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Sample records for muscle invasive bladder

  1. Analysis of intravesical recurrence after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozawa, Mizuki; Miyanaga, Naoto; Hinotsu, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the pattern of recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The subjects were 77 patients with T2-3N0M0 bladder cancer whose bladder was preserved by intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation. The patterns of the first recurrences were retrospectively analyzed. With a median follow-up of 38.5 months, 17 patients (22.1%) experienced intravesical recurrence without metastasis, 14 (82.4%) of which were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence and 3 (17.6%) of which were muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrences. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at the same site as the initial tumor site in all three cases, whereas non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurred at different sites in 64% of the patients in that group. The peak hazard of the non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence was observed at around a year after treatment. Recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer was of a significantly lower histological grade with lower Ki-67-labeling indices than the initial muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Twelve (85.7%) of 14 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence achieved disease-free status. The multivariate analysis revealed that multiplicity, grade and tumor size were significantly correlated with the recurrence (P=0.0001, 0.0442 and 0.0412, respectively). Most of the recurrences after bladder-preserving therapy were cases of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The recurrence pattern and characteristics of the tumors did not differ from those of primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients with high-risk factors would be candidates for prophylactic intravesical therapy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence. (author)

  2. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Agrawal, Sachin; Bläckberg, Mats

    2017-01-01

    The management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has evolved from the first reports on bladder endoscopy and transurethral resection to the introduction of adjuvant intravesical treatment. However, disease recurrence and progression remain an ongoing risk, placing a heavy burden...

  3. Selective bladder preservation with curative intent for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A contemporary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Fumitaka; Kihara, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    Radical cystectomy plus urinary diversion, the reference standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, associates with high complication rates and compromises quality of life as a result of long-term effects on urinary, gastrointestinal and sexual function, and changes in body image. As a society ages, the number of elderly patients unfit for radical cystectomy as a result of comorbidity will increase, and thus the demand for bladder-sparing approaches for muscle-invasive bladder cancer will also inevitably increase. Trimodality bladder-sparing approaches consisting of transurethral resection, chemotherapy and radiotherapy (Σ55-65 Gy) yield overall survival rates comparable with those of radical cystectomy series (50-70% at 5 years), while preserving the native bladder in 40-60% of muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients, contributing to an improvement in quality of life for such patients. Limitations of the trimodality therapy include muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence in the preserved bladder, which most often arises in the original muscle-invasive bladder cancer site; potential lack of curative intervention for regional lymph nodes; and increased morbidity in the event of salvage radical cystectomy for remaining or recurrent disease as a result of high-dose pelvic irradiation. Consolidative partial cystectomy with pelvic lymph node dissection followed by induction chemoradiotherapy at lower dose (exempli gratia (e.g.) 40 Gy) is a rational strategy for overcoming such limitations by strengthening locoregional control and reducing radiation dosage. Molecular profiling of the tumor and functional imaging might play important roles in optimal patient selection for bladder preservation. Refinement of radiation techniques, intensified concurrent or adjuvant chemotherapy, and novel sensitizers, including molecular targeting agent, are also expected to improve outcomes and consequently provide more muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients with favorable

  4. Results of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honnens De Lichtenberg, Mette; Miskowiak, J; Rolff, H

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer.......To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on ureteric obstruction due to muscle-invasive bladder cancer....

  5. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  6. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

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    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  7. Prognosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: difference between primary and progressive tumours and implications for therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrier, B.P.; Hollander, M.P.; Rhijn, B.W. van; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the difference in prognosis between progressive and primary muscle-invasive bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1986 to 2000, 74 patients with progressive muscle-invasive bladder cancer were identified. Eighty-nine patients with primary muscle-invasive bladder cancer

  8. p63 expression defines a lethal subset of muscle-invasive bladder cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woonyoung Choi

    Full Text Available p63 is a member of the p53 family that has been implicated in maintenance of epithelial stem cell compartments. Previous studies demonstrated that p63 is downregulated in muscle-invasive bladder cancers, but the relationship between p63 expression and survival is not clear.We used real-time PCR to characterize p63 expression and several genes implicated in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT in human bladder cancer cell lines (n = 15 and primary tumors (n = 101. We correlated tumor marker expression with stage, disease-specific (DSS, and overall survival (OS. Expression of E-cadherin and p63 correlated directly with one another and inversely with expression of the mesenchymal markers Zeb-1, Zeb-2, and vimentin. Non-muscle-invasive (Ta and T1 bladder cancers uniformly expressed high levels of E-cadherin and p63 and low levels of the mesenchymal markers. Interestingly, a subset of muscle-invasive (T2-T4 tumors maintained high levels of E-cadherin and p63 expression. As expected, there was a strongly significant correlation between EMT marker expression and muscle invasion (p<0.0001. However, OS was shorter in patients with muscle-invasive tumors that retained p63 (p = 0.007.Our data confirm that molecular markers of EMT are elevated in muscle-invasive bladder cancers, but interestingly, retention of the "epithelial" marker p63 in muscle-invasive tumors is associated with a worse outcome.

  9. Updated 2016 EAU Guidelines on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Lebret, T.; Comperat, E.M.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Bruins, H.M.; Hernandez, V.; Espinos, E.L.; Dunn, J.; Rouanne, M.; Neuzillet, Y.; Veskimae, E.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Gakis, G.; Ribal, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Invasive bladder cancer is a frequently occurring disease with a high mortality rate despite optimal treatment. The European Association of Urology (EAU) Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer (MIBC) Guidelines are updated yearly and provides information to optimise diagnosis,

  10. Results of radiotherapy for ureteric obstruction in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, M.; Miskowiak, J.; Rolff, H.

    1996-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of the records of 574 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer revealed 90 patients (16%) with ureteric obstruction; the obstruction was bilateral in 24%. The effect of radiotherapy was assessed in 55 patients with 68 obstructed kidneys. Six patients with eight obstructed kidneys required percutaneous nephrostomy or ureteric catheters in addition to radiotherapy. Drainage improved in only 20% of kidneys and the diverting catheter could be withdrawn permanently in only one (17%) of the diverted patients. The median survival was 11 months. Irradiation was followed by significant complications in 37 patients (67%). This raises doubts about the assumed beneficial effect of irradiation on ureteric obstruction due to muscle invasive bladder cancer. The short median survival of 11 months confirms that ureteric obstruction is a poor prognostic factor in muscle invasive bladder cancer. (au) 10 refs

  11. Contemporary management of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall’Era, Marc A; Cheng, Liang; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment for muscle-invasive nonmetastatic bladder cancer is neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. However, neoadjuvant chemotherapy is not widely accepted even with level 1 evidence. Adjuvant chemotherapy should be discussed if patients have not received neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and have high-risk pathologic features. Although not considered standard of care, bladder-sparing therapy can be considered for highly selected patients and for those medically unfit for surgery. Even though there are no level 1 data, the treatment outcomes for highly select patients given bladder-sparing therapy appear promising, with many patients retaining a functional bladder. Personalized chemotherapy is currently being actively pursued to target the underlying molecular changes and tailor to individual needs. PMID:22845409

  12. Bladder cancer: overview and disease management. Part 1: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Beverley

    2018-05-10

    Part 1 of this two-part article provides an overview of bladder cancer and discusses its management. Since publication of a previous article entitled 'Understanding the role of smoking in the aetiology of bladder cancer' ( Anderson, 2009 ), the author has received many requests for an update. This article provides an overview of bladder cancer and its current management practices, underlining the continued role of smoking as the predominant risk factor in the disease's development. The management of bladder cancer is governed by specific guidelines. Management of non-muscle-invasive cancers, including surgical intervention with transurethral resection, and intravesical therapy using chemotherapy and immunotherapy agents, is discussed. Cystectomy (removal of the bladder), is sometimes necessary. Treatments are effective in reducing tumour recurrence, but the effects of the risks and side-effects on the individual's quality of life can be significant. The prevalence of bladder cancer, and the nature of its management make this cancer one of the most expensive for the NHS to treat. The effectiveness of health promotional strategies in increasing peoples' awareness of their risk of developing the disease, and in enabling them to change long-term health behaviours is discussed. The role of the multidisciplinary team is explored, along with that of the uro-oncology cancer nurse specialist. Part 2 will consider the management of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer.

  13. Quality of life in patients with muscle invasive and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, S; Ziegler, C; Schwalenberg, T; Hinz, A; Götze, H; Schulte, T

    2013-05-01

    Compared to the literature on other malignancies, data on quality of life (QoL) in bladder cancer are sparse. This study sought answers to the following questions: In what QoL domains do patients with bladder cancer differ from the general population? Do patients with radical cystectomy differ in QoL compared to those who received conservative treatment? Do patients with neobladder generally have better QoL compared to patients with other diversion methods? At the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation, N = 823 patients with bladder cancer were assessed. Data of a representative community sample (N = 2037) were used for comparison. The questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30 was used to measure QoL. Multivariate linear regression models were computed to investigate differences between groups. Patients with both non-muscle invasive and muscle invasive bladder cancer reported significantly more problems and worse functioning than the general population. Radiotherapy is associated with clinically relevant more pain, dyspnoea, constipation, appetite loss and decreased social functioning while chemotherapy is associated more with dyspnoea. Cystectomy patients reported more fatigue, appetite loss and decreased role functioning. Male patients ≥70 years with conduit experienced more sleep and emotional problems. These effects of urinary diversion were not observed in women and younger patients. Patients with bladder cancer experience various QoL concerns at the beginning of inpatient rehabilitation. These problems can partly be explained by the type of treatment the patients receive. Type of urinary diversion is relevant for QoL in subgroups of patients.

  14. BCG-unresponsive non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: recommendations from the IBCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Sundi, D.; Lamm, D.; Boehle, A.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Persad, R.; Palou, J.; Soloway, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with live attenuated BCG remains the standard of care for patients with high-risk and intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Most patients initially respond, but recurrence is frequent and progression to invasive cancer is a concern. No established

  15. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Pos, Floris J; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Koedooder, Kees; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant partial bladder boost schedule in radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, coupling a limited boost volume with shortening of the overall treatment time. Methods and materials: Between 1994 and 1999, 50 patients with a T2-T4 N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder received radiotherapy delivered in a short overall treatment time with a concomitant boost technique. With this technique a dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions was administered to the small pelvis with a concomitant boost limited to the bladder tumor area plus margin of 15 Gy in fractions of 0.75 Gy. The total tumor dose was 55 Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks. Toxicity was scored according to EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria. Results: The feasibility of the treatment was good. Severe acute toxicity {>=}G3 was observed in seven patients (14%). Severe late toxicity {>=}G3 was observed in six patients (13%). Thirty-seven patients (74%) showed a complete and five (10 %) a partial remission after treatment. The actuarial 3-year freedom of local progression was 55%. Conclusion: In external radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer a concomitant boost technique coupling a partial bladder boost with shortening of the overall treatment time provides a high probability of local control with acceptable toxicity.

  16. Concomitant boost radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Koedooder, Kees; Gonzalez Gonzalez, Dionisio

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a concomitant partial bladder boost schedule in radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer, coupling a limited boost volume with shortening of the overall treatment time. Methods and materials: Between 1994 and 1999, 50 patients with a T2-T4 N0M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder received radiotherapy delivered in a short overall treatment time with a concomitant boost technique. With this technique a dose of 40 Gy in 2-Gy fractions was administered to the small pelvis with a concomitant boost limited to the bladder tumor area plus margin of 15 Gy in fractions of 0.75 Gy. The total tumor dose was 55 Gy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks. Toxicity was scored according to EORTC/RTOG toxicity criteria. Results: The feasibility of the treatment was good. Severe acute toxicity ≥G3 was observed in seven patients (14%). Severe late toxicity ≥G3 was observed in six patients (13%). Thirty-seven patients (74%) showed a complete and five (10 %) a partial remission after treatment. The actuarial 3-year freedom of local progression was 55%. Conclusion: In external radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer a concomitant boost technique coupling a partial bladder boost with shortening of the overall treatment time provides a high probability of local control with acceptable toxicity

  17. Bladder preservation in non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC): a single-institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardi, Marianna A; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Zerini, Dario; Surgo, Alessia; Dicuonzo, Samantha; Spoto, Ruggero; Fodor, Cristiana; Verri, Elena; Rocca, Maria Cossu; Nolè, Franco; Muto, Matteo; Ferro, Matteo; Musi, Gennaro; Bottero, Danilo; Matei, Deliu V; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to access the feasibility, toxicity profile, and tumour outcome of an organ preservation curative approach in non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer. A retrospective analysis was conducted on patients affected by M0 bladder cancer, who refused cystectomy and were treated with a curative approach. The standard bladder preservation scheme included maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) and combination of radiotherapy and platin-based chemotherapy, followed by endoscopic evaluation, urine cytology, and instrumental evaluation. Thirteen patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. TNM stage was cT2cN0M0 and cT2cNxM0, in 12 and one patients, respectively. All patients had transitional cell cancer. Twelve patients completed the whole therapeutic programme (a bimodal treatment without chemotherapy for one patient). Median follow-up is 36 months. None of the patients developed severe urinary or intestinal acute toxicity. In 10 patients with a follow-up > 6 months, no cases of severe late toxicity were observed. Response evaluated in 12 patients included complete response and stable disease in 11 patients (92%), and one patient (8%), respectively. At the time of data analysis (March 2016), 10 patients (77%) are alive with no evidence of disease, two patients (15%) died for other reasons, and one patient has suspicious persistent local disease. The trimodality approach, including maximal TURBT, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, is well-tolerated and might be considered a valid and feasible option in fit patients who refuse radical cystectomy.

  18. Chemoradiotherapy as a bladder-preservation approach for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru

    2004-01-01

    Radical cystectomy has been considered the (gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder r cancer. However, because of disappointing results with radical surgery in terms of survival and decreased quality of life (QOL), bladder-preservation treatment has been introduced as an alternative to radical cystectomy. The primary purpose of the bladder-preservation approach has been to maximize overall cure rates, with the secondary purpose being to preserve the patient's bladder. The modalities used to ensure successful bladder preservation include radical transurethral resection (TUR), concurrent cisplatin (CDDP)-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. In patients who achieve a complete response (CR) after trimodality therapy, 5-year survival rates of more than 50%, the same as those of radical cystectomy, can be achieved and 70% of this group will retain an intact functional bladder. In this article, bladder-preservation studies using chemoradiotherapy are reviewed. (author)

  19. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

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    Piet, A H.M.; Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Pieters, B R; Koning, C C.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pos, F J [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Inst., Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, T.M. de [Dept. of Urology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was {>=} 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  20. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, A.H.M.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Pieters, B.R.; Koning, C.C.E.; Pos, F.J.; Reijke, T.M. de

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was ≥ 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  1. Definitions, End Points, and Clinical Trial Designs for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Recommendations From the International Bladder Cancer Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Sylvester, R.J.; Bohle, A.; Palou, J.; Lamm, D.L.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Colombel, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide recommendations on appropriate clinical trial designs in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) based on current literature and expert consensus of the International Bladder Cancer Group. METHODS: We reviewed published trials, guidelines, meta-analyses, and reviews and

  2. Risk prediction scores for recurrence and progression of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer : An international validation in primary tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Vedder (Moniek); M. Márquez (Mirari); E.W. de Bekker-Grob (Esther); M.L. Calle (Malu); L. Dyrskjot (Lars); M. Kogevinas (Manolis); U. Segersten (Ulrika); P.-U. Malmström (Per-Uno); F. Algaba (Ferran); W. Beukers (Willemien); T.F. Orntoft (Torben); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); F.X. Real (Francisco); N. Malats (Núria); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: We aimed to determine the validity of two risk scores for patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in different European settings, in patients with primary tumours. Methods: We included 1,892 patients with primary stage Ta or T1 non-muscle invasive bladder cancer who

  3. Reducing recurrence in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Zieger, Karsten Egbert Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluorescence cystoscopy and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) chemoprophylaxis on the risk of recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) under routine clinical conditions. Materials...

  4. A combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yumiko; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji; Takeuchi, Takumi; Matsuda, Izuru; Arahira, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer Without metastasis is radical cystectomy. However, there increase patients very elderly and with serious complications. They are not good candidates for invasive surgical operation. Intraarterial infusion of 70 mg/m"2 of cisplatin and 30 mg/m"2 of pirarubicin into bilateral bladder arteries was conducted for 5 patients diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancers without distant metastasis. Right and left distribution of anti-cancer drugs was determined based on the location of bladder tumor(s). External beam radiation therapy was commenced immediately following intraarterial infusion. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic investigations and bladderbiopsy was performed as needed. Patients were all males who are smoking or with smoking history ranging from 73 to 85 years of age (median 82). The duration between transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TUR-Bt) and intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs was 47.4 days (range 26-68), the median follow-up period after intraarterial infusion was 21.5 months (range 87-547) without death. Total radiation dose was 59.2 ±3.0 Gy. Complete remission was accomplished in all cases. One patient showed intravesical recurrence of non muscle-invasive tumors 45.8 months following intraarterial infusion and underwent TUR-Bt. Two cases underwent bladder biopsies showing no tumors. All patients but one case with bladder recurrence were free of tumor recurrence with radiographic investigation. For adverse events, acute renal failure was in one case and leukocytopenia was in all 5 cases, Grade 2 for one and Grade 3 for 4 cases. Follow-up periods are not long enough, but early results of a combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were good. (author)

  5. Factors influencing treatment results of definitive radiotherapy following transurethral surgery for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Tatsuyuki; Kanehira Chihiro

    1999-01-01

    To determine the prognostic factors influencing the outcome of bladder cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy following transurethral tumor resection (TURBT). From March 1977 through August 1991, 83 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were treated with TURBT (as thoroughly as possible) and definitive radiotherapy (median total dose: 64 Gy, median fractional dose: 2 Gy). Cystectomy was performed when possible for the residual or recurrent invasive cancer following radiotherapy. The median follow-up period was 76 months. The overall survival (OS) and bladder-preserving survival (BPS) rates at 5 years were 38% and 28%, respectively. Univariate analysis indicated that depth of invasion (T2 vs T3), tumor diameter (<3 cm vs. ≥3 cm), and visible (R1) or not visible (R0) residual tumor after TURBT influenced both OS and BPS. In multivariate analysis, absence of visible residual tumor after TURBT was the only significant prognostic factor related to OS (p<0.001) and BPS (p=0.002). Five-year OS and BPS were 54% and 43% in T2-3R0 and 14% and 7% in T2-3R1, respectively. Absence of visible residual tumor after TURBT was significantly associated with better overall survival and bladder-preserving survival for muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy following TURBT. (author)

  6. Fluorescence cystoscopy in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rusakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge of treating non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is multifocal tumors. Current methods of diagnosis are failed to detect all superficial flat tumor lesions in bladder mucosa. The use of fluorescence imaging with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA allows to improve the sensibility of routine cystoscopy, but low specificity decreases its diagnostic accuracy. The method of fluorescence imaging combined with local fluorescence spectroscopy developed in P.A. Herzen MCRI has been shown to increase the specificity from 71% to 84%. Thus, local fluorescence spectroscopy in visible fluorescence of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin allows to perform guided biopsy and decrease the rate of diagnostic mistakes. 

  7. Results of chemoradiotherapyfor muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Gumenetskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of chemoradiotherapy (CRT in 108 patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer in whom surgery was contraindicated. The efficacies and toxicities of three variants of CRT were evaluated. Group 1 (neoadjuvant chemotherapy: 2–3 cycles of cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy followed by a continuous course of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. Group 2: concurrent CRT – cisplatin i.v., 70–100 mg/m 2 during the first and last weeks of continuous-course EBRT. Group 3: sequential neoadjuvant chemotherapy, 2–3 cycles and concurrent CRT. The comparative analysis of long-term outcomes following CRT indicated an improvement in survival rates in group 3 in which the 5-and 10-year cancer-specific survival rates were 42,3 ± 8,8 % and 31,3 ± 9,4 %, respectively, compared with 28,6 ± 9,7 % and 28,6 ± 9,7 % in group 1, and 29,5 ± 8,5 % and 14,8 ± 7,4 % in group 2, respectively (р=0,093. Acute toxicity (GU Grade 1 or 2 arose more often from concurrent radiation and chemotherapy: in 40,0 % and 40,5 % of cases in groups 2 and 3, respectively, whereas in group 1 it occurred in 25,9 % of cases (р<0,2. Late radiation toxicity (GU Grade 2 occurred more often in the concurrent CRT groups: 11,4 % and 11,9 % versus 3,2 % in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group; Grade 3 was noted in 5,7 % and 2,4 % of patients in groups 2 and 3, respectively. The results indicated that chemoradiotherapy including neoadjuvant and concomitant chemotherapy improved the outcomes in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer in whom surgery was contraindicated. There was an acceptable rate of clinically significant complications.

  8. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report a comprehensive analysis of 412 muscle-invasive bladder cancers characterized by multiple TCGA analytical platforms. Fifty-eight genes were significantly mutated, and the overall mutational load was associated with APOBEC-signature mutagenesis. Clustering by mutation signature identified a high-mutation subset with 75% 5-year survival.

  9. Bladder Preservation for Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: The Survival Impact of Local Utilization Rates of Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozak, Kevin R.; Hamidi, Maryam; Manning, Matthew; Moody, John S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study examines the management and outcomes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the United States. Methods and Materials: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer diagnosed between 1988 and 2006 were identified in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. Patients were classified according to three mutually exclusive treatment categories based on the primary initial treatment: no local management, radiotherapy, or surgery. Overall survival was assessed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox models based on multiple factors including treatment utilization patterns. Results: The study population consisted of 26,851 patients. Age, sex, race, tumor grade, histology, and geographic location were associated with differences in treatment (all p < 0.01). Patients receiving definitive radiotherapy tended to be older and have less differentiated tumors than patients undergoing surgery (RT, median age 78 years old and 90.6% grade 3/4 tumors; surgery, median age 71 years old and 77.1% grade 3/4 tumors). No large shifts in treatment were seen over time, with most patients managed with surgical resection (86.3% for overall study population). Significant survival differences were observed according to initial treatment: median survival, 14 months with no definitive local treatment; 17 months with radiotherapy; and 43 months for surgery. On multivariate analysis, differences in local utilization rates of definitive radiotherapy did not demonstrate a significant effect on overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.002; 95% confidence interval, 0.999–1.005). Conclusions: Multiple factors influence the initial treatment strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer, but definitive radiotherapy continues to be used infrequently. Although patients who undergo surgery fare better, a multivariable model that accounted for patient and tumor characteristics found no survival detriment to the utilization of definitive radiotherapy. These results support continued

  10. Single-cell sequencing analysis characterizes common and cell-lineage-specific mutations in a muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Xu, Xun; Song, Luting

    2012-01-01

    sequencing of 66 individual tumor cells from a muscle-invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Analyses of the somatic mutant allele frequency spectrum and clonal structure revealed that the tumor cells were derived from a single ancestral cell, but that subsequent evolution occurred, leading...... to two distinct tumor cell subpopulations. By analyzing recurrently mutant genes in an additional cohort of 99 TCC tumors, we identified genes that might play roles in the maintenance of the ancestral clone and in the muscle-invasive capability of subclones of this bladder cancer, respectively...

  11. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@harthosp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaufman, Donald S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heney, Niall M. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  12. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Helle, Peter A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Jansen, Peter P.; Hanssen, Patrick E.; Kruger, Cornelis G.G. Boeken; Putten, Wim L.J. van

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of transurethral resection (TUR), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and interstitial radiation (IRT) with iridium-192, using the afterloading technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: From May 1989 until September 1995, 66 patients with primary, solitary muscle invasive bladder cancer were treated with TUR, EBRT, and IRT, aiming at bladder preservation. According to the protocol, in three patients low-dose EBRT was applied, whereas 63 patients received high-dose EBRT. Immediately prior to IRT, 42 patients underwent a lymphnode dissection, and in 16 cases a partial cystectomy was performed. For IRT, two to five catheters were used and IRT was started within 24 h after surgery. The majority of patients received 30 Gy of IRT, with a mean dose rate of .58 Gy/h. In three patients, additional EBRT was applied following IRT. Follow-up consisted of regular cystoscopies, mostly done during joint clinics of urologist and radiation oncologist, with urine cytology routinely performed. The median follow-up period was 26 months. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the determination of survival rates. Results: In seven patients, a bladder relapse developed. The probability of remaining bladder relapse free at 5 years was 88%. The bladder was preserved in 98% of the surviving patients. Metastases developed in 16 patients, and the probability of remaining metastasis free at 5 years was 66%. The cumulative 5-year overall and bladder and distant relapse free survival were 48% and 69%, respectively. Acute toxicity was not serious in the majority of cases; surgical correction of a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula was necessary in two patients, whereas a wound toilet had to be performed in another patient. Serious late toxicity (bladder, RTOG Grade 3) was experienced by only one patient. Conclusions: Interstitial radiation preceded by TUR and EBRT, in a selected group of patients with muscle invasive bladder

  13. Muscle invasive bladder cancer: examining survivor burden and unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nihal E; Chaoprang Herrera, Phapichaya; Hudson, Shawna; Revenson, Tracey A; Lee, Cheryl T; Quale, Diane Z; Zarcadoolas, Christina; Hall, Simon J; Diefenbach, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Although improvements in perioperative care have decreased surgical morbidity after radical cystectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer, treatment side effects still have a negative impact on patient quality of life. We examined unmet patient needs along the illness trajectory. A total of 30 patients (26.7% women) treated with cystectomy and urinary diversion for muscle invasive bladder cancer participated in the study. Patients were recruited from the Department of Urology at Mount Sinai and through advertisements on the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) website between December 2011 and September 2012. Data were collected at individual interviews, which were audiotaped and transcribed. Transcribed data were quantitatively analyzed to explore key unmet needs. At diagnosis unmet informational needs were predominant, consisting of insufficient discussion of certain topics, including urinary diversion options and their side effects, self-care, the recovery process and medical insurance. Unmet psychological needs related to depression, and worries about changes in body image and sexual function were reported. Postoperative unmet needs revolved around medical needs (eg pain and bowel dysfunction) and instrumental needs (eg need of support for stomal appliances, catheters and incontinence). During survivorship (ie 6 to 72 months postoperatively) unmet needs centered around psychological support (ie depression, poor body image and sexual dysfunction) and instrumental support (eg difficulty adjusting to changes in daily living). Meeting patient needs is imperative to ensure adequate patient involvement in health care and enhance postoperative quality of life. An effective support provision plan should follow changes in patient needs. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation therapy outcomes in muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer: A single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwana, M S; Ni, L H; Saini, S; Verma, S K; Doddamani, D; Jain, N; Biswas, M; Gupta, Meenu; Gupta, Madhur; Saini, M; Chauhan, N

    2016-01-01

    To audit the survival outcomes and loco-regional control in muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer patients treated with external beam radiation therapy (RT). From November 2008 through December 2011, 50 consecutively diagnosed muscle invasive urinary bladder carcinoma (T2-4a N0-2, M0) patients were included in this retrospective study. All these patients received external beam RT to a median dose of 60 Gy (range 30-66 Gy), and were not suitable for radical surgery due to patients' preference or medical comorbidities. A stepwise procedure using proportional hazard regression was used to identify prognostic factors with respect to survival. Completion trans-urethral resection of bladder tumor was done in 38 (76%) patients of the cohort and 47 (94%) had transitional cell carcinoma on histopathology. Clinical stage T2 was diagnosed in 40 (80%) patients. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 14 ± 8.9 months (range 1-36 months). In conclusion, 24 patients (48%) were free of disease, 5 patients (10%) had residual disease, and 13 patients (26%) had died of disease. Two-year and 3 year overall survival of intact bladder for the entire cohort was 58% and 43.6%, respectively. Cox regression modeling strongly suggested clinical stage (P = 0.01) and RT dose (P = 0.001) as being predictors for overall survival. RT shows reliable outcomes and excellent compliance in this advanced disease. Prescribing a higher RT dose could potentially correlate to better intact bladder control rates while maintaining good quality of life in selected patients.

  15. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Helle, Peter A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Jansen, Peter P.; Hanssens, Patrick E.J.; Boeken Kruger, Cornelis G.G.; Putten, Wim L.J. van

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: In our center interstitial radiation has played an important role in the treatment of bladder cancer patients for over 40 years. Radium needles, that were initially used, were replaced by caesium needles in 1983, whereas the afterloading iridium wire technique was adopted in 1989. Patients with solitary tumors (T1, T2 and T3) with a surface diameter of < 5 cm are considered for interstitial radiation. In this study we report on the results of the afterloading iridium wire technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: From May 1989 to September 1993 interstitial radiation using iridium wires was part of the treatment in 46 patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer (37 T2, 9 T3). The mean age was 67 years. After transurethral resection of all visible tumor (if possible), in most cases 40 Gy (20 x 2.0 Gy, midplane dose) external beam radiation was delivered to the true pelvis, followed by 30 Gy interstitial radiation using iridium-192 wires covering the tumor area in the bladder. Results: After a median follow-up of 26 months, bladder relapses occurred in 7 patients. In 5 of them the tumor relapsed in the initial area, in 1 patient elsewhere in the bladder and in 1 patient tumor recurred in and outside the initial site. Recurrence was superficial (T1) in 4 patients. A relapse in the urethra was found once. Metastases developed in 13 patients, in 8 without bladder relapse. During the observation period 17 patients died, 13 due to bladder cancer. The actuarial bladder relapse-free survival at 4 years was 74% and 82% for T2 and T3 tumors, respectively. The actuarial distant metastases-free survival was 65% for both categories. No serious toxicity was recorded. Conclusion: In a selected group of patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer transurethral resection in combination with external beam and interstitial radiation provides an excellent opportunity to preserve the bladder with a high chance of success. Development of

  16. Treatment results of radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langsenlehner, Tanja; Doeller, Carmen; Stranzl-Lawatsch, Heidi; Kapp, Karin S. [Univ. Clinic of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Quehenberger, Franz [Inst. for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Documentation, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, Uwe [Internal Outpatient Dept., Steiermaerkische GKK, Graz (Austria); Pummer, Karl [Dept. of Urology, Medical Univ. of Graz (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess local control and survival rates in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with external-beam radiotherapy and to investigate prognostic factors. Patients and methods: Between 1997 and 2007, 75 patients (male, n = 58; female, n = 17, median age, 74.2 years) with localized transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (T2, n = 34; T3, n = 32; T4, n = 9) not suitable for radical surgery due to advanced age, comorbidity or inoperability underwent external-beam radiotherapy without simultaneous chemotherapy at the University Clinic of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Medical University of Graz, Austria. A conformal four-field technique was used in all patients to treat the tumor and regional lymph nodes with single daily fractions of 1.8-2 Gy to a total dose of 50-50.4 Gy, followed by a cone-down to encompass the empty bladder which was boosted to 70-70.4 Gy. All patients had undergone transurethral tumor resection prior to radiotherapy which was macroscopically incomplete in 62 patients. Results: Complete response was achieved in 65% of patients. Actuarial 3-year local control and metastases-free survival rates were 52.5% and 63.7%, 3-year local recurrence-free survival rate in complete responders was 71%. In univariate analysis, hydronephrosis, lymph vessel invasion, and macroscopic residual tumor were significantly predictive of disease progression. Hydronephrosis and lymph vessel invasion were also associated with a higher risk of local recurrence. The actuarial 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 40.1% and 56.9%, respectively. Conclusion: Radiotherapy is an effective treatment option in terms of local control and survival even in elderly patients with locally advanced bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy. (orig.)

  17. Treatment of Muscle-Invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Update of the EAU Guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenzl, A.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Kuczyk, M.A.; Merseburger, A.S.; Ribal, M.J.; Sherif, A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: New data regarding treatment of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (MiM-BC) has emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for MiM-BC. OBJECTIVE: To review the new EAU guidelines for MiM-BC with a specific focus on treatment. EVIDENCE

  18. Should patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer undergo more-extensive pelvic lymph node dissection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steven, Kenneth Eric

    2008-01-01

    This Practice Point commentary discusses the paper by Dhar and colleagues, which compared outcomes between two cohorts of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who received either 'limited' pelvic lymph node dissection (LND) or 'extended' pelvic LND at clinics in the US or Switzerland...

  19. The effect of smoking and timing of smoking cessation on clinical outcome in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotenhuis, A.J.; Ebben, C.W.; Aben, K.K.H.; Witjes, J.A.; Vrieling, A.; Vermeulen, H.H.; Kiemeney, B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for urinary bladder cancer. The prognostic effect of cigarette smoking on disease recurrence and progression in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), however, is still unclear. We evaluated the effect of smoking

  20. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Giovanni; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Catalano, Carlo; De Berardinis, Ettore; Leonardo, Constantino; Simone, Giuseppe; Gallucci, Michele; National Cancer Insitute, Rome; Catto, James

    2017-01-01

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. (orig.)

  1. An evaluation of morphological and functional multi-parametric MRI sequences in classifying non-muscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Barchetti, Giovanni; Grompone, Marcello Domenico; Del Monte, Maurizio; Carano, Davide; Catalano, Carlo [Sapienza Univ. Rome (Italy). Dept. of Radiological Sciences, Oncology and Pathology; De Berardinis, Ettore; Leonardo, Constantino [Sapienza Univ. Rome (Italy). Dept. of Gynaecological-Obstetric and Urological Sciences; Simone, Giuseppe; Gallucci, Michele [' ' Regina Elena' ' National Cancer Insitute, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Urology; Catto, James [Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Aademic Urology Unit

    2017-09-15

    Our goal is to determine the ability of multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to differentiate muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) from non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Patients underwent mpMRI before tumour resection. Four MRI sets, i.e. T2-weighted (T2W) + perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI), T2W plus diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), T2W + DWI + PWI, and T2W + DWI + PWI + dif-fusion tensor imaging (DTI) were interpreted qualitatively by two radiologists, blinded to histology results. PWI, DWI and DTI were also analysed quantitatively. Accuracy was determined using histopathology as the reference standard. A total of 82 tumours were analysed. Ninety-six percent of T1-labeled tumours by the T2W + DWI + PWI image set were confirmed to be NMIBC at histopathology. Overall accuracy of the complete mpMRI protocol was 94% in differentiating NMIBC from MIBC. PWI, DWI and DTI quantitative parameters were shown to be significantly different in cancerous versus non-cancerous areas within the bladder wall in T2-labelled lesions. MpMRI with DWI and DTI appears a reliable staging tool for bladder cancer. If our data are validated, then mpMRI could precede cystoscopic resection to allow a faster recognition of MIBC and accelerated treatment pathways. (orig.)

  2. Expression microarray meta-analysis identifies genes associated with Ras/MAPK and related pathways in progression of muscle-invasive bladder transition cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Ewald

    Full Text Available The effective detection and management of muscle-invasive bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma (TCC continues to be an urgent clinical challenge. While some differences of gene expression and function in papillary (Ta, superficial (T1 and muscle-invasive (≥T2 bladder cancers have been investigated, the understanding of mechanisms involved in the progression of bladder tumors remains incomplete. Statistical methods of pathway-enrichment, cluster analysis and text-mining can extract and help interpret functional information about gene expression patterns in large sets of genomic data. The public availability of patient-derived expression microarray data allows open access and analysis of large amounts of clinical data. Using these resources, we investigated gene expression differences associated with tumor progression and muscle-invasive TCC. Gene expression was calculated relative to Ta tumors to assess progression-associated differences, revealing a network of genes related to Ras/MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways with increased expression. Further, we identified genes within this network that are similarly expressed in superficial Ta and T1 stages but altered in muscle-invasive T2 tumors, finding 7 genes (COL3A1, COL5A1, COL11A1, FN1, ErbB3, MAPK10 and CDC25C whose expression patterns in muscle-invasive tumors are consistent in 5 to 7 independent outside microarray studies. Further, we found increased expression of the fibrillar collagen proteins COL3A1 and COL5A1 in muscle-invasive tumor samples and metastatic T24 cells. Our results suggest that increased expression of genes involved in mitogenic signaling may support the progression of muscle-invasive bladder tumors that generally lack activating mutations in these pathways, while expression changes of fibrillar collagens, fibronectin and specific signaling proteins are associated with muscle-invasive disease. These results identify potential biomarkers and targets for TCC treatments, and

  3. Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, A Gordon; Kim, Jaegil; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Guo, Guangwu; Cherniack, Andrew D; Hinoue, Toshinori; Laird, Peter W; Hoadley, Katherine A; Akbani, Rehan; Castro, Mauro A A; Gibb, Ewan A; Kanchi, Rupa S; Gordenin, Dmitry A; Shukla, Sachet A; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Hansel, Donna E; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Reuter, Victor E; Su, Xiaoping; de Sa Carvalho, Benilton; Chagas, Vinicius S; Mungall, Karen L; Sadeghi, Sara; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Lu, Yiling; Klimczak, Leszek J; Zhang, Jiexin; Choo, Caleb; Ojesina, Akinyemi I; Bullman, Susan; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Wu, Catherine J; Schultz, Nicholaus; Getz, Gad; Meyerson, Matthew; Mills, Gordon B; McConkey, David J; Weinstein, John N; Kwiatkowski, David J; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-10-19

    We report a comprehensive analysis of 412 muscle-invasive bladder cancers characterized by multiple TCGA analytical platforms. Fifty-eight genes were significantly mutated, and the overall mutational load was associated with APOBEC-signature mutagenesis. Clustering by mutation signature identified a high-mutation subset with 75% 5-year survival. mRNA expression clustering refined prior clustering analyses and identified a poor-survival "neuronal" subtype in which the majority of tumors lacked small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Clustering by mRNA, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), and miRNA expression converged to identify subsets with differential epithelial-mesenchymal transition status, carcinoma in situ scores, histologic features, and survival. Our analyses identified 5 expression subtypes that may stratify response to different treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Wijnmaalen (Arendjan); P.A. Helle (Peter); P.C.M. Koper (Peter); P.P. Jansen (Peter); P. Hanssens (Patrick); C.G.G. Boeken Kruger (Cornelis); W.L.J. van Putten (Wim)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To evaluate the results of transurethral resection (TUR), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and interstitial radiation (IRT) with iridium-192, using the afterloading technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: From May 1989 until September

  5. Summary and Recommendations from the National Cancer Institute's Clinical Trials Planning Meeting on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Bajorin, D.F.; Dinney, C.P.; Efstathiou, J.A.; Groshen, S.; Hahn, N.M.; Hansel, D.; Kwiatkowski, D.; O'Donnell, M.; Rosenberg, J.; Svatek, R.; Abrams, J.S.; Al-Ahmadie, H.; Apolo, A.B.; Bellmunt, J.; Callahan, M.; Cha, E.K.; Drake, C.; Jarow, J.; Kamat, A.; Kim, W.; Knowles, M.; Mann, B.; Marchionni, L.; McConkey, D.; McShane, L.; Ramirez, N.; Sharabi, A.; Sharpe, A.H.; Solit, D.; Tangen, C.M.; Amiri, A.T.; Allen, E. Van; West, P.J.; Witjes, J.A.; Quale, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    The NCI Bladder Cancer Task Force convened a Clinical Trials Planning Meeting (CTPM) Workshop focused on Novel Therapeutics for Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (NMIBC). Meeting attendees included a broad and multi-disciplinary group of clinical and research stakeholders and included leaders from

  6. Systemic Immunotherapy of Non–Muscle Invasive Mouse Bladder Cancer with Avelumab, an Anti–PD-L1 Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeveer, Amanda J.; Fallon, Jonathan K.; Tighe, Robert; Sabzevari, Helen; Schlom, Jeffrey; Greiner, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the standard of care for intravesical therapy for carcinoma in situ and non–muscle invasive, nonmetastatic human urothelial carcinoma. While the responsiveness to this immunotherapeutic is believed to be linked with (i) a high number of somatic mutations and (ii) a large number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, recent findings of the roles that inhibitory immune receptors and their ligands play in tumor evasion may provide insights into the limitations of the effectiveness of BCG and offer new targets for immune-based therapy. In this study, an aggressive, bioluminescent orthotopic bladder cancer model, MB49 tumor cells transfected with luciferase (MB49luc), was used to study the antitumor effects of avelumab, an antibody to PD-L1. MB49luc murine tumor cells form multifocal tumors on the mucosal wall of the bladder reminiscent of non–muscle invasive, nonmetastatic urothelial carcinomas. MB49luc bladder tumors are highly positive for the expression of PD-L1 and avelumab administration induced significant (P<0.05) antitumor effects. These antitumor effects were more dependent on the presence of CD4 than CD8 T cells, as determined by in vivo immune cell depletions. The findings suggest that in this bladder tumor model, interruption of the immune suppressive PD-1/PD-L1 complex releases a local adaptive immune response that, in turn, reduces tumor growth. This bladder tumor model can be used to further identify host antitumor immune mechanisms and evaluate combinations of immune-based therapies for carcinoma in situ and non–muscle invasive, nonmetastatic urothelial carcinoma, to provide the rationale for subsequent clinical studies. PMID:26921031

  7. Gene expression signatures predict outcome in non-muscle invasive bladder carcinoma - a multi-center validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Zieger, Karsten; Real, Francisco X.

    2007-01-01

    and carcinoma in situ (CIS) and for predicting disease recurrence and progression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyzed tumors from 404 patients diagnosed with bladder cancer in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, England, Spain, and France using custom microarrays. Molecular classifications were compared with pathologic....... CONCLUSION: This multicenter validation study confirms in an independent series the clinical utility of molecular classifiers to predict the outcome of patients initially diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. This information may be useful to better guide patient treatment....

  8. Chromosomal imbalance in the progression of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zieger, Karsten; Wiuf, Carsten; Jensen, Klaus Møller-Ernst; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder neoplasms with invasion of the lamina propria (stage T1) or high grade of dysplasia are at 'high risk' of progression to life-threatening cancer. However, the individual course is difficult to predict. Chromosomal instability (CI) is associated with high tumor stage and grade, and possibly with the risk of progression. To investigate the relationship between CI and subsequent disease progression, we performed a case-control-study of 125 patients with 'high-risk' non-muscle invasive bladder neoplasms, 67 with later disease progression, and 58 with no progression. Selection criteria were conservative (non-radical) resections and full prospective clinical follow-up (> 5 years). We investigated primary lesions in 59, and recurrent lesions in 66 cases. We used Affymetrix GeneChip ® Mapping 10 K and 50 K SNP microarrays to evaluate genome wide chromosomal imbalance (loss-of-heterozygosity and DNA copy number changes) in 48 representative tumors. DNA copy number changes of 15 key instability regions were further investigated using QPCR in 101 tumors (including 25 tumors also analysed on 50 K SNP microarrays). Chromosomal instability did not predict any higher risk of subsequent progression. Stage T1 and high-grade tumors had generally more unstable genomes than tumors of lower stage and grade (mostly non-primary tumors following a 'high-risk' tumor). However, about 25% of the 'high-risk' tumors had very few alterations. This was independent of subsequent progression. Recurrent lesions represent underlying field disease. A separate analysis of these lesions did neither reflect any difference in the risk of progression. Of specific chromosomal alterations, a possible association between loss of chromosome 8p11 and the risk of progression was found. However, the predictive value was limited by the heterogeneity of the changes. Chromosomal instability (CI) was associated with 'high risk' tumors

  9. High resolution MR imaging of bladder cancer: new criteria for determining depth of wall invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Hae; Kressel, Herbert Y

    1993-01-01

    To establish new criteria to determine the depth of bladder cancer as well as to obtain the findings of each stage of bladder cancer we reviewed high resolution MR images of 18 bladder cancer patients including seven cases (26%) with superficial bladder wall invasion. All MR scans were done before biopsy or surgery. Multiple layers of the bladder wall (inner black, middle white, outer black) were demonstrated in 11 cases out of a total 18 cases. Thickening of the middle layer caused by tumor infiltration or edema of lamina propria was seen in 8 of 12 patients with stage T2 or greater, and was suggestive of superficial muscle invasion when multiple layers were demonstrated. Disruption of outer layer (as well as inner layer) and external protrusion of tumor itself were indicative of perivesical invasion. When multiple layers were not demonstrated, the depth of tumor invasion could not be judged. High resolution MR imaging can depict submucosal invasion, muscle invasion, and perivesical invasion secondary to bladder cancer

  10. Systemic Immunotherapy of Non-Muscle Invasive Mouse Bladder Cancer with Avelumab, an Anti-PD-L1 Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeveer, Amanda J; Fallon, Jonathan K; Tighe, Robert; Sabzevari, Helen; Schlom, Jeffrey; Greiner, John W

    2016-05-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) is the standard of care for intravesical therapy for carcinoma in situ and non-muscle invasive, nonmetastatic human urothelial carcinoma. Although the responsiveness to this immunotherapeutic is believed to be linked with (i) a high number of somatic mutations and (ii) a large number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, recent findings of the roles that inhibitory immune receptors and their ligands play in tumor evasion may provide insights into the limitations of the effectiveness of BCG and offer new targets for immune-based therapy. In this study, an aggressive, bioluminescent orthotopic bladder cancer model, MB49 tumor cells transfected with luciferase (MB49(luc)), was used to study the antitumor effects of avelumab, an antibody to PD-L1. MB49(luc) murine tumor cells form multifocal tumors on the mucosal wall of the bladder reminiscent of non-muscle invasive, nonmetastatic urothelial carcinomas. MB49(luc) bladder tumors are highly positive for the expression of PD-L1, and avelumab administration induced significant (P < 0.05) antitumor effects. These antitumor effects were more dependent on the presence of CD4 than CD8 T cells, as determined by in vivo immune cell depletions. The findings suggest that in this bladder tumor model, interruption of the immune-suppressive PD-1/PD-L1 complex releases a local adaptive immune response that, in turn, reduces tumor growth. This bladder tumor model can be used to further identify host antitumor immune mechanisms and evaluate combinations of immune-based therapies for carcinoma in situ and non-muscle invasive, nonmetastatic urothelial carcinoma, to provide the rationale for subsequent clinical studies. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 452-62. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Defining Priorities to Improve Patient Experience in Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Tullika; Connors, Jill Nault; Ladd, Ilene G; Bogaczyk, Tyler L; Larson, Sharon L

    2018-01-20

    Although approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive (NMIBC) at diagnosis, most research tends to focus on invasive disease (e.g., experiences related to radical cystectomy and urinary diversion). There is a lack of studies on quality of life, and especially qualitative research, in bladder cancer generally. As a result, relatively little is known about the experiences and needs of NMIBC patients. To understand patient experience, define care priorities, and identify targets for care improvement in NMIBC across the cancer continuum. Through focus groups, patients treated for NMIBC (stage influences on decision-making, and role of social support. Patients with NMIBC desired timely access to care and honest and caring provider communication. They described urinary function and emotional quality of life changes resulting from diagnosis and treatment. Avoiding cystectomy and being alive for family were the major decision influencers. In this qualitative study, we identified access to care, provider characteristics and communication, quality of life, values/influences on decision-making, and social support as priority areas to improve patient experience in NMIBC. Care redesign efforts should focus on improving access, enhancing provider communication, reducing side effects, and supporting caregiver roles.

  12. Health-related quality of life after bladder preservation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashine, Katsuyoshi; Miura, Noriyoshi; Numata, Kousaku; Shirato, Akitomi; Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Kataoka, Masaaki

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess health-related quality of life (QOL) of bladder cancer patients following bladder preservation therapy (BPT). Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer had been treated between January 1992 and July 2005 at our institutions with BPT consisting of transurethral resection, intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Among them, 48 were alive and free from recurrence at the time of survey and were asked to participate. A total of 168 patients who had been treated for superficial bladder cancer in the same period were used as a control group. Three questionnaires, namely the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the SF-36, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) were used. Thirty-three patients in the BPT group (68.8%) and 128 patients in the control group (76.2%) answered the QOL survey. There was no significant difference in age, gender and other clinical factors among these two groups. No significant difference was found between the groups according to IPSS. The QOL score of BPT was lower than that of the control group in the SF-36, but there was no significant difference without body pain (P=0.047). There was a tendency toward a diminished physical functioning (P=0.053) and role-physical (P=0.064) in BPT. The EPIC scores for urinary function, especially storage and voiding symptoms, and bowel function were significantly lower in the BPT group. At multivariable analysis, body pain and bowel function were associated with the type of treatment. Although some of the QOL outcome parameters after BPT were found to be lower than the control group, these differences were not significant. Overall, patients retaining their bladder had an acceptable health related QOL. (author)

  13. Status of Her2 over expression in muscle invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma: Report of 21 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrine Mejri

    2014-01-01

    Four patients died from disease, one of them had Her2 3+ score. Conclusion: Her2 overexpression can be observed in muscle invasive urothelial bladder carcinoma in an important number of patients. Evaluation criteria must be standardized, especially with heterogeneous cases. Metastases tests can also readdress the expression of Her2, which gives the patient a supplementary therapeutic tool.

  14. Glutathione S-transferase T1, O1 and O2 polymorphisms are associated with survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana I Djukic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the association of six glutathione transferase (GST gene polymorphisms (GSTT1, GSTP1/rs1695, GSTO1/rs4925, GSTO2/rs156697, GSTM1, GSTA1/rs3957357 with the survival of patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer and the genotype modifying effect on chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 105 patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer were included in the study. The follow-up lasted 5 years. The effect of GSTs polymorphisms on predicting mortality was analyzed by the Cox proportional hazard models, while Kaplan-Meier analysis was performed to assess differences in survival. RESULTS: GSTT1 active, GSTO1 Asp140Asp or GSTO2 Asp142Asp genotypes were independent predictors of a higher risk of death among bladder cancer patients (HR = 2.5, P = 0.028; HR = 2.9, P = 0.022; HR = 3.9, P = 0.001; respectively and significantly influenced the overall survival. There was no association between GSTP1, GSTM1 and GSTA1 gene variants with overall mortality. Only GSTO2 polymorphism showed a significant effect on the survival in the subgroup of patients who received chemotherapy (P = 0.006. CONCLUSION: GSTT1 active genotype and GSTO1 Asp140Asp and GSTO2 Asp142Asp genotypes may have a prognostic/pharmacogenomic role in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  15. INITIAL EXPERIENCE WITH ADJUVANT INTRAVESICAL THERMOCHEMOTHERAPY FOR NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Pavlenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the benefits of adjuvant intravesical thermochemotherapy (TCT and to evaluate its efficiency in the treatment of moderateand high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC.Subjects and methods. In the period 2009 to 2010, the Urology Clinic, Federal Medical Biophysical Center, treated 21 patients with nonmuscle invasive BC, by using a Thermotron RF-8 clinical hyperthermal system. Intravesical TCT with mitomycin C 40 mg for 60–80 min was performed at 42 ± 2 °С as one session weekly for 6 weeks. Control cystoscopy was carried out every 3 months.Results. Of the 21 patients, 19 were found to tolerate the procedure well. No complications were recorded in these patients during the sessions and throughout the course of intravesical TCT. A recurrence was histologically verified in 2 patients at 6-month follow-up. There was no evidence suggesting a recurrence in 12 (57.14 % patients at one-year follow-up. The follow-up of the other patients is now less than 12 months.Conclusion. The proposed method of hyperthermia may be used as an alternative to the existing one of intracavitary hyperthermia to treat high- and moderate-risk BC and in case of inefficiency of other adjuvant therapy options for non-muscle invasive BC.

  16. Hospitalization for transurethral bladder resection reduces quality of life in Danish patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder tumour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Karin; Christensen, Karl B.; Vrang, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) on patients’ quality of life (QoL) and to validate a tool to quantify problems associated with TURBT in a Danish population. Materials and methods: A prospective study was carried out...... using a combination of questionnaires and interviews. The study included 165 consecutive patients undergoing a TURBT owing to non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) from 1 May 2011 to 30 April 2012. Seven patients were selected for interviews. The Danish translation of the QLQ-NMIBC24 Quality...... of Life Questionnaire for NMIBC, from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), was used. The interviews were semi-structured. The reliability of the subscales quantifying QoL as defined by the EORTC was tested by computing Cronbach’s coefficient alpha and confirmatory factor...

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of MRE11 expression in muscle-invasive bladder tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rebecca M; Kerr, Martin; Teo, Mark T W; Jevons, Sarah J; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradly G; Bhattarai, Selina; Kiltie, Anne E

    2014-02-28

    Predictive assays are needed to help optimise treatment in muscle-invasive bladder cancer, where patients can be treated by either cystectomy or radical radiotherapy. Our finding that low tumour MRE11 expression is predictive of poor response to radiotherapy but not cystectomy was recently independently validated. Here we investigated further the mechanism underlying low MRE11 expression seen in poorly-responding patients. MRE11 RNA and protein levels were measured in 88 bladder tumour patient samples, by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry respectively, and a panel of eight bladder cancer cell lines was screened for MRE11, RAD50 and NBS1 mRNA and protein expression. There was no correlation between bladder tumour MRE11 protein and RNA scores (Spearman's rho 0.064, p=0.65), suggesting MRE11 is controlled post-transcriptionally, a pattern confirmed in eight bladder cancer cell lines. In contrast, NBS1 and RAD50 mRNA and protein levels were correlated (p=0.01 and p=0.03, respectively), suggesting primary regulation at the level of transcription. MRE11 protein levels were correlated with NBS1 and RAD50 mRNA and protein levels, implicating MRN complex formation as an important determinant of MRE11 expression, driven by RAD50 and NBS1 expression. Our findings of the post-transcriptional nature of the control of MRE11 imply that any predictive assays used in patients need to be performed at the protein level rather than the mRNA level.

  18. Optimal Treatment for Intermediate- and High-Risk, Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.M. van der Meijden

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to clinical and pathological factors the prognosis of a patient with non-muscle invasive bladder tumors can be assessed. The prognosis is determined by the likelihood of recurrence(30-70% and/or progression to muscle invasive bladder cancer(1-15%.Trans urethral resection of bladder tumors remains the initial therapy but adjuvant intravesical instillations are necessary.All patients benefit from a single immediate post operative instillation with a chemotherapeutic agent and for low risk tumors this is the optimal therapy.Patients with intermediate and high risk tumors need more intravesical chemo-or immunotherapy. Chemotherapy reduces recurrences but not progression. Intravesical immunotherapy(BCG prevents or delays progression. Patients at high risk for progression may need upfront cystectomy.

  19. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of the primary tumor in muscle invasive carcinoma of the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, E.M.

    1991-01-01

    Patients with muscle invasive carcinoma of the urinary bladder were examined with contrast-enhanced CT of the primary tumor. A specially designed technique was developed to increase the diagnostic potential of CT. The most important points about the technique were controlled filling of the bladder, the use of thin slices, series of scans before and after intravenous injection of contrast medium, and long scanning times in the precontrast series. The absorbed dose to the patient resulting from the new technique was found to be within the range of the dose from urography or barium enema. This dose was considered to be acceptable given the diagnostic gain of the procedure. Features of irradiated bladder tumors were analysed to find which parameter correlated with persistent malignancy. High contrast enhancement of a tumor relative to the bladder wall was found to be the best indicator of a malignant tumour after irradiation. 127 refs

  20. Prognostic value of sex-hormone receptor expression in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jong Kil; Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Sang Don; Chung, Moon Kee

    2014-09-01

    We investigated sex-hormone receptor expression as predicting factor of recurrence and progression in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. We retrospectively evaluated tumor specimens from patients treated for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder at our institution between January 2006 and January 2011. Performing immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal androgen receptor antibody and monoclonal estrogen receptor-beta antibody on paraffin-embedded tissue sections, we assessed the relationship of immunohistochemistry results and prognostic factors such as recurrence and progression. A total of 169 patients with bladder cancer were evaluated in this study. Sixty-threepatients had expressed androgen receptors and 52 patients had estrogen receptor beta. On univariable analysis, androgen receptor expression was significant lower in recurrence rates (p=0.001), and estrogen receptor beta expression was significant higher in progression rates (p=0.004). On multivariable analysis, significant association was found between androgen receptor expression and lower recurrence rates (hazard ratio=0.500; 95% confidence interval, 0.294 to 0.852; p=0.011), but estrogen receptor beta expression was not significantly associated with progression rates. We concluded that the possibility of recurrence was low when the androgen receptor was expressed in the bladder cancer specimen and it could be the predicting factor of the stage, number of tumors, carcinoma in situ lesion and recurrence.

  1. Selective bladder preservation by combined modality therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachnic, L A; Kaufman, D S; Zietman, A L; Dallow, K C; Griffin, P P; Heney, N M; Althausen, A F; Shipley, W U

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the success of selective organ preservation or radical cystectomy in a large group of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with induction by combined transurethral resection (TURBT), systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: 106 patients (median age 68 years) were treated with induction by maximal TURBT and 2 cycles of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cisplatin, vinblastine - MCV) followed by 39.6 Gy irradiation in 1.8 Gy fractions with concomitant cisplatin. Tumor response was then evaluated by cystoscopy, rebiopsy, and urine cytology. Complete responders were consolidated with radiation to 64.8 Gy and further cisplatin. Any subsequent isolated invasive local relapse was managed by cystectomy. Patients with any less than a complete response (CR) were recommended cystectomy. Median follow-up was 4.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess outcome. Results: 74 CR patients (70%) and 7 non-cystectomy candidates with less than a CR (7%) received consolidation chemotherapy and radiation. 13 incomplete responders (12%) underwent immediate cystectomy. 6 patients underwent cystectomy because they could not tolerate induction chemo-radiation. 1 complete response patient underwent radical cystectomy. 83 patients completed their planned therapy but 5 died of treatment related toxicity during induction chemotherapy. Five year actuarial overall survival and disease-specific survival were 52% and 60% respectively. For T2 patients, actuarial overall survival was 63%, and for T3-4, 45%. Five year survival with an intact functioning bladder was 43%. Five year freedom from distant metastases was 66%. Of those who had a CR after TURBT and MCV, the risk of a subsequent invasive bladder relapse was 18% at 5 years. Of those who had a CR after the completion of induction chemotherapy and 39.6 Gy, this risk was 21%. 18 patients (17%) have experienced a non-invasive bladder relapse requiring further TUR and

  2. Selective bladder preservation by combined modality therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachnic, L. A.; Kaufman, D. S.; Zietman, A. L.; Dallow, K. C.; Griffin, P. P.; Heney, N. M.; Althausen, A. F.; Shipley, W. U.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the success of selective organ preservation or radical cystectomy in a large group of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with induction by combined transurethral resection (TURBT), systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: 106 patients (median age 68 years) were treated with induction by maximal TURBT and 2 cycles of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cisplatin, vinblastine - MCV) followed by 39.6 Gy irradiation in 1.8 Gy fractions with concomitant cisplatin. Tumor response was then evaluated by cystoscopy, rebiopsy, and urine cytology. Complete responders were consolidated with radiation to 64.8 Gy and further cisplatin. Any subsequent isolated invasive local relapse was managed by cystectomy. Patients with any less than a complete response (CR) were recommended cystectomy. Median follow-up was 4.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess outcome. Results: 74 CR patients (70%) and 7 non-cystectomy candidates with less than a CR (7%) received consolidation chemotherapy and radiation. 13 incomplete responders (12%) underwent immediate cystectomy. 6 patients underwent cystectomy because they could not tolerate induction chemo-radiation. 1 complete response patient underwent radical cystectomy. 83 patients completed their planned therapy but 5 died of treatment related toxicity during induction chemotherapy. Five year actuarial overall survival and disease-specific survival were 52% and 60% respectively. For T2 patients, actuarial overall survival was 63%, and for T3-4, 45%. Five year survival with an intact functioning bladder was 43%. Five year freedom from distant metastases was 66%. Of those who had a CR after TURBT and MCV, the risk of a subsequent invasive bladder relapse was 18% at 5 years. Of those who had a CR after the completion of induction chemotherapy and 39.6 Gy, this risk was 21%. 18 patients (17%) have experienced a non-invasive bladder relapse requiring further TUR and

  3. Prediction model for recurrence probabilities after intravesical chemotherapy in patients with intermediate-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, including external validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, R.J.M.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Rodriguez Faba, O.; Witjes, W.P.J.; Palou, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a model to predict recurrence for patients with intermediate-risk (IR) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) treated with intravesical chemotherapy which can be challenging because of the heterogeneous characteristics of these patients. METHODS: Data from three Dutch trials

  4. Molecular Landscape of Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Joshua J; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-11-13

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Hurst et al. report an integrated analysis of non-invasive (stage Ta) bladder cancer. Two genomic subtypes are distinguished by chromosome 9q loss, resulting in increased AKT/PI3K/mTOR signaling. Tumors from female patients have a higher frequency of KDM6A mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lymphovascular invasion, ureteral reimplantation and prior history of urothelial carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis after partial cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer with negative pelvic lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, B; Li, H; Zhang, C; Yang, K; Qiao, B; Zhang, Z; Xu, Y

    2013-10-01

    To identify predictive factors underlying recurrence and survival after partial cystectomy for pelvic lymph node-negative muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) (urothelial carcinoma) and to report the results of partial cystectomy among select patients. We retrospectively reviewed 101 cases that received partial cystectomy for MIBC (pT2-3N0M0) between 2000 and 2010. The log-rank test and a Cox regression analyses were performed to identify factors that were predictive of recurrence and survival. With a median follow-up of 53.0 months (range 9-120), the 5-year overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were 58%, 65% and 50%, respectively. A total of 33 patients died of bladder cancer and 52 patients survived with intact bladder. Of the 101 patients included, 55 had no recurrence, 12 had non-muscle-invasive recurrence in the bladder that was treated successfully, and 34 had recurrence with advanced disease. The multivariate analysis showed that prior history of urothelial carcinoma (PH.UC) was associated with both CSS and RFS and weakly associated with OS; lymphovascular invasion (LVI) and ureteral reimplantation (UR) were associated with OS, CSS and RFS. Among patients with pelvic lymph node-negative MIBC, PH.UC and UR should be considered as contraindications for partial cystectomy, and LVI is predictive of poor outcomes after partial cystectomy. Highly selective partial cystectomy is a rational alternative to radical cystectomy for the treatment of MIBC with negative pelvic lymph nodes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  7. Prognostic Performance and Reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization Grading Classification Systems in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: A European Association of Urology Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer Guidelines Panel Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Viktor; Čapoun, Otakar; Cohen, Daniel; Hernández, Virginia; Babjuk, Marek; Burger, Max; Compérat, Eva; Gontero, Paolo; Lam, Thomas; MacLennan, Steven; Mostafid, A Hugh; Palou, Joan; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rouprêt, Morgan; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Sylvester, Richard; Yuan, Yuhong; Zigeuner, Richard

    2017-11-01

    Tumour grade is an important prognostic indicator in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Histopathological classifications are limited by interobserver variability (reproducibility), which may have prognostic implications. European Association of Urology NMIBC guidelines suggest concurrent use of both 1973 and 2004/2016 World Health Organization (WHO) classifications. To compare the prognostic performance and reproducibility of the 1973 and 2004/2016 WHO grading systems for NMIBC. A systematic literature search was undertaken incorporating Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Studies were critically appraised for risk of bias (QUIPS). For prognosis, the primary outcome was progression to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease. Secondary outcomes were disease recurrence, and overall and cancer-specific survival. For reproducibility, the primary outcome was interobserver variability between pathologists. Secondary outcome was intraobserver variability (repeatability) by the same pathologist. Of 3593 articles identified, 20 were included in the prognostic review; three were eligible for the reproducibility review. Increasing tumour grade in both classifications was associated with higher disease progression and recurrence rates. Progression rates in grade 1 patients were similar to those in low-grade patients; progression rates in grade 3 patients were higher than those in high-grade patients. Survival data were limited. Reproducibility of the 2004/2016 system was marginally better than that of the 1973 system. Two studies on repeatability showed conflicting results. Most studies had a moderate to high risk of bias. Current grading classifications in NMIBC are suboptimal. The 1973 system identifies more aggressive tumours. Intra- and interobserver variability was slightly less in the 2004/2016 classification. We could not confirm that the 2004/2016 classification outperforms the 1973 classification in prediction of recurrence and progression. This article

  8. Is [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose FDG-PET/CT better than CT alone for the preoperative lymph node staging of muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uttam, Mete; Pravin, Nayak; Anish, Bhattacharya; Nandita, Kakkar; Arup, Mandal, E-mail: uttam_mete@yahoo.com [PGIMER, Chandigarh, (India)

    2016-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate whether the use of [F-18]-FDG-PET/CT can accurately predict pelvic lymph node metastasis in patients with muscle invasive TCC of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer had undergone FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs after IV injection of 6.5MBq (Mega-Becquerel)/Kg of FDG. After intravenous hydration IV furosemide was given to overcome the difficulties posed by urinary excretion of {sup 18}F-FDG. PET/ CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/ CT images. The imaging findings were correlated with the histopathology of the nodes (gold standard). Results: CT and FDG-PET had demonstrated positive lymph nodes in 9 & 8 patients respectively. Among the 15 patients 3 had documented metastasis on histopathology. Both CT and PET could detect the nodes in all these 3 patients (100% sensitivity). Nodes were histologically negative amongst 6&5 patients who had node involvement by CT and PET respectively. Therefore, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) & negative predictive value (NPV) for CT and PET/CT were 50%, 33.3%, 100% and 58.3%, 37.5%, 100% respectively. Conclusion: The theoretical advantage of this cutting edge technology for whole body imaging has not been translated into clinical practice as we found minimal advantage of combined FDG-PET/CT over CT alone for nodal staging of muscle invasive bladder cancer. This may be due to substantial overlap between standardized uptake values (SUVs) from active inflammatory processes with those of malignant lesion. (author)

  9. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  10. Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic, and Activity Evaluation of TMX-101 in a Multicenter Phase 1 Study in Patients With Papillary Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arends, T.J.H.; Lammers, R.J.M.; Falke, J.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Rustighini, I.; Pozzi, R.; Ravic, M.; Eisenhardt, A.; Vergunst, H.; Witjes, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND: Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a strong tendency to recur despite adjuvant instillations. TMX-101 is a new liquid form of imiquimod for intravesical instillation and has activity in vitro against urothelial carcinoma. The purpose was to analyze the activity

  11. Molecular markers in disease detection and follow-up of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Moritz; Walz, Simon; Stühler, Viktoria; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Rausch, Steffen; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2018-05-01

    Diagnosis and surveillance of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is mainly based on endoscopic bladder evaluation and urine cytology. Several assays for determining additional molecular markers (urine-, tissue- or blood-based) have been developed in recent years but have not been included in clinical guidelines so far. Areas covered: This review gives an update on different molecular markers in the urine and evaluates their role in patients with NMIBC in disease detection and surveillance. Moreover, the potential of recent approaches such as DNA methylation assays, multi-panel RNA gene expression assays and cell-free DNA analysis is assessed. Expert commentary: Most studies on various molecular urine markers have mainly focused on a potential replacement of cystoscopy. New developments in high throughput technologies and urine markers may offer further advantages as they may represent a non-invasive approach for molecular characterization of the disease. This opens new options for individualized surveillance strategies and may help to choose the best therapeutic option. The implementation of these technologies in well-designed clinical trials is essential to further promote the use of urine diagnostics in the management of patients with NMIBC.

  12. Long-term results of radiation combined with cisplatin in localized muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takahiro; Nishijima, Jun; Miyachika, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiaki; Nagao, Kazuhiro; Sakano, Shigeru; Matsuyama, Hideyasu; Naito, Katsusuke

    2011-01-01

    Although radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for localized muscle invasive-bladder cancer, bladder preservation therapies have been tried for selective patients in several institutes. However, the indication of bladder preservation therapy remains controversial. To select patients who are good candidates for bladder preservation therapy, we evaluated our long-term experience with radiation therapy (conformal radiotherapy (CRT)) combined with cisplatin. Between 1994 and 2009, 90 patients with bladder cancer (clinical stage T2-4N0M0) with no evidence of upper urinary tract cancer were treated with CRT. The response was evaluated by transurethral resection (TUR) of the tumor, urine cytology and CT scan. Thirty-seven cases (41.1%) achieved pathological complete response (CR) which was defined as no microscopic residual tumor in the bladder. After TUR, 74 cases (82.2%) achieved local control of the cancer that was considered as clinical CR. Among 16 patients for whom clinical CR was not achieved, 8 cases were treated with immediate radical cystectomy. We evaluated the long-term results of CRT in 82 cases with bladder preservation. The median follow-up was 36.6 months (range, 4.1-155.1). The five-year overall survival rate and the 5-year progression-free survival rate were 73.0% and 59.2%, respectively. Clinical T stage and type of tumor (primary or recurrent) were prognostic factors for overall survival (p=0.003 and p=0.017). Likewise, clinical T stage and type of tumor were prognostic factors for progression-free survival (p=0.022 and p=0.033). In addition, primary cT2 cases had a significantly better prognosis than those with other T stage and recurrence in overall survival and progression-free survival (p=0.007 and p=0.018). Based on these data, we concluded that primary cT2 tumors were good candidates for radiation combined with cisplatin for bladder preservation therapy. (author)

  13. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients' values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care.

  14. Defining progression in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: it is time for a new, standard definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Donald; Persad, Raj; Brausi, Maurizio; Buckley, Roger; Witjes, J Alfred; Palou, Joan; Böhle, Andreas; Kamat, Ashish M; Colombel, Marc; Soloway, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite being one of the most important clinical outcomes in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, there is currently no standard definition of disease progression. Major clinical trials and meta-analyses have used varying definitions or have failed to define this end point altogether. A standard definition of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer progression as determined by reproducible and reliable procedures is needed. We examine current definitions of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer progression, and propose a new definition that will be more clinically useful in determining patient prognosis and comparing treatment options. The IBCG (International Bladder Cancer Group) analyzed published clinical trials and meta-analyses that examined nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer progression as of December 2012. The limitations of the definitions of progression used in these trials were considered, as were additional parameters associated with the advancement of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. The most commonly used definition of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer progression is an increase in stage from nonmuscle invasive to muscle invasive disease. Although this definition is clinically important, it fails to include other important parameters of advancing disease such as progression to lamina propria invasion and increase in grade. The IBCG proposes the definition of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer progression as an increase in T stage from CIS or Ta to T1 (lamina propria invasion), development of T2 or greater or lymph node (N+) disease or distant metastasis (M1), or an increase in grade from low to high. Investigators should consider the use of this new definition to help standardize protocols and improve the reporting of progression. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A panel of prognostic protein markers for progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer - a multicenter tissue microarray validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Niels; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    cohort of 283 patients with long-term follow-up. For validation of the results we used three independent patient cohorts with long-term follow-up from Sweden, Spain, and Taiwan. In total 649 primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from patients with long-term follow-up were used. Protein expression......Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the Western world. The histopathological parameters used in the clinic cannot precisely predict the individual disease course. Bladder cancer patients are therefore monitored thoroughly for disease recurrence and progression by urine and cystoscopy...... Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. Transcripts from the five genes encoding these proteins were previously included in gene expression signatures for outcome prediction for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). As a training-set, we used primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from a Danish...

  16. Hexaminolevulinate blue-light cystoscopy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: review of the clinical evidence and consensus statement on appropriate use in the USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneshmand, S.; Schuckman, A.K.; Bochner, B.H.; Cookson, M.S.; Downs, T.M.; Gomella, L.G.; Grossman, H.B.; Kamat, A.M.; Konety, B.R.; Lee, C.T.; Pohar, K.S.; Pruthi, R.S.; Resnick, M.J.; Smith, N.D.; Witjes, J.A.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Steinberg, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is a tumour photosensitizer that is used in combination with blue-light cystoscopy (BLC) as an adjunct to white-light cystoscopy (WLC) in the diagnosis and management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Since being licensed in Europe in 2005, HAL has been used in

  17. Isorhapontigenin (ISO) Inhibits Invasive Bladder Cancer Formation In Vivo and Human Bladder Cancer Invasion In Vitro by Targeting STAT1/FOXO1 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guosong; Wu, Amy D; Huang, Chao; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Huang, Haishan; Liao, Xin; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Zeng, Xingruo; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haojie; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-07-01

    Although our most recent studies have identified Isorhapontigenin (ISO), a novel derivative of stilbene that isolated from a Chinese herb Gnetum cleistostachyum, for its inhibition of human bladder cancer growth, nothing is known whether ISO possesses an inhibitory effect on bladder cancer invasion. Thus, we addressed this important question in current study and discovered that ISO treatment could inhibit mouse-invasive bladder cancer development following bladder carcinogen N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl) nitrosamine (BBN) exposure in vivo We also found that ISO suppressed human bladder cancer cell invasion accompanied by upregulation of the forkhead box class O 1 (FOXO1) mRNA transcription in vitro Accordingly, FOXO1 was profoundly downregulated in human bladder cancer tissues and was negatively correlated with bladder cancer invasion. Forced expression of FOXO1 specifically suppressed high-grade human bladder cancer cell invasion, whereas knockdown of FOXO1 promoted noninvasive bladder cancer cells becoming invasive bladder cancer cells. Moreover, knockout of FOXO1 significantly increased bladder cancer cell invasion and abolished the ISO inhibition of invasion in human bladder cancer cells. Further studies showed that the inhibition of Signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation at Tyr701 was crucial for ISO upregulation of FOXO1 transcription. Furthermore, this study revealed that metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was a FOXO1 downstream effector, which was also supported by data obtained from mouse model of ISO inhibition BBN-induced mouse-invasive bladder cancer formation. These findings not only provide a novel insight into the understanding of mechanism of bladder cancer's propensity to invasion, but also identify a new role and mechanisms underlying the natural compound ISO that specifically suppresses such bladder cancer invasion through targeting the STAT1-FOXO1-MMP-2 axis. Cancer Prev Res; 9(7); 567-80. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American

  18. Clinical significance of serum and urinary HER2/neu protein levels in primary non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Arikan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to compare serum and urinary HER2/neu levels between healthy control group and patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Additionally, we evaluated relationship of HER2/neu levels with tumor stage, grade, recurrence and progression. Materials and Methods: Fourty-four patients with primary non-muscle invasive bladder tumors (Group 2 and 40 healthy control group (Group 1 were included the study. Blood and urinary samples were collected from all patients and HER2/neu levels were measured by ELISA method. Blood and urinary HER2/neu levels and additionally, ratio of urinary HER2/neu levels to urinary creatinine levels were recorded. Demographic data and tumor characteristics were recorded. Results: Mean serum HER2/neu levels were similar between two groups and statistically significant difference wasn't observed. Urinary HER2/neu levels were significantly higher in group 2 than group 1. Ratio of urinary HER2/neu to urinary creatinine was significantly higher in group 2 than group 1, (p=0,021. Serum and urinary HER2/ neu levels were not associated with tumor stage, grade, recurrence and progression while ratio of urinary HER2/neu to urinary creatinin levels were significantly higher in high-grade tumors. HER2/neu, the sensitivity of the test was found to be 20.5%, and the specificity was 97.5%, also for the urinary HER2/neu/urinary creatinine ratio, the sensitivity and specificity of the test were found to be 31.8% and 87.5%, respectively. Conclusions: Urinary HER2/neu and ratio of urinary creatinine urine were significantly higher in patients with bladder cancer compared to healthy subjects. Large series and controlled studies are needed for use as a tumor marker.

  19. The effect of the time interval between diagnosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer and radical cystectomy on staging and survival: A Netherlands Cancer Registry analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruins, H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Arends, T.J.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Data from single-center series suggest that a delay in time to radical cystectomy (RC) more than 3 months after diagnosis of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is associated with pathological upstaging and decreased survival. However, limited data is available from population-based

  20. Induction Cisplatin and Fluorouracil-Based Chemotherapy Followed by Concurrent Chemoradiation for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-C.; Hsu, C.-H.; Cheng, Jason C.; Huang, C.-Y.; Tsai, Y.-C.; Hsu, F.-M.; Huang, K.-H.; Cheng, A.-L.; Pu, Y.-S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a multimodality bladder-preserving therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages T2-4aN0M0 bladder cancer suitable for cystectomy underwent radical transurethral resection and induction chemotherapy, followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Patients with a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) <80 or age ≥70 years underwent Protocol A: induction chemotherapy with three cycles of the cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) regimen, and CCRT with six doses of weekly cisplatin and 64.8 Gy radiotherapy given with the shrinking-field technique. Patients with KPS ≥80 and age <70 years underwent Protocol B: induction chemotherapy with three cycles of weekly paclitaxel plus the CF regimen, and CCRT with six doses of weekly paclitaxel and cisplatin plus 64.8 Gy radiotherapy. Interval cystoscopy was employed after induction chemotherapy and when radiotherapy reached 43.2 Gy. Patients without a complete response (CR) were referred for salvage cystectomy. Results: Among 30 patients (median, 66 years) enrolled, 17 and 13 patients underwent Protocol A and B, respectively. After induction chemotherapy, 23 patients achieved CR. Five (17%) of 7 patients without CR underwent salvage cystectomy. Overall, 28 patients (93%) completed the protocol treatment. Of 22 patients who completed CCRT, 1 had recurrence with carcinoma in situ and 3 had distant metastases. After a median follow-up of 47 months, overall and progression-free survival rate for all patients were 77% and 54% at 3 years, respectively. Of 19 surviving patients, 15 (79%) retained functioning bladders. Conclusions: Our protocols may be alternatives to cystectomy for selected patients who wish to preserve the bladder.

  1. Predictive Value of NRAMP1 and HGPX1 Gene Polymorphism for Maintenance BCG Response in Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenormand, Claire; Couteau, Jérôme; Nouhaud, François-Xavier; Maillet, Géraldine; Bou, Jacqueline; Gobet, Françoise; Pfister, Christian

    2016-04-01

    To assess the potential predictive value of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein 1 (NRAMP1) and human glutathione peroxidase 1 (hGPX1) polymorphism in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) instillation, we conducted an original ancillary multicenter study. We evaluated patients included in the multicenter URO-BCG 4 trial, who received three weekly instillations of one-third dose BCG every 6 months (group I) or two weekly instillations every 3 months (group II) for 3 years. For clinical evaluation we also evaluated tumor recurrence and muscle progression. NRAMP1 and hGPX1 polymorphism analyses were performed on blood DNA. NRAMP1 exon 15 and hGPX1 exon 1c were amplified using Type-it Microsatellite PCR Kit® for multiplex polymerase chain reaction. From June 2004 to April 2010, 146 randomized patients were included in this retrospective study. Blood samples were obtained from 107 patients. With 36 months of follow-up, 13.6% of patients had a tumor recurrence and muscle-invasive progression was observed in 4.3% of patients. Concerning NRAMP1 D543N polymorphism, patients with allele A had no tumor recurrence or muscle-invasive progression. No significant difference was observed in gene polymorphism distribution between groups I and II. Moreover, we did not observe any significant association of gene polymorphisms, tumor recurrence or muscle-invasive progression, event time and disease-free survival. Our results suggest that no significant difference was found for NRAMP1 and hGPX1 gene polymorphisms associated with recurrence time, muscle invasion frequency and disease-free survival, nevertheless, we observed that the NRAMP1 D543N GG genotype group had a shorter time to tumor recurrence. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  2. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toyofumi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Sato, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Ken-Ichiro; Itatani, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  3. Adaptive radiotherapy in muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer - An effective method to reduce the irradiated bowel volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuomikoski, Laura; Collan, Juhani; Keyrilaeinen, Jani; Visapaeae, Harri; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tenhunen, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the benefits of adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer in decreasing irradiation of small bowel. Material and methods: Five patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer received adaptive radiotherapy to a total dose of 55.8-65 Gy with daily cone-beam computed tomography scanning. The whole bladder was treated to 45-50.4 Gy, followed by a partial bladder boost. The plan of the day was chosen from 3 to 4 pre-planned treatment plans according to the visible extent of bladder wall in cone-beam computed tomography images. Dose volume histograms for intestinal cavity volumes were constructed and compared with corresponding histograms calculated for conventional non-adaptive radiotherapy with single treatment plan of 2 cm CTV-PTV margins. CTV dose coverage in adaptive treatment technique was compared with CTV dose coverage in conventional radiotherapy. Results: The average volume of intestinal cavity receiving ≥45 Gy was reduced from 335 ± 106 cm 3 to 180 ± 113 cm 3 (1SD). The maximum volume of intestinal cavity spared at 45 Gy on a single patient was 240 cm 3 , while the minimum volume was 65 cm 3 . The corresponding reduction in average intestinal cavity volume receiving ≥45 Gy calculated for the whole bladder treatment only was 66 ± 36 cm 3 . CTV dose coverage was improved on two out of five patients and decreased on three patients. Conclusions: Adaptive radiotherapy considerably reduces dose to the small bowel, while maintaining the dose coverage of CTV at similar level when compared to the conventional treatment technique.

  4. Bladder Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder can be low-grade or high-grade. Bladder cancer is also divided into muscle-invasive and nonmuscle-invasive disease. Find evidence-based information on bladder cancer including treatment, screening, research, and statistics.

  5. ROLE OF ADJUVANT INTRAVESICAL CHEMOTHERAPY IN THE COMBINED ORGAN-SPARING TREATMENT OF NON-MUSCLE-INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Zubko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to enhance the efficiency of combined treatment for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer ((NMIBC and to assess the results of its treatment using transurethral resection (TUR as monotherapy and in combination with intravesical adjuvant chemotherapy (CT.Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 59 patients with NMIBC. Twenty-two patients underwent TUR in Group 1; TUR and single intravesical injection of drugs were performed in 19 patients in Group 2; 18 patients had TUR and long-term intravesical CT.Results and discussion. The recurrence rates were 59.1, 57.9, and 38.89 % in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Intravesical CT was found to appreciably affect the prevention of recurrence in the area of resection. The rate of this recurrence was 31.81, 26.32, and 5.56 % in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Conclusion. Adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy CT is an effective method to prevent recurrent bladder cancer.

  6. Prognostic factors in non-muscle-invasive bladder tumors - I. Clinical prognostic factors: A review of the experience of the EORTC genito-urinary group - II. Biologic prognostic markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurth, Karl-Heinz; Sylvester, Richard J.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To summarize the most important clinical prognostic factors of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, as assessed by the European organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Genito-Urinary Group, to present biologic markers involved in urothelial cell carcinoma, and to address

  7. The prognostic factors affecting survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Oh, Bong Ryoul; Ahn, Sung Ja; Nah, Byung Sik; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwang Sung; Ryu, Soo Bang; Park, Yang Il

    2002-01-01

    treatment response and radiation dose are suggested as the statistically significant factors affecting the survival rate of muscle invasive bladder cancer. A further prospective randomized study is needed to confirm these prognostic factors

  8. The prognostic factors affecting survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Woong Ki; Oh, Bong Ryoul; Ahn, Sung Ja; Nah, Byung Sik; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwang Sung; Ryu, Soo Bang; Park, Yang Il [Chonnam National University Medical School, Chonnam National University Hospital, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-06-15

    rate. The treatment response and radiation dose are suggested as the statistically significant factors affecting the survival rate of muscle invasive bladder cancer. A further prospective randomized study is needed to confirm these prognostic factors.

  9. Prognostic value of cell cycle regulatory proteins in muscle-infiltrating bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmozzi, Fabia; Rubagotti, Alessandra; Romagnoli, Andrea; Carmignani, Giorgio; Perdelli, Luisa; Gatteschi, Beatrice; Boccardo, Francesco

    2006-12-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the expression levels of proteins involved in cell cycle regulation in specimens of bladder cancer and to correlate them with the clinicopathological characteristics, proliferative activity and survival. Eighty-two specimens obtained from patients affected by muscle-invasive bladder cancer were evaluated immunohistochemically for p53, p21 and cyclin D1 expression, as well as for the tumour proliferation index, Ki-67. The statistical analysis included Kaplan-Meier curves with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards models. In univariate analyses, low Ki-67 proliferation index (P = 0.045) and negative p21 immunoreactivity (P = 0.04) were associated to patient's overall survival (OS), but in multivariate models p21 did not reach statistical significance. When the combinations of the variables were assessed in two separate multivariate models that included tumour stage, grading, lymph node status, vascular invasion and perineural invasion, the combined variables p21/Ki-67 or p21/cyclin D1 expression were independent predictors for OS; in particular, patients with positive p21/high Ki-67 (P = 0.015) or positive p21/negative cyclin D1 (P = 0.04) showed the worst survival outcome. Important alterations in the cell cycle regulatory pathways occur in muscle-invasive bladder cancer and the combined use of cell cycle regulators appears to provide significant prognostic information that could be used to select the patients most suitable for multimodal therapeutic approaches.

  10. Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg

    2013-01-01

    (TUR-B), and one single instillation of 40 mg Mitomycin C (MMC) within 24 hours post-TUR-B were introduced at our institution by March 2008. For the study, patients were identified retrospectively using procedure codes for TUR-B and cystoscopy with biopsy and fulguration. Patients with muscle......-invasive bladder cancer were excluded. 190 consecutive patients, treated between 03-01-2008 and 28-02-2010, were included into the intervention group, while 216 patients, treated between 03-01-2006 and 29-02-2008, served as controls. Procedures and pathology results were registered. The groups were comparable...

  11. Pathologic Pattern of Invasive Bladder Carcinoma: Impact of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pathologic pattern of invasive bladder carcinoma in cystectomy specimens in relation to bilharziasis. Patients and Methods: Between April 2002 and October 2006, 148 consecutive patients with invasive bladder cancer were subjected to radical cystectomy and orthotopic sigmoid bladder ...

  12. Promising results with image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, D.; Caine, H.; McCloud, P.; Guo, L.; Kneebone, A.; Eade, T.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the feasibility of image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using daily soft tissue matching in the treatment of bladder cancer. Twenty-eight patients with muscle-invasive carcinoma of the bladder were recruited to a protocol of definitive radiation using IMRT with accelerated hypofractionation with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Isotropic margins of .5 and 1 cm were used to generate the high risk and intermediate risk planning target volumes respectively. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired daily and a soft tissue match was performed. Cystoscopy was scheduled 6 weeks post treatment. The median age was 83 years (range 58-92). Twenty patients had stage II or III disease, and eight were stage IV. Gross disease received 66 Gy in 30 fractions in 11 patients (ten with concurrent chemotherapy) or 55 Gy in 20 fractions for those of poorer performance status or with palliative intent. All patients completed radiation treatment as planned. Three patients ceased chemotherapy early due to toxicity. Six patients (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and six (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Five patients (18 %) developed Grade ≥2 late GU toxicity and no ≥2 late GI toxicity was observed. Nineteen patients underwent cystoscopy following radiation, with complete response (CR) in 16 cases (86 %), including all patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients relapsed, four of which were local relapses. Of the patients with local recurrence, one underwent salvage cystectomy. For patients treated with definitive intent, freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR) and overall survival (OS) was 90 %/100 % for chemoradiotherapy versus 86 %/69 % for radiotherapy alone. IG- IMRT using daily soft tissue matching is a feasible in the treatment of bladder cancer, enabling the delivery of accelerated synchronous integrated boost with good early local control outcomes and low toxicity

  13. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy

  14. Importance of contraction history on muscle force of porcine urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Robin; Böl, Markus; Siebert, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide a comprehensive dataset of porcine urinary bladder smooth muscle properties. Particularly, the history dependence of force production, namely force depression (FD) following shortening and force enhancement (FE) following stretch, was analysed. During active micturition, the circumference of the urinary bladder changes enormously. Thus, FD might be an important phenomenon during smooth muscle contraction. Electrically stimulated, intact urinary bladder strips from pigs (n = 10) were suspended in an aerated-filled organ bath, and different isometric, isotonic, and isokinetic contraction protocols were performed to determine the force-length and the force-velocity relation. FD and FE were assessed in concentric and eccentric contractions with different ramp lengths and ramp velocities. Bladder smooth muscles exhibit considerable amounts of FD and FE. The amount of FD increased significantly with ramp length, while FE did not change. However, FE and FD were independent of ramp velocity. The results imply that smooth muscle bladder strips exhibit similar muscle properties and history-dependent behaviour compared to striated muscles. The provided dataset of muscle properties is important for bladder modelling as well as for the analyses and interpretation of dynamic bladder filling and voiding.

  15. Contemporary management of patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer who fail intravesical BCG therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, D R; Rouprêt, M

    2011-08-01

    It is advocated that patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) receive an adjuvant course of intravesical Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) as first-line treatment. However, a substantial proportion of patients will 'fail' BCG, either early with persistent (refractory) disease or recur late after a long disease-free interval (relapsing). Guideline recommendation in the 'refractory' setting is radical cystectomy, but there are situations when extirpative surgery is not feasible due to competing co-morbidity, a patient's desire for bladder preservation or reluctance to undergo surgery. In this review, we discuss the contemporary management of NMIBC in patients who have failed prior BCG and are not suitable for radical surgery and highlight the potential options available. These options can be categorised as immunotherapy, chemotherapy, device-assisted therapy and combination therapy. However, the current data are still inadequate to formulate definitive recommendations, and data from ongoing trials and maturing studies will give us an insight into whether there is a realistic efficacious second-line treatment for patients who fail intravesical BCG but are not candidates for definitive surgery.

  16. [Bladder-conserving treatment for bladder cancer: potential of and developments in radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Pieters, Bradley R; Koning, Caro C E

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment for muscle-invasive bladder cancer is surgical removal of the bladder and construction of a neobladder. Recently, important improvements have been made in the potential for bladder-conserving treatment using radiotherapy. External beam radiotherapy has undergone technological improvements, as a result of which it is possible to radiate the tumour more precisely while decreasing radiation to healthy tissue. Radiochemotherapy improves local recurrence-free and overall survival compared with radiotherapy alone. The results of this combined treatment are comparable with those of surgery. Additionally, Dutch radiotherapy departments have collected data in a national database of 1040 selected patients with confined bladder cancer. These patients were treated with external beam radiation, limited surgery and brachytherapy. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 75%. Bladder conserving treatment options for muscle-invasive bladder cancer should be discussed during the multidisciplinary meeting.

  17. Comparative effectiveness of gemcitabine plus cisplatin versus methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, plus cisplatin as neoadjuvant therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galsky, Matthew D; Pal, Sumanta K; Chowdhury, Simon

    2015-01-01

    ). In an exploratory analysis evaluating survival, the hazard ratio comparing hazard rates for MVAC versus GC adjusted for propensity scores was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.40-1.54; P = .48). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who received neoadjuvant GC and MVAC achieved......BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) has been adopted as a neoadjuvant regimen for muscle-invasive bladder cancer despite the lack of Level I evidence in this setting. METHODS: Data were collected using an electronic data-capture platform from 28 international centers. Eligible patients had...... clinical T-classification 2 (cT2) through cT4aN0M0 urothelial cancer of the bladder and received neoadjuvant GC or methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, plus cisplatin (MVAC) before undergoing cystectomy. Logistic regression was used to compute propensity scores as the predicted probabilities of patients...

  18. Clinical results of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a focal simultaneous boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in elderly or medically unfit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J; van Os, Rob M; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C C M

    2016-03-18

    For elderly or medically unfit patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, cystectomy or chemotherapy are contraindicated. This leaves radical radiotherapy as the only treatment option. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively analyze the treatment outcome and associated toxicity of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a focal simultaneous tumor boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patients not suitable for cystectomy. One hundred eighteen patients with T2-4 N0-1 M0 bladder cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 80 years. Treatment consisted of either a conformal box technique or IMRT and included a simultaneous boost to the tumor. To enable an accurate boost delivery, fiducial markers were placed around the tumor. Patients were treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the elective treatment volumes, and a daily tumor boost up to 55-60 Gy. Clinical complete response was seen in 87 % of patients. Three-year overall survival was 44 %, with a locoregional control rate of 73 % at 3 years. Toxicity was low, with late urinary and intestinal toxicity rates grade ≥ 2 of 14 and 5 %, respectively. The use of IMRT reduced late intestinal toxicity, whereas fiducial markers reduced acute urinary toxicity. Radical radiotherapy using a focal boost is feasible and effective for elderly or unfit patients, with a 3-year locoregional control of 73 %. Toxicity rates were low, and were reduced by the use of IMRT and fiducial markers.

  19. Prognostic factors in invasive bladder carcinoma treated by combined modality protocol (organ-sparing approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matos, Tadeja; Cufer, Tanja; Cervek, Jozica; Borstnar, Simona; Kragelj, Borut; Zumer-Pregelj, Mirjana

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The results of bladder sparing approach for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer, using a combination of transurethral resection (TUR), chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, are encouraging. The survival of patients treated by this method is similar to the survival of patients treated by radical cystectomy. The aim of our study was to find out which pretreatment characteristics influence the survival of patients treated by organ sparing approach that would enable us to identify the patients most suitable for this type of treatment. Methods and Materials: The prognostic value of different factors, such as age, gender, performance status, hemoglobin level, clinical stage, histologic grade, presence of obstructive uropathy, and completeness of TUR, has been studied in 105 patients with invasive bladder cancer, who received a bladder sparing treatment in the period from 1988 to 1995. They were treated with a combination of TUR, followed by 2-4 cycles of methotrexate, cisplatinum, and vinblastine polychemotherapy. In complete responders the treatment was completed by radiotherapy (50 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the regional lymph nodes), whereas nonresponders underwent cystectomy whenever feasible. Results: Our study has confirmed an independent prognostic value of performance status, histologic grade, and obstructive uropathy, for the disease-specific survival (DSS) of bladder cancer patients treated by a conservative approach. We believe that performance status best reflects the extent of disease and exerts significant influence on the extent and course of treatment, while obstructive uropathy is a good indicator of local spread of the disease, better than clinical T-stage. Our finding that histologic grade is one of the strongest prognostic factors shows that tumor biology also is a very important prognostic factor in patients treated by conservative approach. Conclusion: Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who are most likely to benefit

  20. Muscle invasive bladder cancer in Upper Egypt: the shift in risk factors and tumor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarzour, Ali H; Selim, Mohie; Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A; Hameed, Diaa A; AbdelAziz, Mohammad A

    2008-01-01

    In Egypt, where bilharziasis is endemic, bladder cancer is the commonest cancer in males and the 2 nd in females; squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the commonest type found, with a peculiar mode of presentation. The aim of this study is to identify and rank the risk factors of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) in Upper Egypt and describe its specific criteria of presentation and histopathology. This is an analytical, hospital based, case controlled study conducted in south Egypt cancer institute through comparing MIBC cases (n = 130) with age, sex and residence matched controls (n = 260) for the presence of risk factors of MIBC. Data was collected by personal interview using a well designed questionnaire. Patients' records were reviewed for histopathology and Radiologic findings. The risk factors of MIBC were positive family history [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 7.7], exposure to pesticides [AOR = 6.2], bladder stones [AOR = 5], consanguinity [AOR = 3.9], recurrent cystitis [AOR = 3.1], bilharziasis [odds ratio (OR) = 5.8] and smoking [OR = 5.3]. SCC represented 67.6% of cases with burning micturition being the presenting symptom in 73.8%. MIBC in Upper Egypt is usually of the SCC type (although its percentage is decreasing), occurs at a younger age and presents with burning micturition rather than hematuria. Unlike the common belief, positive family history, parents' consanguinity, exposure to pesticides and chronic cystitis seem to play now more important roles than bilharziasis and smoking in the development of this disease in this area

  1. [(18)F]Fluorodeoxyglucose - positron emission tomography/computed tomography improves staging in patients with high-risk muscle-invasive bladder cancer scheduled for radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollberg, Petter; Almquist, Helen; Bläckberg, Mats; Cronberg, Carin; Garpered, Sabine; Gudjonsson, Sigurdur; Kleist, Jakob; Lyttkens, Kerstin; Patschan, Oliver; Liedberg, Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical use of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in addition to conventional preoperative radiological investigations in a defined group of patients with high-risk muscle-invasive bladder cancer. In total, 103 patients with high-risk muscle-invasive bladder cancer defined as stage T3/T4 disease or as stage T2 with hydronephrosis or high-risk histological features, who were provisionally scheduled to undergo cystectomy, were prospectively recruited to the study. The patients were referred to FDG-PET/CT in addition to standard preoperative investigation with computed tomography (CT). The final treatment decision was reached at a multidisciplinary conference based on all available information including the FDG-PET/CT findings. Compared to CT alone, FDG-PET/CT provided more supplemental findings suggesting malignant manifestations in 48 (47%) of the 103 patients. The additional FDG-PET/CT findings led to an altered provisional treatment plan in 28 out of 103 patients (27%), detection of disseminated bladder cancer and subsequent cancellation of the initially intended cystectomy in 16 patients, and identification of disseminated disease and treatment with induction chemotherapy before radical cystectomy in 12 patients. Preoperative FDG-PET/CT changed the treatment plan for a considerable proportion (27%) of the present patients. Accordingly, such examination can potentially improve the preoperative staging of cystectomy patients with high-risk features, and may also reduce the number of futile operations in patients with advanced disease who are beyond cure.

  2. Recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG for immunotherapy in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begnini, K R; Buss, J H; Collares, T; Seixas, F K

    2015-05-01

    In the past three decades, intravesical instillation of Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been used for treating bladder cancer and it still remains at the forefront of immunotherapy for cancer patients. Although BCG-based therapy is the most effective intravesical therapy for this kind of tumor and represents the only agent known to reduce progression into muscle invasive bladder cancer, BCG is ineffective in approximately 30-40 % of cases and disease recurs in up to 50 % of patients. Since that BCG is considered an effective vehicle for delivery of antigens due to its unique characteristics, the genetic manipulation of these mycobacteria has been appealing in the search for less toxic and more potent therapeutic agents for bladder cancer immunotherapy. Herein, we discuss current advances in recombinant BCG construction, research, concerns, and future directions to promote the development of this promising immunotherapeutic approach for bladder cancer.

  3. The association between smoking cessation before and after diagnosis and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer recurrence: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Osch, Frits H M; Jochems, Sylvia H J; Reulen, Raoul C; Pirrie, Sarah J; Nekeman, Duncan; Wesselius, Anke; James, Nicholas D; Wallace, D Michael A; Cheng, K K; van Schooten, Frederik J; Bryan, Richard T; Zeegers, Maurice P

    2018-07-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for bladder cancer, but the relationship between smoking cessation after initial treatment and bladder cancer recurrence has been investigated less frequently and not prospectively yet. 722 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) patients (pTa, pT1, and CIS) from the prospective Bladder Cancer Prognosis Programme (BCPP) cohort, selected in the UK between 2005 and 2011, provided complete data on smoking behavior before and up to 5 years after diagnosis. The impact of smoking behavior on NMIBC recurrence was explored by multivariable Cox regression models investigating time-to-first NMIBC recurrence. Over a median follow-up period of 4.21 years, 403 pathologically confirmed NMIBC recurrences occurred in 210 patients. Only 25 current smokers at diagnosis quit smoking (14%) during follow-up and smoking cessation after diagnosis did not decrease risk of recurrence compared to continuing smokers (p = 0.352). Although quitting smoking after diagnosis might reduce the risk of recurrence based on retrospective evidence, this is not confirmed in this prospective study because the number of NMIBC patients quitting smoking before their first recurrence was too low. Nevertheless, this indicates an important role for urologists and other health care professionals in promoting smoking cessation in NMIBC.

  4. Clinical results of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy using a focal simultaneous boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in elderly or medically unfit patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutkenhaus, Lotte J.; Os, Rob M. van; Bel, Arjan; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    For elderly or medically unfit patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer, cystectomy or chemotherapy are contraindicated. This leaves radical radiotherapy as the only treatment option. It was the aim of this study to retrospectively analyze the treatment outcome and associated toxicity of conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a focal simultaneous tumor boost for muscle-invasive bladder cancer in patients not suitable for cystectomy. One hundred eighteen patients with T2-4 N0-1 M0 bladder cancer were analyzed retrospectively. Median age was 80 years. Treatment consisted of either a conformal box technique or IMRT and included a simultaneous boost to the tumor. To enable an accurate boost delivery, fiducial markers were placed around the tumor. Patients were treated with 40 Gy in 20 fractions to the elective treatment volumes, and a daily tumor boost up to 55–60 Gy. Clinical complete response was seen in 87 % of patients. Three-year overall survival was 44 %, with a locoregional control rate of 73 % at 3 years. Toxicity was low, with late urinary and intestinal toxicity rates grade ≥ 2 of 14 and 5 %, respectively. The use of IMRT reduced late intestinal toxicity, whereas fiducial markers reduced acute urinary toxicity. Radical radiotherapy using a focal boost is feasible and effective for elderly or unfit patients, with a 3-year locoregional control of 73 %. Toxicity rates were low, and were reduced by the use of IMRT and fiducial markers. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13014-016-0618-6) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  5. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with external beam radiation: influence of total dose, overall treatment time, and treatment interruption on local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moonen, L.; Voet, H. van der; Nijs, R. de; Horenblas, S.; Hart, A.A.M.; Bartelink, H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and eventually quantify a possible influence of tumor proliferation during the external radiation course on local control in muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: The influence of total dose, overall treatment time, and treatment interruption has retrospectively been analyzed in a series of 379 patients with nonmetastasized, muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder. All patients received external beam radiotherapy at the Netherlands Cancer Institute between 1977 and 1990. Total dose varied between 50 and 75 Gy with a mean of 60.5 Gy and a median of 60.4 Gy. Overall treatment time varied between 20 and 270 days with a mean of 49 days and a median of 41 days. Number of fractions varied between 17 and 36 with a mean of 27 and a median of 26. Two hundred and forty-four patients had a continuous radiation course, whereas 135 had an intended split course or an unintended treatment interruption. Median follow-up was 22 months for all patients and 82 months for the 30 patients still alive at last follow-up. A stepwise procedure using proportional hazard regression has been used to identify prognostic treatment factors with respect to local recurrence as sole first recurrence. Results: One hundred and thirty-six patients experienced a local recurrence and 120 of these occurred before regional or distant metastases. The actuarial local control rate was 40.3% at 5 years and 32.3% at 10 years. In a multivariate analysis total dose showed a significant association with local control (p 0.0039), however in a markedly nonlinear way. In fact only those patients treated with a dose below 57.5 Gy had a significant higher bladder relapse rate, whereas no difference in relapse rate was found among patients treated with doses above 57.5 Gy. This remained the case even after adjustment for overall treatment time and all significant tumor and patient characteristics. The Normalized Tumor Dose (NTD) (α/β = 10) and NTD (

  6. Significance of ERBB2 overexpression in therapeutic resistance and cancer-specific survival in muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients treated with chemoradiation-based selective bladder-sparing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Masaharu; Koga, Fumitaka; Yoshida, Soichiro; Tamura, Tomoki; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Ito, Eisaku; Kihara, Kazunori

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) resistance and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients treated with the CRT-based bladder-sparing protocol. From 1997 to 2012, 201 patients with cT2-4aN0M0 bladder cancer were treated with CRT (40 Gy with concurrent cisplatin) following transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Basically, patients with tumors that showed good CRT response and were amenable to segmental resection underwent partial cystectomy (PC) with pelvic lymph node dissection for bladder preservation; otherwise, radical cystectomy (RC) was recommended. Included in this study were 119 patients in whom TURBT specimens were available for immunohistochemical analysis of ERBB 2 expression. Following CRT, 30 and 65 patients underwent PC or RC, respectively; the remaining 24 patients did not undergo cystectomy. Tumors were defined as CRT-resistant when patients did not achieve complete response after CRT. Associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with CRT resistance and CSS were evaluated. CRT resistance was observed clinically in 56% (67 of 119 patients) and pathologically (in cystectomy specimens) in 55% (52 of 95 patients). ERBB 2 overexpression was observed in 45 patients (38%). On multivariate analysis, ERBB 2 overexpression was an independent predictor for CRT resistance clinically (odds ratio, 3.6; P=.002) and pathologically (odds ratio, 2.9; P=.031). ERBB 2 overexpression was associated with shorter CSS (5-year CSS rates, 56% vs 87% for the ERBB 2 overexpression group vs the others; P=.001). ERBB 2 overexpression was also an independent risk factor for bladder cancer death at all time points of our bladder-sparing protocol (pre-CRT, post-CRT, and post-cystectomy). ERBB 2 overexpression appears relevant to CRT resistance and unfavorable CSS in MIBC patients treated with the CRT-based bladder-sparing protocol. ERBB 2-targeting treatment may improve the outcomes

  7. Significance of ERBB2 Overexpression in Therapeutic Resistance and Cancer-Specific Survival in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients Treated With Chemoradiation-Based Selective Bladder-Sparing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Masaharu; Koga, Fumitaka; Yoshida, Soichiro; Tamura, Tomoki; Fujii, Yasuhisa; Ito, Eisaku; Kihara, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with chemoradiation therapy (CRT) resistance and cancer-specific survival (CSS) in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) patients treated with the CRT-based bladder-sparing protocol. Methods and Materials: From 1997 to 2012, 201 patients with cT2-4aN0M0 bladder cancer were treated with CRT (40 Gy with concurrent cisplatin) following transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Basically, patients with tumors that showed good CRT response and were amenable to segmental resection underwent partial cystectomy (PC) with pelvic lymph node dissection for bladder preservation; otherwise, radical cystectomy (RC) was recommended. Included in this study were 119 patients in whom TURBT specimens were available for immunohistochemical analysis of ERBB 2 expression. Following CRT, 30 and 65 patients underwent PC or RC, respectively; the remaining 24 patients did not undergo cystectomy. Tumors were defined as CRT-resistant when patients did not achieve complete response after CRT. Associations of ERBB 2 overexpression with CRT resistance and CSS were evaluated. Results: CRT resistance was observed clinically in 56% (67 of 119 patients) and pathologically (in cystectomy specimens) in 55% (52 of 95 patients). ERBB 2 overexpression was observed in 45 patients (38%). On multivariate analysis, ERBB 2 overexpression was an independent predictor for CRT resistance clinically (odds ratio, 3.6; P=.002) and pathologically (odds ratio, 2.9; P=.031). ERBB 2 overexpression was associated with shorter CSS (5-year CSS rates, 56% vs 87% for the ERBB 2 overexpression group vs the others; P=.001). ERBB 2 overexpression was also an independent risk factor for bladder cancer death at all time points of our bladder-sparing protocol (pre-CRT, post-CRT, and post-cystectomy). Conclusions: ERBB 2 overexpression appears relevant to CRT resistance and unfavorable CSS in MIBC patients treated with the CRT-based bladder

  8. Whole-exome sequencing of muscle-invasive bladder cancer identifies recurrent mutations of UNC5C and prognostic importance of DNA repair gene mutations on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kai Lee; Kiyotani, Kazuma; Tamura, Kenji; Antic, Tatjana; Jang, Miran; Montoya, Magdeline; Campanile, Alexa; Yew, Poh Yin; Ganshert, Cory; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Steinberg, Gary D; O'Donnell, Peter H; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2014-12-15

    Because of suboptimal outcomes in muscle-invasive bladder cancer even with multimodality therapy, determination of potential genetic drivers offers the possibility of improving therapeutic approaches and discovering novel prognostic indicators. Using pTN staging, we case-matched 81 patients with resected ≥pT2 bladder cancers for whom perioperative chemotherapy use and disease recurrence status were known. Whole-exome sequencing was conducted in 43 cases to identify recurrent somatic mutations and targeted sequencing of 10 genes selected from the initial screening in an additional 38 cases was completed. Mutational profiles along with clinicopathologic information were correlated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) in the patients. We identified recurrent novel somatic mutations in the gene UNC5C (9.9%), in addition to TP53 (40.7%), KDM6A (21.0%), and TSC1 (12.3%). Patients who were carriers of somatic mutations in DNA repair genes (one or more of ATM, ERCC2, FANCD2, PALB2, BRCA1, or BRCA2) had a higher overall number of somatic mutations (P = 0.011). Importantly, after a median follow-up of 40.4 months, carriers of somatic mutations (n = 25) in any of these six DNA repair genes had significantly enhanced RFS compared with noncarriers [median, 32.4 vs. 14.8 months; hazard ratio of 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.22-0.98; P = 0.0435], after adjustment for pathologic pTN staging and independent of adjuvant chemotherapy usage. Better prognostic outcomes of individuals carrying somatic mutations in DNA repair genes suggest these mutations as favorable prognostic events in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Additional mechanistic investigation into the previously undiscovered role of UNC5C in bladder cancer is warranted. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Prognostic value of p53 in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Catherine S; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Chyle, Valerian; Zagars, Gunar K; Dinney, Colin P; Benedict, William F

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: The overexpression of mutated and/or wild type p53 has been associated with poorer prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. However, most studies have involved a mixed patient population, including those with superficial and muscle-invasive disease, and some patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. In this study we examine the prognostic significance of p53 detected immunohistochemically in a cohort of patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder treated relatively uniformly with preoperative radiotherapy 4-6 weeks prior to radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods: Of 301 patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy (50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 1960-1983, adequate material for immunohistochemical analysis of p53 was obtained in 107. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue was stained using monoclonal anti-p53 antibody D01 (Oncogene Science, Manhasset, NY). The immunostaining of p53 was considered positive if greater than 20% of the tumor nuclei were stained. There were 82 men and 25 women with a mean age of 61 yr and no patient received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. All patients were without distant metastasis prior to treatment initiation. The median follow-up for those living (n=32) was 88 mo. The number of patients by clinical stage was 48 for T2, 30 for T3a, and 29 for T3b. Results: Overall, 46% of the patients were p53 positive, with 42% in Stage T2, 57% in Stage T3a, and 41% in Stage T3b. The distributions of potential patient prognostic factors by p53 positivity were investigated and the only association was with lymphatic-vascular invasion (p=0.04, chi-square). No correlation was seen between p53 staining and pathologic complete response (seen in 47%), clinical-to-pathologic downstaging (seen in 69%), clinical stage, tumor grade, tumor morphology, tumor number, tumor size, gender, patient age, pretreatment hemoglobin levels, BUN

  10. Outpatient diagnostic of bladder tumours in flexible cystoscopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, Gregers G; Mogensen, Karin; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD).......The aim of this study was to evaluate photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) in flexible cystoscopes and the diagnostic quality of biopsies for diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer in the outpatients department (OPD)....

  11. Evaluation of risk of muscle invasion, perivesical and/or lymph node affectation by diffusion-weighted magnetic nuclear resonance in the patient who is a candidate for radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, F; Andrés, G; Cáceres, F; Ramón de Fata, F; Rodríguez-Barbero, J M; Angulo, J C

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative staging of bladder cancer using imaging methods has serious limitations. The accuracy of the abdominal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MRI) to predict residual muscle invasion, perivesical and/or lymph node affectation in the cystectomy specimen is evaluated. A prospective study was performed on 20 patients with high grade muscle invasive bladder cancer who received transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) in a period of bladder TURB. Furthermore, the ADC coefficient also predicts tumor differentiation grade. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Contemporary use trends and survival outcomes in patients undergoing radical cystectomy or bladder-preservation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, David B; Handorf, Elizabeth A; Ghiraldi, Eric M; Ristau, Benjamin T; Geynisman, Daniel M; Churilla, Thomas M; Horwitz, Eric M; Sobczak, Mark L; Chen, David Y T; Viterbo, Rosalia; Greenberg, Richard E; Kutikov, Alexander; Uzzo, Robert G; Smaldone, Marc C

    2017-11-15

    The current study was performed to examine temporal trends and compare overall survival (OS) in patients undergoing radical cystectomy (RC) or bladder-preservation therapy (BPT) for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. The authors reviewed the National Cancer Data Base to identify patients with AJCC stage II to III urothelial carcinoma of the bladder from 2004 through 2013. Patients receiving BPT were stratified as having received any external-beam radiotherapy (any XRT), definitive XRT (50-80 grays), and definitive XRT with chemotherapy (CRT). Treatment trends and OS outcomes for the BPT and RC cohorts were evaluated using Cochran-Armitage tests, unadjusted Kaplan-Meier curves, adjusted Cox multivariate regression, and propensity score matching, using increasingly stringent selection criteria. A total of 32,300 patients met the inclusion criteria and were treated with RC (22,680 patients) or BPT (9620 patients). Of the patients treated with BPT, 26.4% (2540 patients) and 15.5% (1489 patients), respectively, were treated with definitive XRT and CRT. Improved OS was observed for RC in all groups. After adjustments with more rigorous statistical models controlling for confounders and with more restrictive BPT cohorts, the magnitude of the OS benefit became attenuated on multivariate (any XRT: hazard ratio [HR], 2.115 [95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.045-2.188]; definitive XRT: HR, 1.870 [95% CI, 1.773-1.972]; and CRT: HR, 1.578 [95% CI, 1.474-1.691]) and propensity score (any XRT: HR, 2.008 [95% CI, 1.871-2.154]; definitive XRT: HR, 1.606 [95% CI, 1.453-1.776]; and CRT: HR, 1.406 [95% CI, 1.235-1.601]) analyses. In the National Cancer Data Base, receipt of BPT was associated with decreased OS compared with RC in patients with stage II to III urothelial carcinoma. Increasingly stringent definitions of BPT and more rigorous statistical methods adjusting for selection biases attenuated observed survival differences. Cancer 2017;123:4337-45. © 2017

  13. Perioperative management of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The management of nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is a challenge. Despite current guidelines, the treatment is suboptimal as illustrated by the high risk of recurrence and progression. Transurethral resection plays a pivotal role in the management of bladder cancer, but the

  14. Impact of Molecular Subtypes in Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer on Predicting Response and Survival after Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Roland; Ashab, Hussam Al Deen; Erho, Nicholas; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Winters, Brian; Douglas, James; Van Kessel, Kim E; Fransen van de Putte, Elisabeth E; Sommerlad, Matthew; Wang, Natalie Q; Choeurng, Voleak; Gibb, Ewan A; Palmer-Aronsten, Beatrix; Lam, Lucia L; Buerki, Christine; Davicioni, Elai; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Kardos, Jordan; Hoadley, Katherine A; Lerner, Seth P; McConkey, David J; Choi, Woonyoung; Kim, William Y; Kiss, Bernhard; Thalmann, George N; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Crabb, Simon J; North, Scott; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Boormans, Joost L; Wright, Jonathan; Dall'Era, Marc; van der Heijden, Michiel S; Black, Peter C

    2017-10-01

    An early report on the molecular subtyping of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) by gene expression suggested that response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) varies by subtype. To investigate the ability of molecular subtypes to predict pathological downstaging and survival after NAC. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed on pre-NAC transurethral resection specimens from 343 patients with MIBC. Samples were classified according to four published molecular subtyping methods. We developed a single-sample genomic subtyping classifier (GSC) to predict consensus subtypes (claudin-low, basal, luminal-infiltrated and luminal) with highest clinical impact in the context of NAC. Overall survival (OS) according to subtype was analyzed and compared with OS in 476 non-NAC cases (published datasets). Gene expression analysis was used to assign subtypes. Receiver-operating characteristics were used to determine the accuracy of GSC. The effect of GSC on survival was estimated by Cox proportional hazard regression models. The models generated subtype calls in expected ratios with high concordance across subtyping methods. GSC was able to predict four consensus molecular subtypes with high accuracy (73%), and clinical significance of the predicted consensus subtypes could be validated in independent NAC and non-NAC datasets. Luminal tumors had the best OS with and without NAC. Claudin-low tumors were associated with poor OS irrespective of treatment regimen. Basal tumors showed the most improvement in OS with NAC compared with surgery alone. The main limitations of our study are its retrospective design and comparison across datasets. Molecular subtyping may have an impact on patient benefit to NAC. If validated in additional studies, our results suggest that patients with basal tumors should be prioritized for NAC. We discovered the first single-sample classifier to subtype MIBC, which may be suitable for integration into routine clinical practice. Different molecular

  15. The outcome of a multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer TROG 10.01 BOLART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Pham, Daniel; Rolfo, Aldo; Bressel, Mathias; Tang, Colin I.; Tan, Alex; Turner, Sandra; Hruby, George; Williams, Stephen; Hayne, Dickon; Lehman, Margot; Skala, Marketa; Jose, Chakiath C.; Gogna, Kumar; Kron, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is feasible across multiple Radiation Oncology departments using different imaging, delivery and recording technology. Materials and methods: A multi-centre feasibility study of online adaptive radiotherapy, using a choice of three “plan of the day”, was conducted at 12 departments. Patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer were included. Departments were activated if part of the pilot study or after a site-credentialing visit. There was real time review of the first two cases from each department. Results: 54 patients were recruited, with 50 proceeding to radiotherapy. There were 43 males and 7 females with a mean age of 78 years. The tumour stages treated included T1 (1 patient), T2 (35), T3 (10) and T4 (4). One patient died of an unrelated cause during radiotherapy. The three adaptive plans were created before the 10th fraction in all cases. In 8 (16%) of the patients, a conventional plan using a ‘standard’ CTV to PTV margin of 1.5 cm was used for one or more fractions where the pre-treatment bladder CTV was larger than any of the three adaptive plans. The bladder CTV extended beyond the PTV on post treatment imaging in 9 (18%) of the 49 patients. Conclusions: From a technical perspective an online adaptive radiotherapy technique can be instituted in a multi-centre setting. However, without further bladder filling control or imaging, a CTV to PTV margin of 7 mm is insufficient

  16. Risk estimation of multiple recurrence and progression of non muscle invasive bladder carcinoma using new mathematical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luján, S; Santamaría, C; Pontones, J L; Ruiz-Cerdá, J L; Trassierra, M; Vera-Donoso, C D; Solsona, E; Jiménez-Cruz, F

    2014-12-01

    To apply new mathematical models according to Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Carcinoma (NMIBC) biological characteristics and enabling an accurate risk estimation of multiple recurrences and tumor progression. The classical Cox model is not valid for the assessment of this kind of events becausethe time betweenrecurrencesin the same patientmay be stronglycorrelated. These new models for risk estimation of recurrence/progression lead to individualized monitoring and treatment plan. 960 patients with primary NMIBC were enrolled. The median follow-up was 48.1 (3-160) months. Results obtained were validated in 240 patients from other center. Transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) and random bladder biopsy were performed. Subsequently, adjuvant localized chemotherapy was performed. The variables analyzed were: number and tumor size, age, chemotherapy and histopathology. The endpoints were time to recurrence and time to progression. Cox model and its extensions were used as joint frailty model for multiple recurrence and progression. Model accuracy was calculated using Harrell's concordance index (c-index). 468 (48.8%) patients developed at least one tumor recurrence and tumor progression was reported in 52 (5.4%) patients. Variables for multiple-recurrence risk are: age, grade, number, size, treatment and the number of prior recurrences. All these together with age, stage and grade are the variables for progression risk. Concordance index was 0.64 and 0.85 for multiple recurrence and progression respectively. the high concordance reported besides to the validation process in external source, allow accurate multi-recurrence/progression risk estimation. As consequence, it is possible to schedule a follow-up and treatment individualized plan in new and recurrent NMCB cases. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Artificial intelligence and bladder cancer arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, P J; Catto, J W F; Abbod, M F; Linkens, D A; Herr, A; Pilarsky, C; Wissmann, C; Stoehr, R; Denzinger, S; Knuechel, R; Hamdy, F C; Hartmann, A

    2007-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is a heterogenous disease whose management is dependent upon the risk of progression to muscle invasion. Although the recurrence rate is high, the majority of tumors are indolent and can be managed by endoscopic means alone. The prognosis of muscle invasion is poor and radical treatment is required if cure is to be obtained. Progression risk in non-invasive tumors is hard to determine at tumor diagnosis using current clinicopathological means. To improve the accuracy of progression prediction various biomarkers have been evaluated. To discover novel biomarkers several authors have used gene expression microarrays. Various statistical methods have been described to interpret array data, but to date no biomarkers have entered clinical practice. Here, we describe a new method of microarray analysis using neurofuzzy modeling (NFM), a form of artificial intelligence, and integrate it with artificial neural networks (ANN) to investigate non-muscle invasive bladder cancer array data (n=66 tumors). We develop a predictive panel of 11 genes, from 2800 expressed genes, that can significantly identify tumor progression (average Logrank p = 0.0288) in the analyzed cancers. In comparison, this panel appears superior to those genes chosen using traditional analyses (average Logrank p = 0.3455) and tumor grade (Logrank, p = 0.2475) in this non-muscle invasive cohort. We then analyze panel members in a new non-muscle invasive bladder cancer cohort (n=199) using immunohistochemistry with six commercially available antibodies. The combination of 6 genes (LIG3, TNFRSF6, KRT18, ICAM1, DSG2 and BRCA2) significantly stratifies tumor progression (Logrank p = 0.0096) in the new cohort. We discuss the benefits of the transparent NFM approach with respect to other reported methods.

  18. Invasive bladder cancer treated by radical external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corcoran, M.O.; Thomas, D.M.; Lim, A.; Berry, R.J.; Milroy, E.J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Fifty-three consecutive unselected patients with invasive bladder cancer, Stage T2 to T3, treated by radical radiotherapy have been reviewed. Cystectomy was reserved for patients with significant worsening of disease during treatment, histologically confirmed persistent or recurrent invasive tumour after treatment, or patients with intolerable symptoms due to radiation cystitis. In 64% of our patients a favourable tumour response to radiotherapy was seen, while a further 31% showed disease progression either during or on completion of radiotherapy. Cystectomy was performed on 22% of patients, mainly for radiation cystitis, and was not associated with a significant operative mortality rate. The crude 5-year survival rate was 42%. We conclude that radical radiotherapy is as effective as other forms of treatment for invasive bladder cancer, but that there remains a need to identify those bladder tumours destined to respond poorly to radiotherapy at an earlier stage. (author)

  19. Preoperative prognostic nutritional index and nomogram predicting recurrence-free survival in patients with primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer without carcinoma in situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui J

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Jianfeng Cui,1,* Shouzhen Chen,1,* Qiyu Bo,2 Shiyu Wang,1 Ning Zhang,1 Meng Yu,1 Wenfu Wang,1 Jie Han,3 Yaofeng Zhu,1 Benkang Shi1 1Department of Urology, 2Department of First Operating Room, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital and Institute Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objectives: Among the cancers of the urogenital system, bladder cancer is ranked second both in incidence and mortality, and hence, a more accurate estimate of the prognosis for individual patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is urgently needed. Prognostic nutritional index (PNI which is based on serum albumin levels and peripheral lymphocyte count has been confirmed to have prognostic value in various cancers. The aim of this study was to clarify the prognostic value of PNI in patients with NMIBC.Methods: Data of 329 patients with NMIBC were evaluated retrospectively. Recurrence-free survival (RFS was assessed using the Kaplan–Meier method, and the equivalences of survival curves were tested by log-rank tests. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Discrimination of the nomogram was measured by the concordance index. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results: In univariate analysis, age, tumor focality, tumor size, tumor grade, pathological T stage and preoperative PNI were significantly associated with RFS. Multivariate analysis identified PNI as an independent predictor of RFS in patients with NMIBC. According to these independent predictors, a nomogram for the prediction of recurrence was developed.Conclusion: PNI can be regarded as an independent prognostic factor for predicting RFS in NMIBC. The nomogram could be useful to improve personalized therapy for patients with NMIBC. Keywords: non-muscle-invasive

  20. A bladder preservation regimen using intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer. A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyanaga, Naoto; Akaza, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to investigate combined treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and radiation therapy for bladder preservation in locally invasive bladder cancer. Patients with invasive bladder cancer, stage T2-3N0M0, were included in the study. lntra-arterial chemotherapy was performed with three injections of methotrexate and cisplatin at 3-week intervals. Simultaneously, the patients underwent X-ray irradiation (40 Gy) of the small pelvic space. Where a post-treatment transurethral resection (TUR) biopsy showed no residual tumor, the tumor site was irradiated by a 30 Gy proton beam and the bladder was preserved. Where tumors remained, radical cystectomy was performed. Between 1990 and 1996, 42 patients were treated according to this protocol. Post-treatment TUR biopsy and urine cytology showed no residual tumors in 39 of 42 cases (93%). The bladder was preserved in accordance with the study protocol in 36 cases. A median follow-up of 38 months showed 3-year non-recurrence in 72% of bladder-preserved patients and the rate of bladder preservation was 84%. The nine recurrences included eight cases of superficial bladder recurrence. One cancer death occurred among the bladder-preservation patients, giving 3-year survival and cause-specific survival rates of 84% and 100%, respectively. Although bladder function decreased slightly in compliance, bladder capacity was retained in almost all cases. This regimen is useful for bladder preservation in T2-3 locally invasive bladder cancer. Information from more cases and the results of more long-term observations are needed, as is an evaluation of appropriate subject selection and factors associated with quality of life issues, particularly regarding bladder function. (author)

  1. Clinical utility of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the differentiation between noninvasive and invasive neoplasms of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiu-yang; Tang, Jie; He, En-hui; Li, Yan-mi; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Guangfu

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating invasive and noninvasive neoplasms of urinary bladder. A total of 60 lesions in 60 consecutive patients with bladder tumors received three dimensional ultrasonography, low acoustic power contrast enhanced ultrasonography and low acoustic power three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound examination. The IU22 ultrasound scanner and a volume transducer were used and the ultrasound contrast agent was SonoVue. The contrast-specific sonographic imaging modes were PI (pulse inversion) and PM (power modulation). The three dimensional ultrasonography, contrast enhanced ultrasonography, and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound images were independently reviewed by two readers who were not in the images acquisition. Images were analyzed off-site. A level of confidence in the diagnosis of tumor invasion of the muscle layer was assigned on a 5° scale. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess overall confidence in the diagnosis of muscle invasion by tumor. Kappa values were used to assess inter-readers agreement. Histologic diagnosis was obtained for all patients. Final pathologic staging revealed 44 noninvasive tumors and 16 invasive tumors. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound depicted all 16 muscle-invasive tumors. The diagnostic performance of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound was better than those of three dimensional ultrasonography and contrast enhanced ultrasonography. The receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.976 and 0.967 for three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound, those for three dimensional ultrasonography were 0.881 and 0.869, those for contrast enhanced ultrasonography were 0.927 and 0.929. The kappa values in the three dimensional ultrasonography, contrast enhanced ultrasonography and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound for inter-reader agreements

  2. Clinical utility of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the differentiation between noninvasive and invasive neoplasms of urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Qiu-yang; Tang, Jie; He, En-hui; Li, Yan-mi; Zhou, Yun; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Guangfu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating invasive and noninvasive neoplasms of urinary bladder. Methods: A total of 60 lesions in 60 consecutive patients with bladder tumors received three dimensional ultrasonography, low acoustic power contrast enhanced ultrasonography and low acoustic power three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound examination. The IU22 ultrasound scanner and a volume transducer were used and the ultrasound contrast agent was SonoVue. The contrast-specific sonographic imaging modes were PI (pulse inversion) and PM (power modulation). The three dimensional ultrasonography, contrast enhanced ultrasonography, and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound images were independently reviewed by two readers who were not in the images acquisition. Images were analyzed off-site. A level of confidence in the diagnosis of tumor invasion of the muscle layer was assigned on a 5° scale. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to assess overall confidence in the diagnosis of muscle invasion by tumor. Kappa values were used to assess inter-readers agreement. Histologic diagnosis was obtained for all patients. Results: Final pathologic staging revealed 44 noninvasive tumors and 16 invasive tumors. Three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound depicted all 16 muscle-invasive tumors. The diagnostic performance of three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound was better than those of three dimensional ultrasonography and contrast enhanced ultrasonography. The receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.976 and 0.967 for three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound, those for three dimensional ultrasonography were 0.881 and 0.869, those for contrast enhanced ultrasonography were 0.927 and 0.929. The kappa values in the three dimensional ultrasonography, contrast enhanced ultrasonography and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced ultrasound

  3. Contemporary management of low-risk bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Witjes, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Bladder cancer comprises a heterogeneous group of tumors, the majority of which are non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) at initial presentation. Low-risk bladder cancer--defined as pTa low-grade papillary tumors--is the type of NMIBC with the most favorable oncologic outcome. Although the

  4. Recommended oral sodium bicarbonate administration for urine alkalinization did not affect the concentration of mitomycin-C in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ho Kyung; Kim, Sung Han; Ahn, Kyung-Ohk; Lee, Sang-Jin; Park, Weon Seo; Kim, Sohee; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Do Hoon; Joung, Jae Young; Chung, Jinsoo; Joo, Jungnam; Jeong, Kyung-Chae

    2017-11-10

    Sodium bicarbonate has been reported to maximize the efficacy of intravesical instillation of mitomycin-C (IVI-MMC) therapy by urine alkalinization in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). This study aimed to analyze the changes in MMC concentration according to urinary pH and evaluate the efficacy of sodium bicarbonate to maintain the concentration of active form of MMC during IVI-MMC. We prospectively enrolled 26 patients with NMIBC after transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Patients with very high-risk and low-risk NMIBC were excluded. Urinary creatinine, volume, pH, and concentrations of MMC and its degraded form were measured immediately before and after IVI-MMC. The patients were administered 1.5 g of oral sodium bicarbonate during the preceding evening, in the morning, and immediately before the fourth cycle of the six-cycle IVI-MMC. The correlation between MMC concentration and urinary pH changes was explored with or without oral bicarbonate therapy. Recurrence without progression to muscle-invasive disease was noted in 4 of 26 patients in a 23.7-month follow-up. The mean urinary pH before and after the therapy increased from 6.03 to 6.50, and 6.46 to 7.24, without or with oral SB therapy, respectively. Despite this increase, the concentration of active form of MMC did not change significantly. No correlation was found between urinary pH and MMC concentration. Urine alkalinization by SB administration did not maintain the high concentration of urinary MMC. Urine alkalinization by sodium bicarbonate administration for IVI-MMC did not maintain the high concentration of active urinary MMC in NMIBC.

  5. Can the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio be used to predict recurrence and progression of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Albayrak

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate whether neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR is a predictor of disease progression and recurrence in patients with primary non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. This was a prospective study of 86 patients with newly diagnosed NMIBC. The patients were classified by the number of points assigned by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer risk tables. The correlation between progression score, recurrence score, age, mean platelet volume, red blood cell distribution width and NLR was assessed statistically. The same parameters were compared between the risk groups. A significant difference in NLR and age values was observed between recurrence and progression risk score groups. The relationships between NLR and recurrence and progression risk scores were no longer significant after correcting for the statistical effect of age on scores. Age was significantly different between groups after adjusting for NLR. Our study revealed that NLR and age were associated with patient age and bladder tumor progression and recurrence risk scores. After correcting for age, the significant relationship with NLR was lost, in contrast to some previous studies. We recommend that patient age should be corrected to avoid misleading results in NLR studies.

  6. Genomic Alterations in Liquid Biopsies from Patients with Bladder Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Nordentoft, Iver Kristiansen; Christensen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Background: At least half of the patients diagnosed with non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) experience recurrence and approximately 15% will develop progression to muscle invasive or metastatic disease. Biomarkers for disease surveillance are urgently needed. Objective: Development......-invasive or metastatic bladder cancer; t test for ddPCR data. Results and limitations: We developed from one to six personalised assays per patient. Patients with progressive disease showed significantly higher levels of tumour DNA in plasma and urine before disease progression, compared with patients with recurrent...

  7. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gözen, Ali Serdar; Umari, Paolo; Scheitlin, Walter; Su, Fuat Ernis; Akin, Yigit; Rassweiler, Jens

    2017-06-30

    Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC) instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT) system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel). The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria) score system. Mean age was 72 (32-87) years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period). 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3%) were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  8. Intra-arterial chemotherapy combined with irradiation for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Naohiro; Sato, Hideki; Harada, Shuji; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Ikuyama, Toshihiro

    2004-01-01

    Total cystectomy and urinary diversion are the standard treatments for invasive bladder cancer. However, total cystectomy is not possible in some patients due to advanced age, a poor general condition, or refusal to undergo cystectomy. In such cases, intra-arterial chemotherapy (IAC) and/or radiotherapy are the alternative treatments. We performed IAC with cisplatin and adriamycin in 9 patients with invasive bladder cancer and obtained complete response (CR) in 5 out of the 9 patients (55.6%). However, 3 of these 5 CR patients developed local recurrence within 1 year. In an effort to improve the efficacy, we performed combination therapy comprising IAC plus radiotherapy in 12 patients with invasive bladder cancer. CR was obtained in 58.3% and the bladder was preserved in 91.7% with this combination therapy. However, distant metastases developed in 33.3% after the combined treatment of IAC plus radiation therapy. These findings suggest that the combination of radiotherapy and IAC is useful for local control of invasive bladder cancer. Data from more cases and results from a longer follow-up are needed to fully confirm the efficacy of this type of treatment. In addition, therapeutic modalities to prevent distant metastasis need to be considered. (author)

  9. Current clinical practice gaps in the treatment of intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) with emphasis on the use of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG): results of an international individual patient data survey (IPDS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Palou, J.; Soloway, M.; Lamm, D.; Kamat, A.M.; Brausi, M.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Colombel, M.; Bohle, A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the management of intermediate- and high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), particularly with regard to the use of bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) therapy, in North America and Europe. To compare NMIBC management practices to European Association of Urology (EAU)

  10. Can we improve transurethral resection of the bladder tumour for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, Esmee Iml; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review The recurrence rate in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer is high, and the quality of transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) tumour influences recurrence risk. We review new methods that aim to improve the effectiveness of TURB, and highlight studies of the past

  11. Cisplatin, Gemcitabine, and Lapatinib as Neoadjuvant Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vivek; Mamtani, Ronac; Keefe, Stephen; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Vaughn, David J

    2016-07-01

    We sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of gemcitabine, cisplatin, and lapatinib (GCL) as neoadjuvant therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) planned for radical cystectomy. Four cycles of GCL were administered as neoadjuvant therapy for patients with MIBC. Although initially designed as a phase II efficacy study with a primary endpoint of pathologic complete response at the time of radical cystectomy, the dose selected for investigation proved excessively toxic. A total of six patients were enrolled. The initial four patients received gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) intravenously on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 70 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 of each 21-day treatment cycle. Lapatinib was administered as 1,000 mg orally daily starting one week prior to the initiation of cycle 1 of gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) and continuing until the completion of cycle 4 of GC. These initial doses were poorly tolerated, and the final two enrolled patients received a reduced lapatinib dose of 750 mg orally daily. However, reduction of the lapatinib dose did not result in improved tolerance or drug-delivery, and the trial was terminated early due to excessive toxicity. Grade 3/4 toxicities included diarrhea (33%), nausea/vomiting (33%), and thrombocytopenia (33%). The addition of lapatinib to GC as neoadjuvant therapy for MIBC was limited by excessive treatment-related toxicity. These findings highlight the importance of thorough dose-escalation investigation of combination therapies prior to evaluation in the neoadjuvant setting, as well as the limitations of determination of maximum tolerated dose for novel targeted combination regimens.

  12. Long-term survival of bladder preservation therapy with radiation and chemotherapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Sumio; Takase, Kazunori; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Masuda, Mitsunobu; Yao, Masahiro; Hosaka, Masahiko

    1998-01-01

    The prognoses and prognostic factors of the 54 patients with locally invasive bladder cancer who underwent bladder preservation therapy at Yokohama City University Hospital between 1977 and 1995 were analyzed statistically. The therapeutic modalities of bladder preservation were mainly radiation or chemotherapy. The prognosis for the patients who underwent bladder preservation therapy was worse than that for the patients who underwent total cystectomy. The prognostic factors of these patients were size and grade of tumor, presence of hydronephrosis and performance status (PS) of the patients by univariate analysis. Tumor grade was the most predictable prognostic factor using multivariate analysis. Only 17 patients survived more than 5 years after treatment; 78% of the survivors had good PS (0 or 1). Five of them died of cancer and two patients were alive with cancer. All of them had G3 tumors. These results suggest that patients with locally invasive G2 tumor could be candiates for bladder preservation therapy and patients who underwent bladder preservation therapy should be evaluated at 10 years post-therapy. (author)

  13. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy improves survival outcome in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Jin Hee; Oh, Young Kee; Kim, Byung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate survival rates and prognostic factors related to treatment outcomes after bladder preserving therapy including transurethral resection of bladder tumor, radiotherapy (RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy in bladder cancer with a curative intent. We retrospectively studied 50 bladder cancer patients treated with bladder-preserving therapy at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center from January 1999 to December 2010. Age ranged from 46 to 89 years (median, 71.5 years). Bladder cancer was the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage II, III, and IV in 9, 27, and 14 patients, respectively. Thirty patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and 20 patients with RT alone. Nine patients received chemotherapy prior to CCRT or RT alone. Radiation was delivered with a four-field box technique (median, 63 Gy; range, 48.6 to 70.2 Gy). The follow-up periods ranged from 2 to 169 months (median, 34 months). Thirty patients (60%) showed complete response and 13 (26%) a partial response. All patients could have their own bladder preserved. Five-year overall survival (OS) rate was 37.2%, and the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 30.2%. In multivariate analysis, tumor grade and CCRT were statistically significant in OS. Tumor grade was a significant prognostic factor related to OS. CCRT is also considered to improve survival outcomes. Further multi-institutional studies are needed to elucidate the impact of RT in bladder cancer

  14. A place for precision medicine in bladder cancer: targeting the FGFRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Martino, Erica; Tomlinson, Darren C; Williams, Sarah V; Knowles, Margaret A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder tumors show diverse molecular features and clinical outcome. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer has poor prognosis and novel approaches to systemic therapy are urgently required. Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer has good prognosis, but high recurrence rate and the requirement for life-long disease monitoring places a major burden on patients and healthcare providers. Studies of tumor tissues from both disease groups have identified frequent alterations of FGFRs, including mutations of FGFR3 and dysregulated expression of FGFR1 and FGFR3 that suggest that these may be valid therapeutic targets. We summarize current understanding of the molecular alterations affecting these receptors in bladder tumors, preclinical studies validating them as therapeutic targets, available FGFR-targeted agents and results from early clinical trials in bladder cancer patients.

  15. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Serdar Gözen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Materials and methods: Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel. The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria score system. Results: Mean age was 72 (32-87 years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period. 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3% were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Conclusions: BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  16. Urothelial Tumours of the Urinary Bladder: A Histopathological Study of Cystoscopic Biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujan Vaidya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Bladder tumours constitute one of the most common urological conditions. Urothelial (transitional cell carcinoma accounts for 90% of all primary tumours of the bladder. These tumours are an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to present the histopathological patterns of urothelial tumours and to determine the grade and stage of these tumours. Methods: This is a 3 year retrospective study of urothelial tumours carried out in the Department of Pathology, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS, Lalitpur, Nepal. Data of all cystoscopic biopsies collected during this period were analyzed. Results: Urothelial (transitional cell tumours accounted for 97.59% (81 cases of all bladder tumours. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC was the most common tumour which was present in 67 cases (80.72%. Of these, 32 (47.76% were low grade TCC while 35 (52.24% were high grade TCC. Maximum number of tumours (70.37% were superficial (pTa and pT1 while (29.63% were muscle invasive (pT2. Sixteen percent of low grade and 76.92% of high grade tumours showed muscle invasion. Detrusor muscle was absent in 23.88% cases (16/67. Conclusion: Transitional cell carcinoma was the most common bladder cancer. Most of these tumours were high grade. A large percentage of high grade carcinomas presented with muscle invasion. Pathological grade and muscle invasion are the most valuable prognostic predictors of survival. The importance of including smooth muscle in the biopsy specimens needs to be emphasized Key words: cancer, high grade, low grade, transitional, tumour, urinary bladder.

  17. Thermal dosimetry for bladder hyperthermia treatment. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooneveldt, Gerben; Bakker, Akke; Balidemaj, Edmond; Chopra, Rajiv; Crezee, Johannes; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; Hartmann, Josefin; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Kok, H Petra; Paulides, Margarethus M; Sousa-Escandon, Alejandro; Stauffer, Paul R; Maccarini, Paolo F

    2016-06-01

    The urinary bladder is a fluid-filled organ. This makes, on the one hand, the internal surface of the bladder wall relatively easy to heat and ensures in most cases a relatively homogeneous temperature distribution; on the other hand the variable volume, organ motion, and moving fluid cause artefacts for most non-invasive thermometry methods, and require additional efforts in planning accurate thermal treatment of bladder cancer. We give an overview of the thermometry methods currently used and investigated for hyperthermia treatments of bladder cancer, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages within the context of the specific disease (muscle-invasive or non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer) and the heating technique used. The role of treatment simulation to determine the thermal dose delivered is also discussed. Generally speaking, invasive measurement methods are more accurate than non-invasive methods, but provide more limited spatial information; therefore, a combination of both is desirable, preferably supplemented by simulations. Current efforts at research and clinical centres continue to improve non-invasive thermometry methods and the reliability of treatment planning and control software. Due to the challenges in measuring temperature across the non-stationary bladder wall and surrounding tissues, more research is needed to increase our knowledge about the penetration depth and typical heating pattern of the various hyperthermia devices, in order to further improve treatments. The ability to better determine the delivered thermal dose will enable clinicians to investigate the optimal treatment parameters, and consequentially, to give better controlled, thus even more reliable and effective, thermal treatments.

  18. High frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 protein expression in human bladder cancer is associated with disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egerod, Frederikke Lihme; Bartels, Annette; Fristrup, Niels; Borre, Michael; Ørntoft, Torben F; Oleksiewicz, Martin B; Brünner, Nils; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Egr-1 (early growth response-1 transcription factor) has been proposed to be involved in invasion and metastasis processes of human bladder cancer, but Egr-1 protein expression levels in human bladder cancer have not been investigated. In the present study we investigated the expression levels of Egr-1 protein in early stages of human bladder cancer and correlated it to later progression. Expression of Egr-1 protein in human bladder cancer was examined by immunohistochemistry, on a tissue microarray constructed from tumors from 289 patients with non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer. The frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling correlated to bladder cancer stage, grade and to later progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-4). Stage T1 tumors exhibited significantly higher frequencies of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling than Ta tumors (P = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that a high frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling was significantly associated with a higher risk of progression to stage T2-4 (log-rank test, P = 0.035). Tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling were found to localize at the tumor front in some of the tumor biopsies. The results from this study support a potential involvement of Egr-1 in the progression from non-muscle invasive bladder cancers to muscle invasive bladder cancer

  19. The Prognostic Role of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) in High-risk Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Gian Maria; Ferro, Matteo; Del Giudice, Francesco; Antonini, Gabriele; Chung, Benjamin I; Sperduti, Isabella; Giannarelli, Diana; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Borghesi, Marco; Musi, Gennaro; de Cobelli, Ottavio; De Berardinis, Ettore

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a prognostic marker in patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and assess the efficacy and reliability of 2 different CTC isolation methods. Globally, 155 patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of high-risk NMIBC were included (pT1G3 with or without carcinoma in situ) and underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURB) after a blood withdrawal for CTC evaluation. A total of 101 patients (Group A) had their samples analyzed with the CellSearch automated system, and 54 (Group B) had their samples analyzed with the CELLection Dynabeads manual system. Patients were followed for 28 months, and during this interval, there were a total of 65 (41.9%) recurrences, 27 (17.4%) disease progressions, and 9 (5.8%) lymph node and/or bone metastasis. In our CTC analysis, there were 20 (19.8%) positive patients in Group A and 24 in Group B (44.4%). In our analysis, we found a strong correlation between CTC presence and time to first recurrence; in Group A, we observed an incidence of recurrence in 75% of CTC-positive patients and in Group B of 83% of CTC-positive patients. The time to progression was also strongly correlated with CTCs: 65% and 29%, respectively, of those patients who progressed in those with CTCs in Group A and B. The study demonstrates the potential role of CTCs as a prognostic marker for risk stratification in patients with NMIBC, to predict both recurrence and progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Researchers studying alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new phase I clinical trial conducted by researchers at the Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is evaluating the safety and tolerability, or the degree to which any side effects can be tolerated by patients, of a two-drug combination as a potential alternative to bladder removal for bladder cancer patients. The trial targets patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) whose cancers have stopped responding to traditional therapies. Read more...

  1. Review of invasive urodynamics and progress towards non-invasive measurements in the assessment of bladder outlet obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C J Griffiths

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This article defines the need for objective measurements to help diagnose the cause of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS. It describes the conventional techniques available, mainly invasive, and then summarizes the emerging range of non-invasive measurement techniques. Methods: This is a narrative review derived form the clinical and scientific knowledge of the authors together with consideration of selected literature. Results: Consideration of measured bladder pressure urinary flow rate during voiding in an invasive pressure flow study is considered the gold standard for categorization of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO. The diagnosis is currently made by plotting the detrusor pressure at maximum flow (p detQmax and maximum flow rate (Q max on the nomogram approved by the International Continence Society. This plot will categorize the void as obstructed, equivocal or unobstructed. The invasive and relatively complex nature of this investigation has led to a number of inventive techniques to categorize BOO either by measuring bladder pressure non-invasively or by providing a proxy measure such as bladder weight. Conclusion: Non-invasive methods of diagnosing BOO show great promise and a few have reached the stage of being commercially available. Further studies are however needed to validate the measurement technique and assess their worth in the assessment of men with LUTS.

  2. Developments in diagnosis and prognosis of superficial bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    Non-muscle invasive bladder encompasses the relatively innocent low risk tumours, but also the potentially lethal high risk tumours. Low risk tumours have a high chance of recurrence, but high risk tumours have both a high risk of recurrence and progression. Progression to muscle-invasive disease

  3. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroudi Farshad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for bladder cancer. Methods Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Results Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293 for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083 for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489 for VMAT (P  Conclusions VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours.

  4. Trends in the Use of Chemotherapy before and after Radical Cystectomy in Patients with Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Han; Seo, Ho Kyung; Shin, Hee Chul; Chang, Sung Ja; Yun, Sooin; Joo, Jungnam; Ku, Ja Hyeon; Kim, Hyung Suk; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeong, In Gab; Kang, Seok Ho

    2015-01-01

    We investigated trends in perioperative chemotherapy use, and determined factors associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) use in Korean patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We recruited 1,324 patients who had MIBC without nodal invasion or metastases and had undergone radical cystectomies (RC) between 2003 and 2013. The study's cut-off time for AC was three months after surgery, and the study's timespan was divided into three periods based on NAC use, namely, 2003-2005, 2006-2009, and 2010-2013. Complete remission was defined as histologically confirmed T0N0M0 after RC. NAC and AC were administered to 7.3% and 18.1% of the patients, respectively. The median time interval between completing NAC and undergoing RC was 32 days and the mean number of cycles was 3.2. The median time interval between RC and AC was 43 days and the mean number of cycles was 4.1. Gemcitabine and cisplatin were most frequently used in combination for NAC (49.0%) and AC (74.9%). NAC use increased significantly from 4.6% between 2003 and 2005 to 8.4% between 2010 and 2013 (P < 0.05), but AC use did not increase. Only 1.9% of patients received NAC and AC. Complete remission after NAC was achieved in 12 patients (12.5%). Multivariable modeling revealed that an advanced age, the earliest time period analyzed, and clinical tumor stage ≤ cT2 bladder cancer were negatively associated with NAC use (P < 0.05). While NAC use has slowly increased over time, it remains an underutilized therapeutic approach in Korean clinical practice. PMID:26240494

  5. miR-34a Inhibits Proliferation and Invasion of Bladder Cancer Cells by Targeting Orphan Nuclear Receptor HNF4G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaibin Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available miR-34a is a member of the miR-34 family and acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer. This study explored the regulative role of miR-34a on an orphan nuclear receptor HNF4G, which has a well-confirmed role in bladder tumor growth and invasion. qRT-PCR analysis was applied to measure miR-34a expression in two tumorigenic bladder cancer cell lines 5637 and T24 and one normal human urothelial cell line SV-HUC-1. Luciferase assay was performed to verify the putative binding between miR-34a and HNF4G. The influence of miR-34a-HNF4G axis on cell viability, colony formation, and invasion was assessed with loss- and gain-of-function analysis. This study observed that the miR-34a expressions in 5637 and T24 cells were significantly lower than in SV-HUC-1, while the muscle invasive cell sublines 5637-M and T24-M had even lower miR-34a expression than in the nonmuscle invasive sublines. HNF4G has a 3′-UTR binding site with miR-34a and is a direct downstream target of miR-34a. miR-34a can directly downregulate the expression of HNF4G and thus inhibit tumor cell viability, colony formation, and invasion. Therefore, miR-34a-HNF4G axis is an important pathway modulating cell viability, proliferation, and invasion of bladder cancer cells.

  6. Bladder Cancer Stem-Like Cells: Their Origin and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomokazu Ohishi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer (BC, the most common cancer arising from the human urinary tract, consists of two major clinicopathological phenotypes: muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC and non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. MIBC frequently metastasizes and is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. A certain proportion of patients with metastatic BC can achieve a remission with systemic chemotherapy; however, the disease relapses in most cases. Evidence suggests that MIBC comprises a small population of cancer stem cells (CSCs, which may be resistant to these treatments and may be able to form new tumors in the bladder or other organs. Therefore, the unambiguous identification of bladder CSCs and the development of targeted therapies are urgently needed. Nevertheless, it remains unclear where bladder CSCs originate and how they are generated. We review recent studies on bladder CSCs, specifically focusing on their proposed origin and the possible therapeutic options based on the CSC theory.

  7. Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mak, Kimberley S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Smith, Angela B. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Eidelman, Alec; Clayman, Rebecca; Niemierko, Andrzej; Cheng, Jed-Sian [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Matthews, Jonathan [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Drumm, Michael R. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Nielsen, Matthew E. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Feldman, Adam S.; Lee, Richard J.; Zietman, Anthony L. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ronald C. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Milowsky, Matthew I. [University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A., E-mail: jefstathiou@partners.org [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: Health-related quality of life (QOL) has not been well-studied in survivors of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The present study compared long-term QOL in MIBC patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC) versus bladder-sparing trimodality therapy (TMT). Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional bi-institutional study identified 226 patients with nonmetastatic cT2-cT4 MIBC, diagnosed in 1990 to 2011, who were eligible for RC and were disease free for ≥2 years. Six validated QOL instruments were administered: EuroQOL EQ-5D, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire and EORTC MIBC module, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite bowel scale, Cancer Treatment and Perception Scale, and Impact of Cancer, version 2. Multivariable analyses of the mean QOL scores were conducted using propensity score matching. Results: The response rate was 77% (n=173). The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Of the 173 patients, 64 received TMT and 109, RC. The median interval from diagnosis to questionnaire completion was 9 years after TMT and 7 years after RC (P=.009). No significant differences were found in age, gender, comorbidities, tobacco history, performance status, or tumor stage. On multivariable analysis, patients who received TMT had better general QOL by 9.7 points of 100 compared with those who had received RC (P=.001) and higher physical, role, social, emotional, and cognitive functioning by 6.6 to 9.9 points (P≤.04). TMT was associated with better bowel function by 4.5 points (P=.02) and fewer bowel symptoms by 2.7 to 7.1 points (P≤.05). The urinary symptom scores were similar. TMT was associated with better sexual function by 8.7 to 32.1 points (P≤.02) and body image by 14.8 points (P<.001). The patients who underwent TMT reported greater informed decision-making scores by 13.6 points (P=.01) and less concern about the negative effect of cancer by 6.8 points (P=.006). The study

  8. Quality of Life in Long-term Survivors of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Smith, Angela B.; Eidelman, Alec; Clayman, Rebecca; Niemierko, Andrzej; Cheng, Jed-Sian; Matthews, Jonathan; Drumm, Michael R.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Feldman, Adam S.; Lee, Richard J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Chen, Ronald C.; Shipley, William U.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Efstathiou, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health-related quality of life (QOL) has not been well-studied in survivors of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The present study compared long-term QOL in MIBC patients treated with radical cystectomy (RC) versus bladder-sparing trimodality therapy (TMT). Methods and Materials: This cross-sectional bi-institutional study identified 226 patients with nonmetastatic cT2-cT4 MIBC, diagnosed in 1990 to 2011, who were eligible for RC and were disease free for ≥2 years. Six validated QOL instruments were administered: EuroQOL EQ-5D, European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire and EORTC MIBC module, Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite bowel scale, Cancer Treatment and Perception Scale, and Impact of Cancer, version 2. Multivariable analyses of the mean QOL scores were conducted using propensity score matching. Results: The response rate was 77% (n=173). The median follow-up period was 5.6 years. Of the 173 patients, 64 received TMT and 109, RC. The median interval from diagnosis to questionnaire completion was 9 years after TMT and 7 years after RC (P=.009). No significant differences were found in age, gender, comorbidities, tobacco history, performance status, or tumor stage. On multivariable analysis, patients who received TMT had better general QOL by 9.7 points of 100 compared with those who had received RC (P=.001) and higher physical, role, social, emotional, and cognitive functioning by 6.6 to 9.9 points (P≤.04). TMT was associated with better bowel function by 4.5 points (P=.02) and fewer bowel symptoms by 2.7 to 7.1 points (P≤.05). The urinary symptom scores were similar. TMT was associated with better sexual function by 8.7 to 32.1 points (P≤.02) and body image by 14.8 points (P<.001). The patients who underwent TMT reported greater informed decision-making scores by 13.6 points (P=.01) and less concern about the negative effect of cancer by 6.8 points (P=.006). The study

  9. Cost-effective treatment of low-risk carcinoma not invading bladder muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David A; Rink, Michael; Cha, Eugene K; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Chughtai, Bilal; Scherr, Douglas S; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Lee, Richard K

    2013-03-01

    Study Type - Therapy (cost effectiveness analysis) Level of Evidence 2a What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Bladder cancer is one of the costliest malignancies to treat throughout the life of a patient. The most cost-effective management for low-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is not known. The current study shows that employing cystoscopic office fulguration for low-risk appearing bladder cancer recurrences can materially impact the cost-effectiveness of therapy. In a follow-up protocol where office fulguration is routinely employed for low-risk bladder cancers, peri-operative intravesical chemotherapy may not provide any additional cost-effectiveness benefit. To examine the cost-effectiveness of fulguration vs transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) with and without perioperative intravesical chemotherapy (PIC) for managing low-risk carcinoma not invading bladder muscle (NMIBC). Low-risk NMIBC carries a low progression rate, lending support to the use of office-based fulguration for small recurrences rather than traditional TURBT. A Markov state transition model was created to simulate treatment of NMIBC with vs without PIC, with recurrence treated by formal TURBT vs treatment with fulguration. Costing data were obtained from the Medicare Resource Based Relative Value Scale. Data regarding the success of PIC were obtained from the peer-reviewed literature, as were corresponding utilities for bladder cancer-related procedures. Sensitivity analyses were performed. At 5-year follow-up, a strategy of fulguration without PIC was the most cost-effective (mean cost-effectiveness = US $654.8/quality-adjusted life year), despite a lower recurrence rate with PIC. Both fulguration strategies dominated each TURBT strategy. Sensitivity analysis showed that fulguration without PIC dominated all other strategies when the recurrence rate after PIC was increased to ≥14.2% per year. Similarly, the cost-effectiveness of TURBT becomes more

  10. Ten Years of Complete Remission of Pulmonary Metastasis after Post-Cystectomy Palliative Cisplatin-Gemcitabine Chemotherapy with Gefitinib for Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Omar; Scharpf, Marcus; Schubert, Tina; Feyerabend, Susan; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schwentner, Christian; Fend, Falko; Gakis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is considered one of the most lethal malignancies with high metastatic potential. Usually, metastatic bladder cancer carries worse prognosis with a median survival rate of approximately 6 months, which can be prolonged for up to 14 months with palliative systemic chemotherapy. We present the case of a 61-year-old male patient diagnosed with localized MIBC 10 years ago. He underwent nerve-sparing radical cystectomy with ileal neobladder, but developed pulmonary metastatic disease 7 months postoperatively. Six cycles of gemcitabine/cisplatin combination chemotherapy with an addition of gefitinib as daily oral medication were administered within a randomized phase II clinical trial; this resulted in complete remission of the pulmonary metastases. Until now, the patient is still on gefitinib daily without any side effects. Although, the addition of gefitinib to standard systemic chemotherapy has not been shown to improve the survival in metastatic urothelial cancer, this case represents a very pleasant albeit uncommon long-term outcome. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Natural biology and management of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scarpato, Kristen R; Tyson, Mark D; Clark, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... in low-risk patients. SUMMARY: NMIBC represents a variety of disease states and continues to pose management challenges. As our understanding of tumor biology improves and technology advances, achieving better outcomes through individualized care may be possible.......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the natural biology of noninvasive bladder cancer and its management strategies while summarizing the most recent advances in the field. RECENT FINDINGS: Nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a tendency to recur and progress. Risk stratification has...... helped triage patients but improved tools, including biomarkers, are still needed. Enhanced endoscopy with photodynamic imaging, narrow band imaging, optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy show promise for diagnosis, risk stratification and disease monitoring. Attempts at better...

  12. Expression of CD74 in bladder cancer and its suppression in association with cancer proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in HT-1376 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Jun-Wei; Wahafu, Wasilijiang; Song, Liming; Ping, Hao; Wang, Mingshuai; Yang, Feiya; Niu, Yinong; Qing, Wei; Xing, Nianzeng

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression and potential roles of CD74 in human urothelial cell carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) in vitro and in vivo. CD74 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) were located and assayed in normal and UCB samples and cell lines using immunostaining. CD74 was knocked down using CD74 shRNA lentiviral particles in HT-1376 cells. The proliferative, invasive potential and microvessel density (MVD) of knockdown-CD74 HT-1376 cells were analyzed in vitro or in vivo. The expression of CD74 in an additional high grade UCB J82 cell line was also verified in vivo. All experiments were repeated at least 3 times. The majority of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) samples, and only one high grade UCB cell line, HT-1376, expressed CD74, compared with normal, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) samples and other cell lines. The levels of proliferation and invasion were decreased in the CD74 knockdown-HT-1376 cells, and western blotting assay indicated that the levels of proteins associated with proliferation, apoptosis and invasion in the cells were affected correspondingly by different treatments in vitro. The tumorigenesis and MVD assays indicated less proliferation and angiogenesis in the knockdown-HT-1376 cells compared with the scramble cells. Notably, J82 cells exhibiting no signal of CD74 in vitro presented the expression of CD74 in vivo. The present study revealed the potential roles of CD74 in the proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis of MIBC, and that it may serve as a potential therapeutic target for UCB, but additional studies are required.

  13. Local control of muscle-invasive bladder cancer: preoperative radiotherapy and cystectomy versus cystectomy alone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Christopher J; Pollack, Alan; Zagars, Gunar K; Dinney, Colin P; Swanson, David A; Eschenbach, Andrew C. von

    1995-05-15

    Purpose: The role of preoperative radiotherapy for patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer remains controversial. Since 1985, the primary modality for treatment of these patients at our institution has been radical cystectomy alone. Prior to that time, the use of preoperative radiotherapy and cystectomy had been the mainstay of treatment. In this retrospective review we compare the results of these treatments, focusing on local control. Methods and Materials: The preoperative radiotherapy and radical cystectomy (PREOP) group was comprised of 338 patients with muscle-invasive (Stages T2-T4) transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder treated between 1960 and 1983. A mean total dose of 49.3 {+-} 0.2 Gy ({+-} SE) was administered at 2 Gy per fraction 4-6 weeks prior to cystectomy. The radical cystectomy alone (CYST) group was comprised of 232 patients treated between 1985 and 1990. The median follow-up for the PREOP group was 91 months and for the CYST group was 54 months. Only those patients who completed planned PREOP (n = 301) and CYST (n = 220) treatments were included in the analyses described below. Results: The treatment groups were stratified by clinical stage and compared in terms of actuarial local control. There were no differences between the groups for Stage T2 or T3a patients, and there were not enough Stage T4 patients in the PREOP group with which to make a meaningful comparison. However, for those with T3b disease, actuarial 5 year local control for the PREOP group (n = 92) was 91%, compared to 72% for the CYST group (n = 43). This difference was significant at p = 0.003 (log rank). Patients with T3b disease who received PREOP also fared slightly better at 5 years in terms of freedom from distant metastasis (67% vs. 54%), disease freedom (59% vs. 47%), and overall survival (52% vs. 40%); although, these differences did not reach statistical significance. The distribution of prognostic factors in the groups was analyzed to determine if this could

  14. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta: a novel urinary biomarker for recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiayu; He, Weifeng; Song, Yajun; Wang, Ying; Simpson, Richard J; Zhang, Xiaorong; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun; Huang, Chibing

    2014-01-01

    Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in the urological system with a high risk of recurrence, and effective non-invasive biomarkers for NMIBC relapse are still needed. The human urinary proteome can reflect the status of the microenvironment of the urinary system and is an ideal source for clinical diagnosis of urinary system diseases. Our previous work used proteomics to identify 1643 high-confidence urinary proteins in the urine from a healthy population. Here, we used bioinformatics to construct a cancer-associated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network comprising 16 high-abundance urinary proteins based on the urinary proteome database. As a result, platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRB) was selected for further validation as a candidate biomarker for NMIBC diagnosis and prognosis. Although the levels of urinary PDGFRB showed no significant difference between patients pre- and post-surgery (n = 185, P>0.05), over 3 years of follow-up, urinary PDGFRB was shown to be significantly higher in relapsed patients (n = 68) than in relapse-free patients (n = 117, P<0.001). The levels of urinary PDGFRB were significantly correlated with the risk of 3-year recurrence of NMIBC, and these levels improved the accuracy of a NMIBC recurrence risk prediction model that included age, tumor size, and tumor number (area under the curve, 0.862; 95% CI, 0.809 to 0.914) compared to PDGFR alone. Therefore, we surmise that urinary PDGFRB could serve as a non-invasive biomarker for predicting NMIBC recurrence.

  15. Surgical technique for en bloc transurethral resection of bladder tumour with a Hybrid Knife(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islas-García, J J O; Campos-Salcedo, J G; López-Benjume, B I; Torres-Gómez, J J; Aguilar-Colmenero, J; Martínez-Alonso, I A; Gil-Villa, S A

    2016-05-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most common malignancy of the urinary tract and the 9th worldwide. Latin American has an incidence of 5.6 per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Seventy-five percent of newly diagnosed cases are nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, and 25% of cases present as muscle invasive. The mainstay of treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer is loop transurethral resection. In 2013, the group led by Dr Mundhenk of the University Hospital of Tübingen, Germany, was the first to describe the Hybrid Knife(®) equipment for performing en bloc bladder tumour resection, with favourable functional and oncological results. To describe the surgical technique of en bloc bladder tumour resection with a Hybrid Knife(®) as an alternative treatment for nonmuscle invasive bladder tumours. A male patient was diagnosed by urotomography and urethrocystoscopy with a bladder tumour measuring 2×1cm on the floor. En bloc transurethral resection of the bladder tumour was performed with a Hybrid Knife(®). Surgery was performed for 35min, with 70 watts for cutting and 50 watts for coagulation, resecting and evacuating en bloc the bladder tumour, which macroscopically included the muscle layer of the bladder. There were no complications. The technique of en bloc bladder tumour resection with Hybrid Knife(®) is an effective alternative to bipolar loop transurethral resection. Resection with a Hybrid Knife(®) is a procedure with little bleeding and good surgical vision and minimises the risk of bladder perforation and tumour implants. The procedure facilitates determining the positivity of the neoplastic process, vascular infiltration and bladder muscle invasion in the histopathology study. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Consistent genomic alterations in carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder confirm the presence of two major pathways in bladder cancer development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zieger, Karsten; Marcussen, Niels; Borre, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Bladder cancer develops through different pathways, provisionally entitled "papillary" and "invasive." Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is thought to be the precursor of invasive bladder cancer. However, little is known about chromosomal alterations of these clinically important lesions......, and the relationship between chromosomal alterations and the different pathways. We laser-microdissected 12 CIS and 4 dysplasia samples concomitant to invasive bladder cancer. We determined genome-wide chromosome copy number changes and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using Mapping 10K SNP microarrays. We further...... examined 48 high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers using SNP microarrays to reveal characteristic changes correlated with the CIS-phenotype. DNA copy-number changes were further validated using QPCR in 77 independent tumor samples. CIS was found to be chromosomal unstable in 8 of 12 cases...

  17. Copy Number Analysis of 24 Oncogenes: MDM4 Identified as a Putative Marker for Low Recurrence Risk in Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samanta Salvi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC generally have a high risk of relapsing locally after primary tumor resection. The search for new predictive markers of local recurrence thus represents an important goal for the management of this disease. We studied the copy number variations (CNVs of 24 oncogenes (MDM4, MYCN, ALK, PDGFRA, KIT, KDR, DHFR, EGFR, MET, SMO, FGFR1, MYC, ABL1, RET, CCND1, CCND2, CDK4, MDM2, AURKB, ERBB2, TOP2A, AURKA, AR and BRAF using multiplex ligation probe amplification technique to verify their role as predictive markers of recurrence. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 43 patients who underwent transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB were used; 23 patients had relapsed and 20 were disease-free after 5 years. Amplification frequencies were analyzed for all genes and MDM4 was the only gene that showed significantly higher amplification in non recurrent patients than in recurrent ones (0.65 vs. 0.3; Fisher’s test p = 0.023. Recurrence-free survival analysis confirmed the predictive role of MDM4 (log-rank test p = 0.041. Our preliminary results indicate a putative role for the MDM4 gene in predicting local recurrence of bladder cancer. Confirmation of this hypothesis is needed in a larger cohort of NMIBC patients.

  18. Feasibility of Cisplatin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer Patients With Diminished Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, Vadim S; Barata, Pedro C; Rybicki, Lisa A; Zahoor, Haris; Almassi, Nima; Redden, Alicia M; Fergany, Amr F; Kaouk, Jihad; Haber, Georges-Pascal; Stephenson, Andrew J; Ornstein, Moshe C; Gilligan, Timothy; Garcia, Jorge A; Rini, Brian I; Grivas, Petros

    2018-02-22

    Cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) before radical cystectomy is the standard of care in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. There are limited data regarding chemotherapy tolerability and outcomes for patients with low glomerular filtration rate (GFR) who receive cisplatin-based NAC. A retrospective analysis of patients who received cisplatin-based NAC at Cleveland Clinic (2005-2016) was undertaken. Patients with pre-NAC GFR < 60 mL/min by either Cockcroft-Gault (CG) or Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) formula were compared to patients with GFR ≥ 60 mL/min for NAC tolerability, pathologic complete and partial response (pPR), and the ability to undergo radical cystectomy. Thirty patients with low GFR (34-59 mL/min) and 94 patients with normal GFR (≥ 60 mL/min) were identified. Low GFR patients were older (median, 71 vs. 65 years), but other demographic and transurethral resection of bladder tumor characteristics were comparable. Low GFR patients more frequently had early NAC discontinuation (30% vs. 13%), NAC modifications (delays, dose reduction, or discontinuation, 66% vs. 40%), and cisplatin-based NAC administered in split doses (37% vs. 16%). No differences in NAC tolerability or outcomes were noted among low GFR patients receiving split-dose versus standard regimens. No differences were noted between low and normal GFR patients in NAC cycles (median, 3 for each), cystectomy rates (93% for each), time to cystectomy, and GFR change from baseline to after NAC. Pathologic complete response was higher among normal GFR patients (24% vs. 14%). Patients with low GFR had more NAC discontinuations and modifications, but most completed planned NAC cycles. For carefully selected patients with GFR < 60 mL/min, cisplatin-based NAC remains a treatment option. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Placenta paraaortic with bladder invasion: A plea for multidisciplinary approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawish, Fahmy M. I.; Hammad, Fayez T.; Kazim, Essa M.

    2007-01-01

    Placenta previa percreta with the urinary bladder invasion is a rare but potentially lethal condition. It has an increasing clinical significance due to its association with previous cesarean sections and uterine curettage. Herein, we report on a patient with placenta percreta and bladder invasion, who presented with hematuria and in whom delivery was delayed to almost full term highlighting the potential catastrophic results and the need for a multidisciplinary approach with the need to involve surgeons who are familiar with vascular and urologic surgery. We also present an elegant MRI of placenta percreta invading the urinary bladder, which shows that MRI is potentially an excellent diagnostic diagnostic modality in this difficult condition. (author)

  20. Combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroaki; Nomura, Yoshio; Terada, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ogata, Jiro

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with invasive bladder cancer (T2 in 17, T3 in 6) were treated initially with combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy. Cisplatin (50 mg) was infused into the internal iliac artery through a subcutaneous reservoir twice a week over three weeks while concurrent radiation therapy with 30 Gy, delivered in 15 fractions, was given. In 23 patients, 6 received additional cisplatin infusion and the other 17 had transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Two of the patients undergoing total cystectomy exhibited a complete response (CR). Thus overall response rate was 87% (CR in 13 and partial response in 7). CR was achieved in 53% for T2 patients and 67% for T3 patients. CR was slightly higher in patients with non-papillary cancer than those with papillary one. Toxic reaction included a decrease in bladder capacity in 2 patients and severe diarrhea due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colitis in one. The other toxicities, including nausea, vomiting, neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, were tolerable. All except for one are alive. Seven patients had a local recurrence of bladder cancer. One patient developed invasive bladder cancer reaching the prostatic urethra. One other patient had recurrence at the same site as the previous tumor. Five others had superficial bladder cancer and were managed by TURBT. Bladder function was preserved in 65% at a mean follow-up of 29 months. In conclusion, the combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy is useful for the initial treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (N.K.)

  1. Invasive bladder cancer: treatment strategies using transurethral surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy with selection for bladder conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Kaufman, Donald S.; Althausen, Alex F.; Heney, Niall M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Combined modality therapy has become the standard oncologic approach to achieve organ preservation in many malignancies. Methods and Materials: Although radical cystectomy has been considered as standard treatment for invasive bladder carcinoma in the United States, good results have been recently reported from several centers using multimodality treatment, particularly in patients with clinical T2 and T3a disease who do not have a ureter obstructed by tumor. Results: The components of the combined treatment are usually transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Following an induction course of therapy a histologic response is evaluated by cystoscopy and rebiopsy. Clinical 'complete responders' (tumor site rebiopsy negative and urine cytology with no tumor cells present) continue with a consolidation course of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation. Those patients not achieving a clinical complete response are recommended to have an immediate cystectomy. Individually the local monotherapies of radiation, TURBT, or multidrug chemotherapy each achieve a local control rate of the primary tumor of from 20 to 40%. When these are combined, clinical complete response rates of from 65 to 80% can be achieved. Seventy-five to 85% of the clinical complete responders will remain with bladders free of recurrence of an invasive tumor. Conclusions: Bladder conservation trials using combined modality treatment approaches with selection for organ conservation by response of the tumor to initial treatment report overall 5-year survival rates of approximately 50%, and a 40-45% 5-year survival rate with the bladder intact. These modern multimodality bladder conservation approaches offer survival rates similar to radical cystectomy for patients of similar clinical stage and age. Bladder-conserving therapy should be offered to patients with invasive bladder carcinoma as a realistic alternative to radical

  2. Clinicopathological Profiling of LC3B, an Autophagy Marker, and ESRRA (Estrogen-related Receptor-alpha) in Muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sup; Lee, Adam Jaehyeok; Yeo, Min-Kyung; Na, Yong Gil; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Cho, Moon-June; Kim, Jun-Sang; Jo, Eun-Kyeong; Kim, Jin-Man

    2018-04-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B), an autophagy marker, has been used as a promising marker in various cancer types. However, the expression of LC3B in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) and its prognostic significance have not been investigated. Recent studies pointed to the involvement of ESRRA in regulating autophagy via both transcriptional and post-translational control. In the current study, prognostic importance of LC3B and ESRRA in MIBC was investigated. We immunohistochemically studied the expression of LC3B and ESRRA in 56 MIBC samples. LC3B was stained high in 16 patients (28.6%) and low or negative in 40 patients (71.4%). ESRRA expression was high for 20 patients (35.7%) and low for 36 patients (64.3%). Both LC3B (p=0.003) and ESRRA (p=0.026) expression correlated significantly with disease-free survival rates. Double-positive LC3B and ESRRA correlated with poor overall survival (p=0.007) and disease-free survival (p=0.001) in MIBC patients. LC3B and ESRRA might be a useful prognostic factor in patients with MIBC. The co-expression of LC3B and ESRRA might be a prognostic and therapeutic target for patients with bladder cancer. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  3. Overview of bladder heating technology: matching capabilities with clinical requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; van Rhoon, Gerard C.

    2016-01-01

    Moderate temperature hyperthermia (40–450°C for one hour) is emerging as an effective treatment to enhance best available chemotherapy strategies for bladder cancer. A rapidly increasing number of clinical trials have investigated the feasibility and efficacy of treating bladder cancer with combined intravesical chemotherapy and moderate temperature hyperthermia. To date, most studies have concerned treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) limited to the interior wall of the bladder. Following the promising results of initial clinical trials, investigators are now considering protocols for treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). This paper provides a brief overview of the devices and techniques used for heating bladder cancer. Systems are described for thermal conduction heating of bladder wall via circulation of hot fluid, intravesical microwave antenna heating, capacitively coupled RF current heating, and radiofrequency phased array deep regional heating of the pelvis. Relative heating characteristics of the available technologies are compared based on published feasibility studies, and the systems correlated with clinical requirements for effective treatment of MIBC and NMIBC. PMID:26939993

  4. Platinum Concentration and Pathologic Response to Cisplatin-Based Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Guancial

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt-based chemotherapy is the standard of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC. However, resistance is a major limitation. Reduced intratumoral drug accumulation is an important mechanism of platinum resistance. Our group previously demonstrated a significant correlation between tissue Pt concentration and tumor response to Pt-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in lung cancer. We hypothesized that increased Pt concentration in radical cystectomy (RC specimens would correlate with improved pathologic response to Pt-based NAC in MIBC.A cohort of 19 clinically annotated, archived, fresh frozen RC specimens from patients with MIBC treated with Pt-based NAC was identified [ypT0 (pathologic complete response, pCR, N = 4; ≤ypT1N0M0 (pathologic partial response, pPR, N = 6; ≥ypT2 (minimal pathologic response/progression, N = 9]. RC specimens from 2 patients with MIBC who did not receive NAC and 1 treated with a non-Pt containing NAC regimen were used as negative controls. Total Pt concentration in normal adjacent urothelial tissue and bladder tumors from RC specimens was measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.Total Pt concentration in normal urothelium differed by tumor pathologic response (P = 0.011. Specimens with pCR had the highest Pt concentrations compared to those with pPR (P = 0.0095 or no response/progression (P = 0.020. There was no significant difference in Pt levels in normal urothelium and tumor between pPR and no response/progression groups (P = 0.37; P = 0.25, respectively.Our finding of increased intracellular Pt in RC specimens with pCR following NAC for MIBC compared to those with residual disease suggests that enhanced Pt accumulation may be an important determinant of Pt sensitivity. Factors that modulate intracellular Pt concentration, such as expression of Pt transporters, warrant further investigation as predictive biomarkers of response to Pt-based NAC in MIBC.

  5. microRNA-495 promotes bladder cancer cell growth and invasion by targeting phosphatase and tensin homolog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Mingyue; Mu, Xingyu; Liu, Zhihong; Tao, Le; Wang, Jun; Ge, Jifu; Qiu, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has linked deregulation of microRNA-495 (miR-495) to tumorigenesis; however, its function in tumor progression is controversial. This work was undertaken to explore the expression and biological roles of miR-495 in bladder cancer. The expression of miR-495 was examined in 67 pairs of bladder cancer and adjacent normal bladder tissues. The roles of miR-495 in bladder cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo were determined. Direct target gene(s) mediating the activity of miR-495 in bladder cancer cells was identified. It was found that miR-495 was expressed at greater levels in bladder tissues and cell lines. High expression of miR-495 was significantly associated with larger tumor size, advanced TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis. Overexpression of miR-495 significantly promoted bladder cancer cell proliferation and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-495 suppressed cell proliferation and invasion. PTEN, a well-defined tumor suppressor was identified to be a target gene of miR-495. A significant inverse correlation between miR-495 and PTEN expression was noted in bladder cancer tissues (r = −0.3094, P = 0.0125). Overexpression of miR-495 led to reduction of PTEN expression in bladder cancer cells. Rescue experiments showed that enforced expression of PTEN impaired miR-495-mediated bladder cancer proliferation and invasion. In vivo mouse studies demonstrated that overexpression of miR-495 accelerated the growth of subcutaneous bladder cancer xenografts, which was associated with downregulation of PTEN. Overall, these findings indicate that miR-495 upregulation contributes to bladder cancer cell growth, invasion, and tumorigenesis by targeting PTEN and offer a potential therapeutic target for bladder cancer. - Highlights: • miR-495 upregulation induces aggressive phenotype in bladder cancer. • miR-495 is inversely correlated with PTEN in bladder cancer. • miR-495 promotes bladder cancer cell

  6. Trends in the use of perioperative chemotherapy for localized and locally advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a sign of changing tides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Zachary D; Patel, Sanjay G; Zaid, Harras B; Stimson, C J; Resnick, Matthew J; Keegan, Kirk A; Barocas, Daniel A; Chang, Sam S; Cookson, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the documented survival benefit conferred by neoadjuvant (NAC) and adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), there has been a slow adoption of guideline recommendations for the use of perioperative chemotherapy (POC) in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). To evaluate temporal trends in POC utilization and identify factors influencing POC delivery in a representative cohort of patients with MIBC. Retrospective cohort study identifying factors associated with receipt of POC and evaluating temporal changes in NAC and AC utilization. We included patients from the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) with no prior malignancy who ultimately underwent radical cystectomy for ≥ cT2/cN0/cM0 MIBC between 2006 and 2010. Relationships between demographic and hospital factors and the likelihood of receiving POC were evaluated using Pearson chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, and multivariable logistic regression. Temporal changes in NAC and AC use were detected using a linear test of trend. A total of 5692 patients met our inclusion criteria. POC use increased from 29.5% in 2006 to 39.8% in 2010 (p < 0.001). NAC use increased from 10.1% in 2006 to 20.8% in 2010 (p = 0.005); AC remained stable between 18.1% and 21.3% (p = 0.68). Multivariable modeling revealed advanced age, increasing comorbidity, lack of insurance, increased travel distance, geographic location outside the northeastern United States, and lower income as negatively associated with POC receipt (all p < 0.05). Limitations include retrospective design and potential sampling bias, excluding patients treated at non-NCDB facilities. POC use for MIBC increased from 2006 to 2010, with this increase disproportionately due to rising NAC utilization. Nonetheless, there is persistent variation in the likelihood of receiving POC secondary to nonclinical factors. When retrospectively analyzing a representative cohort of patients undergoing radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer between 2006 and 2010

  7. ErbB2 and NFκB overexpression as predictors of chemoradiation resistance and putative targets to overcome resistance in muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumitaka Koga

    Full Text Available Radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC patients frequently impairs their quality of life (QOL due to urinary diversion. To improve their QOL, a bladder-sparing alternative strategy using chemoradiation has been developed. In bladder-sparing protocols, complete response (CR to induction chemoradiation is a prerequisite for bladder preservation and favorable survival. Thus predicting chemoradiation resistance and overcoming it would increase individual MIBC patients' chances of bladder preservation. The aim of this study is to investigate putative molecular targets for treatment aimed at improving chemoradiation response. Expression levels of erbB2, NFκB, p53, and survivin were evaluated immunohistochemically in pretreatment biopsy samples from 35 MIBC patients in whom chemoradiation sensitivity had been pathologically evaluated in cystectomy specimens, and associations of these expression levels with chemoradiation sensitivity and cancer-specific survival (CSS were investigated. Of the 35 patients, 11 (31% achieved pathological CR, while tumors in the remaining 24 patients (69% were chemoradiation-resistant. Multivariate analysis identified erbB2 and NFκB overexpression and hydronephrosis as significant and independent risk factors for chemoradiation resistance with respective relative risks of 11.8 (P = 0.014, 15.4 (P = 0.024 and 14.3 (P = 0.038. The chemoradiation resistance rate was 88.5% for tumors overexpressing erbB2 and/or NFκB, but only 11.1% for those negative for both (P <0.0001. The 5-year CSS rate was 74% overall. Through multivariate analysis, overexpression of erbB2 and/or NFκB was identified as an independent risk factor for bladder cancer death with marginal significance (hazard ratio 21.5, P = 0.056 along with chemoradiation resistance (P = 0.003 and hydronephrosis (P = 0.018. The 5-year CSS rate for the 11 patients achieving pathological CR was 100%, while that for the 24 with

  8. Molecular biology of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Doyle, William; Kwiatkowski, David J

    2015-04-01

    Classic as well as more recent large-scale genomic analyses have uncovered multiple genes and pathways important for bladder cancer development. Genes involved in cell-cycle control, chromatin regulation, and receptor tyrosine and PI3 kinase-mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways are commonly mutated in muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Expression-based analyses have identified distinct types of bladder cancer that are similar to subsets of breast cancer, and have prognostic and therapeutic significance. These observations are leading to novel therapeutic approaches in bladder cancer, providing optimism for therapeutic progress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bladder instillation of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide alters the muscle contractions in rat urinary bladder via a protein kinase C-related pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, T.I.; Chen, W.J.; Liu, S.H.

    2005-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli is a common cause of urinary tract infection. We determined the effects of intravesical instillation of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) on muscle contractions, protein kinase C (PKC) translocation, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in rat urinary bladder. The contractions of the isolated rat detrusor muscle evoked by electrical field stimulations were measured short-term (1 h) or long-term (24 h) after intravesical instillation of LPS. One hour after LPS intravesical instillation, bladder PKC-α translocation from cytosolic fraction to membrane fraction and endothelial (e)NOS protein was elevated, and detrusor muscle contractions were significantly increased. PKC inhibitors chelerythrine and Ro32-0432 inhibited this LPS-enhanced contractile response. Application of PKC activator β-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate enhanced the muscle contractions. Three hours after intravesical instillation of LPS, iNOS mRNA was detected in the bladder. Immunoblotting study also demonstrated that the induction of iNOS proteins is detected in bladder in which LPS was instilled. 24 h after intravesical instillation of LPS, PKC-α translocation was impaired in the bladder; LPS did not affect PKC-δ translocation. Muscle contractions were also decreased 24 h after LPS intravesical instillation. Aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor, blocked the decrease in PKC-α translocation and detrusor contractions induced by LPS. These results indicate that there are different mechanisms involved in the alteration of urinary bladder contractions after short-term and long-term treatment of LPS; an iNOS-regulated PKC signaling may participate in causing the inhibition of muscle contractions in urinary bladder induced by long-term LPS treatment

  10. Preoperative balloon occluded arterial infusion chemotherapy for locally invasive bladder cancer. Accurate staging for bladder preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Norio; Arima, Kiminobu; Kawamura, Juichi; Tochigi, Hiromi

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of bladder preservation by preoperative balloon occluded arterial infusion (BOAI) chemotherapy was studied in 111 patients with locally invasive bladder cancer. BOAI was performed by blocking the blood flow of the internal iliac artery and by performing intra-arterial infusion of adriamycin (50 mg/body) and cisplatin (100 mg/body). Before BOAI the clinical diagnosis was T2 in 36, T3a in 29, T3b in 27, T4 in 11 and after BOAI it was T0 in 1, T1 in 27, T2 in 25, T3a in 20, T3b in 20, and T4 in 10. Down staging was observed on diagnostic images in 46.6%. Thirty patients (27.0%) received transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-Bt) and their bladder could be preserved. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 100% in pT0 (n=9), 97.5% in pT1 (n=47), 79.9% in pT2 (n=21), 80.0% in pT3a (n=6), 39.9% in pT3b (n=18) and 51.9% in pT4 cases (n=9). For the bladder preservation, accurate staging diagnosis is required. Since 1992, endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in addition to imaging diagnosis for improving the accuracy of staging diagnosis. The accuracies of staging diagnosis with and without endorectal MRI were 62.5% and 44.0%, respectively. BOAI as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy has the possibility of bladder-preserving therapy in locally invasive bladder cancer. Also, the endorectal MRI can improve the accuracy of staging diagnosis, which is important for the bladder preservation. (author)

  11. Using Copy Number Alterations to Identify New Therapeutic Targets for Bladder Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Conconi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer represents the ninth most widespread malignancy throughout the world. It is characterized by the presence of two different clinical and prognostic subtypes: non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs and muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBCs. MIBCs have a poor outcome with a common progression to metastasis. Despite improvements in knowledge, treatment has not advanced significantly in recent years, with the absence of new therapeutic targets. Because of the limitations of current therapeutic options, the greater challenge will be to identify biomarkers for clinical application. For this reason, we compared our array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH results with those reported in literature for invasive bladder tumors and, in particular, we focused on the evaluation of copy number alterations (CNAs present in biopsies and retained in the corresponding cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations that should be the main target of therapy. According to our data, CCNE1, MYC, MDM2 and PPARG genes could be interesting therapeutic targets for bladder CSC subpopulations. Surprisingly, HER2 copy number gains are not retained in bladder CSCs, making the gene-targeted therapy less interesting than the others. These results provide precious advice for further study on bladder therapy; however, the clinical importance of these results should be explored.

  12. Does phosphorylation of cofilin affect the progression of human bladder cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hong; Kim, Hong Sup; Kim, Bokyung; Jung, Seung-Hyo; Won, Kyung-Jong; Jiang, Xiaowen; Lee, Chang-Kwon; Lim, So Dug; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Song, Ki Hak

    2013-01-01

    We determined the differently expressed protein profiles and their functions in bladder cancer tissues with the aim of identifying possible target proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms for taking part in their progression. We examined the expression of proteins by proteomic analysis and western blot in normal urothelium, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs), and muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBCs). The function of cofilin was analyzed using T24 human bladder cancer cells. The expression levels of 12 proteins were altered between bladder cancers and normal bladder tissues. Of these proteins, 14-3-3σ was upregulated in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with controls. On the other hand, myosin regulatory light chain 2, galectin-1, lipid-binding AI, annexin V, transthyretin, CARD-inhibitor of NF-κB-activating ligand, and actin prepeptide were downregulated in cancer samples. Cofilin, an actin-depolymerizing factor, was prominent in both NMIBCs and MIBCs compared with normal bladder tissues. Furthermore, we confirmed that cofilin phosphorylation was more prominent in MIBCs than in NMIBCs using immunoblotting and immunohistochemcal analyses. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) increased the phosphorylation of cofilin and elevated the migration in T24 cells. Knockdown of cofilin expression with small interfering RNA attenuated the T24 cell migration in response to EGF. These results demonstrate that the increased expression and phosphorylation of cofilin might play a role in the occurrence and invasiveness of bladder cancer. We suspected that changes in cofilin expression may participate in the progression of the bladder cancer

  13. Deregulation of HOX B13 expression in urinary bladder cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, L; Cantile, M; Scognamiglio, G; Perdonà, S; La Mantia, E; Cerrone, M; Gigantino, V; Cillo, C; Caraglia, M; Pignata, S; Facchini, G; Botti, G; Chieffi, S; Chieffi, P; Franco, R

    2013-02-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a common malignancy in industrialized countries. More than 90% of bladder cancer originates in the transitional cells. Bladder transitional cancer prognosis is, according to the most recent definition related to the level of tumor infiltration, characterized by two main phenotypes, Non Muscle Invasive Bladder Transitional Cancer (NMIBC) and Muscle Invasive Bladder Transitional Cancer (MIBC). The genetic profile and the clinical course of the two subtypes are completely different, however among NMIBC the prognosis is not completely predictable, since 20% of the cases experience a relapse, even in the form of MIBC. It has recently been reported that the chromosomal region 12q13-15, containing crucial cancer genes such as MDM2, CDK4, GLI and an entire cluster of HOX genes, is amplified in bladder cancer. HOX genes codify for transcriptionl factor, involved in embryonal development and cancer progression, with main nuclear expression. Particularly it was also described the strong involvement of HOX B13 in several tumors of urogenital system. In this study we have been investigated, by immunohistochemisty and quantitative Real Time PCR, the HOX B13 expression in bladder cancer evolution and progression, evaluating its ability to discriminate between NMIBC and MBCI phenotypes. Cytoplasmic HOX B13 delocalization significantly relates with muscle invasion (p 0.004). In addition in the series of NMIBC nuclear HOX B13 expression loss is significantly associated to shorter disease free survival (p-value=0.038) defining a potential prognostic role. Overexpression of HOX B13 in more aggressive phenotype is also demonstrate at gene level by quantitative RT-PCR. The de-regulation and delocalization of HOX B13 in urinary bladder cancer supports again the important role of HOX genes in tumor evolution and represents a starting point to establish an integrated analysis, in which HOX genes represent important prognostic and predictive markers for bladder

  14. Immunohistochemical study of the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at different stages of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; von der Maase, Hans; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2002-01-01

    ; group 1, 23 patients with recurrent stage Ta (non-invasive) tumors; group 2, 22 patients presenting at their first admission with T2-4 (muscle invasive) tumors; group 3, 24 patients who experienced disease progression from Ta or T1 (invasive in connective tissue) to a higher stage......PURPOSE: The cell cycle is known to be deregulated in cancer. We therefore analyzed the expression of the cell cycle related proteins p21, p27, p16, Rb, and L-myc by immunohistochemical staining of bladder tumors.METHODS: The tissue material consisted of bladder tumors from three groups of patients......(kip1) ( P=0.03), Rb ( P=0.00002), and L-myc ( P=0.00000007) in muscle invasive tumors compared to noninvasive tumors. Tumors presenting as muscle invasive at first diagnosis had significantly lower levels of p16/CDKN2A ( P=0.01) when compared to muscle invasive tumors that followed Ta or T1 precursor...

  15. Prognostic factors in invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maulard-Durdux, C.; Housset, M.

    1998-01-01

    In France, invasive bladder cancer is the more frequent urologic malignancy after prostate carcinoma. Treatment of bladder cancer is radical cystectomy. New therapeutic approaches such as chemo-radiation combination for a conservative procedure, neo-adjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy are still developing. In this way, a rigorous selection of patients is needed. This selection is based on prognostic criteria that could be divided into four groups: the volume of the tumor including the tumor infiltration depth, the nodal status, the presence or not of hydronephrosis and the residual tumor mass after trans-urethral resection; the histologic aspects of the tumor including histologic grading, the presence or not of an epidermoid metaplasia, of in situ carcinoma or of thrombi; the expression of tumor markers tissue polypeptide antigen, bladder tumor antigen; the biologic aspects of the tumor as ploidy, cytogenetic abnormalities, expression of Ki67, expression of oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, expression of tumor antigens or growth factor receptors. This paper reviews the prognostic value of the various parameters. (authors)

  16. Chemoradiotherapy for muscle invading bladder carcinoma. final report of a single institutional organ-sparing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Fernando; Dominguez, Miguel A.; Martinez, Enrique; Illarramendi, Jose J.; Miquelez, Santiago; Pascual, Ignacio; Marcos, Marta

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiotherapy is becoming an alternative to radical cystectomy among patients with muscle invading bladder cancer. We began a prospective study in 1988 to determine the possibilities of conservative treatment and aiming to improve the results obtained by cystectomy alone in invasive bladder cancer. A combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin (M-VAC), followed by radiotherapy and concomitant cisplatin was used. Methods: Fifty patients with good performance status and with stages T2 to T4 operable untreated invasive bladder cancer were entered in the study. Treatment protocol was as follows: (i) cytoreductive transurethral resection; (ii) two cycles of M-VAC chemotherapy; (iii) radiotherapy, 45 Gy on pelvic volume and, at the same time, 20 mg/m 2 cisplatin on days 1 to 5. Cystoscopic evaluation: if there was a complete response, radiotherapy was completed up to 65 Gy; if there was not a complete response, a cystectomy was performed. Median follow-up of the series was 73 months (18-180 m). Results: Tumor response was as follows: 34 complete responses (68%), 9 partial responses (18%), and 7 nonresponses (14%) were observed. The 5-year overall survival and local control were 48% and 47%, respectively. For the complete responder patient, 5-year survival and local control were 65% and 70%, respectively. Severe toxicity was uncommon. The most frequent were leucopenia and cystitis. No treatment-related deaths occurred with either treatment protocol. Conclusions: Conservative combination treatment may be an acceptable alternative to immediate cystectomy in selected patients with bladder cancer, although a randomized clinical trial would be required to produce definitive results

  17. Urology and nephrology update: bladder and kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, David C; Fox, Cara-Louise

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that bladder and kidney cancers would be diagnosed in approximately 140,000 Americans in 2013, with approximately 30,000 dying from these cancers. Urinary tract cancers affect men more commonly than they do women, and the median age at diagnosis is 65 years. Major risk factors for these cancers include tobacco smoking, certain chemical exposures, family history, age, and obesity. Unexplained hematuria in adults should be evaluated to exclude bladder and kidney cancer. Staging of bladder and kidney cancer should be based on the TNM staging system, which, along with tumor grade, provides important treatment and prognostic information. Urothelial cell carcinoma is the most common type of bladder cancer; it also can occur in the kidneys or ureters. Renal cell carcinoma is the most common type of kidney cancer. Treatment options for bladder cancer vary widely, depending on the grade of the cancer. Early non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer may be removed cystoscopically and/or treated with intravesical immunotherapy or chemotherapy, whereas patients with muscle-invasive bladder tumors typically require surgery. Management of kidney cancer is almost always surgical, unless the patient is too ill to undergo surgery or chooses palliative care. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  18. Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashistha, Vishal; Wang, Hanzhang; Mazzone, Andrew; Liss, Michael A.; Svatek, Robert S.; Schleicher, Mary; Kaushik, Dharam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparison of overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment-related complications between radical cystectomy (RC) and combined modality treatment (CMT—radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor) in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched 7 databases (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Proquest, CINAHL, and (ClinicalTrials.gov)) for randomized, controlled trials and prospective and retrospective studies directly comparing RC with CMT from database inception to March 2016. We conducted meta-analyses evaluating OS, DSS, and PFS with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Nineteen studies evaluating 12,380 subjects were selected. For the 8 studies encompassing 9554 subjects eligible for meta-analyses, we found no difference in OS at 5 years (HR 0.96, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.72-1.29; P=.778) or 10 years (HR 1.02, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.73-1.42; P=.905). No difference was observed in DSS at 5 years (HR 0.83, favoring radiation, 95% CI 0.54-1.28; P=.390) or 10 years (HR 1.17, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.89-1.55; P=.264), or PFS at 10 years (HR 0.85, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.43-1.67; P=.639). The cystectomy arms had higher rates of early major complications, whereas rates of minor complications were similar between the 2 treatments. Conclusion: Current meta-analysis reveals no differences in OS, DSS, or PFS between RC and CMT. Further randomized, controlled trials are necessary to identify the optimal treatment for specific patients.

  19. Radical Cystectomy Compared to Combined Modality Treatment for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vashistha, Vishal [Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Wang, Hanzhang [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Mazzone, Andrew [Rush Medical College, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Liss, Michael A.; Svatek, Robert S. [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Schleicher, Mary [Department of Internal Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Kaushik, Dharam, E-mail: Kaushik@uthscsa.edu [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive comparison of overall survival (OS), disease-specific survival (DSS), progression-free survival (PFS), and treatment-related complications between radical cystectomy (RC) and combined modality treatment (CMT—radiation therapy, concurrent chemotherapy, and maximal transurethral resection of bladder tumor) in the setting of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: We searched 7 databases (PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Proquest, CINAHL, and (ClinicalTrials.gov)) for randomized, controlled trials and prospective and retrospective studies directly comparing RC with CMT from database inception to March 2016. We conducted meta-analyses evaluating OS, DSS, and PFS with hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: Nineteen studies evaluating 12,380 subjects were selected. For the 8 studies encompassing 9554 subjects eligible for meta-analyses, we found no difference in OS at 5 years (HR 0.96, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.72-1.29; P=.778) or 10 years (HR 1.02, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.73-1.42; P=.905). No difference was observed in DSS at 5 years (HR 0.83, favoring radiation, 95% CI 0.54-1.28; P=.390) or 10 years (HR 1.17, favoring cystectomy, 95% CI 0.89-1.55; P=.264), or PFS at 10 years (HR 0.85, favoring CMT, 95% CI 0.43-1.67; P=.639). The cystectomy arms had higher rates of early major complications, whereas rates of minor complications were similar between the 2 treatments. Conclusion: Current meta-analysis reveals no differences in OS, DSS, or PFS between RC and CMT. Further randomized, controlled trials are necessary to identify the optimal treatment for specific patients.

  20. Clinical usefulness of random biopsies in diagnosis and treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subiela, J D; Palou, J; Esquinas, C; Fernández Gómez, J M; Rodríguez Faba, O

    2017-11-20

    This systematic review of the literature has been focused on determining the clinical usefulness of random bladder biopsies (RB) in the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ. A meta-analysis was performed to establish the clinic and pathological factors associated to positive biopsies. A systematic review was performed using Pubmed/Medline database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Thirty-seven articles were included, recruiting a total of 12,657 patients, 10,975 were submitted to RB. The overall incidence of positive RB was 21.91%. Significant differences were found in the incidence of positive RB when patients were stratified according to urine cytology result, tumor multiplicity, tumor appearance, stage and grade. The results of the meta-analysis revealed that the presence of positive cytology, tumor multiplicity, non-papillary appearance tumors, stage T1 and histological grades G2 and G3 represent the risk factors to predict abnormalities in RB. The incidence of positive RB in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer was 21.91%. The maximum usefulness of RB was observed when these are performed in a standardized way. The results of the meta-analysis showed that besides positive cytology and non-papillary appearance tumors, tumor multiplicity and histological grades G2 and G3 represent risk factors associated to positive RB, suggesting that the use of RB might be extensive to the intermediate risk group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC). Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Combined Chemoradiation Therapy With Twice-Weekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin for Organ Preservation in Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Phase 1 Trial

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    Azria, David, E-mail: david.azria@icm.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); INSERM, U896, IRCM, Montpellier (France); Riou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Rebillard, Xavier [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Thezenas, Simon [Biostatistics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute, Montpellier (France); Thuret, Rodolphe [Department of Urology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Radiophysics Unit, Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM), Montpellier (France); Pouessel, Damien; Culine, Stephane [Department of Medical Oncology, AP-HP Saint-Louis, Paris (France)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concomitant treatment with radiation therapy and cisplatin (CDDP) remains the gold standard for bladder preservation in the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We present the long-term results of a phase 1 clinical trial to assess the association of twice-weekly gemcitabine with CDDP and radiation therapy in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with pT2-pT4N0M0 MIBC without hydronephrosis or diffuse carcinoma in situ were enrolled in this study. After maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor, patients received concomitant radiation therapy (63 Gy in 1.8 fractions) and chemotherapy (CDDP 20 mg/m²/day over 4 days every 21 days and gemcitabine twice a week). The starting dose of gemcitabine was 15 mg/m² with dose escalation to 20, 25, and 30 mg/m². The primary endpoint was the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). Secondary endpoints included toxicity and tumor control. Results: Fourteen patients were enrolled. Dose-limiting toxicity occurred in 2 patients treated with 30 mg/m² gemcitabine (grade 4 thrombocytopenia and severe impairment of World Health Organization performance status, respectively). Nine patients received the complete chemoradiation therapy protocol. The recommended dose of gemcitabine was 25 mg/m². The median follow-up time was 53 months, and the overall and disease-specific 5-year survival rates were 62% and 77%, respectively. Among the patients who received the complete treatment, bladder-intact survival was 76% at 5 years, and the median overall survival was 69.6 months. Conclusions: This regimen was well tolerated. The gemcitabine MTD was 25 mg/m². Bladder preservation and disease control were promising. A multicenter phase 2 randomized trial is ongoing.

  2. A dosimetric comparison of 3D conformal vs intensity modulated vs volumetric arc radiation therapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Kron, Tomas; Wilson, Lesley; Bressel, Mathias; Haworth, Annette; Hornby, Colin; Pham, Daniel; Cramb, Jim; Gill, Suki; Tai, Keen Hun

    2012-01-01

    To compare 3 Dimensional Conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) with Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for bladder cancer. Radiotherapy plans for 15 patients with T2-T4N0M0 bladder cancer were prospectively developed for 3-DCRT, IMRT and VMAT using Varian Eclipse planning system. The same radiation therapist carried out all planning and the same clinical dosimetric constraints were used. 10 of the patients with well localised tumours had a simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of the primary tumour planned for both IMRT and VMAT. Tumour control probabilities and normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated. Mean planning time for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT was 30.0, 49.3, and 141.0 minutes respectively. The mean PTV conformity (CI) index for 3D-CRT was 1.32, for IMRT 1.05, and for VMAT 1.05. The PTV Homogeneity (HI) index was 0.080 for 3D-CRT, 0.073 for IMRT and 0.086 for VMAT. Tumour control and normal tissue complication probabilities were similar for 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT. The mean monitor units were 267 (range 250–293) for 3D-CRT; 824 (range 641–1083) for IMRT; and 403 (range 333–489) for VMAT (P < 0.05). Average treatment delivery time were 2:25min (range 2:01–3:09) for 3D-CRT; 4:39 (range 3:41–6:40) for IMRT; and 1:14 (range 1:13–1:14) for VMAT. In selected patients, the SIB did not result in a higher dose to small bowel or rectum. VMAT is associated with similar dosimetric advantages as IMRT over 3D-CRT for muscle invasive bladder cancer. VMAT is associated with faster delivery times and less number of mean monitor units than IMRT. SIB is feasible in selected patients with localized tumours

  3. Expression and Role of GPR87 in Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kakehi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The orphan GPR87 has recently been matched with its ligand LPA, which is a lipid mediator with multiple physiological functions, including cancer cell proliferation. This study aimed to clarify the role of GPR87 in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder. GPR87 expression was assessed in seven human bladder cancer cell lines. A replication-deficient recombinant adenoviral vector expressing shRNA targeting GPR87 (Ad-shGPR87, was constructed. Gene silencing was carried out using Ad-shGPR87. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed for transurethral resection of bladder tumor samples from 71 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We observed GPR87 expression in five of the seven cell lines, and silencing GPR87 gene expression significantly reduced cell viability. GPR87 expression was positive in 38 (54% of 71 tumors. Ki-67 index was associated with positive GPR87 staining status (p < 0.0001. Patients with GPR87-positive tumors had shorter intravesical recurrence-free survival than those with GPR87-negative tumors (p = 0.010. Multivariate analysis revealed that GPR87 staining status was an independent prognostic parameter for intravesical recurrence (p = 0.041. Progression from non-muscle-invasive to muscle-invasive tumor was more frequently observed in patients with GPR87-positive tumors, although this trend did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.056. These results warrant further prospective studies to clarify the role of GPR87 expression in intravesical recurrence and progression in bladder cancer.

  4. Risk factor assessment in high-risk, bacillus Calmette–Guérin-treated, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holz S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Serge Holz,* Simone Albisinni,* Jacques Gilsoul, Michel Pirson, Véronique Duthie, Thierry Quackels, Marc Vanden Bossche, Thierry Roumeguère Department of Urology, Erasme Hospital, Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To assess the risk factors associated with recurrence, progression and survival in high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC patients treated with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG and validate the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO scores.Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed all BCG-treated NMIBC patients from 1998 to 2012. Multiple variables were tested as risk factors for recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival (PFS. Variables included age, sex, grade, stage, tumor size, number of tumors, carcinoma in situ (CIS, recurrence status, BCG strain used, smoking status, use of re-staging transurethral resection and use of single immediate postoperative instillation. We also tested the accuracy of EORTC and CUETO scores in predicting recurrence and progression.Results: Overall, 123 patients were analyzed. Median (interquartile range follow-up was 49 months. The 5-year overall survival, cancer-specific survival, recurrence-free survival and PFS were 75.0%, 89.3%, 59.4% and 79.2%, respectively. On univariate analysis, multiple tumors (≥3, concomitant CIS and smoking influenced recurrence. Regarding progression, multiple tumors, concomitant CIS and Connaught strain (vs Tice negatively influenced PFS on univariate and multivariate analyses were independent prognostic factors. CUETO scores were accurate, with a slight overestimation, while EORTC score was not predictive of recurrence or progression.Conclusion: In this study, CIS and tumor multiplicity were unfavorable predictors of recurrence and progression in patients with NMIBC receiving BCG

  5. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  6. Pathologic bladder microenvironment attenuates smooth muscle differentiation of skin derived precursor cells: implications for tissue regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Tolg

    Full Text Available Smooth muscle cell containing organs (bladder, heart, blood vessels are damaged by a variety of pathological conditions necessitating surgery or organ replacement. Currently, regeneration of contractile tissues is hampered by lack of functional smooth muscle cells. Multipotent skin derived progenitor cells (SKPs can easily be isolated from adult skin and can be differentiated in vitro into contractile smooth muscle cells by exposure to FBS. Here we demonstrate an inhibitory effect of a pathologic contractile organ microenvironment on smooth muscle cell differentiation of SKPs. In vivo, urinary bladder strain induces microenvironmental changes leading to de-differentiation of fully differentiated bladder smooth muscle cells. Co-culture of SKPs with organoids isolated from ex vivo stretched bladders or exposure of SKPs to diffusible factors released by stretched bladders (e.g. bFGF suppresses expression of smooth muscle markers (alpha SMactin, calponin, myocardin, myosin heavy chain as demonstrated by qPCR and immunofluorescent staining. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signalling, previously observed to prevent bladder strain induced de-differentiation of fully differentiated smooth muscle cells in vitro, inhibits FBS-induced smooth muscle cell differentiation of undifferentiated SKPs. These results suggest that intended precursor cell differentiation may be paradoxically suppressed by the disease context for which regeneration may be required. Organ-specific microenvironment contexts, particularly prevailing disease, may play a significant role in modulating or attenuating an intended stem cell phenotypic fate, possibly explaining the variable and inefficient differentiation of stem cell constructs in in vivo settings. These observations must be considered in drafting any regeneration strategies.

  7. The awareness of patients with non - muscle invasive bladder cancer regarding the importance of smoking cessation and their access to smoking cessation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Yuruk

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives Smoking is the most important risk factor for bladder cancer and smoking cessation is associated with reduced risk of tumor recurrence and progression. The aim of this study is to assess the awareness of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC patients regarding the importance of smoking cessation, determine their access to smoking cessation programs and the effects of smoking cessation on recurrence rates of NMIBC. Materials and Methods NMIBC patients who were followed with cystoscopy were included in the study. Their demographic properties were recorded, along with their smoking habits, awareness regarding the effects of smoking on bladder cancer and previous attempts for smoking cessation. Moreover, the patients were asked whether they applied for a smoking cessation program. Recurrence of bladder cancer during the follow-up period was also noted. Results A total of 187 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 64.68±12.05 (range: 15-90 and the male to female ratio was 167/20. At the time of diagnosis, 114 patients (61.0% were active smokers, 35 patients (18.7% were ex-smokers and 38 patients (20.3% had never smoked before. After the diagnosis, 83.3% of the actively smoking patients were advised to quit smoking and 57.9% of them quit smoking. At the time of the study, 46.52% of the NMIBC patients were aware of the link between smoking and bladder cancer, whereas only 4.1% of the smoking patients were referred to smoking cessation programs. After a mean follow-up of 32.28±11.42 months, 84 patients (44.91% had recurrence; however, current smoking status or awareness of the causative role of smoking on NMIBC did not affect the recurrence. Conclusion In our study group, the majority of the NMIBC patients were not aware of the association between smoking and bladder cancer. Although most of the physicians advised patients to quit smoking, a significant amount of the patients were still active smokers during

  8. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA TUG1 predicts poor prognosis and promotes cancer cell proliferation and migration in high-grade muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Robert; Kleinova, Renata; Juracek, Jaroslav; Dolezel, Jan; Ozanova, Zuzana; Fedorko, Michal; Pacik, Dalibor; Svoboda, Marek; Stanik, Michal; Slaby, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    Long non-coding RNA TUG1 is involved in the development and progression of a variety of tumors. Little is known about TUG1 function in high-grade muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). The aims of our study were to determine expression levels of long non-coding RNA TUG1 in tumor tissue, to evaluate its relationship with clinico-pathological features of high-grade MIBC, and to describe its function in MIBC cells in vitro. TUG1 expression levels were determined in paired tumor and adjacent non-tumor bladder tissues of 47 patients with high-grade MIBC using real-time PCR. Cell line T-24 and siRNA silencing were used to study the TUG1 function in vitro. We observed significantly increased levels of TUG1 in tumor tissue in comparison to adjacent non-tumor bladder tissue (P TUG1 levels were significantly increased in metastatic tumors (P = 0.0147) and were associated with shorter overall survival of MIBC patients (P = 0.0241). TUG1 silencing in vitro led to 34 % decrease in cancer cell proliferation (P = 0.0004) and 23 % reduction in migration capacity of cancer cells (P TUG1 silencing on cell cycle distribution and number of apoptotic cells. Our study confirmed overexpression of TUG1 in MIBC tumor tissue and described its association with worse overall survival in high-grade MIBC patients. Together with in vitro observations, these data suggest an oncogenic role of TUG1 and its potential usage as biomarker or therapeutic target in MIBC.

  9. Renin-Angiotensin Inhibitors Decrease Recurrence after Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumor in Patients with Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blute, Michael L; Rushmer, Timothy J; Shi, Fangfang; Fuller, Benjamin J; Abel, E Jason; Jarrard, David F; Downs, Tracy M

    2015-11-01

    Prior reports suggest that renin-angiotensin system inhibition may decrease nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer recurrence. We evaluated whether angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker treatment at initial surgery was associated with decreased recurrence or progression in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Using an institutional bladder cancer database we identified 340 patients with data available on initial transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Progression was defined as an increase to stage T2. Cox proportional hazards models were used to evaluate associations with recurrence-free and progression-free survival. Median patient age was 69.6 years. During a median followup of 3 years (IQR 1.3-6.1) 200 patients (59%) had recurrence and 14 (4.1%) had stage progression. Of those patients 143 were receiving angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers at the time of the first transurethral resection. On univariate analysis factors associated with improved recurrence-free survival included carcinoma in situ (p = 0.040), bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy (p = 0.003) and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker therapy (p = 0.009). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients treated with bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy (HR 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-0.87, p = 0.002) or angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker therapy (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.45-0.84, p = 0.005) were less likely to experience tumor recurrence. The 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 45.6% for patients treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers and 28.1% in those not treated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (p = 0.009). Subgroup analysis was performed to evaluate nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer pathology (Ta, T1 and carcinoma in situ) in 85 patients on bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy alone and in

  10. Novel Multisensor Probe for Monitoring Bladder Temperature During Locoregional Chemohyperthermia for Nonmuscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Technical Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose: The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional hyperthermia delivery necessitates adequate thermal dosimetry; thus, optimal thermometry methods are needed to monitor accurately the temperature distribution throughout the bladder wall. The aim of the study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of a novel intravesical device (multi-sensor probe) developed to monitor the local bladder wall temperatures during loco-regional C-HT. Materials and Methods: A multisensor thermocouple probe was designed for deployment in the human bladder, using special sensors to cover the bladder wall in different directions. The deployment of the thermocouples against the bladder wall was evaluated with visual, endoscopic, and CT imaging in bladder phantoms, porcine models, and human bladders obtained from obduction for bladder volumes and different deployment sizes of the probe. Finally, porcine bladders were embedded in a phantom and subjected to locoregional heating to compare probe temperatures with additional thermometry inside and outside the bladder wall. Results: The 7.5 cm thermocouple probe yielded optimal bladder wall contact, adapting to different bladder volumes. Temperature monitoring was shown to be accurate and representative for the actual bladder wall temperature. Conclusions: Use of this novel multisensor probe could yield a more accurate monitoring of the bladder wall temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia. PMID:24112045

  11. Current trends in the management of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amit R; Campbell, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of bladder cancer etiology, diagnosis, and management for WOC nurses. Bladder cancer incidence continues to rise yearly in the United States, and patients with bladder cancer comprise some of the most challenging cases in urologic oncology. Nurses are involved with all aspects of the processes of care for the patient with bladder cancer, from initial diagnosis and treatment to postsurgical care and follow-up. For nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, treatment includes transurethral resection followed by intravesical chemotherapy or immunotherapy to prevent recurrence or progression. Radical cystectomy along with chemotherapy protocols provides a survival advantage for muscle invasive bladder cancer, although the timing of chemotherapy remains controversial. Numerous factors are considered when determining the type of urinary diversion used at the time of radical cystectomy, but patient, family, surgeon, and nursing input are essential for preserving an optimal health-related quality of life and reducing morbidity. Patients with metastatic bladder cancer are generally treated with a cisplatin-based chemotherapy but continue to have a poor prognosis. Newer therapies involving novel molecular-targeted agents provide hope for the future for patients with metastatic disease.

  12. Androgen receptor activation: a prospective therapeutic target for bladder cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Taichi; Tirador, Kathleen A; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Patients with non-muscle-invasive or muscle-invasive bladder cancer undergoing surgery and currently available conventional therapy remain having a high risk of tumor recurrence or progression, respectively. Novel targeted molecular therapy is therefore expected to improve patient outcomes. Meanwhile, substantially higher incidence of bladder cancer in men has prompted research on androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signaling in this malignancy. Indeed, preclinical evidence has suggested that AR signaling plays an important role in urothelial carcinogenesis and tumor outgrowth as well as resistance to some of the currently available conventional non-surgical therapies. Areas covered: We summarize and discuss available data suggesting the involvement of AR and its potential downstream targets in the development and progression of bladder cancer. Associations between AR signaling and sensitivity to cisplatin/doxorubicin or bacillus Calmette-Guérin treatment are also reviewed. Expert opinion: AR activation is likely to correlate with the promotion of urothelial carcinogenesis and cancer outgrowth as well as resistance to conventional therapies. Molecular therapy targeting the AR may thus provide effective chemopreventive and therapeutic approaches for urothelial cancer. Accordingly, bladder cancer can now be considered as an endocrine-related neoplasm. Clinical application of various anti-AR therapies available for AR-dependent prostate cancer to bladder cancer patients is anticipated.

  13. Transforming Growth Factor-β Is an Upstream Regulator of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Dependent Bladder Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sounak; Hau, Andrew M; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Harwalkar, Jyoti; Shoskes, Aaron C; Elson, Paul; Beach, Jordan R; Hussey, George S; Schiemann, William P; Egelhoff, Thomas T; Howe, Philip H; Hansel, Donna E

    2016-05-01

    Our prior work identified the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) as a key regulator of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion, although upstream growth factor mediators of this pathway in bladder cancer have not been well delineated. We tested whether transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, which can function as a promotility factor in bladder cancer cells, could regulate mTORC2-dependent bladder cancer cell motility and invasion. In human bladder cancers, the highest levels of phosphorylated SMAD2, a TGF-β signaling intermediate, were present in high-grade invasive bladder cancers and associated with more frequent recurrence and decreased disease-specific survival. Increased expression of TGF-β isoforms, receptors, and signaling components was detected in invasive high-grade bladder cancer cells that expressed Vimentin and lacked E-cadherin. Application of TGF-β induced phosphorylation of the Ser473 residue of AKT, a selective target of mTORC2, in a SMAD2- and SMAD4-independent manner and increased bladder cancer cell migration in a modified scratch wound assay and invasion through Matrigel. Inhibition of TGF-β receptor I using SB431542 ablated TGF-β-induced migration and invasion. A similar effect was seen when Rictor, a key mTORC2 component, was selectively silenced. Our results suggest that TGF-β can induce bladder cancer cell invasion via mTORC2 signaling, which may be applicable in most bladder cancers. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The management of non-invasive bladder tumours with Doxorubicin intravesical instillation after transurethral resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gallab, Musa I; Naddaf, Louai A; Kanan, Mohamad R

    2009-04-01

    Evaluation of the intravesical instillation of doxorubicin for its effect on disease recurrence for patients with non-invasive bladder tumour. The study was performed at Al Assad University Hospital in Lattakia, Syria and included patients with non-invasive bladder tumours who were managed with transurethral resection and induction and maintenance therapy with intravesical doxorubicin. They were followed up by cystoscopy every 3 months for 2 years and every 6 months thereafter with special emphasis on recurrence rates. The study included 85 patients with non-invasive bladder tumours: 23 with non-invasive papillary carcinoma (Stage Ta), 62 with tumour invading subepithelial connective tissue (Stage T1). Twelve patients had well differentiated tumours (Grade 1), 48 had moderately differentiated (Grade 2), 25 had poorly differentiated (Grade 3) tumours. The total recurrence rate was 23%. The rates of recurrence were 56% in Grade 3 and 0% in Grade 1. The recurrence rate was 41% in patients with large tumours versus 17% in those with small tumours; 44% in those with multiple tumours compared to 18% in those with solitary tumours; 30% of Stage Ta tumours recurred and 21% of Stage T1 tumours. In short term follow-up, our rate of recurrence was 23%. Adjuvant intravesical doxorubicin was shown to reduce the recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. Tumour grade, size and number were shown to be prognostic factors for recurrence.

  15. CT Accuracy of Extrinsic Tongue Muscle Invasion in Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junn, J C; Baugnon, K L; Lacayo, E A; Hudgins, P A; Patel, M R; Magliocca, K R; Corey, A S; El-Deiry, M; Wadsworth, J T; Beitler, J J; Saba, N F; Liu, Y; Aiken, A H

    2017-02-01

    Extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in oral cavity cancer upstages the primary tumor to a T4a. Despite this American Joint Committee on Cancer staging criterion, no studies have investigated the accuracy or prognostic importance of radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion, the feasibility of standardizing extrinsic tongue muscle invasion reporting, or the degree of agreement across different disciplines: radiology, surgery, and pathology. The purpose of this study was to assess the agreement among radiology, surgery, and pathology for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion and to determine the imaging features most predictive of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion with surgical/pathologic confirmation. Thirty-three patients with untreated primary oral cavity cancer were included. Two head and neck radiologists, 3 otolaryngologists, and 1 pathologist prospectively evaluated extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Fourteen of 33 patients had radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion; however, only 8 extrinsic tongue muscle invasions were confirmed intraoperatively. Pathologists were unable to determine extrinsic tongue muscle invasion in post-formalin-fixed samples. Radiologic extrinsic tongue muscle invasion had 100% sensitivity, 76% specificity, 57% positive predictive value, and 100% negative predictive value with concurrent surgical-pathologic evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion as the criterion standard. On further evaluation, the imaging characteristic most consistent with surgical-pathologic evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion was masslike enhancement. Evaluation of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion is a subjective finding for all 3 disciplines. For radiology, masslike enhancement of extrinsic tongue muscle invasion most consistently corresponded to concurrent surgery/pathology evaluation positive for extrinsic tongue muscle invasion. Intraoperative surgical and pathologic evaluation should be encouraged to verify radiologic extrinsic tongue

  16. Analysis of failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mameghan, Hedy; Fisher, Richard; Mameghan, Jill; Brook, Susan

    1995-01-15

    Purpose: To assess prognostic factors for bladder relapse and distant failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients treated in the period 1977 to 1990 by definitive radiotherapy. The factors studied included age, sex, T stage, histological grade, tumor multiplicity, ureteric obstruction, total radiation dose, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The endpoints studied were bladder relapse and distant failure. Results: There were 342 patients with a mean follow-up time of 7.9 years. Bladder relapse was observed in 159 patients. The overall actuarial bladder relapse rate at 5 years was 55% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher bladder relapse rate were: tumor multiplicity (p < 0.001), presence of ureteric obstruction (p = 0.001), and higher T stage (p 0.044). Distant failure occurred in 39 patients. The overall actuarial distant failure rate at 5 years was 28% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher distant failure rate were: ureteric obstruction (p = 0.003) and higher T stage (p = 0.030). Conclusion: In our study, patients with invasive bladder TCC fell into distinct prognostic groups determined by the three independent factors, ureteric obstruction, tumor multiplicity, and T stage. These factors provided estimated risks of bladder relapse by 5 years which ranged from 34% to 91%. Knowledge of these prognostic factors can help in the selection of patients more suited for bladder preservation by definitive radiotherapy.

  17. Analysis of failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mameghan, Hedy; Fisher, Richard; Mameghan, Jill; Brook, Susan

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To assess prognostic factors for bladder relapse and distant failure following definitive radiotherapy for invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of patients treated in the period 1977 to 1990 by definitive radiotherapy. The factors studied included age, sex, T stage, histological grade, tumor multiplicity, ureteric obstruction, total radiation dose, and use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The endpoints studied were bladder relapse and distant failure. Results: There were 342 patients with a mean follow-up time of 7.9 years. Bladder relapse was observed in 159 patients. The overall actuarial bladder relapse rate at 5 years was 55% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher bladder relapse rate were: tumor multiplicity (p < 0.001), presence of ureteric obstruction (p = 0.001), and higher T stage (p 0.044). Distant failure occurred in 39 patients. The overall actuarial distant failure rate at 5 years was 28% (SE = 3%). Prognostic factors for a higher distant failure rate were: ureteric obstruction (p = 0.003) and higher T stage (p = 0.030). Conclusion: In our study, patients with invasive bladder TCC fell into distinct prognostic groups determined by the three independent factors, ureteric obstruction, tumor multiplicity, and T stage. These factors provided estimated risks of bladder relapse by 5 years which ranged from 34% to 91%. Knowledge of these prognostic factors can help in the selection of patients more suited for bladder preservation by definitive radiotherapy

  18. Potential therapeutic strategies for non - muscle invasive bladder cancer based on association of intravesical immunotherapy with p - mapa and systemic administration of cisplatin and doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Queila Cristina; Nunes, Iseu da Silva; Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Favaro, Wagner Jose

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the histopathological and molecular effects of P-MAPA (Protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride) intravesical immunotherapy combined with systemic doxorubicin or cisplatin for treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) in an appropriate animal model. Our results showed an undifferentiated tumor, characterizing a tumor invading mucosa or submucosa of the bladder wall (pT1) and papillary carcinoma in situ (pTa) in the Cancer group. The histopathological changes were similar between the combined treatment with intravesical P-MAPA plus systemic Cisplatin and P-MAPA immunotherapy alone, showing decrease of urothelial neoplastic lesions progression and histopathological recovery in 80% of the animals. The animals treated systemically with cisplatin or doxorubicin singly, showed 100% of malignant lesions in the urinary bladder. Furthemore, the combined treatment with P-MAPA and Doxorubicin showed no decrease of urothelial neoplastic lesions progression and histopathological recovery. Furthermore, Akt, PI3K, NF-kB and VEGF protein levels were significantly lower in intravesical P-MAPA plus systemic cisplatin and in intravesical P-MAPA alone treatments than other groups. In contrast, PTEN protein levels were significantly higher in intravesical P-MAPA plus systemic cisplatin and in intravesical P-MAPA alone treatments. Thus, it could be concluded that combination of intravesical P-MAPA immunotherapy and systemic cisplatin in the NMIBC animal model was effective, well tolerated and showed no apparent signs of antagonism between the drugs. In addition, intravesical P-MAPA immunotherapy may be considered as a valuable option for treatment of BCG unresponsive patients that unmet the criteria for early cystectomy. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  19. Applications of Nanotechnology in Bladder Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Wei Hsu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective therapies can prevent superficial bladder cancer from developing into muscle-invasive stage or more severe stages which require radical cystectomy and negatively affect life quality. In terms of therapeutic approaches against superficial bladder cancer, intravesical (regional therapy has several advantages over oral (systemic therapy. Though urologists can directly deliver drugs to bladder lesions by intravesical instillation after transurethral resection, the efficacy of conventional drug delivery is usually low due to the bladder permeability barrier and bladder periodical discharge. Nanoparticles have been well developed as pharmaceutical carriers. By their versatile properties, nanoparticles can greatly improve the interactions between urothelium and drugs and also enhance the penetration of drugs into urothelium with lesions, which dramatically improves therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we discuss the advances of nanotechnology in bladder cancer therapy by different types of nanoparticles with different encapsulating materials.

  20. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlBazzaz Pishtewan H

    2009-01-01

    The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations. (author)

  1. Stage of urinary bladder cancer at first presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bazzaz Pishtewan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The stage of urinary bladder cancer is an important factor in determining prognosis of the disease. This prospective study was performed to determine the stage of bladder cancer at first presentation at the Rizgary Hospital in the Erbil governorate in Iraqi Kurdistan. We evaluated 72 patients with bladder cancer. The grades and stages of bladder cancer of these patients were determined through physical examination and investigations. We found that 47.2% of patients had superficial cancer, 19.4% had tumor with invasion into the lamina propria and 30.6% of patients had tumor with invasion to muscle wall. Regional or distant metastases were found in 2.8% of patients. Well differentiated tumor was seen in 44.4% of the patients, moderately differentiated tumor was found in 38.9% and poorly differentiated tumor was found in 16.7% of the patients. Our study suggests that bladder cancer is diagnosed at a relatively early stage in the Erbil governorate. However, the situation can be further improved by adopting proper screening programs and performing appropriate investigations.

  2. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder can distinguish between residual tumour and post-chemotherapy effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Cowan, Richard; Lyons, Jeanette; Elliott, Tony; Carrington, Bernadette M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer with chemotherapy results in haemorrhagic inflammation, mimicking residual tumour on conventional MR images and making interpretation difficult. The aim of this study was to use dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to estimate descriptive and tracer kinetic parameters post-neoadjuvant chemotherapy and to investigate whether parameters differed in areas of residual tumour and chemotherapy-induced haemorrhagic inflammation (treatment effect, Tr-Eff). Methods and materials: Twenty-one patients underwent DCE-MRI scans with 2.5 s temporal resolution before and following neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Regions-of-interest (ROIs) were defined in areas suspicious of residual tumour on T 2 -weighted MRI scans. Data were analysed semi-quantitatively and with a two-compartment exchange model to obtain parameters including relative signal intensity (rSI 80s ) and plasma perfusion (F p ) respectively. The bladder was subsequently examined histologically after cystectomy for evidence of residual tumour and/or Tr-Eff. Differences in parameters measured in areas of residual tumour and Tr-Eff were examined using Student's t-test. Results: Twenty-four abnormal sites were defined after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. On pathology, 10 and 14 areas were identified as residual tumour and Tr-Eff respectively. Median rSI 80s and F p were significantly higher in areas of residual tumour than Tr-Eff (rSI 80s = 2.9 vs 1.7, p < 0.001; F p = 20.7 vs 9.1 ml/100 ml/min, p = 0.03). The sensitivity and specificity for differentiating residual tumour from Tr-Eff were 70% and 100% (rSI 80s ), 60% and 86% (F p ), and 75% and 100% when combined. Conclusion: DCE-MRI parameters obtained post-treatment are capable of distinguishing between residual tumour and treatment effect in patients treated for bladder cancer with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

  3. Treatment of invasive bladder cancer with cisplatin, fluorouracil and concurrent radiotherapy: a pilot study; Traitement des cancers infiltrants de vessie par cisplatine, fluoro-uracile et radiotherapie concomitante: resultats d`une etude pilote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvet, B.; Felix-Faure, C.; Berger, C.; Vincent, P.; Reboul, F. [Clinique Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Davin, J.L. [Clinique Rhone-Durance, Avignon (France)

    1998-04-01

    Pilot study to assess treatment feasibility and results of a 2-drug chemotherapy (CT) regimen administered concurrently with radiotherapy (RT) for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The median follow-up was 38 months. The feasibility of concurrent CT-RT was excellent: 96 % of the patients completed radiotherapy and 100 % of them received the two courses of P-FU. The acute toxicity was mild: no hematological toxicity or renal toxicity over grade II, 4 cases of bowel or rectal reversible grade III toxicity and 2 cases of reversible grade III cystitis. A complete response was achieved in 30 out of the 42 evaluable patients (65.2 %). Nine patients received an immediate salvage treatment (3TUR, 3 additional radiotherapy and 3 cystectomies). Ten patients had local failure. Projected 3-year locoregional control was 49 % for the 46 patients. Projected overall 3-year survival was 53 %. Functional results were good for disease-free patients with preserved bladder: 1 grade I, 3 grade II, and no grade III cystitis. Concurrent 2-drug chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil is feasible without major toxicity and offers a potentially curative and conservative treatment for patients with localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer. (authors)

  4. [Placenta percreta with bladder invasion: an uncommon cause of hematuria during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Solís, A; Leo-Barahona, M; Romero-López, A I; Gómez-Guerrero, J M

    2014-01-01

    Placenta percreta with bladder invasion is a very uncommon condition that can lead to very severe complications in pregnant women. Although it is often diagnosed during delivery, imaging techniques are very useful for early diagnosis, which is fundamental for planning surgery and avoiding potentially lethal complications. We present the case of a woman with a history of cesarean section who presented with hematuria and low back pain. The diagnosis of placenta percreta with bladder invasion was suggested after ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and was confirmed at surgery. We provide a brief review of the literature, emphasizing the role of imaging techniques. Copyright © 2012 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Pathologic Response Rates of Gemcitabine/Cisplatin versus Methotrexate/Vinblastine/Adriamycin/Cisplatin Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Muscle Invasive Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin C. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare pathologic outcomes after treatment with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC versus methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin (MVAC in the neoadjuvant setting. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected on 178 patients with T2-T4 bladder cancer who underwent radical cystectomy between 2003 and 2011. Outcomes of interest included those with complete response (pT0 and any response (≤pT1. Odds ratios were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. Compared to those who did not receive neoadjuvant chemotherapy, there were more patients with complete response (28% versus 9%, OR 3.11 (95% CI: 1.45–6.64, P=0.03 and any response (52% versus 25%, OR 3.23 (95% CI: 1.21–8.64, P=0.01. Seventy-two patients received GC (n=41 or MVAC (n=31. CR was achieved in 29% and 22% of GC and MVAC patients, respectively (multivariate OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.10–1.58. Any response (≤pT1 was achieved in 56% of GC and 45% of MVAC patients (multivariate OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.12–1.71. Conclusions. We observed similar pathologic response rates for GC and MVAC neoadjuvant chemotherapy in this cohort of patients with muscle invasive urothelial cancer (MIBC. Our findings support the use of GC as an alternative regimen in the neoadjuvant setting.

  6. Reconstitution of experimental neurogenic bladder dysfunction using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masahiro; Tamaki, Tetsuro; Tono, Kayoko; Okada, Yoshinori; Masuda, Maki; Akatsuka, Akira; Hoshi, Akio; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Postoperative neurogenic bladder dysfunction is a major complication of radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer and is mainly caused by unavoidable damage to the bladder branch of the pelvic plexus (BBPP) associated with colateral blood vessels. Thus, we attempted to reconstitute disrupted BBPP and blood vessels using skeletal muscle-derived multipotent stem cells that show synchronized reconstitution capacity of vascular, muscular, and peripheral nervous systems. METHODS.: Under pentobarbital anesthesia, intravesical pressure by electrical stimulation of BBPP was measured as bladder function. The distal portion of BBPP with blood vessels was then cut unilaterally (experimental neurogenic bladder model). Measurements were performed before, immediately after, and at 4 weeks after transplantation as functional recovery. Stem cells were obtained from the right soleus and gastrocnemius muscles after enzymatic digestion and cell sorting as CD34/45 (Sk-34) and CD34/45 (Sk-DN). Suspended cells were autografted around the damaged region, whereas medium alone and CD45 cells were transplanted as control groups. To determine the morphological contribution of the transplanted cells, stem cells obtained from green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse muscles were transplanted into a nude rat model and were examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoelectron microscopy. RESULTS.: At 4 weeks after surgery, the transplantation group showed significantly higher functional recovery ( approximately 80%) than the two controls ( approximately 28% and 24%). The transplanted cells showed an incorporation into the damaged peripheral nerves and blood vessels after differentiation into Schwann cells, perineurial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and fibroblasts around the bladder. CONCLUSION.: Transplantation of multipotent Sk-34 and Sk-DN cells is potentially useful for the reconstitution of damaged BBPP.

  7. Prognostic significance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) over expression in urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Atif Ali; Hussain, Zubaida Fida; Irfan, Muhammad; Khan, Erum Yousuf; Faridi, Naveen; Naqvi, Hanna; Khan, Amir; Edhi, Muhammad Muzzammil

    2018-06-07

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to have abnormal expression in many human cancers and is considered as a marker of poor prognosis. Frequency of over expression in bladder cancer has not been studied in our population; therefore we aimed to evaluate the frequency and prognostic significance of EGFR immunohistochemical expression in locoregional population. We performed EGFR immunohistochemistry on 126 cases of bladder cancer and association of EGFR expression with tumor grade, lamina propria invasion, deep muscle invasion and recurrence of disease was evaluated. High EGFR expression was noted in 26.2% (33 cases), 15.1% (19 cases) and 58.7% (74 cases) revealed low and no EGFR expression respectively. Significant association of EGFR expression was noted with tumor grade, lamina propria invasion, deep muscle invasion and recurrence status while no significant association was seen with age, gender and overall survival. Kaplan- Meier curves revealed significant association of EGFR expression with recurrence while no significant association was seen with overall survival. Significant association of EGFR overexpression with tumor grade, muscularis propria invasion and recurrence signifies its prognostic value; therefore EGFR can be used as a prognostic biomarker in Urothelial bladder carcinoma.

  8. Role of hexaminolevulinate-guided fluorescence cystoscopy in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Grabe, Magnus; Haug, Erik Skaaheim

    2012-01-01

    Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is an optical imaging agent used with fluorescence cystoscopy (FC) for the detection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Guidelines from the European Association of Urology (EAU) and a recent, more detailed European expert consensus statement agree that HAL...

  9. Radical radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fokdal, Lars; Høyer, Morten; von der Maase, Hans

    2006-01-01

    The exact value of radiotherapy in the treatment of muscle-invasive       bladder cancer is difficult to establish, as most studies exploring this       issue are retrospective with different procedures for selecting patients       for treatment, as well as varying treatment strategies. An estima...

  10. Urinary high molecular weight matrix metalloproteinases as non-invasive biomarker for detection of bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Mohammed A; Seleim, Manar F; Abdalla, Mohga S; Sharada, Hayat M; Abdel Wahab, Abdel Hady A

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key molecules for tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. Over-expression of different MMPs in tumor tissues can disturb the homeostasis and increase the level of various body fluids. Many MMPs including high molecular weights (HMWs) were detected in the urine of prostate and bladder cancer patients. Our aim here is to assess the usefulness of HMW MMPs as non invasive biomarkers in bilharzial bladder cancer in Egyptian patients. Methods The activ...

  11. Novel multisensor probe for monitoring bladder temperature during locoregional chemohyperthermia for nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: technical feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordeiro, Ernesto R.; Geijsen, Debby E.; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Schooneveldt, Gerben; Sijbrands, Jan; Hulshof, Maarten C.; de la Rosette, Jean; de Reijke, Theo M.; Crezee, Hans

    2013-01-01

    The effectiveness of locoregional hyperthermia combined with intravesical instillation of mitomycin C to reduce the risk of recurrence and progression of intermediate- and high-risk nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is currently investigated in clinical trials. Clinically effective locoregional

  12. Near infrared imaging to identify sentinel lymph nodes in invasive urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Deborah W.; Adams, Larry G.; Niles, Jacqueline D.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Ramos-Vara, Jose; Bonney, Patty L.; deGortari, Amalia E.; Frangioni, John V.

    2006-02-01

    Approximately 12,000 people are diagnosed with invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder (InvTCC) each year in the United States. Surgical removal of the bladder (cystectomy) and regional lymph node dissection are considered frontline therapy. Cystectomy causes extensive acute morbidity, and 50% of patients with InvTCC have occult metastases at the time of diagnosis. Better staging procedures for InvTCC are greatly needed. This study was performed to evaluate an intra-operative near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) system (Frangioni laboratory) for identifying sentinel lymph nodes draining InvTCC. NIRF imaging was used to map lymph node drainage from specific quadrants of the urinary bladder in normal dogs and pigs, and to map lymph node drainage from naturally-occurring InvTCC in pet dogs where the disease closely mimics the human condition. Briefly, during surgery NIR fluorophores (human serum albumen-fluorophore complex, or quantum dots) were injected directly into the bladder wall, and fluorescence observed in lymphatics and regional nodes. Conditions studied to optimize the procedure including: type of fluorophore, depth of injection, volume of fluorophore injected, and degree of bladder distention at the time of injection. Optimal imaging occurred with very superficial injection of the fluorophore in the serosal surface of the moderately distended bladder. Considerable variability was noted from dog to dog in the pattern of lymph node drainage. NIR fluorescence was noted in lymph nodes with metastases in dogs with InvTCC. In conclusion, intra-operative NIRF imaging is a promising approach to improve sentinel lymph node mapping in invasive urinary bladder cancer.

  13. AgNOR Count in Resting Cells (Resting NOR Is a New Prognostic Marker in Invasive Bladder Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuro Tomobe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We have previously demonstrated that the AgNOR count in proliferating cells is a predictor of tumor recurrence in superficial bladder tumor (J. Urol. 162 (1999, 63–68. In the present study, we evaluate the type of AgNOR associated with cell cycles as a prognostic factor in invasive bladder tumor using a double staining technique employing both AgNOR and MIB-1 labelling. Materials and methods: Forty-four paraffin sections of invasive bladder tumors were stained simultaneously with AgNOR and MIB-1. The number of AgNORs in proliferating (MIB-1 positive or resting (MIB-1 negative cells were counted from a total of 100 nuclei. Correlations between MIB-1 associated AgNOR count and clinicopathological parameters were statistically analyzed. Results: The AgNOR count in proliferating cells (proliferating NOR was significantly higher than that in resting cells (resting NOR (p < 0.01. The resting NOR in tumors with distant metastases was significantly higher than that in tumors without metastases (p < 0.05. Patients with a low resting NOR tumor had a better prognosis than those with a high resting NOR tumor, whereas the proliferating NOR was not associated with survival. Survival analysis revealed that the resting NOR was the most powerful prognostic marker in patients with invasive bladder tumor (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Resting NOR had a predictive value in the prognosis of patients with invasive bladder tumor. Keywords: Transitional cell carcinoma, invasive, resting cell, AgNORs, MIB-1

  14. Interstitial lung disease secondary to Cetuximab in bladder cancer: an Oncologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Louise; Glynn, Patricia; Zarkar, Anjali

    2017-12-20

    A wide variety of cytotoxic medications cause interstitial lung disease (ILD). For the first time, we describe ILD in an 82-year-old woman with muscle invasive bladder cancer 10 days after receiving cetuximab as part of a novel trial. She had no significant medical history or drug allergies, had good exercise tolerance and a 5 pack-year smoking history. She received neoadjuvant chemotherapy (gemcitabine, cisplatin) with a good response on MRI. She was eligible for a phase 2 trial of cetuximab with chemotherapy and radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer (TUXEDO), in which the trial arm used cetuximab plus standard chemoradiotherapy to the bladder (64 grey in 32 fractions plus mitomycinandfluorouracil). Ten days after her third infusion of cetuximab, she was presented with type 1 respiratory failure. Thoracic CT scan demonstrated new widespread ground glass change in the lungs. She received high-dose steroids (prednisolone 1 mg/kg), broad spectrum antibacterial cover and non-invasive ventilation. She survived to be discharged with residual respiratory failure. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Efficacy and tolerability of concurrent weekly low dose cisplatin during radiation treatment of localised muscle invasive bladder transitional cell carcinoma: A report of two sequential Phase II studies from the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar; Matthews, John H.L.; Turner, Sandra L.; Mameghan, Heidi; Duchesne, Gillian M.; Spry, Nigel; Berry, Martin P.; Keller, Jacqui; Tripcony, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the feasibility, toxicity, and clinical effectiveness of concurrent weekly cisplatin chemotherapy in conjunction with definitive radiation in the treatment of localised muscle invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: In January 1997 the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group embarked on a Phase II study (TROG 97.01) of weekly cisplatin (35 mg/m 2 x 7 doses) plus radiation to a dose of 63 Gy over 7 weeks. Following an interim toxicity analysis, the dose intensity of cisplatin was reduced to 6 cycles and the radiation schedule changed to 64 Gy over 6.5 weeks leading to the second study (TROG 99.06). A total of 113 patients were enrolled. Results: Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity occurred in 23% of the patients. Acute grade 4 pelvic toxicity was not seen. Thirty-eight patients (33%) experienced grade 3 or 4 cisplatin related toxicities with 15 patients (12%) requiring significant dose modification. The reduced dose intensity in Study 99.06 improved tolerability. Incidence of significant late morbidity was low (6%). Seventy-nine patients (70%) achieved complete remission at the 6 month cystoscopic assessment. Local invasive recurrence was seen in 11 of the 79 patients (14%). In 18 patients (16%) isolated superficial TCC/CIS were detected (6 months and beyond).The local control rate was 45% with a functional bladder being retained in 69 of the 113 patients (61%). RFS and DSS at 5 years were 33% and 50%, respectively. Conclusion: Our two sequential Phase II studies have shown that concurrent chemoradiation using weekly cisplatin in the management of localised invasive bladder TCC is feasible and reasonably well tolerated. This approach is currently being investigated further in a randomised study

  16. Primary bladder adenocarcinoma: Case report with long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Uhlig

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary Bladder Adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy that has been observed in a heterogeneous patient population.This case report presents a 51 year old female with muscle-invasive primary bladder adenocarcinoma diagnosed in 2008. After transurethral resection and cystectomy with ileum neobladder adjuvant radiochemotherapy was administered. Two years later, a symptomatic fistula between neobladder and ileoileal anastomosis was excised, resulting in urinary incontinency. In 2016, the patient shows no signs of disease relapse but suffers from reduction of bladder capacity.This case report presents classical symptoms of adenocarcinoma of the bladder and a possible treatment regimen with associated side effects. Keywords: Adenocarcinoma, Urinary bladder, Urinary diversion, Urinary fistula, Oncology

  17. Curative effect analysis of invasive bladder cancer by joint surgical operation with interventional therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Biao; Wen Bin; Liu Tisheng; Wei Liqian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effective therapy for invasive bladder cancer. Methods: Forty patients with invasive bladder cancer were divided into group A and group B. Intra-internal lilac-arterial chemotherapy and infusion pump chemotherapy combined with surgical operation were performed in group A and only surgical operation for group B. The differences of recurrence rates and survival rates between the two groups together with the effectiveness of intra-arterial chemotherapy combined surgical operation were evaluated at the same time. Results: Reduction in volumes of cancer and hematuria were obvious and nearly disappeared in group A patients with pathomorphological features demonstrating large pachyareas of necrosis together with degeneration and inflammatory changes of carcinoma tissue; outcoming with five recurrent cases (20%) and 2 deaths (10%). In group B, 9 cases relapsed(45%) and 4 eases died(20%). Conclusion: The combination of intra-internal lilac-arterial chemoembolization with infusion pump chemotherapy together with surgical operation is safe, effective for invasive bladder cancer, resulting in high raise of survival and life quality. (authors)

  18. The Impact of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) on Progression of Bladder Cancer - A New Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Cookson, M.; Witjes, J.A.; Stenzl, A.; Grossman, H.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The International Bladder Cancer Group (IBCG) recently proposed a new definition of disease progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), including change in T-stage, change to T2 or higher or change from low to high grade. Objective: To establish whether blue light

  19. Allelic deletions of cell growth regulators during progression of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, H; von der Maase, H; Christensen, M

    2000-01-01

    Cell growth regulators include proteins of the p53 pathway encoded by the genes CDKN2A (p16, p14arf), MDM2, TP53, and CDKN1A (p21) as well as proteins encoded by genes like RB1, E2F, and MYCL. In the present study we investigated allelic deletions of all these genes in each recurrent bladder tumor...... difference in the numbers of gene loci hit by deletions muscle-invasive versus noninvasive tumors (P = 0.0000002), with the genes most often hit by deletions in muscle-invasive tumors being TP53, RB1, and MYCL. A number of novel findings were made. Losses of MYCL and RB1 alleles were more pronounced...... that a characteristic difference between recurrent noninvasive and recurrent progressing bladder tumors is loss of cell cycle-regulatory genes in the latter group....

  20. Trimodality therapy in bladder cancer: Who, what and when?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premo, Christopher; Apolo, Andrea B.; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Radical cystectomy is a standard treatment for non-metastatic, muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Treatment with trimodality therapy consisting of maximal transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation has emerged as a method to preserve the native bladder in highly motivated patients. A number of factors can impact the likelihood of long term bladder preservation after trimodality therapy, and therefore should be taken into account when selecting patients. New radiation techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and image guided radiation therapy may decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy in this setting, but remain an area of active study. Novel chemotherapy regimens may improve response rates and minimize toxicity. PMID:25882559

  1. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-07-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  2. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-01-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  3. Effects and Mechanisms of Checkpoint Inhibitors (CTLA-4, PD-1 and PD-L1 Inhibitors as New Immunotherapeutic Agents for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Çelik

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Since intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG began to be used for bladder cancer, our understanding of the importance of immune mechanisms in bladder cancer has steadily grown. With developments in immunotherapy in recent years, the use of new immunotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer, especially chemotherapy-resistant invasive and metastatic cancers, has opened the way for research in this area. Of these new therapeutic agents, this article reviews studies published on PubMed or listed on the ClinicalTrials.gov website as of December 2017 regarding the effects and mechanisms of action of checkpoint inhibitors [cytotoxic t-lymphocyte associated protein-4, programmed cell death 1 receptor (PD-1 and PD-1 ligand inhibitors] on bladder cancer. Because checkpoint inhibitors were first used for chemotherapy-resistant bladder cancer after identification of positive expression in tumor cells and especially in tumor-infiltrating mononuclear cells, significant objective response rates and survival advantages have been reported. Research continues regarding the use of these agents as first- and second-line treatment for metastatic disease in combination with chemotherapy; their efficacy in neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and bladder-preserving approaches to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC disease, and their use in non-muscle-invasize bladder cancer (NMIBC, especially BCG-refractory disease. Depending on the results of these ongoing studies, immunotherapy may direct the treatment of bladder cancer in the future.

  4. Urinary long noncoding RNAs in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer: new architects in cancer prognostic biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Daniela; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; D'Elia, Carolina; Musi, Gennaro; de Cobelli, Ottavio; Mirone, Vincenzo; Cimmino, Amelia

    2017-06-01

    Several reports over the last 10 years provided evidence that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are often altered in bladder cancers. lncRNAs are longer than 200 nucleotides and function as important regulators of gene expression, interacting with the major pathways of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. A large number of lncRNAs has oncogenic function and is more expressed in tumor compared with normal tissues. Their overexpression may be associated with tumor formation, progression, and metastasis in a variety of tumors including bladder cancer. Although lncRNAs have been shown to have critical regulatory roles in cancer biology, the biological functions and prognostic values in nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer remain largely unknown. Nevertheless, a growing body of evidence suggests that several lncRNAs expression profiles in bladder malignancies are associated with poor prognosis, and they can be detected in biological fluids, such as urines. Here, we review current progress in the biology and the implication of lncRNAs associated with bladder cancer, and we discuss their potential use as diagnosis and prognosis biomarkers in bladder malignancies with a focus on their role in high-risk nonmuscle-invasive tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 1,25D3 differentially suppresses bladder cancer cell migration and invasion through the induction of miR-101-3p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingyu; Luo, Wei; Bunch, Brittany L; Pratt, Rachel N; Trump, Donald L; Johnson, Candace S

    2017-09-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of bladder cancer death. 1,25D 3 , the active metabolite of vitamin D, has shown anti-metastasis activity in several cancer model systems. However, the role of 1,25D 3 in migration and invasion in bladder cancer is unknown. To investigate whether 1,25D 3 affects migration and invasion, four human bladder cell lines with different reported invasiveness were selected: low-invasive T24 and 253J cells and highly invasive 253J-BV and TCCSUP cells. All of the four bladder cancer cells express endogenous and inducible vitamin D receptor (VDR) as examined by immunoblot analysis. 1,25D 3 had no effect on the proliferation of bladder cancer cells as assessed by MTT assay. In contrast, 1,25D 3 suppressed migration and invasion in the more invasive 253J-BV and TCCSUP cells, but not in the low-invasive 253J and T24 cells using "wound" healing, chemotactic migration and Matrigel-based invasion assays. 1,25D 3 promoted the expression of miR-101-3p and miR-126-3p in 253J-BV cells as examined by qRT-PCR. miR-101-3p inhibitor partially abrogated and pre-miR-101-3p further suppressed the inhibition of 1,25D 3 on migration and invasion in 253J-BV cells. Further, 1,25D 3 enhanced VDR recruitment to the promoter region of miR-101-3p using ChIP-qPCR assay. 1,25D 3 enhanced the promoter activity of miR-101-3p as evaluated by luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, 1,25D 3 suppresses bladder cancer cell migration and invasion in two invasive/migration competent lines but not in two less invasive/motile lines, which is partially through the induction of miR-101-3p expression at the transcriptional level.

  6. Radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Iizumi, Takashi; Shimizu, Shosei; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Tomokazu; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    This paper explained the current state of radiotherapy for bladder cancer and kidney cancer, and discussed the role of radiotherapy in curative treatment and the future development. In the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer, it is important to judge the existence of pathological muscular layer invasion based on transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). In surgical results in Japan, the U.S., and Switzerland, 5-year survival rate is about 60 to 70%. Standard treatment for bladder cancer with muscle layer invasion had been surgery, and radiotherapy had been applied to the cases without resistance to surgery. Three combined therapy with TUR-BT and simultaneous chemoradiotherapy is the current standard bladder conserving therapy. The 5-year survival rate is approximately 60%, which is superior to the treatment with irradiation alone. Radiotherapy for kidney cancer is most often used as perioperative treatment for locally advanced cancer or as symptomatic treatment for metastatic lesions. However, due to recent improvement in radiotherapy technology, correspondence to respiratory movement and high dose administration associated with improvement in dose concentration have been realized, and stereotactic irradiation using a high single dose for inoperable disease cases or surgery refusal disease cases has come to be clinically applied. (A.O.)

  7. Recent advances in high-throughput molecular marker identification for superficial and invasive bladder cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt; Zieger, Karsten; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2007-01-01

    individually contributed to the management of the disease. However, the development of high-throughput techniques for simultaneous assessment of a large number of markers has allowed classification of tumors into clinically relevant molecular subgroups beyond those possible by pathological classification. Here......Bladder cancer is the fifth most common neoplasm in industrialized countries. Due to frequent recurrences of the superficial form of this disease, bladder cancer ranks as one of the most common cancers. Despite the description of a large number of tumor markers for bladder cancers, none have......, we review the recent advances in high-throughput molecular marker identification for superficial and invasive bladder cancers....

  8. Treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer. Is there a role for neoadjuvant chemotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuten, A.; Baz, M.; Rubinov, R.; Dale, J.; Haim, N.; Robinson, E.; Cohen, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We compared the outcome of 3 different but widely accepted treatment protocols for bladder cancer in ordet to find which, if any, was superior, with particular emphasis upon the performance of the newest treatment, neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Data on 224 bladder patients treated at our institution (1975 to 1991) with 1 of the 3 protocols was analyzed. Those protocols were: 1. Radiotherapy >60 Gy (143 patients); 2. low dose radiotherapy followed by cystectomy (25 patients); 3. chemotherapy followed by either definitive radiotherapy or surgery (56 patients). Because the latter group was also a chronologically newer group with a shorter possible follow-up, we compared all treatments on the basis of 2-year survival, using Kaplan-Meier life tables. We briefly reviewed those modalities which are bladder-sparing because of the significance to quality of life of this factor. Two-year survival figures for the patients were: 63% for those wo received only radiotherapy; 72% for those undergoing cystectomy: 68% for the group to whom neoadjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The differences were not statistically significant. However, 23% of those patients treated neoadjuvantly were alive with intact bladders at 2 years. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Immunohistochemical study of the expression of cell cycle regulating proteins at different stages of bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Hanne; von der Maase, Hans; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The cell cycle is known to be deregulated in cancer. We therefore analyzed the expression of the cell cycle related proteins p21, p27, p16, Rb, and L-myc by immunohistochemical staining of bladder tumors.METHODS: The tissue material consisted of bladder tumors from three groups of patients......; group 1, 23 patients with recurrent stage Ta (non-invasive) tumors; group 2, 22 patients presenting at their first admission with T2-4 (muscle invasive) tumors; group 3, 24 patients who experienced disease progression from Ta or T1 (invasive in connective tissue) to a higher stage...

  10. LDH-A promotes malignant progression via activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and conferring stemness in muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fujin [Department of Urinary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Department of Urinary Surgery, Huai' an Hospital to Xuzhou Medical University, Huai' an, Jiangsu (China); Ma, Song [Department of Urinary Surgery, Huai' an Hospital to Xuzhou Medical University, Huai' an, Jiangsu (China); Xue, Yubao [Department of Medical Oncology, Huai' an Hospital to Xuzhou Medical University, Huai' an, Jiangsu (China); Hou, Jianquan, E-mail: Jianquanhou@aliyun.com [Department of Urinary Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Yongjie, E-mail: zhangyj0818@126.com [Department of Medical Oncology, Huai' an Hospital to Xuzhou Medical University, Huai' an, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-01-22

    Lactate dehydrogenase-A(LDH-A) is an important rate-limiting enzyme in the Warburg effect. Survival analysis indicated poor clinical outcomes in MIBC with high LDH-A expression. The results of in vitro experiment indicated that LDH-A promotes MIBC cells proliferation, invasion and migration. The positive relationship between LDH-A expression and CSC/EMT markers was confirmed both in invasive bladder cell line and in 136 MIBC specimens. Thus, we conclude that LDH-A may be a promising target for MIBC. - Highlights: • Survival analysis indicated poor clinical outcomes in MIBC with high LDH-A expression. • IHC analysis of 136 MIBC specimens revealed increased LDH-A is correlated with positive Oct4 and negative E-cadherin. • In vitro experiments demonstrated LDH-A promotes MIBC progression by positive regulation of EMT/CSC.

  11. Bioinformatic identification of FGF, p38-MAPK, and calcium signalling pathways associated with carcinoma in situ in the urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbsleb, Malene; Christensen, Ole F; Thykjaer, Thomas; Wiuf, Carsten; Borre, Michael; Ørntoft, Torben F; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is believed to be a precursor of invasive bladder cancer. Identification of CIS is a valuable prognostic factor since radical treatment strategies can be offered these patients before the disease becomes invasive. We developed a pathway based classifier approach to predict presence or absence of CIS in patients suffering from non muscle invasive bladder cancer. From Ingenuity Pathway Analysis we considered four canonical signalling pathways (p38 MAPK, FGF, Calcium, and cAMP pathways) with most coherent expression of transcription factors (TFs) across samples in a set of twenty-eight non muscle invasive bladder carcinomas. These pathways contained twelve TFs in total. We used the expression of the TFs to predict presence or absence of CIS in a Leave-One-Out Cross Validation classification. We showed that TF expression levels in three pathways (FGF, p38 MAPK, and calcium signalling) or the expression of the twelve TFs together could be used to predict presence or absence of concomitant CIS. A cluster analysis based on expression of the twelve TFs separated the samples in two main clusters: one branch contained 11 of the 15 patients without concomitant CIS and with the majority of the genes being down regulated; the other branch contained 10 of 13 patients with concomitant CIS, and here genes were mostly up regulated. The expression in the CIS group was comparable to the expression of twenty-three patients suffering from muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma. Finally, we validated our results in an independent test set and found that prediction of CIS status was possible using TF expression of the p38 MAPK pathway. We conclude that it is possible to use pathway analysis for molecular classification of bladder tumors

  12. Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer risk stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Isharwal

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: EORTC and CUETO risk tables are the two best-established models to predict recurrence and progression in patients with NMIBC though they tend to overestimate risk and have poor discrimination for prognostic outcomes in external validation. Future research should focus on enhancing the predictive accuracy of risk assessment tools by incorporating additional prognostic factors such as depth of lamina propria invasion and molecular biomarkers after rigorous validation in multi-institutional cohorts.

  13. Development and Application of a Microfluidics-Based Panel in the Basal/Luminal Transcriptional Characterization of Archival Bladder Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Kim

    Full Text Available In the age of personalized medicine stratifying tumors into molecularly defined subtypes associated with distinctive clinical behaviors and predictable responses to therapies holds tremendous value. Towards this end, we developed a custom microfluidics-based bladder cancer gene expression panel for characterization of archival clinical samples. In silico analysis indicated that the content of our panel was capable of accurately segregating bladder cancers from several public datasets into the clinically relevant basal and luminal subtypes. On a technical level, our bladder cancer panel yielded robust and reproducible results when analyzing formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues. We applied our panel in the analysis of a novel set of 204 FFPE samples that included non-muscle invasive bladder cancers (NMIBCs, muscle invasive disease (MIBCs, and bladder cancer metastases (METs. We found NMIBCs to be mostly luminal-like, MIBCs to include both luminal- and basal-like types, and METs to be predominantly of a basal-like transcriptional profile. Mutational analysis confirmed the expected enrichment of FGFR3 mutations in luminal samples, and, consistently, FGFR3 IHC showed high protein expression levels of the receptor in these tumors. Our bladder cancer panel enables basal/luminal characterization of FFPE tissues and with further development could be used for stratification of bladder cancer samples in the clinic.

  14. Quality of Life Assessment After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of a Multicenter Prospective Study (GETUG 97-015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Bascoul-Mollevi, Caroline; Geoffrois, Lionnel; Beckendorf, Veronique; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Joly, Florence; Allouache, Nedjila; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Chevreau, Christine; Kramar, Andrew; Chauvet, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate bladder preservation and functional quality after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for muscle-invasive cancer in 53 patients included in a Phase II trial. Patient and Methods: Pelvic irradiation delivered 45Gy, followed by an 18-Gy boost. Concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil by continuous infusion was performed at Weeks 1, 4, and 7 during radiotherapy. Patients initially suitable for surgery were evaluated with macroscopically complete transurethral resection after 45Gy, followed by radical cystectomy in case of incomplete response. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire QLQ-C30, specific items on bladder function, and the Late Effects in Normal Tissues-Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (LENT-SOMA) symptoms scale were used to evaluate quality of life before treatment and 6, 12, 24, and 36 months after treatment. Results: Median age was 68 years for 51 evaluable patients. Thirty-two percent of patients had T2a tumors, 46% T2b, 16% T3, and 6% T4. A visibly complete transurethral resection was possible in 66%. Median follow-up was 8 years. Bladder was preserved in 67% (95% confidence interval, 52-79%) of patients. Overall survival was 36% (95% confidence interval, 23-49%) at 8 years for all patients, and 45% (28-61%) for the 36 patients suitable for surgery. Satisfactory bladder function, according to LENT-SOMA, was reported for 100% of patients with preserved bladder and locally controlled disease 6-36 months after the beginning of treatment. Satisfactory bladder function was reported for 35% of patients before treatment and for 43%, 57%, and 29%, respectively, at 6, 18, and 36 months. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy allowed bladder preservation with tumor control for 67% patients at 8 years. Quality of life and quality of bladder function were satisfactory for 67% of patients.

  15. Accuracy of preoperative urinary symptoms, urinalysis, computed tomography and cystoscopic findings for the diagnosis of urinary bladder invasion in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woranisarakul, Varat; Ramart, Patkawat; Phinthusophon, Kittipong; Chotikawanich, Ekkarin; Prapasrivorakul, Siriluck; Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2014-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of preoperative urinary symptoms, urinalysis, computed tomography (CT) and cystoscopic findings for the diagnosis of urinary bladder invasion in patients with colorectal cancer. Records of patients with colorectal cancer and a suspicion of bladder invasion, who underwent tumor resection with partial or total cystectomy between 2002 and 2013 at the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, were reviewed. Correlations between preoperative urinary symptoms, urinalysis, cystoscopic finding, CT imaging and final pathological reports were analyzed. This study included 90 eligible cases (71% male). The most common site of primary colorectal cancer was the sigmoid colon (44%), followed by the rectum (33%). Final pathological reports showed definite bladder invasion in 53 cases (59%). Significant features for predicting definite tumor invasion were gross hematuria (OR 13.6, sensitivity 39%, specificity 73%), and visible tumor during cystoscopy (OR 5.33, sensitivity 50%, specificity 84%). Predictive signs in CT imaging were gross tumor invasion (OR 7.07, sensitivity 89%, specificity 46%), abnormal enhancing mass at bladder wall (OR 4.09, sensitivity 68%, specificity 66%), irregular bladder mucosa (OR 3.53, sensitivity 70%, specificity 60% ), and loss of perivesical fat plane (OR 3.17, sensitivity 81%, specificity 43%). However, urinary analysis and other urinary tract symptoms were poor predictors of bladder involvement. The present study demonstrated that the most relevant preoperative predictors of definite bladder invasion in patients with colorectal cancer are gross hematuria, a visible tumor during cystoscopy, and abnormal CT findings.

  16. Concurrent 5-fluorouracil and radiotherapy in radical treatment of frail patients with deeply invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellin, G.; Mussari, S.; Graffer, U.; Caffo, O.; Valduga, F.; Tomio, L.; Luciani, L. [S. Chiara Hospital, Trento (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    The radical treatment of deeply invasive bladder cancer with full dose radiotherapy and concomitant 5- fluorouracil continuous infusion is feasible even in frail patients, with an acceptable toxicity and a response rate comparable to that obtained using radiotherapy and simultaneous cisplatin. Many patients can retain a functioning bladder. (author)

  17. BCG+MMC trial: adding mitomycin C to BCG as adjuvant intravesical therapy for high-risk, non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: a randomised phase III trial (ANZUP 1301)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayne, Dickon; Stockler, Martin; McCombie, Steve P.; Chalasani, Venu; Long, Anne; Martin, Andrew; Sengupta, Shomik; Davis, Ian D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite adequate trans-urethral resection of the bladder tumour (TURBT), non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is associated with high rates of recurrence and progression. Instillation of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) into the urinary bladder after TURBT (adjuvant intravesical administration) reduces the risk of both recurrence and progression, and this is therefore the standard of care for high-risk tumours. However, over 30 % of people still recur or progress despite optimal delivery of BCG. Our meta-analysis suggests that outcomes might be improved further by using an adjuvant intravesical regimen that includes both mitomycin and BCG. These promising findings require corroboration in a definitive, large scale, randomised phase III trial using standard techniques for intravesical administration. The BCG + MMC trial (ANZUP 1301) is an open-label, randomised, stratified, two-arm multi-centre phase III trial comparing the efficacy and safety of standard intravesical therapy (BCG alone) against experimental intravesical therapy (BCG and mitomycin) in the treatment of adults with resected, high-risk NMIBC. Participants in the control group receive standard treatment with induction (weekly BCG for six weeks) followed by maintenance (four-weekly BCG for ten months). Participants in the experimental group receive induction (BCG weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8; mitomycin weeks 3, 6, and 9) followed by four-weekly maintenance (mitomycin weeks 13, 17, 25, 29, 37, and 41; BCG weeks 21, 33, and 45). The trial aims to include 500 participants who will be centrally randomised to one of the two treatment groups in a 1:1 ratio stratified by T-stage, presence of CIS, and study site. The primary endpoint is disease-free survival; secondary endpoints are disease activity, time to recurrence, time to progression, safety, health-related quality of life, overall survival, feasibility, and resource use

  18. Sequential transurethral surgery, multiple drug chemotherapy and radiation therapy for invasive bladder carcinoma: Initial report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervek, J.; Cufer, T.; Kragelj, B.; Zakotnik, B.; Stanonik, M.

    1993-01-01

    Forty-seven patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2--T4, Nx, MO) were treated by transurethral resection, followed by 3--4 cycles of combination chemotherapy (methothrexate 30 mg/m2 on days 1, 14; cis-platinum 100 mg/m2 on day 2; vinblastine 3 mg/m2 on days 1, 14; repeated every 21 days), and external beam irradiation (64--66 Gy to the bladder and 40 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics). Complete remission after transurethral resection and chemotherapy was achieved in 24 out of 45 patients (53%). Cystectomy was performed in patients without complete response to transurethral resection and chemotherapy. The therapy was completed as planned in 45/47 patients. After transurethral resection, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, biopsy proven complete response was achieved in 62% (28/45); Stage T2T3 in 67% (23/24), Stage T4 in 45% (5/11) of patients. Among 19 patients with positive biopsy findings after transurethral resection and chemotherapy, 14 underwent cystectomy. After follow-up of 4--55 months (median 23 months) 75% (34/45) are alive, 68% (31/45) have had their bladders preserved, and 53% (24/45) are free of the primary tumor. The actuarial survival of all 45 patients is 73%. Moderate nausea and vomiting during treatment were common; severe leukopenia and mucositis were observed in five patients. Late side effects such as miction disorders and diarrhea were predominantly mild. Although the observation period has been too short to allow a definitive evaluation of treatment results, the authors feel both from the point of bladder preservation and disease-free survival that the presented treatment approach is successful in a majority of T2T3 patients, whereas a large tumor size (T4) renders this treatment less effective. 17 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Positioning invasive versus noninvasive urodynamics in the assessment of bladder outlet obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnolds, Michiel; Oelke, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide evidence of promising tests to noninvasively diagnose bladder outlet obstruction (800) in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Recent findings Pressure-flow studies are usually performed to prove BOO prior to prostatectomy. However, pressure-flow studies are invasive,

  20. Management of bladder stones: the move towards non-invasive treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac A. Deswanto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bladder stone accounts for 5% of all cases of urolithiasis. Bladder stones management has evolved over the last decades from open bladder surgery (sectio alta to intracorporeal cystholithotripsy as well as extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL. ESWL presents to be a promising modality in the management of bladder calculi due to its simplicity and well tolerability. This study is thus conducted to present data on the safety and effectiveness of ESWL in the management of bladder stone patients.Methods: This is a retrospective study evaluating the medical records of 92 bladder calculi patients admitted to Cipto Mangunkusumo General Hospital (RSCM from January 2011 to April 2015. Patient’s age, gender, type of stone and procedure being done, status of stone disintegration, length of hospital stay, and any complications that may occur are noted down and statistically analyzed using SPSS v. 20.Results: Majority of the patients underwent ESWL (49 out of 92, 53.3%. The stone free rates for ESWL, intracorporeal lithotripsy, and sectio alta are 93.9%, 97.0% and 100% respectively. One patient had to repeat ESWL. The ESWL group had the smallest stone size average compared to the intracorporeal lithotripsy and section alta group (2.5 cm±2.0 cm vs 4.8 cm±3.7 cm vs 7.4 cm±5.4 cm respectively. The ESWL sessions were conducted in the outpatient clinic, and thus no hospital stay was required.Conclusion: ESWL can be suggested as an effective non-invasive approach in the disintegration of bladder stone of ≤25 mm with a promisingly high stone-free rate (93.9% Furthermore, ESWL can be performed on an outpatient basis with minimal complications.

  1. The force recovery following repeated quick releases applied to pig urinary bladder smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA method for measuring several quick-releases during one contraction of a pig urinary bladder smooth muscle preparation was developed. The force recovery following quick release in this muscle type was studied by fitting a multiexponential model to 926 responses measured during the first

  2. What are the currently available and in development molecular markers for bladder cancer? Will they prove to be useful in the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajed, Mohamed Ismat; Sancak, Eyüp Burak; Reşorlu, Berkan; Al-Chalaby, Gydhia Zuhair

    2014-12-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is the 9(th) most common cancer worldwide. Most urothelial tumors are non-muscle invasive on presentation. However, two-thirds of non-invasive bladder cancers will eventually recur with a 25% risk of progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Tumor stage, histological grade and pathological invasion of blood vessels and lymphatic tissue are the main indicators for urothelial cancer prognosis. The gold standard for diagnosing bladder cancer is conventional white-light cystoscopy and biopsy. Urine cytology is a highly specific, sensitive test for high-grade tumors or carcinoma in situ (CIS). Urinary NMP22 has an overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting bladder cancer of 49% and 87%, respectively. However, there are false-positive results in the presence of urinary tract infection or hematuria. The detection of specific gene mutations related to urothelial cancers has been studied and employed to reproduce markers helpful for diagnosis. According to current studies, molecular markers can be used to predict tumor recurrence. From a prognostic point of view, new molecular markers have yet to be established as reliable indicators of tumor aggressiveness. We aimed to review the molecular markers with possible prognostic significance that have been discussed in the literature. This review examined the literature for various molecular markers under development for bladder cancer in an attempt to optimize patient care and reduce the costs of treating these patients.

  3. High expression of insulin receptor on tumour-associated blood vessels in invasive bladder cancer predicts poor overall and progression-free survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudnicky, Filip; Dieterich, Lothar C; Poyet, Cedric; Buser, Lorenz; Wild, Peter; Tang, Dave; Camenzind, Peter; Ho, Chien Hsien; Otto, Vivianne I; Detmar, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Bladder cancer is a frequently recurring disease with a very poor prognosis once progressed to invasive stages, and tumour-associated blood vessels play a crucial role in this process. In order to identify novel biomarkers associated with progression, we isolated blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) from human invasive bladder cancers and matched normal bladder tissue, and found that tumour-associated BECs greatly up-regulated the expression of insulin receptor (INSR). High expression of INSR on BECs of invasive bladder cancers was significantly associated with shorter progression-free and overall survival. Furthermore, increased expression of the INSR ligand IGF-2 in invasive bladder cancers was associated with reduced overall survival. INSR may therefore represent a novel biomarker to predict cancer progression. Mechanistically, we observed pronounced hypoxia in human bladder cancer tissue, and found a positive correlation between the expression of the hypoxia marker gene GLUT1 and vascular INSR expression, indicating that hypoxia drives INSR expression in tumour-associated blood vessels. In line with this, exposure of cultured BECs and human bladder cancer cell lines to hypoxia led to increased expression of INSR and IGF-2, respectively, and IGF-2 increased BEC migration through the activation of INSR in vitro. Taken together, we identified vascular INSR expression as a potential biomarker for progression in bladder cancer. Furthermore, our data suggest that IGF-2/INSR mediated paracrine crosstalk between bladder cancer cells and endothelial cells is functionally involved in tumour angiogenesis and may thus represent a new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Defining and treating the spectrum of intermediate risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Witjes, J.A.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Bohle, A.; Colombel, M.; Palou, J.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Low, intermediate and high risk categories have been defined to help guide the treatment of patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (Ta, T1, CIS). However, while low and high risk disease has been well classified, the intermediate risk category has traditionally comprised a

  5. The Danish Bladder Cancer Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen E

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Erik Hansen,1–3 Heidi Larsson,4 Mette Nørgaard,4 Peter Thind,3,5 Jørgen Bjerggaard Jensen1–3 1Department of Urology, Hospital of West Jutland-Holstebro, Holstebro, 2Department of Urology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 3The Danish Bladder Cancer Database Group, 4Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 5Department of Urology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the Danish Bladder Cancer Database (DaBlaCa-data is to monitor the treatment of all patients diagnosed with invasive bladder cancer (BC in Denmark. Study population: All patients diagnosed with BC in Denmark from 2012 onward were included in the study. Results presented in this paper are predominantly from the 2013 population. Main variables: In 2013, 970 patients were diagnosed with BC in Denmark and were included in a preliminary report from the database. A total of 458 (47% patients were diagnosed with non-muscle-invasive BC (non-MIBC and 512 (53% were diagnosed with muscle-invasive BC (MIBC. A total of 300 (31% patients underwent cystectomy. Among the 135 patients diagnosed with MIBC, who were 75 years of age or younger, 67 (50% received neoadjuvent chemotherapy prior to cystectomy. In 2013, a total of 147 patients were treated with curative-intended radiation therapy. Descriptive data: One-year mortality was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 15–21. One-year cancer-specific mortality was 25% (95% CI: 22–27%. One-year mortality after cystectomy was 14% (95% CI: 10–18. Ninety-day mortality after cystectomy was 3% (95% CI: 1–5 in 2013. One-year mortality following curative-intended radiation therapy was 32% (95% CI: 24–39 and 1-year cancer-specific mortality was 23% (95% CI: 16–31 in 2013. Conclusion: This preliminary DaBlaCa-data report showed that the treatment of MIBC in Denmark overall meet high international academic standards. The database is able to identify Danish BC patients and

  6. Urinary Cell-Free DNA Quantification as Non-Invasive Biomarker in Patients with Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisuda, Antonin; Pazourkova, Eva; Soukup, Viktor; Horinek, Ales; Hrbáček, Jan; Capoun, Otakar; Svobodova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Korabecna, Marie; Mares, Jaroslav; Hanuš, Tomáš; Babjuk, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Concentration of urinary cell-free DNA (ucfDNA) belongs to potential bladder cancer markers, but the reported results are inconsistent due to the use of various non-standardised methodologies. The aim of the study was to standardise the methodology for ucfDNA quantification as a potential non-invasive tumour biomarker. In total, 66 patients and 34 controls were enrolled into the study. Volumes of each urine portion (V) were recorded and ucfDNA concentrations (c) were measured using real-time PCR. Total amounts (TA) of ucfDNA were calculated and compared between patients and controls. Diagnostic accuracy of the TA of ucfDNA was determined. The calculation of TA of ucfDNA in the second urine portion was the most appropriate approach to ucfDNA quantification, as there was logarithmic dependence between the volume and the concentration of a urine portion (p = 0.0001). Using this methodology, we were able to discriminate between bladder cancer patients and subjects without bladder tumours (p = 0.0002) with area under the ROC curve of 0.725. Positive and negative predictive value of the test was 90 and 45%, respectively. Quantification of ucf DNA according to our modified method could provide a potential non-invasive biomarker for diagnosis of patients with bladder cancer. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Population-based assessment of racial/ethnic differences in utilization of radical cystectomy for patients diagnosed with bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen B; Huo, Jinhai; Kosarek, Christopher D; Chamie, Karim; Rogers, Selwyn O; Williams, Michele A; Giordano, Sharon H; Kim, Simon P; Kamat, Ashish M

    2017-07-01

    Radical cystectomy is a surgical treatment for recurrent non-muscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancer; however, many patients may not receive this treatment. A total of 27,578 patients diagnosed with clinical stage I-IV bladder cancer from 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2013 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry database. We used multivariable regression analyses to identify factors predicting the use of radical cystectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze survival outcomes. A total of 1,693 (6.1%) patients with bladder cancer underwent radical cystectomy. Most patients (92.4%) who underwent radical cystectomy also underwent pelvic lymph node dissection. When compared with white patients, non-Hispanic blacks were less likely to undergo a radical cystectomy [odds ratio (OR) 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.96, p = 0.019]. Moreover, recent year of surgery 2013 versus 2007 (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.90-2.83, p groups diagnosed with bladder cancer, especially among older, non-Hispanic black patients.

  8. Effect of bladder wall thickness on miniature pneumatic artificial muscle performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Thomas E; Kothera, Curt S; Wereley, Norman M

    2015-09-28

    Pneumatic artificial muscles (PAMs) are actuators known for their high power to weight ratio, natural compliance and light weight. Due to these advantages, PAMs have been used for orthotic devices and robotic limbs. Small scale PAMs have the same advantages, as well as requiring greatly reduced volumes with potential application to prostheses and small scale robotics. The bladder of a PAM affects common actuator performance metrics, specifically: blocked force, free contraction, hysteresis, and dead-band pressure. This paper investigates the effect that bladder thickness has on static actuation performance of small scale PAMs. Miniature PAMs were fabricated with a range of bladder thicknesses to quantify the change in common actuator performance metrics specifically: blocked force, free contraction, and dead-band pressure. These PAMs were then experimentally characterized in quasi-static conditions, where results showed that increasing bladder wall thickness decreases blocked force and free contraction, while dead-band pressure increases. A nonlinear model was then applied to determine the structure of the stress-strain relationship that enables accurate modeling and the minimum number of terms. Two nonlinear models are compared and the identified parameters are analyzed to study the effect of the bladder thickness on the model.

  9. Spatial and temporal profile of cisplatin delivery by ultrasound-assisted intravesical chemotherapy in a bladder cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Sasaki

    Full Text Available Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is one of the most common tumors of the urinary tract. Despite the current multimodal therapy, recurrence and progression of disease have been challenging problems. We hereby introduced a new approach, ultrasound-assisted intravesical chemotherapy, intravesical instillation of chemotherapeutic agents and microbubbles followed by ultrasound exposure. We investigated the feasibility of the treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. In order to evaluate intracellular delivery and cytotoxic effect as a function to the thickness, we performed all experiments using a bladder cancer mimicking 3D culture model. Ultrasound-triggered microbubble cavitation increased both the intracellular platinum concentration and the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin at the thickness of 70 and 122 μm of the culture model. The duration of enhanced cytotoxic effect of cisplatin by ultrasound-triggered microbubble cavitation was approximately 1 hr. Based on the distance and duration of delivery, we further tested the feasibility of repetition of the treatment. Triple treatment increased the effective distance by 1.6-fold. Our results clearly showed spatial and temporal profile of delivery by ultrasound-triggered microbubble cavitation in a tumor-mimicking structure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the increase in intracellular concentration results in the enhancement of the cytotoxic effect in a structure with the certain thickness. Repetition of ultrasound exposure would be treatment of choice in future clinical application. Our results suggest ultrasound-triggered microbubble cavitation can be repeatable and is promising for the local control of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  10. Bladder cancer: what’s new in 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Karyakin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of bladder cancer has been a complicated problem. Low survival for regional and metastatic disease remains. In recent years,  the efforts of doctors, biologists, diagnosticians were aimed at development of new technologies in these spheres and improvement of treatment results for this pathology. In this review, current views on diagnosis, the role of repeated surgical interventions in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer, etc. are presented. Advances in molecular biology allowed to differentiate subtypes of urothelial bladder cancer. Importantly, the results of biomolecular studies allowed to identify different responses to drug treatment. Moreover, in some cases these results have a follow-up period of up to 3 years. Based on other data characterizing the tumor, the effectiveness of new drugs for treatment of regional, metastatic and post-cisplatin therapy bladder cancer was evaluated. These results allow to hope for increased life span and quality of life for patients with this severe disease.

  11. Increased cell motility and invasion upon knockdown of lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR in SW780 bladder cancer cells

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    Ørntoft Torben F

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanisms underlying the malignant development in bladder cancer are still not well understood. Lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR has previously been found to be upregulated by P53. Furthermore, we have previously found LSR to be differentially expressed in bladder cancer. Here we investigated the role of LSR in bladder cancer. Methods A time course siRNA knock down experiment was performed to investigate the functional role of LSR in SW780 bladder cancer cells. Since LSR was previously shown to be regulated by P53, siRNA against TP53 was included in the experimental setup. We used Affymetrix GeneChips for measuring gene expression changes and we used Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to investigate the relationship among differentially expressed genes upon siRNA knockdown. Results By Ingenuity Pathway analysis of the microarray data from the different timepoints we identified six gene networks containing genes mainly related to the functional categories "cancer", "cell death", and "cellular movement". We determined that genes annotated to the functional category "cellular movement" including "invasion" and "cell motility" were highly significantly overrepresented. A matrigel assay showed that 24 h after transfection the invasion capacity was significantly increased 3-fold (p Conclusion We conclude that LSR may impair bladder cancer cells from gaining invasive properties.

  12. A role of multimodality bladder-preserving therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer plus hydronephrosis with or without pelvic nodal involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Chiang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: With trimodality treatment involving visually complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor, cisplatin-based induction chemotherapy, and CCRT, patients with unfavorable factors maintained satisfactory bladder preservation but not systemic control.

  13. Inhibiting Invasion into Human Bladder Carcinoma 5637 Cells with Diallyl Trisulfide by Inhibiting Matrix Metalloproteinase Activities and Tightening Tight Junctions

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    Yung Hyun Choi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Diallyl trisulfide (DATS, an organosulfur compound in garlic, possesses pronounced anti-cancer potential. However, the anti-invasive mechanism of this compound in human bladder carcinoma is not fully understood. In this study, we evaluated the anti-invasive effects of DATS on a human bladder carcinoma (5637 cell line and investigated the underlying mechanism. The results indicated that DATS suppressed migration and invasion of 5637 cells by reducing the activities and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 at both the protein and mRNA levels. DATS treatment up-regulated expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in 5637 cells. The inhibitory effects of DATS on invasiveness were associated with an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance and repression of the levels of claudin family members. Although further studies are needed, our data demonstrate that DATS exhibits anti-invasive effects in 5637 cells by down-regulating the activity of tight junctions and MMPs. DATS may have future utility in clinical applications for treating bladder cancer.

  14. The length dependence of the series elasticity of pig bladder smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Mastrigt (Ron)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractStrips of urinary bladder smooth muscle were subjected to a series of quick release measurements. Each measurement consisted of several releases and resets to the original length, made during one contraction. The complete length-force characteristic of series elasticity was quantified by

  15. Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer Recurrence Based on Urinary Levels of EOMES, HOXA9, POU4F2, TWIST1, VIM, and ZNF154 Hypermethylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Thomas; Borre, Michael; Christiansen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Non muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has the highest recurrence rate of any malignancy and as many as 70% of patients experience relapse. Aberrant DNA methylation is present in all bladder tumors and can be detected in urine specimens. Previous studies have identified DNA methylation markers...

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Differential Proteome Expression in Bladder Cancer vs. Normal Bladder Cells Using SILAC Method.

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    Ganglong Yang

    Full Text Available The best way to increase patient survival rate is to identify patients who are likely to progress to muscle-invasive or metastatic disease upfront and treat them more aggressively. The human cell lines HCV29 (normal bladder epithelia, KK47 (low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, NMIBC, and YTS1 (metastatic bladder cancer have been widely used in studies of molecular mechanisms and cell signaling during bladder cancer (BC progression. However, little attention has been paid to global quantitative proteome analysis of these three cell lines. We labeled HCV29, KK47, and YTS1 cells by the SILAC method using three stable isotopes each of arginine and lysine. Labeled proteins were analyzed by 2D ultrahigh-resolution liquid chromatography LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometry. Among 3721 unique identified and annotated proteins in KK47 and YTS1 cells, 36 were significantly upregulated and 74 were significantly downregulated with >95% confidence. Differential expression of these proteins was confirmed by western blotting, quantitative RT-PCR, and cell staining with specific antibodies. Gene ontology (GO term and pathway analysis indicated that the differentially regulated proteins were involved in DNA replication and molecular transport, cell growth and proliferation, cellular movement, immune cell trafficking, and cell death and survival. These proteins and the advanced proteome techniques described here will be useful for further elucidation of molecular mechanisms in BC and other types of cancer.

  17. Apoptosis and downstaging after preoperative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chyle, Valerian; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A.; Stephens, L. Clifton; Zagars, Gunar K.; Terry, Nicholas H.A.; Meyn, Raymond E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship between pretreatment (basal) apoptosis levels and clinical-to-pathologic downstaging resulting from preoperative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1960-1983, 338 patients were dispositioned to receive preoperative radiotherapy and radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Of these, adequate hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections for morphologic analysis of apoptosis were available in 158 patients. These patients were treated to a mean dose of 49.4 ± 3.0 Gy (± S.D.) and a median dose of 50 Gy. The average fractional dose was 2.0 ± 0.2 Gy with a median of 2.0 Gy. No patient had clinical or radiographic evidence of lymph nodal or distant metastasis, and none received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. The median follow-up for those living was 90 mo. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated from the ratio of the number of apoptotic cells divided by the total counted and multiplied by 100. The apoptotic cells were counted from several random high powered fields. A minimum of 500 cells were counted from each patient. Results: The average AI for the whole group (n=158) was 2.0 ± 1.3 with a median of 1.8. The association of several potential prognostic factors to AI revealed that AI correlated strongly with clinical stage. The average AI for clinical stage T2 (n=56) was 1.8, for stage T3a (n=51) was 1.9, and for stage T3b (n=51) was 2.4 (p=0.036, Kendall Correlation). The relationship of AI to radiotherapy response also was significant with an average AI of 2.2 for those who were downstaged (n=103), 1.9 for those in whom the stage remained unchanged (n=20), and 1.7 for those who were upstaged (n=35, p=0.054, Kendall Correlation). The only other correlations with AI were for the factors gender (p=0.035) and pretreatment hemoglobin level (p=0.077). The AI was then categorized into 3 groups (≤1, >1 and ≤3, and >3) to examine the prognostic significance of this

  18. Apoptosis and downstaging after preoperative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chyle, Valerian; Pollack, Alan; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Stephens, L Clifton; Zagars, Gunar K; Terry, Nicholas H.A.; Meyn, Raymond E

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To determine the relationship between pretreatment (basal) apoptosis levels and clinical-to-pathologic downstaging resulting from preoperative radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Between 1960-1983, 338 patients were dispositioned to receive preoperative radiotherapy and radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Of these, adequate hematoxylin and eosin stained tissue sections for morphologic analysis of apoptosis were available in 158 patients. These patients were treated to a mean dose of 49.4 {+-} 3.0 Gy ({+-} S.D.) and a median dose of 50 Gy. The average fractional dose was 2.0 {+-} 0.2 Gy with a median of 2.0 Gy. No patient had clinical or radiographic evidence of lymph nodal or distant metastasis, and none received neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy. The median follow-up for those living was 90 mo. The apoptotic index (AI) was calculated from the ratio of the number of apoptotic cells divided by the total counted and multiplied by 100. The apoptotic cells were counted from several random high powered fields. A minimum of 500 cells were counted from each patient. Results: The average AI for the whole group (n=158) was 2.0 {+-} 1.3 with a median of 1.8. The association of several potential prognostic factors to AI revealed that AI correlated strongly with clinical stage. The average AI for clinical stage T2 (n=56) was 1.8, for stage T3a (n=51) was 1.9, and for stage T3b (n=51) was 2.4 (p=0.036, Kendall Correlation). The relationship of AI to radiotherapy response also was significant with an average AI of 2.2 for those who were downstaged (n=103), 1.9 for those in whom the stage remained unchanged (n=20), and 1.7 for those who were upstaged (n=35, p=0.054, Kendall Correlation). The only other correlations with AI were for the factors gender (p=0.035) and pretreatment hemoglobin level (p=0.077). The AI was then categorized into 3 groups ({<=}1, >1 and {<=}3, and >3) to examine the prognostic

  19. Sperm associated antigen 9 plays an important role in bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

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    Deepika Kanojia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Majority of bladder cancer deaths are caused due to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC which is the most prevalent and chemoresistant malignancy of urinary bladder. Therefore, we analyzed the role of Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9 in bladder TCC. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: We examined SPAG9 expression and humoral response in 125 bladder TCC patients. Four bladder cancer cell lines were assessed for SPAG9 expression. In addition, we investigated the effect of SPAG9 ablation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle, migration and invasion in UM-UC-3 bladder cancer cells by employing gene silencing approach. Our SPAG9 gene and protein expression analysis revealed SPAG9 expression in 81% of bladder TCC tissue specimens. High SPAG9 expression (>60% SPAG9 positive cells was found to be significantly associated with superficial non-muscle invasive stage (P = 0.042 and low grade tumors (P = 0.002 suggesting SPAG9 putative role in early spread and tumorigenesis. Humoral response against SPAG9 was observed in 95% of patients found positive for SPAG9 expression. All four bladder cancer cell lines revealed SPAG9 expression. In addition, SPAG9 gene silencing in UM-UC-3 cells resulted in induction of G0-G1 arrest characterized by up-regulation of p16 and p21 and consequent down-regulation of cyclin E, cyclin D and cyclin B, CDK4 and CDK1. Further, SPAG9 gene silencing also resulted in reduction in cellular growth, and migration and invasion ability of cancer cells in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our data in clinical specimens indicated that SPAG9 is potential biomarker and therapeutic target for bladder TCC.

  20. Testosterone Modifies Alterations to Detrusor Muscle after Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction in Juvenile Mice

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    Andrew S. Flum

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to posterior urethral valves (PUV arise in boys during adolescence. The reasons for this have previously been attributed to increased urine output as boys experience increased growth. Additionally, there are few choices for clinicians to effectively treat these complications. We formed the new hypothesis that increased androgen levels at this time of childhood development could play a role at the cellular level in obstructed bladders. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the role of testosterone on bladder detrusor muscle following injury from partial bladder outlet obstruction (PO in mice. A PO model was surgically created in juvenile male mice. A group of mice were castrated by bilateral orchiectomy at time of obstruction (CPO. Testosterone cypionate was administered to a group of castrated, obstructed mice (CPOT. Bladder function was assessed by voiding stain on paper (VSOP. Bladders were analyzed at 7 and 28 days by weight and histology. Detrusor collagen to smooth muscle ratio (Col/SM was calculated using Masson’s trichrome stain. All obstructed groups had lower max voided volumes (MVV than sham mice at 1 day. Hormonally intact mice (PO continued to have lower MVV at 7 and 28 days while CPO mice improved to sham levels at both time points. In accordance, PO mice had higher bladder-to-body weight ratios than CPO and sham mice demonstrating greater bladder hypertrophy. Histologically, Col/SM was lower in sham and CPO mice. When testosterone was restored in CPOT mice, MVV remained low at 7 and 28 days compared to CPO and bladder-to-body weight ratios were also greater than CPO. Histologic changes were also seen in CPOT mice with higher Col/SM than sham and CPO mice. In conclusion, our findings support a role for testosterone in the fibrotic changes that occur after obstruction in male mice. This suggests that while other changes may occur in adolescent boys that cause complication in boys

  1. Application of 2-Micron Laser to Outpatients with Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer%2 μm激光治疗非肌层浸润性膀胱肿瘤30例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文政; 李宏召; 杨勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the security and feasibility of 2-micron laser to treat outpatients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer under local anesthesia. Methods Altogether 30 cases of single and thin-pedicle bladder tumors with a diameter less than 3 cm were directly resected with 2-micron laser during the cystoscopy. NRS pain scores were taken separately during the cystoscopy and resection. Bladder epirubicin irrigation was given in 2 hours after the operation. Follow-up visits were conducted regularly. Results The pathological results showed 25 cases of GradeⅠ urothelial carcinoma, 3 cases of GradeⅠ -Ⅱ urothelial carcinoma and 2 cases of inverted papilloma. As to the NRS pain score related to the cystoscopy, 12 cases got a score of 2, and 18 cases a score of 3. For the resection, the NRS pain scores were 4 in 5 cases, 5 in 13 cases and 6 in 12 cases. No obturator nerve reflex or bladder perforation was found. The postoperative follow-up lasted for 6-24 months, and none of the patients was observed with tumor recurrence in si- Conclusions It is safe and feasible to treat non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer of outpatients with 2-micron laser, which alleviated greatly the patients'pain and economic burden.%目的 探讨局部麻醉下门诊膀胱镜检查中2 μm激光气化切除单发非肌层浸润性膀胱肿瘤的安全性和可行性.方法 在尿道局部麻醉下,经膀胱镜检查发现的单发、带蒂、直径小于3 cm的膀胱肿瘤患者30例,直接采用2μm激光气化切除.并在膀胱镜检查及激光气化切除过程中对患者进行NRS疼痛评分.术后2h给予表阿霉素膀胱灌注,定期灌注随访.结果 组织病理学检查结果显示,尿路上皮癌Ⅰ级25例,尿路上皮癌Ⅰ~Ⅱ级3例,内翻性乳头状瘤2例.膀胱镜检查时NRS疼痛评分:2分12例,3分18例;激光切除时疼痛评分:4分5例,5分13例,6分12例.术中无闭孔神经反射及膀胱穿孔等手术并发症.术后6~24

  2. Initial Results of Bladder Preserving Approach by Chemo-Radiotherapy in Patients with Muscle Invading Transitional Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboziada, M.A.; Hamza, H.; Abdlrahem, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to test the efficacy and tolerability of trimodality treatment for invasive bladder cancer and to test the possibility of bladder sparing. Methods: This study had been carried out on 50 patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) stage T2- T3 tumors with adequate performance status and renal function. All patients were subjected to maximum transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). Patients were then subjected to chemo-radiation that was executed in two treatment phases. Phase I was external radiotherapy in the form of 46 Gy /23 fractions /5 weeks to whole pelvis with concurrent cisplatin 40 mg/m 2 weekly. Phase II was 20 Gy /10 fractions /2 weeks to the bladder tumor with concurrent cisplatin 40 mg/m2 weekly. After phase I, patients who had complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) were subjected to phase II and patients who had stationary disease (SD) were subjected to salvage cystectomy. After the end of treatment, patients who had CR were subjected to bladder preservation. Radiological and cystoscopic reevaluation was done to assess the tumor response after phase I and phase II. After completion of the scheduled treatment, patients were under follow up for clinical examination, radiological, and cystoscopic assessment. Results: The treatment schedule was tolerable and was associated with infrequent incidence of moderate toxicity that was easily controlled without interruption of treatment. Bladder preservation was achieved in 72% of patients. The actuarial relapse free survival and overall survival at a median follow up 18 months for patients who were candidate for bladder preservation were 81% and 100%; respectively. Invasive recurrence (16%) sal-Jvaged with cystectomy and superficial recurrence (6%) successfully treated with Bacilles bilie de Calmette- Guerin. Conclusions: This study indicates that in spite of a relatively small number of patients and short follow-up period; the trimodality treatment could be an

  3. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). Participants The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Findings to date Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. Future plans The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding

  4. Cohort profile: The Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) and the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Christel; Liedberg, Fredrik; Hagberg, Oskar; Aljabery, Firas; Ströck, Viveka; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gårdmark, Truls; Sherif, Amir; Malmström, Per-Uno; Garmo, Hans; Jahnson, Staffan; Holmberg, Lars

    2017-09-27

    To monitor the quality of bladder cancer care, the Swedish National Register of Urinary Bladder Cancer (SNRUBC) was initiated in 1997. During 2015, in order to study trends in incidence, effects of treatment and survival of men and women with bladder cancer, we linked the SNRUBC to other national healthcare and demographic registers and constructed the Bladder Cancer Data Base Sweden (BladderBaSe). The SNRUBC is a nationwide register with detailed information on 97% of bladder cancer cases in Sweden as compared with the Swedish Cancer Register. Participants in the SNRUBC have registered data on tumour characteristics at diagnosis, and for 98% of these treatment data have been captured. From 2009, the SNRUBC holds data on 88% of eligible participants for follow-up 5 years after diagnosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer, and from 2011, data on surgery details and complications for 85% of participants treated with radical cystectomy. The BladderBaSe includes all data in the SNRUBC from 1997 to 2014, and additional covariates and follow-up data from linked national register sources on comorbidity, socioeconomic factors, detailed information on readmissions and treatment side effects, and causes of death. Studies based on data in the SNRUBC have shown inequalities in survival and treatment indication by gender, regions and hospital volume. The BladderBaSe includes 38 658 participants registered in SNRUBC with bladder cancer diagnosed from 1 January 1997 to 31 December 2014. The BladderBaSe initiators are currently in collaboration with researchers from the SNRUBC investigating different aspects of bladder cancer survival. The SNRUBC and the BladderBaSe project are open for collaborations with national and international research teams. Collaborators can submit proposals for studies and study files can be uploaded to servers for remote access and analysis. For more information, please contact the corresponding author. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  5. Quality-of-life survey for patients diagnosed with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abáigar-Pedraza, I; Megías-Garrigós, J; Sánchez-Payá, J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the reliability and validity of a quality-of-life survey for patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer. A total of 180 patients were included in the study. We developed a survey with 21 questions grouped into 5 areas. The patients filled in this survey and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Bladder Cancer (FACT-BL) survey. To assess reliability, we calculated Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the kappa index. To determine criterion validity, we studied the association between the scores obtained from our survey and those from the FACT-BL survey using the Pearson correlation coefficient. To determine the construct validity (factorial and discriminatory), we performed a factor analysis, comparing it with Student's t-test for the scores obtained according to the tumour characteristics of reduced quality of life (e.g., malignancies located at the trigone of the bladder). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was .83, and the kappa index varied between .7 and 1. For the association study between the new survey and the FACT-BL survey, we measured an r=.82 for the overall score and between r=.68 (disease) and r=.97 (sex life) in the various measures. In the factor analysis, we measured a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin index of .77 and performed the Barlett test (P<.001). The comparison between the scores, in the presence or absence of certain tumour characteristics, has shown a reduced quality of life when those characteristics are present, which was statistically significant (P<.05) in the majority of cases. Our survey to measure the quality of life of patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer is reliable and valid. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical implications in the shift of syndecan-1 expression from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, Makito; Lawton, Adrienne; Dai, Yunfeng; Chang, Myron; Mengual, Lourdes; Alcaraz, Antonio; Goodison, Steve; Rosser, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic and prognostic capability of urinary and tumoral syndecan-1 (SDC-1) levels in patients with cancer of the urinary bladder. SDC-1 levels were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 308 subjects (102 cancer subjects and 206 non-cancer subjects) to assess its diagnostic capabilities in voided urine. The performance of SDC-1 was evaluated using the area under the curve of a receiver operating characteristic curve. In addition, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining assessed SDC-1 protein expression in 193 bladder specimens (185 cancer subjects and 8 non-cancer subjects). Outcomes were correlated to SDC-1 levels. Mean urinary levels of SDC-1 did not differ between the cancer subjects and the non-cancer subjects, however, the mean urinary levels of SDC-1 were reduced in high-grade compared to low-grade disease (p < 0.0001), and in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) compared to non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p = 0.005). Correspondingly, preliminary data note a shift from a membranous cellular localization of SDC-1 in normal tissue, low-grade tumors and NMIBC, to a distinctly cytoplasmic localization in high-grade tumors and MIBC was observed in tissue specimens. Alone urinary SDC-1 may not be a diagnostic biomarker for bladder cancer, but its urinary levels and cellular localization were associated with the differentiation status of patients with bladder tumors. Further studies are warranted to define the potential role for SDC-1 in bladder cancer progression

  7. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, Astrid N.; Leer, Jan-Willem H.; Collins, C. David; Wondergem, Jan; Hermans, Jo; Timothy, Adrian

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: The policy of the Radiotherapy Department of St. Thomas' Hospital in London for patients with invasive bladder cancer, used to be treatment with hypofractionated radiotherapy. The advantages of this fractionation scheme included reduction of the number of treatment sessions and better use of limited resources. Our results after hypofractionation were compared to series with more conventional radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between 1975 and 1985, 123 patients with a T2-T3 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder were treated by a radical course of hypofractionated radiotherapy. Local control, survival and morbidity rates were analysed retrospectively. Results: The actuarial local control rates at 5 and 10 years were 31 and 29%, respectively. The actuarial cancer-specific 5- and 10-year survival rates were 48 and 39%, respectively. Acute side effects were observed in 87% of patients. The actuarial overall and severe late complication rates at 5 years were 33 and 9%, respectively. The local control, survival and early side effect rates we found, were in the same range as those reported in literature. Late radiation side effects however, were more common after hypofractionated radiotherapy compared to conventional radiotherapy schedules. Conclusions: We conclude that the potential advantage of a reduced number of treatment sessions may be lost in the long term, because of the higher incidence of late morbidity after hypofractionated radiotherapy. Hypofractionation however, remains a valuable technique for palliation and deserves further investigation for radical treatment where access to equipment is difficult or resources are limited

  8. Impact of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on complications of minimally invasive radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizée, D; Salas, R S; Barret, E; Galiano, M; Di Trapani, E; Montorsi, F; Cathelineau, X

    2017-03-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NC) before minimally invasive radical cystectomy (MIRC) is considered a standard of care in muscle-invasive bladder cancer or recurrent high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. To evaluate the impact of NC on morbidity and mortality after MIRC. We prospectively evaluated 135 patients who underwent MIRC (laparoscopic: n=100; robotic: n=35) between 2007 and 2013 with ≥90 days of follow-up (median age: 66 year). Complications were analyzed and graded according to the Clavien Dindo classification system. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the impact of NC on postoperative complications. Kaplan-Meier methods with the log-rank test were used for cancer-specific survival probabilities and differences between the 2groups (MIRC with and without NC). Sixty-two of 135 patients received NC. A total of 118 patients (87.4%) developed 179 complications, chiefly infectious (48.0%) or gastrointestinal (21.2%), ≤90 days after surgery; 3 patients died bladder cancer who had NC versus no NC. We did not find any significant differences in terms of early or late complications, length of stay, or reintervention. The oncologic outcomes regarding NC were encouraging. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Circular RNA expression is abundant and correlated to aggressiveness in early-stage bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm, Trine Line Hauge; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Hamilton, Mark

    2017-01-01

    The functions and biomarker potential of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in various cancer types are a rising field of study, as emerging evidence relates circRNAs to tumorigenesis. Here, we profiled the expression of circRNAs in 457 tumors from patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). We...

  10. Neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy with a combination of radiotherapy for the treatment of invasive bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiyoshi, Yoshiteru; Uyama, Takeshi.

    1992-01-01

    Fifty patients with invasive bladder carcinoma were treated with neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy using doxorubicin or pirarubicin, and this was combined with low dose radiotherapy. All of 50 patients were evaluated for clinical and histological efficacy. Twenty-nine of 50 (58%) patients achieved a clinically complete remission (CR) and 17 of 50 (34%) achieved a clinically partial remission (PR). Twenty-eight of 50 (56%) achieved a histological CR and 13 of 50 (26%) achieved a histological PR. The patients who underwent bladder preservation operations after this treatment and were followed up for longer than 3 years were evaluated for long-term results. The 5-year survival for 35 patients in this group was 74.1%. The 5-year survival for patients with a clinical CR was 93.3%, and for patients with a clinical PR it was 45.3%. The survival for patients with a histological CR was 93.3%, and for patients with a histological PR, it was 85.7%. This study suggests that neoadjuvant intra-arterial chemotherapy plus radiotherapy is a useful regimen that could become the treatment of first choice for patients with invasive bladder carcinoma. Patients who achieved a histological CR or PR with this regimen, might be able to retain the function of their bladders. (author)

  11. Adjuvant chemotherapy for superficial transitional cell bladder carcinoma : Long-term results of a European organization for research and treatment of cancer randomized trial comparing doxorubicin, ethoglucid and transurethral resection alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurth, K; Tunn, U; Ay, R; Schroder, FH; PavoneMacaluso, M; Debruyne, F; TenKate, F; DePauw, M; Sylvester, R; Essed, E; Caubergh, RV; Hoekstra, JW; deVoogt, HJ; Newling, DWW; deReijke, TM; Mensink, HJA; Groen, JM; Jakse, G; Leisinger, HJ; Richards, B; Adib, RA; Robinson, M; Denis, L; Bouffioux, C; Schulman, C; Carpentier, PJ

    Purpose: We compared the efficacy of transurethral resection alone or transurethral resection followed by bladder instillations of doxorubicin or ethoglucid for 1 year in patients with superficial bladder carcinoma, and followed them long term for the incidence of progression to muscle invasion.

  12. Radiochemotherapy With Cisplatin and 5-Fluorouracil After Transurethral Surgery in Patients With Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Christian; Engehausen, Dirk G.; Krause, Frens S.; Papadopoulos, Thomas; Dunst, Juergen; Sauer, Rolf; Roedel, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To give an update on the long-term outcome of an intensified protocol of combined radiochemotherapy (RCT) with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and cisplatin after initial transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) with selective organ preservation in bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred twelve patients with muscle-invading or high-risk T1 (G3, associated Tis, multifocality, diameter >5 cm) bladder cancer were enrolled in a protocol of TURBT followed by concurrent cisplatin (20 mg/m 2 /day as 30-min infusion) and 5-FU (600 mg/m 2 /day as 120-h continuous infusion), administered on Days 1-5 and 29-33 of radiotherapy. Response to treatment was evaluated by restaging TURBT 4-6 weeks after RCT. In case of invasive residual tumor or recurrence, salvage cystectomy was recommended. Results: Ninety-nine patients (88.4%) had no detectable tumor at restaging TURBT; 71 patients (72%) have been continuously free from local recurrence or distant metastasis. Superficial relapse occurred in 13 patients and muscle-invasive recurrence in 11 patients. Overall and cause-specific survival rates for all patients were 74% and 82% at 5 years, respectively. Of all surviving patients, 82% maintained their own bladder, 79% of whom were delighted or pleased with their urinary condition. Hematologic Grade 3/4 toxicity occurred in 23%/6% and Grade 3 diarrhea in 21% of patients. One patient required salvage cystectomy due to a shrinking bladder. Conclusion: Concurrent RCT with 5-FU/cisplatin has been associated with acceptable acute and long-term toxicity. Overall and cause-specific survival rates are encouraging. More than 80% of patients preserved their well-functioning bladder

  13. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A; Neumayer, Katharina M H; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Hart, Melanie L

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1-2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  14. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Brun

    Full Text Available The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1-2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2, transgelin (TAGLN, calponin (CNN1, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11 according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion

  15. Bladder Contracture – A Rare and Serious Side Effect of Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Instillation of intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG is an effective treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. The high incidence of side effects may limit its tolerability in patients. Local side effects including cystitis and hematuria are common but generally self-limiting. Bladder contractures are a rare but serious consequence of BCG treatment. In this case, an 82 year-old male developed BCG reactivation and subsequent bladder contractures following transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP three years post-BCG. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of BCG reactivation post-TURP leading to the rare but serious effect of bladder contractures.

  16. p53-stabilizing Agent CP-31398 Prevents Growth and Invasion of Urothelial Cancer of the Bladder in Transgenic UPII-SV40T Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateshwar Madka

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of bladder cancer and its recurrence make it an important target for chemoprevention. About half of invasive urothelial tumors have mutations in p53. We determined the chemopreventive efficacy of a p53-stabilizing agent, CP-31398, in a transgenic UPII-SV40T mouse model of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC that strongly resembles human TCC. After genotyping, six-week-old UPII-SV40T mice (n = 30/group were fed control (AIN-76A or experimental diets containing 150 or 300 ppm of CP-31398 for 34 weeks. Progression of bladder cancer growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. At 40 weeks of age, all mice were killed; urinary bladders were collected to determine weights, tumor incidence, and histopathology. There was a significant increase in bladder weights of transgenic versus wild-type mice (male: 140.2 mg vs 27.3 mg, P < .0001; female: 34.2 mg vs 14.8 mg, P < .0001. A significant decrease in the bladder tumor weights (by 68.6–80.2%, P < .0001 in males and by 36.9–55.3%, P < .0001 in females was observed in CP-31398-treated mice. Invasive papillary TCC incidence was 100% in transgenic mice fed control diet. Both male and female mice exposed to CP-31398 showed inhibition of invasive TCC. CP-31398 (300 ppm completely blocked invasion in female mice. Molecular analysis of the bladder tumors showed an increase in apoptosis markers (p53, p21, Bax, and Annexin V with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor in transgenic mice fed CP-31398. These results suggest that p53-modulating agents can serve as potential chemopreventive agents for bladder TCC.

  17. Expression of RFC/SLC19A1 is associated with tumor type in bladder cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa M Abdel-Haleem

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder cancer (UBC ranks ninth in worldwide cancer. In Egypt, the pattern of bladder cancer is unique in that both the transitional and squamous cell types prevail. Despite much research on the topic, it is still difficult to predict tumor progression, optimal therapy and clinical outcome. The reduced folate carrier (RFC/SLC19A1 is the major transport system for folates in mammalian cells and tissues. RFC is also the primary means of cellular uptake for antifolate cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, however, membrane transport of antifolates by RFC is considered as limiting to antitumor activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the mRNA expression level of RFC/SLC19A1 in urothelial and non-urothelial variants of bladder carcinomas. Quantification of RFC mRNA in the mucosa of 41 untreated bladder cancer patients was performed using RT-qPCR. RFC mRNA steady-state levels were ∼9-fold higher (N = 39; P<0.0001 in bladder tumor specimens relative to normal bladder mRNA. RFC upregulation was strongly correlated with tumor type (urothelial vs. non-urothelial; p<0.05 where median RFC mRNA expression was significantly (p<0.05 higher in the urothelial (∼14-fold compared to the non-urothelial (∼4-fold variant. This may account for the variation in response to antifolate-containing regimens used in the treatment of either type. RFC mRNA levels were not associated with tumor grade (I, II and III or stage (muscle-invasive vs. non-muscle invasive implying that RFC cannot be used for prognostic purposes in bladder carcinomas and its increased expression is an early event in human bladder tumors pathogenesis. Further, RFC can be considered as a potential marker for predicting response to antifolate chemotherapy in urothelial carcinomas.

  18. Alterations in ubiquitin ligase Siah-2 and its corepressor N-CoR after P-MAPA immunotherapy and anti-androgen therapy: new therapeutic opportunities for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Apolinário, Letícia Montanholi; Böckelmann, Petra Karla; da Silva Nunes, Iseu; Duran, Nelson; Fávaro, Wagner José

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes the role of the ubiquitin ligase Siah-2 and corepressor N-CoR in controlling androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) signaling in an appropriate animal model (Fischer 344 female rats) of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), especially under conditions of anti-androgen therapy with flutamide. Furthermore, this study describes the mechanisms of a promising therapeutic alternative for NMIBC based on Protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride (P-MAPA) intravesical immunotherapy combined with flutamide, involving the interaction among steroid hormone receptors, their regulators and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Our results demonstrated that increased Siah-2 and AR protein levels and decreased N-CoR, cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and estrogen receptors levels played a critical role in the urothelial carcinogenesis, probably leading to escape of urothelial cancer cells from immune system attack. P-MAPA immunotherapy led to distinct activation of innate immune system TLRs 2 and 4-mediated, resulting in increase of interferon signaling pathway, which was more effective in recovering the immunosuppressive tumor immune microenvironment and in recovering the bladder histology features than BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) treatments. The AR blockade therapy was important in the modulating of downstream molecules of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathway, decreasing the inflammatory cytokines signaling and enhancing the interferon signaling pathway when associated with P-MAPA. Taken together, the data obtained suggest that interferon signaling pathway activation and targeting AR and Siah-2 signals by P-MAPA intravesical immunotherapy alone and/ or in combination with AR blockade may provide novel therapeutic approaches for NMIBC.

  19. Nano-BCG: A Promising Delivery System for Treatment of Human Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Julieti Huch; Begnini, Karine Rech; Bender, Camila Bonemann; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Guterres, Silvia S; Collares, Tiago; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) remains at the forefront of immunotherapy for treating bladder cancer patients. However, the incidence of recurrence and progression to invasive cancer is commonly observed. There are no established effective intravesical therapies available for patients, whose tumors recur following BCG treatment, representing an important unmet clinical need. In addition, there are very limited options for patients who do not respond to or tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities, resulting in poor overall treatment outcomes. Within this context, nanotechnology is an emergent and promising tool for: (1) controlling drug release for extended time frames, (2) combination therapies due to the ability to encapsulate multiple drugs simultaneously, (3) reducing systemic side effects, (4) increasing bioavailability, (5) and increasing the viability of various routes of administration. Moreover, bladder cancer is often characterized by high mutation rates and over expression of tumor antigens on the tumor cell surface. Therapeutic targeting of these biomolecules may be improved by nanotechnology strategies. In this mini-review, we discuss how nanotechnology can help overcome current obstacles in bladder cancer treatment, and how nanotechnology can facilitate combination chemotherapeutic and BCG immunotherapies for the treatment of non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer.

  20. Nano-BCG: A Promising Delivery System for Treatment of Human Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieti Huch Buss

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG remains at the forefront of immunotherapy for treating bladder cancer patients. However, the incidence of recurrence and progression to invasive cancer is commonly observed. There are no established effective intravesical therapies available for patients, whose tumors recur following BCG treatment, representing an important unmet clinical need. In addition, there are very limited options for patients who do not respond to or tolerate chemotherapy due to toxicities, resulting in poor overall treatment outcomes. Within this context, nanotechnology is an emergent and promising tool for: (1 controlling drug release for extended time frames, (2 combination therapies due to the ability to encapsulate multiple drugs simultaneously, (3 reducing systemic side effects, (4 increasing bioavailability, (5 and increasing the viability of various routes of administration. Moreover, bladder cancer is often characterized by high mutation rates and over expression of tumor antigens on the tumor cell surface. Therapeutic targeting of these biomolecules may be improved by nanotechnology strategies. In this mini-review, we discuss how nanotechnology can help overcome current obstacles in bladder cancer treatment, and how nanotechnology can facilitate combination chemotherapeutic and BCG immunotherapies for the treatment of non-muscle invasive urothelial bladder cancer.

  1. Prenatal Detection of Bladder Wall Involvement in Invasive Placentation with Sequential Two-dimensional and Adjunctive Three-dimensional Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Min Chou

    2009-03-01

    Conclusion: 3D US may be a useful adjunctive tool in refining 2D ultrasonographic techniques to identify the extent and degree of placental invasion of the bladder. The advantages of 3D US are: (1 a multiplanar image display allows viewing of sections from sagittal, coronal and axial planes at the same time, thereby more accurately determining the location and extent of placental invasion; (2 the viewing planes of the spatial angioarchitecture network can be arbitrarily manipulated to better delineate the aberrant vessels protruding into the bladder; (3 3D reconstruction images can be clearly displayed by live 3D in a rotation mode for a better illustrative effect.

  2. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy of bladder cancer with alasens (results of multicenter trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of multicenter prospective trial for efficacy of combined modality treatment: transurethral resection (TUR + photodynamic therapy (PDT with alasens for bladder cancer are represented in the article. Trials were organized by Research Institute of Organic Intermediates and Dyes and conducted according to clinical protocol approved by Ministry of Health of Russia, at the sites of leading Russian cancer clinical centers. The trial included 45 subjects with verified diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients underwent TUR of bladder with simultaneous PDT as anti-relapse treatment. Alasens was administered to patients as intravesicular instillation of 3% solution in volume of 50 ml with 1.5–2h exposure (prior to TUR. TUR was performed after instillation. PDT session was conducted immediately after the completion of TUR on a single occasion by means of combined local irradiation on tumor bed with diffuse irradiation on whole urinary bladder mucosa (light dose of local irradiation – 100 J/cm2, diffuse irradiation – 20 J/cm2. Good tolerance of the treatment was noticed, there were no complications. Among 45 patients included in the trial, 35 (78% completed 12 month protocol follow-up without relapse. The recurrence of bladder tumor was registered in 10 (22% cases 6–12 months after TUR+PDT including 3 patients with recurrence 6 months after treatment, 3–9 months and 4–12 months. These patients underwent repeated TUR, whereafter their follow-up in the settings of the clinical trial was disposed. Thus, PDT with alasens after TUR allowed to decrease the recurrence rate of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer for 1st year after treatment to 22% versus 40–80% for TUR as monotherapy according to literature data. The obtained results were comparable by efficiency with TUR combined with methods of adjuvant treatment for bladder tumors (the recurrence rates for 1-year follow-up after TUR+chemotherapy – 36–44%, after TUR

  3. Combination treatment with ionising radiation and gefitinib ('Iressa', ZD1839), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, significantly inhibits bladder cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, AJ; Mchugh, LA; Tulchinsky, E.; Kriajevska, M.; Mellon, JK

    2007-01-01

    External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) is the principal bladder-preserving monotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Seventy percent of muscle-invasive bladder cancers express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is associated with poor prognosis. Ionising radiation (IR) stimulates EGFR causing activation of cytoprotective signalling cascades and thus may be an underlying cause of radioresistance in bladder tumours. We assessed the ability of IR to activate EGFR in bladder cancer cells and the effect of the anti-EGFR therapy, gefitinib on potential radiation-induced activation. Subsequently we assessed the effect of IR on signalling pathways downstream of EGFR. Finally we assessed the activity of gefitinib as a monotherapy, and in combination with IR, using clonogenic assay in vitro, and a murine model in vivo. IR activated EGFR and gefitinib partially inhibited this activation. Radiation-induced activation of EGFR activated the MAPK and Akt pathways. Gefitinib partially inhibited activation of the MAPK pathway but not the Akt pathway. Treatment with combined gefitinib and IR significantly inhibited bladder cancer cell colony formation more than treatment with gefitinib alone (p=0.001-0.03). J82 xenograft tumours treated with combined gefitinib and IR showed significantly greater growth inhibition than tumours treated with IR alone (p=0.04). Combining gefitinib and IR results in significantly greater inhibition of invasive bladder cancer cell colony formation in vitro and significantly greater tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Given the high frequency of EGFR expression by bladder tumours and the low toxicity of gefitinib there is justification to translate this work into a clinical trial. (author)

  4. Positive Correlation between Matrix Metalloproteinases and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and its Association with Clinical Outcome in Bladder Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R; Mandhani, A; Agrawal, V; Garg, Minal

    2018-01-18

    Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in the pathogenesis of urothelial carcinoma elects them to be sensitive marker for clinical and prognostic implications. MMPs regulate tumor growth and invasion by inducing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) which is characterized by the complex reprogramming of epithelial cells and ultimately bring about major changes in the structural organization of bladder urothelium. The present study has been undertaken to evaluate the clinical relevance of MMPs in two distinct types of bladder cancer disease. Expression analysis of MMPs namely MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and EMT markers including epithelial marker, E-cadherin; mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin and Vimentin; and EMT-activating transcriptional factors (EMT-ATFs), Snail, Slug, Twist and Zeb was done in 64 cases of bladder tumor tissues [{Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC): 35 cases} and {Muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC): 29 cases}] by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining was done in matched bladder tumor tissues to evaluate the protein expression and localization of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, Vimentin, Snail, and Slug. Our data showed overexpression of MMP-2, MMP-7 and MMP-9 at transcriptome level in 32.8%, 25% and 37.5% bladder tumor cases respectively. These tumor tissues were examined for higher expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin and Vimentin) at mRNA and protein level and exhibited statistical association with tumor stage and tumor grade (p = 0.02, p = 0.04, Mann-Whitney test). Significant statistical correlation in tumor tissues with overexpressed MMPs has also been observed between gain of transcriptional factors and weak expression of E-cadherin with tumor stage, grade, gender, presence of hematuria and smoking history of the patients. Gene expression patterns of EMT markers in bladder tumors with overexpressed MMPs and their significant association with clinical profile

  5. An oncofetal glycosaminoglycan modification provides therapeutic access to Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiler, Roland; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Tortora, Davide

    2017-01-01

    the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we can target these sugar chains, and our results showed a significant antitumor effect in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer. This novel treatment paradigm provides therapeutic access to bladder cancers not responding to cisplatin.......BACKGROUND: Although cisplatin-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) improves survival of unselected patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC), only a minority responds to therapy and chemoresistance remains a major challenge in this disease setting. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical...... significance of oncofetal chondroitin sulfate (ofCS) glycosaminoglycan chains in cisplatin-resistant MIBC and to evaluate these as targets for second-line therapy. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: An ofCS-binding recombinant VAR2CSA protein derived from the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (rVAR2...

  6. Combined intraarterial chemotherapy and radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, Hidekazu; Okamura, Keigo; Matsuo, Yasushige; Yajima, Hisanori

    2003-01-01

    A total of 9 patients with invasive bladder cancer (T2b, n=2; T3a, n=0; T3b, n=3; T4, n=4) were treated with intra-arterial cisplatin (CDDP) and pirarubicin (THP)-doxorubicin (ADM), in combination with external radiotherapy. Clinical response was as follows: complete response (CR) was obtained in 3 patients, partial response (PR) in 2 patients, no change (NC) in 3 patients and no progressive disease (PD). One patient died during the treatment because of pneumonia caused by myelosuppression and overall response rate was 62.5%. Total cystectomy was performed for 4 patients after chemo-radiotherapy. Overall survival rate was 75.0% for 1-year, 62.5% for 2-year, and 41.7% for 5-year. In group with cystectomy survival rate was 100% for 1-year, 100% for 2-year, and 50.0% for 5-year. In group without cystectomy, 50.0% for 1-year, and 25.0% for 2-year. Overall no recurrence rate was 87.5% for 6-months, 58.3% for 1-year, and 58.3% for 5-year. Main side effects were myelosuppression, appetite loss, diarrhea, thigh pain and contracted bladder. (author)

  7. Organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer: Brachytherapy, an alternative to cystectomy and combined modality treatment?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris; Horenblas, Simon; Dom, Paul; Moonen, Luc; Bartelink, Harry

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate our long-term results of bladder preservation with brachytherapy in the treatment of bladder cancer. Methods and materials: Between 1987 and 2000, 108 patients with T1-G3 and T2-T3a stages of bladder cancer were treated with a transurethral resection (TUR) and a course of external beam radiotherapy (30 Gy in 15 fractions) followed by brachytherapy (40 Gy). All tumors were solitary lesions with a diameter ≤5 cm. Median follow-up was 54 months (range, 1-178 months). Results: The 5-year and 10-year overall survival rates were 62% and 50%, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates were 73% and 67%, respectively. The actuarial local control rate was 73% at 5 and 73% at 10 years, respectively. The 5-year and 10-year disease-specific survival rates for patients with a preserved bladder were 68% and 59%, respectively. Of all long-term surviving patients, 90% preserved their native bladders. The treatment was well tolerated. Acute toxicity was mild. Two patients experienced serious late toxicity: 1 patient developed a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula and the other a stricture of the urethra and ureters. Conclusion: For patients with solitary, organ confined invasive bladder cancer ≤5 cm, bladder preservation with brachytherapy is an excellent alternative to radical cystectomy and combined modality treatment

  8. SPIRE - combining SGI-110 with cisplatin and gemcitabine chemotherapy for solid malignancies including bladder cancer: study protocol for a phase Ib/randomised IIa open label clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Crabb, Simon; Caddy, Joshua; Dunkley, Denise; Rajaram, Jessica; Ellis, Deborah; Hill, Stephanie; Whitehead, Amy; Huddart, Robert; Griffiths, Gareth; Kalevras, Michail

    2018-01-01

    Background: urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) accounts for 10,000 new diagnoses and 5000 deaths annually in the UK (Cancer Research UK, http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/statistics-by-cancer-type/bladder-cancer , Cancer Research UK, Accessed 26 Mar 2018). Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is standard of care therapy for UBC for both palliative first-line treatment of advanced/metastatic disease and radical neoadjuvant treatment of localised muscle invasive bladder...

  9. Defining progression in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer: it is time for a new, standard definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamm, D.; Persad, R.; Brausi, M.; Buckley, R.; Witjes, J.A.; Palou, J.; Bohle, A.; Kamat, A.M.; Colombel, M.; Soloway, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Despite being one of the most important clinical outcomes in nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer, there is currently no standard definition of disease progression. Major clinical trials and meta-analyses have used varying definitions or have failed to define this end point altogether. A

  10. Treatment changes and long-term recurrence rates after hexaminolevulinate (HAL) fluorescence cystoscopy: does it really make a difference in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geavlete, Bogdan; Multescu, Razvan; Georgescu, Dragos; Jecu, Marian; Stanescu, Florin; Geavlete, Petrisor

    2012-02-01

    •  To evaluate in a prospective, randomized study the impact of hexaminolevulinate blue-light cystoscopy (HAL-BLC) on the diagnostic accuracy and treatment changes in cases of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) compared with standard white-light cystoscopy (WLC). •  To compare the long-term recurrence rates in the two study arms. •  In all, 362 patients suspected of NMIBC were included in the trial based on positive urinary cytology and/or ultrasonographic suspicion of bladder tumours and underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumours. •  A single postoperative mytomicin-C instillation was performed in all cases, intravesical chemotherapy for intermediate-risk patients and BCG instillations for high-risk cases. •  The follow-up protocol consisted of urinary cytology and WLC every 3 months for 2 years. •  Only first-time recurrences after the initial diagnosis were considered. •  In the 142 patients with NMIBC in the HAL-BLC series, tumour detection rates significantly improved for carcinoma in situ, pTa andoverall cases. •  In 35.2% of the cases, additional malignant lesions were found by HAL-BLC and consequently, the recurrence- and progression-risk categories of patients and subsequent treatment improved in 19% of the cases due to fluorescence cystoscopy. •  In all, 125 patients in the HAL-BLC group and 114 of the WLC group completed the follow-up. •  The recurrence rate at 3 months was lower in the HAL-BLC series (7.2% vs 15.8%) due to fewer 'other site' recurrences when compared with the WLC series (0.8% vs 6.1%). •  The 1 and 2 years recurrence rates were significantly decreased in the HAL-BLC group compared with the WLC group (21.6% vs 32.5% and 31.2% vs 45.6%, respectively). •  HAL-BLC was better than WLC for detecting NMIBC cases and improved tumour detection rates. •  HAL-BLC significantly modified the postoperative treatment of cases. •  The 3 months, 1 and 2 years recurrence rates were

  11. SDF-1/CXCR4 expression in bladder cancer tissue and the correlation with negative costimulatory molecule PD-L1, cell apoptosis and invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Bao Ye

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the SDF-1/CXCR4 expression in bladder cancer tissue and the correlation with negative costimulatory molecule PD-L1, cell apoptosis and invasion. Methods: A total of 118 cases of bladder cancer tissue and para-carcinoma tissue surgically removed in our hospital between May 2014 and May 2016 were selected as the research samples, the RNA was extracted and then reverse-transcribed into cDNA, and the expression levels of SDF-1/ CXCR4, PD-L1/PD-1, cell apoptosis-related molecules and cell invasion-related molecules were detected. Results: SDF-1 and CXCR4 mRNA expression in bladder cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in para-carcinoma tissue; PD-L1, PD-1, Rec1, Survivin, MRPS5, Nanog, BCAPP2Ac, TRPM8, TRPV2, ILK, β-catenin and GUGBP1 mRNA expression in bladder cancer tissue were significantly higher than those in para-carcinoma tissue and positively correlated with SDF-1 and CXCR4 mRNA expression. Conclusion: Highly expressed SDF-1/CXCR4 in bladder cancer tissue are closely related to the high expression of negative costimulatory molecule PD-L1, pro-proliferation molecules and proinvasion molecules, and SDF-1/CXCR4 can promote the immune escape, proliferation and invasion of bladder cancer cells.

  12. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  13. SU-F-J-05: The Effect of Air Pockets in the Urinary Bladder During Bladder Hyperthermia Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooneveldt, G.; Kok, H.P.; Bakker, A.; Geijsen, E.D.; Reijke, T.M. de; Crezee, J. [Academisch Medisch Centrum / Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperthermia combined with Mitomycin C is used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using a phased array system of microwave antennas for bladder heating. Often some air is present in the bladder, which effectively blocks the microwave radiation, potentially preventing proper treatment of that part of the bladder. Air can be a relevant fraction of the bladder content and large air pockets are expected to have a noticeable influence on achieved temperatures. Methods: We analysed 14 NMIBC patients treated at our institute with our AMC-4 hyperthermia device with four 70MHz antennas around the pelvis. A CT scan was made after treatment and a physician delineated the bladder on the CT scan. On the same scan, the amount of air present in the bladder was delineated. Using our in-house developed hyperthermia treatment planning system, we simulated the treatment using the clinically applied device settings. We did this once with the air pocket delineated on the CT scan, and once with the same volume filled with bladder tissue. Results: The patients had on average 4.2ml (range 0.8–10.1ml) air in the bladder. The bladder volume was delineated by the physician, that is including air pocket and bladder wall, was on average 253ml (range 93–452ml). The average volume in which changes exceeded 0.25°C was 22ml (range 0–108 ml), with the bladder being up to 2°C cooler when an air pocket was present. Except for extreme cases, there was no evident relation between the quantity of air and the difference in temperature. Conclusion: The effect of an air pocket in the bladder during bladder hyperthermia treatment varies strongly between patients. Generally, this leads to lower temperatures in the bladder, potentially affecting treatment quality, and suggesting that care need be taken to minimise the size of air pockets during hyperthermia treatments. The KWF Dutch Cancer Society financially supported this work, grant UVA 2012-5539.

  14. Non-invasive characterization of real-time bladder sensation using accelerated hydration and a novel sensation meter: An initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, Anna S; Speich, John E; De Wachter, Stefan G; Ghamarian, Peter P; Le, David M; Colhoun, Andrew F; Ratz, Paul H; Barbee, Robert W; Klausner, Adam P

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to develop a non-invasive, objective, and unprompted method to characterize real-time bladder sensation. Volunteers with and without overactive bladder (OAB) were prospectively enrolled in a preliminary accelerated hydration study. Participants drank 2L Gatorade-G2® and recorded real-time sensation (0-100% scale) and standardized verbal sensory thresholds using a novel, touch-screen "sensation meter." 3D bladder ultrasound images were recorded throughout fillings for a subset of participants. Sensation data were recorded for two consecutive complete fill-void cycles. Data from 14 normal and 12 OAB participants were obtained (ICIq-OAB-5a = 0 vs. ≥3). Filling duration decreased in fill2 compared to fill1, but volume did not significantly change. In normals, adjacent verbal sensory thresholds (within fill) showed no overlap, and identical thresholds (between fill) were similar, demonstrating effective differentiation between degrees of %bladder capacity. In OAB, within-fill overlaps and between-fill differences were identified. Real-time %capacity-sensation curves left shifted from fill1 to fill2 in normals, consistent with expected viscoelastic behavior, but unexpectedly right shifted in OAB. 3D ultrasound volume data showed that fill rates started slowly and ramped up with variable end points. This study establishes a non-invasive means to evaluate real-time bladder sensation using a two-fill accelerated hydration protocol and a sensation meter. Verbal thresholds were inconsistent in OAB, and the right shift in OAB %capacity-sensation curve suggests potential biomechanical and/or sensitization changes. This methodology could be used to gain valuable information on different forms of OAB in a completely non-invasive way. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Down-regulation of S100C is associated with bladder cancer progression and poor survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Memon, Ashfaque Ahmed; Sorensen, Boe Sandahl; Meldgaard, Peter

    2005-01-01

    cancer biopsy samples obtained from 88 patients followed for a median of 23 months (range, 1-97 months). RESULTS: We found a significantly lower mRNA expression of S100C in connective tissue invasive tumors (T1, P = 0.0030) and muscle invasive tumors [(T2-T4), P ...PURPOSE: The goal of this study was to identify proteins down-regulated during bladder cancer progression. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: By using comparative proteome analysis and measurement of mRNA, we found a significant down-regulation of S100C, a member of the S100 family of proteins, in T24 (grade 3......) as compared with RT4 (grade 1) bladder cancer cell lines. Moreover, quantification of the mRNA level revealed that decreased expression of the protein reflects a low level of transcription of the S100C gene. Based on this observation, we quantified the S100C mRNA expression level with real-time PCR in bladder...

  16. Can Bcl-XL expression predict the radio sensitivity of Bilharzial-related squamous bladder carcinoma? a prospective comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Nermen A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Local pelvic recurrence after radical cystectomy for muscle invasive bilharzial related squamous cell carcinoma accounts for 75% of treatment failures even in organ confined tumors. Despite the proven value of lymphadenectomy, up to 60% of patients undergoing cystectomy do not have it. These factors are in favor of adjuvant radiotherapy reevaluation. objectives: to evaluate the effect of adjuvant radiotherapy on disease free survival in muscle invasive bilharzial related squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder and to test the predictability of radio-sensitivity using the anti apoptotic protein Bcl-XL. Methods The study prospectively included 71 patients, (47 males, 24 females with muscle invasive bilharzial related squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder (Stage pT2a-T3N0-N3M0 who underwent radical cystectomy in Assiut university hospitals between January 2005 and December 2006. Thirty eight patients received adjuvant radiotherapy to the pelvis in the dose of 50Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks (Group 1, while 33 patients did not receive adjuvant radiotherapy (group 2. Immunohistochemical characterization for bcl-xL expression was done. Follow up was done every 3 months for 12 to 36 months with a mean of 16 ± 10 months. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Three years cumulative disease free survival was calculated and adjusted to Bcl-XL expression and side effects of the treatment were recorded. Results The disease free cumulative survival was 48% for group 1 and 29% for group 2 (log rank p value 0.03. The multivariate predictors of tumor recurrence were the positive Bcl-XL expression (odd ratio 41.1, 95% CI 8.4 - 102.3, p Conclusions Adjuvant radiotherapy for muscle invasive bilharzial related squamous cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder has potential effectiveness and minor side effects. Moreover, Bcl-XL expression is a valuable tool for predicting those who might not respond to this adjuvant treatment.

  17. A population-based study of the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayter, Charles R.R.; Paszat, Lawrence F.; Groome, Patti A.; Schulze, Karleen; Mackillop, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to describe the use and outcome of radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer in the province of Ontario, Canada, between 1982 and 1994. Methods: Electronic records of invasive bladder cancer (ICD code 188) from the Ontario Cancer Registry were linked to surgical records from all Ontario hospitals and radiotherapy (RT) records from all Ontario cancer centers. We identified cases receiving radical RT by selecting RT records containing 'bladder' or 'pelvis' anatomic region codes and a radical or curative intent code (or dose > 39.5 Gy if intent missing). We identified cases receiving salvage total cystectomy by selecting total cystectomy procedure codes occurring at any time beyond 4 months from the start of radical RT. We used life table methods to compute the following: the time from diagnosis to radical RT, the time from radical RT to salvage cystectomy, overall and cause-specific survival from radical radiotherapy to death, and overall and cause-specific survival from salvage cystectomy to death. We modeled the factors associated with time to death, time to cystectomy conditional on survival, and time to cystectomy or death, whichever came first, using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: From the 20,906 new cases of bladder cancer diagnosed in Ontario from 1982 to 1994, we identified 1,372 cases treated by radical radiotherapy (78% male, 22% female; mean age 69.8 years). The median interval to start of radical RT from diagnosis was 13.4 weeks. Ninety-three percent of patients were treated on high-energy linacs, and the most common dose/fractionation scheme was 60 Gy/30 (31% of cases). Five-year survival rates were as follows: bladder cancer cause-specific, 41%; overall, 28%; cystectomy-free, 25%; bladder cancer cause-specific following salvage cystectomy, 36%; overall following salvage cystectomy, 28%. Factors associated with a higher risk of death and a poorer cystectomy-free survival were histology (squamous or

  18. The Long Non-Coding RNA XIST Interacted with MiR-124 to Modulate Bladder Cancer Growth, Invasion and Migration by Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yaoyao; Wang, Long; Li, Yuan; Chen, Minfeng; He, Wei; Qi, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) is involved in the progression of several tumors. The interaction between lncRNA and miRNA or miRNA's target genes is reported to play crucial roles in malignancy. In addition, Androgen receptor (AR) is considered to be involved in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the role of XIST in human bladder cancer and its interaction with miR-124 and AR. XIST and AR expression was detected in bladder tumor samples and cell lines. Effects of XIST and AR on bladder cancer cells growth, invasion and migration were analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays were used to identify the interaction among XIST, AR and miR-124. The correlations of miR-124 with XIST and AR in bladder cancer samples were statistically analyzed. XIST and AR were upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and positively correlated. Higher XIST and AR expression were related to poorer TNM stage of bladder cancer. XIST knockdown reduced bladder cancer cells' proliferation, invasion and migration. While this inhibitory effect could be partially restored by AR overexpression. XIST inhibited miR-124 expression by directly targeting. Moreover, miR-124 could bind to the 3'UTR of AR to regulate its expression. MiR-124 inhibition partially restored the XIST knockdown-induced reduction of AR, c-myc, p27, MMP13 and MMP9 expression. In bladder cancer tissues, miR-124 level was inversely correlated with the expression of XIST and AR, respectively. These findings indicated that XIST might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted the bladder cancer growth, invasion and migration via miR-124 dependent AR regulation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. The Long Non-Coding RNA XIST Interacted with MiR-124 to Modulate Bladder Cancer Growth, Invasion and Migration by Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoyao Xiong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds/Aims: Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST is involved in the progression of several tumors. The interaction between lncRNA and miRNA or miRNA’s target genes is reported to play crucial roles in malignancy. In addition, Androgen receptor (AR is considered to be involved in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the role of XIST in human bladder cancer and its interaction with miR-124 and AR. Methods: XIST and AR expression was detected in bladder tumor samples and cell lines. Effects of XIST and AR on bladder cancer cells growth, invasion and migration were analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays were used to identify the interaction among XIST, AR and miR-124. The correlations of miR-124 with XIST and AR in bladder cancer samples were statistically analyzed. Results: XIST and AR were upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and positively correlated. Higher XIST and AR expression were related to poorer TNM stage of bladder cancer. XIST knockdown reduced bladder cancer cells’ proliferation, invasion and migration. While this inhibitory effect could be partially restored by AR overexpression. XIST inhibited miR-124 expression by directly targeting. Moreover, miR-124 could bind to the 3’UTR of AR to regulate its expression. MiR-124 inhibition partially restored the XIST knockdown-induced reduction of AR, c-myc, p27, MMP13 and MMP9 expression. In bladder cancer tissues, miR-124 level was inversely correlated with the expression of XIST and AR, respectively. Conclusion: These findings indicated that XIST might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted the bladder cancer growth, invasion and migration via miR-124 dependent AR regulation.

  20. A study of image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer based on lipiodol injection in the bladder wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soendergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Elstroem, Ulrik Vindelev; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Oerding Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. We have tested a procedure of focal injection of the contrast medium Lipiodol as a fiducial marker for image-guided boost of the tumor in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we have evaluated the feasibility and the safety of the method as well as the inter- and intra-fraction shift of the bladder tumor. Materials and methods. Five patients with muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer were included in the study. Lipiodol was injected during flexible cystoscopy into the submucosa of the bladder wall at the periphery of the tumor or the post resection tumor-bed. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired daily throughout the course of RT. Results. Lipiodol demarcation of the bladder tumor was feasible and safe with only a minimum of side effects related to the procedure. The Lipiodol spots were visible on CT and CBCT scans for the duration of the RT course. More than half of all the treatment fractions required a geometric shift of 5 mm or more to match on the Lipiodol spots. The mean intra-fraction shift (3D) of the tumor was 3 mm, largest in the anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that Lipiodol can be injected into the bladder mucosa and subsequently visualized on CT and CBCT as a fiducial marker. The relatively large inter-fraction shifts in the positions of Lipiodol spots compared to the intra-fraction movement indicates that image-guided RT based on radio-opaque markers is important for RT of the bladder cancer tumor.

  1. [The diagnostic value of microsatellite LOH analysis and the prognostic relevance of angiogenic gene expression in urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarvas, Tibor

    2009-12-01

    Bladder cancer is the second most common malignancy affecting the urinary system. Currently, histology is the only tool that determines therapy and patients' prognosis. As the treatment of non-invasive (Ta/T1) and muscle invasive (T2-T4) bladder tumors are completely different, correct staging is important, although it is often hampered by disturbing factors. Molecular methods offer new prospects for early disease detection, confirmation of unclear histological findings and prognostication. Applying molecular biological methods, the present study is searching for answers to current diagnostic and prognostic problems in bladder carcinoma. We analyzed tumor, blood and/or urine samples of 334 bladder cancer patients and 117 control individuals. Genetic alterations were analyzed in urine samples of patients and controls, both by PCR-based microsatellite loss of heterozigosity (LOH) analysis using 12 fluorescently labeled primers and by DNA hybridization based UroVysion FISH technique using 4 probes, to assess the diagnostic values of these methods. Whole genome microsatellite analysis (with 400 markers) was performed in tumor and blood specimens of bladder cancer patients to find chromosomal regions, the loss of which may be associated with tumor stage. Furthermore, we assessed the prognostic value of Tie2, VEGF, Angiopoietin-1 and -2. We concluded that DNA analysis of voided urine samples by microsatellite analysis and FISH are sensitive and non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. Furthermore, we established a panel of microsatellite markers that could differentiate between non-invasive and invasive bladder cancer. However, further analyses in a larger cohort of patients are needed to assess their specificity and sensitivity. Finally, we identified high Ang-2 and low Tie2 gene expression as significant and independent risk factors of tumor recurrence and cancer related survival.

  2. The progression from a lower to a higher invasive stage of bladder cancer is associated with severe alterations in glucose and pyruvate metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, Vanessa R. [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Oliveira, Pedro F. [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Department of Microscopy, Laboratory of Cell Biology and Unit for Multidisciplinary Research in Biomedicine, Abel Salazar Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of Porto – UMIB/ICBAS/UP (Portugal); Nunes, Ana R.; Rocha, Cátia S. [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Ramalhosa, Elsa; Pereira, José A. [Mountain Research Centre (CIMO), School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança (Portugal); Alves, Marco G., E-mail: alvesmarc@gmail.com [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal); Silva, Branca M., E-mail: bmcms@ubi.pt [CICS-UBI–Health Sciences Research Centre, University of Beira Interior, Covilhã (Portugal)

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells present a particular metabolic behavior. We hypothesized that the progression of bladder cancer could be accompanied by changes in cells glycolytic profile. We studied two human bladder cancer cells, RT4 and TCCSUP, in which the latter represents a more invasive stage. The levels of glucose, pyruvate, alanine and lactate in the extracellular media were measured by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The protein expression levels of glucose transporters 1 (GLUT1) and 3 (GLUT3), monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK1), glutamic-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were determined. Our data showed that glucose consumption and GLUT3 levels were similar in both cell lines, but TCCSUP cells displayed lower levels of GLUT1 and PFK expression. An increase in pyruvate consumption, concordant with the higher levels of lactate and alanine production, was also detected in TCCSUP cells. Moreover, TCCSUP cells presented lower protein expression levels of GPT and LDH. These results illustrate that bladder cancer progression is associated with alterations in cells glycolytic profile, namely the switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption in the more aggressive stage. This may be useful to develop new therapies and to identify biomarkers for cancer progression. - Highlights: • Metabolic phenotype of less and high invasive bladder cancer cells was studied. • Bladder cancer progression involves alterations in cells glycolytic profile. • More invasive bladder cancer cells switch from glucose to pyruvate consumption. • Our results may help to identify metabolic biomarkers of bladder cancer progression.

  3. Assessing Prediction Performance of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Bladder Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is a treatment routinely prescribed to patients diagnosed with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Unfortunately, not all patients are responsive to this treatment and would greatly benefit from an accurate prediction of their expected response to chemotherapy. In this project, I attempt to develop a model that will predict response using tumour microarray data. I show that using my dataset, every method is insufficient at accurately classifying responders and non-respond...

  4. Diagnostic and Prognostic Significance of Serum and Tissue Galectin 3 Expression in Patients with Carcinoma of the Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendy, Hoda El; Madkour, Bothina; Abdelaty, Sara; Essawy, Fayza; Khattab, Dina; Hammam, Olfat; Nour, Hani H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Galectins are group of proteins found in the cytoplasm, nucleus, cell surface and extracellular matrix. Galectin 3 (Gal-3) displays pathological expression in a variety of processes such as tumorigenesis. Patients and Method 70 patients classified into the control group, cystitis group, transitional cell carcinoma group, and squamous cell carcinoma group were enrolled in this study which aimed to detect the serum level and the intensity of tissue expression of Gal-3. Results Both serum level and tissue expression of Gal-3 were statistically higher in bladder cancer patients compared to the other groups. Gal-3 level expression increased from low to high grade urothelial tumors, with a statistically significant increase of its level and expression between muscle invasive and non-muscle invasive Ta urothelial tumors. Conclusion The serum Gal-3 level is sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. The prognostic significance of tissue expression is to be confirmed. PMID:26195948

  5. Establishment and antitumor effects of dasatinib and PKI-587 in BD-138T, a patient-derived muscle invasive bladder cancer preclinical platform with concomitant EGFR amplification and PTEN deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nakho; Lee, Hye Won; Lim, Joung Eun; Jeong, Da Eun; Song, Hye Jin; Kim, Sudong; Nam, Do-Hyun; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han-Yong; Jeon, Hwang Gyun

    2016-08-09

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) consists of a heterogeneous group of tumors with a high rate of metastasis and mortality. To facilitate the in-depth investigation and validation of tailored strategies for MIBC treatment, we have developed an integrated approach using advanced high-throughput drug screening and a clinically relevant patient-derived preclinical platform. We isolated patient-derived tumor cells (PDCs) from a rare MIBC case (BD-138T) that harbors concomitant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletion. High-throughput in vitro drug screening demonstrated that dasatinib, a SRC inhibitor, and PKI-587, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor, exhibited targeted anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects against BD-138T PDCs. Using established patient-derived xenograft models that successfully retain the genomic and molecular characteristics of the parental tumor, we confirmed that these anti-tumor responses occurred through the inhibition of SRC and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways. Taken together, these experimental results demonstrate that dasatinib and PKI-587 might serve as promising anticancer drug candidates for treating MIBC with combined EGFR gene amplification and PTEN deletion.

  6. Preoperative radiation therapy for muscle-invading bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.A.; Greven, K.M.; Anscher, M.S.; Morgan, T.M.; Scott, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on low-dose and high-dose radiation therapy (RT) followed by cystectomy for bladder carcinoma that was evaluated for survival, failure patterns, and complications as these outcomes have been incompletely documented in the past. One hundred five patients with clinical stages T2-T4 (muscle-invading) transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder who completed preoperative RT followed by total cystectomy were evaluated. Eighty-five patients received 20-27 Gy in 4-7 fractions (group A). Twenty patients received 40-50 Gy in 20-28 fractions (group B). Actuarial 5-year survival was 45% and 29% (P = .06) for groups A and B, respectively; 6% of group A was stage T4 compared with 30% of group B. Five-year actuarial survival for patients with stages T2-T3 in groups A and B was 46% and 42%, respectively, while that for T4 was 33% and 0% in groups A and B, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that stage, grade, and presence of hydronephrosis independently affected survival. Five-year actuarial local control rates for T2, T3, and T4 were 93%, 93%, and 22%, respectively, with no significant difference between RT groups. Rates of distant metastasis and complications versus preoperative regime and stage were similar

  7. Occult Pelvic Lymph Node Involvement in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Definitive Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Baumann, Brian C.; He, Jiwei; Tucker, Kai; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vaughn, David; Keefe, Stephen M. [Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S. Bruce [Department of Urology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Christodouleas, John P., E-mail: christojo@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To inform radiation treatment planning for clinically staged, node-negative bladder cancer patients by identifying clinical factors associated with the presence and location of occult pathologic pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with clinically staged T1-T4N0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy at a single institution were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between preoperative clinical variables and occult pathologic pelvic or common iliac lymph nodes. Percentages of patient with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed within whole bladder (perivesicular nodal region), small pelvic (perivesicular, obturator, internal iliac, and external iliac nodal regions), and extended pelvic clinical target volume (CTV) (small pelvic CTV plus common iliac regions) were calculated. Results: Among 315 eligible patients, 81 (26%) were found to have involved pelvic lymph nodes at the time of surgery, with 38 (12%) having involved common iliac lymph nodes. Risk of occult pathologically involved lymph nodes did not vary with clinical T stage. On multivariate analysis, the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on preoperative biopsy was significantly associated with occult pelvic nodal involvement (odds ratio 3.740, 95% confidence interval 1.865-7.499, P<.001) and marginally associated with occult common iliac nodal involvement (odds ratio 2.307, 95% confidence interval 0.978-5.441, P=.056). The percentages of patients with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed by whole bladder, small pelvic, and extended pelvic CTVs varied with clinical risk factors, ranging from 85.4%, 95.1%, and 100% in non-muscle-invasive patients to 44.7%, 71.1%, and 94.8% in patients with muscle-invasive disease and biopsy LVI. Conclusions: Occult pelvic lymph node rates are substantial for all clinical subgroups, especially patients with LVI on biopsy. Extended

  8. The value of bladder mapping and prostatic urethra biopsies for detection of carcinoma in situ (CIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjónsson, Sigurdur; Bläckberg, Mats; Chebil, Gunilla; Jahnson, Staffan; Olsson, Hans; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Månsson, Wiking; Liedberg, Fredrik

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that CIS is a major risk factor for muscle-invasive bladder cancer and that this entity can be difficult to diagnose. Taking cold-cup mapping biopsies from different areas of the bladder (BMAP) is commonly used in patients at risk of harbouring CIS. The diagnostic accuracy of this approach has not been assessed until now. By using the CIS found in the cystoprostatectomy specimen as an indicator of the true occurrence of CIS and comparing that with the findings of BMAP, it is clear that the sensitivity of BMAP to detect CIS when present is low and that negative findings should be considered unreliable. To assess the value of bladder mapping and prostatic urethra biopsies for detection of urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS). CIS of the urinary bladder is a flat high-grade lesion of the mucosa associated with a significant risk of progression to muscle-invasive disease. CIS is difficult to identify on cystoscopy, and definite diagnosis requires histopathology. Traditionally, if CIS is suspected, multiple cold-cup biopsies are taken from the bladder mucosa, and resection biopsies are obtained from the prostatic urethra in males. This approach is often called bladder mapping (BMAP). The accuracy of BMAP as a diagnostic tool is not known. Male patients with bladder cancer scheduled for cystectomy underwent cold-cup bladder biopsies (sidewalls, posterior wall, dome, trigone), and resection biopsies were taken from the prostatic urethra. After cystectomy, the surgical specimen was investigated in a standardised manner and subsequently compared with the BMAP biopsies for the presence of CIS. The histopathology reports of 162 patients were analysed. CIS was detected in 46% of the cystoprostatectomy specimens, and multiple (≥2) CIS lesions were found in 30%. BMAP (cold-cup bladder biopsies + resection biopsies from the prostatic urethra) provided sensitivity of 51% for any CIS, and 55% for multiple CIS lesions. The cold-cup biopsies for CIS in the bladder

  9. TGFβ1 induces apoptosis in invasive prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells via Akt-independent, p38 MAPK and JNK/SAPK-mediated activation of caspases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Gao, Fei; Goc, Anna; Somanath, Payaningal R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► TGFβ induced apoptosis in invasive prostate cancer and bladder cancer cells. ► TGFβ inhibited prostate/bladder cancer cell proliferation and colony/foci formation. ► TGFβ induced prostate/bladder cancer cell apoptosis independent of Akt inhibition. ► TGFβ inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation in prostate/bladder cancer cells. ► TGFβ induced p38 MAPK and JNK-mediated activation of caspases-9, -8 and -3. -- Abstract: Recent findings indicate that advanced stage cancers shun the tumor suppressive actions of TGFβ and inexplicably utilize the cytokine as a tumor promoter. We investigated the effect of TGFβ1 on the survival and proliferation of invasive prostate (PC3) and bladder (T24) cancer cells. Our study indicated that TGFβ1 decreased cell viability and induced apoptosis in invasive human PC3 and T24 cells via activation of p38 MAPK-JNK-Caspase9/8/3 pathway. Surprisingly, no change in the phosphorylation of pro-survival Akt kinase was observed. We postulate that TGFβ1 pathway may be utilized for specifically targeting urological cancers without inflicting side effects on normal tissues.

  10. FGFR3, HRAS, KRAS, NRAS AND PIK3CA mutations in bladder cancer and their potential as biomarkers for surveillance and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Kompier (Lucie); I. Lurkin (Irene); M.M.N. van der Aa (Madelon); B.W.G. van Rhijn (Bas); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Fifty percent of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MI-BC) die from their disease and current chemotherapy treatment only marginally increases survival. Novel therapies targeting receptor tyrosine kinases or activated oncogenes may improve outcome. Hence, it is

  11. Micropapillary bladder cancer: current treatment patterns and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Daniel L; Flaig, Thomas W; Hansel, Donna E; Milowsky, Matthew I; Grubb, Robert L; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Plimack, Elizabeth R; Koppie, Theresa M; McConkey, David J; Dinney, Colin P; Hoffman, Vanessa A; Droller, Michael J; Messing, Edward; Kamat, Ashish M

    2014-08-01

    No guidelines exist for the management of micropapillary bladder cancer (MPBC) and most reports of this variant of urothelial carcinoma are case series comprising small numbers of patients. We sought to determine current practice patterns for MPBC using a survey sent to the Society of Urologic Oncology (SUO) and to present those results in the setting of a comprehensive review of the existing literature. A survey developed by the Translational Science Working Group of the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network-sponsored Think Tank meeting was distributed to members of the SUO. The results from 118 respondents were analyzed and presented with a literature review. Most survey respondents were urologists, with 80% considering bladder cancer their primary area of interest. Although 78% of the respondents reported a dedicated genitourinary pathologist at their institution, there were discrepant opinions on how a pathologic diagnosis of MPBC is determined as well as variability on the proportion of MPBC that is clinically significant. Among them, 78% treat MPBC differently than conventional urothelial carcinoma, with 81% reporting that they would treat cT1 MPBC with upfront radical cystectomy. However, the respondents had split opinions regarding the sensitivity of MPBC to cisplatin-based chemotherapy, which affected utilization of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in muscle-invasive disease. The management of MPBC is diverse among members of the SUO. Although most favors early cystectomy for cT1 MPBC, there is no consensus on the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy for muscle-invasive MPBC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 protein expression in human bladder cancer is associated with disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egerod, Frederikke N S Lihme; Bartels, Annette; Fristrup, Niels

    2009-01-01

    bladder cancer. RESULTS: The frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling correlated to bladder cancer stage, grade and to later progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-4). Stage T1 tumors exhibited significantly higher frequencies of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling...... than Ta tumors (P = 0.001). Furthermore, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that a high frequency of tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling was significantly associated with a higher risk of progression to stage T2-4 (log-rank test, P = 0.035). Tumor cells with nuclear Egr-1 immunolabelling...

  13. CXCL5 is a potential diagnostic and prognostic marker for bladder cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xi; Qiao, Yan; Liu, Weihua; Wang, Wenying; Shen, Hongliang; Lu, Yi; Hao, Gangyue; Zheng, Jiajia; Tian, Ye

    2016-04-01

    Chemokine C-X-C motif ligand 5 (CXCL5) is critical for bladder cancer growth and progression. Our previous study demonstrated that increase of CXCL5 in bladder cancer cell lines had an effect on tumor growth and progression. This study aims to investigate the expression of CXCL5 in tissue and urine of bladder cancer patients, in relation to clinicopathologic parameters, and as a predictive value in diagnosing and evaluating bladder cancer. Urothelial bladder cancer tissues from 255 patients were profiled for CXCL5 alterations by immunohistochemistry. Urine samples collected from patients with bladder cancer and urinary tract infections as well as healthy volunteers were analyzed by ELISA. High expression of CXCL5 in bladder cancer tissue was correlated with TNM stage (P = 0.012), cancer grade (P = 0.001), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.007). CXCL5 alterations were associated with overall survival (P = 0.007), progression free survival (P = 0.004), and recurrence free survival in muscle invasive bladder cancers (P = 0.026). CXCL5 expression in the urine of bladder cancer patients was significantly different from urinary tract infection patients (P = 0.001) and healthy volunteers. However, urine leukocytes may predict CXCL5 levels (β = 0.56, P bladder cancer TNM stage (P = 0.039), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.023), tumor size (P = 0.007), and tumor grade (P = 0.005). The sensitivity and specificity for CXCL5/creatinine in predicting bladder cancer were 80.4 and 61.3 %, respectively. These results suggest increased CXCL5 expression in cancer tissue predicts poor survival in bladder cancer patients. CXCL5 expression in urine is useful in a minimally invasive modality for bladder cancer diagnosis. However, urine leukocytes are significant predictors of CXCL5 levels and may affect its result in bladder cancer diagnosis.

  14. Artificial muscles for a novel simulator in minimally invasive spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollensteiner, Marianne; Fuerst, David; Schrempf, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are commonly used minimally invasive methods to treat vertebral compression fractures. Novice surgeons gather surgical skills in different ways, mainly by "learning by doing" or training on models, specimens or simulators. Currently, a new training modality, an augmented reality simulator for minimally invasive spine surgeries, is going to be developed. An important step in investigating this simulator is the accurate establishment of artificial tissues. Especially vertebrae and muscles, reproducing a comparable haptical feedback during tool insertion, are necessary. Two artificial tissues were developed to imitate natural muscle tissue. The axial insertion force was used as validation parameter. It appropriates the mechanical properties of artificial and natural muscles. Validation was performed on insertion measurement data from fifteen artificial muscle tissues compared to human muscles measurement data. Based on the resulting forces during needle insertion into human muscles, a suitable material composition for manufacturing artificial muscles was found.

  15. Comparison of the efficacy and feasibility of laser enucleation of bladder tumor versus transurethral resection of bladder tumor: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Wang, Ning; Han, Shanfu; Male, Musa; Zhao, Chenming; Yao, Daqiang; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2017-12-01

    The transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT) remains the most widely used method in the surgical treatment of the non-muscle invasive bladder tumor (NMIBT). Despite its popularity, the laser technique has been widely used in urology as an alternative, via the application of transurethral laser enucleation of bladder tumor. The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy and feasibility between transurethral laser enucleation and transurethral resection of bladder tumor. A systematic search of the following databases was conducted: PubMed, Wed of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Google scholar, and Medline. The search included studies up to the 1st of January 2017. The outcomes of interest that were used in order to assess the two techniques included operation time, catheterization time, hospitalization time, obturator nerve reflex, bladder perforation, bladder irritation, 24-month-recurrence rate, and the postoperative adjuvant intravesical chemotherapy. A total of 13 trials with 2012 participants were included, of which 975 and 1037 underwent transurethral laser enucleation and transurethral resection of bladder tumor, respectively. No significant difference was noted in the operation time between the two groups, although significant differences were reported for the variables catheterization time, hospitalization time, obturator nerve reflex, bladder perforation, bladder irritation, and 24-month-recurrence rate. In the mitomycin and epirubicin subgroups, no significant differences were observed in the laser enucleation and TURBT methods with regard to the 24-month-recurrence rate. The laser enucleation was superior to TURBT with regard to the parameters obturator nerve reflex, bladder perforation, catheterization time, hospitalization time, and 24-month-recurrence rate. Moreover, laser enucleation can offer a more accurate result of the tumor's pathological stage and grade.

  16. "Focused introspection" during naturally increased diuresis: description and repeatability of a method to study bladder sensation non-invasively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wachter, Stefan G G; Heeringa, Rhea; Van Koeveringe, Gommert A; Winkens, Bjorn; Van Kerrebroeck, Philip E V; Gillespie, James I

    2014-06-01

    To present and describe a non-invasive method to study the origin and development of bladder filling sensation and to evaluate the repeatability of the method. Eighteen volunteers participated in the study and were given a water loading protocol consisting of 1,000 ml water intake 1 hr before the session and 200 ml every 10 min during the session. Protocol 1: To evaluate diuresis rate, seven participants were asked to void every 15 min and the voided volume was measured. Protocol 2: Eleven volunteers graded bladder sensation on regular time points, on an empty graph with time on the X-axis and intensity of sensation on the Y-axis. The protocol ended at absolute need to void (maximal intensity) and voided volumes were measured. This protocol was conducted three times with a 10 days interval. Protocol 1: The diuresis rate was not different during the sessions and showed no variation over the studied time period (P = 0.2). Protocol 2: For an individual, the diuresis rate was not different between the sessions. The curves in all patients showed a continuously increasing bladder intensity. In seven participants the curve was convex, in the other four, the curve was sigmoidal. For each individual the pattern was constant during the three sessions. A strict water loading protocol induces a constant diuresis. This allows individuals to draw an introspection bladder sensation curve with a specific shape, which can be used as a method to study the development of bladder sensation non-invasively. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training on symptoms and uroflowmetry parameters in female patients with overactive bladder

    OpenAIRE

    KULAKSIZOĞLU, HALUK; AKAND, MURAT; ÇAKMAKÇI, EVRİM; GÜL, MURAT; SEÇKİN, BEDREDDİN

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim: To evaluate the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) on symptoms of overactive bladder (OAB) as well as uroflowmetry parameters and functional bladder capacity. Materials and methods: Fifty-nine female patients with OAB symptoms were included. Patients were assessed by SEAPI-QMM, uroflowmetry, and abdominal ultrasound. A specially designed PFMT program using a Pilates ball was generated for patients. The training period was 1-h sessions twice a week for 6 weeks and ...

  18. Clinical characteristics of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury: the experience from a single centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böthig, Ralf; Kurze, Ines; Fiebag, Kai; Kaufmann, Albert; Schöps, Wolfgang; Kadhum, Thura; Zellner, Michael; Golka, Klaus

    2017-06-01

    Life expectancy for people with spinal cord injury has shown a marked increase due to modern advances in treatment methods and in neuro-urology. However, since life expectancy of people with paralysis increases, the risk of developing of urinary bladder cancer is gaining importance. Single-centre retrospective evaluation of patient data with spinal cord injuries and proven urinary bladder cancer and summary of the literature. Between 1998 and 2014, 24 (3 female, 21 male) out of a total of 6599 patients with spinal cord injury were diagnosed with bladder cancer. The average age at bladder cancer diagnosis was 57.67 years, which is well below the average for bladder cancer cases in the general population (male: 73, female: 77). All but one patient had a latency period between the onset of the spinal paralysis and tumour diagnosis of more than 10 years. The median latency was 29.83 years. The median survival for these patients was 11.5 months. Of the 24 patients, 19 (79%) had muscle invasive bladder cancer at ≥T2 at the time of diagnosis. The type of neurogenic bladder (neurogenic detrusor overactivity or acontractility) and the form of bladder drainage do not appear to influence the risk. Long-term indwelling catheter drainage played only a minor role in the investigated patients. The significantly younger age at onset and the frequency of invasive tumours at diagnosis indicate that spinal cord injury influences bladder cancer risk and prognosis as well. Early detection of bladder cancer in patients with spinal cord injury remains a challenge.

  19. Co-delivery of micronized urinary bladder matrix damps regenerative capacity of minced muscle grafts in the treatment of volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Goldman

    Full Text Available Minced muscle grafts (MG promote de novo muscle fiber regeneration and neuromuscular strength recovery in small and large animal models of volumetric muscle loss. The most noteworthy limitation of this approach is its reliance on a finite supply of donor tissue. To address this shortcoming, this study sought to evaluate micronized acellular urinary bladder matrix (UBM as a scaffolding to promote in vivo expansion of this MG therapy in a rat model. Rats received volumetric muscle loss injuries to the tibialis anterior muscle of their left hind limb which were either left untreated or repaired with minced muscle graft at dosages of 50% and 100% of the defect mass, urinary bladder matrix in isolation, or a with an expansion product consisting of a combination of the two putative therapies in which the minced graft is delivered at a dosage of 50% of the defect mass. Rats survived to 2 and 8 weeks post injury before functional (in vivo neuromuscular strength, histological, morphological, and biochemical analyses were performed. Rats treated with the expansion product exhibited improved neuromuscular function relative to untreated VML after an 8 week time period following injury. This improvement in functional capacity, however, was accompanied with a concomitant reduction in graft mediated regeneration, as evidenced cell lineage tracing enable by a transgenic GFP expressing donor, and a mixed histological outcome indicating coincident fibrous matrix deposition with interspersed islands of nascent muscle fibers. Furthermore, quantitative immunofluorescence and transcriptional analysis following the 2 week time point suggests an exacerbated immune response to the UBM as a possible nidus for the observed suboptimal regenerative outcome. Moving forward, efforts related to the development of a MG expansion product should carefully consider the effects of the host immune response to candidate biomaterials in order to avoid undesirable dysregulation of pro

  20. Impact of age and gender on the clinicopathological characteristics of bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Gupta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the impact of age and gender on the clinicopathological characteristics of histologically confirmed bladder cancer in India. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 to June 2008, records of patients with bladder cancer were evaluated for age and gender at presentation, clinical symptoms, cystoscopic finding, history of smoking, and histopathological characteristics. A total of 561 patients were identified from the computer-based hospital information system and the case files of patients. Results: A total of 97% of the patients presented with painless hematuria. The mean age was 60.2 ± 4.4 years old (range: 18-90 years old and the male to female ratio was 8.6:1. Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC was the most common histological variety, which was present in 97.71% (470 of 481 of the patients. A total of 26% of the patients had muscle invasive disease at the time of presentation. However, 34.5% (166 of 481 of the patients did not show any evidence of detrusor muscle in their biopsy specimen. In patients with nonmuscle-invasive bladder carcinoma, 55% had p Ta while 45% had p T1. Overall, 44.7% (215 of 481 of the patients had low-grade disease. Among patients younger than 60 years old, low-grade (51.0% vs. 38.1%; P = 0.006 and low-stage (77.1% vs. 70.8%; P = 0.119 disease were more prevalent than in patients older than 60 years old. The incidence of smoking was much higher among males compared with females (74% vs. 22%. Conclusion: TCC is the predominant cancer, with significant male preponderance among Indian patients. Younger-aged patients have low-grade disease. Hematuria is the most common presentation and greater awareness is needed not to overlook bladder cancer.

  1. Evasion of immunosurveillance by genomic alterations of PPARγ/RXRα in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpal, Manav; Puyang, Xiaoling; Jeremy Wu, Zhenhua; Seiler, Roland; Furman, Craig; Oo, Htoo Z; Seiler, Michael; Irwin, Sean; Subramanian, Vanitha; Julie Joshi, Jaya; Wang, Chris K; Rimkunas, Victoria; Tortora, Davide; Yang, Hua; Kumar, Namita; Kuznetsov, Galina; Matijevic, Mark; Chow, Jesse; Kumar, Pavan; Zou, Jian; Feala, Jacob; Corson, Laura; Henry, Ryan; Selvaraj, Anand; Davis, Allison; Bloudoff, Kristjan; Douglas, James; Kiss, Bernhard; Roberts, Morgan; Fazli, Ladan; Black, Peter C; Fekkes, Peter; Smith, Peter G; Warmuth, Markus; Yu, Lihua; Hao, Ming-Hong; Larsen, Nicholas; Daugaard, Mads; Zhu, Ping

    2017-07-24

    Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Although immunotherapies are approved for MIBC, the majority of patients fail to respond, suggesting existence of complementary immune evasion mechanisms. Here, we report that the PPARγ/RXRα pathway constitutes a tumor-intrinsic mechanism underlying immune evasion in MIBC. Recurrent mutations in RXRα at serine 427 (S427F/Y), through conformational activation of the PPARγ/RXRα heterodimer, and focal amplification/overexpression of PPARγ converge to modulate PPARγ/RXRα-dependent transcription programs. Immune cell-infiltration is controlled by activated PPARγ/RXRα that inhibits expression/secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Clinical data sets and an in vivo tumor model indicate that PPARγ High /RXRα S427F/Y impairs CD8 + T-cell infiltration and confers partial resistance to immunotherapies. Knockdown of PPARγ or RXRα and pharmacological inhibition of PPARγ significantly increase cytokine expression suggesting therapeutic approaches to reviving immunosurveillance and sensitivity to immunotherapies. Our study reveals a class of tumor cell-intrinsic "immuno-oncogenes" that modulate the immune microenvironment of cancer.Muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) is a potentially lethal disease. Here the authors characterize diverse genetic alterations in MIBC that convergently lead to constitutive activation of PPARgamma/RXRalpha and result in immunosurveillance escape by inhibiting CD8+ T-cell recruitment.

  2. Gynaecomastia: an unusual presenting symptom of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mashrafi; Kanji, Aleem; Begum, Tahmina

    2015-06-25

    A 74-year-old man presented to the outpatient clinic with painful gynaecomastia. A detailed physical examination to sort out possible causes of the gynaecomastia, including intracranial tumour, liver cirrhosis, hyperthyroidism, and adrenal and testicular tumour, was negative. No offending agent was found in his medication list. A CT scan of the head and ultrasound of the scrotum did not show any mass lesion. His serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) and oestradiol levels were elevated. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis revealed bladder wall thickening with soft tissue mass. A cystoscopic biopsy confirmed transitional cell carcinoma with muscle invasion. The patient was started on chemotherapy but responded poorly. This case report describes the β-hCG and oestradiol-secreting transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder presenting as gynaecomastia in an older man. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  3. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    for detection of recurrences in urine in patients with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A set of 111 UBCs of different stages was used to assess TERT promoter mutations by Sanger sequencing and TERT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription...... surveillance after diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive UBC (n=194), was tested using a SNaPshot assay. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Association of mutation status with age, sex, tobacco, stage, grade, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutation, progression-free survival, disease...... frequent among FGFR3 mutant tumors (p=0.0002). There was no association between TERT mutations and mRNA expression (p=0.3). Mutations were not associated with clinical outcome. In urine, TERT mutations had 90% specificity in subjects with hematuria but no bladder tumor, and 73% in recurrence-free UBC...

  4. A Non-Invasive Bladder Sensory Test Supports a Role for Dysmenorrhea Increasing Bladder Noxious Mechanosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    TU, Frank F.; EPSTEIN, Aliza E.; POZOLO, Kristen E.; SEXTON, Debra L.; MELNYK, Alexandra I.; HELLMAN, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Catheterization to measure bladder sensitivity is aversive and hinders human participation in visceral sensory research. Therefore, we sought to characterize the reliability of sonographically-estimated female bladder sensory thresholds. To demonstrate this technique’s usefulness, we examined the effects of self-reported dysmenorrhea on bladder pain thresholds. Methods Bladder sensory threshold volumes were determined during provoked natural diuresis in 49 healthy women (mean age 24 ± 8) using three-dimensional ultrasound. Cystometric thresholds (Vfs – first sensation, Vfu – first urge, Vmt – maximum tolerance) were quantified and related to bladder urgency and pain. We estimated reliability (one-week retest and interrater). Self-reported menstrual pain was examined in relationship to bladder pain, urgency and volume thresholds. Results Average bladder sensory thresholds (mLs) were Vfs (160±100), Vfu (310±130), and Vmt (500±180). Interrater reliability ranged from 0.97–0.99. One-week retest reliability was Vmt = 0.76 (95% CI 0.64–0.88), Vfs = 0.62 (95% CI 0.44–0.80), and Vfu = 0.63, (95% CI 0.47–0.80). Bladder filling rate correlated with all thresholds (r = 0.53–0.64, p dysmenorrhea pain had increased bladder pain and urgency at Vfs and increased pain at Vfu (p’s dysmenorrhea pain was unrelated to bladder capacity. Discussion Sonographic estimates of bladder sensory thresholds were reproducible and reliable. In these healthy volunteers, dysmenorrhea was associated with increased bladder pain and urgency during filling but unrelated to capacity. Plausibly, dysmenorrhea sufferers may exhibit enhanced visceral mechanosensitivity, increasing their risk to develop chronic bladder pain syndromes. PMID:23370073

  5. Monoclonal antibody Zt/g4 targeting RON receptor tyrosine kinase enhances chemosensitivity of bladder cancer cells to Epirubicin by promoting G1/S arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Feng; Yu, Bi-Xia; Yu, Rui; Ma, Liang; Lv, Xiu-Yi; Cheng, Yue; Ma, Qi

    2017-02-01

    Epirubicin (EPI) is one of the most used intravesical chemotherapy agents after transurethral resection to non-muscle invasive bladder tumors (NMIBC) to prevent cancer recurrence and progression. However, even after resection of bladder tumors and intravesical chemotherapy, half of them will recur and progress. RON is a membrane tyrosine kinase receptor usually overexpressed in bladder cancer cells and associated with poor pathological features. This study aims to investigate the effects of anti-RON monoclonal antibody Zt/g4 on the chemosensitivity of bladder cells to EPI. After Zt/g4 treatment, cell cytotoxicity was significantly increased and cell invasion was markedly suppressed in EPI-treated bladder cancer cells. Further investigation indicated that combing Zt/g4 with EPI promoted cell G1/S-phase arrest and apoptosis, which are the potential mechanisms that RON signaling inhibition enhances chemosensitivity of EPI. Thus, combing antibody-based RON targeted therapy enhances the therapeutic effects of intravesical chemotherapy, which provides new strategy for further improvement of NMIBC patient outcomes.

  6. HumanMethylation450K Array–Identified Biomarkers Predict Tumour Recurrence/Progression at Initial Diagnosis of High-risk Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark O Kitchen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (HR-NMIBC is a clinically unpredictable disease. Despite clinical risk estimation tools, many patients are undertreated with intra-vesical therapies alone, whereas others may be over-treated with early radical surgery. Molecular biomarkers, particularly DNA methylation, have been reported as predictive of tumour/patient outcomes in numerous solid organ and haematologic malignancies; however, there are few reports in HR-NMIBC and none using genome-wide array assessment. We therefore sought to identify novel DNA methylation markers of HR-NMIBC clinical outcomes that might predict tumour behaviour at initial diagnosis and help guide patient management. Patients and methods: A total of 21 primary initial diagnosis HR-NMIBC tumours were analysed by Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays and subsequently bisulphite Pyrosequencing. In all, 7 had not recurred at 1 year after resection and 14 had recurred and/or progressed despite intra-vesical BCG. A further independent cohort of 32 HR-NMIBC tumours (17 no recurrence and 15 recurrence and/or progression despite BCG were also assessed by bisulphite Pyrosequencing. Results: Array analyses identified 206 CpG loci that segregated non-recurrent HR-NMIBC tumours from clinically more aggressive recurrence/progression tumours. Hypermethylation of CpG cg11850659 and hypomethylation of CpG cg01149192 in combination predicted HR-NMIBC recurrence and/or progression within 1 year of diagnosis with 83% sensitivity, 79% specificity, and 83% positive and 79% negative predictive values. Conclusions: This is the first genome-wide DNA methylation analysis of a unique HR-NMIBC tumour cohort encompassing known 1-year clinical outcomes. Our analyses identified potential novel epigenetic markers that could help guide individual patient management in this clinically unpredictable disease.

  7. A network meta-analysis of therapeutic outcomes after new image technology-assisted transurethral resection for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: 5-aminolaevulinic acid fluorescence vs hexylaminolevulinate fluorescence vs narrow band imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joo Yong; Cho, Kang Su; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Jung, Hae Do; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk

    2015-01-01

    This study included a network meta-analysis of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the therapeutic outcome of transurethral resection (TUR) in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer assisted by photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) employing 5-aminolaevulinic acid (5-ALA) or hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) or by narrow band imaging (NBI). Relevant RCTs were identified from electronic databases. The proceedings of relevant congresses were also searched. Fifteen articles based on RCTs were included in the analysis, and the comparisons were made by qualitative and quantitative syntheses using pairwise and network meta-analyses. Seven of 15 RCTs were at moderate risk of bias for all quality criteria and two studies were classified as having a high risk of bias. The recurrence rate of cancers resected with 5-ALA-based PDD was lower than of those resected using HAL-based PDD (odds ratio (OR) = 0.48, 95 % confidence interval (CI) [0.26–0.95]) but was not significantly different than those resected with NBI (OR = 0.53, 95 % CI [0.26–1.09]). The recurrence rate of cancers resected using HAL-based PDD versus NBI did not significantly differ (OR = 1.11, 95 % CI [0.55–2.1]). All cancers resected using 5-ALA-based PDD, HAL-based PDD, or NBI recurred at a lower rate than those resected using white light cystoscopy (WLC). No difference in progression rate was observed between cancers resected by all methods investigated. The recurrence rate of some bladder cancers can be decreased by the implementation of either PDD- and NBI-assisted TUR; in real settings, clinicians should consider replacing WLC as the standard imaging technology to guide TUR

  8. Experimental Treatment of Bladder Cancer with Bi-213-anti-EGFR MAb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Christof; Pfost, Birgit; Müller, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Therapy of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (carcinoma in situ) comprises transurethral resection of the tumour and subsequent instillation of the chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C in order to eradicate remaining tumour cells. Yet 15 – 40% of treated patients relapse within 5 years. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies to combat tumour recurrence are needed. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides efficiently kill single tumour cells or small tumour cell clusters. Because the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed on bladder cancer cells, conjugates composed of the alpha-emitter Bi-213 and the anti-EGFR antibody matuzumab should provide a powerful drug to eliminate disseminated bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the aims of our study were (i) to analyse the cytotoxic effects of Bi-213-anti-EGFR radioimmunoconjugates at the cellular level, (ii) to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of intravesically applied Bi-213- anti-EGFR-Mab in a nude mouse model with intravesical human bladder cancer xenografts, (iii) to compare Bi- 213-anti-EGFR-Mab efficacy with chemotherapy using mitomycin C and (iv) to demonstrate that radioimmunotherapy is not toxic to cells of the bladder wall and of the kidneys

  9. Subcellular trafficking of FGF controls tracheal invasion of Drosophila flight muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Soren J; Krasnow, Mark A

    2015-01-15

    To meet the extreme oxygen demand of insect flight muscle, tracheal (respiratory) tubes ramify not only on its surface, as in other tissues, but also within T-tubules and ultimately surrounding every mitochondrion. Although this remarkable physiological specialization has long been recognized, its cellular and molecular basis is unknown. Here, we show that Drosophila tracheoles invade flight muscle T-tubules through transient surface openings. Like other tracheal branching events, invasion requires the Branchless FGF pathway. However, localization of the FGF chemoattractant changes from all muscle membranes to T-tubules as invasion begins. Core regulators of epithelial basolateral membrane identity localize to T-tubules, and knockdown of AP-1γ, required for basolateral trafficking, redirects FGF from T-tubules to surface, increasing tracheal surface ramification and preventing invasion. We propose that tracheal invasion is controlled by an AP-1-dependent switch in FGF trafficking. Thus, subcellular targeting of a chemoattractant can direct outgrowth to specific domains, including inside the cell. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patient-centered prioritization of bladder cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Angela B; Chisolm, Stephanie; Deal, Allison; Spangler, Alejandra; Quale, Diane Z; Bangs, Rick; Jones, J Michael; Gore, John L

    2018-05-04

    Patient-centered research requires the meaningful involvement of patients and caregivers throughout the research process. The objective of this study was to create a process for sustainable engagement for research prioritization within oncology. From December 2014 to 2016, a network of engaged patients for research prioritization was created in partnership with the Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN): the BCAN Patient Survey Network (PSN). The PSN leveraged an online bladder cancer community with additional recruitment through print advertisements and social media campaigns. Prioritized research questions were developed through a modified Delphi process and were iterated through multidisciplinary working groups and a repeat survey. In year 1 of the PSN, 354 patients and caregivers responded to the research prioritization survey; the number of responses increased to 1034 in year 2. The majority of respondents had non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), and the mean time since diagnosis was 5 years. Stakeholder-identified questions for noninvasive, invasive, and metastatic disease were prioritized by the PSN. Free-text questions were sorted with thematic mapping. Several questions submitted by respondents were among the prioritized research questions. A final prioritized list of research questions was disseminated to various funding agencies, and a highly ranked NMIBC research question was included as a priority area in the 2017 Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute announcement of pragmatic trial funding. Patient engagement is needed to identify high-priority research questions in oncology. The BCAN PSN provides a successful example of an engagement infrastructure for annual research prioritization in bladder cancer. The creation of an engagement network sets the groundwork for additional phases of engagement, including design, conduct, and dissemination. Cancer 2018. © 2018 American Cancer Society. © 2018 American Cancer Society.

  11. Prospective Study Delivering Simultaneous Integrated High-dose Tumor Boost (≤70 Gy) With Image Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Radical Treatment of Localized Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: Shaista.Hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Warren-Oseni, Karole [The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen A.; Hansen, Vibeke N.; Jones, Kelly; Tan, Melissa; Khan, Attia [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; Mohammed, Kabir; Thomas, Karen; Thompson, Alan; Kumar, Pardeep [The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Image guided adaptive radiation therapy offers individualized solutions to improve target coverage and reduce normal tissue irradiation, allowing the opportunity to increase the radiation tumor dose and spare normal bladder tissue. Methods and Materials: A library of 3 intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created (small, medium, and large) from planning computed tomography (CT) scans performed at 30 and 60 minutes; treating the whole bladder to 52 Gy and the tumor to 70 Gy in 32 fractions. A “plan of the day” approach was used for treatment delivery. A post-treatment cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired weekly to assess intrafraction filling and coverage. Results: A total of 18 patients completed treatment to 70 Gy. The plan and treatment for 1 patient was to 68 Gy. Also, 1 patient's plan was to 70 Gy but the patient was treated to a total dose of 65.6 Gy because dose-limiting toxicity occurred before dose escalation. A total of 734 CBCT scans were evaluated. Small, medium, and large plans were used in 36%, 48%, and 16% of cases, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation rate of intrafraction filling at the start of treatment (ie, week 1) was 4.0 ± 4.8 mL/min (range 0.1-19.4) and at end of radiation therapy (ie, week 5 or 6) was 1.1 ± 1.6 mL/min (range 0.01-7.5; P=.002). The mean D{sub 98} (dose received by 98% volume) of the tumor boost and bladder as assessed on the post-treatment CBCT scan was 97.07% ± 2.10% (range 89.0%-104%) and 99.97% ± 2.62% (range 96.4%-112.0%). At a median follow-up period of 19 months (range 4-33), no muscle-invasive recurrences had developed. Two patients experienced late toxicity (both grade 3 cystitis) at 5.3 months (now resolved) and 18 months after radiation therapy. Conclusions: Image guided adaptive radiation therapy using intensity modulated radiation therapy to deliver a simultaneous integrated tumor boost to 70 Gy is feasible, with acceptable toxicity, and will be

  12. Use of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) to distinguish vascular and "pseudovascular" invasion in transitional cell carcinoma of bladder with lamina propria invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M P; Steinberg, G D; Brendler, C B; Epstein, J I

    1990-01-01

    We used Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI)-immunoperoxidase staining of endothelium to study the accuracy of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) diagnosis, occurrence, and significance of lymphvascular invasion in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder invading the lamina propria (Stage T1). Original histologic slides from cases (1967 to 1985) with and without vascular invasion were destained and restained with UEAI-immunoperoxidase. Only 5 of 36 biopsies originally diagnosed with lymphvascular invasion had tumor nests within endothelium-lined spaces. The 31 negative biopsies had extensive retraction artifacts lined by connective tissue and fibroblasts around tumor nests. Thirty-five control biopsies remained negative for lymphvascular invasion. Clinical follow-up of the five patients with proven lymphvascular invasion found three without progression of disease 3 to 10 yr postbiopsy, one dead of a local recurrence of TCC 1.67 yr postbiopsy, and one lost to follow-up. Based on this study, we feel that lymphvascular invasion by TCC in Stage T1 tumors is unusual, is frequently misdiagnosed on H&E stain, and does not necessarily portend a poor prognosis.

  13. A novel bioreactor to simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties and compliance for bladder functional tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Li, Dao-bing; Xu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Yu-chun; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-jie

    2011-02-01

    Bioreactors are pivotal tools for generating mechanical stimulation in functional tissue engineering study. This study aimed to create a bioreactor that can simulate urinary bladder mechanical properties, and to investigate the effects of a mechanically stimulated culture on urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells. We designed a bioreactor to simulate the mechanical properties of bladder. A pressure-record system was used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the bioreactor by measuring the pressure in culture chambers. To test the biocompatibility of the bioreactor, viabilities of urothelial cells and smooth muscle cells cultured in the bioreactor under static and mechanically changed conditions were measured after 7-day culture. To evaluate the effect of mechanical stimulations on the vital cells, urethral cells and smooth muscle cells were cultured in the simulated mechanical conditions. After that, the viability and the distribution pattern of the cells were observed and compared with cells cultured in non-mechanical stimulated condition. The bioreactor system successfully generated waveforms similar to the intended programmed model while maintaining a cell-seeded elastic membrane between the chambers. There were no differences between viabilities of urothelial cells ((91.90 ± 1.22)% vs. (93.14 ± 1.78)%, P > 0.05) and bladder smooth muscle cells ((93.41 ± 1.49)% vs. (92.61 ± 1.34)%, P > 0.05). The viability of cells and tissue structure observation after cultured in simulated condition showed that mechanical stimulation was the only factor affected cells in the bioreactor and improved the arrangement of cells on silastic membrane. This bioreactor can effectively simulate the physiological and mechanical properties of the bladder. Mechanical stimulation is the only factor that affected the viability of cells cultured in the bioreactor. The bioreactor can change the growth behavior of urothelial cells and bladder smooth muscle cells, resulting in

  14. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy

  15. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canyilmaz, Emine, E-mail: dremocan@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Yavuz, Melek Nur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Akdeniz University, Antalya (Turkey); Serdar, Lasif [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey); Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kanuni Research and Education Hospital, Trabzon (Turkey); Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45 Gy/1.8 Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5 Gy in 5 weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1 months (range, 4.3-223.3 months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], ± 0.027), 17.9% (SE, ± 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, ± 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1 months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, ± 0.03), 30.3% (SE, ± 0.03), and 28% (SE, ± 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8 months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, ± 0.03), 57.6% (SE, ± 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, ± 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable 5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  16. Combination of panoramic and fluorescence endoscopic images to obtain tumor spatial distribution information useful for bladder cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijnyk, S.; Hernández Mier, Y.; Blondel, W. C. P. M.; Daul, C.; Wolf, D.; Bourg-Heckly, G.

    2007-07-01

    Bladder cancer is widely spread. Moreover, carcinoma in situ can be difficult to diagnose as it may be difficult to see, and become invasive in 50 % of case. Non invasive diagnosis methods like photodynamic or autofluorescence endoscopy allow enhancing sensitivity and specificity. Besides, bladder tumors can be multifocal. Multifocality increases the probability of recurrence and infiltration into bladder muscle. Analysis of spatial distribution of tumors could be used to improve diagnosis. We explore the feasibility to combine fluorescence and spatial information on phantoms. We developed a system allowing the acquisition of consecutive images under white light or UV excitation alternatively and automatically along the video sequence. We also developed an automatic image processing algorithm to build a partial panoramic image from a cystoscopic sequence of images. Fluorescence information is extracted from wavelength bandpass filtered images and superimposed over the cartography. Then, spatial distribution measures of fluorescent spots can be computed. This cartography can be positioned on a 3D generic shape of bladder by selecting some reference points. Our first results on phantoms show that it is possible to obtain cartography with fluorescent spots and extract quantitative information of their spatial distribution on a "wide" field of view basis.

  17. Initial Results of Retrospective Study: Preoperative Transurethral Excision Plus Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy and Trial of Bladder Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammal El-Deen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    For patients with invasive bladder cancer the usual recommended treatment is radical cystectomy, although transurethral resection of the tumor, systemic chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are each effective in some patients. This retrospective study evaluated the experience of the Clinical Oncology Department, Tanta University Hospital with combined modality treatment and selective bladder preservation in patients with muscle-invading bladder cancer with assessment of its safety, tolerance, and efficacy to determine whether these treatments in combination might be as effective as radical cystectomy and thus might allow the bladder to be preserved and the cancer cured and to identify factors that may predict treatment response, risk of relapse and survival. Patients and Methods: Between January 2000 and January 2006, 55 consecutive patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (stages T2 through T4, NX M0) were treated with as complete transurethral surgery as possible, followed by induction combination chemotherapy, and irradiation with 4500 cGy with concurrent cisplatin administration. Urologic evaluation by cystoscopy, cytology, and re biopsy 2-3 weeks later of the tumor response directed further therapy: either radical cystectomy in the patients who had incomplete responses, or additional chemotherapy with the same drugs and doses and radiotherapy up to 6480 cGy in the patients who had complete responses. The median follow-up was 48 months. Results: In 37 patients (67.3%) the bladder was free of invasive tumor and functioning well, even though in 13(23.6%) a superficial tumor recurred and required further transurethral surgery and intravesical drug therapy. Of the 18 (32.7%) patients who still had detectable tumor after initial treatment, all of them underwent radical cystectomy. None of the patients had required a cystectomy for radiation toxicity. Of the 37 (67.3%) patients who had complete responses with no tumor detectable on urine cytology or re biopsy after

  18. Asthma status is associated with decreased risk of aggressive urothelial bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rava, Marta; Czachorowski, Maciej J; Silverman, Debra; Márquez, Mirari; Kishore, Sirish; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; García-Closas, Montse; Garcia-Closas, Reina; Carrato, Alfredo; Rothman, Nathaniel; Real, Francisco X; Kogevinas, Manolis; Malats, Núria

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies suggested an association between atopic conditions and specific cancers. The results on the association with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) are scarce and inconsistent. To evaluate the association between asthma and risk of UBC, we considered 936 cases and 1,022 controls from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO Study (86% males, mean age 65.4 years), a multicenter and hospital-based case-control study conducted during 1998-2001. Participants were asked whether they had asthma and detailed information about occupational exposures, smoking habits, dietary factors, medical conditions and history of medication was collected through face-to-face questionnaires performed by trained interviewers. Since asthma and UBC might share risk factors, association between patients' characteristics and asthma was studied in UBC controls. Association between UBC and asthma was assessed using logistic regression unadjusted and adjusted for potential confounders. The complex interrelationships, direct and mediating effect of asthma on UBC, were appraised using counterfactual mediation models. Asthma was associated with a reduced risk of UBC (odds ratio (OR) = 0.54, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37, 0.79) after adjusting for a wide range of confounders. No mediating effect was identified. The reduced risk associated with asthma was restricted to patients with high-risk non-muscle invasive (OR = 0.25, 95%CI 0.10, 0.62) and muscle invasive UBC (OR = 0.32, 95%CI 0.15, 0.69). Our results support that asthma is associated with a decreased risk of UBC, especially among aggressive tumors. Further work on the relationship between asthma and other atopic conditions and cancer risk should shed light on the relationship between immune response mechanisms and bladder carcinogenesis. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Outcome of urinary bladder recurrence after partial cystectomy for en bloc urinary bladder adherent colorectal cancer resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao Lun; Tsai, Kai Lung; Lin, Shung Eing; Chiang, Po Hui

    2013-05-01

    Around 10 % of colorectal cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis. There are higher incidences for sigmoid and rectal cancer adhered to urinary bladder (UB) rather than other segments of colon cancer. Surgeons often performed partial cystectomy as possible for preservation of patient's life quality. This study investigates prognostic factors in patients who underwent bladder preservation en bloc resection for UB adherent colorectal cancer. From 2000 to 2011, 123 patients with clinically UB involvement colorectal cancer underwent primary colorectal cancer with urinary bladder resection. Seventeen patients were excluded because of the concurrent distant metastasis at diagnosis and another 22 patients were excluded because of total cystectomy with uretero-ileal urinary diversion. Finally, 84 patients with clinical stage IIIC (T4bN0M0, according to AJCC 7th edition) that underwent en bloc colorectal cancer resection with partial cystectomy were enrolled into this study for further analysis. Preoperative colovesical fistula and positive CT result were significantly more in the urinary bladder invasion group (p = 0.043 and 0.010, respectively). Pathological UB invasion is an independent predictor of intravesical recurrence (p = 0.04; HR, 10.71; 95 % CI = 1.12∼102.94) and distant metastasis (p = 0.016; HR, 4.85; 95 % CI = 1.34 ∼ 17.53) in multivariate analysis. For bladder preservation en bloc resection of urinary bladder adherent colorectal cancer, the pathological urinary bladder invasion is significantly associated with more urinary bladder recurrence and distant metastasis. This result helps surgeons make decisions at surgical planning and establish follow-up protocol.

  20. Bladder cancer: The combination of chemotherapy and irradiation in the treatment of patients with muscle-invading tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    1996-01-01

    In the USA the recommended treatment for patients with muscle-invading transitional cell cancer of the bladder is usually radical cystectomy. Conservative surgery irradiation, and cisplatin-based systemic chemotherapy are, however, each effective for some patients. Although they provide the opportunity for bladder preservation, each modality, when used alone, is inferior to radical cystectomy in terms of local control and, perhaps, survival. Many recent publications have now documented the efficacy of combined modality treatment protocols employing all three of these modalities together. All employ a selective approach in which the patients only receive full-dose radiation if they have had a complete response to induction CMT. Overall survival data for T2-T3a patients are certainly as good as any reported cystectomy series of similarly clinically staged and similar aged patients. Radiation adds very significantly to the transurethral resection and systemic chemotherapy to maintain the bladder free of tumor. Substantially higher rates of pathologic confirmation of complete response are found following transurethral surgery and chemoradiation when compared with transurethral surgery and chemotherapy omitting the radiation. Overall survival is as good as cystectomy based approaches at 48-54% and over 80% of these long-term survivors keep their bladders. Following such therapies, 20-30% will subsequently develop superficial tumors. These patients may still be well treated by standard methods using transurethral resection and intravesical drugs. The concern of urologists that the conserved irradiated bladder functions poorly has also been answered by recent reports using modern radiation techniques. The instance of cystectomy for bladder shrinkage is repeatedly below 2%. Furthermore, sexual function is commonly preserved. The systemic morbidity of the chemotherapy is relatively high, but new approached using anti-emetics and GCSF now allow this to be reduced. In many

  1. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

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    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Guzzo, Thomas [Department of Urology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Malkowicz, S. Bruce [Department of Urology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Christodouleas, John, E-mail: christojo@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  2. Summary of the 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank: new directions in urologic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatek, Robert S; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Galsky, Matthew D; Lee, Cheryl T; Latini, David M; Bochner, Bernard H; Weizer, Alon Z; Apolo, Andrea B; Sridhar, Srikala S; Kamat, Ashish M; Hansel, Donna; Flaig, Thomas W; Smith, Norm D; Lotan, Yair

    2013-10-01

    The 6th Annual Bladder Cancer Think Tank brought together a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and representatives from the National Cancer Institute and Industry in an effort to advance bladder cancer research efforts. This year's meeting comprised panel discussions and research involving 5 separate working groups, including the Survivorship, Clinical Trials, Standardization of Care, Data Mining, and Translational Science working groups. In this manuscript, the accomplishments and objectives of the working groups are summarized. Notable efforts include: (1) the development of a survivorship care plan for early and late-stage bladder cancer; (2) the development of consensus criteria for eligibility and endpoints for bladder cancer clinical trials; (3) an improved understanding of current practice patterns regarding the use of perioperative chemotherapy in an effort to standardize care; (4) creation of a comprehensive handbook to assist researchers with developing bladder cancer databases; and (5) identification of response to therapy of high-grade non muscle invasive disease through a collaborative exchange of expertise and resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Biofabricated Structures Reconstruct Functional Urinary Bladders in Radiation-injured Rat Bladders.

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    Imamura, Tetsuya; Shimamura, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Teruyuki; Minagawa, Tomonori; Nagai, Takashi; Silwal Gautam, Sudha; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2018-05-08

    The ability to repair damaged urinary bladders through the application of bone marrow-derived cells is in the earliest stages of development. We investigated the application of bone marrow-derived cells to repair radiation-injured bladders. We used a three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting robot system to biofabricate bone marrow-derived cell structures. We then determined if the biofabricated structures could restore the tissues and functions of radiation-injured bladders. The bladders of female 10-week-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were irradiated with 2-Gy once a week for 5 weeks. Adherent and proliferating bone marrow-derived cells harvested from the femurs of male 17-week-old green fluorescence protein-transfected Tg-SD rats were cultured in collagen-coated flasks. Bone marrow-derived cell spheroids were formed in 96-well plates. Three layers of spheroids were assembled by the bioprinter onto a 9x9 microneedle array. The assembled spheroids were perfusion cultured for 7 days, and then the microneedle array was removed. Two weeks after the last radiation treatment, the biofabricated structures were transplanted into an incision on the anterior wall of the bladders (n=10). Control rats received the same surgery but without the biofabricated structures (sham-structure, n=12). At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, the sham-structure control bladder tissues exhibited disorganized smooth muscle layers, decreased nerve cells, and significant fibrosis with increased presence of fibrosis-marker P4HB-positive cells and hypoxia-marker HIF1α-positive cells. The transplanted structures survived within the recipient tissues, and blood vessels extended within them from the recipient tissues. The bone marrow-derived cells in the structures differentiated into smooth muscle cells and formed smooth muscle clusters. The recipient tissues near the transplanted structures had distinct smooth muscle layers and reconstructed nerve cells, and only minimal fibrosis with decreased presence of P4

  4. Clinical impact of bladder biopsies with TUR-BT according to cytology results in patients with bladder cancer: a case control study

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    Matsumoto Kazuhiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There seems to be no consensus concerning taking bladder biopsies during transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT. We investigate the clinical significance of bladder biopsy with TUR-BT and the relationship between urinary cytology and the biopsy results. Methods We reviewed a total of 424 patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer treated with TUR-BT between 1998 and 2005. Of the total, 293 patients also underwent a bladder biopsy. Biopsies from suspicious-appearing urothelium (N = 59 and those from normal-appearing urothelium (N = 234 were evaluated separately. Results Bladder cancer was observed in 23 cases (39.0% who underwent a biopsy of suspicious-appearing urothelium. Among these 23 cases, 9 cases with visible tumor resection had carcinoma in situ (CIS only in the biopsies from suspicious-appearing urothelium. Urinary cytology was negative in 3 of the 9 cases. Bladder cancer was observed in 26 cases (11.1% who underwent a biopsy of normal-appearing urothelium. Of them, 5 cases with visible tumors had CIS only in the multiple biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium. Urinary cytology was positive in all of the 5 cases. No upstaging or upgrading cases were found in these patients by the addition of these two types of biopsy. Furthermore, therapy was not altered in these patients. With or without bladder biopsy was not a significant factor for tumor recurrence in either the univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusions Based on the results, it is concluded the multiple biopsies from normal-appearing urothelium are not necessary in patients with negative cytology results because of the low detection rate and lack of influence on therapeutic decisions. Meanwhile, biopsy of suspicious-appearing urothelium is needed in patients with negative cytology results in order to detect CIS due to staging properties. This result supports a recent EAU guideline.

  5. Bladder cancer risk associated with genotypic polymorphism of the matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 7 in North Indian population.

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    Srivastava, Priyanka; Gangwar, Ruchika; Kapoor, Rakesh; Mittal, Rama D

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to tumor invasion and microenvironment, hence are associated with bladder cancer risk. We therefore, tested whether polymorphisms in MMP genes modify the risk of bladder cancer (BC) and whether smoke exposure modifies this risk. Genotyping was performed in 200 BC patients and 200 controls by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). MMP1-1607 2G/2G and MMP7-181 GG genotype were associated with increased risk of BC (p BCG) treated non muscle invasive BC (NMIBC) patients (log rank p, 0.030). Our data suggested that MMP1-1607 2G and MMP7-181 G allele were associated with high risk of BC, which was quite evident amongst smokers too. BCG treated NMIBC patients reflected protective effect for 2G allele carrier (1G/2G + 2G/2G) of MMP1-1607. This study provided new support for the association of MMP1-1607 and MMP7-181 in bladder cancer development, the tumorigenic effect of which was observed to be more enhanced in case of tobacco exposure.

  6. Null mutation for Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF is associated with less aggressive bladder cancer in mice

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    Tsimikas John

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory cytokines may promote tumorigenesis. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is a proinflammatory cytokine with regulatory properties over tumor suppressor proteins involved in bladder cancer. We studied the development of bladder cancer in wild type (WT and MIF knockout (KO mice given N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl-nitrosamine (BBN, a known carcinogen, to determine the role of MIF in bladder cancer initiation and progression. Methods 5-month old male C57Bl/6 MIF WT and KO mice were treated with and without BBN. Animals were sacrificed at intervals up to 23 weeks of treatment. Bladder tumor stage and grade were evaluated by H&E. Immunohistochemical (IHC analysis was performed for MIF and platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, a measure of vascularization. MIF mRNA was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Poorly differentiated carcinoma developed in all BBN treated mice by week 20. MIF WT animals developed T2 disease, while KO animals developed only T1 disease. MIF IHC revealed predominantly urothelial cytoplasmic staining in the WT control animals and a shift toward nuclear staining in WT BBN treated animals. MIF mRNA levels were 3-fold higher in BBN treated animals relative to controls when invasive cancer was present. PECAM-1 staining revealed significantly more stromal vessels in the tumors in WT animals when compared to KOs. Conclusion Muscle invasive bladder cancer with increased stromal vascularity was associated with increased MIF mRNA levels and nuclear redistribution. Consistently lower stage tumors were seen in MIF KO compared to WT mice. These data suggest that MIF may play a role in the progression to invasive bladder cancer.

  7. The evolution of bladder cancer genomics: What have we learned and how can we use it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audenet, François; Attalla, Kyrollis; Sfakianos, John P

    2018-03-21

    With advancements in molecular biology techniques, great progress has been made in the understanding of urothelial carcinoma pathogenesis. To examine the historic description of molecular alterations in bladder cancer and their evolution towards our current comprehension of the biology of the disease. Historically, a two-pathway model was described from histological and cytogenetic studies: low-grade papillary non-muscle invasive bladder cancers (NMIBC) were described to arise from epithelial hyperplasia with loss of chromosome 9 as an early event, whereas muscle-invasive bladder cancers (MIBC) were considered to develop from dysplasia, associated with genetic instability. Although there could be connections between the 2 pathways, NMIBC and MIBC were largely believed to develop secondary to different molecular alterations. Next-generation sequencing has allowed important insights into cancer biology and a better understanding of the pathways involved in bladder cancer pathogenesis and heterogeneity. Urothelial carcinoma has been found to have a high frequency of somatic mutations compared to other solid tumors, including several mutations in multiple signaling pathways, such as cell cycle regulators (TP53, RB1), RTK/RAS/RAF pathway, PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and TERT gene promoter. Epigenetic changes and mutations in chromatin remodeling genes are especially frequent in bladder cancer. Mutations in FGFR3 and KDM6A are more common in NMIBC than in MIBC, whereas mutations in TP53 and KMT2D are more common in MIBC, suggesting the previously hypothesized 2 different pathways, with a subset of tumors progressing from NMIBC to MIBC. Using comprehensive RNA expression profiling studies, at least 5 subtypes of bladder cancer have been identified, the most fundamental division being Basal/Squamous-like and Luminal. These subtypes have different prognoses, natural histories and responses to systemic treatments: Luminal subtypes are enriched with papillary histology and have a

  8. A combined analysis of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, and Medical Research Council randomized clinical trials for the prophylactic treatment of stage TaT1 bladder cancer. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Genitourinary Tract Cancer Cooperative Group and the Medical Research Council Working Party on Superficial Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawinski, A.; Sylvester, R.; Kurth, K. H.; Bouffioux, C.; van der Meijden, A.; Parmar, M. K.; Bijnens, L.

    1996-01-01

    The use of prophylactic agents after primary resection can decrease the incidence of tumor recurrence in patients with stage TaT1 bladder cancer. However, the long-term impact on progression to muscle invasive disease as well as on duration of survival is unknown. A combined analysis of individual

  9. [Systematic review on conservative treatment options in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer patients refractory to Bacillus Calmette-Guérin instillation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Thomas; Wezel, Felix; Löbig, Niklas; Mitterberger, Michael J; Colleselli, Daniela

    2017-08-01

    Background Adjuvant Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) intravesical instillation is the recommended standard treatment in patients with high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, a significant proportion of patients fail treatment, and radical cystectomy (RC) is the subsequent gold standard. On the other hand, there is an unmet need for conservative alternatives for patients who are unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. This study aimed to identify conservative treatment options in NMIBC patients after BCG failure. Material and Methods We performed a systematic search in the databases Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and EMBASE, including all randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-RCTs and single-arm studies, in which patients with NMIBC were treated with second-line intravesical or systemic therapy after BCG failure. A minimum of eight patients were included in each treatment arm. Full papers were restricted to English language. Literature research and data analysis were assessed independently by two reviewers. Data on treatment response, recurrence, time to recurrence, progression and rate of cystectomy were collected and analysed. Results  This systematic review included 42 publications with a total of 3521 patients (2371 BCG failures). Valrubicin, taxanes, gemcitabine, combination chemotherapy, thermochemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, combination of BCG and interferon and immunotherapies or targeted therapies were identified as conservative treatment options. For taxanes, gemcitabine and thermochemotherapy there is the highest evidence for a clinical meaningful response with minor toxicities. Conclusions Despite some promising response rates for taxanes, gemcitabine or thermochemotherapy, an evidence-based recommendation for treatment options superior to RC in patients failing BCG therapy cannot be made. The definition of BCG failure is still inconsistent and heterogeneous outcomes in patients with BCG

  10. Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group: 2011 consensus guidelines for curative radiotherapy for urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindson, Benjamin R.; Turner, Sandra L.; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2012-01-01

    Curative radiotherapy, with or without concurrent chemotherapy, is recognized as a standard treatment option for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. It is commonly used for two distinct groups of patients: either for those medically unfit for surgery, or as part of a 'bladder preserving' management plan incorporating the possibility of salvage cystectomy. However, in both situations, the approach to radiotherapy varies widely around the world. The Australian and New Zealand Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group recognised a need to develop consistent, evidence-based guidelines for patient selection and radiotherapy technique in the delivery of curative radiotherapy. Following a workshop convened in May 2009, a working party collated opinions and conducted a wide literature appraisal linking each recommendation with the best available evidence. This process was subject to ongoing re-presentation to the Faculty of Radiation Oncology Genito-Urinary Group members prior to final endorsement. These Guidelines include patient selection, radiation target delineation, dose and fractionation schedules, normal tissue constraints and investigational techniques. Particular emphasis is given to the rationale for the target volumes described. These Guidelines provide a consensus-based framework for the delivery of curative radiotherapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Widespread input from radiation oncologists treating bladder cancer ensures that these techniques are feasible in practice. We recommend these Guidelines be adopted widely in order to encourage a uniformly high standard of radiotherapy in this setting, and to allow for better comparison of outcomes.

  11. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

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    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  12. A Phase 1/2 Trial of a Combination of Paclitaxel and Trastuzumab With Daily Irradiation or Paclitaxel Alone With Daily Irradiation After Transurethral Surgery for Noncystectomy Candidates With Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer (Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 0524)

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    Michaelson, M. Dror, E-mail: dmichaelson1@partners.org [Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hu, Chen [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sydney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Virginia Mason CCOP, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dahl, Douglas M.; Lee-Wu, Chin [Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Swanson, Gregory P. [University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Vuky, Jacqueline [Virginia Mason CCOP, Seattle, Washington (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Chang, Brian [Parkview Cancer Center, Parkview Hospital, Fort Wayne, Indiana (United States); George, Asha [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Shipley, William [Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Bladder preservation therapy is an effective treatment for muscle-invasive urothelial carcinoma (UC). In this study we treated noncystectomy candidates with daily radiation and weekly paclitaxel for 7 weeks. Patients whose tumors showed her2/neu overexpression were additionally treated with weekly trastuzumab. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight evaluable patients were treated with radiation therapy and either paclitaxel + trastuzumab (group 1) or paclitaxel alone (group 2). Groups were assigned on the basis of her2/neu immunohistochemistry results. Patients received 1.8-Gy fractions to a total dose of 64.8 Gy. The primary endpoint of the study was treatment-related toxicity, and secondary endpoints included complete response (CR) rate, protocol completion rate, and survival. Results: A total of 20 evaluable patients were treated in group 1 and 46 patients in group 2. Acute treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were observed in 7 of 20 patients in group 1 (35%) and 14 of 46 patients in group 2 (30.4%). Protocol therapy was completed by 60% (group 1) and 74% (group 2) of patients. Most incompletions were due to toxicity, and the majority of AEs were gastrointestinal, including 1 grade 5 AE (group 1). Two other deaths (both in group 2) were unrelated to protocol therapy. No unexpected cardiac, hematologic, or other toxicities were observed. The CR rate at 1 year was 72% for group 1 and 68% for group 2. Conclusions: In patients with muscle-invasive UC who are not candidates for cystectomy, daily radiation combined with paclitaxel is an effective treatment strategy with a high completion rate and moderate toxicity. In patients with her2/neu-positive tumors, a group generally considered to have worse outcomes, the addition of trastuzumab appears to result in comparable efficacy and toxicity. Further biomarker-driven trials should be undertaken in advancing treatment of this challenging disease.

  13. Robotic Extramucosal Excision of Bladder Wall Leiomyoma

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    Khalid E. Al-Othman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple case reports and reviews have been described in the literature for bladder wall leiomyoma resection via different approaches. The minimally invasive partial cystectomy remains the most widely accepted technique; however, case reports for enucleation of bladder wall leiomyoma have also been described. The purpose of this video is to demonstrate the robotic extramucosal excision of a bladder wall leiomyoma, without cystotomy, but with complete removal of the muscular layer. Materials and Methods: A 35-year old male present with lower urinary tract symptoms and imaging showed bladder wall mass with histopathology showed leiomyoma. The patient consented for mass excision with the possibility of a partial cystectomy. The patient was placed in the supine, 30-degree Trendelenburg position during the procedure. A total of 4 ports were inserted. A 3-arm da Vinci robotic surgical system was docked, and the arms were connected. Extramucosal excision was accomplished without cystotomy and muscle approximation was achieved by 2 0 Vicryle. Result: The operative time was 90 minutes, blood loss of approximately 50mL and the patient was discharged after 72 hours with no immediate complications and a 6 months follow-up showed no recurrence. Conclusion: Such a technique results in complete excision of the tumor, without cystotomy, and also maintains an intact mucosa. These steps, in addition to decreasing the risk of local recurrence, also shorten the period of postoperative catheterization and hospitalization.

  14. Urothelial carcinoma associated 1 is a hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-targeted long noncoding RNA that enhances hypoxic bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mei; Li, Xu; Li, Zhengkun; Chen, Wei

    2014-07-01

    Urothelial carcinoma associated 1 (UCA1) has been identified as an oncogenic long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) that is involved in bladder cancer progression and acts as a diagnostic biomarker for bladder carcinoma. Here, we studied the expression and function of lncRNA-UCA1 in the hypoxic microenvironment of bladder cancer. The expression and transcriptional activity of lncRNA-UCA1 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and luciferase assays. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated by MTT assays and flow cytometry. Cell migration and invasion were detected by wound healing, migration, and invasion assays. The binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to hypoxia response elements (HREs) in the lncRNA-UCA1 promoter was confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. HRE mutations were generated by using a site-directed mutagenesis kit, and HIF-1α knockdown was mediated by small interfering RNA. The effect of HIF-1α inhibition by YC-1 on lncRNA-UCA1 expression was also examined. LncRNA-UCA1 was upregulated by hypoxia in bladder cancer cells. Under hypoxic conditions, lncRNA-UCA1 upregulation increased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion and inhibited apoptosis. The underlying mechanism of hypoxia-upregulated lncRNA-UCA1 expression was that HIF-1α specifically bound to HREs in the lncRNA-UCA1 promoter. Furthermore, HIF-1α knockdown or inhibition could prevent lncRNA-UCA1 upregulation under hypoxia. These findings revealed the mechanism of lncRNA-UCA1 upregulation in hypoxic bladder cancer cells and suggested that effective blocking of lncRNA-UCA1 expression in the hypoxic microenvironment of bladder cancer could be a novel therapeutic strategy.

  15. Endometrial stem cell differentiation into smooth muscle cell: a novel approach for bladder tissue engineering in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoae-Hassani, Alireza; Sharif, Shiva; Seifalian, Alexander M; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Rezaie, Sassan; Verdi, Javad

    2013-10-01

    To investigate manufacturing smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for regenerative bladder reconstruction from differentiation of endometrial stem cells (EnSCs), as the recent discovery of EnSCs from the lining of women's uteri, opens up the possibility of using these cells for tissue engineering applications, such as building up natural tissue to repair prolapsed pelvic floors as well as building urinary bladder wall. Human EnSCs that were positive for cluster of differentiation 146 (CD146), CD105 and CD90 were isolated and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagle/F12 medium supplemented with myogenic growth factors. The myogenic factors included: transforming growth factor β, platelet-derived growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Differentiated SMCs on bioabsorbable polyethylene-glycol and collagen hydrogels were checked for SMC markers by real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), western blot (WB) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) analyses. Histology confirmed the growth of SMCs in the hydrogel matrices. The myogenic growth factors decreased the proliferation rate of EnSCs, but they differentiated the human EnSCs into SMCs more efficiently on hydrogel matrices and expressed specific SMC markers including α-smooth muscle actin, desmin, vinculin and calponin in RT-PCR, WB and ICC experiments. The survival rate of cultures on the hydrogel-coated matrices was significantly higher than uncoated cultures. Human EnSCs were successfully differentiated into SMCs, using hydrogels as scaffold. EnSCs may be used for autologous bladder wall regeneration without any immunological complications in women. Currently work is in progress using bioabsorbable nanocomposite materials as EnSC scaffolds for developing urinary bladder wall tissue. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  16. The prognostic value of family history among patients with urinary bladder cancer.

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    Egbers, Lieke; Grotenhuis, Anne J; Aben, Katja K; Alfred Witjes, J; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Vermeulen, Sita H

    2015-03-01

    A history of urinary bladder cancer (UBC) in first-degree relatives increases UBC risk by twofold. The influence of positive family history on UBC prognosis is unknown. Here, we investigated association of first-degree UBC family history with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of UBC patients. Detailed clinical data of 1,465 non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and 250 muscle-invasive or metastatic bladder cancer (MIBC) patients, diagnosed from 1995 to 2010, were collected through medical file review. Competing risk analyses were used to compare recurrence-free survival (RFS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of NMIBC patients according to self-reported UBC family history. Overall survival in MIBC patients was estimated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. The added value of family history in prediction of NMIBC prognosis was quantified with Harrell's concordance-index. Hundred (6.8%) NMIBC and 14 (5.6%) MIBC patients reported UBC in first-degree relatives. Positive family history was statistically significantly associated with smaller tumor size and non-significantly with more favorable distribution of other tumor characteristics. In univariable analyses, positive family history correlated with longer RFS (p = 0.11) and PFS (p = 0.04). Hazard ratios for positive vs. negative family history after adjustment for clinicopathological characteristics were 0.75 (95% CI = 0.53-1.07) and 0.45 (95% CI = 0.18-1.12) for RFS and PFS, respectively. Five familial and 48 sporadic MIBC patients (Kaplan-Meier 10-year risk: 41% and 25%) died within 10 years. Family history did not improve the c-index of prediction models. This study shows that a first-degree family history of UBC is not clearly associated with NMIBC prognosis. Family history does not aid in prediction of NMIBC recurrence or progression. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  17. Assessment of range of uric and serum biomarkers in determination of bladder cancer severity

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    Popkov V.M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish efficiency of a range of uric and serum biomarkers of bladder cancer for diagnostics and the prognosis of risk of development of disease recurrence. Material and methods: TPA and TPS, VEGF level research in blood serum, UBC in urine in 176 people, among which 135 patients with bladder cancer (RMP have been conducted. Group of comparison has included16 patients (patients with cystitis. The control group has been made of 25 almost healthy men. 75 patients had non-muscle invasive RMP (Ta-1N0M0. Results. It has been statistically determined that reliable growth of of TPA, TPS in blood serum and UBC in urine in patients with non-muscle invasive RMP in comparison with patients in groups of control and comparison has been established. The increase of UBC in urine of patients of this group with recurrence of tumoral growth within a year has been noted. In comparison with cytological research of urine sedimentation, molecular markers of RMP (the uric UBC and serum TPA, TPS possess diagnostic sensitivity, allow to confirm the presence of disease, to carry out diagnostics of stages of organ and extra invasion. RMP is possible to consider as an additional prognostic serum marker increase in the VEGF level in blood serum. Conclusion. Inclusion in diagnostic process in the clinical research of biomarkers showed that identification of NMIRMP increased from 18,1% in 2006 to 55,6% in 2011. The chosen volume of complex treatment allowed to reduce recurrence and lethality in the first two years from 32 to 15,5%.

  18. Pelvic floor muscle training in women with stress urinary incontinence causes hypertrophy of the urethral sphincters and reduces bladder neck mobility during coughing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Linda; Varette, Kevin; Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; Harvey, Marie-Andree; Baker, Kevin; Sauerbrei, Eric

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 12-week pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training program on urethral morphology and mobility in women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Forty women with SUI were randomly assigned to one of two groups: the treatment group received 12 weekly physiotherapy sessions during which they learned how to properly contract their pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) and a home exercise program was prescribed, reviewed, and progressed; the control group received no treatment. Before and after the 12-week study period, ultrasound imaging was used to evaluate bladder neck position and mobility during coughing and Valsalva maneuver in supine and in standing, as well as urethral morphology. Secondary outcome measures included a 3-day bladder diary, 30-min pad test, the Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and the Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6). The women in the treatment group demonstrated reduced bladder neck mobility during coughing and increased cross-sectional area of their urethra after as compared to before the training. These changes were not evident in the control group. No differences in the resting position of the bladder neck or in bladder neck excursion during Valsalva maneuver were noted in either group. Concomitantly the women in the treatment group demonstrated significant improvements in the 3-day bladder diary and IIQ-7 after the PFM training and improved significantly more than the control group. Physiotherapist-supervised PFM training reduces bladder neck motion during coughing, and results in hypertrophy of the urethral sphincter in women who present with SUI. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A 3-plex methylation assay combined with the FGFR3 mutation assay sensitively detects recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandimalla, Raju; Masius, Roy; Beukers, Willemien

    2013-01-01

    is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a urine assay for the diagnosis of recurrences in patients with a previous primary NMIBC G1/G2 by using cystoscopy as the reference standard. Experimental Design: We selected eight CpG islands (CGI) methylated in bladder cancer from our earlier genome-wide study......Purpose: DNA methylation is associated with bladder cancer and these modifications could serve as useful biomarkers. FGFR3 mutations are present in 60% to 70% of non–muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Low-grade bladder cancer recurs in more than 50% of patients. The aim of this study......, and nonmalignant urines (n = 130). Results: The 3-plex assay identified recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine with a sensitivity of 74% in the validation set. In combination with the FGFR3 mutation assay, a sensitivity of 79% was reached (specificity of 77%). Sensitivity of FGFR3 and cytology was 52% and 57...

  20. Results of a Phase 1 Dose Escalation Study of Intravesical TMX-101 in Patients with Nonmuscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, Johannes; Lammers, Rianne J. M.; Arentsen, Harm C.; Ravic, Miroslav; Pozzi, Raffaella; Cornel, Erik B.; Vergunst, Henk; de Reijke, Theo M.; Witjes, J. Alfred

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Imiquimod, a toll like receptor 7 (TLR-7) agonist, is effective as a topical treatment for skin malignancies. TMX-101 is a liquid formulation of imiquimod. In this study we establish a safety profile of TMX-101 in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Materials and Methods: We

  1. Results of a phase 1 dose escalation study of intravesical TMX-101 in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falke, J.; Lammers, R.; Arentsen, H.C.; Ravic, M.; Pozzi, R.; Cornel, E.B.; Vergunst, H.; Reijke, T.M. de; Witjes, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Imiquimod, a toll like receptor 7 (TLR-7) agonist, is effective as a topical treatment for skin malignancies. TMX-101 is a liquid formulation of imiquimod. In this study we establish a safety profile of TMX-101 in patients with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We

  2. The influence of the level of lamina propria invasion and the prevalence of p53 nuclear accumulation on survival in stage T1 transitional cell bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Horn, T; Steven, K

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: We assessed the influence of the level of lamina propria invasion and the prevalence of p53 nuclear immunoreactivity on the survival of patients with stage T1 transitional cell bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All patients presenting with stage T1 bladder cancer were prospectively...... and routinely grouped according to the level of lamina propria invasion. Invasion of the tumor stalk was defined as stage T1a, invasion of the lamina propria proper superficial to the level of muscularis mucosa as stage T1b and into or deeper than the muscularis mucosa as stage T1c. The p53 nuclear...... related to age, level of lamina propria invasion and presence of p53 nuclear accumulation. For this subpopulation overall survival was 67%, and 79% for stage T1a, 70% for stage T1b and 57% for stage T1c (p

  3. A STUDY OF P53 EXPRESSION IN UROTHELIAL NEOPLASMS OF URINARY BLADDER

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    G. Sathish Kumar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Urothelial Cell Carcinoma (UCC of urinary bladder is the seventh commonest cancer wordwide.1 At initial diagnosis, 30% of UCC display solid and invasive growth patterns and are locally advanced or metastatic at the time of diagnosis. 70% of tumours are noninvasive papillary UCC confined to the epithelium and subepithelial connective tissue,2 which can be managed by endoscopic resection. A significant number of post-resected cases, progress for recurrence of tumour and infiltration to muscle layers. Invasive bladder cancer has high morbidity and uniform mortality when it is metastatic. There are no effective tools to predict aggressiveness of tumour, so that these cases can be managed more successfully. Mutated Tp53/p53 is the genetic abnormality most frequently associated with UCC and related to cell transformation, malignancy and high recurrence rates.2 MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a descriptive study conducted in the departments of urology and pathology and during the period of March 2014 to February 2015. All consecutive cystoscopic biopsies, Trans urethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT and radical cystectomy specimens histopathologically diagnosed as UCC were included in the study. p53 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Positive and negative controls were used. Bivariate analysis was done using Chi-square test in all cases. RESULTS A total of 80 cases were analysed. Significant association of p53 expression was found in higher grades of tumour. Also, noted relation of p53 mutation with tumour size, multifocality, multiplicity, muscle invasion and tumour stage, which were statistically not significant. CONCLUSION Bladder tumour grade shows significant association to p53 expression. Papillary neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP tumours are negative for p53, and in the present study, there was significant difference in p53 over expression low-grade papillary UCC compared with PUNLMP. 90% of low

  4. Advances in immunotherapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyu; Chen Lijun

    2009-01-01

    The conventional treatments for bladder cancer, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, are highly invasive and bring about lots of side effects. Immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for the treatment of malignant tumors. This review presents the research advances in immunotherapy of bladder cancer. (authors)

  5. p53 Status correlates with the risk of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancers treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhou

    Full Text Available Published studies have yielded inconsistent results on the relationship between p53 status and the prognosis of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG intravesical therapy. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic value of p53 in NMIBC treated with BCG.We systematically searched for relevant literature in PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI, and Chinese Wanfang databases. Hazard ratios (HRs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs were combined as the effect size (ES across studies for recurrence-free survival (RFS and progression-free survival (PFS.A total of 11 studies, consisting of 1,049 participants, met the criteria. Overall, there was no clear relationship between p53 status and RFS or PFS for NMIBC patients treated with BCG (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 0.91-2.16; HR: 1.37, 95% CI: 0.90-2.09, respectively. Obvious heterogeneity was observed across the studies (I2 = 69.5%, P = 0.001; I2 = 44.7%, P = 0.081, respectively. In stratified analysis by region, p53 overexpression was a predictor of poor RFS in Asian populations (HR: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.08-2.27. In addition, after excluding the studies that possibly contributed to the heterogeneity by the Galbraith plot, the overall association for RFS became statistically significant (HR: 1.38 95% CI: 1.08-1.77 without evidence of heterogeneity (I2 = 0.0%, P = 0.499.This meta-analysis suggests that p53 overexpression in NMIBC patients treated with BCG may be associated with RFS, especially in Asian populations. Because of the heterogeneity and other limitations, further studies with rigid criteria and large populations are still warranted to confirm our findings.

  6. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  7. Polymorphisms and plasma levels of IL-27: impact on genetic susceptibility and clinical outcome of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Peng; Tang, Tielong; Liao, Hong; Zhang, Kui; Pu, Yan; Chen, Peng; Song, Yaping; Zhang, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) has been recognized as a pleiotropic cytokine with both pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. Few studies have investigated polymorphisms and serum/plasma levels of IL-27 in diseases including cancers. This study has analyzed the associations of IL-27 gene polymorphisms, as well as plasma levels of IL-27, with susceptibility to bladder cancer and clinical outcome. Three hundred and thirty-two patients (nonmuscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC)/muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC): 176/156) included in a 60-month follow-up program and 499 controls were enrolled. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs153109 and rs17855750, were genotyped by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) -restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. Plasma concentration of IL-27 was determined by ELISA in 124 patients (NMIBC/MIBC: 50/74) and 151 controls. Significantly increased risk for bladder cancer was associated with AG/GG genotypes of rs153109 (P = 0.029). No GG genotype of rs17855750 was observed in controls, while 4 patients were found to be GG homozygotes, suggesting GG genotype may be associated with bladder cancer risk (P = 0.006). For bladder cancer patients, SNP rs17855750 was also associated with increased risk for MIBC. For MIBC patients, but not NMIBC, TG/GG genotypes of rs17855750 turned out to be a protective factor for overall survival (P = 0.035). Significantly reduced plasma levels of IL-27 were observed in both NMIBC and MIBC patients compared with controls (P < 0.0001). Our data suggest that polymorphisms and reduced plasma levels of IL-27 may predict the susceptibility to bladder cancer, and rs17855750 may be a useful marker to distinguish patients with high risk of death

  8. Bladder wall thickness and ultrasound estimated bladder weight in healthy adults with portative ultrasound device

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    Selcen Kanyilmaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate bladder wall thickness (BWT and ultrasound estimated bladder weight (UEBW values in healthy population with a portative ultrasound device and their relationship with demographic parameters. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in Neurorehabilitation Clinic of Ege University Hospital. Ninety-five subjects (48 women and 47 men aged between 18 and 56 were included in the study. BWT and UEBW were determined non-invasively with a portative ultrasound device; Bladder Scan BVM 6500 (Verathon Inc., WA, USA at a frequency of 3.7 MHz at functional bladder capacity. These values were compared by gender, and their relation was assessed with age, body mass index (BMI and parity. Results: Mean BWT was 2.0 ± 0.4 mm and UEBW was 44.6 ± 8.3 g at a mean volume of 338.0 ± 82.1 ml. Although higher results were obtained in men at higher bladder volumes, the results did not differ significantly by gender. Correlation analyses revealed statistically significant correlation between UEBW and age (r = 0.32. BWT was negatively correlated with volume (r = -0.50 and bladder surface area (r = -0.57. Also, statistically significant correlations were observed between UEBW and volume (r = 0.36, bladder surface area (r = 0.48 and BWT (r = 0.25. Conclusion: Determined values of BWT and UEBW in healthy population are estimated with portative ultrasound devices, which are future promising, for their convenient, easy, non-invasive, time-efficient hand-held use for screening.

  9. Preoperative lymph-node staging of invasive urothelial bladder cancer with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thor Knak; Holt, Per; Gerke, Oke

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The treatment and prognosis of bladder cancer are based on the depth of primary tumour invasion and the presence of metastases. A highly accurate preoperative tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) staging is critical to proper patient management and treatment. This study retrospectively...... investigated the value of ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed axial tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for preoperative N staging of bladder cancer. Material and methods. From June 2006 to January 2008, 48 consecutive patients diagnosed with bladder......) for MRI and ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT, respectively. The differences in specificity and negative predictive values were not statistically significant. Conclusions. No significant statistical difference between ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT and MRI for preoperative N staging of urothelial bladder cancer was found in the study...

  10. Effect of diabetes on the ion pumps of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Seham

    2013-01-01

    To establish whether the activities of Na+/K+-adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and Ca2+-ATPases ion pumps in bladder smooth muscle are altered as a consequence of diabetes and, if so, how this might contribute to bladder cystopathy. Urinary bladder dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with diabetes. Pressure generation requires calcium and cytosolic ATP. Activities of these pumps are responsible for calcium homeostasis. Rat urinary detrusor muscle strips were suspended in organ baths containing Krebs solution for isometric tension recording. Tissue responses to the Na+/K+-ATPase pump inhibitor, ouabain, the plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, vanadate, and the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase inhibitor, cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), were examined from normal and streptozocin-induced diabetic rats for 2, 4, and 12 weeks. Ouabain, vanadate, and CPA caused concentration-dependent contractions of bladder strips from diabetic and normal rats. The degree of contraction of diabetic bladder muscle was lower than that of controls. This reduction was a function of duration of diabetes. For ouabain, the reduction peaked at 2 weeks, with partial restoration to normal after diabetes induction. For vanadate and CPA, the reduction increased with the duration of diabetes. The ion pumps are important modulators of bladder smooth muscle tone, and in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, the activity of these pumps is impaired. Although this is only a single model of diabetes, these findings suggest that a defect in these pumps may be an important component of the development of diabetic bladder cystopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radical cystectomy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer with variant histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetterlein, Malte W; Wankowicz, Stephanie A M; Seisen, Thomas; Lander, Richard; Löppenberg, Björn; Chun, Felix K-H; Menon, Mani; Sun, Maxine; Barletta, Justine A; Choueiri, Toni K; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Preston, Mark A

    2017-11-15

    Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in pure urothelial bladder cancer provides a significant survival benefit. However, to the authors' knowledge, it is unknown whether this benefit persists in histological variants. The objective of the current study was to assess the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on the probability of non-organ-confined disease and overall survival after radical cystectomy (RC) in patients with histological variants. Querying the National Cancer Data Base, the authors identified 2018 patients with histological variants who were undergoing RC for bladder cancer between 2003 and 2012. Variants were categorized as micropapillary or sarcomatoid differentiation, squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, and other histology. Logistic regression models estimated the odds of non-organ-confined disease at the time of RC for each histological variant, stratified by the receipt of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cox regression models were used to examine the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on overall mortality in each variant subgroup. Patients with neuroendocrine tumors (odds ratio [OR], 0.16; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.08-0.32 [Pchemotherapy. An overall survival benefit for neoadjuvant chemotherapy was only found in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.33-0.74 [P=.001]). Patients with neuroendocrine tumors benefit from neoadjuvant chemotherapy, as evidenced by better overall survival and lower rates of non-organ-confined disease at the time of RC. For tumors with micropapillary differentiation, sarcomatoid differentiation, or adenocarcinoma, neoadjuvant chemotherapy decreased the frequency of non-organ-confined disease at the time of RC. However, this favorable effect did not translate into a statistically significant overall survival benefit for these patients, potentially due to the aggressive tumor biology. Cancer 2017;123:4346-55. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  12. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, A.; Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A.; Bankart, M.J.G.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial (≤T1) from invasive (≥T2) and in differentiating organ-confined (≤T2) from non-organ-confined (≥T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial (≤T1) from invasive (≥T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined (≤T2) from non-organ confined (≥T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  13. Bladder cancer: Evaluation of staging accuracy using dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, A., E-mail: arajesh27@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Sokhi, H.K.; Fung, R.; Mulcahy, K.A. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester General Hospital (United Kingdom); Bankart, M.J.G. [Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Aim: To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in staging bladder cancer and to assess whether dynamic gadolinium-enhanced sequences have any added benefit in staging. Materials and methods: Over a 22 month period, the MRI findings of 100 consecutive patients with histologically proven transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were reviewed. The T stage was assessed independently on T2-weighted imaging alone and in combination with gadolinium-enhanced MRI. The final histological diagnosis was considered the reference standard. Statistical analysis was performed to ascertain stage-by-stage accuracy. Accuracy of MRI in differentiating superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) and in differentiating organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ-confined ({>=}T3) disease was assessed. Results: On a stage-by-stage basis, tumours were correctly staged using MRI in 63% of patients (observed agreement = 0.63, weighted kappa = 0.57). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between superficial ({<=}T1) from invasive ({>=}T2) disease was 78.2 and 93.3%. The observed agreement for this group was 85% (kappa = 70%; p < 0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of MRI to differentiate between organ-confined ({<=}T2) from non-organ confined ({>=}T3) disease was 90.5 and 60%. The observed agreement for this group was 89% (kappa = 30%; p < 0.01). Gadolinium-enhanced images improved staging in only three patients. Conclusion: In the present study MRI was found to be a moderately accurate tool in assessing the T stage. Agreement on a stage-by-stage basis was good. Agreement for differentiating between non-invasive versus muscle-invasive disease was good and that for organ-confined versus non-organ-confined disease was fair. Routine use of gadolinium-enhanced images is not routinely required.

  14. Monitoring treatment response and metastatic relapse in advanced bladder cancer by liquid biopsy analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Christensen, Emil; Nordentoft, Iver Kristiansen

    2017-01-01

    of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma and urine to detect metastatic relapse after cystectomy and measure treatment efficacy. We exome sequenced tumour and germline DNA from patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and monitored ctDNA in 370 liquid biopsies throughout the disease courses by 84......DNA detection in plasma and diagnosis of relapse was 101 d after cystectomy (range 0-932 d). Early detection of metastatic relapse and treatment response using liquid biopsies represents a novel, highly sensitive tool for monitoring patients, supporting clinicians, and guiding treatment decisions. PATIENT...

  15. Mycobacterium Brumae Extract Fractions with Potential Immunotherapeutic Activity for Bladder Cancer

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    Zeliha Ertürk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Immunotherapy with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG application is a gold standard treatment for high risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC, despite its local and systemic side effects. We aimed to develop less toxic and more powerful therapeutic agents for the treatment of bladder cancer than live strain. Materials and Methods: Immunostimulated and non-pathogenic Mycobacterium brumae strains resembling BCG with cytotoxic activities were used. The bacteria were sonicated after heat treatment. Samples prepared by aqueous solution and acetone were subjected to high performance liquid chromatography on reverse phase and strong ion exchange columns. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α stimulating activities and the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectroscopy findings of the samples were analysed. Results: As a result, it was revealed that two components, m/z ratios around 1800 and another around m/z 3600 could be responsible for TNF-α stimulating activity. Conclusion: These components have a potential to develop of new agents for NMIBC treatment.

  16. Management of obstructive urolithiasis in dairy calves with intact bladder and urethra by Fazili’s minimally invasive tube cystotomy technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujeeb ur Rehman Fazili

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was planned to evaluate minimally invasive tube cystotomy technique in calves suffering from obstructive urolithiasis having intact urinary bladder and urethra. Fifteen male non-castrated calves with age ranging from 1-10 months (mean 4.05 months, presented for treatment within one to three days (mean 2.2 days of complete urinary tract obstruction due to urethral calculi with intact bladder and urethra, were included in this study. Under light sedation and local infiltration anaesthesia, all the animals were subjected through left paralumbar fossa, to a minimally invasive surgical tube cystotomy in which catheter was placed in the bladder lumen through a metallic cannula and fixed to the skin with a stay suture (Fazili’s technique. All the animals were discharged the same day. Time taken for the procedure varied from 8 to 17 minutes (mean 11.0 minutes. Normal urination resumed in twelve (80.0% calves. Mean time taken for normal urination was 10.50 days. In two of the remaining calves, urine flow stopped through the catheter prematurely and they were then subjected to standard surgical tube cystotomy. One more calf did not urinate normally for 30 postoperative days and was lost to the follow up thereafter. Recurrence of the obstruction was not detected in ten and nine animals observed up to six and 12 months respectively. In conclusion, the outcome of this minimally invasive technique is similar to the standard tube cystectomy. Additionally, the procedure is cost effective, quick, simple and field applicable. It also minimizes exposure of abdominal cavity of metabolically compromised animals. However, the technique needs to be tried in larger number of such calves wherein better quality catheter of larger diameter be used before recommending its extensive use.

  17. Modeling bladder cancer in mice: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Owczarek, Tomasz B.; McKiernan, James M.; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment of bladder cancer have hardly improved in the last 20 years. Bladder cancer remains a debilitating and often fatal disease, and among the most costly cancers to treat. The generation of informative mouse models has the potential to improve our understanding of bladder cancer progression, as well as impact its diagnosis and treatment. However, relatively few mouse models of bladder cancer have been described and particularly few that develop invasive cancer phenotypes. This review focuses on opportunities for improving the landscape of mouse models of bladder cancer. PMID:25533675

  18. The Impact of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) on Progression of Bladder Cancer - A New Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Cookson, Michael; Witjes, J Alfred; Stenzl, Arnulf; Grossman, H Barton

    2016-04-27

    Background: The International Bladder Cancer Group (IBCG) recently proposed a new definition of disease progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), including change in T-stage, change to T2 or higher or change from low to high grade. Objective: To establish whether blue light cystoscopy with hexaminolevulinate (HAL) impacts the rate of progression and time to progression using the revised definition. Methods: An earlier long-term follow-up of a controlled Phase III study reported outcomes following blue light cystoscopy with HAL (255 patients) or white light (WL) cystoscopy (261 patients) in NMIBC patients. The data was re-analysed according to the new definition. Results: In the original analysis, after 4.5 years (median), eight HAL and 16 WL patients were deemed to have progressed (transition from NMIBC to muscle invasive bladder cancer, (T2-4)). According to the new definition, additional patients in both groups were found to have progressed: 31 (12.2%) HAL vs 46 (17.6%) WL ( p  = 0.085) with four (1.6%) HAL and 11 (4.2%) WL patients progressing from Ta to CIS. Time to progression was longer in the HAL group ( p  = 0.05). Conclusions: Applying the new IBCG definition there was a trend towards a lower rate of progression in HAL patients, particularly in those progressing from Ta to CIS. Time to progression was significantly prolonged. This suggests that patients should receive blue light cystoscopy with HAL rather than WL at resection. Adoption of the new definition could allow more patients at risk of progression to be treated appropriately earlier.

  19. UroVysion compared with cytology and quantitative cytology in the surveillance of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.M.J.; Merkx, G.F.M.; Peelen, P.; Karthaus, H.F.M.; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The multitarget fluorescence in situ hybridization probe set Vysis UroVysion, consisting of probes for chromosomes 3, 7, and 17 and for the 9p21 band, was studied to evaluate its value in the follow-up of patients with bladder cancer. The results were compared with conventional cytology

  20. Enzalutamide inhibits androgen receptor-positive bladder cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Ide, Hiroki; Kashiwagi, Eiji; El-Shishtawy, Kareem A; Li, Yi; Reis, Leonardo O; Zheng, Yichun; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    Emerging preclinical evidence suggests that androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signals promote bladder cancer progression. However, little is known about the efficacy of an AR signaling inhibitor, enzalutamide, in the growth of bladder cancer cells. In this study, we compared the effects of enzalutamide and 2 other classic antiandrogens, flutamide and bicalutamide, on androgen-induced bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion as well as tumor growth in vivo. Thiazolyl blue cell viability assay, flow cytometry, scratch wound-healing assay, transwell invasion assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and reporter gene assay were performed in AR-positive (e.g., UMUC3, TCCSUP, and 647V-AR) and AR-negative (e.g., UMUC3-AR-short hairpin RNA [shRNA], TCCSUP-AR-shRNA, 647V) bladder cancer lines treated with dihydrotestosterone and each AR antagonist. We also used a mouse xenograft model for bladder cancer. Dihydrotestosterone increased bladder cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion indicating that endogenous or exogenous AR was functional. Enzalutamide, hydroxyflutamide, and bicalutamide showed similar inhibitory effects, without significant agonist activity, on androgen-mediated cell viability/apoptosis, cell migration, and cell invasion in AR-positive lines. No significant effects of dihydrotestosterone as well as AR antagonists on the growth of AR-negative cells were seen. Correspondingly, in UMUC3 cells, these AR antagonists down-regulated androgen-induced expression of AR, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and interleukin-6. Androgen-enhanced AR-mediated transcriptional activity was also blocked by each AR antagonist exhibiting insignificant agonist activity. In UMUC3 xenograft-bearing mice, oral gavage treatment with each antiandrogen retarded tumor growth, and only enzalutamide demonstrated a statistically significant suppression compared with mock treatment. Our current data support recent observations indicating the involvement of

  1. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten; Lebesque, Joos; Lotz, Heidi; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Moonen, Luc; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV CONV ). During the first treatment week, five daily computed tomography (CT) scans were made immediately before or after treatment. In the second week, a volume was constructed encompassing the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the planning scan and the five CT scans (GTV ART ). The GTV ART was expanded with a 1 cm margin for the construction of a PTV ART . Starting in the third week, patients were treated to PTV ART . Repeat CT scans were used to evaluate treatment accuracy. Results: On 5 of 91 repeat CT scans (5%), the GTV was not adequately covered by the PTV ART . On treatment planning, there was only one scan in which the GTV was not adequately covered by the 95% isodose. On average, the treatment volumes were reduced by 40% when comparing PTV ART with PTV CONV (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The adaptive strategy for bladder cancer is an effective way to deal with treatment errors caused by variations in bladder tumor position and leads to a substantial reduction in treatment volumes

  2. Adaptive radiotherapy for invasive bladder cancer: A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pos, Floris J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lebesque, Joos [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lotz, Heidi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Tienhoven, Geertjan van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Moonen, Luc [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Remeijer, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of adaptive radiotherapy (ART) in combination with a partial bladder irradiation. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with solitary T1-T4 N0M0 bladder cancer were treated to the bladder tumor + 2 cm margin planning target volume (PTV{sub CONV}). During the first treatment week, five daily computed tomography (CT) scans were made immediately before or after treatment. In the second week, a volume was constructed encompassing the gross tumor volumes (GTVs) on the planning scan and the five CT scans (GTV{sub ART}). The GTV{sub ART} was expanded with a 1 cm margin for the construction of a PTV{sub ART}. Starting in the third week, patients were treated to PTV{sub ART}. Repeat CT scans were used to evaluate treatment accuracy. Results: On 5 of 91 repeat CT scans (5%), the GTV was not adequately covered by the PTV{sub ART}. On treatment planning, there was only one scan in which the GTV was not adequately covered by the 95% isodose. On average, the treatment volumes were reduced by 40% when comparing PTV{sub ART} with PTV{sub CONV} (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: The adaptive strategy for bladder cancer is an effective way to deal with treatment errors caused by variations in bladder tumor position and leads to a substantial reduction in treatment volumes.

  3. mTOR inhibitors in urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Leite, R; Arantes-Rodrigues, R; Sousa, Nuno; Oliveira, P A; Santos, L

    2016-09-01

    Despite the great scientific advances that have been made in cancer treatment, there is still much to do, particularly with regard to urinary bladder cancer. Some of the drugs used in urinary bladder cancer treatment have been in use for more than 30 years and show reduced effectiveness and high recurrence rates. There have been several attempts to find new and more effective drugs, to be used alone or in combination with the drugs already in use, in order to overcome this situation.The biologically important mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is altered in cancer and mTOR inhibitors have raised many expectations as potentially important anticancer drugs. In this article, the authors will review the mTOR pathway and present their experiences of the use of some mTOR inhibitors, sirolimus, everolimus and temsirolimus, in isolation and in conjunction with non-mTOR inhibitors cisplatin and gemcitabine, on urinary bladder tumour cell lines. The non-muscle-invasive cell line, 5637, is the only one that exhibits a small alteration in the mTOR and AKT phosphorylation after rapalogs exposure. Also, there was a small inhibition of cell proliferation. With gemcitabine plus everolimus or temsirolimus, the results were encouraging as a more effective response was noticed with both combinations, especially in the 5637 and T24 cell lines. Cisplatin associated with everolimus or temsirolimus also gave promising results, as an antiproliferative effect was observed when the drugs were associated, in particular on the 5637 and HT1376 cell lines. Everolimus or temsirolimus in conjunction with gemcitabine or cisplatin could have an important role to play in urinary bladder cancer treatment, depending on the tumour grading.

  4. Bladder cancer: the combination of chemotherapy and irradiation in the treatment of patients with muscle-invading tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    1995-01-01

    In the USA the recommended treatment for patients with muscle-invading transitional cell cancer of the bladder is usually radical cystectomy. Conservative surgery (transurethral resection and partial cystectomy), irradiation, and cis-platinum based systemic chemotherapy are, however, each effective for some patients. Although they provide the opportunity for bladder preservation, each modality, when used alone, is inferior to radical cystectomy in terms of local control and, perhaps, survival. Initial response and local control rates are improved when a multimodality approach is used. Up to 85% of patients selected for bladder sparing therapy on the basis of their initial response to chemo-radiation may keep their bladders. This figure could increase further when other powerful prognostic factors, such as the presence of hydronephrosis or carcinoma in situ, are taken into account in initial patient selection. Deferring the patient from immediate cystectomy does not appear to compromise survival. The most appropriate sequencing of radiation and chemotherapy is yet to be established. Concomitant cis-platinum and irradiation improves local control and bladder preservation when compared with irradiation alone but does not decrease the metastatic rate. It is hoped that the well recognized activity of cis-platinum based combination chemotherapy in advanced disease will translate into effective eradication of micrometastatic disease (known to be present in up to 40% of patients at diagnosis). This has yet to be clearly demonstrated in a randomized trial. The addition of combination chemotherapy to radiation does not increase bladder morbidity but carries a considerable systemic risk. Thus, despite promising phase II studies, until a survival benefit is proven in a randomized trial, neoadjuvant or adjuvant combination chemotherapy in conjunction with irradiation should continue to be regarded as experimental

  5. A meta-analysis of the relationship between FGFR3 and TP53 mutations in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzillet, Yann; Paoletti, Xavier; Ouerhani, Slah; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Soliman, Hany; de The, Hugues; Sibony, Mathilde; Denoux, Yves; Molinie, Vincent; Herault, Aurélie; Lepage, May-Linda; Maille, Pascale; Renou, Audrey; Vordos, Dimitri; Abbou, Claude-Clément; Bakkar, Ashraf; Asselain, Bernard; Kourda, Nadia; El Gaaied, Amel; Leroy, Karen; Laplanche, Agnès; Benhamou, Simone; Lebret, Thierry; Allory, Yves; Radvanyi, François

    2012-01-01

    TP53 and FGFR3 mutations are the most common mutations in bladder cancers. FGFR3 mutations are most frequent in low-grade low-stage tumours, whereas TP53 mutations are most frequent in high-grade high-stage tumours. Several studies have reported FGFR3 and TP53 mutations to be mutually exclusive events, whereas others have reported them to be independent. We carried out a meta-analysis of published findings for FGFR3 and TP53 mutations in bladder cancer (535 tumours, 6 publications) and additional unpublished data for 382 tumours. TP53 and FGFR3 mutations were not independent events for all tumours considered together (OR = 0.25 [0.18-0.37], p = 0.0001) or for pT1 tumours alone (OR = 0.47 [0.28-0.79], p = 0.0009). However, if the analysis was restricted to pTa tumours or to muscle-invasive tumours alone, FGFR3 and TP53 mutations were independent events (OR = 0.56 [0.23-1.36] (p = 0.12) and OR = 0.99 [0.37-2.7] (p = 0.35), respectively). After stratification of the tumours by stage and grade, no dependence was detected in the five tumour groups considered (pTaG1 and pTaG2 together, pTaG3, pT1G2, pT1G3, pT2-4). These differences in findings can be attributed to the putative existence of two different pathways of tumour progression in bladder cancer: the CIS pathway, in which FGFR3 mutations are rare, and the Ta pathway, in which FGFR3 mutations are frequent. TP53 mutations occur at the earliest stage of the CIS pathway, whereas they occur would much later in the Ta pathway, at the T1G3 or muscle-invasive stage.

  6. Voided urine versus bladder washing cytology for detection of urothelial carcinoma: which is better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2017-08-01

    Cytology is recommended as part of the follow-up of high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, currently there are no solid guideline recommendations regarding the use of voided urine versus bladder washing for cytology as part of the diagnosis or follow-up of NMIBC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cytological outcome was equal regarding the two techniques. The authors reviewed all outpatient flexible cystoscopies carried out in their department in 2013. Patient records in the registry of pathology were examined and those with simultaneous urine and bladder washing cytology were included. Previous urothelial disease and positive histology within 3 months after the cystoscopy were registered. A total of 1458 patients had both voided urine and bladder washing cytology and were included in the study, of whom 643 (44%) had a history of urothelial disease. An equal outcome of urine and bladder washing cytology was found in 1447 patients (99.2%). For the remaining 11 patients, only four patients underwent further examinations based on cytology findings in addition to what had already been planned after cystoscopy. Of the included patients, 100 (6.9%) had a positive histological outcome within 3 months. In most patients, no relevant difference between voided urine and bladder washing cytology was observed. Therefore, if cytology is indicated, it is recommended to use the test that is most readily available locally. The additional gain in using both urine and bladder wash is minimal, and can therefore be discarded.

  7. Examining Sexual Dysfunction in Non‐Muscle‐Invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of Cross‐Sectional Mixed‐Methods Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Kowalkowski, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: Survivors' sexual symptoms may result from NMIBC, comorbidities, or both. These results inform literature and practice by raising awareness about the frequency of symptoms and the impact on NMIBC survivors' intimate relationships. Further work is needed to design symptom management education programs to dispel misinformation about contamination post‐treatment and improve quality of life. Kowalkowski MA, Chandrashekar A, Amiel GE, Lerner SP, Wittmann DA, Latini DM, and Goltz HH. Examining sexual dysfunction in non‐muscle‐invasive bladder cancer: Results of cross‐sectional mixed‐methods research. Sex Med 2014;2:141–151.

  8. Impedance ratio method for urine conductivity-invariant estimation of bladder volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schlebusch

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive estimation of bladder volume could help patients with impaired bladder volume sensation to determine the right moment for catheterisation. Continuous, non-invasive impedance measurement is a promising technology in this scenario, although influences of body posture and unknown urine conductivity limit wide clinical use today. We studied impedance changes related to bladder volume by simulation, in-vitro and in-vivo measurements with pigs. In this work, we present a method to reduce the influence of urine conductivity to cystovolumetry and bring bioimpedance cystovolumetry closer to a clinical application.

  9. Intrafraction Bladder Motion in Radiation Therapy Estimated From Pretreatment and Posttreatment Volumetric Imaging

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    Foroudi, Farshad, E-mail: farshad.foroudi@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Bressel, Mathias [Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gill, Suki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The use of image guidance protocols using soft tissue anatomy identification before treatment can reduce interfractional variation. This makes intrafraction clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) changes more important, including those resulting from intrafraction bladder filling and motion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the required intrafraction margins for soft tissue image guidance from pretreatment and posttreatment volumetric imaging. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer (T2-T4) underwent an adaptive radiation therapy protocol using daily pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) with weekly posttreatment CBCT. A total of 235 pairs of pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT images were retrospectively contoured by a single radiation oncologist (CBCT-CTV). The maximum bladder displacement was measured according to the patient's bony pelvis movement during treatment, intrafraction bladder filling, and bladder centroid motion. Results: The mean time between pretreatment and posttreatment CBCT was 13 minutes, 52 seconds (range, 7 min 52 sec to 30 min 56 sec). Taking into account patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling, the required margins to cover intrafraction changes from pretreatment to posttreatment in the superior, inferior, right, left, anterior, and posterior were 1.25 cm (range, 1.19-1.50 cm), 0.67 cm (range, 0.58-1.12 cm), 0.74 cm (range, 0.59-0.94 cm), 0.73 cm (range, 0.51-1.00 cm), 1.20 cm (range, 0.85-1.32 cm), and 0.86 cm (range, 0.73-0.99), respectively. Small bladders on pretreatment imaging had relatively the largest increase in pretreatment to posttreatment volume. Conclusion: Intrafraction motion of the bladder based on pretreatment and posttreatment bladder imaging can be significant particularly in the anterior and superior directions. Patient motion, bladder centroid motion, and bladder filling all contribute to changes between

  10. A Unique Case of Muscle Invasive Metastatic Breast Cancer Mimicking Myositis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-28

    TYPE 08/ 03/20 17 Publ ication/Journal 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A unique case of muscle-invasive metastatic breast cancer mimicking myositis 6...Rev. 8/98) Prescnbed by ANSI Std Z39. 18 Adobe Profes11on11 7.0 Title: A Unique Case of M uscle-Invasive Metastatic Breast Cancer M imicking...an 84-year-old female who presented with neck swelling and upper airway obstruction due to metastatic breast cancer invading the sternocleidomastoid

  11. Thrombomodulin expression regulates tumorigenesis in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chun-Te; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Lin, Paul- Yang; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of potential tumor markers will help improve therapeutic planning and patient management. Thrombomodulin (TM) is a sensitive urothelial marker. TM was reported to be one of the endogenous anti-metastatic factors and has diagnostic and prognostic values for the progression of carcinoma. In the present study, we examine the role of TM in bladder cancer. We studied the role of TM in tumor behavior and related signaling pathways in vitro using the human bladder cancer cell lines HT1376, HT1197, J82 and T24, and in vivo using animal models. We also selected clinical specimens from 100 patients with bladder cancer for immunohistochemical staining to evaluate the predictive capacity of TM in tumor invasiveness. The data revealed that positive immunoreactivity for TM was inversely correlated with clinical stage and DNA methyltransferase 1 immunoreactivity. Decreased TM expression could predict the aggressive tumor growth and advanced clinical stage in bladder cancer. When TM was inhibited, tumor growth rate and invasion ability were augmented in vitro and in vivo. The underlying changes included increased cell proliferation, enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and angiogenesis. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB activation significantly increased TM expression and attenuated tumor aggressiveness in bladder cancer. TM plays an important role in bladder cancer tumor aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo and is a clinically significant predictor that may represent a suitable therapeutic target for bladder cancer

  12. mTORC2 activation is regulated by the urokinase receptor (uPAR) in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Andrew M; Leivo, Mariah Z; Gilder, Andrew S; Hu, Jing-Jing; Gonias, Steven L; Hansel, Donna E

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) has been identified as a major regulator of bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. Upstream pathways that mediate mTORC2 activation remain poorly defined. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) is a GPI-anchored membrane protein and known activator of cell-signaling. We identified increased uPAR expression in 94% of invasive human bladder cancers and in 54-71% of non-invasive bladder cancers, depending on grade. Normal urothelium was uPAR-immunonegative. Analysis of publicly available datasets identified uPAR gene amplification or mRNA upregulation in a subset of bladder cancer patients with reduced overall survival. Using biochemical approaches, we showed that uPAR activates mTORC2 in bladder cancer cells. Highly invasive bladder cancer cell lines, including T24, J82 and UM-UC-3 cells, showed increased uPAR mRNA expression and protein levels compared with the less aggressive cell lines, UROtsa and RT4. uPAR gene-silencing significantly reduced phosphorylation of Serine-473 in Akt, an mTORC2 target. uPAR gene-silencing also reduced bladder cancer cell migration and Matrigel invasion. S473 phosphorylation was observed by immunohistochemistry in human bladder cancers only when the tumors expressed high levels of uPAR. S473 phosphorylation was not controlled by uPAR in bladder cancer cell lines that are PTEN-negative; however, this result probably did not reflect altered mTORC2 regulation. Instead, PTEN deficiency de-repressed alternative kinases that phosphorylate S473. Our results suggest that uPAR and mTORC2 are components of a single cell-signaling pathway. Targeting uPAR or mTORC2 may be beneficial in patients with bladder cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Non-invasive assessment of muscle stiffness in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacourpaille, Lilian; Hug, François; Guével, Arnaud; Péréon, Yann; Magot, Armelle; Hogrel, Jean-Yves; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-02-01

    Assessment of muscle mechanical properties may provide clinically valuable information for follow-up of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) through the course of their disease. In this study we aimed to assess the effect of DMD on stiffness of relaxed muscles using elastography (supersonic shear imaging). Fourteen DMD patients and 13 control subjects were studied. Six muscles were measured at 2 muscle lengths (shortened and stretched): gastrocnemius medialis (GM); tibialis anterior (TA); vastus lateralis (VL); biceps brachii (BB); triceps brachii (TB); and abductor digiti minimi (ADM). Stiffness was significantly higher in DMD patients compared with controls for all the muscles (main effect for population, P muscle lengths) to large (d = 0.86 for BB/stretched). Supersonic shear imaging is a sensitive non-invasive technique to assess the increase in muscle stiffness associated with DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Suppressions of Migration and Invasion by Cantharidin in TSGH-8301 Human Bladder Carcinoma Cells through the Inhibitions of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2/-9 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis becomes an initial cause of cancer death in human population. In many cancers, it has been shown that the high levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and/or MMP-9 are associated with the invasive phenotypes of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of cantharidin, a derivative of blister beetles which is one of the traditional Chinese medicines, on the adhesion, migration, and invasion of human bladder cancer TSGH-8301 cells. Cantharidin effectively suppressed TSGH-8301 cell adhesion, migration, and invasion in a concentration-dependent manner. Results from Western blotting, RT-PCR, and gelatin zymography assays indicated that cantharidin blocked the protein levels, gene expression (mRNA, and activities of MMP-2 and -9 in TSGH-8301 cells. Cantharidin also significantly suppressed the protein expressions of p-p38 and p-JNK1/2 in TSGH-8301 cells. Taken together, cantharidin was suggested to present antimetastatic potential via suppressing the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression that might be mediated by targeting the p38 and JNK1/2 MAPKs pathway in TSGH-8301 human bladder cancer cells.

  15. Relevance of prostate cancer in patients with synchronous invasive bladder urothelial carcinoma: a monocentric retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Dell’Atti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We retrospectively reviewed data of patients with incidental prostate cancer (PCa who underwent radical cystoprostatectomy (RCP for invasive bladder cancer and we analyzed their features with regard to incidence, pathologic characteristics, clinical significance, and implications for management. Material and Methods: Clinical data and pathological features of 64 patients who underwent standard RCP for bladder cancer were included in this study. Besides the urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder, the location and tumor volume of the PCa, prostate apex involvement, Gleason score, pathological staging and surgical margins were evaluated. Clinically significant PCa was defined as a tumor with a Gleason 4 or 5 pattern, stage ≥ pT3, lymph node involvement, positive surgical margin or multifocality of three or more lesions. Postoperative follow-up was scheduled every 3 months in the first year, every 6 months in the second and third year, annually thereafter. Results: 11 out of 64 patients (17.2% who underwent RCP had incidentally diagnosed PCa. 3 cases (27.3% were diagnosed as significant PCa, while 8 cases (72.7% were clinically insignificant. The positive surgical margin of PCa was detected in 1 patient with significant disease. The prostate apex involvement was present in 1 patient of the significant PCa group. Median follow-up period was 47.8 ± 29.2 (range 4-79. During the follow-up, biochemical recurrence occurred in 1 patient (9%. Concernig the cancer specific survival there was no statistical significance (P = 0.326 between the clinically significant and clinical insignificant cancer group. Conclusions: In line with published studies, incidental PCa does not impact on the prognosis of bladder cancer of patients undergoing RCP.

  16. Expression and function of K(V)2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A Y; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2012-06-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and the electrically silent K(V)9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)4.2 homotetrameric channels and of K(V)2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3 (but not K(V)4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced K(V) current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5-30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive K(V)2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction.

  17. Retinoblastoma protein expression is an independent predictor of both radiation response and survival in muscle invasive bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerbæk, Mads; Alsner, Jan; Marcussen, Niels

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the predictive value of various clinical, biochemical, and histopathological parameters, with special emphasis on the expression of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB), on the radiation response in bladder cancer. In order to obtain a truly objective...

  18. Delayed Cystectomy for T1G3 Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) of the Urinary Bladder, NCI Retrospective Case Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAKHR, I.; EL-HOSSIENY, H.; SALAMA, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We aim to evaluate the National Cancer Institute (NCI) treatment protocol and its outcome regarding recurrence, progression and survival in patients with T1G3 urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma. Patients and Methods: In a retrospective study, between January 2001 and December 2007, all 34 patients with T1G3 bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), after complete transurethral resection (TURBT), received intravesical BCG as adjuvant therapy. A conservative approach was adopted, whereby those with superficial recurrences were eligible to TURBT, with delayed cystectomy for progression to muscle invasion. Overall, recurrence, and progression-free survival were analyzed. Results: Thirty-three patients were included, 29 were males and 4 were females. The mean age was 61 years (range 35-89 years). Final analysis was made at median follow-up of 15 months (Range of 3-68 months, mean 18 months) for survival. Eleven (33.3%) patients had multi- focal tumors. Associated schistosomiasis was present in 12 (36.6%) patients. Twenty-two (66.67%) patients showed recurrence. Eleven out of these 22 (50.0%) patients progressed to muscle invasion and underwent radical cystectomy. Ten out of 34 (30.3%) patients received post- cystectomy radiotherapy. Two (20.0%) of them, were staged as TNM stage II, 6 (60.0%) as TNM stage III and 2 (20.0%) patients were TNM stage IV. Eight (72.7%) of these 11 patients had post-cystectomy radiotherapy alone; while the 2 (6.0%) other patients with stage IV had adjuvant concomitant Cisplatin and Gemcitabine chemotherapy. Five (14%) patients of those cystectomy patients died of TCC. Three (60%) patients died from metastatic disease (to lung, liver and bone), one patient died from advanced locoregional disease and another patient died from post- operative complications. Among those patients who received radiotherapy alone, 62.5% are alive. Although, we report a biologically more aggressive behavior of T1G3 than that reported by some authors

  19. Non-invasive monitoring of muscle blood perfusion by photoplethysmography: evaluation of a new application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, M; Zhang, Q; Styf, J; Gerdle, B; Lindberg, L-G

    2005-04-01

    To evaluate a specially developed photoplethysmographic (PPG) technique, using green and near-infrared light sources, for simultaneous non-invasive monitoring of skin and muscle perfusion. Evaluation was based on assessments of changes in blood perfusion to various provocations, such as post-exercise hyperaemia and hyperaemia following the application of liniment. The deep penetrating feature of PPG was investigated by measurement of optical radiation inside the muscle. Simultaneous measurements using ultrasound Doppler and the new PPG application were performed to elucidate differences between the two methods. Specific problems related to the influence of skin temperature on blood flow were highlightened, as well. Following static and dynamic contractions an immediate increase in muscle perfusion was shown, without increase in skin perfusion. Liniment application to the skin induced a rapid increase in skin perfusion, but not in muscle. Both similarities and differences in blood flow measured by Ultrasound Doppler and PPG were demonstrated. The radiant power measured inside the muscle, by use of an optical fibre, showed that the near-infrared light penetrates down to the vascular depth inside the muscle. The results of this study indicate the potentiality of the method for non-invasive measurement of local muscle perfusion, although some considerations still have to be accounted for, such as influence of temperature on blood perfusion.

  20. Effect of routine repeat transurethral resection for superficial bladder cancer: a long-term observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Marc-Oliver; Steinhoff, Christine; Simon, Xenia; Spiegelhalder, Philipp; Ackermann, Rolf; Vogeli, Thomas Alexander

    2003-08-01

    We determined the long-term outcome in patients with superficial bladder cancer (Ta and T1) undergoing routine second transurethral bladder tumor resection (ReTURB) in regard to recurrence and progression. We performed an inception cohort study of 124 consecutive patients with superficial bladder cancer undergoing transurethral resection and routine ReTURB (83) between November 1993 and October 1995 at a German university hospital. Immediately after transurethral resection all lesions were documented on a designed bladder map. ReTURB of the scar from initial resection and other suspicious lesions was performed at a mean of 7 weeks. Patients were followed until recurrence or death, or a minimum of 5 years. Residual tumor was found in 33% of all ReTURB cases, including 27% of Ta and 53% of T1 disease, and in 81% at the initial resection site. Five of the 83 patients underwent radical cystectomy due to ReTURB findings. The estimated risk of recurrence after years 1 to 3 was 18%, 29% and 32%, respectively. After 5 years 63% of the patients undergoing ReTURB were still disease-free (mean recurrence-free survival 62 months, median 87). Progression to muscle invasive disease was observed in only 2 patients (3%) after a mean observation of 61 months. These data suggest a favorable outcome regarding recurrence and progression in patients with superficial bladder cancer who undergo ReTURB. ReTURB is suggested at least in those at high risk when bladder preservation is intended.

  1. The Patient Deficit Model Overturned: a qualitative study of patients' perceptions of invitation to participate in a randomized controlled trial comparing selective bladder preservation against surgery in muscle invasive bladder cancer (SPARE, CRUK/07/011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moynihan Clare

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that poor recruitment into clinical trials rests on a patient ‘deficit’ model – an inability to comprehend trial processes. Poor communication has also been cited as a possible barrier to recruitment. A qualitative patient interview study was included within the feasibility stage of a phase III non-inferiority Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT (SPARE, CRUK/07/011 in muscle invasive bladder cancer. The aim was to illuminate problems in the context of randomization. Methods The qualitative study used a ‘Framework Analysis’ that included ‘constant comparison’ in which semi-structured interviews are transcribed, analyzed, compared and contrasted both between and within transcripts. Three researchers coded and interpreted data. Results Twenty-four patients agreed to enter the interview study; 10 decliners of randomization and 14 accepters, of whom 2 subsequently declined their allocated treatment. The main theme applying to the majority of the sample was confusion and ambiguity. There was little indication that confusion directly impacted on decisions to enter the SPARE trial. However, confusion did appear to impact on ethical considerations surrounding ‘informed consent’, as well as cause a sense of alienation between patients and health personnel. Sub-optimal communication in many guises accounted for the confusion, together with the logistical elements of a trial that involved treatment options delivered in a number of geographical locations. Conclusions These data highlight the difficulty of providing balanced and clear trial information within the UK health system, despite best intentions. Involvement of multiple professionals can impact on communication processes with patients who are considering participation in RCTs. Our results led us to question the ‘deficit’ model of patient behavior. It is suggested that health professionals might consider facilitating a context in which patients

  2. Progression of urothelial carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder: a switch from luminal to basal phenotype and related therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Isabella; Schneider, Ursula; Grimm, Tobias; Karl, Alexander; Horst, David; Gaisa, Nadine T; Knüchel, Ruth; Garczyk, Stefan

    2018-05-01

    The stratification of bladder cancer into luminal and basal tumors has recently been introduced as a novel prognostic system in patient cohorts of muscle-invasive bladder cancer or high-grade papillary carcinomas. Using a representative immunohistochemistry panel, we analyzed luminal and basal marker expression in a large case series (n = 156) of urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS), a precancerous lesion that frequently progresses to muscle-invasive disease. The majority of CIS cases was characterized by a positivity for luminal markers (aberrant cytokeratin (CK) 20 85% (132/156), GATA3 median Remmele score (score of staining intensity (0-3) multiplied with percentage of positive cells (0-4)): 12, estrogen receptor (ER) β Remmele score > 2: 88% (138/156), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) Dako score 3+ 32% (50/156), Her2 Dako score 2+ 33% (51/156)), and marginal expression of basal markers (CK5/6+ 2% (3/156), CK14+ 1% (2/156)). To further investigate phenotypic stability during disease progression, we compared 48 pairs of CIS and invasive tumors from the same biopsy. A highly significant loss of luminal marker expression (p < 0.001) was observed in the course of progression whereas an increase of basal marker expression (p < 0.01) was noted in the invasive compartment. Importantly, 91% of CIS cases demonstrated a positivity for at least one of the two predictive markers Her2 and ERβ, indicating that the analysis of Her2 and ERβ may help to identify CIS-patient subgroups prone to more efficient targeted treatment strategies. Larger prospective and biomarker-embedded clinical trials are needed to confirm and validate our preliminary findings.

  3. Genetic Alterations in the Molecular Subtypes of Bladder Cancer: Illustration in the Cancer Genome Atlas Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woonyoung; Ochoa, Andrea; McConkey, David J; Aine, Mattias; Höglund, Mattias; Kim, William Y; Real, Francisco X; Kiltie, Anne E; Milsom, Ian; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Lerner, Seth P

    2017-09-01

    Recent whole genome mRNA expression profiling studies revealed that bladder cancers can be grouped into molecular subtypes, some of which share clinical properties and gene expression patterns with the intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer and the molecular subtypes found in other solid tumors. The molecular subtypes in other solid tumors are enriched with specific mutations and copy number aberrations that are thought to underlie their distinct progression patterns, and biological and clinical properties. The availability of comprehensive genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other large projects made it possible to correlate the presence of DNA alterations with tumor molecular subtype membership. Our overall goal was to determine whether specific DNA mutations and/or copy number variations are enriched in specific molecular subtypes. We used the complete TCGA RNA-seq dataset and three different published classifiers developed by our groups to assign TCGA's bladder cancers to molecular subtypes, and examined the prevalence of the most common DNA alterations within them. We interpreted the results against the background of what was known from the published literature about the prevalence of these alterations in nonmuscle-invasive and muscle-invasive bladder cancers. The results confirmed that alterations involving RB1 and NFE2L2 were enriched in basal cancers, whereas alterations involving FGFR3 and KDM6A were enriched in luminal tumors. The results further reinforce the conclusion that the molecular subtypes of bladder cancer are distinct disease entities with specific genetic alterations. Our observation showed that some of subtype-enriched mutations and copy number aberrations are clinically actionable, which has direct implications for the clinical management of patients with bladder cancer. Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Lymphography and computed tomography in the assessment of lymphnode invasion by bladder cancer. Comparison of diagnostic value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leguay, O.; Bellin, M.F.; Richard, F.; Mallet, A.; Grellet, J.

    1989-01-01

    The diagnostic value of lymphography and computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of lymph node invasion by bladder cancers has been compared on the basis of 30 observations. Although computed tomography apparently yields better results (reliability: 93%) than lymphography (reliability: 87%), these findings have no statistical significance. The study of literature shows that the statistical exploitation of the results was seldom carried out. The combination of both exploration techniques seems to improve predictive values, but this improvement was not statistically significant in the study [fr

  5. Use of a latex biomembrane for bladder augmentation in a rabbit model: biocompatibility, clinical and histological outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre L. A. Domingos

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate histological features and biocompatibility of a latex biomembrane for bladder augmentation using a rabbit model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: After a partial cystectomy, a patch of a non-vulcanized latex biomembrane (2x4 cm was sewn to the bladder with 5/0 monofilament polydioxanone sulfate in a watertight manner. Groups of 5 animals were sacrificed at 15, 45 and 90 days after surgery and the bladder was removed. The 5-µm preparations obtained from grafted area and normal bladder were stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Immunohistochemical staining was performed with a primary antibody against alpha-actin to assess muscle regeneration. RESULTS: No death, urinary leakage or graft extrusion occurred in any group. All bladders showed a spherical shape. Macroscopically, after 90 days, the latex biomembrane was not identifiable and the patch was indistinguishable from normal bladder. A bladder stone was found in one animal (6.6%. On the 90th day, histology revealed continuity of transitional epithelium of host bladder tissue on the patch area. At this time, the muscle layers were well organized in a similar fashion to native bladder muscle layers. The inflammatory process was higher on grafted areas when compared to controls: 15 days - p < 0.0001, 45 days - p < 0.001, and 90 days - p < 0.01. The anti alpha-actin immunoexpression peaked at 45 days, when the graft was observed covered by muscle cells. CONCLUSION: The latex biomembrane is biocompatible and can be used in models for bladder augmentation in rabbits. It promotes epithelium and muscle regeneration without urinary leakage.

  6. Experimental electrical stimulation of the bladder using a new device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T.; Christiansen, P.; Nielsen, B.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated bladder contractions were evoked during a six month period in three unanaesthetized female minipigs by using unipolar carbon fiber electrodes embedded in the bladder wall adjacent to the ureterovesical junction. In contrast to bipolar and direct bladder muscle stimulation unipolar...... electrodes at each ureterovesical junction evoked bladder pressure increase similar to those produced in previous investigations in dogs. Sacral nerve stimulation of S2 evoked bladder contraction at a minimal current. Microscopic examination revealed no cellular reactions to the carbon fibers...

  7. Nanotechnology in bladder cancer: current state of development and clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Ben; Lin, Tzu-yin; Dall'Era, Marc; Pan, Chong-Xian

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is being developed for the diagnosis and treatment of both nonmyoinvasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) and invasive bladder cancer. The diagnostic applications of nanotechnology in NMIBC mainly focus on tumor identification during endoscopy to increase complete resection of bladder cancer while nanotechnology to capture malignant cells or their components continues to be developed. The therapeutic applications of nanotechnology in NMIBC are to reformulate biological and cytotoxic agents for intravesical instillation, combine both diagnostic and therapeutic application in one nanoformulation. In invasive and advanced bladder cancer, magnetic resonance imaging with supraparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles can improve the sensitivity and specificity in detecting small metastasis to lymph nodes. Nanoformulation of cytotoxic agents can potentially decrease the toxicity while increasing efficacy. PMID:25929573

  8. Roles of polyuria and hyperglycemia in bladder dysfunction in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Nan; Wang, Zhiping; Huang, Yexiang; Daneshgari, Firouz; Liu, Guiming

    2013-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus causes diabetic bladder dysfunction. We identified the pathogenic roles of polyuria and hyperglycemia in diabetic bladder dysfunction in rats. A total of 72 female Sprague-Dawley® rats were divided into 6 groups, including age matched controls, and rats with sham urinary diversion, urinary diversion, streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus after sham urinary diversion, streptozotocin induced diabetes mellitus after urinary diversion and 5% sucrose induced diuresis after sham urinary diversion. Urinary diversion was performed by ureterovaginostomy 10 days before diabetes mellitus induction. Animals were evaluated 20 weeks after diabetes mellitus or diuresis induction. We measured 24-hour drinking and voiding volumes, and cystometry. Bladders were harvested to quantify smooth muscle, urothelium and collagen. We measured nitrotyrosine and Mn superoxide dismutase in the bladder. Diabetes and diuresis caused increases in drinking and voiding volume, and bladder weight. Bladder weight decreased in the urinary diversion group and the urinary diversion plus diabetes group. The intercontractile interval, voided volume and compliance increased in the diuresis and diabetes groups, decreased in the urinary diversion group and further decreased in the urinary diversion plus diabetes group. Total cross-sectional tissue, smooth muscle and urothelium areas increased in the diuresis and diabetes groups, and decreased in the urinary diversion and urinary diversion plus diabetes groups. As a percent of total tissue area, collagen decreased in the diuresis and diabetes groups, and increased in the urinary diversion and urinary diversion plus diabetes groups. Smooth muscle and urothelium decreased in the urinary diversion and urinary diversion plus diabetes groups. Nitrotyrosine and Mn superoxide dismutase increased in rats with diabetes and urinary diversion plus diabetes. Polyuria induced bladder hypertrophy, while hyperglycemia induced substantial oxidative

  9. Curcumin inhibits bladder cancer progression via regulation of β-catenin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Wang, Yunpeng; Jia, Zhuomin; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Chaofei; Yao, Yuanxin

    2017-07-01

    Bladder cancer has a considerable morbidity and mortality impact with particularly poor prognosis. Curcumin has been recently noticed as a polyphenolic compound separated from turmeric to regulate tumor progression. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which curcumin inhibits the invasion and metastasis of bladder cancer cells is not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigate the effect of curcumin on the bladder cancer as well as possible mechanisms of curcumin. The expression of β-catenin was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical analysis in a series of bladder cancer tissues. In addition, bladder cancer cell lines T24 and 5637 cells were treated with different concentrations of curcumin. The cytotoxic effect of curcumin on cell proliferation of T24 and 5637 cells was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The migration and invasion capacity of T24 and 5637 cells were measured by transwell assay. The effects of curcumin on expression levels of β-catenin and epithelial-mesenchymal transition marker were determined by western blotting. The β-catenin expression was significantly upregulated in bladder cancer tissues when compared with corresponding peri-tumor tissues. Furthermore, curcumin inhibited the cell proliferation of T24 and 5637 cells, and curcumin reduced the migration and invasive ability of T24 and 5637 cells via regulating β-catenin expression and reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Curcumin may be a new drug for bladder cancer.

  10. The Role of Genetically Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Urinary Bladder Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow-Lisy, Devon C; Diaz, Edward C; Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Hannick, Jessica H; Ahmad, Nida; Sharma, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) combined with CD34+ hematopoietic/stem progenitor cells (HSPCs) can function as surrogate urinary bladder cells to synergistically promote multi-faceted bladder tissue regeneration. However, the molecular pathways governing these events are unknown. The pleiotropic effects of Wnt5a and Cyr61 are known to affect aspects of hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, and muscle and nerve regeneration. Within this study, the effects of Cyr61 and Wnt5a on bladder tissue regeneration were evaluated by grafting scaffolds containing modified human bone marrow derived MSCs. These cell lines were engineered to independently over-express Wnt5a or Cyr61, or to exhibit reduced expression of Cyr61 within the context of a nude rat bladder augmentation model. At 4 weeks post-surgery, data demonstrated increased vessel number (~250 vs ~109 vessels/mm2) and bladder smooth muscle content (~42% vs ~36%) in Cyr61OX (over-expressing) vs Cyr61KD (knock-down) groups. Muscle content decreased to ~25% at 10 weeks in Cyr61KD groups. Wnt5aOX resulted in high numbers of vessels and muscle content (~206 vessels/mm2 and ~51%, respectively) at 4 weeks. Over-expressing cell constructs resulted in peripheral nerve regeneration while Cyr61KD animals were devoid of peripheral nerve regeneration at 4 weeks. At 10 weeks post-grafting, peripheral nerve regeneration was at a minimal level for both Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines. Blood vessel and bladder functionality were evident at both time-points in all animals. Results from this study indicate that MSC-based Cyr61OX and Wnt5aOX cell lines play pivotal roles with regards to increasing the levels of functional vasculature, influencing muscle regeneration, and the regeneration of peripheral nerves in a model of bladder augmentation. Wnt5aOX constructs closely approximated the outcomes previously observed with the co-transplantation of MSCs with CD34+ HSPCs and may be specifically targeted as an

  11. Expression and proliferation profiles of PKC, JNK and p38MAPK in physiologically stretched human bladder smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Dai, Yi; Yue, Xuan; Tian, Ye; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation in human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMC). •5% Equibiaxial elongation produces maximum proliferation. •Physiologic stretch decreases apoptotic cell death. •PKC is involved in functional modulation of bladder. •JNK and p38 are not involved in proliferating HBSMC. -- Abstract: Objective: To determine protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase (JNK) and P38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38MAPK) expression levels and effects of their respective inhibitors on proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) when physiologically stretched in vitro. Materials and methods: HBSMCs were grown on silicone membrane and stretch was applied under varying conditions; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (frequency: 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1 Hz). Optimal physiological stretch was established by assessing proliferation with 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) assay and flow cytometry. PKC, JNK and p38 expression levels were analyzed by Western blot. Specificity was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (GF109203X for PKC, SP600125 for JNK and SB203580 for p38MAPK), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation was observed at 5% equibiaxial stretch (BrdU: 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023)%, (P 0.05 SP600125) and (1.461 ± 0.01, P > 0.05 SB203580). These findings show that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative modulation through PKC and possibly JNK but not via p38MAPK in hBSMCs

  12. A novel role for drebrin in regulating progranulin bioactivity in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi-Qiong; Buraschi, Simone; Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Shirao, Tomoaki; Peiper, Stephen C; Gomella, Leonard G; Birbe, Ruth; Belfiore, Antonino; Iozzo, Renato V; Morrione, Andrea

    2015-05-10

    We recently established a critical role for the growth factor progranulin in bladder cancer insofar as progranulin promotes urothelial cancer cell motility and contributes, as an autocrine growth factor, to the transformed phenotype by modulating invasion and anchorage-independent growth. In addition, progranulin expression is upregulated in invasive bladder cancer tissues compared to normal controls. However, the molecular mechanisms of progranulin action in bladder cancer have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we searched for novel progranulin-interacting proteins using pull-down assays with recombinant progranulin and proteomics. We discovered that drebrin, an F-actin binding protein, bound progranulin in urothelial cancer cells. We characterized drebrin function in urothelial cancer cell lines and showed that drebrin is critical for progranulin-dependent activation of the Akt and MAPK pathways and modulates motility, invasion and anchorage-independent growth. In addition, drebrin regulates tumor formation in vivo and its expression is upregulated in bladder cancer tissues compared to normal tissue controls. Our data are translationally relevant as indicate that drebrin exerts an essential functional role in the regulation of progranulin action and may constitute a novel target for therapeutic intervention in bladder tumors. In addition, drebrin may serve as novel biomarker for bladder cancer.

  13. Medical management of overactive bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvpreet S Ubee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB, as defined by the International Continence Society, is characterized by a symptom complex including urinary urgency with or without urge incontinence, usually associated with frequency and nocturia. OAB syndrome has an incidence reported from six European countries ranging between 12-17%, while in the United States; a study conducted by the National Overactive Bladder Evaluation program found the incidence at 17%. In Asia, the prevalence of OAB is reported at 53.1%. In about 75%, OAB symptoms are due to idiopathic detrusor activity; neurological disease, bladder outflow obstruction (BOO intrinsic bladder pathology and other chronic pelvic floor disorders are implicated in the others. OAB can be diagnosed easily and managed effectively with both non-pharmacological and pharmacological therapies. The first-line treatments are lifestyle interventions, bladder training, pelvic floor muscle exercises and anticholinergic drugs. Antimuscarinics are the drug class of choice for OAB symptoms; with proven efficacy, and adverse event profiles that differ somewhat.

  14. Role of androgen receptor and associated lysine-demethylase coregulators, LSD1 and JMJD2A, in localized and advanced human bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Eric C; Robinson, Brian D; Downes, Martin J; Powell, Leagh G; Lee, Ming Ming; Scherr, Douglas S; Gudas, Lorraine J; Mongan, Nigel P

    2011-12-01

    Bladder cancer is approximately three times more common in men as compared to women. We and others have previously investigated the contribution of androgens and the androgen receptor (AR) to bladder cancer. JMJD2A and LSD1 are recently discovered AR coregulator proteins that mediate AR-dependent transcription via recently described histone lysine-demethylation (KDM) mechanisms. We used immunohistochemistry to examine JMJD2A, LSD1, and AR expression in 72 radical cystectomy specimens, resulting in evaluation of 129 tissue samples (59 urothelial carcinoma, 70 benign). We tested levels of these proteins for statistical association with clinicopathologic variables and patient survival. Expression of these markers was also assessed in human bladder cancer cell lines. The effects of pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 on the proliferation of these bladder cancer cells was determined. JMJD2A and AR levels were significantly lower in malignant versus benign urothelium, while increased LSD1 levels were observed in malignant urothelium relative to benign. A significant reduction in all three proteins occurred with cancer stage progression, including muscle invasion (JMJD2A/LSD1/AR), extravesical extension (JMJD2A/LSD1), and lymph node metastasis (JMJD2A/AR). Lower JMJD2A intensity correlated with additional poor prognostic features, including lymphovascular invasion, concomitant carcinoma in situ and tobacco usage, and predicted significantly worse overall survival. Pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 suppressed bladder cancer cell proliferation and androgen-induced transcription. Our results support a novel role for the AR-KDM complex in bladder cancer initiation and progression, identify JMJD2A as a promising prognostic biomarker, and demonstrate targeting of the KDM activity as an effective potential approach for bladder cancer growth inhibition. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The effect of chemotherapy with or without radiation on the accuracy of MR imaging for evaluating tumor infiltration into the bladder wall in cases of advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Kazushige; Satou, Yuji; Nannri, Masaharu

    2004-01-01

    Staging of tumor infiltration into the bladder wall is one of the critical points in decision-making for optimal treatment of invasive bladder cancer. We studied the correlation of MR findings with pathological diagnosis in cases of invasive bladder cancer which had been treated with chemotherapy, with or without radiation. Twenty-one patients (14 men and 7 women) with invasive bladder tumors who underwent either partial cystectomy or radical cystectomy were entered into the study. Eight cases had received chemotherapy after staging biopsy (Group A), 6 cases had undergone chemo-radiation therapy following staging biopsy (Group B), and 7 cases had received no adjuvant therapy except for staging biopsy preoperatively (Group C). All cases had MR imaging study before surgical treatment. The pathological stage was assessed by examining the whole layer of the resected bladder wall. Pathological diagnosis was pT0 in 4 cases, pT1 in 2 cases, pT2b in 5 cases, pT3a in 2 cases and pT3b in 8 cases. Staging with MR imaging was consistent with pathological findings in 14 of the 21 cases (66.7%), while MR imaging produced over-staging in 6 cases and under-staging in 1 case. Of the 6 cases with over-staging, 2 cases had received chemo-radiation therapy, 2 cases had received chemotherapy, and 2 cases had received staging biopsy alone preoperatively. The one case with under-staging had received chemo-radiation therapy preoperatively. The accuracy in staging with MR imaging was 75.0% (6/8), 50.0% (3/6), and 71.4% (5/7) in Groups A, B, and C, respectively. Imaging study with MR is useful for the staging of invasive bladder cancer. However, care should be taken in the staging of invasive bladder tumors which have been treated with chemotherapy, with or without radiation therapy, because inflammatory infiltration and/or fibrous change caused by the chemo-radiation make accurate staging with MR imaging difficult. (author)

  16. Case report of metastatic invasive breast lobular carcinoma to the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ibraheemi, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women except skin cancer. The common metastatic sites include lymph node, lung, liver and bone. However, metastasis to the bladder is extremely rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of breast cancer metastasis to urinary bladder in Jordan which is reported. Nine years after the initial diagnosis of lobular breast carcinoma, the patient suffered from left side leg edema; Ultrasonography and Computed tomography scanning showed thickening of posterior bladder wall and bilateral hydronephrosis. The biopsy of the bladder confirmed metastatic lesion from the breast. In contrast to the primary tumor, bladder metastasis showed negative expression of estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors. However, Her2neu test was negative in both. The reported case confirms that bladder metastasis from breast cancer tend to occur late after the diagnosis of the primary tumor. Furthermore, bladder metastasis can be asymptomatic and heterogeneous in ER and PR expression in comparison with the primary tumor. This report supports the need for careful follow-up and early intervention whenever such clinical situation is suspected. This report supports further evaluation of receptor status at time of metastasis.

  17. Bladder Cancer in HIV-infected Adults: An Emerging Issue? Case-Reports and Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Chawki

    Full Text Available Non-AIDS-related malignancies now represent a frequent cause of death among HIV-infected patients. Albeit bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, it has been rarely reported among HIV-infected patients. We wished to assess the prevalence and characteristics of bladder cancer in HIV-infected patients.We conducted a single center retrospective study from 1998 to 2013 in a university hospital in Paris. Cases of bladder cancer among HIV-infected patients were identified using the electronic records of the hospital database and of the HIV-infected cohort. Patient characteristics and outcomes were retrieved from patients charts. A systematic review of published cases of bladder cancers in patients with HIV-infection was also performed.During the study period we identified 15 HIV-infected patients (0.2% of the cohort with a bladder cancer. Patients were mostly men (73% and smokers (67%, with a median age of 56 years at cancer diagnosis. Bladder cancer was diagnosed a median of 14 years after HIV-infection. Most patients were on ART (86% with median current and nadir CD4 cell counts of 506 and 195 cells/mm3, respectively. Haematuria (73% was the most frequent presenting symptom and HPV-associated lesions were seen in 6/10 (60% patients. Histopathology showed transitional cell carcinoma in 80% and a high proportion of tumors with muscle invasion (47% and high histologic grade (73%. One-year survival rate was 74.6%. The systematic review identified 13 additional cases of urothelial bladder cancers which shared similar features.Bladder cancers in HIV-infected patients remain rare but may occur in relatively young patients with a low nadir CD4 cell count, have aggressive pathological features and can be fatal.

  18. Conformal radiotherapy of urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig Paul; Smaaland, Rune; Dahl, Olav

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in radiotherapy (RT) are founded on the enhanced tumour visualisation capabilities of new imaging modalities and the precise deposition of individualised radiation dose distributions made possible with the new systems for RT planning and delivery. These techniques have a large potential to also improve the results of RT of urinary bladder cancer. Major challenges to take full advantage of these advances in the management of bladder cancer are to control, and, as far as possible, reduce bladder motion, and to reliably account for the related intestine and rectum motion. If these obstacles are overcome, it should be possible in the near future to offer selected patients with muscle invading bladder cancer an organ-sparing, yet effective combined-modality treatment as an alternative to radical surgery

  19. CT in the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumi, Yoshifumi; Mitani, Takashi; Kuriyama, Keiko

    1988-01-01

    CT findings of 8 operated cases with squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder were reviewed. All of them had advanced stage tumor with invasion into perivesical fat or organs (≥ T3b), and with or without lymphnode involvement. We compared them with 15 operated cases with advavced transitional cell carcinoma of urinary bladder (≥ T3b) especially in regard to the direction of tumor growth, and the frequency of invasion into perivesical organs and lymphnode involvement. Futhermore, we studied a relation between CT findings and histopathological stages of the squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder. Squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder showed predominant extravesical growth as the stage advanced, while transitional cell carcinoma generally showed predominant intravesical growth. Squamous cell carcinoma invaded into perivesical organs and metastasized to lymphnodes more frequently than transitional cell carcinoma of control group. Accuracy of CT staging of squamous cell carcinoma of urinary bladder was found to be 100 % in T stage and 75 % in N stage. (author)

  20. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon; Shin, Su-Jin; Cho, Nam Hoon; Choi, Young Deuk

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  1. Non-contrast magnetic resonance imaging for bladder cancer: fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging and T2-weighted imaging helps evaluate depth of invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minsu; Oh, Young Taik; Jung, Dae Chul; Park, Sung Yoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su-Jin [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hanyang University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Hoon [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Deuk [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Urology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To investigate the utility of fused high b value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) for evaluating depth of invasion in bladder cancer. We included 62 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgically confirmed urothelial carcinoma in the urinary bladder. An experienced genitourinary radiologist analysed the depth of invasion (T stage <2 or ≥2) using T2WI, DWI, T2WI plus DWI, and fused DWI and T2WI (fusion MRI). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and accuracy were investigated. Area under the curve (AUC) was analysed to identify T stage ≥2. The rate of patients with surgically confirmed T stage ≥2 was 41.9% (26/62). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 50.0%, 55.6%, 44.8%, 60.6% and 53.2%, respectively, with T2WI; 57.7%, 77.8%, 65.2%, 71.8% and 69.4%, respectively, with DWI; 65.4%, 80.6%, 70.8%, 76.3% and 74.2%, respectively, with T2WI plus DWI and 80.8%, 77.8%, 72.4%, 84.9% and 79.0%, respectively, with fusion MRI. AUC was 0.528 with T2WI, 0.677 with DWI, 0.730 with T2WI plus DWI and 0.793 with fusion MRI for T stage ≥2. Fused high b value DWI and T2WI may be a promising non-contrast MRI technique for assessing depth of invasion in bladder cancer. (orig.)

  2. Suppression of progranulin expression inhibits bladder cancer growth and sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraschi, Simone; Xu, Shi-Qiong; Stefanello, Manuela; Moskalev, Igor; Morcavallo, Alaide; Genua, Marco; Tanimoto, Ryuta; Birbe, Ruth; Peiper, Stephen C; Gomella, Leonard G; Belfiore, Antonino; Black, Peter C; Iozzo, Renato V; Morrione, Andrea

    2016-06-28

    We have recently demonstrated a critical role for progranulin in bladder cancer. Progranulin contributes, as an autocrine growth factor, to the transformed phenotype by modulating Akt-and MAPK-driven motility, invasion and anchorage-independent growth. Progranulin also induces F-actin remodeling by interacting with the F-actin binding protein drebrin. In addition, progranulin is overexpressed in invasive bladder cancer compared to normal tissue controls, suggesting that progranulin might play a key role in driving the transition to the invasive phenotype of urothelial cancer. However, it is not established whether targeting progranulin could have therapeutic effects on bladder cancer. In this study, we stably depleted urothelial cancer cells of endogenous progranulin by shRNA approaches and determined that progranulin depletion severely inhibited the ability of tumorigenic urothelial cancer cells to migrate, invade and grow in anchorage-independency. We further demonstrate that progranulin expression is critical for tumor growth in vivo, in both xenograft and orthotopic tumor models. Notably, progranulin levels correlated with response to cisplatin treatment and were upregulated in bladder tumors. Our data indicate that progranulin may constitute a novel target for therapeutic intervention in bladder tumors. In addition, progranulin may serve as a novel biomarker for bladder cancer.

  3. A comparison of morbidity following conformal versus intensity-modulated radiotherapy for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Jimmi; Holmberg, Mats; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Agerbæk, Mads; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Høyer, Morten

    2014-10-01

    In radiotherapy (RT) of urinary bladder cancer, the use of intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) opens for sparing of considerable intestinal volumes. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the acute and late toxicities following either conformal RT (CRT) or IMRT for bladder cancer, and to correlate the toxicities to dose-volume parameters. The study included 116 consecutively treated patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who received either CRT (n = 66) or IMRT (n = 50) during 2007-2010. Acute side effects were retrospectively collected whereas late effects were assessed by a cross-sectional evaluation b