogenesis and determine whether siRNA mediated knockdown of S6K1 would lead to an increased rate of myotube formation. Results S6K1 activity increased in a linear fashion following plating and was more than 3-fold higher after Day 3 of differentiation (subconfluent = 11.09 ± 3.05, Day 3 = 29.34 ± 3.58. IRS-1 levels tended to increase upon serum withdrawal but decreased approximately 2-fold (subconfluent = 0.88 ± 0.10, Day 3 = 0.42 ± 0.06 3 days following differentiation whereas IRS-2 protein remained stable. IRS-1 associated p85 was significantly reduced upon serum withdrawal (subconfluent = 0.86 ± 0.07, Day 0 = 0.31 ± 0.05, remaining low through day 1. IRS-2 associated p85 decreased following serum withdrawal (subconfluent = 0.96 ± 0.05, Day 1 = 0.56 ± 0.08 and remained suppressed up to Day 3 following differentiation (0.56 ± 0.05. Phospho-tyrosine associated p85 increased significantly from subconfluent to Day 0 and remained elevated throughout differentiation. siRNA directed against S6K1 and S6K2 did not result in changes in IRS-1 levels after either 48 or 96 hrs. Furthermore, neither 48 nor 96 hrs of S6K1 knockdown caused a change in myotube formation. Conclusions Even though S6K1 activity increases throughout muscle cell differentiation and IRS-1 levels decrease over this period, siRNA suggests that S6K1 is not mediating the decrease in IRS-1. The decrease in IRS-1/2 associated p85 together with the increase in phospho-tyrosine associated p85 suggests that PI3K associates primarily with scaffolds other than IRS-1/2 during muscle cell differentiation.

  20. TGF-β1 activates the canonical NF-κB signaling to promote cell survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhen-Yu [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Department of Neurology, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou Medical University, No.250 Changgang East Road, Guangzhou 510260, Guangdong Province (China); Zhong, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Meng-Yao; Zhong, Yu-Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Wei-Xi, E-mail: weixizhang@qq.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, No. 58 Zhongshan 2nd Road, Guangzhou 510080, Guangdong Province (China)

    2016-03-18

    Activated fibroblasts continue to proliferate at injury sites, leading to progressive muscular fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). TGF-β1 is a dominant profibrotic mediator thought to play a critical role in muscle fibrosis; however, the implicated mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we showed that TGF-β1 increased the resistance to apoptosis and stimulated cell cycle progression in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts under serum deprivation conditions in vitro. TGF-β1 treatment activated the canonical NF-κB pathway; and we found that pharmacological inhibition of IKKβ with IMD-0354 and RelA gene knockdown with siRNA attenuated these effects of TGF-β1 on dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts through the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 promotes survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • TGF-β1 activated the canonical NF-κB pathway in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • Canonical NF-κB pathway mediates these effects of TGF-β1.

  1. TGF-β1 activates the canonical NF-κB signaling to promote cell survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Zhen-Yu; Zhong, Zhi-Gang; Qiu, Meng-Yao; Zhong, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Xi

    2016-01-01

    Activated fibroblasts continue to proliferate at injury sites, leading to progressive muscular fibrosis in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). TGF-β1 is a dominant profibrotic mediator thought to play a critical role in muscle fibrosis; however, the implicated mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we showed that TGF-β1 increased the resistance to apoptosis and stimulated cell cycle progression in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts under serum deprivation conditions in vitro. TGF-β1 treatment activated the canonical NF-κB pathway; and we found that pharmacological inhibition of IKKβ with IMD-0354 and RelA gene knockdown with siRNA attenuated these effects of TGF-β1 on dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that TGF-β1 prevents apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts through the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 promotes survival and proliferation in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • TGF-β1 activated the canonical NF-κB pathway in dystrophic muscle fibroblasts. • Canonical NF-κB pathway mediates these effects of TGF-β1.

  2. Electrical stimuli are anti-apoptotic in skeletal muscle via extracellular ATP. Alteration of this signal in Mdx mice is a likely cause of dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Denisse; Almarza, Gonzalo; Contreras, Ariel; Pavez, Mario; Buvinic, Sonja; Jaimovich, Enrique; Casas, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    ATP signaling has been shown to regulate gene expression in skeletal muscle and to be altered in models of muscular dystrophy. We have previously shown that in normal muscle fibers, ATP released through Pannexin1 (Panx1) channels after electrical stimulation plays a role in activating some signaling pathways related to gene expression. We searched for a possible role of ATP signaling in the dystrophy phenotype. We used muscle fibers from flexor digitorum brevis isolated from normal and mdx mice. We demonstrated that low frequency electrical stimulation has an anti-apoptotic effect in normal muscle fibers repressing the expression of Bax, Bim and PUMA. Addition of exogenous ATP to the medium has a similar effect. In dystrophic fibers, the basal levels of extracellular ATP were higher compared to normal fibers, but unlike control fibers, they do not present any ATP release after low frequency electrical stimulation, suggesting an uncoupling between electrical stimulation and ATP release in this condition. Elevated levels of Panx1 and decreased levels of Cav1.1 (dihydropyridine receptors) were found in triads fractions prepared from mdx muscles. Moreover, decreased immunoprecipitation of Cav1.1 and Panx1, suggest uncoupling of the signaling machinery. Importantly, in dystrophic fibers, exogenous ATP was pro-apoptotic, inducing the transcription of Bax, Bim and PUMA and increasing the levels of activated Bax and cytosolic cytochrome c. These evidence points to an involvement of the ATP pathway in the activation of mechanisms related with cell death in muscular dystrophy, opening new perspectives towards possible targets for pharmacological therapies.

  3. Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Interaction via FoxM1 Signaling Mediates Vascular Remodeling and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhiyu; Zhu, Maggie M; Peng, Yi; Jin, Hua; Machireddy, Narsa; Qian, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianming; Zhao, You-Yang

    2018-04-17

    Angioproliferative vasculopathy is a hallmark of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, little is known how endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) crosstalk regulates the angioproliferative vascular remodeling. We aimed to investigate the role of EC and SMC interaction and underlying signaling pathways in PH development. SMC-specific Foxm1 or Cxcr4 knockout mice, EC-specific Foxm1 or Egln1 knockout mice, as well as EC-specific Egln1/Cxcl12 double knockout mice were used to assess the role of FoxM1 on SMC proliferation and PH. Lung tissues and cells from PAH patients were employed to validate clinical relevance. FoxM1 inhibitor Thiostrepton was used in Sugen 5416/hypoxia- and monocrotaline-challenged rats. FoxM1 expression was markedly upregulated in lungs and pulmonary arterial SMCs of idiopathic PAH patients and 4 discrete PH rodent models. Mice with SMC- (but not EC-) specific deletion of Foxm1 were protected from hypoxia- or Sugen 5416/hypoxia-induced PH. The upregulation of FoxM1 in SMCs induced by multiple EC-derived factors (PDGF-B, CXCL12, ET-1 and MIF) mediated SMC proliferation. Genetic deletion of endothelial Cxcl12 in Egln1Tie2Cre mice or loss of its cognate receptor Cxcr4 in SMCs in hypoxia-treated mice inhibited FoxM1 expression, SMC proliferation and PH. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of FoxM1 inhibited severe PH in both Sugen 5416/hypoxia and monocrotaline-challenged rats. Multiple factors derived from dysfunctional ECs induced FoxM1 expression in SMCs and activated FoxM1-dependent SMC proliferation which contributes to pulmonary vascular remodeling and PH. Thus, targeting FoxM1 signaling represents a novel strategy for treatment of IPAH.

  4. Diethyl hexyl phthalate-induced changes in insulin signaling molecules and the protective role of antioxidant vitamins in gastrocnemius muscle of adult male rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Khan, Adam Ismail; Balaji, Venkataraman; Selvaraj, Jayaraman; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2011-01-01

    Diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an endocrine disruptor, it influences various organ systems in human beings and experimental animals. DEHP reduced the serum testosterone and increased the blood glucose, estradiol, T 3 and T 4 in rats. However, the effect of DEHP on insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle is not known. Adult male albino rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Control; Groups II and III: DEHP treated (dissolved in olive oil at a dose of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days); and Group IV: DEHP (100 mg/kg body weight) plus vitamins E (50 mg/kg body weight) and C (100 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in olive oil and distilled water, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days. On completion of treatment, animals were euthanized and perfused (whole body); gastrocnemius muscle was dissected out and subjected to assessment of various parameters. DEHP treatment increased the H 2 O 2 , hydroxyl radical levels and lipid peroxidation which disrupt the membrane integrity and insulin receptor. DEHP impaired the insulin signal transduction, glucose uptake and oxidation through decreased expression of plasma membrane GLUT4, which may partly be responsible for the elevation of fasting blood glucose level. The present study suggests that DEHP exposure affects glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle and is mediated through enhanced lipid peroxidation, impaired insulin signaling and GLUT4 expression in plasma membrane. Antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have a protective role against the adverse effect of DEHP. -- Highlights: ► DEHP treatment significantly decreased serum insulin and testosterone levels. ► Increased ROS and decreased glucose uptake were observed in DEHP treated animals. ► Impaired insulin signaling in gastrocnemius muscle was observed in DEHP treatment. ► Vitamins C and E alter ROS, glucose uptake, oxidation and insulin signaling molecules.

  5. Effect of a sustained reduction in plasma free fatty acid concentration on insulin signalling and inflammation in skeletal muscle from human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hanyu; Tantiwong, Puntip; Sriwijitkamol, Apiradee; Shanmugasundaram, Karthigayan; Mohan, Sumathy; Espinoza, Sara; Defronzo, Ralph A; Dubé, John J; Musi, Nicolas

    2013-06-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Reducing plasma FFA concentration in obese and type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects improves insulin sensitivity. However, the molecular mechanism by which FFA reduction improves insulin sensitivity in human subjects is not fully understood. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that pharmacological FFA reduction enhances insulin action by reducing local (muscle) inflammation, leading to improved insulin signalling. Insulin-stimulated total glucose disposal (TGD), plasma FFA species, muscle insulin signalling, IBα protein, c-Jun phosphorylation, inflammatory gene (toll-like receptor 4 and monocyte chemotactic protein 1) expression, and ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG) content were measured in muscle from a group of obese and T2DM subjects before and after administration of the antilipolytic drug acipimox for 7 days, and the results were compared to lean individuals. We found that obese and T2DM subjects had elevated saturated and unsaturated FFAs in plasma, and acipimox reduced all FFA species. Acipimox-induced reductions in plasma FFAs improved TGD and insulin signalling in obese and T2DM subjects. Acipimox increased IBα protein (an indication of decreased IB kinase-nuclear factor B signalling) in both obese and T2DM subjects, but did not affect c-Jun phosphorylation in any group. Acipimox also decreased inflammatory gene expression, although this reduction only occurred in T2DM subjects. Ceramide and DAG content did not change. To summarize, pharmacological FFA reduction improves insulin signalling in muscle from insulin-resistant subjects. This beneficial effect on insulin action could be related to a decrease in local inflammation. Notably, the improvements in insulin action were more pronounced in T2DM, indicating that these subjects are more susceptible to the toxic effect of FFAs.

  6. Impairment of IGF-I Expression and Anabolic Signaling Following Ischemia/Reperfusion in Skeletal Muscle of Old Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    has a role in the impaired recovery of skeletal muscle with age. Keywords Tourniquet; sarcopenia ; muscle regeneration; mTOR; FoxO Correspondence...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 INTRODUCTION Sarcopenia is the progressive decline in skeletal muscle mass and function with advanced aging (See Adamo...clinically-relevant problem. Considering the large proportion of orthopedic surgeries performed on elderly individuals, the extent of damage and subsequent

  7. Rac1 Activation Caused by Membrane Translocation of a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor in Akt2-Mediated Insulin Signaling in Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Takenaka

    Full Text Available Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT4, which is translocated to the plasma membrane following insulin stimulation. Several lines of evidence suggested that the protein kinase Akt2 plays a key role in this insulin action. The small GTPase Rac1 has also been implicated as a regulator of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, acting downstream of Akt2. However, the mechanisms whereby Akt2 regulates Rac1 activity remain obscure. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 has been identified as a direct regulator of Rac1 in Akt2-mediated signaling, but its characterization was performed mostly in cultured myoblasts. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FLJ00068 indeed acts downstream of Akt2 as a Rac1 regulator by using mouse skeletal muscle. Small interfering RNA knockdown of FLJ00068 markedly diminished GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma following insulin administration or ectopic expression of a constitutively activated mutant of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Akt2. Additionally, insulin and these constitutively activated mutants caused the activation of Rac1 as shown by immunofluorescent microscopy using a polypeptide probe specific to activated Rac1 in isolated gastrocnemius muscle fibers and frozen sections of gastrocnemius muscle. This Rac1 activation was also abrogated by FLJ00068 knockdown. Furthermore, we observed translocation of FLJ00068 to the cell periphery following insulin stimulation in cultured myoblasts. Localization of FLJ00068 in the plasma membrane in insulin-stimulated, but not unstimulated, myoblasts and mouse gastrocnemius muscle was further affirmed by subcellular fractionation and subsequent immunoblotting. Collectively, these results strongly support a critical role of FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation in mouse skeletal muscle insulin signaling.

  8. Signal intensity and T2 time of extraocular muscles in assessment of their physiological status in MR imaging in healthy subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pająk, Michał; Loba, Piotr; Wieczorek-Pastusiak, Julia; Antosik-Biernacka, Aneta; Stefańczyk, Ludomir; Majos, Agata

    2012-01-01

    Lack of standardised orbital MR protocols leads to a situation, when each institution/centre may arbitrarily choose sequence parameters. Therefore, the results obtained and published by the authors may not be compared freely, and what is most important may not be considered fully reliable. Signal intensity (IS) and T2 time (T2) are important parameters in estimation of inflammatory processes of extraocular muscles in the clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine the reference values (i.e. cut-off values) for absolute signal intensity and T2 relaxation time in healthy subjects, their relativised values to white matter (WM) and temporal muscles (TM) and to evaluate the correlation between those parameters. The orbital examination was performed in healthy volunteers according to the protocol prepared in the Radiology-Imaging Diagnostic Department of the Medical University of Lodz for patients with suspected/diagnosed thyroid orbitopathy. Using two of the standard sequences IS and T2 time were calculated for the muscles and two relativisation tissues in realtion to WM and TM. Subsequently cut-off values for healthy volunteers were calculated. The differences between muscles for IS, IS MAX, IS/TM, IS/WM, IS MAX/TM, IS MAX/WM and T2 MAX/WM were not statistically significant. Therefore one cut-off value of these parameters for all the rectus muscles was calculated. T2-relaxation time and T2 relativised to white matter had to be calculated separately for each muscle. No statistical correlation was found between IS and T2-time for extraocular muscles in healthy volunteers. We calculated the reference ranges (cut-off values) for absolute IS and T2-time values and relativised parameters. In the clinical practice the objectification of IS and T2-time values should be done to WM, than to IS or T2 of the temporal muscle. The T2 MAX/WM seems to have the highest clinical utility for the assessment of the pathophysiological status of extraocular muscles

  9. Genetic impairment of AMPK{alpha}2 signaling does not reduce muscle glucose uptake during treadmill exercise in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine Just; Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck; Rose, Adam John

    2009-01-01

    and female mice over-expressing kinase-dead alpha2-AMPK (AMPK-KD) in skeletal and heart muscles. Wildtype and AMPK-KD mice were exercised at the same absolute intensity and the same relative intensity (30% and 70% of individual maximal running speed) to correct for reduced exercise capacity of the AMPK......-KD mouse. Muscle glucose clearance was measured using [3H]-2-deoxy-glucose as tracer. In wildtype mice glucose clearance was increased at 30% and 70% of maximal running speed by 40% and 350% in the quadriceps muscle, and by 120% and 380% in gastrocnemius muscle, respectively. Glucose clearance...

  10. mTOR Complex Signaling through the SEMA4A-Plexin B2 Axis Is Required for Optimal Activation and Differentiation of CD8+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Nojima, Satoshi; Nishide, Masayuki; Okuno, Tatsusada; Takamatsu, Hyota; Kang, Sujin; Kimura, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Yuji; Morimoto, Keiko; Maeda, Yohei; Hosokawa, Takashi; Toyofuku, Toshihiko; Ohshima, Jun; Kamimura, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Murakami, Masaaki; Morii, Eiichi; Rakugi, Hiromi; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Kumanogoh, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays crucial roles in activation and differentiation of diverse types of immune cells. Although several lines of evidence have demonstrated the importance of mTOR-mediated signals in CD4(+) T cell responses, the involvement of mTOR in CD8(+) T cell responses is not fully understood. In this study, we show that a class IV semaphorin, SEMA4A, regulates CD8(+) T cell activation and differentiation through activation of mTOR complex (mTORC) 1. SEMA4A(-/-) CD8(+) T cells exhibited impairments in production of IFN-γ and TNF-α and induction of the effector molecules granzyme B, perforin, and FAS-L. Upon infection with OVA-expressing Listeria monocytogenes, pathogen-specific effector CD8(+) T cell responses were significantly impaired in SEMA4A(-/-) mice. Furthermore, SEMA4A(-/-) CD8(+) T cells exhibited reduced mTORC1 activity and elevated mTORC2 activity, suggesting that SEMA4A is required for optimal activation of mTORC1 in CD8(+) T cells. IFN-γ production and mTORC1 activity in SEMA4A(-/-) CD8(+) T cells were restored by administration of recombinant Sema4A protein. In addition, we show that plexin B2 is a functional receptor of SEMA4A in CD8(+) T cells. Collectively, these results not only demonstrate the role of SEMA4A in CD8(+) T cells, but also reveal a novel link between a semaphorin and mTOR signaling. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. TNF-α promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► TNF-α induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. ► MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression. ► Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-α-induced MMP-9 expression. ► SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-α. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-α promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-α-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-α-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-α promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  12. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan [The Affiliated Eye Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Jiang, Qin, E-mail: Jqin710@vip.sina.com [The Affiliated Eye Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China); Yao, Jin, E-mail: dryaojin@yahoo.com [The Affiliated Eye Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029 (China)

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  13. Ames dwarf (Prop1(df)/Prop1(df)) mice display increased sensitivity of the major GH-signaling pathways in liver and skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquet, Johanna G; Muñoz, Marina C; Giani, Jorge F; González, Lorena; Dominici, Fernando P; Bartke, Andrzej; Turyn, Daniel; Sotelo, Ana I

    2010-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is an anabolic hormone that regulates growth and metabolism. Ames dwarf mice are natural mutants for Prop1, with impaired development of anterior pituitary and undetectable levels of circulating GH, prolactin and TSH. They constitute an endocrine model of life-long GH-deficiency. The main signaling cascades activated by GH binding to its receptor are the JAK2/STATs, PI-3K/Akt and the MAPK Erk1/2 pathways. We have previously reported that GH-induced STAT5 activation was higher in Ames dwarf mice liver compared to non-dwarf controls. The aim of this study was to evaluate the principal components of the main GH-signaling pathways under GH-deficiency in liver and skeletal muscle, another GH-target tissue. Ames dwarf mice and their non-dwarf siblings were assessed. Animals were injected i.p. with GH or saline 15min before tissue removal. Protein content and phosphorylation of signaling mediators were determined by immunoblotting of tissue solubilizates. GH was able to induce STAT5 and STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation in both liver and muscle, but the response was higher for Ames dwarf mice than for non-dwarf controls. When Erk1/2 activation was assessed in liver, only dwarf mice showed GH-induced phosphorylation, while in muscle no response to the hormone was found in either genotype. GH-induced Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 in liver was only detected in dwarf mice. In skeletal muscle, both normal and dwarf mice responded to a GH stimulus, although dwarf mice presented higher GH activation levels. The phosphorylation of GSK-3, a substrate of Akt, increased upon hormone stimulation only in dwarf mice in both tissues. In contrast, no differences in the phosphorylation of mTOR, another substrate of Akt, were observed after GH stimulus, either in normal or dwarf mice in liver, while we were unable to determine mTOR in muscle. Protein content of GH-receptor and of the signaling mediators studied did not vary between normal and dwarf animals in the assessed

  14. Reduced Insulin/Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Signaling and Dietary Restriction Inhibit Translation but Preserve Muscle Mass in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Shanmugam, Nilesh; Smolders, Arne; Dhondt, Ineke; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2013-09-03

    Reduced signaling through the C. elegans insulin/IGF1 like tyrosine kinase receptor daf2 and dietary restriction via bacterial dilution are two well-characterized lifespan-extending interventions that operate in parallel or through (partially) independent mechanisms. Using accurate mass and time tag LCMS/MS quantitative proteomics we detected that the abundance of a large number of ribosomal subunits is decreased in response to dietary restriction as well as in the daf2(e1370) insulin/IGF1 receptor mutant. In addition, general protein synthesis levels in these long-lived worms are repressed. Surprisingly, ribosomal transcript levels were not correlated to actual protein abundance, suggesting that posttranscriptional regulation determines ribosome content. Proteomics also revealed increased presence of many structural muscle cell components in long-lived worms, which appears to result from prioritized preservation of muscle cell volume in nutrient-poor conditions or low insulin-like signaling. Activation of DAF16, but not diet-restriction, stimulates mRNA expression of muscle-related genes to prevent muscle atrophy. Important daf2 specific proteome changes include overexpression of aerobic metabolism enzymes and a general activation of stress responsive and immune defense systems, while increased abundance of many protein subunits of the proteasome core complex is a DR-specific characteristic.

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent signaling system is a primary metabolic target for non-thermal effect of microwaves on heart muscle hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narinyan, Lilia; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we have suggested that cell hydration is a universal and extra-sensitive sensor for the structural changes of cell aqua medium caused by the impact of weak chemical and physical factors. The aim of present work is to elucidate the nature of the metabolic messenger through which physiological solution (PS) treated by non-thermal (NT) microwaves (MW) could modulate heart muscle hydration of rats. For this purpose, the effects of NT MW-treated PS on heart muscle hydration, [ 3 H]-ouabain binding with cell membrane, 45 Ca 2+ uptake and intracellular cyclic nucleotides contents in vivo and in vitro experiments were studied. It is shown that intraperitoneal injections of both Sham-treated PS and NT MW-treated PS elevate heart muscle hydration. However, the effect of NT MW-treated PS on muscle hydration is more pronounced than the effect of Sham-treated PS. In vitro experiments NT MW-treated PS has dehydration effect on muscle, which is not changed by decreasing Na + gradients on membrane. Intraperitoneal injection of Sham- and NT MW-treated PS containing 45 Ca 2+ have similar dehydration effect on muscle, while NT MW-treated PS has activation effect on Na + /Ca 2+ exchange in reverse mode. The intraperitoneal injection of NT MW-treated PS depresses [ 3 H]-ouabain binding with its high-affinity membrane receptors, elevates intracellular cAMP and decreases cGMP contents. Based on the obtained data, it is suggested that cAMP-dependent signaling system serves as a primary metabolic target for NT MW effect on heart muscle hydration.

  16. Evaluation of the role of the cyclooxygenase signaling pathway during inflammation in skin and muscle tissues of ball pythons (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Ryan A; Schumacher, Juergen P; Rathore, Kusum; Newkirk, Kim M; Cole, Grayson; Seibert, Rachel; Cekanova, Maria

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine degrees of production of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and -2 and other mediators of inflammation in noninflamed and inflamed skin and muscle tissues in ball pythons (Python regius). ANIMALS 6 healthy adult male ball pythons. PROCEDURES Biopsy specimens of noninflamed skin and muscle tissue were collected from anesthetized snakes on day 0. A 2-cm skin and muscle incision was then made 5 cm distal to the biopsy sites with a CO2 laser to induce inflammation. On day 7, biopsy specimens of skin and muscle tissues were collected from the incision sites. Inflamed and noninflamed tissue specimens were evaluated for production of COX-1, COX-2, phosphorylated protein kinase B (AKT), total AKT, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, phosphorylated extracellular receptor kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2, and total ERK proteins by western blot analysis. Histologic evaluation was performed on H&E-stained tissue sections. RESULTS All biopsy specimens of inflamed skin and muscle tissues had higher histologic inflammation scores than did specimens of noninflamed tissue. Inflamed skin specimens had significantly greater production of COX-1 and phosphorylated ERK than did noninflamed skin specimens. Inflamed muscle specimens had significantly greater production of phosphorylated ERK and phosphorylated AKT, significantly lower production of COX-1, and no difference in production of COX-2, compared with production in noninflamed muscle specimens. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Production of COX-1, but not COX-2, was significantly greater in inflamed versus noninflamed skin specimens from ball pythons. Additional research into the reptilian COX signaling pathway is warranted.

  17. Suppression of skeletal muscle signal using a crusher coil: A human cardiac (31) p-MR spectroscopy study at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Benoit; Clarke, William T; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2016-03-01

    The translation of sophisticated phosphorus MR spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS) protocols to 7 Tesla (T) is particularly challenged by the issue of radiofrequency (RF) heating. Legal limits on RF heating make it hard to reliably suppress signals from skeletal muscle that can contaminate human cardiac (31)P spectra at 7T. We introduce the first surface-spoiling crusher coil for human cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. A planar crusher coil design was optimized with simulations and its performance was validated in phantoms. Crusher gradient pulses (100 μs) were then applied during human cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. In a phantom, residual signals were 50 ± 10% with BISTRO (B1 -insensitive train to obliterate signal), and 34 ± 8% with the crusher coil. In vivo, residual signals in skeletal muscle were 49 ± 4% using BISTRO, and 24 ± 5% using the crusher coil. Meanwhile, in the interventricular septum, spectral quality and metabolite quantification did not differ significantly between BISTRO (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate [PCr/ATP] = 2.1 ± 0.4) and the crusher coil (PCr/ATP = 1.8 ± 0.4). However, the specific absorption rate (SAR) decreased from 96 ± 1% of the limit (BISTRO) to 16 ± 1% (crusher coil). A crusher coil is an SAR-efficient alternative for selectively suppressing skeletal muscle during cardiac (31)P-MRS at 7T. A crusher coil allows the use of sequence modules that would have been SAR-prohibitive, without compromising skeletal muscle suppression. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance.

  18. Suppression of skeletal muscle signal using a crusher coil: A human cardiac 31p‐MR spectroscopy study at 7 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, William T.; Neubauer, Stefan; Robson, Matthew D.; Rodgers, Christopher T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The translation of sophisticated phosphorus MR spectroscopy (31P‐MRS) protocols to 7 Tesla (T) is particularly challenged by the issue of radiofrequency (RF) heating. Legal limits on RF heating make it hard to reliably suppress signals from skeletal muscle that can contaminate human cardiac 31P spectra at 7T. We introduce the first surface‐spoiling crusher coil for human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. Methods A planar crusher coil design was optimized with simulations and its performance was validated in phantoms. Crusher gradient pulses (100 μs) were then applied during human cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. Results In a phantom, residual signals were 50 ± 10% with BISTRO (B1‐insensitive train to obliterate signal), and 34 ± 8% with the crusher coil. In vivo, residual signals in skeletal muscle were 49 ± 4% using BISTRO, and 24 ± 5% using the crusher coil. Meanwhile, in the interventricular septum, spectral quality and metabolite quantification did not differ significantly between BISTRO (phosphocreatine/adenosine triphosphate [PCr/ATP] = 2.1 ± 0.4) and the crusher coil (PCr/ATP = 1.8 ± 0.4). However, the specific absorption rate (SAR) decreased from 96 ± 1% of the limit (BISTRO) to 16 ± 1% (crusher coil). Conclusion A crusher coil is an SAR‐efficient alternative for selectively suppressing skeletal muscle during cardiac 31P‐MRS at 7T. A crusher coil allows the use of sequence modules that would have been SAR‐prohibitive, without compromising skeletal muscle suppression. Magn Reson Med 75:962–972, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Medicine in Resonance. PMID:25924813

  19. Exercise Protects Against Defective Insulin Signaling and Insulin Resistance of Glucose Transport in Skeletal Muscle of Angiotensin II-Infused Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juthamard Surapongchai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study investigated the impact of voluntary exercise on insulin-stimulated glucose transport and the protein expression and phosphorylation status of the signaling molecules known to be involved in the glucose transport process in the soleus muscle as well as other cardiometabolic risks in a rat model with insulin resistance syndrome induced by chronic angiotensin II (ANGII infusion.Materials and Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to sedentary or voluntary wheel running (VWR groups. Following a 6-week period, rats in each group were subdivided and subcutaneously administered either normal saline or ANGII at 100 ng/kg/min for 14 days. Blood pressure, glucose tolerance, insulin-stimulated glucose transport and signaling proteins, including insulin receptor (IR, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1, Akt, Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160, AMPKα, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK, p38 MAPK, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, ANGII type 1 receptor (AT1R, ACE2, Mas receptor (MasR and oxidative stress marker in the soleus muscle, were evaluated.Results: Exercise protected against the insulin resistance of glucose transport and defective insulin signaling molecules in the soleus muscle; this effect was associated with a significant increase in AMPK Thr172 (43% and decreases in oxidative stress marker (31% and insulin-induced p38 MAPK Thr180/Tyr182 (45% and SAPK/JNK Thr183/Tyr185 (25%, without significant changes in expression of AT1R, AT2R, ACE, ACE2, and MasR when compared to the sedentary rats given ANGII infusion. At the systemic level, VWR significantly decreased body weight, fat weight, and systolic blood pressure as well as improved serum lipid profiles.Conclusion: Voluntary exercise can alleviate insulin resistance of glucose transport and impaired insulin signaling molecules in the soleus muscle and improve whole-body insulin sensitivity in rats chronically administered with ANGII.

  20. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Mechanoactivation Involves RGS5 (Regulator of G Protein Signaling 5) in Skeletal Muscle Arteries: Impaired Trafficking of RGS5 in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Kwangseok; Li, Min; Nourian, Zahra; Meininger, Gerald A; Hill, Michael A

    2017-12-01

    Studies suggest that arteriolar pressure-induced vasoconstriction can be initiated by GPCRs (G protein-coupled receptors), including the AT 1 R (angiotensin II type 1 receptor). This raises the question, are such mechanisms regulated by negative feedback? The present studies examined whether RGS (regulators of G protein signaling) proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells are colocalized with the AT 1 R when activated by mechanical stress or angiotensin II and whether this modulates AT 1 R-mediated vasoconstriction. To determine whether activation of the AT 1 R recruits RGS5, an in situ proximity ligation assay was performed in primary cultures of cremaster muscle arteriolar vascular smooth muscle cells treated with angiotensin II or hypotonic solution in the absence or presence of candesartan (an AT 1 R blocker). Proximity ligation assay results revealed a concentration-dependent increase in trafficking/translocation of RGS5 toward the activated AT 1 R, which was attenuated by candesartan. In intact arterioles, knockdown of RGS5 enhanced constriction to angiotensin II and augmented myogenic responses to increased intraluminal pressure. Myogenic constriction was attenuated to a higher degree by candesartan in RGS5 siRNA-transfected arterioles, consistent with RGS5 contributing to downregulation of AT 1 R-mediated signaling. Further, translocation of RGS5 was impaired in vascular smooth muscle cells of spontaneously hypertensive rats. This is consistent with dysregulated (RGS5-mediated) AT 1 R signaling that could contribute to excessive vasoconstriction in hypertension. In intact vessels, candesartan reduced myogenic vasoconstriction to a greater extent in spontaneously hypertensive rats compared with controls. Collectively, these findings suggest that AT 1 R activation results in translocation of RGS5 toward the plasma membrane, limiting AT 1 R-mediated vasoconstriction through its role in G q/11 protein-dependent signaling. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Colocalization properties of elementary Ca(2+) release signals with structures specific to the contractile filaments and the tubular system of intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiev, Tihomir; Zapiec, Bolek; Förderer, Moritz; Fink, Rainer H A; Vogel, Martin

    2015-12-01

    Ca(2+) regulates several important intracellular processes. We combined second harmonic generation (SHG) and two photon excited fluorescence microscopy (2PFM) to simultaneously record the SHG signal of the myosin filaments and localized elementary Ca(2+) release signals (LCSs). We found LCSs associated with Y-shaped structures of the myosin filament pattern (YMs), so called verniers, in intact mouse skeletal muscle fibers under hypertonic treatment. Ion channels crucial for the Ca(2+) regulation are located in the tubular system, a system that is important for Ca(2+) regulation and excitation-contraction coupling. We investigated the tubular system of intact, living mouse skeletal muscle fibers using 2PFM and the fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator Fluo-4 dissolved in the external solution or the membrane dye di-8-ANEPPS. We simultaneously measured the SHG signal from the myosin filaments of the skeletal muscle fibers. We found that at least a subset of the YMs observed in SHG images are closely juxtaposed with Y-shaped structures of the transverse tubules (YTs). The distances of corresponding YMs and YTs yield values between 1.3 μm and 4.1 μm including pixel uncertainty with a mean distance of 2.52±0.10 μm (S.E.M., n=41). Additionally, we observed that some of the linear-shaped areas in the tubular system are colocalized with linear-shaped areas in the SHG images. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transiently Active Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Is Not Required but Must Be Silenced for Stem Cell Function during Muscle Regeneration

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    Malea M. Murphy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult muscle’s exceptional capacity for regeneration is mediated by muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells. As with many stem cells, Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been proposed to be critical in satellite cells during regeneration. Using new genetic reagents, we explicitly test in vivo whether Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary and sufficient within satellite cells and their derivatives for regeneration. We find that signaling is transiently active in transit-amplifying myoblasts, but is not required for regeneration or satellite cell self-renewal. Instead, downregulation of transiently activated β-catenin is important to limit the regenerative response, as continuous regeneration is deleterious. Wnt/β-catenin activation in adult satellite cells may simply be a vestige of their developmental lineage, in which β-catenin signaling is critical for fetal myogenesis. In the adult, surprisingly, we show that it is not activation but rather silencing of Wnt/β-catenin signaling that is important for muscle regeneration.

  3. Electrical vs manual acupuncture stimulation in a rat model of polycystic ovary syndrome: different effects on muscle and fat tissue insulin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Johansson

    Full Text Available In rats with dihydrotestosterone (DHT-induced polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, repeated low-frequency electrical stimulation of acupuncture needles restores whole-body insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. We hypothesized that electrical stimulation causing muscle contractions and manual stimulation causing needle sensation have different effects on insulin sensitivity and related signaling pathways in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, with electrical stimulation being more effective in DHT-induced PCOS rats. From age 70 days, rats received manual or low-frequency electrical stimulation of needles in abdominal and hind limb muscle five times/wk for 4-5 wks; controls were handled but untreated rats. Low-frequency electrical stimulation modified gene expression (decreased Tbc1d1 in soleus, increased Nr4a3 in mesenteric fat and protein expression (increased pAS160/AS160, Nr4a3 and decreased GLUT4 by western blot and increased GLUT4 expression by immunohistochemistry in soleus muscle; glucose clearance during oral glucose tolerance tests was unaffected. Manual stimulation led to faster glucose clearance and modified mainly gene expression in mesenteric adipose tissue (increased Nr4a3, Mapk3/Erk, Adcy3, Gsk3b, but not protein expression to the same extent; however, Nr4a3 was reduced in soleus muscle. The novel finding is that electrical and manual muscle stimulation affect glucose homeostasis in DHT-induced PCOS rats through different mechanisms. Repeated electrical stimulation regulated key functional molecular pathways important for insulin sensitivity in soleus muscle and mesenteric adipose tissue to a larger extent than manual stimulation. Manual stimulation improved whole-body glucose tolerance, an effect not observed after electrical stimulation, but did not affect molecular signaling pathways to the same extent as electrical stimulation. Although more functional signaling pathways related to insulin sensitivity

  4. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Li, Fengna; Kong, Xiangfeng; Tan, Bie; Li, Yinghui; Duan, Yehui; Blachier, François; Hu, Chien-An A; Yin, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA) pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet)- or higher/NRC (National Research Council)-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I) and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II) were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (Prelated AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05) than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K), and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05). There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05) the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but repressed (P<0.05) the level for p70S6K in Landrace pigs. The higher protein-NRC diet increased ratio of p-mTOR/mTOR in

  5. Vitamin C and E supplementation alters protein signalling after a strength training session, but not muscle growth during 10 weeks of training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, G; Hamarsland, H; Cumming, K T; Johansen, R E; Hulmi, J J; Børsheim, E; Wiig, H; Garthe, I; Raastad, T

    2014-12-15

    This study investigated the effects of vitamin C and E supplementation on acute responses and adaptations to strength training. Thirty-two recreationally strength-trained men and women were randomly allocated to receive a vitamin C and E supplement (1000 mg day(-1) and 235 mg day(-1), respectively), or a placebo, for 10 weeks. During this period the participants' training involved heavy-load resistance exercise four times per week. Muscle biopsies from m. vastus lateralis were collected, and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and maximal isometric voluntary contraction force, body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and muscle cross-sectional area (magnetic resonance imaging) were measured before and after the intervention. Furthermore, the cellular responses to a single exercise session were assessed midway in the training period by measurements of muscle protein fractional synthetic rate and phosphorylation of several hypertrophic signalling proteins. Muscle biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis twice before, and 100 and 150 min after, the exercise session (4 × 8RM, leg press and knee-extension). The supplementation did not affect the increase in muscle mass or the acute change in protein synthesis, but it hampered certain strength increases (biceps curl). Moreover, increased phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 and p70S6 kinase after the exercise session was blunted by vitamin C and E supplementation. The total ubiquitination levels after the exercise session, however, were lower with vitamin C and E than placebo. We concluded that vitamin C and E supplementation interfered with the acute cellular response to heavy-load resistance exercise and demonstrated tentative long-term negative effects on adaptation to strength training. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  6. Power frequency spectrum analysis of surface EMG signals of upper limb muscles during elbow flexion - A comparison between healthy subjects and stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Silvija; Ribagin, Simeon; Raikova, Rositsa; Veneva, Ivanka

    2018-02-01

    After a stroke, motor units stop working properly and large, fast-twitch units are more frequently affected. Their impaired functions can be investigated during dynamic tasks using electromyographic (EMG) signal analysis. The aim of this paper is to investigate changes in the parameters of the power/frequency function during elbow flexion between affected, non-affected, and healthy muscles. Fifteen healthy subjects and ten stroke survivors participated in the experiments. Electromyographic data from 6 muscles of the upper limbs during elbow flexion were filtered and normalized to the amplitudes of EMG signals during maximal isometric tasks. The moments when motion started and when the flexion angle reached its maximal value were found. Equal intervals of 0.3407 s were defined between these two moments and one additional interval before the start of the flexion (first one) was supplemented. For each of these intervals the power/frequency function of EMG signals was calculated. The mean (MNF) and median frequencies (MDF), the maximal power (MPw) and the area under the power function (APw) were calculated. MNF was always higher than MDF. A significant decrease in these frequencies was found in only three post-stroke survivors. The frequencies in the first time interval were nearly always the highest among all intervals. The maximal power was nearly zero during first time interval and increased during the next ones. The largest values of MPw and APw were found for the flexor muscles and they increased for the muscles of the affected arm compared to the non-affected one of stroke survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. GH signaling in human adipose and muscle tissue during 'feast and famine': amplification of exercise stimulation following fasting compared to glucose administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendelbo, Mikkel H; Christensen, Britt; Grønbæk, Solbritt B; Høgild, Morten; Madsen, Michael; Pedersen, Steen B; Jørgensen, Jens O L; Jessen, Niels; Møller, Niels

    2015-09-01

    Fasting and exercise stimulates, whereas glucose suppresses GH secretion, but it is uncertain how these conditions impact GH signaling in peripheral tissues. To test the original 'feast and famine hypothesis' by Rabinowitz and Zierler, according to which the metabolic effects of GH are predominant during fasting, we specifically hypothesized that fasting and exercise act in synergy to increase STAT-5b target gene expression. Eight healthy men were studied on two occasions in relation to a 1 h exercise bout: i) with a concomitant i.v. glucose infusion ('feast') and ii) after a 36 h fast ('famine'). Muscle and fat biopsy specimens were obtained before, immediately after, and 30 min after exercise. GH increased during exercise on both examination days and this effect was amplified by fasting, and free fatty acid (FFA) levels increased after fasting. STAT-5b phosphorylation increased similarly following exercise on both occasions. In adipose tissue, suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) and SOCS2 were increased after exercise on the fasting day and both fasting and exercise increased cytokine inducible SH2-containing protein (CISH). In muscle, SOCS2 and CISH mRNA were persistently increased after fasting. Muscle SOCS1, SOCS3, and CISH mRNA expression increased, whereas SOCS2 decreased after exercise on both examination days. This study demonstrates that fasting and exercise act in tandem to amplify STAT-5b target gene expression (SOCS and CISH) in adipose and muscle tissue in accordance with the 'feast and famine hypothesis'; the adipose tissue signaling responses, which hitherto have not been scrutinized, may play a particular role in promoting FFA mobilization. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  8. Attenuation of p38α MAPK stress response signaling delays the in vivo aging of skeletal muscle myofibers and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaconstantinou, John; Wang, Chen Z; Zhang, Min; Yang, San; Deford, James; Bulavin, Dmitry V; Ansari, Naseem H

    2015-09-01

    Functional competence and self-renewal of mammalian skeletal muscle myofibers and progenitor cells declines with age. Progression of the muscle aging phenotype involves the decline of juvenile protective factorsi.e., proteins whose beneficial functions translate directly to the quality of life, and self-renewal of progenitor cells. These characteristics occur simultaneously with the age-associated increase of p38α stress response signaling. This suggests that the maintenance of low levels of p38α activity of juvenile tissues may delay or attenuate aging. We used the dominant negative haploinsufficient p38α mouse (DN-p38α(AF/+)) to demonstrate that in vivo attenuation of p38α activity in the gastrocnemius of the aged mutant delays age-associated processes that include: a) the decline of the juvenile protective factors, BubR1, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A (ALDH1A1), and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2); b) attenuated expression of p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) tumor suppressor genes of the Cdkn2a locus; c) decreased levels of hydroxynonenal protein adducts, expression of COX2 and iNOS; d) decline of the senescent progenitor cell pool level and d) the loss of gastrocnemius muscle mass. We propose that elevated P-p38α activity promotes skeletal muscle aging and that the homeostasis of p38α impacts the maintenance of a beneficial healthspan.

  9. Acute Exercise Induced Mitochondrial H2O2 Production in Mouse Skeletal Muscle: Association with p66Shc and FOXO3a Signaling and Antioxidant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercise induced skeletal muscle phenotype change involves a complex interplay between signaling pathways and downstream regulators. This study aims to investigate the effect of acute exercise on mitochondrial H2O2 production and its association with p66Shc, FOXO3a, and antioxidant enzymes. Male ICR/CD-1 mice were subjected to an acute exercise. Muscle tissues (gastrocnemius and quadriceps femoris were taken after exercise to measure mitochondrial H2O2 content, expression of p66Shc and FOXO3a, and the activity of antioxidant enzymes. The results showed that acute exercise significantly increased mitochondrial H2O2 content and expressions of p66Shc and FOXO3a in a time-dependent manner, with a linear correlation between the increase in H2O2 content and p66Shc or FOXO3a expression. The activity of mitochondrial catalase was slightly reduced in the 90 min exercise group, but it was significantly higher in groups with 120 and 150 min exercise compared to that of 90 min exercise group. The activity of SOD was not significantly affected. The results indicate that acute exercise increases mitochondrial H2O2 production in the skeletal muscle, which is associated with the upregulation of p66Shc and FOXO3a. The association of p66Shc and FOXO3a signaling with exercise induced H2O2 generation may play a role in regulating cellular oxidative stress during acute exercise.

  10. Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 to attenuate insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Baran A; Tarun, Akansha; D'Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D; Cohen, David E

    2013-07-30

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenced by insulin-independent IRS2 activation after knockdown, genetic ablation, or chemical inhibition of PC-TP. In addition, IRS2 was activated after knockdown of THEM2, providing support for a role for the interaction of PC-TP with THEM2 in suppressing insulin signaling. Additionally, we showed that PC-TP bound to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and stabilized the components of the TSC1-TSC2 complex, which functions to inhibit mTORC1. Preventing phosphatidylcholine from binding to PC-TP disrupted interactions of PC-TP with THEM2 and TSC2, and disruption of the PC-TP-THEM2 complex was associated with increased activation of both IRS2 and mTORC1. In livers of mice with genetic ablation of PC-TP or that had been treated with a PC-TP inhibitor, steady-state amounts of IRS2 were increased, whereas those of TSC2 were decreased. These findings reveal a phospholipid-dependent mechanism that suppresses insulin signaling downstream of its receptor.

  11. Obesity impairs skeletal muscle AMPK signaling during exercise: role of AMPKα2 in the regulation of exercise capacity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Young, R S; Ayala, J E; Fueger, P T; Mayes, W H; Kang, L; Wasserman, D H

    2011-07-01

    Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α2 activity is impaired in obese, insulin-resistant individuals during exercise. We determined whether this defect contributes to the metabolic dysregulation and reduced exercise capacity observed in the obese state. C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice and/or mice expressing a kinase dead AMPKα2 subunit in skeletal muscle (α2-KD) were fed chow or high-fat (HF) diets from 3 to 16 weeks of age. At 15 weeks, mice performed an exercise stress test to determine exercise capacity. In WT mice, muscle glucose uptake and skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activity was assessed in chronically catheterized mice (carotid artery/jugular vein) at 16 weeks. In a separate study, HF-fed WT and α2-KD mice performed 5 weeks of exercise training (from 15 to 20 weeks of age) to test whether AMPKα2 is necessary to restore work tolerance. HF-fed WT mice had reduced exercise tolerance during an exercise stress test, and an attenuation in muscle glucose uptake and AMPKα2 activity during a single bout of exercise (Pfeeding further reduced running time ∼25% (Pexercise training, HF-fed WT and α2-KD mice increased maximum running speed ∼35% (PExercise training restored running speed to levels seen in healthy, chow-fed mice. HF feeding impairs AMPKα2 activity in skeletal muscle during exercise in vivo. Although this defect directly contributes to reduced exercise capacity, findings in HF-fed α2-KD mice show that AMPKα2-independent mechanisms are also involved. Importantly, α2-KD mice on a HF-fed diet adapt to regular exercise by increasing exercise tolerance, demonstrating that this adaptation is independent of skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activity.

  12. Diethyl hexyl phthalate-induced changes in insulin signaling molecules and the protective role of antioxidant vitamins in gastrocnemius muscle of adult male rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Chinnapaiyan; Khan, Adam Ismail; Balaji, Venkataraman; Selvaraj, Jayaraman; Balasubramanian, Karundevi, E-mail: kbala82@rediffmail.com

    2011-12-15

    Diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an endocrine disruptor, it influences various organ systems in human beings and experimental animals. DEHP reduced the serum testosterone and increased the blood glucose, estradiol, T{sub 3} and T{sub 4} in rats. However, the effect of DEHP on insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle is not known. Adult male albino rats were divided into four groups: Group I: Control; Groups II and III: DEHP treated (dissolved in olive oil at a dose of 10 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days); and Group IV: DEHP (100 mg/kg body weight) plus vitamins E (50 mg/kg body weight) and C (100 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in olive oil and distilled water, respectively, once daily through gastric intubation for 30 days. On completion of treatment, animals were euthanized and perfused (whole body); gastrocnemius muscle was dissected out and subjected to assessment of various parameters. DEHP treatment increased the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, hydroxyl radical levels and lipid peroxidation which disrupt the membrane integrity and insulin receptor. DEHP impaired the insulin signal transduction, glucose uptake and oxidation through decreased expression of plasma membrane GLUT4, which may partly be responsible for the elevation of fasting blood glucose level. The present study suggests that DEHP exposure affects glucose oxidation in skeletal muscle and is mediated through enhanced lipid peroxidation, impaired insulin signaling and GLUT4 expression in plasma membrane. Antioxidant vitamins (C and E) have a protective role against the adverse effect of DEHP. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP treatment significantly decreased serum insulin and testosterone levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased ROS and decreased glucose uptake were observed in DEHP treated animals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired insulin signaling in gastrocnemius muscle was observed in DEHP treatment. Black

  13. Role of the medial medullary reticular formation in relaying vestibular signals to the diaphragm and abdominal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, R. L.; Bergsman, A. E.; Holmes, M. J.; Yates, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    Changes in posture can affect the resting length of respiratory muscles, requiring alterations in the activity of these muscles if ventilation is to be unaffected. Recent studies have shown that the vestibular system contributes to altering respiratory muscle activity during movement and changes in posture. Furthermore, anatomical studies have demonstrated that many bulbospinal neurons in the medial medullary reticular formation (MRF) provide inputs to phrenic and abdominal motoneurons; because this region of the reticular formation receives substantial vestibular and other movement-related input, it seems likely that medial medullary reticulospinal neurons could adjust the activity of respiratory motoneurons during postural alterations. The objective of the present study was to determine whether functional lesions of the MRF affect inspiratory and expiratory muscle responses to activation of the vestibular system. Lidocaine or muscimol injections into the MRF produced a large increase in diaphragm and abdominal muscle responses to vestibular stimulation. These vestibulo-respiratory responses were eliminated following subsequent chemical blockade of descending pathways in the lateral medulla. However, inactivation of pathways coursing through the lateral medulla eliminated excitatory, but not inhibitory, components of vestibulo-respiratory responses. The simplest explanation for these data is that MRF neurons that receive input from the vestibular nuclei make inhibitory connections with diaphragm and abdominal motoneurons, whereas a pathway that courses laterally in the caudal medulla provides excitatory vestibular inputs to these motoneurons.

  14. Influence of aging on isometric muscle strength, fat-free mass and electromyographic signal power of the upper and lower limbs in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Josária F.; Alvim, Felipe C.; Castro, Eliane A.; Doimo, Leonice A.; Silva, Marcus V.; Novo, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Aging is a multifactorial process that leads to changes in the quantity and quality of skeletal muscle and contributes to decreased levels of muscle strength. Objective This study sought to investigate whether the isometric muscle strength, fat-free mass (FFM) and power of the electromyographic (EMG) signal of the upper and lower limbs of women are similarly affected by aging. Method The sample consisted of 63 women, who were subdivided into three groups (young (YO) n=33, 24.7±3.5 years; middle age (MA) n=15, 58.6±4.2 years; and older adults (OA). n=15, 72.0±4.2 years). Isometric strength was recorded simultaneously with the capture of the electrical activity of the flexor muscles of the fingers and the vastus lateralis during handgrip and knee extension tests, respectively. FFM was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Results The handgrip strength measurements were similar among groups (p=0.523), whereas the FFM of the upper limbs was lower in group OA compared to group YO (p=0.108). The RMSn values of the hand flexors were similar among groups (p=0.754). However, the strength of the knee extensors, the FFM of the lower limbs and the RMSn values of the vastus lateralis were lower in groups MA (p=0.014, p=0.006 and p=0.013, respectively) and OA (p=0.000, p=0.000 and pisometric muscle strength in MLG and electromyographic activity of the lower limbs are more pronounced with the aging process of the upper limb. PMID:24676705

  15. Sarcopaenia: Where do we stand after two decades of research?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle mass as sarcopaenia (Greek sarx=flesh and paenia=loss).2 The estimated relative annual rate of loss of muscle mass is 1% in men and 0.84% in women.1 ... over a prolonged period.1 The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway in muscle plays a key role in regulating exercise-.

  16. Mechanisms of amino acid sensing in mTOR signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eunjung

    2009-01-01

    Amino acids are fundamental nutrients for protein synthesis and cell growth (increase in cell size). Recently, many compelling evidences have shown that the level of amino acids is sensed by extra- or intra-cellular amino acids sensor(s) and regulates protein synthesis/degradation. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is placed in a central position in cell growth regulation and dysregulation of mTOR signaling pathway has been implicated in many serious human diseases including ca...

  17. Obesity impairs skeletal muscle AMPK signaling during exercise: role of AMPK?2 in the regulation of exercise capacity in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Lee-Young, Robert S.; Ayala, Julio E.; Fueger, Patrick T.; Mayes, Wesley H.; Kang, Li; Wasserman, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)?2 activity is impaired in obese, insulin resistant individuals during exercise. We determined whether this defect contributes to the metabolic dysregulation and reduced exercise capacity observed in the obese state. Design C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice and/or mice expressing a kinase dead AMPK?2 subunit in skeletal muscle (?2-KD) were fed chow or high fat (HF) diets from 3?16 weeks (wks) of age. At 15wks mice performed an exercise s...

  18. Signaling Pathways Related to Protein Synthesis and Amino Acid Concentration in Pig Skeletal Muscles Depend on the Dietary Protein Level, Genotype and Developmental Stages.

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    Yingying Liu

    Full Text Available Muscle growth is regulated by the homeostatic balance of the biosynthesis and degradation of muscle proteins. To elucidate the molecular interactions among diet, pig genotype, and physiological stage, we examined the effect of dietary protein concentration, pig genotype, and physiological stages on amino acid (AA pools, protein deposition, and related signaling pathways in different types of skeletal muscles. The study used 48 Landrace pigs and 48 pure-bred Bama mini-pigs assigned to each of 2 dietary treatments: lower/GB (Chinese conventional diet- or higher/NRC (National Research Council-protein diet. Diets were fed from 5 weeks of age to respective market weights of each genotype. Samples of biceps femoris muscle (BFM, type I and longissimus dorsi muscle (LDM, type II were collected at nursery, growing, and finishing phases according to the physiological stage of each genotype, to determine the AA concentrations, mRNA levels for growth-related genes in muscles, and protein abundances of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling pathway. Our data showed that the concentrations of most AAs in LDM and BFM of pigs increased (P<0.05 gradually with increasing age. Bama mini-pigs had generally higher (P<0.05 muscle concentrations of flavor-related AA, including Met, Phe, Tyr, Pro, and Ser, compared with Landrace pigs. The mRNA levels for myogenic determining factor, myogenin, myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2 A, and myostatin of Bama mini-pigs were higher (P<0.05 than those of Landrace pigs, while total and phosphorylated protein levels for protein kinase B, mTOR, and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinases (p70S6K, and ratios of p-mTOR/mTOR, p-AKT/AKT, and p-p70S6K/p70S6K were lower (P<0.05. There was a significant pig genotype-dependent effect of dietary protein on the levels for mTOR and p70S6K. When compared with the higher protein-NRC diet, the lower protein-GB diet increased (P<0.05 the levels for mTOR and p70S6K in Bama mini-pigs, but

  19. NF-kappaB signaling mediates vascular smooth muscle endothelin type B receptor expression in resistance arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Jian-Pu; Zhang, Yaping; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC) endothelin type B (ET(B)) receptor upregulation results in strong vasoconstriction and reduction of local blood flow. We hypothesizes that the underlying molecular mechanisms involve transcriptional factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) pathway. ET(B) recepto...

  20. Post-exercise cold water immersion attenuates acute anabolic signalling and long-term adaptations in muscle to strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Llion A; Raastad, Truls; Markworth, James F; Figueiredo, Vandre C; Egner, Ingrid M; Shield, Anthony; Cameron-Smith, David; Coombes, Jeff S; Peake, Jonathan M

    2015-09-15

    We investigated functional, morphological and molecular adaptations to strength training exercise and cold water immersion (CWI) through two separate studies. In one study, 21 physically active men strength trained for 12 weeks (2 days per week), with either 10 min of CWI or active recovery (ACT) after each training session. Strength and muscle mass increased more in the ACT group than in the CWI group (P work (19%), type II muscle fibre cross-sectional area (17%) and the number of myonuclei per fibre (26%) increased in the ACT group (all P < 0.05), but not the CWI group. In another study, nine active men performed a bout of single-leg strength exercises on separate days, followed by CWI or ACT. Muscle biopsies were collected before and 2, 24 and 48 h after exercise. The number of satellite cells expressing neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (10-30%) and paired box protein (Pax7) (20-50%) increased 24-48 h after exercise with ACT. The number of NCAM(+) satellite cells increased 48 h after exercise with CWI. NCAM(+) - and Pax7(+) -positive satellite cell numbers were greater after ACT than after CWI (P < 0.05). Phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase(Thr421/Ser424) increased after exercise in both conditions but was greater after ACT (P < 0.05). These data suggest that CWI attenuates the acute changes in satellite cell numbers and activity of kinases that regulate muscle hypertrophy, which may translate to smaller long-term training gains in muscle strength and hypertrophy. The use of CWI as a regular post-exercise recovery strategy should be reconsidered. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  1. The Link between Dietary Protein Intake, Skeletal Muscle Function and Health in Older Adults

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    Jamie I. Baum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle mass and function are progressively lost with age, a condition referred to as sarcopenia. By the age of 60, many older adults begin to be affected by muscle loss. There is a link between decreased muscle mass and strength and adverse health outcomes such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Data suggest that increasing dietary protein intake at meals may counterbalance muscle loss in older individuals due to the increased availability of amino acids, which stimulate muscle protein synthesis by activating the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTORC1. Increased muscle protein synthesis can lead to increased muscle mass, strength and function over time. This review aims to address the current recommended dietary allowance (RDA for protein and whether or not this value meets the needs for older adults based upon current scientific evidence. The current RDA for protein is 0.8 g/kg body weight/day. However, literature suggests that consuming protein in amounts greater than the RDA can improve muscle mass, strength and function in older adults.

  2. A hepatic amino acid/mTOR/S6K-dependent signalling pathway modulates systemic lipid metabolism via neuronal signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kenji; Yamada, Tetsuya; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Kaneko, Keizo; Ono, Hiraku; Asano, Tomoichiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2015-08-13

    Metabolism is coordinated among tissues and organs via neuronal signals. Levels of circulating amino acids (AAs), which are elevated in obesity, activate the intracellular target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1)/S6kinase (S6K) pathway in the liver. Here we demonstrate that hepatic AA/mTORC1/S6K signalling modulates systemic lipid metabolism via a mechanism involving neuronal inter-tissue communication. Hepatic expression of an AA transporter, SNAT2, activates the mTORC1/S6K pathway, and markedly elevates serum triglycerides (TGs), while downregulating adipose lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Hepatic Rheb or active-S6K expression have similar metabolic effects, whereas hepatic expression of dominant-negative-S6K inhibits TG elevation in SNAT2 mice. Denervation, pharmacological deafferentation and β-blocker administration suppress obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia with adipose LPL upregulation, suggesting that signals are transduced between liver and adipose tissue via a neuronal pathway consisting of afferent vagal and efferent sympathetic nerves. Thus, the neuronal mechanism uncovered here serves to coordinate amino acid and lipid levels and contributes to the development of obesity-related hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. Wushenziye Formula Improves Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus via PTP1B-IRS1-Akt-GLUT4 Signaling Pathway.

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    Tian, Chunyu; Chang, Hong; La, Xiaojin; Li, Ji-An

    2017-01-01

    Background. Wushenziye formula (WSZYF) is an effective traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Aim. This study aimed to identify the effects and underlying mechanisms of WSZYF on improving skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM. Methods. An animal model of T2DM was induced by Goto-Kakizaki diabetes prone rats fed with high fat and sugar for 4 weeks. Insulin resistance model was induced in skeletal muscle cell. Results. In vivo , WSZYF improved general conditions and decreased significantly fasting blood glucose, glycosylated serum protein, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin concentration, and insulin resistance index of T2DM rats. In vitro , WSZYF enhanced glucose consumption in insulin resistance model of skeletal muscle cell. Furthermore, WSZYF affected the expressions of molecules in regulating T2DM, including increasing the expressions of p-IRS1, p-Akt, and GLUT4, reducing PTP1B expression. Conclusion . These findings displayed the potential of WSZYF as a new drug candidate in the treatment of T2DM and the antidiabetic mechanism of WSZYF is probably mediated through modulating the PTP1B-IRS1-Akt-GLUT4 signaling pathway.

  4. Wushenziye Formula Improves Skeletal Muscle Insulin Resistance in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus via PTP1B-IRS1-Akt-GLUT4 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Wushenziye formula (WSZYF is an effective traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Aim. This study aimed to identify the effects and underlying mechanisms of WSZYF on improving skeletal muscle insulin resistance in T2DM. Methods. An animal model of T2DM was induced by Goto-Kakizaki diabetes prone rats fed with high fat and sugar for 4 weeks. Insulin resistance model was induced in skeletal muscle cell. Results. In vivo, WSZYF improved general conditions and decreased significantly fasting blood glucose, glycosylated serum protein, glycosylated hemoglobin, insulin concentration, and insulin resistance index of T2DM rats. In vitro, WSZYF enhanced glucose consumption in insulin resistance model of skeletal muscle cell. Furthermore, WSZYF affected the expressions of molecules in regulating T2DM, including increasing the expressions of p-IRS1, p-Akt, and GLUT4, reducing PTP1B expression. Conclusion. These findings displayed the potential of WSZYF as a new drug candidate in the treatment of T2DM and the antidiabetic mechanism of WSZYF is probably mediated through modulating the PTP1B-IRS1-Akt-GLUT4 signaling pathway.

  5. Inhibition of swallowing reflex following phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase in nucleus tractus solitarii neurons in rats with masseter muscle nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Kitagawa, Junichi; Ueda, Koichiro; Iwata, Koichi

    2009-02-06

    Pain is associated with swallowing abnormalities in dysphagic patients. Understanding neuronal mechanisms underlying the swallowing abnormalities associated with orofacial abnormal pain is crucial for developing new methods to treat dysphagic patients. However, how the orofacial abnormal pain is involved in the swallowing abnormalities is not known. In order to evaluate neuronal mechanisms of modulation of the swallows by masticatory muscle pain, here we first induced swallows by topical administration of distilled water to the pharyngolaryngeal region. The swallowing reflex was significantly inhibited after capsaicin (10, 30mM) injection into the masseter muscle compared to vehicle injection. Moreover the number of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase-like immunoreactive (pERK-LI) neurons in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) was significantly increased in the rats with capsaicin injection into the masseter muscle compared to that with vehicle injection. Rostro-caudal distribution of pERK-LI neurons in the NTS was peaked at the obex level. The capsaicin-induced inhibitory effect on swallowing reflex was reversed after intrathecal administration of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor, PD98059. The present findings suggest that phosphorylation of ERK in NTS neurons may be involved in capsaicin-induced inhibition of swallowing reflex.

  6. Transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess hexavalent chromium modifies insulin signaling in liver and skeletal muscle of rat progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shobana, Navaneethabalakrishnan; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael; Tochhawng, Lalmuankimi; Loganathan, Ayyalu; Balaji, Sadhasivam; Kumar, Mani Kathiresh; Banu, Liaquat Alikhan Sheerin; Navin, Ajit Kumar; Mayilvanan, Chinnaiyan; Ilangovan, Ramachandran; Balasubramanian, Karundevi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium (Cr), an essential micronutrient potentiates insulin action, whereas excess hexavalent Cr (CrVI) acts as an endocrine disruptor. Pregnant mothers living in areas abutting industries using the metal and chromite ore dumps are exposed to ground water contaminated with Cr. Nevertheless, the impact of prenatal exposure to excess CrVI on insulin signaling in the progeny remains obscure. We tested the hypothesis "transient gestational exposure to drinking water containing excess CrVI may modify insulin signaling during postnatal life". Pregnant Wistar rats were given drinking water containing 50, 100 and 200 ppm CrVI (K 2 Cr 2 O 7 ) from gestational day 9-14 encompassing the period of organogenesis; the male progenies were tested at postnatal day 60. Neither fasting blood glucose nor oral glucose tolerance was altered in CrVI treated progeny. Nevertheless, western blot detection pointed out attenuated expression level of insulin receptor (IR), its downstream signaling molecules (IRS-1, pIRS-1 Tyr632 , Akt and pAkt Ser473 ) and organ specific glucose transporters (GLUT2 in liver and GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle), along with a significant increase in serum insulin level in male progenies exposed to CrVI. While 14 C-2-deoxy glucose uptake increased in the liver, the same decreased in the skeletal muscle whereas, 14 C-glucose oxidation recorded a consistent decrease in both tissues of CrVI exposed rats. These findings support our hypothesis and suggest that transient gestational exposure to excess CrVI may affect insulin signaling and glucose oxidation in the progeny, predictably rendering them vulnerable to insulin resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  8. Muscle Contraction Regulates BDNF/TrkB Signaling to Modulate Synaptic Function through Presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Erica; Cilleros, Víctor; Nadal, Laura; Simó, Anna; Obis, Teresa; Garcia, Neus; Santafé, Manel M; Tomàs, Marta; Halievski, Katherine; Jordan, Cynthia L; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Josep

    2017-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts via tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) to regulate synapse maintenance and function in the neuromuscular system. The potentiation of acetylcholine (ACh) release by BDNF requires TrkB phosphorylation and Protein Kinase C (PKC) activation. BDNF is secreted in an activity-dependent manner but it is not known if pre- and/or postsynaptic activities enhance BDNF expression in vivo at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Here, we investigated whether nerve and muscle cell activities regulate presynaptic conventional PKC (cPKCα and βI) via BDNF/TrkB signaling to modulate synaptic strength at the NMJ. To differentiate the effects of presynaptic activity from that of muscle contraction, we stimulated the phrenic nerve of rat diaphragms (1 Hz, 30 min) with or without contraction (abolished by μ-conotoxin GIIIB). Then, we performed ELISA, Western blotting, qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and electrophysiological techniques. We found that nerve-induced muscle contraction: (1) increases the levels of mature BDNF protein without affecting pro-BDNF protein or BDNF mRNA levels; (2) downregulates TrkB.T1 without affecting TrkB.FL or p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75) levels; (3) increases presynaptic cPKCα and cPKCβI protein level through TrkB signaling; and (4) enhances phosphorylation of cPKCα and cPKCβI. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cPKCβI, which is exclusively located in the motor nerve terminals, increases activity-induced acetylcholine release. Together, these results show that nerve-induced muscle contraction is a key regulator of BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway, retrogradely activating presynaptic cPKC isoforms (in particular cPKCβI) to modulate synaptic function. These results indicate that a decrease in neuromuscular activity, as occurs in several neuromuscular disorders, could affect the BDNF/TrkB/