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Sample records for murine tumor model

  1. A murine model of targeted infusion for intracranial tumors.

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    Kim, Minhyung; Barone, Tara A; Fedtsova, Natalia; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wilfong, Chandler D; Alosi, Julie A; Plunkett, Robert J; Gudkov, Andrei; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, intra-arterial (IA) drug administration for malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was performed as an attempt to improve drug delivery. With the advent of percutaneous neuorovascular techniques and modern microcatheters, intracranial drug delivery is readily feasible; however, the question remains whether IA administration is safe and more effective compared to other delivery modalities such as intravenous (IV) or oral administrations. Preclinical large animal models allow for comparisons between treatment routes and to test novel agents, but can be expensive and difficult to generate large numbers and rapid results. Accordingly, we developed a murine model of IA drug delivery for GBM that is reproducible with clear readouts of tumor response and neurotoxicities. Herein, we describe a novel mouse model of IA drug delivery accessing the internal carotid artery to treat ipsilateral implanted GBM tumors that is consistent and reproducible with minimal experience. The intent of establishing this unique platform is to efficiently interrogate targeted anti-tumor agents that may be designed to take advantage of a directed, regional therapy approach for brain tumors.

  2. Shigella mediated depletion of macrophages in a murine breast cancer model is associated with tumor regression.

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    Katharina Galmbacher

    Full Text Available A tumor promoting role of macrophages has been described for a transgenic murine breast cancer model. In this model tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs represent a major component of the leukocytic infiltrate and are associated with tumor progression. Shigella flexneri is a bacterial pathogen known to specificly induce apotosis in macrophages. To evaluate whether Shigella-induced removal of macrophages may be sufficient for achieving tumor regression we have developed an attenuated strain of S. flexneri (M90TDeltaaroA and infected tumor bearing mice. Two mouse models were employed, xenotransplantation of a murine breast cancer cell line and spontanous breast cancer development in MMTV-HER2 transgenic mice. Quantitative analysis of bacterial tumor targeting demonstrated that attenuated, invasive Shigella flexneri primarily infected TAMs after systemic administration. A single i.v. injection of invasive M90TDeltaaroA resulted in caspase-1 dependent apoptosis of TAMs followed by a 74% reduction in tumors of transgenic MMTV-HER-2 mice 7 days post infection. TAM depletion was sustained and associated with complete tumor regression.These data support TAMs as useful targets for antitumor therapy and highlight attenuated bacterial pathogens as potential tools.

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled elastin-derived peptide, VAPG for multimodal tumor imaging in murine tumor model.

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    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled peptide, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was synthesized by using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG with Tc-99m was done by using ligand exchange via tartrate. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with SW620 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry by using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG determined by saturation binding was 16.8 ± 3.6 nM. Confocal microscopy images of SW620 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of VAPG. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumor cells. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Photothermal Therapy Using Gold Nanorods and Near-Infrared Light in a Murine Melanoma Model Increases Survival and Decreases Tumor Volume

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    Mary K. Popp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal therapy (PTT treatments have shown strong potential in treating tumors through their ability to target destructive heat preferentially to tumor regions. In this paper we demonstrate that PTT in a murine melanoma model using gold nanorods (GNRs and near-infrared (NIR light decreases tumor volume and increases animal survival to an extent that is comparable to the current generation of melanoma drugs. GNRs, in particular, have shown a strong ability to reach ablative temperatures quickly in tumors when exposed to NIR light. The current research tests the efficacy of GNRs PTT in a difficult and fast growing murine melanoma model using a NIR light-emitting diode (LED light source. LED light sources in the NIR spectrum could provide a safer and more practical approach to photothermal therapy than lasers. We also show that the LED light source can effectively and quickly heat in vitro and in vivo models to ablative temperatures when combined with GNRs. We anticipate that this approach could have significant implications for human cancer therapy.

  5. NetH2pan: A Computational Tool to Guide MHC peptide prediction on Murine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVette, Christa I; Andreatta, Massimo; Bardet, Wilfried

    2018-01-01

    With the advancement of personalized cancer immunotherapies, new tools are needed to identify tumor antigens and evaluate T-cell responses in model systems, specifically those that exhibit clinically relevant tumor progression. Key transgenic mouse models of breast cancer are generated and mainta......With the advancement of personalized cancer immunotherapies, new tools are needed to identify tumor antigens and evaluate T-cell responses in model systems, specifically those that exhibit clinically relevant tumor progression. Key transgenic mouse models of breast cancer are generated...... for evaluating antigen specificity in the murine FVB strain. Our study provides the first detailed molecular and immunoproteomic characterization of the FVB H-2q MHC Class I alleles, including >8500 unique peptide ligands, a multi-allele murine MHC peptide prediction tool, and in vivo validation of these data...

  6. Treatment of Murine Tumor Models of Breast Adenocarcinoma by Continuous Dual-Frequency Ultrasound

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    Amir Hoshang Barati

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acoustic transient cavitation is the primary mechanism of sonochemical reaction and has potential use for tumor treatment. In this study, the in vivo anti-tumor effect of simultaneous dual-frequency ultrasound at low-level intensity (ISATA < 6 W/cm2 was investigated in a spontaneous murine model of breast adenocarcinoma in Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: Forty tumor bearing mice were divided into four groups (10 in each group. The treated groups received 15 or 30 minutes of combined dual-frequency ultrasound in continuous mode (1 MHzcon + 150 kHzcon respectively. The control and the sham groups contained the untreated mice. The tumor growth delay parameters including tumor volume, relative tumor volume, T5 and T2 (the needed time for each tumor to reach 5 and 2 times the initial tumor volume, respectively, survival period and percent of tumor growth inhibition ratio were measured on different days after treatment. Results: The results showed that the 30 min treatment was effective in tumor growth delay and percent of tumor growth inhibitory ratio compared to the sham and the control groups. The tumor volume growth and relative volume of tumors in the same treated group showed an anti-tumor effect relative to the sham and the control groups. There was a significant difference in tumor volume growth between this 30 min treatment group and the sham group 12 days after treatment (p-value

  7. A novel Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled arginine-arginine-leucine-containing peptide as a multimodal tumor imaging agent in a murine tumor model.

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    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2018-06-15

    We developed a Tc-99m and TAMRA-labeled peptide, Tc-99m arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide (TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL), to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with PC-3 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL determined by saturation binding was 41.7 ± 7.8 nM. Confocal microscopy images of PC-3 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of RRL. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In conclusion, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Productively infected murine Kaposi's sarcoma-like tumors define new animal models for studying and targeting KSHV oncogenesis and replication.

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    Brittany M Ashlock

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells.

  9. Micro-MRI at 11.7 T of a Murine Brain Tumor Model Using Delayed Contrast Enhancement

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    Rex A. Moats

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging methodologies allow for serial measurement of tumor size, circumventing the need for sacrificing mice at given time points. In orthotopically transplanted murine models of brain tumors, cross-section micro-MRI allows for visualization and measurement of the physically inaccessible tumors. To allow for long resident times of a contrast agent in the tumor, intraperitoneal administration was used as a route of injection for contrast-enhanced micro-MRI, and a simple method for relative tumor volume measurements was examined. A strategy for visualizing the variability of the delayed tumor enhancement was developed. These strategies were applied to monitor the growth of brain tumors xenotransplanted into nude mice and either treated with the antiangiogenic peptide EMD 121974 or an inactive control peptide. Each mouse was used as its own control. Serial imaging was done weekly, beginning at Day 7 after tumor cell implantation and continued for 7 weeks. Images obtained were reconstructed on the MRI instrument. The image files were transferred off line to be postprocessed to assess tumor growth (volume and variability in enhancement (three-dimensional [3-D] intensity models. In a small study, tumor growth and response to treatment were followed using this methodology and the high-resolution images displayed in 3-D allowed for straightforward qualitative assessment of variable enhancement related to vascular factors and tumor age.

  10. Therapeutic efficacy and microSPECT/CT imaging of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome in a C26 murine colon carcinoma solid tumor model

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    Chang, Y.-J.; Chang, C.-H.; Yu, C.-Y.; Chang, T.-J.; Chen, L.-C. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, M.-H. [National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China); Lee, T.-W. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Ting Gann [National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: gann.ting@msa.hinet.net

    2010-01-15

    Nanocarriers can selectively target cancer sites and carry payloads, thereby improving diagnostic and therapeutic effectiveness and reducing toxicity. The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of a new co-delivery radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-N,N-bis (2-mercaptoethyl)-N',N'-diethylethylenediamine (BMEDA)-labeled pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (DXR) ({sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome) in a C26 murine colon carcinoma solid tumor model. To evaluate the targeting and localization of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome in C26 murine tumor-bearing mice, biodistribution, microSPECT/CT imaging and pharmacokinetic studies were performed. The antitumor effect of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome was assessed by tumor growth inhibition, survival ratio and histopathological hematoxylin-eosin staining. The tumor target and localization of the nanoliposome delivery radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome were demonstrated in the biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and in vivo nuclear imaging studies. In the study on therapeutic efficacy, the tumor-bearing mice treated with bimodality radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome showed better mean tumor growth inhibition rate (MGI) and longer median survival time (MGI=0.048; 74 days) than those treated with radiotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-liposome (MGI=0.134; 60 days) and chemotherapeutics of Lipo-Dox (MGI=0.413; 38 days). The synergistic tumor regression effect was observed with the combination index (CI) exceeding 1 (CI=1.145) for co-delivery radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome. Two (25%) of the mice treated with radiochemotherapeutics were completely cured after 120 days. The therapeutic efficacy of radiotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-liposome and the synergistic effect of the combination radiochemotherapeutics of {sup 188}Re-DXR-liposome have been demonstrated in a C26 murine solid tumor animal model, which pointed to the potential benefit and promise of the co-delivery of

  11. Biological markers as predictors of radiosensitivity in syngeneic murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sei Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo; Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether a relationship exists between tumor control dose 50 (TCD 50 ) or tumor growth delay (TGD) and radiation induced apoptosis (RIA) in syngeneic murine tumors. Also we investigated the biological markers that can predict radiosensitivity in murine tumor system through analysis of relationship between TCD 50 , TGD, RIA and constitutive expression levels of the genetic products regulating RIA. Syngeneic murine tumors such as ovarian adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma, hepatocarcinoma were used in this study. C3H/HeJ mice were bred and maintained in our specific pathogen free mouse colony and were 8 ∼ 12 weeks old when used for the experiments. The tumors, growing in the right hind legs of mice, were analyzed for TCD 50 , TGD, and RIA at 8 mm in diameter. The tumors were also analyzed for the constitutive expression levels of p53, p21 WAF1/CIP1 , BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-x L , Bcl-x S , and p34. Correlation analysis was performed whether the level of RIA were correlated with TCD 50 or TGD, and the constitutive expression levels of genetic products regulating RIA were correlated with TCD 50 , TGD, RIA. The level of RIA showed a significant positive correlation (R = 0.922, ρ = 0.026) with TGD, and showed a trend to correlation (R = -0.848), marginally significant correlation with TCD 50 (ρ = 0.070). It indicates that tumors that respond to radiation with high percentage of apoptosis were more radiosensitive. The constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 and p34 showed a significant correlation either with TCD 50 (R = 0.893, ρ = 0.041 and R = 0.904, ρ = 0.035) or with TGD (R = -0.922, ρ 0.026 and R = -0.890, ρ = 0.043). The tumors with high constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 or p34 were less radiosensitive than those with low expression. Radiosensitivity may be predicted with the level of RIA in murine tumors. The constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 or p34 can be used as biological

  12. Biological markers as predictors of radiosensitivity in syngeneic murine tumors

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    Chang, Sei Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We investigated whether a relationship exists between tumor control dose 50 (TCD{sub 50}) or tumor growth delay (TGD) and radiation induced apoptosis (RIA) in syngeneic murine tumors. Also we investigated the biological markers that can predict radiosensitivity in murine tumor system through analysis of relationship between TCD{sub 50}, TGD, RIA and constitutive expression levels of the genetic products regulating RIA. Syngeneic murine tumors such as ovarian adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma, hepatocarcinoma were used in this study. C3H/HeJ mice were bred and maintained in our specific pathogen free mouse colony and were 8 {approx} 12 weeks old when used for the experiments. The tumors, growing in the right hind legs of mice, were analyzed for TCD{sub 50}, TGD, and RIA at 8 mm in diameter. The tumors were also analyzed for the constitutive expression levels of p53, p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}, BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-x{sub L}, Bcl-x{sub S}, and p34. Correlation analysis was performed whether the level of RIA were correlated with TCD{sub 50} or TGD, and the constitutive expression levels of genetic products regulating RIA were correlated with TCD{sub 50}, TGD, RIA. The level of RIA showed a significant positive correlation (R = 0.922, {rho} = 0.026) with TGD, and showed a trend to correlation (R = -0.848), marginally significant correlation with TCD{sub 50} ({rho} = 0.070). It indicates that tumors that respond to radiation with high percentage of apoptosis were more radiosensitive. The constitutive expression levels of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} and p34 showed a significant correlation either with TCD{sub 50} (R = 0.893, {rho} = 0.041 and R = 0.904, {rho} = 0.035) or with TGD (R = -0.922, {rho} 0.026 and R = -0.890, {rho} = 0.043). The tumors with high constitutive expression levels of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} or p34 were less radiosensitive than those with low expression. Radiosensitivity may be predicted with the level of RIA in murine tumors. The

  13. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

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    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  14. Combination of Gold Nanoparticle-Conjugated Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Radiation Therapy Results in a Synergistic Antitumor Response in Murine Carcinoma Models.

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    Koonce, Nathan A; Quick, Charles M; Hardee, Matthew E; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Dent, Judith A; Paciotti, Giulio F; Nedosekin, Dmitry; Dings, Ruud P M; Griffin, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Although remarkable preclinical antitumor effects have been shown for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) alone and combined with radiation, its clinical use has been hindered by systemic dose-limiting toxicities. We investigated the physiological and antitumor effects of radiation therapy combined with the novel nanomedicine CYT-6091, a 27-nm average-diameter polyethylene glycol-TNF-coated gold nanoparticle, which recently passed through phase 1 trials. The physiologic and antitumor effects of single and fractionated radiation combined with CYT-6091 were studied in the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma and SCCVII head and neck tumor squamous cell carcinoma models. In the 4T1 murine breast tumor model, we observed a significant reduction in the tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) 24 hours after CYT-6091 alone and combined with a radiation dose of 12 Gy (P.05 vs control) despite extensive vascular damage observed. The IFP reduction in the 4T1 model was also associated with marked vascular damage and extravasation of red blood cells into the tumor interstitium. A sustained reduction in tumor cell density was observed in the combined therapy group compared with all other groups (P<.05). Finally, we observed a more than twofold delay in tumor growth when CYT-6091 was combined with a single 20-Gy radiation dose-notably, irrespective of the treatment sequence. Moreover, when hypofractionated radiation (12 Gy × 3) was applied with CYT-6091 treatment, a more than five-fold growth delay was observed in the combined treatment group of both tumor models and determined to be synergistic. Our results have demonstrated that TNF-labeled gold nanoparticles combined with single or fractionated high-dose radiation therapy is effective in reducing IFP and tumor growth and shows promise for clinical translation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of tumor size on F-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose and fluoroerythronitroimidazole uptake in a murine sarcoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, June-Key; Chang, Young Soo; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Young Ju; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Jang, Ja June; Lee, Myung Chul

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of tumor size on the uptake of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoroerythronitroimidazole (FETNIM) in a murine sarcoma model. ICR mice were xenografted with sarcoma 180 cell line and tumors were allowed to grow to a weight of 0.26-5.82 grams. 18 F-FDG and 18 F-FETNIM were injected intravenously in separate groups of mice, and after 1 hr, the tumors were excised and radiotracer uptake was measured. In another group of mice tumors were autoradiographically analyzed and subjected to H and E staining. In both the FDG and FETNIM group, per-gram radiotracer uptake by a tumor was inversely proportional to tumor weight. 18 F-FETNIM correlated more (r=-0.593, p 18 F-FDG (r=-0.447, p 18 F-FETNIM, a direct correlation between tumor weight and the no-uptake-area to total-tumor-area was demonstrated. We concluded that increased tumor size is associated with decreased uptake of 18 F-FDG and FETNIM, though this depends on the type of radiotracers and distribution of necrosis. (author)

  16. The effect of perioperative analgesic drugs omnopon and dexketoprofen on the functional activity of immune cells in murine model of tumor surgery.

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    Sydor, R I; Khranovska, N M; Skachkova, O V; Skivka, L M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of perioperative analgesia with nonselective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor dexketoprofen and opioid drug omnopon on the functional activity of immune cells in tumor excision murine model. Lewis lung carcinoma cells were transplanted into hind paw of C57/black mice. On the 23th day tumor was removed. Analgesic drugs were injected 30 min before and once a day for 3 days after the surgery. Biological material was obtained a day before, 1 day and 3 days after the tumor removal. IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β mRNA levels in splenic cells were assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cytotoxic activity of splenocytes was estimated by flow cytometry. We found that in splenocytes of mice received opioid analgesia IL-10 mRNA level was increased 2.3 times on day one after the surgery compared to preoperative level (P dexketoprofen group this parameter did not change. IFN-γ gene expression level on day 3 after tumor removal was 40% higher in splenocytes of dexketoprofen treated mice as compared with omnopon treated animals (P dexketoprofen against (50.2 ± 3.3)% in omnopon group. In conclusion, perioperative analgesia with cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen in contrast to opioid analgesia with omnopon preserves higher functional activity of murine immune cells in the experimental model of tumor surgery.

  17. Mitochondrial ASncmtRNA-1 and ASncmtRNA-2 as potent targets to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in the RenCa murine renal adenocarcinoma model.

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    Borgna, Vincenzo; Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Verónica A; Belmar, Sebastián; Araya, Mariela; Jeldes, Emanuel; Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Villota, Claudio; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Castillo, Octavio; Burzio, Luis O

    2017-07-04

    Knockdown of antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptosis in several human and mouse tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for a selective therapy against different types of cancer. Here we show that in vitro knockdown of murine ASncmtRNAs induces apoptotic death of mouse renal adenocarcinoma RenCa cells, but not normal murine kidney epithelial cells. In a syngeneic subcutaneous RenCa model, treatment delayed and even reversed tumor growth. Since the subcutaneous model does not reflect the natural microenviroment of renal cancer, we used an orthotopic model of RenCa cells inoculated under the renal capsule. These studies showed inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. Direct metastasis assessment by tail vein injection of RenCa cells also showed a drastic reduction in lung metastatic nodules. In vivo treatment reduces survivin, N-cadherin and P-cadherin levels, providing a molecular basis for metastasis inhibition. In consequence, the treatment significantly enhanced mouse survival in these models. Our results suggest that the ASncmtRNAs could be potent and selective targets for therapy against human renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Diltiazem enhances tumor blood flow: MRI study in a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muruganandham, M.; Kasiviswanathan, A.; Jagannathan, N.R.; Raghunathan, P.; Jain, P.C.; Jain, V.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Diltiazem, a calcium-channel blocker, is known to differentially influence the radiation responses of normal and murine tumor tissues. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, the effects of diltiazem on the radiation response of Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) in mice have been investigated, and the hemodynamic changes induced by diltiazem in tumor and normal muscle have been studied using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. Methods and Materials: Ehrlich ascites tumors were grown subcutaneously in Swiss albino strain A mice. Dynamic gadodiamide and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast enhanced 1 H MR imaging studies of EAT and normal muscle were performed after administration of diltiazem in mice using a 4.7 Tesla MR scanner. Tumor radiotherapy experiments (total dose = 10 Gy, 0.4-0.5 Gy/min, single fraction) were carried out with 30 min preadministration of diltiazem (27.5 or 55 mg/kg i.p.) to EAT-bearing mice using a teletherapy machine. Results: The diltiazem+ radiation treated group showed significant tumor regression (in congruent with 65% of the animals) and enhanced animal survival. MR-gadodiamide contrast kinetics revealed a higher magnitude of signal enhancement in diltiazem treated groups as compared to the controls. The observed changes in the magnitude of kinetic parameters were the same for both tumor and normal muscle. BOLD-MR images at 30 min after diltiazem administration showed a 25% and 8% (average) intensity enhancement from their basal values in tumor and normal muscle regions, respectively. The control group showed no significant changes. Conclusion: The present studies demonstrate the radiosensitization potential of diltiazem in the mice EAT model. The enhanced radiation response observed with diltiazem correlates with the diltiazem-induced increase in tumor blood flow (TBF) and tumor oxygenation. The present results also demonstrate the applications of BOLD-MR measurements in investigating the alterations in tumor

  19. The effect of perioperative analgesic drugs omnopon and dexketoprofen on the functional activity of immune cells in murine model of tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. I. Sydor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the effect of perioperative analgesia with nonselective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor dexketoprofen and opioid drug omnopon on the functional activity of immune cells in tumor excision murine model. Lewis lung carcinoma cells were transplanted into hind paw of C57/black mice. On the 23th day tumor was removed. Analgesic drugs were injected 30 min before and once a day for 3 days after the surgery. Biological material was obtained a day before, 1 day and 3 days after the tumor removal. IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β mRNA levels in splenic cells were assessed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cytotoxic activity of splenocytes was estimated by flow cytometry. We found that in splenocytes of mice received opioid analgesia IL-10 mRNA level was increased 2.3 times on day one after the surgery compared to preoperative level (P < 0.05, while in dexketoprofen group this parameter did not change. IFN-γ gene expression level on day 3 after tumor removal was 40% higher in splenocytes of dexketoprofen treated mice as compared with omnopon treated animals (P < 0.05. Cytotoxic activity of splenocytes on day 3 postsurgery was (62.2 ± 2.4% in dexketoprofen against (50.2 ± 3.3% in omnopon group. In conclusion, perioperative analgesia with cyclooxygenase inhibitor dexketoprofen in contrast to opioid analgesia with omnopon preserves higher functional activity of murine immune cells in the experimental model of tumor surgery.

  20. Sex differences in the MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Gilbertson, Shai; Davis, Megan; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Kasman, Laura M

    The MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer has been widely used for more than 35 years. In humans, bladder cancer is one third as prevalent in women as in men, with a trend toward lower prevalence in parous compared to nulliparous women. Our objective was to determine if the MB49 bladder cancer model reproduces the sex differences observed in humans, and to determine its sensitivity to testosterone and the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Male and female C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MB49 murine bladder cancer cells, and observed for tumor growth. MB49 dose responses to hCG and dihydrotestosterone were determined in vitro . MB49 tumor growth was significantly greater in male mice than female mice. Pregnancy did not affect MB49 tumor growth in female mice. MB49 cells did not proliferate in response to hCG in vitro and the functional receptor for gonadotropins was absent. Dihydrotestosterone strongly stimulated growth of MB49 cells in vitro . The MB49 murine model of bladder cancer reproduced some aspects of the sex differences observed in humans. Our results suggest that testosterone may stimulate MB49 cell proliferation, which may explain the more rapid MB49 tumor growth observed in male mice.

  1. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21 WAF1/CIP1

  2. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}. Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 {sup WAF1/CIP1}. Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}.

  3. Combination of Gold Nanoparticle-Conjugated Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Radiation Therapy Results in a Synergistic Antitumor Response in Murine Carcinoma Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonce, Nathan A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Quick, Charles M. [Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Hardee, Matthew E.; Jamshidi-Parsian, Azemat; Dent, Judith A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Paciotti, Giulio F. [CytImmune Sciences, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Nedosekin, Dmitry [Department of Otolaryngology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Dings, Ruud P.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States); Griffin, Robert J., E-mail: RJGriffin@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Although remarkable preclinical antitumor effects have been shown for tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) alone and combined with radiation, its clinical use has been hindered by systemic dose-limiting toxicities. We investigated the physiological and antitumor effects of radiation therapy combined with the novel nanomedicine CYT-6091, a 27-nm average-diameter polyethylene glycol-TNF-coated gold nanoparticle, which recently passed through phase 1 trials. Methods and Materials: The physiologic and antitumor effects of single and fractionated radiation combined with CYT-6091 were studied in the murine 4T1 breast carcinoma and SCCVII head and neck tumor squamous cell carcinoma models. Results: In the 4T1 murine breast tumor model, we observed a significant reduction in the tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) 24 hours after CYT-6091 alone and combined with a radiation dose of 12 Gy (P<.05 vs control). In contrast, radiation alone (12 Gy) had a negligible effect on the IFP. In the SCCVII head and neck tumor model, the baseline IFP was not markedly elevated, and little additional change occurred in the IFP after single-dose radiation or combined therapy (P>.05 vs control) despite extensive vascular damage observed. The IFP reduction in the 4T1 model was also associated with marked vascular damage and extravasation of red blood cells into the tumor interstitium. A sustained reduction in tumor cell density was observed in the combined therapy group compared with all other groups (P<.05). Finally, we observed a more than twofold delay in tumor growth when CYT-6091 was combined with a single 20-Gy radiation dose—notably, irrespective of the treatment sequence. Moreover, when hypofractionated radiation (12 Gy × 3) was applied with CYT-6091 treatment, a more than five-fold growth delay was observed in the combined treatment group of both tumor models and determined to be synergistic. Conclusions: Our results have demonstrated that TNF-labeled gold

  4. Pulsed terahertz imaging of breast cancer in freshly excised murine tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Tyler; Chavez, Tanny; Khan, Kamrul; Wu, Jingxian; Chakraborty, Avishek; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Bailey, Keith; El-Shenawee, Magda

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates terahertz (THz) imaging and classification of freshly excised murine xenograft breast cancer tumors. These tumors are grown via injection of E0771 breast adenocarcinoma cells into the flank of mice maintained on high-fat diet. Within 1 h of excision, the tumor and adjacent tissues are imaged using a pulsed THz system in the reflection mode. The THz images are classified using a statistical Bayesian mixture model with unsupervised and supervised approaches. Correlation with digitized pathology images is conducted using classification images assigned by a modal class decision rule. The corresponding receiver operating characteristic curves are obtained based on the classification results. A total of 13 tumor samples obtained from 9 tumors are investigated. The results show good correlation of THz images with pathology results in all samples of cancer and fat tissues. For tumor samples of cancer, fat, and muscle tissues, THz images show reasonable correlation with pathology where the primary challenge lies in the overlapping dielectric properties of cancer and muscle tissues. The use of a supervised regression approach shows improvement in the classification images although not consistently in all tissue regions. Advancing THz imaging of breast tumors from mice and the development of accurate statistical models will ultimately progress the technique for the assessment of human breast tumor margins.

  5. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie Liao

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+ T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression.Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  6. Cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis by modulating the tumor immune microenvironment in a 4T1 murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Debbie; Luo, Yunping; Markowitz, Dorothy; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2009-11-23

    Local inflammation associated with solid tumors commonly results from factors released by tumor cells and the tumor stroma, and promotes tumor progression. Cancer associated fibroblasts comprise a majority of the cells found in tumor stroma and are appealing targets for cancer therapy. Here, our aim was to determine the efficacy of targeting cancer associated fibroblasts for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. We demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts are key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment of a 4T1 murine model of metastatic breast cancer. Elimination of cancer associated fibroblasts in vivo by a DNA vaccine targeted to fibroblast activation protein results in a shift of the immune microenvironment from a Th2 to Th1 polarization. This shift is characterized by increased protein expression of IL-2 and IL-7, suppressed recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages, myeloid derived suppressor cells, T regulatory cells, and decreased tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, the vaccine improved anti-metastatic effects of doxorubicin chemotherapy and enhanced suppression of IL-6 and IL-4 protein expression while increasing recruitment of dendritic cells and CD8(+) T cells. Treatment with the combination therapy also reduced tumor-associated Vegf, Pdgfc, and GM-CSF mRNA and protein expression. Our findings demonstrate that cancer associated fibroblasts promote tumor growth and metastasis through their role as key modulators of immune polarization in the tumor microenvironment and are valid targets for therapy of metastatic breast cancer.

  7. Quantitation of Murine Stroma and Selective Purification of the Human Tumor Component of Patient-Derived Xenografts for Genomic Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina E Schneeberger

    Full Text Available Patient-derived xenograft (PDX mouse models are increasingly used for preclinical therapeutic testing of human cancer. A limitation in molecular and genetic characterization of PDX tumors is the presence of integral murine stroma. This is particularly problematic for genomic sequencing of PDX models. Rapid and dependable approaches for quantitating stromal content and purifying the malignant human component of these tumors are needed. We used a recently developed technique exploiting species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplicon length (ssPAL differences to define the fractional composition of murine and human DNA, which was proportional to the fractional composition of cells in a series of lung cancer PDX lines. We compared four methods of human cancer cell isolation: fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS, an immunomagnetic mouse cell depletion (MCD approach, and two distinct EpCAM-based immunomagnetic positive selection methods. We further analyzed DNA extracted from the resulting enriched human cancer cells by targeted sequencing using a clinically validated multi-gene panel. Stromal content varied widely among tumors of similar histology, but appeared stable over multiple serial tumor passages of an individual model. FACS and MCD were superior to either positive selection approach, especially in cases of high stromal content, and consistently allowed high quality human-specific genomic profiling. ssPAL is a dependable approach to quantitation of murine stromal content, and MCD is a simple, efficient, and high yield approach to human cancer cell isolation for genomic analysis of PDX tumors.

  8. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  9. Micro-computed tomography derived anisotropy detects tumor provoked deviations in bone in an orthotopic osteosarcoma murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A Cole

    Full Text Available Radiographic imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Currently, computed-tomography (CT is used to measure tumor-induced osteolysis as a marker for tumor growth by monitoring the bone fractional volume. As most tumors primarily induce osteolysis, lower bone fractional volume has been found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. However, osteosarcoma is an exception as it induces osteolysis and produces mineralized osteoid simultaneously. Given that competent bone is highly anisotropic (systematic variance in its architectural order renders its physical properties dependent on direction of load and that tumor induced osteolysis and osteogenesis are structurally disorganized relative to competent bone, we hypothesized that μCT-derived measures of anisotropy could be used to qualitatively and quantitatively detect osteosarcoma provoked deviations in bone, both osteolysis and osteogenesis, in vivo. We tested this hypothesis in a murine model of osteosarcoma cells orthotopically injected into the tibia. We demonstrate that, in addition to bone fractional volume, μCT-derived measure of anisotropy is a complete and accurate method to monitor osteosarcoma-induced osteolysis. Additionally, we found that unlike bone fractional volume, anisotropy could also detect tumor-induced osteogenesis. These findings suggest that monitoring tumor-induced changes in the structural property isotropy of the invaded bone may represent a novel means of diagnosing primary and metastatic bone tumors.

  10. In vivo targeting of dead tumor cells in a murine tumor model using a monoclonal antibody specific for the La autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ejeh, Fares; Darby, Jocelyn M; Pensa, Katherine; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D; Brown, Michael P

    2007-09-15

    To investigate the potential of the La-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3B9 as an in vivo tumor-targeting agent. The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line was used for in vitro studies and the EL4 model in which apoptosis was induced with cyclophosphamide and etoposide was used for in vivo studies. In vitro studies compared 3B9 binding in the EL4 cell with that in its counterpart primary cell type of the thymocyte. For in vivo studies, 3B9 was intrinsically or extrinsically labeled with carbon-14 or 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N''''-tetraacetic acid-indium-111, respectively, and biodistribution of the radiotracers was investigated in EL4 tumor-bearing mice, which were treated or not with chemotherapy. La-specific 3B9 mAb bound EL4 cells rather than thymocytes, and binding was detergent resistant. 3B9 binding to dead EL4 cells in vitro was specific, rapid, and saturable. Significantly, more 3B9 bound dead EL4 tumor explant cells after host mice were treated with chemotherapy, which suggested that DNA damage induced 3B9 binding. Tumor binding of 3B9 in vivo was antigen specific and increased significantly after chemotherapy. Tumor accumulation of 3B9 peaked at approximately 50% of the injected dose per gram of tumor 72 h after chemotherapy and correlated with increased tumor cell death. Tumor/organ ratios of 3B9 biodistribution, which included the tumor/blood ratio, exceeded unity 48 or more hours after chemotherapy. La-specific mAb selectively targeted dead tumor cells in vivo, and targeting was augmented by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This novel cell death radioligand may be useful both for radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy.

  11. Cdh11 Acts as a Tumor Suppressor in a Murine Retinoblastoma Model by Facilitating Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchong, Mellone N.; Yurkowski, Christine; Ma, Clement; Spencer, Clarellen; Pajovic, Sanja; Gallie, Brenda L.

    2010-01-01

    CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01). Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8) (p = 0.01) and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016), compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003). In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers), while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121). Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and β-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death. PMID:20421947

  12. Cdh11 acts as a tumor suppressor in a murine retinoblastoma model by facilitating tumor cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellone N Marchong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available CDH11 gene copy number and expression are frequently lost in human retinoblastomas and in retinoblastomas arising in TAg-RB mice. To determine the effect of Cdh11 loss in tumorigenesis, we crossed Cdh11 null mice with TAg-RB mice. Loss of Cdh11 had no gross morphological effect on the developing retina of Cdh11 knockout mice, but led to larger retinal volumes in mice crossed with TAg-RB mice (p = 0.01. Mice null for Cdh11 presented with fewer TAg-positive cells at postnatal day 8 (PND8 (p = 0.01 and had fewer multifocal tumors at PND28 (p = 0.016, compared to mice with normal Cdh11 alleles. However, tumor growth was faster in Cdh11-null mice between PND8 and PND84 (p = 0.003. In tumors of Cdh11-null mice, cell death was decreased 5- to 10-fold (p<0.03 for all markers, while proliferation in vivo remained unaffected (p = 0.121. Activated caspase-3 was significantly decreased and beta-catenin expression increased in Cdh11 knockdown experiments in vitro. These data suggest that Cdh11 displays tumor suppressor properties in vivo and in vitro in murine retinoblastoma through promotion of cell death.

  13. Macrophage content of murine tumors: Associations with TD50 and tumor radiocurability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wike, J.; Hunter, N.; Volpe, J.; Milas, L.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments were designed to investigate whether the tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) content of murine solid tumors correlates with tumor response to ionizing radiation and with the clonogenic ability of tumor cells to establish s.c. tumors. Of 13 tumors studied, 6 were sarcomas and 7 were carcinomas; all tumors were of spontaneous origin in C/sub 3/Hf/Kam mice, with the exception of one sarcoma that was induced by 3-methylcholanthrene. Tumors were growing in the hind thighs of syngeneic mice, and their TAM content was determined when they were 8 mm in diameter. Their macrophage content varied greatly, ranging from 9 to 83%. Radiocurability of 8 mm tumors, determined by TCD50, ranged from 42 Gy (fibrosarcoma FSA) to > 80 Gy (hepatocarcinoma HCA-I). There was an obvious trend toward positive correlation (r = 0.43) between TAM content and reduced local tumor radiocurability. However, there was a significant negative correlation between TAM content and TD50 values, implying that cells from tumors with higher macrophage content were more clonogenic. TAM from the NFSA sarcoma, a tumor with a low TD50 value and poorly responsive to radiation, stimulated the in vitro growth of NFSA tumor cells. These observations suggest that high TAM content could be conducive to tumor cell proliferation and could be a factor in poor tumor radioresponse

  14. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are potent enhancers of radio- and chemoresponses of murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathryn A.; Neal, Robert; Hunter, Nancy; Ariga, Hisanori; Ang, Kian; Milas, Luka

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs bind to Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and stimulate both innate and adaptive immune reactions and possess anti-tumor activity. We recently reported that CpG ODN 1826 strongly enhances radioresponse of both immunogenic [Milas L, Mason K, Ariga H, et al. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide enhances tumor response to radiation. Cancer Res 2004;64:5074-7] and non-immunogenic [Mason KA, Ariga H, Neal R, et al. Targeting toll-like receptor-9 with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides enhances tumor response to fractionated radiotherapy. Clin Cancer Res 2005;11:361-9] murine tumors. Using two immunogenic murine tumors, a fibrosarcoma (FSa) and a mammary carcinoma (MCa-K), the present study explored whether CpG ODN 1826 also improves the response of murine tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel (DOC). Materials and methods: CpG ODN 1826 (100 μg) was given sc three times: when leg tumors were 6 mm, when they grew to 8 mm and again 1 week later. DOC (33 mg/kg iv) and local tumor radiation (10 Gy) were given when tumors were 8 mm. Effects of the treatments were assayed by tumor growth delay, defined as days for tumors to grow from 8 to 12 mm in diameter. Results: Treatment with CpG ODN 1826 resulted in strongly enhanced response of FSa tumors to radiation and MCa-K tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent DOC. Enhancement of tumor treatment response was demonstrated by a strong prolongation in the primary tumor treatment endpoint, tumor growth delay. Coincidentally, this treatment also resulted in a higher rate of tumor cure than that observed after tumor radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone. When all three agents were combined the effect was comparable to that of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with radiation in the case of FSa or of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with DOC in the case of MCa-K. Conclusion: Overall results show that CpG ODN 1826 can markedly improve tumor response

  15. Impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution after curative surgical tumor resection in a murine orthotopic xenograft model for human MSI colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Katy; Ferron, Marianne; Calmel, Claire; Fléjou, Jean-François; Pocard, Marc; Praz, Françoise

    2017-09-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRCs) displaying microsatellite instability (MSI) most often result from MLH1 deficiency. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of MLH1 expression per se on tumor evolution after curative surgical resection using a xenograft tumor model. Transplantable tumors established with the human MLH1-deficient HCT116 cell line and its MLH1-complemented isogenic clone, mlh1-3, were implanted onto the caecum of NOD/SCID mice. Curative surgical resection was performed at day 10 in half of the animals. The HCT116-derived tumors were more voluminous compared to the mlh1-3 ones (P = .001). Lymph node metastases and peritoneal carcinomatosis occurred significantly more often in the group of mice grafted with HCT116 (P = .007 and P = .035, respectively). Mlh1-3-grafted mice did not develop peritoneal carcinomatosis or liver metastasis. After surgical resection, lymph node metastases only arose in the group of mice implanted with HCT116 and the rate of cure was significantly lower than in the mlh1-3 group (P = .047). The murine orthotopic xenograft model based on isogenic human CRC cell lines allowed us to reveal the impact of MLH1 expression on tumor evolution in mice who underwent curative surgical resection and in mice whose tumor was left in situ. Our data indicate that the behavior of MLH1-deficient CRC is not only governed by mutations arising in genes harboring microsatellite repeated sequences but also from their defect in MLH1 as such. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effect of small dose of radiation on induction of apoptosis in murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Chung, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the presence of adaptive response by low dose radiation in murine tumors in relation to radiation induced apoptosis as well as related mechanism. Syngeneic murine tumors, OCa-1 and HCa-l, were given 0.05 Gy pretreatment followed by therapeutic dose of 25 Gy radiation. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed for each treatment group. Regulating molecules of apoptosis. p53, Bcl-2, Sax, Bel-X, were also analyzed by Western blotting. In 0.05 Gy pretreatment group of OCa-l, 25 Gy-induced apoptosis per 1000 cells was 229, which was estimated at 30% lower level than the expected (p<0.05). In contrast, this reduction in radiation induced apoptosis was not seen in HCa-1. In the expression of apoptosis regulating molecules, p53 increased in both tumors in response to radiation. Bcl-2 and Bax did not show significant change in both tumors however, the expression of Bcl-2 surpassed that of Bax in 0.05 Gy pretreatment group of OCa-1. Bcl-X was not expressed in OCa-1. In HCa-l, ScI-X showed increased expression even with 0.05 Gy. Adaptive response by low dose radiation is shown in one murine tumor, OCa-I, in relation to radiation induced apoptosis. Apoptosis regulating molecules including Bcl-2/Bax and Bcl-X, appear to related. This study shows an evidence that adaptive response is present, but not a generalized phenomenon in vivo

  17. Tumor-targeting properties of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled α-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues in a murine melanoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Yubin; Hoffman, Timothy J.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the tumor-targeting properties of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH in a murine melanoma mouse model. Methods: The in vitro properties of cellular internalization and retention of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were studied in B16/F1 murine melanoma cells. The pharmacokinetics of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Results: 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH exhibited fast cellular internalization and extended cellular retention in B16/F1 cells. High receptor-mediated tumor uptake and retention coupled with fast whole-body clearance of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were demonstrated in B16/F1 tumor-bearing C57 mice. The tumor uptakes of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH were 25.70±4.64 and 14.48±0.85 %ID/g at 2 h, and 14.09±2.73 and 17.68±3.32 %ID/g at 4 h postinjection. There was little activity accumulated in normal organs except for kidney. Conclusions: High tumor-targeting properties of 90 Y-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH and 177 Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg 11 )CCMSH highlighted their potential as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma in further investigations

  18. Targeting antisense mitochondrial ncRNAs inhibits murine melanoma tumor growth and metastasis through reduction in survival and invasion factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Silva, Verónica; Araya, Mariela; Restovic, Franko; Echenique, Javiera; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Briones, Macarena; Villegas, Jaime; Villota, Claudio; Vidaurre, Soledad; Borgna, Vincenzo; Socias, Miguel; Valenzuela, Sebastián; Lopez, Constanza; Socias, Teresa; Varas, Manuel; Díaz, Jorge; Burzio, Luis O; Burzio, Verónica A

    2016-09-06

    We reported that knockdown of the antisense noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ASncmtRNAs) induces apoptotic death of several human tumor cell lines, but not normal cells, suggesting this approach for selective therapy against different types of cancer. In order to translate these results to a preclinical scenario, we characterized the murine noncoding mitochondrial RNAs (ncmtRNAs) and performed in vivo knockdown in syngeneic murine melanoma models. Mouse ncmtRNAs display structures similar to the human counterparts, including long double-stranded regions arising from the presence of inverted repeats. Knockdown of ASncmtRNAs with specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) reduces murine melanoma B16F10 cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in vitro through downregulation of pro-survival and metastasis markers, particularly survivin. For in vivo studies, subcutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice were treated systemically with specific and control antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). For metastasis studies, tumors were resected, followed by systemic administration of ASOs and the presence of metastatic nodules in lungs and liver was assessed. Treatment with specific ASO inhibited tumor growth and metastasis after primary tumor resection. In a metastasis-only assay, mice inoculated intravenously with cells and treated with the same ASO displayed reduced number and size of melanoma nodules in the lungs, compared to controls. Our results suggest that ASncmtRNAs could be potent targets for melanoma therapy. To our knowledge, the ASncmtRNAs are the first potential non-nuclear targets for melanoma therapy.

  19. Radioprotection by murine and human tumor-necrosis factor; Dose-dependent effects on hematopoiesis in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloerdal, L; Muench, M O; Warren, D J; Moore, M A.S. [James Ewing Laboratory of Developmental Hematopoiesis, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (USA)

    1989-01-01

    Tumor-necrosis factor (TNF) has been shown to confer significant radioprotection in murine models. Herein, we demonstrate a dose-dependent enhancement of hematological recovery when single doses of either murine or human recombinant TNF are administered prior to irradiation. In addition to its action upon leukocytes and erythocytes, TNF also alleviates radiation-induced thrombocytopenia in the mouse. These effects on circulating blood constituents are further reflected in increased numbers of both primitive (CFU-S) and more differentiated (CFU-GM, CFU-Mega) hematopoietic progenitors in TNF-treated animals. This suggests that TNF exerts it radioprotective effects on a pool of primitive multi-potential hematopoietic cells. (author).

  20. In vivo and in vitro hyperthermia in a murine ovarian tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, N.F.; Ghozland, S.A.; Berek, J.S.; Resnick, B.; Lagasse, L.D.

    1984-01-01

    Preliminary studies using a noninvasive circumferential electrode to deliver low-frequency radiowave heat to a murine ovarian tumor (MOT) model demonstrated that noncancer-bearing anesthetised female C3FeJ/HeB mice could tolerate temperatures to the pelvis and abdomen of up to 43 0 C for 1 hour and that uniform heating of abdominal organs could be obtained. Following in vitro heating of 5 x 10/sup 6/ MOT cells and subsequent transfer of these cells into the naive mouse, a dose-response effect was noted, all animals inoculated with cells heated to 41 0 C for 1 hour dying of disease, compared to 50% of animals innoculated with cells heated to 42 0 C for 1 hour, and 25% of animals innoculated with cells heated to 43 0 C for 1 hour. Following intraperitoneal transfer of 10/sup 5/ MOT cells, in vivo heating to 42 0 C for 30 minutes on 2 occasions 72 hours apart increased median survival from 24 days to 33 days (P 0 C for 30 minutes daily for 5 days, and suggests the development of thermal tolerance with daily heating. The authors are presently investigating the value of indomethacin in preventing thermal tolerance

  1. SU-G-IeP4-11: Monitoring Tumor Growth in Subcutaneous Murine Tumor Model in Vivo: A Comparison Between MRI and Small Animal CT

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    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Fan, J; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare the volume measurement of subcutaneous tumors in mice with different imaging platforms, namely a GE MRI and a Sofie-Biosciences small animal CT scanner. Methods: A549 human lung carcinoma cells and FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into flanks of nude mice. Three FaDu tumors and three A549 tumors were included in this study. The MRI scans were done with a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla MR scanner using a fast T2-weighted sequence (70mm FOV and 1.2mm slice thickness), while the CT scans were done with the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT platform dedicated for small animal studies (48mm FOV and 0.2mm slice thickness). Imaging contrast agent was not used in this study. Based on the DICOM images from MRI and CT scans, the tumors were contoured with Philips DICOM Viewer and the tumor volumes were obtained by summing up the contoured area and multiplied by the slice thickness. Results: The volume measurements based on the CT scans agree reasonably with that obtained with MR images for the subcutaneous tumors. The mean difference in the absolute tumor volumes between MRI- and CT-based measurements was found to be −6.2% ± 1.0%, with the difference defined as (VMR – VCT)*100%/VMR. Furthermore, we evaluated the normalized tumor volumes, which were defined for each tumor as V/V{sub 0} where V{sub 0} stands for the volume from the first MR or CT scan. The mean difference in the normalized tumor volumes was found to be 0.10% ± 0.96%. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the difference between normal and abnormal tissues is often less clear on small animal CT images than on MR images, one can still obtain reasonable tumor volume information with the small animal CT scans for subcutaneous murine xenograft models.

  2. A preliminary study of murine walker-256 tumor hypoxia detected by blood oxygen level dependent-MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shengjian; Mao Jian; Wu Bin; Peng Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish Walker-256 transplantation tumor model in SD Rats. To study of R_2"* signal changes on murine Walker-256 tumor after inhaling Carbogen by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD)-MR, and to explore the feasibility of BOLD-MRI on detecting tumor hypoxia. Methods: Walker-256 tumor cell implanted subcutaneously in right lower abdomen of 95 female SD rats. MR was performed on the tumor-forming rats when the maximum diameter of tumor reached 1-3 cm, using a 3.0 T MR scanner equipped with a 3 inch animal surface coil. BOLD-MRI was done by using a multiecho SPGR sequence during inhaling air and at 10 minute after inhaling Carbogen, respectively. All images were transferred to GE ADW 4.3 workstation, then a baseline R_2"* (R_2"* a) and R_2"* (R_2"* b) after inhaling Carbogen of tumor was calculated using R_2 Star analysis software and ΔR_2"* was calculated through ΔR_2"* = R_2"* b -R_2"* a", meanwhile the volume of tumor were calculated as well. The difference of R_2"* signal pre and post-inhaling of Carbogen was compared with a paired t test, Pearson correlation was calculated between R_2"* a, ΔR_2"* and the volume of tumor, respectively. The correlation between ΔR_2"* and R_2"* a was also assessed by Pearson correlation. Results: Sixty-eight of ninety-five female SD rats formed the tumor (71.6%). The volume of tumor was from 352 to 13 173 mm"3. Mean ΔR_2"* decreased significantly (-2.26 ± 3.90) s"-"1 from (41.18 ± 22.29) s"-"1 during breathing air to (38.91 ± 21.35) s"-"1 10 min after inhaling Carbogen (t = 4.01, P 0.05). Conclusions: BOLD-MRI can detect the R_2"* signal change of murine Walker-256 tumor pre-and post-inhaling of Carbogen. The R_2"* signal showed significant decrease after inhaling Carbogen, however, the individual variation was remarkable. (authors)

  3. Vaccination directed against the human endogenous retrovirus-K envelope protein inhibits tumor growth in a murine model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Benjamin; Fischer, Katrin; Büchner, Sarah M; Wels, Winfried S; Löwer, Roswitha; Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2013-01-01

    Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) genomes are chromosomally integrated in all cells of an individual. They are normally transcriptionally silenced and transmitted only vertically. Enhanced expression of HERV-K accompanied by the emergence of anti-HERV-K-directed immune responses has been observed in tumor patients and HIV-infected individuals. As HERV-K is usually not expressed and immunological tolerance development is unlikely, it is an appropriate target for the development of immunotherapies. We generated a recombinant vaccinia virus (MVA-HKenv) expressing the HERV-K envelope glycoprotein (ENV), based on the modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA), and established an animal model to test its vaccination efficacy. Murine renal carcinoma cells (Renca) were genetically altered to express E. coli beta-galactosidase (RLZ cells) or the HERV-K ENV gene (RLZ-HKenv cells). Intravenous injection of RLZ-HKenv cells into syngenic BALB/c mice led to the formation of pulmonary metastases, which were detectable by X-gal staining. A single vaccination of tumor-bearing mice with MVA-HKenv drastically reduced the number of pulmonary RLZ-HKenv tumor nodules compared to vaccination with wild-type MVA. Prophylactic vaccination of mice with MVA-HKenv precluded the formation of RLZ-HKenv tumor nodules, whereas wild-type MVA-vaccinated animals succumbed to metastasis. Protection from tumor formation correlated with enhanced HERV-K ENV-specific killing activity of splenocytes. These data demonstrate for the first time that HERV-K ENV is a useful target for vaccine development and might offer new treatment opportunities for diverse types of cancer.

  4. A bioengineered murine model using CD24+CD44+ pancreatic cancer stem cells for chemotherapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Shengqi; Li, Jianshe; Zhang, Zhongtao; Deng, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first developed a murine pancreatic tumor model using CD24 + CD44 + pancreatic cancer stem cells (CSC) supported by an electrospun scaffold. Unlike conventional models, the use of CSC and the scaffold, which were biologically and chemically defined, afforded scientists a reliable platform to evaluate novel chemotherapy regimens. CD24 + CD44 + CSC successfully initiated tumorigenesis in vitro on the scaffold without suffering apoptosis, evidencing the lack of cytotoxicity of scaffolding materials. Also, the scaffold contributed to the acceleration of in vivo tumorigenesis and increased the likelihood of tumor formation. Using this model, we set out to explore the effectiveness of irinotecan/gemcitabine (IRIN-GEM), a chemotherapy regimen, for pancreatic cancer. Our study showed that IRIN-GEM induced a tumor regression whereas gemcitabine alone could only arrest the tumor growth. Further study suggested that the superior performance of IRIN-GEM could be attributed to its capacity to demolish the CD24 + CD44 + CSC sub-population by inducing a large-scale apoptosis. The use of highly proliferative yet homogenous CD24 + CD44 + CSC along with a chemically defined scaffold accelerated the tumor formation and significantly reduced the variability associated with conventional murine models. Armed with this new model, we discovered that IRIN-GEM would be a promising chemotherapy candidate for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. (paper)

  5. Reemergence of apoptotic cells between fractionated doses in irradiated murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyn, R.E.; Hunter, N.R.; Milas, L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to follow up our previous studies on the development of apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors by testing whether an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerges between fractionated exposures. Mice bearing a murine ovarian carcinoma, OCa-I, were treated in vivo with two fractionation protocols: two doses of 12.5 Gy separated by various times out to 5 days and multiple daily fractions of 2.5 Gy. Animals were killed 4 h after the last dose in each protocol, and the percent apoptosis was scored from stained histological sections made from the irradiated tumors according to the specific features characteristic of this mode of cell death. The 12.5+12.5 Gy protocol yielded a net total percent apoptosis of about 45% when the two doses were separated by 5 days (total dose = 25 Gy), whereas the 2.5 Gy per day protocol yielded about 50% net apoptotic cells when given for 5 days (total dose = 12.5 Gy). These values are to be compared to the value of 36% apoptotic cells that is yielded by large single doses (> 25 Gy). Thus, these results indicate that an apoptotic subpopulation of cells reemerged between the fractions in both protocols, but the kinetics appeared to be delayed in the 12.5+12.5 Gy vs. the multiple 2.5 Gy protocol. This reemergence of cells with the propensity for radiation-induced apoptosis between fractionated exposures is consistent with a role for this mode of cell death in the response of tumors to radiotherapy and may represent the priming of a new subpopulation of tumor cells for apoptosis as part of normal tumor homeostasis to counterbalance cell division. 25 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  6. Lin28b is sufficient to drive liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance in murine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Liem H.; Robinton, Daisy A.; Seligson, Marc; Wu, Linwei; Li, Lin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Comerford, Sarah; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Parikh, Monisha; Yang, Erin; Powers, John T.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar; Hammer, Robert; Daley, George Q.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lin28a/b are RNA-binding proteins that influence stem cell maintenance, metabolism, and oncogenesis. Poorly differentiated, aggressive cancers often overexpress Lin28, but its role in tumor initiation or maintenance has not been definitively addressed. We report that LIN28B overexpression is sufficient to initiate hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in murine models. We also detected Lin28b overexpression in MYC-driven hepatoblastomas, and liver-specific deletion of Lin28a/b reduced tumor burden, extended latency, and prolonged survival. Both intravenous siRNA against Lin28b and conditional Lin28b deletion reduced tumor burden and prolonged survival. Igf2bp proteins are upregulated and Igf2bp3 is required in the context of LIN28B overexpression to promote growth. Thus, multiple murine models demonstrate that Lin28b is both sufficient to initiate liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance. PMID:25117712

  7. Impact of MR-guided boiling histotripsy in distinct murine tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Martijn; Eikelenboom, Dylan C; van den Bijgaart, Renske J E; Heerschap, Arend; Wesseling, Pieter; den Brok, Martijn H; Fütterer, Jurgen J; Adema, Gosse J

    2017-09-01

    Interest in mechanical high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation is rapidly growing. Boiling histotripsy (BH) is applied for mechanical fragmentation of soft tissue into submicron fragments with limited temperature increase using the shock wave and cavitation effects of HIFU. Research on BH has been largely limited to ex vivo experiments. As a consequence, the in vivo pathology after BH treatment and the relation to preexistent tissue characteristics are not well understood. This study reports on in vivo MR guided BH treatment, either with 100 or 200 pulses per focal spot, in three different subcutaneous mouse tumor models: a soft-tissue melanoma (B16OVA), a compact growing thymoma (EL4), and a highly vascularized neuroblastoma (9464D). Extensive treatment evaluation was performed using MR imaging followed by histopathology 2h after treatment. T2 weighted MRI allowed direct in vivo visualization of the BH lesions in all tumor models. The 100-pulse treated area in the B16OVA tumors was larger than the predicted treatment volume (500±10%). For the more compact growing EL4 and 9464D tumors this was 95±13% and 55±33%, respectively. Histopathology after the 100-pulse treatment revealed completely disintegrated lesions in the treated area with sharp borders in the compact EL4 and 9464D tumors, while for B16OVA tumors the lesion contained a mixture of discohesive (partly viable) clusters of cells, micro-vessel remainings, and tumor cell debris. The treatment of B16OVA with 200 pulses increased the fragmentation of tumor tissue. In all tumor types only micro-hemorrhages were detected after ablation (slightly higher after 200-pulse treatment for the highly vascularized 9464D tumors). Collagen staining revealed that the collagen fibers were to a greater or lesser extent still intact and partly clotted together near the lesion border in all tumor models. In conclusion, this study reveals effective mechanical fragmentation of different tumor types using BH without

  8. Effect of SPG (Sonifilan) immunotherapy and PDT on murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Krosl, G.; Dougherty, G.J.; Chaplin, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    PhotoDynamic Therapy of solid tumors is unique in eliciting a strong host immune response unparalleled in other cancer therapies. This immune response is manifested as an acute inflammatory reaction, and can be readily seen as redness and edema around the treated area. Destruction of typical solid tumor cannot be accomplished solely by direct phototoxic action. This was shown to be the case even with drugs more potent in this direct killing effect than Photofrin, the photosensitizer presently used in clinical PDT. Limiting factors seem to be regional insufficiencies in supply of molecular oxygen, needed for generation of phototoxic species. They can be ascribed to the existence of chronically and acute hypoxic tumor regions, oxygen consumption by the photodynamic process, and vascular shutdown induced during PDT. The remaining tumor mass is eradicated by an indirect effect, necrosis induced by destruction of tumor vasculature. Since most events in PDT treated tumor that lead to vascular collapse are, in fact, typical inflammatory manifestations, it was suggested that PDT-induced acute inflammatory reaction actually leads to vascular damage. In a related report characteristics are shown of cellular inflammatory infiltrate in PDT-treated murine tumor. This work examines the effect of combining PDT with immunotherapy, in an attempt to investigate a possibility of amplification of immune reaction to PDT and its direction towards more pervasive destruction of treated tumors. (authors). 6 refs

  9. The inhibition effect of 211At-Te colloid and Na211 at injections on murine Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juan; Wang Xizhong; Zhang Jiazao

    1992-01-01

    Na 211 At and 211 At-Te colloid injections are prepared. It has been demonstrated that the 211 At-Te colloid is stable in vivo and in vitro, and can be applied in the study of biology and medicine. In the report, the model of Murine Ehrlich Ascites Cells cultured in vivo and in vitro is elected for a series of experiments. It has been proved that Na 211 At and 211 At-Te colloid injections possess an inhibition effect on tumor cells. The inhibition effect was expressed in surviving of the mice and inhibiting growth of tumor as well as the changes of enzyme activity. Meanwhile, it was also noticed that Na 211 At and 211 At-Te colloid injections of various dose inhibited the absorb of pyrimidine nucleosides in Murine Ehrlich Ascites Cells. And the effect is not reversible. It is closely related to the dose administrated and 50% inhibition rate needs about 1.48 x 10 5 Bq/ml culture

  10. The response of hypoxic cells in SCCVII murine tumors to treatment with cisplatin and x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, R.D.; Durand, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of enhancement of radiation effects by cisplatin, including radiosensitization of hypoxic cells, drug-induced tumor reoxygenation, and inhibition of repair of sublethal radiation damage, were examined in the murine SCCVII model. Combination radiation/drug treatments were most effective when drug exposure preceded irradiation of animals breathing a reduced oxygen atmosphere, indicating that the primary interaction between the modalities was a cisplatin-induced increase in the oxygenation status of the acutely hypoxic cells in those tumors. Delivering cisplatin prior to or immediately after the first of two 5 Gy fractions was more effective than combinations with a single x-ray exposure, suggesting that proper sequences of the combined modalities may augment natural reoxygenation processes

  11. Dendritic cells pulsed with a tumor-specific peptide induce long-lasting immunity and are effective against murine intracerebral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberger, Amy B; Archer, Gary E; Crotty, Laura E; McLendon, Roger E; Friedman, Allan H; Friedman, Henry S; Bigner, Darell D; Sampson, John H

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized cells of the immune system that are capable of generating potent immune responses that are active even within the "immunologically privileged" central nervous system. However, immune responses generated by DCs have also been demonstrated to produce clinically significant autoimmunity. Targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII), which is a mutation specific to tumor tissue, could eliminate this risk. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate that DC-based immunizations directed solely against this tumor-specific antigen, which is commonly found on tumors that originate within or metastasize to the brain, could be efficacious. C3H mice were vaccinated with DCs mixed with a keyhole limpet hemocyanin conjugate of the tumor-specific peptide, PEP-3, which spans the EGFRvIII mutation, or the random-sequence peptide, PEP-1, and were intracerebrally challenged with a syngeneic melanoma expressing a murine homologue of EGFRvIII. Systemic immunization with DCs mixed with PEP-3-keyhole limpet hemocyanin generated antigen-specific immunity. Among mice challenged with intracerebral tumors, this resulted in an approximately 600% increase in the median survival time (>300 d, P < 0.0016), relative to control values. Sixty-three percent of mice treated with DCs mixed with the tumor-specific peptide survived in the long term and 100% survived rechallenge with tumor, indicating that antitumor immunological memory was also induced. In a murine melanoma model, immunization with DCs mixed with tumor-specific peptide results in an antigen-specific immunological response that recognizes the EGFRvIII mutation, has potent antitumor efficacy against intracerebral tumors that express EGFRvIII, and results in long-lasting antitumor immunity.

  12. Spontaneous transformation of murine oviductal epithelial cells: A model system to investigate the onset of fallopian-derived tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIchael P. Endsley

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC is the most lethal ovarian cancer histotype. The fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs are a proposed progenitor cell type. Genetically altered FTSECs form tumors in mice; however, a spontaneous HGSC model has not been described. Apart from a subpopulation of genetically predisposed women, most women develop ovarian cancer spontaneously, which is associated with aging and lifetime ovulations. A murine oviductal cell line (MOELOW was developed and continuously passaged in culture to mimic cellular aging (MOEHIGH. The MOEHIGH cellular model exhibited a loss of acetylated tubulin consistent with an outgrowth of secretory epithelial cells in culture. MOEHIGH cells proliferated significantly faster than MOELOW, and the MOEHIGH cells produced more 2D foci and 3D soft agar colonies as compared to MOELOW. MOEHIGH were xenografted into athymic female nude mice both in the subcutaneous and the intraperiteonal compartments. Only the subcutaneous grafts formed tumors that were negative for cytokeratin, but positive for oviductal markers such as oviductal glycoprotein 1 and Pax8. These tumors were considered to be poorly differentiated carcinoma. The differential molecular profiles between MOEHIGH and MOELOW were determined using RNA-Seq and confirmed by protein expression to uncover pathways important in transformation, like the p53 pathway, the FOXM1 pathway, WNT signaling, and splicing. MOEHIGH had enhanced protein expression of c-myc, Cyclin E, p53 and FOXM1 with reduced expression of p21. MOEHIGH were also less sensitive to cisplatin and DMBA, which induce lesions typically repaired by base-excision repair. A model of spontaneous tumorogenesis was generated starting with normal oviductal cells. Their transition to cancer involved alterations in pathways associated with high-grade serous cancer in humans.

  13. Comparative expression analysis reveals lineage relationships between human and murine gliomas and a dominance of glial signatures during tumor propagation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Nico V; Forshew, Tim; Tatevossian, Ruth; Ellis, Matthew; Richard-Loendt, Angela; Rogers, Hazel; Jacques, Thomas S; Reitboeck, Pablo Garcia; Pearce, Kerra; Sheer, Denise; Grundy, Richard G; Brandner, Sebastian

    2013-09-15

    Brain tumors are thought to originate from stem/progenitor cell populations that acquire specific genetic mutations. Although current preclinical models have relevance to human pathogenesis, most do not recapitulate the histogenesis of the human disease. Recently, a large series of human gliomas and medulloblastomas were analyzed for genetic signatures of prognosis and therapeutic response. Using a mouse model system that generates three distinct types of intrinsic brain tumors, we correlated RNA and protein expression levels with human brain tumors. A combination of genetic mutations and cellular environment during tumor propagation defined the incidence and phenotype of intrinsic murine tumors. Importantly, in vitro passage of cancer stem cells uniformly promoted a glial expression profile in culture and in brain tumors. Gene expression profiling revealed that experimental gliomas corresponded to distinct subclasses of human glioblastoma, whereas experimental supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) correspond to atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT), a rare childhood tumor. ©2013 AACR.

  14. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  15. Visualization of Tumor Angiogenesis Using MR Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibody Conjugate in a Mouse Tumor Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jun, Hong Young; Yin, Hong Hua; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Hun Soo; Yoon Kwon Ha Yoon

    2010-01-01

    To visualize tumor angiogenesis using the MRI contrast agent, Gd- DTPA-anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody conjugate, with a 4.7-Tesla MRI instrument in a mouse model. We designed a tumor angiogenesis-targeting T1 contrast agent that was prepared by the bioconjugation of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) antibody. The specific binding of the agent complex to cells that express VEGFR2 was examined in cultured murine endothelial cells (MS-1 cells) with a 4.7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Angiogenesis-specific T1 enhancement was imaged with the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate using a CT-26 adenocarcinoma tumor model in eight mice. As a control, the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-rat immunoglobulin G (Gd-DTPA-anti-rat IgG) was imaged with a tumor model in eight mice. Statistical significance was assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. Tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate showed predominant binding to cultured endothelial cells that expressed a high level of VEGFR2. Signal enhancement was approximately three-fold for in vivo T1-weighted MR imaging with the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as compared with the Gd-DTPA-rat IgG in the mouse tumor model (p < 0.05). VEGFR2 expression in CT-26 tumor vessels was demonstrated using immunohistochemical staining. MR imaging using the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as a contrast agent is useful in visualizing noninvasively tumor angiogenesis in a murine tumor model

  16. Visualization of Tumor Angiogenesis Using MR Imaging Contrast Agent Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGF Receptor 2 Antibody Conjugate in a Mouse Tumor Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Hong Young; Yin, Hong Hua; Kim, Sun Hee; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Hun Soo; Yoon Kwon Ha Yoon [Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To visualize tumor angiogenesis using the MRI contrast agent, Gd- DTPA-anti-VEGF receptor 2 antibody conjugate, with a 4.7-Tesla MRI instrument in a mouse model. We designed a tumor angiogenesis-targeting T1 contrast agent that was prepared by the bioconjugation of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) antibody. The specific binding of the agent complex to cells that express VEGFR2 was examined in cultured murine endothelial cells (MS-1 cells) with a 4.7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Angiogenesis-specific T1 enhancement was imaged with the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate using a CT-26 adenocarcinoma tumor model in eight mice. As a control, the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-rat immunoglobulin G (Gd-DTPA-anti-rat IgG) was imaged with a tumor model in eight mice. Statistical significance was assessed using the Mann-Whitney test. Tumor tissue was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate showed predominant binding to cultured endothelial cells that expressed a high level of VEGFR2. Signal enhancement was approximately three-fold for in vivo T1-weighted MR imaging with the use of the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as compared with the Gd-DTPA-rat IgG in the mouse tumor model (p < 0.05). VEGFR2 expression in CT-26 tumor vessels was demonstrated using immunohistochemical staining. MR imaging using the Gd-DTPA-anti-VEGFR2 antibody conjugate as a contrast agent is useful in visualizing noninvasively tumor angiogenesis in a murine tumor model

  17. Generation of murine tumor cell lines deficient in MHC molecule surface expression using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Das

    Full Text Available In this study, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to establish murine tumor cell lines, devoid of MHC I or MHC II surface expression, respectively. The melanoma cell line B16F10 and the murine breast cancer cell line EO-771, the latter stably expressing the tumor antigen NY-BR-1 (EO-NY, were transfected with an expression plasmid encoding a β2m-specific single guide (sgRNA and Cas9. The resulting MHC I negative cells were sorted by flow cytometry to obtain single cell clones, and loss of susceptibility of peptide pulsed MHC I negative clones to peptide-specific CTL recognition was determined by IFNγ ELISpot assay. The β2m knockout (KO clones did not give rise to tumors in syngeneic mice (C57BL/6N, unless NK cells were depleted, suggesting that outgrowth of the β2m KO cell lines was controlled by NK cells. Using sgRNAs targeting the β-chain encoding locus of the IAb molecule we also generated several B16F10 MHC II KO clones. Peptide loaded B16F10 MHC II KO cells were insusceptible to recognition by OT-II cells and tumor growth was unaltered compared to parental B16F10 cells. Thus, in our hands the CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be an efficient straight forward strategy for the generation of MHC knockout cell lines. Such cell lines could serve as parental cells for co-transfection of compatible HLA alleles together with human tumor antigens of interest, thereby facilitating the generation of HLA matched transplantable tumor models, e.g. in HLAtg mouse strains of the newer generation, lacking cell surface expression of endogenous H2 molecules. In addition, our tumor cell lines established might offer a useful tool to investigate tumor reactive T cell responses that function independently from MHC molecule surface expression by the tumor.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaseca, Antoni; Campillo, Noelia; Torres, Marta; Musquera, Mireia; Gozal, David; Montserrat, Josep M; Alcaraz, Antonio; Touijer, Karim A; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH), a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50) of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001) and circulating VEGF (p<0.001) in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  19. Intermittent hypoxia increases kidney tumor vascularization in a murine model of sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Vilaseca

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxia (IH, a characteristic feature of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, on renal cancer progression in an animal and cell model. An in vivo mouse model (Balb/c, n = 50 of kidney cancer was used to assess the effect of IH on tumor growth, metastatic capacity, angiogenesis and tumor immune response. An in vitro model tested the effect of IH on RENCA cells, macrophages and endothelial cells. Tumor growth, metastatic capacity, circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and content of endothelial cells, tumor associated macrophages and their phenotype were assessed in the tumor. In vitro, VEGF cell expression was quantified.Although IH did not boost tumor growth, it significantly increased endothelial cells (p = 0.001 and circulating VEGF (p<0.001 in the in vivo model. Macrophages exposed to IH in vitro increased VEGF expression, whereas RENCA cells and endothelial cells did not. These findings are in keeping with previous clinical data suggesting that OSA has no effect on kidney cancer size and that the association observed between OSA and higher Fuhrman grade of renal cell carcinoma may be mediated though a proangiogenic process, with a key role of macrophages.

  20. Expression of membrane anchored cytokines and B7-1 alters tumor microenvironment and induces protective antitumor immunity in a murine breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Erica N; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Machiah, Deepa K; Patel, Jaina M; Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Tien, Linda; Shashidharamurthy, Rangaiah; Selvaraj, Periasamy

    2013-05-07

    Many studies have shown that the systemic administration of cytokines or vaccination with cytokine-secreting tumors augments an antitumor immune response that can result in eradication of tumors. However, these approaches are hampered by the risk of systemic toxicity induced by soluble cytokines. In this study, we have evaluated the efficacy of 4TO7, a highly tumorigenic murine mammary tumor cell line, expressing glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of cytokine molecules alone or in combination with the costimulatory molecule B7-1 as a model for potential cell or membrane-based breast cancer vaccines. We observed that the GPI-anchored cytokines expressed on the surface of tumor cells greatly reduced the overall tumorigenicity of the 4TO7 tumor cells following direct live cell challenge as evidenced by transient tumor growth and complete regression within 30 days post challenge. Tumors co-expressing B7-1 and GPI-IL-12 grew the least and for the shortest duration, suggesting that this combination of immunostimulatory molecules is most potent. Protective immune responses were also observed following secondary tumor challenge. Further, the 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-2 and 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 transfectants were capable of inducing regression of a wild-type tumor growing at a distant site in a concomitant tumor challenge model, suggesting the tumor immunity elicited by the transfectants can act systemically and inhibit the tumor growth at a distant site. Additionally, when used as irradiated whole cell vaccines, 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 led to a significant inhibition in tumor growth of day 7 established tumors. Lastly, we observed a significant decrease in the prevalence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T-cells in the tumor microenvironment on day 7 post challenge with 4TO7-B7-1/GPI-IL-12 cells, which provides mechanistic insight into antitumor efficacy of the tumor-cell membrane expressed IL-12. These studies have implications in designing membrane

  1. Bacterial Clearance and Cytokine Profiles in a Murine Model of Postsurgical Nosocomial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Manderscheid, Patricia A.; Bodkin, Ryan P.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Jensen, Erik; Russo, Thomas A.; Knight, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a nosocomial pneumonia is facilitated by alterations in host innate pulmonary antibacterial defenses following surgical trauma, which can result in decreased pulmonary bacterial clearance and increased morbidity and mortality. In a murine model of postoperative nosocomial infection, surgical stress (laparotomy) decreased Escherichia coli clearance from the lungs of animals that underwent surgery. Consistent with previous studies, (i) pulmonary levels of tumor necrosis facto...

  2. Combination effect of cisplatin and radiation in murine solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Shin; Lee, Kan-ei; Ishibashi, Akira; Komiyama, Hiroki; Umezawa, Iwao.

    1986-01-01

    The combination effect of cisplatin and radiation was studied using the two different murine systems of sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich solid tumors. In sarcoma 180 solid tumor the minimal effective doses (MED) of cisplatin and radiation were 19.5 mg/kg and 10375 rad respectively whereas these doses did not show any effective antitumor activity practically. Administration of cisplatin with a doses of 9 mg/kg given 24 hours before radiation (1000 rad), however, showed synergistic antitumor activity. In Ehrlich solid tumor the MED of cisplatin and radiation were 13.8 mg/kg and 2892 rad respectively. Treatment with cisplatin, 3, 6 or 9 mg/kg, given 24 hours before radiation (1000 rad) showed also synergistic antitumor activity also. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) rescue was effective in reducing toxicity of cisplatin on combined use of the drug with radiation. Cell kinetics of sarcoma 180 solid tumor in vivo after the combined treatment was analyzed by computer aided flowcytometry. Accumulation of cells in the radiosensitive G 2 + M phase was observed 18 to 42 hours after a single intraperitoneal administration of 9 mg/kg of cisplatin. It is strongly suggested that this synchronization is one of the mechanisms of the synergism in the combination therapy. (author)

  3. Radiobiologic effect of intermittent radiation exposure in murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugie, Chikao; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ito, Masato; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Akihiko; Fukaya, Nobuyuki; Niimi, Hiroshige; Hashizume, Takuya

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In stereotactic irradiation using a linear accelerator, the effect of radiation may be reduced during intermittent exposures owing to recovery from sublethal damage in tumor cells. After our previous in vitro study suggesting this phenomenon, we investigated the issue in murine tumors. Methods and Materials: We used EMT6 and SCCVII tumors approximately 1 cm in diameter growing in the hind legs of syngeneic mice. Three schedules of intermittent radiation were investigated. First, 2 fractions of 10 Gy were given at an interval of 15-360 min to investigate the pattern of recovery from sublethal damage. Second, 5 fractions of 4 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 2.5-15 min each. Third, 10 fractions of 2 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 1-7 min each. Doses of 15-20 Gy were also given without interruption to estimate the dose-modifying factors. Tumors were excised 20 h later, and tumor cell survival was determined by an in vivo-in vitro assay. Results: In the 2-fraction experiment, the increase in cell survival with elongation of the interval was much less than that observed in our previous in vitro study. In the 5- and 10-fraction experiments, no significant increase in cell survival was observed after the intermittent exposures. Moreover, cell survival decreased at most points of the 5-fraction experiments by interruption of radiation in both EMT6 and SCCVII tumors. In the 10-fraction experiment, cell survival also decreased when the interruption was 3 or 7 min in EMT6 tumors. Conclusion: The results of the present in vivo studies were different from those of our in vitro studies in which cell survival increased significantly when a few minutes or longer intervals were posed between fractions. This suggests that recovery from sublethal damage in vivo may be counterbalanced by other phenomena such as reoxygenation that sensitizes tumor cells to subsequent irradiation

  4. Dendritic cell-based vaccination in cancer: therapeutic implications emerging from murine models

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    Soledad eMac Keon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a pivotal role in the orchestration of immune responses, and are thus key targets in cancer vaccine design. Since the 2010 FDA approval of the first cancer DC-based vaccine (Sipuleucel T there has been a surge of interest in exploiting these cells as a therapeutic option for the treatment of tumors of diverse origin. In spite of the encouraging results obtained in the clinic, many elements of DC-based vaccination strategies need to be optimized. In this context, the use of experimental cancer models can help direct efforts towards an effective vaccine design. This paper reviews recent findings in murine models regarding the antitumoral mechanisms of DC-based vaccination, covering issues related to antigen sources, the use of adjuvants and maturing agents, and the role of DC subsets and their interaction in the initiation of antitumoral immune responses. The summary of such diverse aspects will highlight advantages and drawbacks in the use of murine models, and contribute to the design of successful DC-based translational approaches for cancer treatment.

  5. Investigation of HIFU-induced anti-tumor immunity in a murine tumor model

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    Lyerly H Kim

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is an emerging non-invasive treatment modality for localized treatment of cancers. While current clinical strategies employ HIFU exclusively for thermal ablation of the target sites, biological responses associated with both thermal and mechanical damage from focused ultrasound have not been thoroughly investigated. In particular, endogenous danger signals from HIFU-damaged tumor cells may trigger the activation of dendritic cells. This response may play a critical role in a HIFU-elicited anti-tumor immune response which can be harnessed for more effective treatment. Methods Mice bearing MC-38 colon adenocarcinoma tumors were treated with thermal and mechanical HIFU exposure settings in order to independently observe HIFU-induced effects on the host's immunological response. In vivo dendritic cell activity was assessed along with the host's response to challenge tumor growth. Results Thermal and mechanical HIFU were found to increase CD11c+ cells 3.1-fold and 4-fold, respectively, as compared to 1.5-fold observed for DC injection alone. In addition, thermal and mechanical HIFU increased CFSE+ DC accumulation in draining lymph nodes 5-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Moreover, focused ultrasound treatments not only caused a reduction in the growth of primary tumors, with tumor volume decreasing by 85% for thermal HIFU and 43% for mechanical HIFU, but they also provided protection against subcutaneous tumor re-challenge. Further immunological assays confirmed an enhanced CTL activity and increased tumor-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells in the mice treated by focused ultrasound, with cytotoxicity induced by mechanical HIFU reaching as high as 27% at a 10:1 effector:target ratio. Conclusion These studies present initial encouraging results confirming that focused ultrasound treatment can elicit a systemic anti-tumor immune response, and they suggest that this immunity is closely related to

  6. Murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for interleukin-12 gene delivery into Ewing sarcoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoping; Guan, Hui; Cao, Ying; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of interleukin 12 (IL-12) gene therapy in Ewing sarcoma and whether murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could serve as vehicles for IL-12 gene delivery. MSCs were isolated from murine bone marrow cells. Cells were phenotyped using flow cytometry. Cultured MSCs differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes using the appropriate media. Freshly isolated MSCs were transfected with adenoviral vectors containing either the beta-galactosidase (Ad:beta-gal) or the IL-12 (Ad:IL-12) gene. Expression of IL-12 was confirmed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Mice with TC71 Ewing sarcoma tumors were then treated intravenously with MSCs transfected with Ad:beta-gal or Ad:IL-12. Tumors were measured and analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of IL-12 protein. Expression of both p35 and p40 IL-12 subunits was demonstrated in MSCs transfected in vitro with Ad:IL-12. IL-12 expression was seen in tumors from mice treated with MSCs transfected with Ad:IL-12. Tumor growth was also significantly inhibited compared with that in mice treated with MSCs transfected with Ad:beta-gal. MSCs can be transfected with the IL-12 gene. These transfected cells localize to tumors after intravenous injection and induce local IL-12 protein production and the regression of established tumors. Copyright (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  7. GU81, a VEGFR2 antagonist peptoid, enhances the anti-tumor activity of doxorubicin in the murine MMTV-PyMT transgenic model of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, Kristi D; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika; Roland, Christina L; Castrillon, Diego H; Kodadek, Thomas J; Brekken, Rolf A

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a primary stimulant of angiogenesis under physiological and pathological conditions. Anti-VEGF therapy is a clinically proven strategy for the treatment of a variety of cancers including colon, breast, lung, and renal cell carcinoma. Since VEGFR2 is the dominant angiogenic signaling receptor, it has become an important target in the development of novel anti-angiogenic therapies. We have reported previously the development of an antagonistic VEGFR2 peptoid (GU40C4) that has promising anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In the current study, we utilize a derivative of GU40C4, termed GU81 in therapy studies. GU81 was tested alone or in combination with doxorubicin for in vivo efficacy in the MMTV-PyMT transgenic model of breast cancer. The derivative GU81 has increased in vitro efficacy compared to GU40C4. Single agent therapy (doxorubicin or GU81 alone) had no effect on tumor weight, histology, tumor fat content, or tumor growth index. However, GU81 is able to significantly to reduce total vascular area as a single agent. GU81 used in combination with doxorubicin significantly reduced tumor weight and growth index compared to all other treatment groups. Furthermore, treatment with combination therapy significantly arrested tumor progression at the premalignant stage, resulting in increased tumor fat content. Interestingly, treatment with GU81 alone increased tumor-VEGF levels and macrophage infiltration, an effect that was abrogated when used in combination with doxorubicin. This study demonstrates the VEGFR2 antagonist peptoid, GU81, enhances the anti-tumor activity of doxorubicin in spontaneous murine MMTV-PyMT breast tumors

  8. Enhancement of tumor response by MEK inhibitor in murine HCa-I tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Seong, Jin Sil

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, opposes initiation of the apoptotic cell death which is programmed by diverse cytotoxic stimuli. In this regard, the inhibition of ERK may be useful in improving the therapeutic efficacy of established anticancer agents. Murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l is known to be highly radioresistant with a TCD50 (radiation dose yield in 50% cure) of more than 80 Gy. Various anticancer drugs have been found to enhance the radioresponse of this particular tumor but none were successful. The objective of this study was to explore whether the selective inhibition of MEK could potentiate the antitumor efficacy of radiation in vivo, particularly in the case of radioresistant tumor. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 7.5-8 mm. HCa-l, were treated with PD98059 (intratumoral injection of 0.16 μg in 50 μl). Downregulation of ERK by PD98059 was most prominent 1h after the treatment. In the tumor growth delay assay, the drug was found to increase the effect of the tumor radioresponse with an enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 and 1.87. Combined treatment of 25 Gy radiation with PD98059 significantly increased radiation induced apoptosis. The peak apoptotic index (number of apoptotic nuclei in 1000 nuclei X100) was 1.2% in the case of radiation treatment alone, 0.9% in the case of drug treatment alone and 4.9%, 5.3% in the combination treatment group. An analysis of apoptosis regulating molecules with Western blotting showed up regulation of p53, p21 WAF1 / CIP1 and Bcl-X s in the combination treatment group as compared to their levels in either the radiation alone or drug alone treatment groups. The level of other molecules such as Bcl-X L , Bax and BCI-2 were changed to a lesser extent. The selective inhibition of MEK in combination with radiation therapy may have potential benefit in cancer treatment

  9. Enhancement of tumor response by MEK inhibitor in murine HCa-I tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Seong, Jin Sil [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, opposes initiation of the apoptotic cell death which is programmed by diverse cytotoxic stimuli. In this regard, the inhibition of ERK may be useful in improving the therapeutic efficacy of established anticancer agents. Murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l is known to be highly radioresistant with a TCD50 (radiation dose yield in 50% cure) of more than 80 Gy. Various anticancer drugs have been found to enhance the radioresponse of this particular tumor but none were successful. The objective of this study was to explore whether the selective inhibition of MEK could potentiate the antitumor efficacy of radiation in vivo, particularly in the case of radioresistant tumor. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 7.5-8 mm. HCa-l, were treated with PD98059 (intratumoral injection of 0.16 {mu}g in 50 {mu}l). Downregulation of ERK by PD98059 was most prominent 1h after the treatment. In the tumor growth delay assay, the drug was found to increase the effect of the tumor radioresponse with an enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 and 1.87. Combined treatment of 25 Gy radiation with PD98059 significantly increased radiation induced apoptosis. The peak apoptotic index (number of apoptotic nuclei in 1000 nuclei X100) was 1.2% in the case of radiation treatment alone, 0.9% in the case of drug treatment alone and 4.9%, 5.3% in the combination treatment group. An analysis of apoptosis regulating molecules with Western blotting showed up regulation of p53, p21{sup WAF1}/{sup CIP1} and Bcl-X{sub s} in the combination treatment group as compared to their levels in either the radiation alone or drug alone treatment groups. The level of other molecules such as Bcl-X{sub L}, Bax and BCI-2 were changed to a lesser extent. The selective inhibition of MEK in combination with radiation therapy may have potential benefit in cancer treatment.

  10. Murine Models of Gastric Corpus PreneoplasiaSummary

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    Christine P. Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma evolves in a field of pre-existing metaplasia. Over the past 20 years, a number of murine models have been developed to address aspects of the physiology and pathophysiology of metaplasia induction. Although none of these models has achieved true recapitulation of the induction of adenocarcinoma, they have led to important insights into the factors that influence the induction and progression of metaplasia. Here, we review the pathologic definitions relevant to alterations in gastric corpus lineages and classification of metaplasia by specific lineage markers. In addition, we review present murine models of the induction and progression of spasmolytic polypeptide (TFF2–expressing metaplasia, the predominant metaplastic lineage observed in murine models. These models provide a basis for the development of a broader understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of metaplasia in the stomach. Keywords: SPEM, Intestinal Metaplasia, Gastric Cancer, TFF2, Chief Cell, Hyperplasia

  11. Murine polyomavirus virus-like particles carrying full-length human PSA protect BALB/c mice from outgrowth of a PSA expressing tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilda Eriksson

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs consist of capsid proteins from viruses and have been shown to be usable as carriers of protein and peptide antigens for immune therapy. In this study, we have produced and assayed murine polyomavirus (MPyV VLPs carrying the entire human Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA (PSA-MPyVLPs for their potential use for immune therapy in a mouse model system. BALB/c mice immunized with PSA-MPyVLPs were only marginally protected against outgrowth of a PSA-expressing tumor. To improve protection, PSA-MPyVLPs were co-injected with adjuvant CpG, either alone or loaded onto murine dendritic cells (DCs. Immunization with PSA-MPyVLPs loaded onto DCs in the presence of CpG was shown to efficiently protect mice from tumor outgrowth. In addition, cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization were examined. PSA-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells were demonstrated, but no PSA-specific IgG antibodies. Vaccination with DCs loaded with PSA-MPyVLPs induced an eight-fold lower titre of anti-VLP antibodies than vaccination with PSA-MPyVLPs alone. In conclusion, immunization of BALB/c mice with PSA-MPyVLPs, loaded onto DCs and co-injected with CpG, induces an efficient PSA-specific tumor protective immune response, including both CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells with a low induction of anti-VLP antibodies.

  12. Murine Polyomavirus Virus-Like Particles Carrying Full-Length Human PSA Protect BALB/c Mice from Outgrowth of a PSA Expressing Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Mathilda; Andreasson, Kalle; Weidmann, Joachim; Lundberg, Kajsa; Tegerstedt, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) consist of capsid proteins from viruses and have been shown to be usable as carriers of protein and peptide antigens for immune therapy. In this study, we have produced and assayed murine polyomavirus (MPyV) VLPs carrying the entire human Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) (PSA-MPyVLPs) for their potential use for immune therapy in a mouse model system. BALB/c mice immunized with PSA-MPyVLPs were only marginally protected against outgrowth of a PSA-expressing tumor. To improve protection, PSA-MPyVLPs were co-injected with adjuvant CpG, either alone or loaded onto murine dendritic cells (DCs). Immunization with PSA-MPyVLPs loaded onto DCs in the presence of CpG was shown to efficiently protect mice from tumor outgrowth. In addition, cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization were examined. PSA-specific CD4+ and CD8+ cells were demonstrated, but no PSA-specific IgG antibodies. Vaccination with DCs loaded with PSA-MPyVLPs induced an eight-fold lower titre of anti-VLP antibodies than vaccination with PSA-MPyVLPs alone. In conclusion, immunization of BALB/c mice with PSA-MPyVLPs, loaded onto DCs and co-injected with CpG, induces an efficient PSA-specific tumor protective immune response, including both CD4+ and CD8+ cells with a low induction of anti-VLP antibodies. PMID:21858228

  13. Combined calcitriol and menadione reduces experimental murine triple negative breast tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Luciana; Guizzardi, Solange; Rodríguez, Valeria; Hinrichsen, Lucila; Rozados, Viviana; Cremonezzi, David; Tolosa de Talamoni, Nori; Picotto, Gabriela

    2017-10-01

    Calcitriol (D) or 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 inhibits the growth of several tumor cells including breast cancer cells, by activating cell death pathways. Menadione (MEN), a glutathione-depleting compound, may be used to potentiate the antiproliferative actions of D on cancer cells. We have previously shown in vitro that MEN improved D-induced growth arrest on breast cancer cell lines, inducing oxidative stress and DNA damage via ROS generation. Treatment with MEN+D resulted more effective than D or MEN alone. To study the in vivo effect of calcitriol, MEN or their combination on the development of murine transplantable triple negative breast tumor M-406 in its syngeneic host. Tumor M-406 was inoculated s.c., and when tumors reached the desired size, animals were randomly assigned to one of four groups receiving daily i.p. injections of either sterile saline solution (controls, C), MEN, D, or both (MEN+D). Body weight and tumor volume were recorded three times a week. Serum calcium was determined before and at the end of the treatment, at which time tumor samples were obtained for histological examination. None of the drugs, alone or in combination, affected mice body weight in the period studied. The combined treatment reduced tumor growth rate (C vs. MEN+D, P<0.05) and the corresponding histological sections exhibited small remaining areas of viable tumor only in the periphery. A concomitant DNA fragmentation was observed in all treated groups and MEN potentiated the calcitriol effect on tumor growth. As previously observed in vitro, treatment with MEN and D delayed tumor growth in vivo more efficiently than the individual drugs, with evident signals of apoptosis induction. Our results propose an alternative protocol to treat triple negative breast cancer, using GSH depleting drugs together with calcitriol, which would allow lower doses of the steroid to maintain the antitumor effect while diminishing its adverse pharmacological effects. Copyright © 2017. Published by

  14. Novel allelic mutations in murine Serca2 induce differential development of squamous cell tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Inoue, Maki; Motegi, Hiromi; Karashima, Yuko; Ikeda, Ami [Team for Advanced Development and Evaluation of Human Disease Models, Riken BioResource Center (BRC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kaneda, Hideki [Technology and Development Team for Mouse Phenotype Analysis, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki [Mutagenesis and Genomics Team, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Saiki, Yuriko [Department of Molecular Pathology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Wakana, Shigeharu [Technology and Development Team for Mouse Phenotype Analysis, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Suzuki, Hiroshi [Department of Biochemistry, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Hokkaido (Japan); Gondo, Yoichi [Mutagenesis and Genomics Team, Riken BRC, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiroishi, Toshihiko [Mammalian Genetics Laboratory, National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka (Japan); Noda, Tetsuo, E-mail: tnoda@jfcr.or.jp [Team for Advanced Development and Evaluation of Human Disease Models, Riken BioResource Center (BRC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Department of Cell Biology, Cancer Institute, The Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    Dominant mutations in the Serca2 gene, which encodes sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase, predispose mice to gastrointestinal epithelial carcinoma [1–4] and humans to Darier disease (DD) [14–17]. In this study, we generated mice harboring N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced allelic mutations in Serca2: three missense mutations and one nonsense mutation. Mice harboring these Serca2 mutations developed tumors that were categorized as either early onset squamous cell tumors (SCT), with development similar to null-type knockout mice [2,4] (aggressive form; M682, M814), or late onset tumors (mild form; M1049, M1162). Molecular analysis showed no aberration in Serca2 mRNA or protein expression levels in normal esophageal cells of any of the four mutant heterozygotes. There was no loss of heterozygosity at the Serca2 locus in the squamous cell carcinomas in any of the four lines. The effect of each mutation on Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity was predicted using atomic-structure models and accumulated mutated protein studies, suggesting that putative complete loss of Serca2 enzymatic activity may lead to early tumor onset, whereas mutations in which Serca2 retains residual enzymatic activity result in late onset. We propose that impaired Serca2 gene product activity has a long-term effect on squamous cell carcinogenesis from onset to the final carcinoma stage through an as-yet unrecognized but common regulatory pathway. -- Highlights: •Novel mutations in murine Serca2 caused early onset or late onset of tumorigenesis. •They also caused higher or lower incidence of Darier Disease phenotype. •3D structure model suggested the former mutations led to severer defect on ATPase. •Driver gene mutations via long-range effect on Ca2+ distributions are suggested.

  15. Automated segmentation of murine lung tumors in x-ray micro-CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swee, Joshua K. Y.; Sheridan, Clare; de Bruin, Elza; Downward, Julian; Lassailly, Francois; Pizarro, Luis

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen micro-CT emerge as a means of providing imaging analysis in pre-clinical study, with in-vivo micro-CT having been shown to be particularly applicable to the examination of murine lung tumors. Despite this, existing studies have involved substantial human intervention during the image analysis process, with the use of fully-automated aids found to be almost non-existent. We present a new approach to automate the segmentation of murine lung tumors designed specifically for in-vivo micro-CT-based pre-clinical lung cancer studies that addresses the specific requirements of such study, as well as the limitations human-centric segmentation approaches experience when applied to such micro-CT data. Our approach consists of three distinct stages, and begins by utilizing edge enhancing and vessel enhancing non-linear anisotropic diffusion filters to extract anatomy masks (lung/vessel structure) in a pre-processing stage. Initial candidate detection is then performed through ROI reduction utilizing obtained masks and a two-step automated segmentation approach that aims to extract all disconnected objects within the ROI, and consists of Otsu thresholding, mathematical morphology and marker-driven watershed. False positive reduction is finally performed on initial candidates through random-forest-driven classification using the shape, intensity, and spatial features of candidates. We provide validation of our approach using data from an associated lung cancer study, showing favorable results both in terms of detection (sensitivity=86%, specificity=89%) and structural recovery (Dice Similarity=0.88) when compared against manual specialist annotation.

  16. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

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    Mao-Qiang Man

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis.

  17. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

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    Amelia Kellar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer.

  18. Radiation-induced nitric oxide mitigates tumor hypoxia and radioresistance in a murine SCCVII tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Yamamori, Tohru; Zhao, Songji; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara; Kameya, Hiromi; Nakamura, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •IR-induced NO increased tissue perfusion and pO 2 . •IR increased NO production in tumors without changes in the mRNA and protein levels of NOS isoforms. •NOS activity assay showed that IR upregulated eNOS activity in tumors. •IR-induced NO decreased tumor hypoxia and altered tumor radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: Tumor hypoxia, which occurs mainly as a result of inadequate tissue perfusion in solid tumors, is a well-known challenge for successful radiotherapy. Recent evidence suggests that ionizing radiation (IR) upregulates nitric oxide (NO) production and that IR-induced NO has the potential to increase intratumoral circulation. However, the kinetics of NO production and the responsible isoforms for NO synthase in tumors exposed to IR remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which IR stimulates NO production in tumors and the effect of IR-induced NO on tumor radiosensitivity. Hoechst33342 perfusion assay and electron spin resonance oxymetry showed that IR increased tissue perfusion and pO 2 in tumor tissue. Immunohistochemical analysis using two different hypoxic probes showed that IR decreased hypoxic regions in tumors; treatment with a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, L-NAME, abrogated the effects of IR. Moreover, IR increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) activity without affecting its mRNA or protein expression levels in SCCVII-transplanted tumors. Tumor growth delay assay showed that L-NAME decreased the anti-tumor effect of fractionated radiation (10 Gy × 2). These results suggested that IR increased eNOS activity and subsequent tissue perfusion in tumors. Increases in intratumoral circulation simultaneously decreased tumor hypoxia. As a result, IR-induced NO increased tumor radiosensitivity. Our study provides a new insight into the NO-dependent mechanism for efficient fractionated radiotherapy

  19. Molecular characterization of murine models of squamous carcinomas of preclinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornachea Gomez, O.; Berdugo Zamora, A.

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium affected by numerous pathologies, including cancer, being the tumors originated in this tissue more than half of the epithelial tumors diagnosed every year. Animal models are an essential tool for cancer research, as they provide information to understand how a homologous gene may cause or contribute to the disease in humans. The p53 CE and Rb CE; p53 CE murine models develop undifferentiated epidermal tumors with high metastatic potential that show a strong transcriptional similarity to many human tumors with poor prognosis. Numerous studies have associated the p53 tumor suppressor with deregulation of microRNAs involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis processes. Furthermore, tumors in p53 EC models show an early repression of p63 whose predominant isoform in keratinocytes of the basal layer is Np63. Our results indicate that miR21 helps to provide metastatic capacity to p53-deficient mouse skin tumors. The increased expression of miR21 correlates with active signaling pathways that can be inhibited pharmacologically. Moreover, miR21 expression is elevated in human metastatic lung tumors with poor prognosis. Besides, we also show that ?Np63? expression in p53-deficient cells partially reduces the metastatic behavior, most probably through the modulation microRNAs and transcription factors involved in the EMT process. These facts point to p53-deficient epidermal animal models as excellent candidates for preclinical analysis of human metastatic tumors characterized by TP53 alterations. Finally we developed a model in which the three members of the retinoblastoma family are ablated in the basal cells of stratified epithelia in a tamoxifen inducible manner: Rb1F/F ; Rbl2F/F;Rbl1-/-;K14CreErT2 (TKO). Previously our laboratory had shown that, in the absence of pRb, malignant conversion occurred when p53 is lost. At high doses of tamoxifen these animals show early lethality. When we adjust the dose

  20. Local delivery of cannabinoid-loaded microparticles inhibits tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Hernán Pérez de la Ossa

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids, the active components of marijuana and their derivatives, are currently investigated due to their potential therapeutic application for the management of many different diseases, including cancer. Specifically, Δ(9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC and Cannabidiol (CBD - the two major ingredients of marijuana - have been shown to inhibit tumor growth in a number of animal models of cancer, including glioma. Although there are several pharmaceutical preparations that permit the oral administration of THC or its analogue nabilone or the oromucosal delivery of a THC- and CBD-enriched cannabis extract, the systemic administration of cannabinoids has several limitations in part derived from the high lipophilicity exhibited by these compounds. In this work we analyzed CBD- and THC-loaded poly-ε-caprolactone microparticles as an alternative delivery system for long-term cannabinoid administration in a murine xenograft model of glioma. In vitro characterization of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles showed that this method of microencapsulation facilitates a sustained release of the two cannabinoids for several days. Local administration of THC-, CBD- or a mixture (1:1 w:w of THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles every 5 days to mice bearing glioma xenografts reduced tumour growth with the same efficacy than a daily local administration of the equivalent amount of those cannabinoids in solution. Moreover, treatment with cannabinoid-loaded microparticles enhanced apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and angiogenesis in these tumours. Our findings support that THC- and CBD-loaded microparticles could be used as an alternative method of cannabinoid delivery in anticancer therapies.

  1. A cyclopalladated complex interacts with mitochondrial membrane thiol-groups and induces the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine and cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, Fabiana A; Machado, Joel Jr; Santos, Edson L; Pesquero, João B; Martins, Rafael M; Travassos, Luiz R; Caires, Antonio CF; Rodrigues, Elaine G; Matsuo, Alisson L; Monteforte, Priscila T; Bechara, Alexandre; Smaili, Soraya S; Santana, Débora P; Rodrigues, Tiago; Pereira, Felipe V; Silva, Luis S

    2011-01-01

    Systemic therapy for cancer metastatic lesions is difficult and generally renders a poor clinical response. Structural analogs of cisplatin, the most widely used synthetic metal complexes, show toxic side-effects and tumor cell resistance. Recently, palladium complexes with increased stability are being investigated to circumvent these limitations, and a biphosphinic cyclopalladated complex {Pd 2 [S (-) C 2 , N-dmpa] 2 (μ-dppe)Cl 2 } named C7a efficiently controls the subcutaneous development of B16F10-Nex2 murine melanoma in syngeneic mice. Presently, we investigated the melanoma cell killing mechanism induced by C7a, and extended preclinical studies. B16F10-Nex2 cells were treated in vitro with C7a in the presence/absence of DTT, and several parameters related to apoptosis induction were evaluated. Preclinical studies were performed, and mice were endovenously inoculated with B16F10-Nex2 cells, intraperitoneally treated with C7a, and lung metastatic nodules were counted. The cytotoxic effects and the respiratory metabolism were also determined in human tumor cell lines treated in vitro with C7a. Cyclopalladated complex interacts with thiol groups on the mitochondrial membrane proteins, causes dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induces Bax translocation from the cytosol to mitochondria, colocalizing with a mitochondrial tracker. C7a also induced an increase in cytosolic calcium concentration, mainly from intracellular compartments, and a significant decrease in the ATP levels. Activation of effector caspases, chromatin condensation and DNA degradation, suggested that C7a activates the apoptotic intrinsic pathway in murine melanoma cells. In the preclinical studies, the C7a complex protected against murine metastatic melanoma and induced death in several human tumor cell lineages in vitro, including cisplatin-resistant ones. The mitochondria-dependent cell death was also induced by C7a in human tumor cells. The cyclopalladated C7a complex is

  2. Selection, calibration, and validation of models of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, E A B F; Oden, J T; Hormuth, D A; Yankeelov, T E; Almeida, R C

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents general approaches for addressing some of the most important issues in predictive computational oncology concerned with developing classes of predictive models of tumor growth. First, the process of developing mathematical models of vascular tumors evolving in the complex, heterogeneous, macroenvironment of living tissue; second, the selection of the most plausible models among these classes, given relevant observational data; third, the statistical calibration and validation of models in these classes, and finally, the prediction of key Quantities of Interest (QOIs) relevant to patient survival and the effect of various therapies. The most challenging aspects of this endeavor is that all of these issues often involve confounding uncertainties: in observational data, in model parameters, in model selection, and in the features targeted in the prediction. Our approach can be referred to as "model agnostic" in that no single model is advocated; rather, a general approach that explores powerful mixture-theory representations of tissue behavior while accounting for a range of relevant biological factors is presented, which leads to many potentially predictive models. Then representative classes are identified which provide a starting point for the implementation of OPAL, the Occam Plausibility Algorithm (OPAL) which enables the modeler to select the most plausible models (for given data) and to determine if the model is a valid tool for predicting tumor growth and morphology ( in vivo ). All of these approaches account for uncertainties in the model, the observational data, the model parameters, and the target QOI. We demonstrate these processes by comparing a list of models for tumor growth, including reaction-diffusion models, phase-fields models, and models with and without mechanical deformation effects, for glioma growth measured in murine experiments. Examples are provided that exhibit quite acceptable predictions of tumor growth in laboratory

  3. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the [ 35 S]O 4 - -labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of [ 35 S]O 4 - -labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10μg/ml), arteparon (10μg/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 μg/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis

  4. Neuroimmune mechanisms of behavioral alterations in a syngeneic murine model of human papilloma virus-related head and neck cancer.

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    Vichaya, Elisabeth G; Vermeer, Daniel W; Christian, Diana L; Molkentine, Jessica M; Mason, Kathy A; Lee, John H; Dantzer, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Patients with cancer often experience a high symptom burden prior to the start of treatment. As disease- and treatment-related neurotoxicities appear to be additive, targeting disease-related symptoms may attenuate overall symptom burden for cancer patients and improve the tolerability of treatment. It has been hypothesized that disease-related symptoms are a consequence of tumor-induced inflammation. We tested this hypothesis using a syngeneic heterotopic murine model of human papilloma virus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. This model has the advantage of being mildly aggressive and not causing cachexia or weight loss. We previously showed that this tumor leads to increased IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α expression in the liver and increased IL-1β expression in the brain. The current study confirmed these features and demonstrated that the tumor itself exhibits high inflammatory cytokine expression (e.g., IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) compared to healthy tissue. While there is a clear relationship between cytokine levels and behavioral deficits in this model, the behavioral changes are surprisingly mild. Therefore, we sought to confirm the relationship between behavior and inflammation by amplifying the effect using a low dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 0.1mg/kg). In tumor-bearing mice LPS induced deficits in nest building, tail suspension, and locomotor activity approximately 24h after LPS. However, these mice did not display an exacerbation of LPS-induced weight loss, anorexia, or anhedonia. Further, while heightened serum IL-6 was observed there was minimal priming of liver or brain cytokine expression. Next we sought to inhibit tumor-induced burrowing deficits by reducing inflammation using minocycline. Minocycline (∼50mg/kg/day in drinking water) was able to attenuate tumor-induced inflammation and burrowing deficits. These data provide evidence in favor of an inflammatory-like mechanism for the behavioral alterations associated with tumor growth in a syngeneic

  5. Size-Dependent Accumulation of PEGylated Silane-Coated Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Murine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Nielsen, T.; Wittenborn, T.

    2009-01-01

    following intravenous injection. Biocompatible iron oxide MNPs coated with PEG were prepared by replacing oleic acid with a biocompatible and commercially available silane-PEG to provide an easy and effective method for chemical coating. The colloidal stable PEGylated MNPs were magnetically separated...... into two distinct size subpopulations of 20 and 40 nm mean diameters with increased phagocytic uptake observed for the 40 nm size range in vitro. MRI detection revealed greater iron accumulation in murine tumors for 40 nm nanoparticles after intravenous injection. The enhanced MRI contrast of the larger...

  6. Selection of optimal therapy for neuroblastoma: a study of the immunomodulatory effects of surgery and irradiation in the murine C1300 neuroblastoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topalian, S.L.; Ziegler, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    Human neuroblastoma is an immunogenic tumor for which therapy directed in an immunologic context may offer some advantage over conventional treatment. This study examines the immunomodulatory effects of surgery and irradiation in the murine C1300 neuroblastoma model. In vivo studies of primary tumor growth characteristics after treatment demonstrated no superiority of either therapeutic modality in control of local tumor or prolongation of host survival. However, irradiated hosts showed an increased ability to reject a secondary tumor challenge, compared to their surgical counterparts. That this phenomenon may be immune-related is suggested by in vitro studies of T lymphocyte function utilizing mixed lymphocyte-tumor cell cultures and PHA lymphoblastogenesis

  7. Tumor regression induced by intratumor therapy with a disabled infectious single cycle (DISC) herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector, DISC/HSV/murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, correlates with antigen-specific adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Selman A; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Rojas, José M; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2002-04-01

    Direct intratumor injection of a disabled infectious single cycle HSV-2 virus encoding the murine GM-CSF gene (DISC/mGM-CSF) into established murine colon carcinoma CT26 tumors induced a significant delay in tumor growth and complete tumor regression in up to 70% of animals. Pre-existing immunity to HSV did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of DISC/mGM-CSF, and, when administered in combination with syngeneic dendritic cells, further decreased tumor growth and increased the incidence of complete tumor regression. Direct intratumor injection of DISC/mGM-CSF also inhibited the growth of CT26 tumor cells implanted on the contralateral flank or seeded into the lungs following i.v. injection of tumor cells (experimental lung metastasis). Proliferation of splenocytes in response to Con A was impaired in progressor and tumor-bearer, but not regressor, mice. A potent tumor-specific CTL response was generated from splenocytes of all mice with regressing, but not progressing tumors following in vitro peptide stimulation; this response was specific for the gp70 AH-1 peptide SPSYVYHQF and correlated with IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 cytokine production. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells from regressor splenocytes before in vitro stimulation with the relevant peptide abolished their cytolytic activity, while depletion of CD4(+) T cells only partially inhibited CTL generation. Tumor regression induced by DISC/mGM-CSF virus immunotherapy provides a unique model for evaluating the immune mechanism(s) involved in tumor rejection, upon which tumor immunotherapy regimes may be based.

  8. Medulloblastoma: Molecular Genetics and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Raffel

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma is a primary brain tumor found in the cerebellum of children. The tumor occurs in association with two inherited cancer syndromes: Turcot syndrome and Gorlin syndrome. Insights into the molecular biology of the tumor have come from looking at alterations in the genes altered in these syndromes, PTC and APC, respectively. Murine models of medulloblastoma have been constructed based on these alterations. Additional murine models that, while mimicking the appearance of the human tumor, seem unrelated to the human tumor's molecular alterations have been made. In this review, the clinical picture, origin, molecular biology, murine models of medulloblastoma are discussed. Although a great deal has been discovered about this tumor, the genetic alterations responsible for tumor development in a majority of patients have yet to be described.

  9. Efficacy of irreversible electroporation in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma: advanced murine model

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    Prejesh Philips

    Full Text Available Irreversible electroporation (IRE is a promising cell membrane ablative modality for pancreatic cancer. There have been recent concerns regarding local recurrence and the potential use of IRE as a debulking (partial ablation modality. We hypothesize that incomplete ablation leads to early recurrence and a more aggressive biology. We created the first ever heterotopic murine model by inoculating BALB/c nude mice in the hindlimb with a subcutaneous injection of Panc-1 cells, an immortalized human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line. Tumors were allowed to grow from 0.75 to 1.5 cm and then treated with the goal of complete ablation or partial ablation using standard IRE settings. Animals were recovered and survived for 2 days (n = 6, 7 (n = 6, 14 (n = 6, 21 (n = 6, 30 (n = 8, and 60 (n = 8 days. All 40 animals/tumors underwent successful IRE under general anesthesia with muscle paralysis. The mean tumor volume of the animals undergoing ablation was 1,447.6 mm3 ± 884. Histologically, in the 14-, 21-, 30-, and 60-day survival groups the entire tumor was nonviable, with a persistent tumor nodule completely replaced fibrosis. In the group treated with partial ablation, incomplete electroporation/recurrences (N = 10 animals were seen, of which 66% had confluent tumors and this was a significant predictor of recurrence (P < 0.001. Recurrent tumors were also significantly larger (mean 4,578 mm3 ± SD 877 versus completed electroporated tumors 925.8 ± 277, P < 0.001. Recurrent tumors had a steeper growth curve (slope = 0.73 compared with primary tumors (0.60, P = 0.02. Recurrent tumors also had a significantly higher percentage of EpCAM expression, suggestive of stem cell activation. Tumors that recur after incomplete electroporation demonstrate a biologically aggressive tumor that could be more resistant to standard of care chemotherapy. Clinical correlation of this data is limited, but should be considered when IRE of pancreatic cancer is being

  10. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration After Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in a Murine Model

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    Kane, Jonathan [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krueger, Sarah A.; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Torma, John T.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian [Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Madlambayan, Gerard J., E-mail: madlamba@oakland.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To characterize the recruitment of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within tumor microenvironment after radiation therapy (RT) in a murine, heterotopic tumor model. Methods and Materials: Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with 30 Gy given as 2 fractions over 2 days. Tumors were imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measured daily with digital calipers. The HSPC and myelomonocytic cell content was assessed via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. Functionality of tumor-associated HSPCs was verified in vitro using colony-forming cell assays and in vivo by rescuing lethally irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Results: Irradiation significantly reduced tumor volumes and tumor regrowth rates compared with nonirradiated controls. The number of CD133{sup +} HSPCs present in irradiated tumors was higher than in nonirradiated tumors during all stages of regrowth. CD11b{sup +} counts were similar. PET/CT imaging and growth rate analysis based on standardized uptake value indicated that HSPC recruitment directly correlated to the extent of regrowth and intratumor cell activity after irradiation. The BM-derived tumor-associated HSPCs successfully formed hematopoietic colonies and engrafted irradiated mice. Finally, targeted treatment with a small animal radiation research platform demonstrated localized HSPC recruitment to defined tumor subsites exposed to radiation. Conclusions: Hypofractionated irradiation resulted in a pronounced and targeted recruitment of BM-derived HSPCs, possibly as a mechanism to promote tumor regrowth. These data indicate for the first time that radiation therapy regulates HSPC content within regrowing tumors.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Migration After Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in a Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kane, Jonathan; Krueger, Sarah A.; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Torma, John T.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian; Madlambayan, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the recruitment of bone marrow (BM)-derived hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) within tumor microenvironment after radiation therapy (RT) in a murine, heterotopic tumor model. Methods and Materials: Lewis lung carcinoma tumors were established in C57BL/6 mice and irradiated with 30 Gy given as 2 fractions over 2 days. Tumors were imaged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and measured daily with digital calipers. The HSPC and myelomonocytic cell content was assessed via immunofluorescent staining and flow cytometry. Functionality of tumor-associated HSPCs was verified in vitro using colony-forming cell assays and in vivo by rescuing lethally irradiated C57BL/6 recipients. Results: Irradiation significantly reduced tumor volumes and tumor regrowth rates compared with nonirradiated controls. The number of CD133 + HSPCs present in irradiated tumors was higher than in nonirradiated tumors during all stages of regrowth. CD11b + counts were similar. PET/CT imaging and growth rate analysis based on standardized uptake value indicated that HSPC recruitment directly correlated to the extent of regrowth and intratumor cell activity after irradiation. The BM-derived tumor-associated HSPCs successfully formed hematopoietic colonies and engrafted irradiated mice. Finally, targeted treatment with a small animal radiation research platform demonstrated localized HSPC recruitment to defined tumor subsites exposed to radiation. Conclusions: Hypofractionated irradiation resulted in a pronounced and targeted recruitment of BM-derived HSPCs, possibly as a mechanism to promote tumor regrowth. These data indicate for the first time that radiation therapy regulates HSPC content within regrowing tumors

  12. Coadministration of doxorubicin and etoposide loaded in camel milk phospholipids liposomes showed increased antitumor activity in a murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maswadeh HM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hamzah M Maswadeh,1 Ahmed N Aljarbou,1 Mohammed S Alorainy,2 Arshad H Rahmani,3 Masood A Khan3 1Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, 2Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, College of Medicine, 3College of Applied Medical Sciences, Qassim University, Buraydah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Abstract: Small unilamellar vesicles from camel milk phospholipids (CML mixture or from 1,2 dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC were prepared, and anticancer drugs doxorubicin (Dox or etoposide (ETP were loaded. Liposomal formulations were used against fibrosarcoma in a murine model. Results showed a very high percentage of Dox encapsulation (~98% in liposomes (Lip prepared from CML-Lip or DPPC-Lip, whereas the percentage of encapsulations of ETP was on the lower side, 22% of CML-Lip and 18% for DPPC-Lip. Differential scanning calorimetry curves show that Dox enhances the lamellar formation in CML-Lip, whereas ETP enhances the nonlamellar formation. Differential scanning calorimetry curves also showed that the presence of Dox and ETP together into DPPC-Lip produced the interdigitation effect. The in vivo anticancer activity of liposomal formulations of Dox or ETP or a combination of both was assessed against benzopyrene (BAP-induced fibrosarcoma in a murine model. Tumor-bearing mice treated with a combination of Dox and ETP loaded into CML-Lip showed increased survival and reduced tumor growth compared to other groups, including the combination of Dox and ETP in DPPC-Lip. Fibrosarcoma-bearing mice treated with a combination of free (Dox + ETP showed much higher tumor growth compared to those groups treated with CML-Lip-(Dox + ETP or DPPC-Lip-(Dox + ETP. Immunohistochemical study was also performed to show the expression of tumor-suppressor PTEN, and it was found that the tumor tissues from the group of mice treated with a combination of free (Dox + ETP showed greater loss of cytoplasmic PTEN than tumor tissues obtained from the

  13. Primary osteopathy of vertebrae in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Rhodes, Steven D; Zhao, Liming; He, Yongzheng; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Dalong; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Park, Su-Jung; Chen, Shi; Turner, Charles; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2011-06-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by mutation of the NF1 tumor suppressor gene. Spinal deformities are common skeletal manifestations in patients with NF1. To date, the mechanism of vertebral abnormalities remains unclear because of the lack of appropriate animal models for the skeletal manifestations of NF1. In the present study, we report a novel murine NF1 model, Nf1(flox/-);Col2.3Cre(+) mice. These mice display short vertebral segments. In addition, a significant reduction in cortical and trabecular bone mass of the vertebrae was observed in Nf1(flox/-);Col2.3Cre(+) mice as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Peak stress and peak load were also significantly reduced in Nf1(flox/-);Col2.3Cre(+) mice as compared to controls. Furthermore, the lumbar vertebrae showed enlargement of the inter-vertebral canal, a characteristic feature of lumbar vertebrae in NF1 patients. Finally, histologic analysis demonstrated increased numbers of osteoclasts and decreased numbers of osteoblasts in the vertebrae of Nf1(flox/-);Col2.3Cre(+) mice in comparison to controls. In summary, Nf1(flox/-);Col2.3Cre(+) mice demonstrate multiple structural and functional abnormalities in the lumbar vertebrae which recapitulate the dystrophic vertebral changes in NF1 patients. This novel murine model provides a platform to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of spinal deficits in NF1 patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel anti-Sialyl-Tn monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates demonstrate tumor specificity and anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Jillian M; Galvao da Silva, Ana Paula; Eavarone, David A; Ghaderi, Darius; Zhang, Mai; Brady, Dane; Wicks, Joan; DeSander, Julie; Behrens, Jeff; Rueda, Bo R

    Targeted therapeutics that can differentiate between normal and malignant tumor cells represent the ideal standard for the development of a successful anti-cancer strategy. The Sialyl-Thomsen-nouveau antigen (STn or Sialyl-Tn, also known as CD175s) is rarely seen in normal adult tissues, but it is abundantly expressed in many types of human epithelial cancers. We have identified novel antibodies that specifically target with high affinity the STn glycan independent of its carrier protein, affording the potential to recognize a wider array of cancer-specific sialylated proteins. A panel of murine monoclonal anti-STn therapeutic antibodies were generated and their binding specificity and efficacy were characterized in vitro and in in vivo murine cancer models. A subset of these antibodies were conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). These ADCs demonstrated in vitro efficacy in STn-expressing cell lines and significant tumor growth inhibition in STn-expressing tumor xenograft cancer models with no evidence of overt toxicity.

  15. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  16. A Multimodal Imaging Approach for Longitudinal Evaluation of Bladder Tumor Development in an Orthotopic Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Scheepbouwer

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy amongst men in Western industrialized countries with an initial response rate of 70% for the non-muscle invasive type, and improving therapy efficacy is highly needed. For this, an appropriate, reliable animal model is essential to gain insight into mechanisms of tumor growth for use in response monitoring of (new agents. Several animal models have been described in previous studies, but so far success has been hampered due to the absence of imaging methods to follow tumor growth non-invasively over time. Recent developments of multimodal imaging methods for use in animal research have substantially strengthened these options of in vivo visualization of tumor growth. In the present study, a multimodal imaging approach was addressed to investigate bladder tumor proliferation longitudinally. The complementary abilities of Bioluminescence, High Resolution Ultrasound and Photo-acoustic Imaging permit a better understanding of bladder tumor development. Hybrid imaging modalities allow the integration of individual strengths to enable sensitive and improved quantification and understanding of tumor biology, and ultimately, can aid in the discovery and development of new therapeutics.

  17. Modulation of fibronectin-mediated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin attachment to murine bladder mucosa by drugs influencing the coagulation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M A; Brown, E J; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1991-07-15

    Adjuvant intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has proved to be an effective treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Intraluminal attachment of BCG organisms via binding to the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin (FN), appears to be required for expression of the antitumor efficacy of BCG against a murine bladder tumor. Initial studies demonstrated that radiolabeled FN localized to the acutely injured urothelium but not to intact urothelium. These studies also demonstrated that exogenous administration of FN enhanced BCG attachment to the injured but not to the intact urothelium. Because FN has been shown to be an integral part of clot formation at sites of urothelial injury, drugs known to affect fibrin clot formation were tested for their effects on BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model. A stabilizer of fibrin clot formation was shown to enhance both BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in the same model. An increased number of BCG organisms were also retained in the lymph nodes and spleens of mice receiving fibrin clot stabilizers, suggesting indirectly that immunological mechanisms are involved in the antitumor efficacy of BCG. The data presented herein provide further support for the hypothesis that BCG attachment to the injured bladder is mediated by FN. Furthermore, modulation of BCG-FN attachment is demonstrated to be possible with drugs influencing the coagulation pathway. This attachment is shown to be required for the antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model, and thus modulation of BCG-FN attachment appears to have significant influence on the antitumor efficacy of BCG in the murine bladder tumor model.

  18. Novel Tc-99m labeled ELR-containing 6-mer peptides for tumor imaging in epidermoid carcinoma xenografts model. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Woo-Hyoung; Kim, Myoung-Hyoun; Kim, Chang-Guhn

    2013-01-01

    ELR-containing peptides targeting CXCR2 could be the excellent candidate for targeting ligand of molecular tumor imaging. In this study, we had developed two ELR-containing 6-mer peptides and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m labeled 6-mer peptides as a molecular imaging agent in murine models bearing KB epidermoid carcinoma. Peptides were synthesized using Fmoc solid phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling efficiency with Tc-99m was evaluated using instant thin-layer chromatography. In KB epidermoid cancer-bearing mice, gamma images had acquired and tumor-to-muscle uptake ratio was calculated. Competition and biodistribution studies had performed. Two 6-mer peptides, ELR-ECG and ECG-ELR were successfully synthesized. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, the complex Tc-99m ELR-ECG and Tc-99m ECG-ELR were prepared in high yield. In the gamma camera imaging of murine model, Tc-99m ELR-ECG was substantially accumulated in the subcutaneously engrafted tumor and tumor uptake had been suppressed by the free ELR co-injection. However, Tc-99m ECG-ELR was minimally accumulated in the tumor. Two ELR-containing 6-mer peptides, ELR-ECG and ECG-ELR, were developed as a molecular imaging agent to target CXCR2 of epidermoid carcinoma. Tc-99m ELR-ECG had showed significant uptake in tumor and it was good candidate for a tumor imaging. (author)

  19. Impact of sentinel lymphadenectomy on survival in a murine model of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, Robert B; Lazar, Alexander J F; Fidler, Isaiah J; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E

    2008-01-01

    Lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy-also termed sentinel lymphadenectomy (SL)-has become a standard of care for patients with primary invasive cutaneous melanoma. This technique has been shown to provide accurate information about the disease status of the regional lymph node basins at risk for metastasis, provide prognostic information, and provide durable regional lymph node control. The potential survival benefit afforded to patients undergoing SL is controversial. Central to this controversy is whether metastasis to regional lymph nodes occurs independent of or prior to widespread hematogenous dissemination. A related area of uncertainty is whether tumor cells residing within regional lymph nodes have increased metastatic potential. We have used a murine model of primary invasive cutaneous melanoma based on injection of B16-BL6 melanoma cells into the pinna to address two questions: (1) does SL plus wide excision of the primary tumor result in a survival advantage over wide excision alone; and (2) do melanoma cells growing within lymph nodes produce a higher incidence of hematogenous metastases than do cells growing at the primary tumor site? We found that SL significantly improved the survival of mice with small primary tumors. We found no difference in the incidence of lung metastases produced by B16-BL6 melanoma cells growing exclusively within regional lymph nodes and cells growing within the pinna.

  20. Murine models of H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Sabine; Roessner, Albert; Kuester, Doerthe

    2011-10-15

    Laboratory mice have become one of the best animal species for mechanistic studies in gastrointestinal research. Their abundant genetic information, the way of causing carcinogenesis easily by transgenic and gene knockout techniques, limited effort in time and costs, and their practicability provide advantages over other animal models. Meanwhile, several murine practical models have been established for the investigation of the initiation, expansion, and progression of gastritis and gastric carcinoma, for assessing the effects of bacterial, genetic and environmental factors, and for evaluating therapeutic and preventive strategies in gastric diseases. This article gives a review of murine models of gastritis and gastric cancer, placing emphasis on the models associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and techniques used in our laboratory. We discuss matters of murine gastric anatomy, as well as techniques of infection, tissue preparation, and histology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Differential immune microenvironments and response to immune checkpoint blockade amongst molecular subtypes of murine medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D.; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Sayour, Elias J.; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E.; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma (MB), the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and Group 3 MB for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. METHODS AND RESULTS Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with Group 3 tumors. However, murine Group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8+ PD-1+ T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial Group 3 tumors compared to SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1+ peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of MB and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. PMID:26405194

  2. Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M; Yearley, Jennifer H; Sayour, Elias J; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma, the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and group 3 medulloblastoma for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with group 3 tumors. However, murine group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8(+) PD-1(+) T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial group 3 tumors compared with SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1(+) peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment. This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Photodynamic Therapy of the Murine LM3 Tumor Using Meso-Tetra (4-N,N,N-Trimethylanilinium) Porphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, L L; Juarranz, A; Cañete, M; Villanueva, A; Stockert, J C

    2007-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer is based on the cytotoxicity induced by a photosensitizer in the presence of oxygen and visible light, resulting in cell death and tumor regression. This work describes the response of the murine LM3 tumor to PDT using meso-tetra (4-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium) porphine (TMAP). BALB/c mice with intradermal LM3 tumors were subjected to intravenous injection of TMAP (4 mg/kg) followed 24 h later by blue-red light irradiation (λmax: 419, 457, 650 nm) for 60 min (total dose: 290 J/cm(2)) on depilated and glycerol-covered skin over the tumor of anesthetized animals. Control (drug alone, light alone) and PDT treatments (drug + light) were performed once and repeated 48 h later. No significant differences were found between untreated tumors and tumors only treated with TMAP or light. PDT-treated tumors showed almost total but transitory tumor regression (from 3 mm to less than 1 mm) in 8/9 animals, whereas no regression was found in 1/9. PDT response was heterogeneous and each tumor showed different regression and growth delay. The survival of PDT-treated animals was significantly higher than that of TMAP and light controls, showing a lower number of lung metastasis but increased tumor-draining lymph node metastasis. Repeated treatment and reduction of tissue light scattering by glycerol could be useful approaches in studies on PDT of cancer.

  4. Immunological tumor destruction in a murine melanoma model by targeted LTalpha independent of secondary lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrama, D.; Voigt, H.; Eggert, A.O.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We previously demonstrated that targeting lymphotoxin alpha (LTalpha) to the tumor evokes its immunological destruction in a syngeneic B16 melanoma model. Since treatment was associated with the induction of peritumoral tertiary lymphoid tissue, we speculated that the induced immune...... response was initiated at the tumor site. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to directly test this notion, we analyzed the efficacy of tumor targeted LTalpha in LTalpha knock-out (LTalpha(-/-)) mice which lack peripheral lymph nodes. To this end, we demonstrate that tumor-targeted LTalpha mediates the induction...... of specific T-cell responses even in the absence of secondary lymphoid organs. In addition, this effect is accompanied by the initiation of tertiary lymphoid tissue at the tumor site in which B and T lymphocytes are compartmentalized in defined areas and which harbor expanded numbers of tumor specific T cells...

  5. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    .... and whether depletion of tumor-associated macrophages has any effect on the tumor growth. The breast cancer model was established in BALB/c mice by subcutaneous injection of estrogen receptor-positive murine mammary tumor cells (4T1...

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of Tc-99m-labeled RRL-containing peptide as a non-invasive tumor imaging agent in a mouse fibrosarcoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2015-11-01

    Arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) is considered a tumor endothelial cell-specific binding sequence. RRL-containing peptide targeting tumor vessels is an excellent candidate for tumor imaging. In this study, we developed RRL-containing hexapeptides and evaluated their feasibility as a tumor imaging agent in a HT-1080 fibrosarcoma-bearing murine model. The hexapeptide, glutamic acid-cysteine-glycine (ECG)-RRL was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling efficiency was evaluated using instant thin-layer chromatography. Uptake of Tc-99m ECG-RRL within HT-1080 cells was evaluated in vitro by confocal microscopy and cellular binding affinity was calculated. Gamma images were acquired In HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumor-bearing mice, and the tumor-to-muscle uptake ratio was calculated. The inflammatory-to-normal muscle uptake ratio was also calculated in an inflammation mouse model. A biodistribution study was performed to calculate %ID/g. A high yield of Tc-99m ECG-RRL complexes was prepared after Tc-99m radiolabeling. Binding of Tc-99m ECG-RRL to tumor cells had was confirmed by in vitro studies. Gamma camera imaging in the murine model showed that Tc-99m ECG-RRL accumulated substantially in the subcutaneously engrafted tumor and that tumoral uptake was blocked by co-injecting excess RRL. Moreover, Tc-99m ECG-RRL accumulated minimally in inflammatory lesions. We successfully developed Tc-99m ECG-RRL as a new tumor imaging candidate. Specific tumoral uptake of Tc-99m ECG-RRL was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo, and it was determined to be a good tumor imaging candidate. Additionally, Tc-99m ECG-RRL effectively distinguished between cancerous tissue and inflammatory lesions.

  7. Non-toxic approach for treatment of breast cancer and its cutaneous metastasis: Capecitabine (Xeloda) enhanced photodynamic therapy in a murine tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sanjay; Denisyuk, Anton; Bullock, Taylor; Govande, Mukul; Maytin, Edward V.

    2018-02-01

    Breast cancer (BCA) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women, with distant metastases to lung, liver, bone and skin occurring in approximately 40% of cases. Radiation therapy (RT) has been successfully employed for the treatment of BCA; however, multiple rounds of RT are associated with undesirable cutaneous side effects. This study explores PDT as a therapeutic alternative, to be given alone or in combination with RT and chemotherapy. Earlier, we had developed differentiation-enhanced combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) using a neoadjuvant (5-fluorouracil; 5FU) prior to PDT. The neoadjuvant increases the levels of PpIX, leading to better efficacy following aminolevulinate (ALA)- based PDT. Here, to avoid the toxicity of systemic 5FU, we used a nontoxic 5FU precursor (Capecitabine; CPBN) in a new cPDT regimen. CBPN, a standard chemotherapeutic for BCA, is metabolized to 5FU specifically within tumor tissue. Murine (4T1) BCA cells were injected into breast fat pads of nude mice. CPBN was administered by oral gavage followed by intraperitoneal ALA and red light for PDT. CPBN pretreatment of 4T1 tumors led to increased tumor cell differentiation (3.5 fold), homogenous elevation of intratumoral PpIX levels (4.5 fold), and enhanced tumor cell death post-PDT (5 fold), relative to vehicle control. Using an in vivo imaging system (IVIS), a decline in tumor growth following CPBN-PDT was observed. Results showing the effect of CPBN-PDT on distant metastases of BCA to lung, lymph nodes and skin will be presented. In summary, CPBN-PDT, a novel combination approach, has a significant potential for translation into the clinic.

  8. Three-dimensional alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Nishimura, Akinobu; Satonaka, Haruhiko; Shintani, Ken; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Kasai, Yuichi; Masuda, Koichi; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2009-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the bone and often forms pulmonary metastases, which are the most important prognostic factor. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the progression and metastasis of human OS, a culture system mimicking the microenvironment of the tumor in vivo is needed. We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma. Two different metastatic clones, the parental Dunn and its derivative line LM8, which has a higher metastatic potential to the lungs, were encapsulated in alginate beads to develop the 3D culture system. The beads containing murine OS cells were also transplanted into mice to determine their metastatic potential in vivo. In this culture system, murine OS cells encapsulated in alginate beads were able to grow in a 3D structure with cells detaching from the alginate environment. The number of detaching cells was higher in the LM8 cell line than the Dunn cell line. In the in vivo alginate bead transplantation model, the rate of pulmonary metastasis was higher with LM8 cells compared with that of Dunn cells. The cell characteristics and kinetics in this culture system closely reflect the original malignant potential of the cells in vivo.

  9. Influence of misonidazole on the radiation response of murine tumors of different size: possible artifacts caused by pentobarbital sodium anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.; van der Schueren, E.; van den Hoeven, H.; Breur, K.

    1981-01-01

    The radiosensitivity of a transplantable murine adenocarcinoma decreased with increasing tumor volume. In unanesthetized mice this phenomenon (based on the effect of the hypoxic cell sensitizer misonidazole), in the range of volumes studied, can largely be explained by the appearance of hypoxic cells in the tumor during growth. The use of pentobarbital sodium during irradiation is confiremd to be a disturbing factor, as it may increase the hypoxic cell fraction in the tumors. No evidence was found for a direct radiochemical protection because of pentobarbital sodium. The radioprotective effect of the anesthetic could only be demonstrated in conditions where there is already a fraction of hypoxic cells; no influence of the anesthesia was found in small tumors in which the fraction of hypoxic cells was relatively small. This may account for the previously conflicting data on the influence of pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. The vascularization of larger tumors is apparently inferior to smaller tumors and this has important repercussions in the case of anesthesia. Changes in blood flow induced by pentobarbital sodium in larger tumors cause an insufficient oxygenation and hence acute hypoxia

  10. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  11. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Kavanagh, M.C.; Newcombe, D.

    1995-01-01

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 ± 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 ± 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 ± 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO 2 values, or [ 3 H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  12. Effects of Androgen Ablation on Anti-Tumor Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kast, Martin

    2004-01-01

    .... This AA induced autoimmune-like response exerts limited anti-tumor activity in a murine prostate cancer model, but could be synergistic with CTLA-4 blockade that promotes the development of autoreactive T cell...

  13. Characterization of PD-1 upregulation on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in human and murine gliomas and preclinical therapeutic blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejaegher, Joost; Verschuere, Tina; Vercalsteren, Ellen; Boon, Louis; Cremer, Jonathan; Sciot, Raf; Van Gool, Stefaan W; De Vleeschouwer, Steven

    2017-11-01

    Blockade of the immune checkpoint molecule programmed-cell-death-protein-1 (PD-1) yielded promising results in several cancers. To understand the therapeutic potential in human gliomas, quantitative data describing the expression of PD-1 are essential. Moreover, due the immune-specialized region of the brain in which gliomas arise, differences between tumor-infiltrating and circulating lymphocytes should be acknowledged. In this study we have used flow cytometry to quantify PD-1 expression on tumor-infiltrating T cells of 25 freshly resected glioma cell suspensions (10 newly and 5 relapsed glioblastoma, 10 lower grade gliomas) and simultaneously isolated circulating T cells. A strong upregulation of PD-1 expression in the tumor microenvironment compared to the blood circulation was seen in all glioma patients. Additionally, circulating T cells were isolated from 15 age-matched healthy volunteers, but no differences in PD-1 expression were found compared to glioma patients. In the murine GL261 malignant glioma model, there was a similar upregulation of PD-1 on brain-infiltrating lymphocytes. Using a monoclonal PD-1 blocking antibody, we found a marked prolonged survival with 55% of mice reaching long-term survival. Analysis of brain-infiltrating cells 21 days after GL261 tumor implantation showed a shift in infiltrating lymphocyte subgroups with increased CD8+ T cells and decreased regulatory T cells. Together, our results suggest an important role of PD-1 in glioma-induced immune escape, and provide translational evidence for the use of PD-1 blocking antibodies in human malignant gliomas. © 2017 UICC.

  14. Identification of proteins that regulate radiation-induced apoptosis in murine tumors with wild type p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jinsil; Oh, Hae Jin; Kim, Jiyoung; An, Jeung Hee; Kim, Wonwoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Univ. Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-09-15

    In this study, we investigated the molecular factors determining the induction of apoptosis by radiation. Two murine tumors syngeneic to C3H/HeJ mice were used: an ovarian carcinoma OCa-I, and a hepatocarcinoma HCa-I. Both have wild type p53, but display distinctly different radiosensitivity in terms of specific growth delay (12.7 d in OCa-I and 0.3 d in HCa-I) and tumor cure dose 50% (52.6 Gy in OCa-I and >80 Gy in HCa-I). Eight-mm tumors on the thighs of mice were irradiated with 25 Gy and tumor samples were collected at regular time intervals after irradiation. The peak levels of apoptosis were 16.1{+-}0.6% in OCa-I and 0.2{+-}0.0% in HCa-I at 4 h after radiation, and this time point was used for subsequent proteomics analysis. Protein spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting with a focus on those related to apoptosis. In OCa-I tumors, radiation increased the expression of cytochrome c oxidase and Bcl2/adenovirus E1B-interacting 2 (Nip 2) protein higher than 3-fold. However in HCa-I, these two proteins showed no significant change. The results suggest that radiosensitivity in tumors with wild type p53 is regulated by a complex mechanism. Furthermore, these proteins could be molecular targets for a novel therapeutic strategy involving the regulation of radiosensitivity. (author)

  15. Identification of proteins that regulate radiation-induced apoptosis in murine tumors with wild type p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jinsil; Oh, Hae Jin; Kim, Jiyoung; An, Jeung Hee; Kim, Wonwoo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular factors determining the induction of apoptosis by radiation. Two murine tumors syngeneic to C3H/HeJ mice were used: an ovarian carcinoma OCa-I, and a hepatocarcinoma HCa-I. Both have wild type p53, but display distinctly different radiosensitivity in terms of specific growth delay (12.7 d in OCa-I and 0.3 d in HCa-I) and tumor cure dose 50% (52.6 Gy in OCa-I and >80 Gy in HCa-I). Eight-mm tumors on the thighs of mice were irradiated with 25 Gy and tumor samples were collected at regular time intervals after irradiation. The peak levels of apoptosis were 16.1±0.6% in OCa-I and 0.2±0.0% in HCa-I at 4 h after radiation, and this time point was used for subsequent proteomics analysis. Protein spots were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting with a focus on those related to apoptosis. In OCa-I tumors, radiation increased the expression of cytochrome c oxidase and Bcl2/adenovirus E1B-interacting 2 (Nip 2) protein higher than 3-fold. However in HCa-I, these two proteins showed no significant change. The results suggest that radiosensitivity in tumors with wild type p53 is regulated by a complex mechanism. Furthermore, these proteins could be molecular targets for a novel therapeutic strategy involving the regulation of radiosensitivity. (author)

  16. Noninvasive Assessment of Tumor Cell Proliferation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Edinger

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Revealing the mechanisms of neoplastic disease and enhancing our ability to intervene in these processes requires an increased understanding of cellular and molecular changes as they occur in intact living animal models. We have begun to address these needs by developing a method of labeling tumor cells through constitutive expression of an optical reporter gene, noninvasively monitoring cellular proliferation in vivo using a sensitive photon detection system. A stable line of HeLa cells that expressed a modified firefly luciferase gene was generated, proliferation of these cells in irradiated severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice was monitored. Tumor cells were introduced into animals via subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intravenous inoculation and whole body images, that revealed tumor location and growth kinetics, were obtained. The number of photons that were emitted from the labeled tumor cells and transmitted through murine tissues was sufficient to detect 1×103 cells in the peritoneal cavity, 1×104 cells at subcutaneous sites and 1×106 circulating cells immediately following injection. The kinetics of cell proliferation, as measured by photon emission, was exponential in the peritoneal cavity and at subcutaneous sites. Intravenous inoculation resulted in detectable colonies of tumor cells in animals receiving more than 1×103 cells. Our demonstrated ability to detect small numbers of tumor cells in living animals noninvasively suggests that therapies designed to treat minimal disease states, as occur early in the disease course and after elimination of the tumor mass, may be monitored using this approach. Moreover, it may be possible to monitor micrometastases and evaluate the molecular steps in the metastatic process. Spatiotemporal analyses of neoplasia will improve the predictability of animal models of human disease as study groups can be followed over time, this method will accelerate development of novel therapeutic

  17. Combining fisetin and ionizing radiation suppresses the growth of mammalian colorectal cancers in xenograft tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Jyh-Der; Wang, Bo-Shen; Chiu, Shu-Jun; Chang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Fu-Du; Avirmed, Shiirevnyamba; Lee, Yi-Jang

    2016-12-01

    Fisetin (3,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone), which belongs to the flavonoid group of polyphenols and is found in a wide range of plants, has been reported to exhibit a number of biological activities in human cancer cells, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, anti-invasive and antiproliferative effects. Although previous in vitro studies have shown that fisetin treatment increases the apoptotic rate and enhances the radiosensitivity of human colorectal cancer cells, the in vivo effects of fisetin on tumor growth remain unclear. In the present study a murine xenograft tumor model was employed to investigate the therapeutic effects of fisetin in combination with radiation on CT-26 colon cancer cells and human HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. This revealed that intratumoral injection of fisetin significantly suppressed the growth of CT-26 tumors compared with the untreated control group, but had little effect on the growth of HCT116 tumors. However, fisetin in combination with 2-Gy radiation enhanced tumor suppressor activity in murine colon and human colorectal xenograft tumors, as compared with 2-Gy fractionated radiation administered alone for 5 days and fisetin alone. Interestingly, fisetin downregulated the expression of the oncoprotein securin in a p53-independent manner. However, securin-null HCT116 tumors showed only moderate sensitivity to fisetin treatment, and the combination of fisetin and radiation did not significantly suppress securin-null HCT116 tumor growth compared with normal HCT116 tumors. Therefore, the role of securin in mediating the effect of fisetin on colorectal cancer growth warrants further investigation. In conclusion, the results of the current study provide important preclinical data for evaluating the efficacy of fisetin and radiation combination treatment as an adjuvant chemoradiotherapy for human colorectal cancers.

  18. Increased Cerebral Tff1 Expression in Two Murine Models of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva B Znalesniak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF1 is a typical secretory product of the gastric mucosa and a very low level of expression occurs in nearly all regions of the murine brain. TFF1 possesses a lectin activity and binding to a plethora of transmembrane glycoproteins could explain the diverse biological effects of TFF1 (e.g., anti-apoptotic effect. It was the aim to test whether TFF expression is changed during neuroinflammation. Methods: Expression profiling was performed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses in two murine models of neuroinflammation, i.e. Toxoplasma gondii-induced encephalitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the latter being the most common animal model of multiple sclerosis. Tff1 expression was also localized using RNA in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results: We report for the first time on a significant transcriptional induction in cerebral Tff1 expression in both T. gondii-induced encephalitis and EAE. In contrast, Tff2 and Tff3 expression were not altered. Tff1 transcripts were predominantly localized in the internal granular layer of the cerebellum indicating neuronal expression. Furthermore, also glial cells are expected to express Tff1. Characterization of both experimental models by expression profiling (e.g., inflammasome sensors, inflammatory cytokines, microglial marker Iba1, ependymin related protein 1 revealed differences concerning the expression of the inflammasome sensor Nlrp1 and interleukin 17a. Conclusion: The up-regulated expression of Tff1 is probably the result of a complex inflammatory process as its expression is induced by tumor necrosis factor α as well as interleukins 1β and 17. However on the transcript level, Tff1KO mice did not show any significant signs of an altered immune response after infection with T. gondii in comparison with the wild type animals.

  19. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  20. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26, multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlAm*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlAm* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced

  1. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-01-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no [3H]hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of [3H]hypoxanthine to [3H]IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol

  2. [Virulence of Sporothrix globosa in murine models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Pérez Gaete, Salomón; Rodríguez Badilla, Valentina; Vieille Oyarzo, Peggy; Opazo Sanchez, Héctor

    The sporothricosis disease is an infection caused by species included in Sporothrix schenkii complex. Verify the virulence of a strain of S. globosa using two different concentrations of inoculum by intraperitoneally and subcutaneously, into a mouse model. Nonrandomized pilot study, in murine inoculated with a strain of S. globosa (CBS 14.076M) by intraperitoneally and subcutaneously with inoculum concentrations of 0.5 and 4 McFarland. For this purpose 18 rodents CF-1 (ISP, Santiago, Chile) were used. The studied strain did not induce illness or injury on animals, they all survived and neither the tissue culture nor the histopathological analysis showed fungal growth or suggestive infection by organ abnormalities. The S. globosa strain did not present any virulence enough to cause disease at 0.5 and 4.0 McFarland concentration inoculum when inoculated in both intraperitoneally and subcutaneously, in murine models. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiation-induced autologous in situ tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guha, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) has been used as a definitive treatment for many solid tumors. While tumoricidal properties of RT are instrumental for standard clinical application, irradiated tumors can potentially serve as a source of tumor antigens in vivo, where dying tumor cells would release tumor antigens and danger signals and serve as autologous in situ tumor vaccines. Using murine tumor models of prostate, metastatic lung cancer and melanoma, we have demonstrated evidence of radiation-enhanced tumor-specific immune response that resulted in improved primary tumor control and reduction in systemic metastasis and cure. We will discuss the immunogenic properties of RT and determine how immunotherapeutic approaches can synergize with RT in boosting immune cells cell function. (author)

  4. Newly Characterized Murine Undifferentiated Sarcoma Models Sensitive to Virotherapy with Oncolytic HSV-1 M002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Ring

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in conventional chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and radiation, outcomes for patients with relapsed, refractory, or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas are dismal. Survivors often suffer from lasting morbidity from current treatments. New targeted therapies with less toxicity, such as those that harness the immune system, and immunocompetent murine sarcoma models to test these therapies are greatly needed. We characterized two new serendipitous murine models of undifferentiated sarcoma (SARC-28 and SARC-45 and tested their sensitivity to virotherapy with oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1. Both models expressed high levels of the primary HSV entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111 and were susceptible to killing by interleukin-12 (IL-12 producing HSV-1 M002 in vitro and in vivo. M002 resulted in a significant intratumoral increase in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated monocytes, and a decrease in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in immunocompetent mice. Compared to parent virus R3659 (no IL-12 production, M002 resulted in higher CD8:MDSC and CD8:T regulatory cell (Treg ratios, suggesting that M002 creates a more favorable immune tumor microenvironment. These data provide support for clinical trials targeting sarcomas with oncolytic HSV-1. These models provide an exciting opportunity to explore combination therapies for soft tissue sarcomas that rely on an intact immune system to reach full therapeutic potential.

  5. DNA supercoiling in proliferating and quiescent 67 murine mammary tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran-Sandhu, L.; Warters, R.L.; Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    The nucleoid sedimentation assay, which is a measure of DNA ''compactness'' or supercoiling, was used to evaluate the supercoiling state of proliferating (P) and quiescent (Q) murine mammary tumor cells. Two day old cultures are referred to as P cells, whereas 7 day old cultures maintained without media replenishment are referred to as Q cells (>95% arrested in G/sub 1/). Q nucleoids sedimented significantly less far into neutral sucrose gradients than P nucleoids, suggesting a less compact DNA structure. This was further confirmed by the utilization of two other probes of DNA supercoiling: ionizing radiation and sedimentation through gradients containing the intercalator ethidium bromide (EtBr). Whereas nucleoids from P cells showed a decrease in sedimentation following ionizing radiation and an initial decrease, followed by an increase, in sedimentation through gradients containing increasing concentrations of EtBr, the sedimentation of nucleoids from Q cells did not change following either treatment. These data indicate that the DNA of nucleoids isolated from Q cells is in a ''relaxed'' state. The potential significance of these results is discussed

  6. Connexin 43 Gene Therapy Delivered by Polymer-Modified Salmonella in Murine Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kuang Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the most innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This method is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria are capable of selectively multiplying in tumors and inhibiting their growth. Previously, we found that the tumor-targeting efficiency of Salmonella could be modulated by modifying the immune response to these bacteria by coating them with poly(allylamine hydrochloride (PAH, and these organisms are designated PAH-S.C. (S. choleraesuis. PAH can provide a useful platform for the chemical modification of Salmonella, perhaps by allowing a therapeutic gene to bind to tumor-targeting Salmonella. This study aimed to investigate the benefits of the use of PAH-S.C. for gene delivery. To evaluate this modulation, the invasion activity and gene transfer of DNA-PAH-S.C. were measured in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with PAH-S.C. carrying a tumor suppressor gene (connexin 43 resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, which suggested that tumor-targeted gene therapy using PAH-S.C. carrying a therapeutic gene could exert antitumor activities. This technique represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.

  7. Antiangiogenic Effects of Noscapine Enhance Radioresponse for GL261 Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W.; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Alonso-Basanta, Michelle; Esencay, Min; Smirnova, Iva; Schnee, Tona; Shao Yongzhao; Devitt, Mary Louise; Zagzag, David; McBride, William; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the effects of noscapine, a tubulin-binding drug, in combination with radiation in a murine glioma model. Methods and Materials: The human T98G and murine GL261 glioma cell lines treated with noscapine, radiation, or both were assayed for clonogenic survival. Mice with established GL261 hind limb tumors were treated with noscapine, radiation, or both to evaluate the effect of noscapine on radioresponse. In a separate experiment with the same treatment groups, 7 days after radiation, tumors were resected and immunostained to measure proliferation rate, apoptosis, and angiogenic activity. Results: Noscapine reduced clonogenic survival without enhancement of radiosensitivity in vitro. Noscapine combined with radiation significantly increased tumor growth delay: 5, 8, 13, and 18 days for control, noscapine alone, radiation alone, and the combination treatment, respectively (p < 0.001). To assess the effect of the combination of noscapine plus radiation on the tumor vasculature, tubule formation by the murine endothelial 2H11 cells was tested. Noscapine with radiation significantly inhibited tubule formation compared with radiation alone. By immunohistochemistry, tumors treated with the combination of noscapine plus radiation showed a decrease in BrdU incorporation, an increase in apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling, and a decrease in tumor vessel density compared with tumors treated with radiation alone. Conclusion: Noscapine enhanced the sensitivity of GL261 glioma tumors to radiation, resulting in a significant tumor growth delay. An antiangiogenic mechanism contributed to the effect. These findings are clinically relevant, particularly in view of the mild toxicity profile of this drug

  8. A Novel Murine Model for Localized Radiation Necrosis and its Characterization Using Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost, Sarah C.; Hope, Andrew; Kiehl, Erich; Perry, Arie; Travers, Sarah; Garbow, Joel R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a murine model of radiation necrosis using fractionated, subtotal cranial irradiation; and to investigate the imaging signature of radiation-induced tissue damage using advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four mice each received 60 Gy of hemispheric (left) irradiation in 10 equal fractions. Magnetic resonance images at 4.7 T were subsequently collected using T1-, T2-, and diffusion sequences at selected time points after irradiation. After imaging, animals were killed and their brains fixed for correlative histologic analysis. Results: Contrast-enhanced T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance images at months 2, 3, and 4 showed changes consistent with progressive radiation necrosis. Quantitatively, mean diffusivity was significantly higher (mean = 0.86, 1.13, and 1.24 μm 2 /ms at 2, 3, and 4 months, respectively) in radiated brain, compared with contralateral untreated brain tissue (mean = 0.78, 0.82, and 0.83 μm 2 /ms) (p < 0.0001). Histology reflected changes typically seen in radiation necrosis. Conclusions: This murine model of radiation necrosis will facilitate investigation of imaging biomarkers that distinguish between radiation necrosis and tumor recurrence. In addition, this preclinical study supports clinical data suggesting that diffusion-weighted imaging may be helpful in answering this diagnostic question in clinical settings.

  9. Comparison of Adipose-Derived and Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in a Murine Model of Crohn's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Minghao; Qin, Huabo; Luo, Qianxin; He, Xiaosheng; He, Xiaowen; Lan, Ping; Lian, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been used in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD) because of the immunomodulatory ability. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of adipose-derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) and to compare the therapeutic effect of AD-MSCs with that of bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) in a murine model of CD. Murine colitis model of CD was created by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Twelve hours after treatment with TNBS, the mouse model was injected with MSCs intraperitoneally. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry staining were used to measure the expression levels of inflammatory cytokines in colonic tissues to investigate the therapeutic effect of AD-MSCs. The ten-day survival was recorded after infusion of MSCs. Intraperitoneal injection of MSCs alleviated the clinical and histopathologic severity of intestinal inflammation, and improved the survival of the TNBS-induced mouse model of CD. AD-MSCs could effectively increase the expression of interleukin-10 and reduce the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-12, and vascular endothelial growth factor. The mucosal injury was repaired by AD-MSCs. These effects were comparable between AD-MSCs and BM-MSCs. The therapeutic effect appears similar between AD-MSCs and BM-MSCs in treating CD. AD-MSCs may be a potential alternative of cell-based therapy for CD.

  10. The Role of Tumor Protein 53 Mutations in Common Human Cancers and Targeting the Murine Double Minute 2–P53 Interaction for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Hamzehloie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The gene TP53 (also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53, encoding transcription factor P53, is mutated or deleted in half of human cancers, demonstrating the crucial role of P53 in tumor suppression. There are reports of nearly 250 independent germ line TP53 mutations in over 100 publications. The P53 protein has the structure of a transcription factor and, is made up of several domains. The main function of P53 is to organize cell defense against cancerous transformation. P53 is a potent transcription factor that is activated in response to diverse stresses, leading to the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The P53 tumor suppressor is negatively regulated in cells by the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 protein. Murine double minute 2 favors its nuclear export, and stimulates its degradation. Inhibitors of the P53-MDM2 interaction might be attractive new anticancer agents that could be used to activate wild-type P53 in tumors. Down regulation of MDM2 using an small interfering RNA (siRNA approach has recently provided evidence for a new role of MDM2 in the P53 response, by modulating the inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2 by P21/WAF1 (also known as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 or CDK-interacting protein 1.

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition blocks M2 macrophage differentiation and suppresses metastasis in murine breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Rang Na

    Full Text Available Tumor cells are often associated with abundant macrophages that resemble the alternatively activated M2 subset. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs inhibit anti-tumor immune responses and promote metastasis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibition is known to prevent breast cancer metastasis. This study hypothesized that COX-2 inhibition affects TAM characteristics potentially relevant to tumor cell metastasis. We found that the specific COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, inhibited human M2 macrophage differentiation, as determined by decreased CD14 and CD163 expressions and increased TNFα production. Several key metastasis-related mediators, such as vascular endothelial growth factor-A, vascular endothelial growth factor-C, and matrix metalloproteinase-9, were inhibited in the presence of etodolac as compared to untreated M2 macrophages. Murine bone marrow derived M2 macrophages also showed enhanced surface MHCII IA/IE and CD80, CD86 expressions together with enhanced TNFα expressions with etodolac treatment during differentiation. Using a BALB/c breast cancer model, we found that etodolac significantly reduced lung metastasis, possibly due to macrophages expressing increased IA/IE and TNFα, but decreased M2 macrophage-related genes expressions (Ym1, TGFβ. In conclusion, COX-2 inhibition caused loss of the M2 macrophage characteristics of TAMs and may assist prevention of breast cancer metastasis.

  12. Murine model of long term obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A.; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of 3 murine models of obstructive jaundice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Results 70% (7/10) of tCL mice died by Day 7, whereas majority 67% (10/15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. 19% (3/16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond Day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 days after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by Day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension as well as severe fibrosis by Day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. Conclusion The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice but long term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. PMID:27916350

  13. Blocking Indolamine-2,3-Dioxygenase Rebound Immune Suppression Boosts Antitumor Effects of Radio-Immunotherapy in Murine Models and Spontaneous Canine Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjazeb, Arta M; Kent, Michael S; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Mall, Christine; Zamora, Anthony E; Mirsoian, Annie; Chen, Mingyi; Kol, Amir; Shiao, Stephen L; Reddy, Abhinav; Perks, Julian R; T N Culp, William; Sparger, Ellen E; Canter, Robert J; Sckisel, Gail D; Murphy, William J

    2016-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that intratumoral CpG immunotherapy in combination with radiotherapy acts as an in-situ vaccine inducing antitumor immune responses capable of eradicating systemic disease. Unfortunately, most patients fail to respond. We hypothesized that immunotherapy can paradoxically upregulate immunosuppressive pathways, a phenomenon we term "rebound immune suppression," limiting clinical responses. We further hypothesized that the immunosuppressive enzyme indolamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a mechanism of rebound immune suppression and that IDO blockade would improve immunotherapy efficacy. We examined the efficacy and immunologic effects of a novel triple therapy consisting of local radiotherapy, intratumoral CpG, and systemic IDO blockade in murine models and a pilot canine clinical trial. In murine models, we observed marked increase in intratumoral IDO expression after treatment with radiotherapy, CpG, or other immunotherapies. The addition of IDO blockade to radiotherapy + CpG decreased IDO activity, reduced tumor growth, and reduced immunosuppressive factors, such as regulatory T cells in the tumor microenvironment. This triple combination induced systemic antitumor effects, decreasing metastases, and improving survival in a CD8(+) T-cell-dependent manner. We evaluated this novel triple therapy in a canine clinical trial, because spontaneous canine malignancies closely reflect human cancer. Mirroring our mouse studies, the therapy was well tolerated, reduced intratumoral immunosuppression, and induced robust systemic antitumor effects. These results suggest that IDO maintains immune suppression in the tumor after therapy, and IDO blockade promotes a local antitumor immune response with systemic consequences. The efficacy and limited toxicity of this strategy are attractive for clinical translation. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4328-40. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Rosiglitazone inhibits metastasis development of a murine mammary tumor cell line LMM3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magenta, Gabriela; Borenstein, Ximena; Rolando, Romina; Jasnis, María Adela

    2008-01-01

    Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors γ (PPARγ) induces diverse effects on cancer cells. The thiazolidinediones (TZDs), such as troglitazone and ciglitazone, are PPARγ agonists exhibiting antitumor activities; however, the underlying mechanism remains inconclusive. Rosiglitazone (RGZ), a synthetic ligand of PPARγ used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes, inhibits growth of some tumor cells and is involved in other processes related to cancer progression. Opposing results have also been reported with different ligands on tumor cells. The purpose of this study was to determine if RGZ and 15d-PGJ 2 induce antitumor effects in vivo and in vitro on the murine mammary tumor cell line LMM3. The effect on LMM3 cell viability and nitric oxide (NO) production of different doses of RGZ, 15-dPGJ 2 , BADGE and GW9662 were determined using the MTS colorimetric assay and the Griess reaction respectively. In vivo effect of orally administration of RGZ on tumor progression was evaluated either on s.c. primary tumors as well as on experimental metastasis. Cell adhesion, migration (wound assay) and invasion in Transwells were performed. Metalloproteinase activity (MMP) was determined by zymography in conditioned media from RGZ treated tumor cells. PPARγ expression was detected by inmunohistochemistry in formalin fixed tumors and by western blot in tumor cell lysates. RGZ orally administered to tumor-bearing mice decreased the number of experimental lung metastases without affecting primary s.c. tumor growth. Tumor cell adhesion and migration, as well as metalloproteinase MMP-9 activity, decreased in the presence of 1 μM RGZ (non-cytotoxic dose). RGZ induced PPARγ protein expression in LMM3 tumors. Although metabolic activity -measured by MTS assay- diminished with 1–100 μM RGZ, 1 μM-treated cells recovered their proliferating capacity while 100 μM treated cells died. The PPARγ antagonist Biphenol A diglicydyl ether (BADGE) did not affect RGZ activity

  15. Multiple Delivery of siRNA against Endoglin into Murine Mammary Adenocarcinoma Prevents Angiogenesis and Delays Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolinsek, Tanja; Markelc, Bostjan; Sersa, Gregor; Coer, Andrej; Stimac, Monika; Lavrencak, Jaka; Brozic, Andreja; Kranjc, Simona; Cemazar, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Endoglin is a transforming growth factor-β (TGF- β) co-receptor that participates in the activation of a signaling pathway that mediates endothelial cell proliferation and migration in angiogenic tumor vasculature. Therefore, silencing of endoglin expression is an attractive approach for antiangiogenic therapy of tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules against endoglin in vitro and in vivo. Therapeutic potential in vitro was assessed in human and murine endothelial cells (HMEC-1, 2H11) by determining endoglin expression level, cell proliferation and tube formation. In vivo, the therapeutic potential of siRNA molecules was evaluated in TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma growing in BALB/c mice. Results of our study showed that siRNA molecules against endoglin have a good antiangiogenic therapeutic potential in vitro, as expression of endoglin mRNA and protein levels in mouse and human microvascular endothelial cells after lipofection were efficiently reduced, which resulted in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. In vivo, silencing of endoglin with triple electrotransfer of siRNA molecules into TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma also significantly reduced the mRNA levels, number of tumor blood vessels and the growth of tumors. The obtained results demonstrate that silencing of endoglin is a promising antiangiogenic therapy of tumors that could not be used as single treatment, but as an adjunct to the established cytotoxic treatment approaches. PMID:23593103

  16. Multiple delivery of siRNA against endoglin into murine mammary adenocarcinoma prevents angiogenesis and delays tumor growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Dolinsek

    Full Text Available Endoglin is a transforming growth factor-β (TGF- β co-receptor that participates in the activation of a signaling pathway that mediates endothelial cell proliferation and migration in angiogenic tumor vasculature. Therefore, silencing of endoglin expression is an attractive approach for antiangiogenic therapy of tumors. The aim of our study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules against endoglin in vitro and in vivo. Therapeutic potential in vitro was assessed in human and murine endothelial cells (HMEC-1, 2H11 by determining endoglin expression level, cell proliferation and tube formation. In vivo, the therapeutic potential of siRNA molecules was evaluated in TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma growing in BALB/c mice. Results of our study showed that siRNA molecules against endoglin have a good antiangiogenic therapeutic potential in vitro, as expression of endoglin mRNA and protein levels in mouse and human microvascular endothelial cells after lipofection were efficiently reduced, which resulted in the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation. In vivo, silencing of endoglin with triple electrotransfer of siRNA molecules into TS/A mammary adenocarcinoma also significantly reduced the mRNA levels, number of tumor blood vessels and the growth of tumors. The obtained results demonstrate that silencing of endoglin is a promising antiangiogenic therapy of tumors that could not be used as single treatment, but as an adjunct to the established cytotoxic treatment approaches.

  17. Cytotoxic and toxicological effects of phthalimide derivatives on tumor and normal murine cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO MICHEL PINHEIRO FERREIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Eleven phthalimide derivatives were evaluated with regards to their antiproliferative activity on tumor and normal cells and possible toxic effects. Cytotoxic analyses were performed against murine tumors (Sarcoma 180 and B-16/F-10 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using MTT and Alamar Blue assays. Following, the investigation of cytotoxicity was executed by flow cytometry analysis and antitumoral and toxicological potential by in vivo techniques. The molecules 3b, 3c, 4 and 5 revealed in vitro cytotoxicity against Sarcoma 180, B-16/F-10 and PBMC. Since compound 4 was the most effective derivative, it was chosen to detail the mechanism of action after 24, 48 and 72 h exposure (22.5 and 45 µM. Sarcoma 180 cells treated with compound 4 showed membrane disruption, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in a time- and dose-dependent way. Compounds 3c, 4 and 5 (50 mg/kg/day did not inhibit in vivotumor growth. Compound 4-treated animals exhibited an increase in total leukocytes, lymphocytes and spleen relative weight, a decreasing in neutrophils and hyperplasia of spleen white pulp. Treated animals presented reversible histological changes. Molecule 4 had in vitro antiproliferative action possibly triggered by apoptosis, reversible toxic effects on kidneys, spleen and livers and exhibited immunostimulant properties that can be explored to attack neoplasic cells.

  18. Human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes express a distinct RNA profile compared to human control and murine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Arora, Sonali; de Witte, Lot; Ulas, Thomas; Markovic, Darko; Schultze, Joachim L; Holland, Eric C; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. It is strongly infiltrated by microglia and peripheral monocytes that support tumor growth. In the present study we used RNA sequencing to compare the expression profile of CD11b(+) human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes (hGAMs) to CD11b(+) microglia isolated from non-tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis showed a clear separation of the two sample groups and we identified 334 significantly regulated genes in hGAMs. In comparison to human control microglia hGAMs upregulated genes associated with mitotic cell cycle, cell migration, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix organization. We validated the expression of several genes associated with extracellular matrix organization in samples of human control microglia, hGAMs, and the hGAMs-depleted fraction via qPCR. The comparison to murine GAMs (mGAMs) showed that both cell populations share a significant fraction of upregulated transcripts compared with their respective controls. These genes were mostly related to mitotic cell cycle. However, in contrast to murine cells, human GAMs did not upregulate genes associated to immune activation. Comparison of human and murine GAMs expression data to several data sets of in vitro-activated human macrophages and murine microglia showed that, in contrast to mGAMs, hGAMs share a smaller overlap to these data sets in general and in particular to cells activated by proinflammatory stimulation with LPS + INFγ or TNFα. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes and give detailed information about the validity of murine experimental models. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1416-1436. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Murine model of long-term obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of three murine models of obstructive jaundice. C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Overall, 70% (7 of 10) of tCL mice died by day 7, whereas majority 67% (10 of 15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. A total of 19% (3 of 16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 d after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension and severe fibrosis by day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice, but long-term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Murine mammary tumor virus pol-related sequences in human DNA: characterization and sequence comparison with the complete murine mammary tumor virus pol gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deen, K.C.; Sweet, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Sequences in the human genome with homology to the murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) pol gene were isolated from a human phage library. Ten clones with extensive pol homology were shown to define five separate loci. These loci share common sequences immediately adjacent to the pol-like segments and, in addition, contain a related repeat element which bounds this region. This organization is suggestive of a proviral structure. The authors estimate that the human genome contains 30 to 40 copies of these pol-related sequences. The pol region of one of the cloned segments (HM16) and the complete MMTV pol gene were sequenced and compared. The nucleotide homology between these pol sequences is 52% and is concentrated in the terminal regions. The MMTV pol gene contains a single long open reading frame encoding 899 amino acids and is demarcated from the partially overlapping putative gag gene by termination codons and a shift in translational reading frame. The pol sequence of HM16 is multiply terminated but does contain open reading frames which encode 370, 105, and 112 amino acids residues in separate reading frames. The authors deduced a composite pol protein sequence for HM16 by aligning it to the MMTV pol gene and then compared these sequences with other retroviral pol protein sequences. Conserved sequences occur in both the amino and carboxyl regions which lie within the polymerase and endonuclease domains of pol, respectively

  1. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  2. Characterization of the murine orthotopic adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma PDX model by MRI in correlation with histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölsken, Annett; Schwarz, Marc; Gillmann, Clarissa; Pfister, Christina; Uder, Michael; Doerfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Schlaffer, Sven; Fahlbusch, Rudolf; Buslei, Rolf; Bäuerle, Tobias

    2018-01-01

    Adamantinomatous craniopharyngiomas (ACP) as benign sellar brain tumors are challenging to treat. In order to develop robust in vivo drug testing methodology, the murine orthotopic craniopharyngioma model (PDX) was characterized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology in xenografts from three patients (ACP1-3). In ACP PDX, multiparametric MRI was conducted to assess morphologic characteristics such as contrast-enhancing tumor volume (CETV) as well as functional parameters from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) including area-under-the-curve (AUC), peak enhancement (PE), time-to-peak (TTP) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). These MRI parameters evaluated in 27 ACP PDX were correlated to histological features and percentage of vital tumor cell content. Qualitative analysis of MRI and histology from PDX revealed a similar phenotype as seen in patients, although the MRI appearance in mice resulted in a more solid tumor growth than in humans. CETV were significantly higher in ACP2 xenografts relative to ACP1 and ACP3 which correspond to respective average vitality of 41%, <10% and 26% determined histologically. Importantly, CETV prove tumor growth of ACP2 PDX as it significantly increases in longitudinal follow-up of 110 days. Furthermore, xenografts from ACP2 revealed a significantly higher AUC, PE and TTP in comparison to ACP3, and significantly increased ADC relative to ACP1 and ACP3 respectively. Overall, DCE-MRI and DWI can be used to distinguish vital from non-vital grafts, when using a cut off value of 15% for vital tumor cell content. MRI enables the assessment of craniopharyngioma PDX vitality in vivo as validated histologically.

  3. Definitive Management of Oligometastatic Melanoma in a Murine Model Using Combined Ablative Radiation Therapy and Viral Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Miran [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shim, Kevin G. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Grams, Michael P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Rajani, Karishma; Diaz, Rosa M. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Furutani, Keith M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Thompson, Jill [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R.; Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Markovic, Svetomir N. [Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pandha, Hardev [The Postgraduate Medical School, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Melcher, Alan [Leeds Institute of Cancer Studies and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin [Targeted Therapy Laboratory, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Shane [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Targeted Therapy Laboratory, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Vile, Richard, E-mail: vile.richard@mayo.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Leeds Institute of Cancer Studies and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: The oligometastatic state is an intermediate state between a malignancy that can be completely eradicated with conventional modalities and one in which a palliative approach is undertaken. Clinically, high rates of local tumor control are possible with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), using precisely targeted, high-dose, low-fraction radiation therapy. However, in oligometastatic melanoma, virtually all patients develop progression systemically at sites not initially treated with ablative radiation therapy that cannot be managed with conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy. We have demonstrated in mice that intravenous administration of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generates systemic immune responses capable of clearing established tumors. Therefore, in the present preclinical study, we tested whether the combination of systemic VSV-mediated antigen delivery and SABR would be effective against oligometastatic disease. Methods and Materials: We generated a model of oligometastatic melanoma in C57BL/6 immunocompetent mice and then used a combination of SABR and systemically administered VSV-TAA viral immunotherapy to treat both local and systemic disease. Results: Our data showed that SABR generates excellent control or cure of local, clinically detectable, and accessible tumor through direct cell ablation. Also, the immunotherapeutic activity of systemically administered VSV-TAA generated T-cell responses that cleared subclinical metastatic tumors. We also showed that SABR induced weak T-cell-mediated tumor responses, which, particularly if boosted by VSV-TAA, might contribute to control of local and systemic disease. In addition, VSV-TAA therapy alone had significant effects on control of both local and metastatic tumors. Conclusions: We have shown in the present preliminary murine study using a single tumor model that this approach represents an effective, complementary

  4. Definitive Management of Oligometastatic Melanoma in a Murine Model Using Combined Ablative Radiation Therapy and Viral Immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, Miran; Shim, Kevin G.; Grams, Michael P.; Rajani, Karishma; Diaz, Rosa M.; Furutani, Keith M.; Thompson, Jill; Olivier, Kenneth R.; Park, Sean S.; Markovic, Svetomir N.; Pandha, Hardev; Melcher, Alan; Harrington, Kevin; Zaidi, Shane; Vile, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The oligometastatic state is an intermediate state between a malignancy that can be completely eradicated with conventional modalities and one in which a palliative approach is undertaken. Clinically, high rates of local tumor control are possible with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), using precisely targeted, high-dose, low-fraction radiation therapy. However, in oligometastatic melanoma, virtually all patients develop progression systemically at sites not initially treated with ablative radiation therapy that cannot be managed with conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy. We have demonstrated in mice that intravenous administration of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generates systemic immune responses capable of clearing established tumors. Therefore, in the present preclinical study, we tested whether the combination of systemic VSV-mediated antigen delivery and SABR would be effective against oligometastatic disease. Methods and Materials: We generated a model of oligometastatic melanoma in C57BL/6 immunocompetent mice and then used a combination of SABR and systemically administered VSV-TAA viral immunotherapy to treat both local and systemic disease. Results: Our data showed that SABR generates excellent control or cure of local, clinically detectable, and accessible tumor through direct cell ablation. Also, the immunotherapeutic activity of systemically administered VSV-TAA generated T-cell responses that cleared subclinical metastatic tumors. We also showed that SABR induced weak T-cell-mediated tumor responses, which, particularly if boosted by VSV-TAA, might contribute to control of local and systemic disease. In addition, VSV-TAA therapy alone had significant effects on control of both local and metastatic tumors. Conclusions: We have shown in the present preliminary murine study using a single tumor model that this approach represents an effective, complementary

  5. 3D tumor tissue analogs and their orthotopic implants for understanding tumor-targeting of microenvironment-responsive nanosized chemotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; Swindell, Elden P; Chan, Ryan; Langner, Ulrich W; Feddock, Jonathan M; Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-11-01

    An appropriate representation of the tumor microenvironment in tumor models can have a pronounced impact on directing combinatorial treatment strategies and cancer nanotherapeutics. The present study develops a novel 3D co-culture spheroid model (3D TNBC) incorporating tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts as color-coded murine tumor tissue analogs (TTA) to better represent the tumor milieu of triple negative breast cancer in vitro. Implantation of TTA orthotopically in nude mice, resulted in enhanced growth and aggressive metastasis to ectopic sites. Subsequently, the utility of the model is demonstrated for preferential targeting of irradiated tumor endothelial cells via radiation-induced stromal enrichment of galectin-1 using anginex conjugated nanoparticles (nanobins) carrying arsenic trioxide and cisplatin. Demonstration of a multimodal nanotherapeutic system and inclusion of the biological response to radiation using an in vitro/in vivo tumor model incorporating characteristics of tumor microenvironment presents an advance in preclinical evaluation of existing and novel cancer nanotherapies. Existing in-vivo tumor models are established by implanting tumor cells into nude mice. Here, the authors described their approach 3D spheres containing tumor cells, enodothelial cells and fibroblasts. This would mimic tumor micro-environment more realistically. This interesting 3D model should reflect more accurately tumor response to various drugs and would enable the design of new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The histopathology of a human mesenchymal stem cell experimental tumor model: support for an hMSC origin for Ewing's sarcoma?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, J S; Abdallah, B M; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2008-01-01

    -forming potential of early passage hMSC-TERT20 cells, tumors derived from late passage cells expressed early biomarkers of osteogenesis. However, hMSC-TERT20 cells were heterogeneous for alpha smooth muscle actin (ASMA) expression and one out of six hMSC-TERT20 derived single cell clones was strongly ASMA positive....... Tumors from this ASMA+ clone had distinctive vascular qualities with hot spots of high CD34+ murine endothelial cell density, together with CD34- regions with a branching periodic acid Schiff reaction pattern. Such clone-specific differences in host vascular response provide novel models to explore...

  7. A novel murine model for evaluating bovine papillomavirus prophylactics/therapeutics for equine sarcoid-like tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Lies; Woodham, Andrew W; Da Silva, Diane M; Martens, Ann; Meyer, Evelyne; Kast, W Martin

    2015-09-01

    Equine sarcoids are highly recurrent bovine papillomavirus (BPV)-induced fibroblastic neoplasms that are the most common skin tumours in horses. In order to facilitate the study of potential equine sarcoid prophylactics or therapeutics, which can be a slow and costly process in equines, a murine model for BPV-1 protein-expressing equine sarcoid-like tumours was developed in mice through stable transfection of BPV-1 E5 and E6 in a murine fibroblast tumour cell line (K-BALB). Like equine sarcoids, these murine tumour cells (BPV-KB) were of fibroblast origin, were tumorigenic and expressed BPV-1 proteins. As an initial investigation of the preclinical potential of this tumour model for equine sarcoids prophylactics, mice were immunized with BPV-1 E5E6 Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles, prior to BPV-KB challenge, which resulted in an increased tumour-free period compared with controls, indicating that the BPV-KB murine model may be a valuable preclinical alternative to equine clinical trials.

  8. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  9. 4-1BB Aptamer-Based Immunomodulation Enhances the Therapeutic Index of Radiation Therapy in Murine Tumor Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benaduce, Ana Paula; Brenneman, Randall; Schrand, Brett; Pollack, Alan; Gilboa, Eli; Ishkanian, Adrian, E-mail: aishkanian@med.miami.edu

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To report a novel strategy using oligonucleotide aptamers to 4-1BB as an alternate method for costimulation, and show that combinatorial therapy with radiation improves the therapeutic ratio over equivalent monoclonal antibodies. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous 4T1 (mouse mammary carcinoma) tumors were established (approximately 100 mm{sup 3}), and a radiation therapy (RT) dose/fractionation schedule that optimally synergizes with 4-1BB monoclonal antibody (mAb) was identified. Comparable tumor control and animal survival was observed when either 4-1BB antibody or aptamer were combined with RT using models of breast cancer and melanoma (4T1 and B16-F10). Off-target CD8{sup +} T-cell toxicity was evaluated by quantification of CD8{sup +} T cells in livers and spleens of treated animals. Results: When combined with 4-1BB mAb, significant differences in tumor control were observed by varying RT dose and fractionation schedules. Optimal synergy between RT and 4-1BB mAb was observed at 5 Gy × 6. Testing 4-1BB mAb and aptamer independently using the optimal RT (5 Gy × 6 for 4T1/Balb/c and 12 Gy × 1 for B16/C57BL6J mouse models) revealed equivalent tumor control using 4-1BB aptamer and 4-1BB mAb. 4-1BB mAb, but not 4-1BB aptamer-treated animals, exhibited increased lymphocytic liver infiltrates and increased splenic and liver CD8{sup +} T cells. Conclusions: Radiation therapy synergizes with 4-1BB mAb, and this effect is dependent on RT dose and fractionation. Tumor control by 4-1BB aptamer is equivalent to 4-1BB mAb when combined with optimal RT dose, without eliciting off-target liver and spleen CD8{sup +} expansion. 4-1BB aptamer-based costimulation affords a comparable and less toxic strategy to augment RT-mediated tumor control.

  10. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Ching [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong [Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lai, Kuang-Chi [Department of Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin 651, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min [Department of Pathology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tin-Yun [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Hsiang, Chien-Yun, E-mail: cyhsiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chung, Jing-Gung, E-mail: jgchung@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  11. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  12. Protective effects of astaxanthin from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on murine gastric ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenta; Oyagi, Atsushi; Takahira, Dai; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishibashi, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin extracted from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on gastric mucosal damage in murine gastric ulcer models. Mice were pretreated with astaxanthin for 1 h before ulcer induction. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by oral administration of hydrochloride (HCl)/ethanol or acidified aspirin. The effect of astaxanthin on lipid peroxidation in murine stomach homogenates was also evaluated by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The free radical scavenging activities of astaxanthin were also measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Astaxanthin significantly decreased the extent of HCl/ethanol- and acidified aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. Astaxanthin also decreased the level of TBARS. The ESR measurement showed that astaxanthin had radical scavenging activities against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and the superoxide anion radical. These results suggest that astaxanthin has antioxidant properties and exerts a protective effect against ulcer formation in murine models. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Intra-adrenal murine TH-MYCN neuroblastoma tumors grow more aggressive and exhibit a distinct tumor microenvironment relative to their subcutaneous equivalents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroesen, Michiel; Brok, Ingrid C; Reijnen, Daphne; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Den Brok, Martijn H; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-05-01

    In around half of the patients with neuroblastoma (NBL), the primary tumor is located in one of the adrenal glands. We have previously reported on a transplantable TH-MYCN model of subcutaneous (SC) growing NBL in C57Bl/6 mice for immunological studies. In this report, we describe an orthotopic TH-MYCN transplantable model where the tumor cells were injected intra-adrenally (IA) by microsurgery. Strikingly, 9464D cells grew out much faster in IA tumors compared to the subcutis. Tumors were infiltrated by equal numbers of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Within the myeloid cell population, however, tumor-infiltrating macrophages were more abundant in IA tumors compared to SC tumors and expressed lower levels of MHC class II, indicative of a more immunosuppressive phenotype. Using 9464D cells stably expressing firefly luciferase, enhanced IA tumor growth could be confirmed using bioluminescence. Collectively, these data show that the orthotopic IA localization of TH-MYCN cells impacts the NBL tumor microenvironment, resulting in a more stringent NBL model to study novel immunotherapeutic approaches for NBL.

  14. [Modern biomaterials as hemostatic dressings in kidney nephron sparing surgery (NSS)--murine model. A preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Maciej; Jundziłł, Arkadiusz; Bieniek, Miłosz; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Kloskowski, Tomasz; Drewa, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Kidney cancer is now days, one of the main problems in oncological urology. More frequent cases detection of this type of cancer and the implementation of modern methods of treatment, involves the public and good diagnostic radiological imaging methods. Approximately 40% of renal tumors are detected clinically as a changes in T1N0M0 stage. This means that in these patients, surgery can be performed using the method of nephron sparing surgery (NSS), far from consisting the implementation of radical nephrectomy. Unfortunately, despite the saving nature of this type of treatment, NSS methods are associated with local recurrence of tumor formation. Another problem is intra operative bleeding, that's why in order to stop this negative process surgeons currently use hemostatic dressings. Potentially and clinically significant solution could be a combination of this two main problematics points of concern, through the use of modern biomaterials coated on oncostatic substances as a haemostatic dressings, to the prevention of tumor recurrence. The aim of this work, was to present preliminary report of the use of advanced biomaterials, as haemostatic dressings in an experimental technique of nephron sparing surgery on an murine model. In the experiment we use two types of biomaterials and the standard haemostatic dressing used in the nephron sparing surgery (NSS) as a control. We use a polycaprolactone biomaterial obtained by electrospinning. As a second type of biomaterial, we use a homogeneous material with a structure similar to wool, also obtained from medical polycaprolactone by electrospinning. As an murine (in vivo) model in the study, we use 10 C57BL/J mice (with the local ethical committee permission). 8 mice were used in the present study, 2 mice were constituted as a separate control for obtaining the bleeding data. Kidney melanoma cells were implanted under the C57B1/J B16 mouse kidney fibrous capsule, one week before NSS. After 3 weeks the animals were

  15. Development of a Method to Implement Whole-Genome Bisulfite Sequencing of cfDNA from Cancer Patients and a Mouse Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C. Maggi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a method for whole genome cell-free DNA (cfDNA methylation analysis in humans and mice with the ultimate goal to facilitate the identification of tumor derived DNA methylation changes in the blood. Plasma or serum from patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors or lung cancer, and plasma from a murine model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma was used to develop a protocol for cfDNA isolation, library preparation and whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of ultra low quantities of cfDNA, including tumor-specific DNA. The protocol developed produced high quality libraries consistently generating a conversion rate >98% that will be applicable for the analysis of human and mouse plasma or serum to detect tumor-derived changes in DNA methylation.

  16. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; He, Zhengxiang; Qin, Li; Li, Qinyan; Shi, Xibao; Zhao, Siting; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL) staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+) T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria parasite may provide a novel strategy or therapeutic vaccine vector for anti-lung cancer

  17. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+ T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria

  18. A bioavailable cathepsin S nitrile inhibitor abrogates tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Richard D A; Young, Andrew; Burden, Roberta E; Williams, Rich; Scott, Christopher J

    2016-04-21

    Cathepsin S has been implicated in a variety of malignancies with genetic ablation studies demonstrating a key role in tumor invasion and neo-angiogenesis. Thus, the application of cathepsin S inhibitors may have clinical utility in the treatment of cancer. In this investigation, we applied a cell-permeable dipeptidyl nitrile inhibitor of cathepsin S, originally developed to target cathepsin S in inflammatory diseases, in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models. Validation of cathepsin S selectivity was carried out by assaying fluorogenic substrate turnover using recombinant cathepsin protease. Complete kinetic analysis was carried out and true K i values calculated. Abrogation of tumour invasion using murine MC38 and human MCF7 cell lines were carried out in vitro using a transwell migration assay. Effect on endothelial tube formation was evaluated using primary HUVEC cells. The effect of inhibitor in vivo on MC38 and MCF7 tumor progression was evaluated using cells propagated in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice respectively. Subsequent immunohistochemical staining of proliferation (Ki67) and apoptosis (TUNEL) was carried out on MCF7 tumors. We confirmed that this inhibitor was able to selectively target cathepsin S over family members K, V, L and B. The inhibitor also significantly reduced MC38 and MCF7 cell invasion and furthermore, significantly reduced HUVEC endothelial tubule formation in vitro. In vivo analysis revealed that the compound could significantly reduce tumor volume in murine MC38 syngeneic and MCF7 xenograft models. Immunohistochemical analysis of MCF7 tumors revealed cathepsin S inhibitor treatment significantly reduced proliferation and increased apoptosis. In summary, these results highlight the characterisation of this nitrile cathepsin S inhibitor using in vitro and in vivo tumor models, presenting a compound which may be used to further dissect the role of cathepsin S in cancer progression and may hold therapeutic potential.

  19. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  20. Tumor cell-derived microparticles polarize M2 tumor-associated macrophages for tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Degao; Dong, Wenqian; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Ma, Jingwei; Liang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Yi; Shen, Guanxin; Qin, Xiaofeng; Huang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Despite identification of macrophages in tumors (tumor-associated macrophages, TAM) as potential targets for cancer therapy, the origin and function of TAM in the context of malignancy remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that microparticles (MPs), as a by-product, released by tumor cells act as a general mechanism to mediate M2 polarization of TAM. Taking up tumor MPs by macrophages is a very efficient process, which in turn results in the polarization of macrophages into M2 type, not only leading to promoting tumor growth and metastasis but also facilitating cancer stem cell development. Moreover, we demonstrate that the underlying mechanism involves the activation of the cGAS/STING/TBK1/STAT6 pathway by tumor MPs. Finally, in addition to murine tumor MPs, we show that human counterparts also possess consistent effect on human M2 polarization. These findings provide new insights into a critical role of tumor MPs in remodeling of tumor microenvironment and better understanding of the communications between tumors and macrophages.

  1. Synergistic anti-tumor effects of melatonin and PUFAs from walnuts in a murine mammary adenocarcinoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Carolina P; Lamarque, Alicia L; Comba, Andrea; Berra, María A; Silva, Renata A; Labuckas, Diana O; Das, Undurti N; Eynard, Aldo R; Pasqualini, Maria E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of some polyunsaturated fatty acids plus phytomelatonin from walnuts in the development of mammary gland adenocarcinoma. BALB/c mice were fed a semisynthetic diet supplemented with either 6% walnut oil and 8% walnut flour containing phytomelatonin (walnut diet: WD); or 6% corn oil plus commercial melatonin (melatonin diet: MD), or the control group (CD), which received only 6% of corn oil. Membrane fatty acids of tumor cells (TCs) were analyzed by gas liquid chromatography, cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) derivatives, and plasma melatonin by high-performance liquid chromatography; apoptosis and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes by flow cytometry. TCs from the MD and WD mice showed significant decreases in linoleic acid compared with the CD group (P < 0.05). Significantly lower levels of LOX-[13(S)-HODE] were found in TCs from the MD and WD group than in CD (P < 0.0001). COX-[12(S)-HHT] was lower and 12 LOX-[12(S)-HETE] was higher in TCs from the MD group than form the WD and CD arms (P < 0.05). Plasma melatonin, apoptosis, tumor infiltration, and survival time were significantly lower in CD mice than in MD and WD mice (P < 0.05). This study shows that melatonin, along with polyunsaturated fatty acids, exerts a selective inhibition of some COX and LOX activities and has a synergistic anti-tumor effect on a mammary gland adenocarcinoma model. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Exosome derived from epigallocatechin gallate treated breast cancer cells suppresses tumor growth by inhibiting tumor-associated macrophage infiltration and M2 polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Ji-Young; Lee, Jong-Kuen; Jeon, Yoon-Kyung; Kim, Chul-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play an important role in tumor microenvironment. Particularly, M2 macrophages contribute to tumor progression, depending on the expression of NF-κB. Tumor-derived exosomes can modulate tumor microenvironment by transferring miRNAs to immune cells. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) has well known anti-tumor effects; however, no data are available on the influence of EGCG on communication with cancer cells and TAM. Murine breast cancer cell lines, 4T1, was used for in vivo and ex vivo studies. Exosome was extracted from EGCG-treated 4T1 cells, and the change of miRNAs was screened using microarray. Tumor cells or TAM isolated from murine tumor graft were incubated with exosomes derived from EGCG-treated and/or miR-16 inhibitor-transfected 4T1 cells. Chemokines for monocytes (CSF-1 and CCL-2), cytokines both with high (IL-6 and TGF-β) and low (TNF-α) expression in M2 macrophages, and molecules in NF-κB pathway (IKKα and Iκ-B) were evaluated by RT-qPCR or western blot. EGCG suppressed tumor growth in murine breast cancer model, which was associated with decreased TAM and M2 macrophage infiltration. Expression of chemokine for monocytes (CSF-1 and CCL-2) were low in tumor cells from EGCG-treated mice, and cytokines of TAM was skewed from M2- into M1-like phenotype by EGCG as evidenced by decreased IL-6 and TGF-β and increased TNF-α. Ex vivo incubation of isolated tumor cells with EGCG inhibited the CSF-1 and CCL-2 expression. Ex vivo incubation of TAM with exosomes from EGCG-treated 4T1 cells led to IKKα suppression and concomitant I-κB accumulation; increase of IL-6 and TGF-β; and, decrease of TNF-α. EGCG up-regulated miR-16 in 4T1 cells and in the exosomes. Treatment of tumor cells or TAM with exosomes derived from EGCG-treated and miR-16-knock-downed 4T1 cells restored the above effects on chemokines, cytokines, and NF-κB pathway elicited by EGCG-treated exosomes. Our data demonstrate that EGCG up-regulates miR-16 in

  3. [Evaluation of Fusarium spp. pathogenicity in plant and murine models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Reyes, Consuelo M; Alvarado-Fernández, Angela M; Ceballos-Rojas, Ana M; González-Carmona, Lady C; Linares-Linares, Melva Y; Castañeda-Salazar, Rubiela; Pulido-Villamarín, Adriana; Góngora-Medina, Manuel E; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús A; Rodríguez-Bocanegra, María X

    The genus Fusarium is widely recognized for its phytopathogenic capacity. However, it has been reported as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Thus, it can be considered a microorganism of interest in pathogenicity studies on different hosts. Therefore, this work evaluated the pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. isolates from different origins in plants and animals (murine hosts). Twelve isolates of Fusarium spp. from plants, animal superficial mycoses, and human superficial and systemic mycoses were inoculated in tomato, passion fruit and carnation plants, and in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed BALB/c mice. Pathogenicity tests in plants did not show all the symptoms associated with vascular wilt in the three plant models; however, colonization and necrosis of the vascular bundles, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates, showed the infective potential of Fusarium spp. in different plant species. Moreover, the pathogenicity tests in the murine model revealed behavioral changes. It was noteworthy that only five isolates (different origin and species) caused mortality. Additionally, it was observed that all isolates infected and colonized different organs, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates or host immune status. In contrast, the superficial inoculation test showed no evidence of epidermal injury or colonization. The observed results in plant and murine models suggest the pathogenic potential of Fusarium spp. isolates in different types of hosts. However, further studies on pathogenicity are needed to confirm the multihost capacity of this genus. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yigang; Tang Yamei; Liu Jun; Sun Ying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy. Methods: A total of 40 rats were subjected to local γ-irradiation to the brain with the dosage of 7 Gy/d for 6 consecutive days. The amount of food intake, hairs and skin of irradiated field, body weight, general activities, CNS symptoms and signs were examined and recorded after irradiation. On day 3, 7, 14 and 30, the brain tissue was removed to observe histopathologic changes. Results: During the first two days after irradiation, the irradiated rats were agitated, and the amount of food intake decreased from day 2 onwards. No serious skin reaction to irradiation was observed. Survived rats had normal activities without any abnormal nervous signs. Histopathologic changes showed slight neuronal degeneration, smaller cell body, red-colored cytoplasm, disappearance of Nissl body, vacuolation, typical cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear divergence. On the 14th and 30th days, hypochromatism, loose and reticular necrotic foci were found in some samples. Conclusion: The murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy is useful and practical in radiobiological studies

  5. Carbogen Breathing Differentially Enhances Blood Plasma Volume and 5-Fluorouracil Uptake in Two Murine Colon Tumor Models with a Distinct Vascular Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke W.M. van Laarhoven

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available For the systemic treatment of colorectal cancer, 5-fluorouracil (FU-based chemotherapy is the standard. However, only a subset of patients responds to chemotherapy. Breathing of carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2 may increase the uptake of FU through changes in tumor physiology. This study aims to monitor in animal models in vivo the effects of carbogen breathing on tumor blood plasma volume, pH, and energy status, and on FU uptake and metabolism in two colon tumor models C38 and C26a, which differ in their vascular structure and hypoxic status. Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS was used to assess tumor pH and energy status, and fluorine-19 MRS was used to follow FU uptake and metabolism. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods using ultrasmall particles of iron oxide were performed to assess blood plasma volume. The results showed that carbogen breathing significantly decreased extracellular pH and increased tumor blood plasma volume and FU uptake in tumors. These effects were most significant in the C38 tumor line, which has the largest relative vascular area. In the C26a tumor line, carbogen breathing increased tumor growth delay by FU. In this study, carbogen breathing also enhanced systemic toxicity by FU.

  6. Cloning and Characterization of the Genes Encoding the Murine Homologues of the Human Melanoma Antigens MART1 and gp100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yifan; Yang, James C.; Spiess, Paul; Nishimura, Michael I.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Roberts, Bruce; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    The recent identification of genes encoding melanoma-associated antigens has opened new possibilities for the development of cancer vaccines designed to cause the rejection of established tumors. To develop a syngeneic animal model for evaluating antigen-specific vaccines in cancer therapy, the murine homologues of the human melanoma antigens MART1 and gp 100, which were specifically recognized by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes from patients with melanoma, were cloned and sequenced from a murine B16 melanoma cDNA library. The open reading frames of murine MART1 and gp 100 encode proteins of 113- and 626-amino acids with 68.8 and 77% identity to the respective human proteins. Comparison of the DNA sequences of the murine MART1 genes, derived from normal melanocytes, the immortalized nontumorgenic melanocyte line Melan-a and the B16 melanoma, showed all to be identical. Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed that both genes encoded products that were melanocyte lineage proteins. Mice immunized with murine MART1 or gp 100 using recombinant vaccinia virus failed to produce any detectable T-cell responses or protective immunity against B16 melanoma. In contrast, immunization of mice with human gp 100 using recombinant adenoviruses elicited T cells specific for hgp100, but these T cells also cross reacted with B16 tumor in vitro and induced significant but weak protection against B16 challenge. Immunization with human and mouse gp100 together [adenovirus type 2 (Ad2)-hep100 plus recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV)-mgp100], or immunization with human gp100 (Ad2-hgp100) and boosting with heterologous vector (rVV-hgp100 or rVV-mgp100) or homologous vector (Ad2-hgp100), did not significantly enhance the protective response against B16 melanoma. These results may suggest that immunization with heterologous tumor antigen, rather than self, may be more effective as an immunotherapeutic reagent in designing antigen-specific cancer vaccines. PMID:9101410

  7. M402, a novel heparan sulfate mimetic, targets multiple pathways implicated in tumor progression and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Zhou

    Full Text Available Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs play a key role in shaping the tumor microenvironment by presenting growth factors, cytokines, and other soluble factors that are critical for host cell recruitment and activation, as well as promoting tumor progression, metastasis, and survival. M402 is a rationally engineered, non-cytotoxic heparan sulfate (HS mimetic, designed to inhibit multiple factors implicated in tumor-host cell interactions, including VEGF, FGF2, SDF-1α, P-selectin, and heparanase. A single s.c. dose of M402 effectively inhibited seeding of B16F10 murine melanoma cells to the lung in an experimental metastasis model. Fluorescent-labeled M402 demonstrated selective accumulation in the primary tumor. Immunohistological analyses of the primary tumor revealed a decrease in microvessel density in M402 treated animals, suggesting anti-angiogenesis to be one of the mechanisms involved in-vivo. M402 treatment also normalized circulating levels of myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice. Chronic administration of M402, alone or in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel, inhibited spontaneous metastasis and prolonged survival in an orthotopic 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model. These data demonstrate that modulating HSPG biology represents a novel approach to target multiple factors involved in tumor progression and metastasis.

  8. Role of tumor necrosis factor in flavone acetic acid-induced tumor vasculature shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, V.; Malik, S.T.; Meager, A.; Fiers, W.; Lewis, G.P.; Hart, I.R.

    1990-01-01

    Flavone acetic acid (FAA), a novel investigational antitumor agent, has been shown to cause early vascular shutdown in several experimental murine tumors, and this phenomenon is believed to be crucial to FAA's antitumor effects. However, the basis of this FAA-induced tumor vascular shutdown is unknown. In this study a radioactive tracer-clearance technique has been used as an objective indication of tumor blood flow to show that i.p. administered FAA induces a progressive and sustained reduction in blood flow in a colon 26 tumor growing s.c. in syngeneic mice. As early as 1 h after administration, there was a significant increase in the t1/2 clearance value for intratumorally injected 133Xe, reaching a peak at 3 h (117.3 +/- 36.4 versus 7.8 +/- 0.85 min for controls). Significant inhibition of blood flow was still apparent 48 h after a single injection of drug. This FAA-induced vascular shutdown was virtually abolished in tumor-bearing mice pretreated with an antiserum against tumor necrosis factor, while no such effect was observed in controls pretreated with nonimmune serum (t1/2 of 10.8 +/- 1.2 versus 65.6 +/- 8.0 min for controls). Furthermore, in vitro FAA was seen to induce tumor necrosis factor secretion from murine peritoneal cells and splenocytes. These studies suggest that FAA-induced tumor vascular shutdown in the colon 26 tumor is mediated by tumor necrosis factor

  9. Potentiation of electrochemotherapy by intramuscular IL-12 gene electrotransfer in murine sarcoma and carcinoma with different immunogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlar, Ales; Dolinsek, Tanja; Markelc, Bostjan; Prosen, Lara; Kranjc, Simona; Bosnjak, Masa; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy provides good local tumor control but requires adjuvant treatment for increased local response and action on distant metastasis. In relation to this, intramuscular interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene electro-transfer, which provides systemic shedding of IL-12, was combined with local electrochemotherapy with cisplatin. Furthermore, the dependence on tumor immunogenicity and immunocompetence of the host on combined treatment response was evaluated. Sensitivity of SA-1 sarcoma and TS/A carcinoma cells to electrochemotherapy with cisplatin was tested in vitro. In vivo, intratumoral electrochemotherapy with cisplatin (day 1) was combined with a single (day 0) or multiple (days 0, 2, 4) intramuscular murine IL-12 (mIL-12) gene electrotransfer. The antitumor effectiveness of combined treatment was evaluated on immunogenic murine SA-1 sarcoma in A/J mice and moderately immunogenic murine TS/A carcinoma, in immunocompetent BALB/c and immunodeficient SCID mice. Electrochemotherapy in vitro resulted in a similar IC 50 values for both sarcoma and carcinoma cell lines. However, in vivo electrochemotherapy was more effective in the treatment of sarcoma, the more immunogenic of the tumors, resulting in a higher log cell kill, longer specific tumor growth delay, and also 17% tumor cures compared to carcinoma where no tumor cures were observed. Adjuvant intramuscular mIL-12 gene electrotransfer increased the log cell kill in both tumor models, potentiating the specific tumor growth delay by a factor of 1.8-2 and increasing tumor cure rate by approximately 20%. In sarcoma tumors, the potentiation of the response by intramuscular mIL-12 gene electrotransfer was dose-dependent and also resulted in a faster onset of tumor cures. Comparison of the carcinoma response to the combined treatment modality in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice demonstrated that the immune system is needed both for increased cell kill and for attaining tumor cures. Based on the comparison of

  10. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-09-15

    Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days) of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  11. Down-regulation of DNA mismatch repair proteins in human and murine tumor spheroids: implications for multicellular resistance to alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Green, Shane K; Bocci, Guido; Man, Shan; Emmenegger, Urban; Ebos, John M L; Weinerman, Adina; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2005-10-01

    Similar to other anticancer agents, intrinsic or acquired resistance to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics is a major obstacle for cancer therapy. Current strategies aimed at overcoming this problem are mostly based on the premise that tumor cells acquire heritable genetic mutations that contribute to drug resistance. Here, we present evidence for an epigenetic, tumor cell adhesion-mediated, and reversible form of drug resistance that is associated with a reduction of DNA mismatch repair proteins PMS2 and/or MLH1 as well as other members of this DNA repair process. Growth of human breast cancer, human melanoma, and murine EMT-6 breast cancer cell lines as multicellular spheroids in vitro, which is associated with increased resistance to many chemotherapeutic drugs, including alkylating agents, is shown to lead to a reproducible down-regulation of PMS2, MLH1, or, in some cases, both as well as MHS6, MSH3, and MSH2. The observed down-regulation is in part reversible by treatment of tumor spheroids with the DNA-demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine. Thus, treatment of EMT-6 mouse mammary carcinoma spheroids with 5-azacytidine resulted in reduced and/or disrupted cell-cell adhesion, which in turn sensitized tumor spheroids to cisplatin-mediated killing in vitro. Our results suggest that antiadhesive agents might sensitize tumor spheroids to alkylating agents in part by reversing or preventing reduced DNA mismatch repair activity and that the chemosensitization properties of 5-azacytidine may conceivably reflect its role as a potential antiadhesive agent as well as reversal agent for MLH1 gene silencing in human tumors.

  12. Effect of hyperthermia and misonidazole on the radiosensitivity of a transplant murine tumor: influence of factors modifying the fraction of hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.; van der Schueren, E.; van den Hoeven, H.; Breur, K.

    1982-01-01

    Hypoxia has been demonstrated to play an important role in the effect of hyperthermia on tumors. The influence of different factors modifying the oxygenation status of a transplantable murine mammary adenocarcinoma has been studied. The effect of hyperthermia alone on the tumor is not significantly influenced by the change in oxygenation status during the growth of the tumor. Also, the large increase of the acutely hypoxic cell fraction, as a result of anesthesia, does not change the effect of hyperthermia alone. In the combined irradiation-heat treatment there is a clear influence of the chronically hypoxic cell fraction on the response to hyperthermia: an increase in tumor size, resulting in a larger hypoxic cell fraction, leads to an increase in thermal enhancement ratio. However, the increased acutely hypoxic cell fraction, resulting from anesthesia, did not lead to an increase in thermal enhancement ratio; in fact the enhancement ratio apparently decreased. In spite of the fact that hyperthermia was applied immediately after irradiation no potentiation of radiation effects was found. The thermal enhancement of the radiation response was never larger than the enhancement as a result of misonidazole

  13. Semaphorin7A promotes tumor growth and exerts a pro-angiogenic effect in macrophages of mammary tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon eGarcia-Areas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Semaphorins, a large family of molecules involved in the axonal guidance and development of the nervous system, have been recently shown to have both angiogenic and anti-angiogenic properties. Specifically, semaphorin 7A (SEMA7A has been reported to have a chemotactic activity in neurogenesis, and to be an immune modulator via it binding to α1β1integrins. Additionally, SEMA7A has been shown to promote chemotaxis of monocytes, inducing them to produce proinflammatory mediators. In this study we explored the role of SEMA7A in the tumoral context. We show that SEMA7A is highly expressed by DA-3 murine mammary tumor cells in comparison to normal mammary cells (EpH4, and that peritoneal macrophages from mammary tumor-bearing mice also express SEMA7A at higher levels compared to peritoneal macrophages derived from normal control mice. We also show that murine macrophages treated with recombinant murine SEMA7A significantly increased their expression of proangiogenic molecules, such as CXCL2/MIP-2. Gene silencing of SEMA7A in peritoneal elicited macrophages from DA-3 tumor-bearing mice resulted in decreased CXCL2 expression. Mice implanted with SEMA7A silenced tumor cells showed decreased angiogenesis in the tumors compared to the wild type tumors. Furthermore, peritoneal elicited macrophages from mice bearing SEMA7A-silenced tumors produce significantly (p< 0.01 lower levels of angiogenic proteins, such as MIP-2, CXCL1 and MMP-9, compared to macrophages from control DA-3 mammary tumors. We postulate that SEMA7A derived from mammary carcinomas may serve as a monocyte chemoattractant and skew monocytes into a pro-tumorigenic phenotype. A putative relationship between tumor-derived SEMA7A and monocytes could prove valuable in establishing new research avenues towards unraveling important tumor-host immune interactions in breast cancer patients.

  14. Diclofenac inhibits tumor growth in a murine model of pancreatic cancer by modulation of VEGF levels and arginase activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mayorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX, diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2 (PLA(2, thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac treatment (30 mg/kg/bw for 11 days of mice inoculated with PANC02 cells, reduced the tumor weight by 60%, correlating with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Since this effect was not observed in vitro on cultured PANCO2 cells, we theorized that diclofenac beneficial treatment involved other mediators present in vivo. Indeed, diclofenac drastically decreased tumor vascularization by downregulating VEGF in the tumor and in abdominal cavity fluid. Furthermore, diclofenac directly inhibited vascular sprouting ex vivo. Surprisingly, in contrast to other COX-2 inhibitors, diclofenac increased arginase activity/arginase 1 protein content in tumor stroma cells, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells by 2.4, 4.8 and 2 fold, respectively. We propose that the subsequent arginine depletion and decrease in NO levels, both in serum and peritoneal cavity, adds to tumor growth inhibition by malnourishment and poor vasculature development. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, diclofenac shows pronounced antitumoral properties in pancreatic cancer model that can contribute to further treatment development. The ability of diclofenac to induce arginase activity in tumor stroma, peritoneal macrophages and white blood cells provides a tool to study a controversial issue of pro-and antitumoral effects of arginine depletion.

  15. A molecular approach to immunoscintigraphy: A study of the T-antigen conformation on the surface of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noujaim, A.; Selvaraj, S.; Suresh, M.R.; Turner, C.; McLean, G.; Willans, D.; Longenecker, B.M.; Haines, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    The role of glycoconjugates in tumor cell differentiation has been well documented. We have examined the expression of the two anomers of the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen on the surface of human, canine and murine tumor cell membranes both in vitro and in vivo. This has been accomplished through the synthesis of the disaccharide terminal residues in both α and β configuration. Both entities were used to generate murine monoclonal antibodies which recognized the carbohydrate determinants. The determination of fine specificities of these antibodies was effected by means of cellular uptake, immunohistopathology and immunoscintigraphy. Examination of pathological specimens of human and canine tumor tissue indicated that the expressed antigen was in the β configuration. More than 89% of all human carcinomas tested expressed the antigen in the above anomeric form. The combination of synthetic antigens and monoclonal antibodies raised specifically against them provide us with invaluable tools for the study of tumor marker expression in humans and their respective animal tumor models. (orig.) [de

  16. Radiation and concurrent chemotherapy for the treatment of Lewis lung tumor and B16 melanoma tumor in C57/BL mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, J.E.; Barron, G.

    1984-01-01

    C57/BL mice bearing either Lewis lung tumor or B16 melanoma tumor were treated with radiation and concurrent chemotherapy. The treatment results were determined in vivo by tumor regrowth delay assay. When continuous infusion of either Cyclophosphamide (CYCLO) or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) or Adriamycin (ADRIA) or Mitomycin-C (MITO-C) was used in combination with continuous radiation at 1 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. When multiple drug chemotherapy, FAM (5-FU, ADRIA, MITO-C) was administered in combination with radiation at 80 cGy/min, no increase in tumor regrowth delay was observed over that of radiation alone. In these two murine tumor models, when clinically relevant concentrations of commonly used chemotherapy agents were combined with radiation, no therapeutic advantage was observed

  17. Characterization of TEM1/endosialin in human and murine brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson-Walter, Eleanor B; Walter, Kevin A; Winans, Bethany N; Whiteman, Melissa C; Liu, Yang; Jarvela, Sally; Haapasalo, Hannu; Tyler, Betty M; Huso, David L; Johnson, Mahlon D

    2009-01-01

    TEM1/endosialin is an emerging microvascular marker of tumor angiogenesis. We characterized the expression pattern of TEM1/endosialin in astrocytic and metastatic brain tumors and investigated its role as a therapeutic target in human endothelial cells and mouse xenograft models. In situ hybridization (ISH), immunohistochemistry (IH) and immunofluorescence (IF) were used to localize TEM1/endosialin expression in grade II-IV astrocytomas and metastatic brain tumors on tissue microarrays. Changes in TEM1/endosialin expression in response to pro-angiogenic conditions were assessed in human endothelial cells grown in vitro. Intracranial U87MG glioblastoma (GBM) xenografts were analyzed in nude TEM1/endosialin knockout (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice. TEM1/endosialin was upregulated in primary and metastatic human brain tumors, where it localized primarily to the tumor vasculature and a subset of tumor stromal cells. Analysis of 275 arrayed grade II-IV astrocytomas demonstrated TEM1/endosialin expression in 79% of tumors. Robust TEM1/endosialin expression occurred in 31% of glioblastomas (grade IV astroctyomas). TEM1/endosialin expression was inversely correlated with patient age. TEM1/endosialin showed limited co-localization with CD31, αSMA and fibronectin in clinical specimens. In vitro, TEM1/endosialin was upregulated in human endothelial cells cultured in matrigel. Vascular Tem1/endosialin was induced in intracranial U87MG GBM xenografts grown in mice. Tem1/endosialin KO vs WT mice demonstrated equivalent survival and tumor growth when implanted with intracranial GBM xenografts, although Tem1/endosialin KO tumors were significantly more vascular than the WT counterparts. TEM1/endosialin was induced in the vasculature of high-grade brain tumors where its expression was inversely correlated with patient age. Although lack of TEM1/endosialin did not suppress growth of intracranial GBM xenografts, it did increase tumor vascularity. The cellular localization of TEM1

  18. Combination therapy of murine tumors with a degraded D-manno-D-glucan (DMG) from Microellobosporia grisea, and cyclophosphamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H; Hashimoto, S; Kita, Y; Takashi, T; Tsukada, W; Kohno, M; Ogawa, H; Abe, S; Mizuno, D

    1983-12-01

    DMG, a degraded D-manno-D-glucan with a host-mediated antitumor activity did not significantly enhance nor inhibit the development of suppressor cells for either the antibody-forming response or the delayed hypersensitivity reaction to sheep red blood cells. Cyclophosphamide (CY), which inhibited the generation of suppressor cells, was combined with DMG in treatment of murine syngeneic tumors to obtain a higher antitumor activity. The antitumor activity of the combination against MH134 hepatoma was synergistically higher than that of either component alone. A marked antitumor effect of the combination treatment against MM46 mammary carcinoma was also shown. High levels of antitumor delayed hypersensitivity reactions were observed with this combination therapy. The possible roles of DMG and CY in this combination therapy are discussed.

  19. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  1. A targeted complement-dependent strategy to improve the outcome of mAb therapy, and characterization in a murine model of metastatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvington, Michelle; Huang, Yuxiang; Morgan, B. Paul; Qiao, Fei; van Rooijen, Nico; Atkinson, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Complement inhibitors expressed on tumor cells provide an evasion mechanism against mAb therapy and may modulate the development of an acquired antitumor immune response. Here we investigate a strategy to amplify mAb-targeted complement activation on a tumor cell, independent of a requirement to target and block complement inhibitor expression or function, which is difficult to achieve in vivo. We constructed a murine fusion protein, CR2Fc, and demonstrated that the protein targets to C3 activation products deposited on a tumor cell by a specific mAb, and amplifies mAb-dependent complement activation and tumor cell lysis in vitro. In syngeneic models of metastatic lymphoma (EL4) and melanoma (B16), CR2Fc significantly enhanced the outcome of mAb therapy. Subsequent studies using the EL4 model with various genetically modified mice and macrophage-depleted mice revealed that CR2Fc enhanced the therapeutic effect of mAb therapy via both macrophage-dependent FcγR-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and by direct complement-mediated lysis. Complement activation products can also modulate adaptive immunity, but we found no evidence that either mAb or CR2Fc treatment had any effect on an antitumor humoral or cellular immune response. CR2Fc represents a potential adjuvant treatment to increase the effectiveness of mAb therapy of cancer. PMID:22442351

  2. Modified Gompertz equation for electrotherapy murine tumor growth kinetics: predictions and new hypotheses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrales, Luis E Bergues; Mateus, Miguel A O'Farril; Brooks, Soraida C Acosta; Palencia, Fabiola Suárez; Zamora, Lisset Ortiz; Quevedo, María C Céspedes; Seringe, Sarah Edward; Cuitié, Vladimir Crombet; Cabrales, Idelisa Bergues; González, Gustavo Sierra; Nava, Juan J Godina; Aguilera, Andrés Ramírez; Joa, Javier A González; Ciria, Héctor M Camué; González, Maraelys Morales; Salas, Miriam Fariñas; Jarque, Manuel Verdecia; González, Tamara Rubio

    2010-01-01

    Electrotherapy effectiveness at different doses has been demonstrated in preclinical and clinical studies; however, several aspects that occur in the tumor growth kinetics before and after treatment have not yet been revealed. Mathematical modeling is a useful instrument that can reveal some of these aspects. The aim of this paper is to describe the complete growth kinetics of unperturbed and perturbed tumors through use of the modified Gompertz equation in order to generate useful insight into the mechanisms that underpin this devastating disease. The complete tumor growth kinetics for control and treated groups are obtained by interpolation and extrapolation methods with different time steps, using experimental data of fibrosarcoma Sa-37. In the modified Gompertz equation, a delay time is introduced to describe the tumor's natural history before treatment. Different graphical strategies are used in order to reveal new information in the complete kinetics of this tumor type. The first stage of complete tumor growth kinetics is highly non linear. The model, at this stage, shows different aspects that agree with those reported theoretically and experimentally. Tumor reversibility and the proportionality between regions before and after electrotherapy are demonstrated. In tumors that reach partial remission, two antagonistic post-treatment processes are induced, whereas in complete remission, two unknown antitumor mechanisms are induced. The modified Gompertz equation is likely to lead to insights within cancer research. Such insights hold promise for increasing our understanding of tumors as self-organizing systems and, the possible existence of phase transitions in tumor growth kinetics, which, in turn, may have significant impacts both on cancer research and on clinical practice

  3. Stochastic models for tumoral growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Carlos

    2006-02-01

    Strong experimental evidence has indicated that tumor growth belongs to the molecular beam epitaxy universality class. This type of growth is characterized by the constraint of cell proliferation to the tumor border and the surface diffusion of cells at the growing edge. Tumor growth is thus conceived as a competition for space between the tumor and the host, and cell diffusion at the tumor border is an optimal strategy adopted for minimizing the pressure and helping tumor development. Two stochastic partial differential equations are reported in this paper in order to correctly model the physical properties of tumoral growth in (1+1) and (2+1) dimensions. The advantage of these models is that they reproduce the correct geometry of the tumor and are defined in terms of polar variables. An analysis of these models allows us to quantitatively estimate the response of the tumor to an unfavorable perturbation during growth.

  4. The development of a murine model for Forcipomyia taiwana (biting midge) allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mey-Fann; Yang, Kai-Jei; Wang, Nancy M; Chiu, Yung-Tsung; Chen, Pei-Chih; Chen, Yi-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Forcipomyia taiwana (biting midge) allergy is the most prevalent biting insect allergy in Taiwan. An animal model corresponding to the human immuno-pathologic features of midge allergy is needed for investigating the mechanisms and therapies. This study successfully developed a murine model of Forcipomyia taiwana allergy. BALB/c mice were sensitized intra-peritoneally with midge extract on days 0, 7, 14, 21 then intra-dermally on days 28, 31 and 35. Serum midge-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a were measured every 14 days by indirect ELISA. The mice were challenged intradermally with midge extract at day 40 and then sacrificed. Proliferation and cytokine production of splenocytes after stimulation with midge extract were determined by MTT assay and ELISA, respectively. The cytokine mRNA expression in response to midge stimulation was analyzed by RT-PCR. Serum IgE, total IgG, and IgG1 antibody levels against midge extract were significantly higher in the midge-sensitized mice than in the control mice. After the two-step sensitization, all mice in the midge-sensitized group displayed immediate itch and plasma extravasation reactions in response to challenge with midge extract. Skin histology from midge-sensitized mice showed marked eosinophil and lymphocyte infiltrations similar to that observed in humans. Stimulation of murine splenocytes with midge extract elicited significant proliferation, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ protein production, and up-regulation of mRNA in a dose-dependent manner in the midge-sensitized group, but not in the control group. A murine model of midge bite allergy has been successfully developed using a two-step sensitization protocol. The sensitized mice have very similar clinical and immunologic reactions to challenge with midge proteins as the reactions of human to midge bites. This murine model may be a useful platform for future research and the development of treatment strategies for insect bite allergy.

  5. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Qingwen [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Jiang, Songmin [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Han, Baohui [Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Tongwen [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang [College of Biotechnology, Tianjin University of Science and Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Sun, Jialin, E-mail: jialin_sun@126.com [Wuhan Junyu Innovation Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor–superantigen conjugate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF–SEA. ► VEGF–SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. ► T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. ► VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. ► The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF–SEA treated with 15 μg, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4 + and CD8 + T cells driven by VEGF–SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF–SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  7. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Stimac

    Full Text Available Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET (TS plasmid, in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid, in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined.

  8. Gene Electrotransfer of Plasmid with Tissue Specific Promoter Encoding shRNA against Endoglin Exerts Antitumor Efficacy against Murine TS/A Tumors by Vascular Targeted Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Monika; Dolinsek, Tanja; Lampreht, Ursa; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Vascular targeted therapies, targeting specific endothelial cell markers, are promising approaches for the treatment of cancer. One of the targets is endoglin, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) co-receptor, which mediates proliferation, differentiation and migration of endothelial cells forming neovasculature. However, its specific, safe and long-lasting targeting remains the challenge. Therefore, in our study we evaluated the transfection efficacy, vascular targeted effects and therapeutic potential of the plasmid silencing endoglin with the tissue specific promoter, specific for endothelial cells marker endothelin-1 (ET) (TS plasmid), in comparison to the plasmid with constitutive promoter (CON plasmid), in vitro and in vivo. Tissue specificity of TS plasmid was demonstrated in vitro on several cell lines, and its antiangiogenic efficacy was demonstrated by reducing tube formation of 2H11 endothelial cells. In vivo, on a murine mammary TS/A tumor model, we demonstrated good antitumor effect of gene electrotransfer (GET) of either of both plasmids in treatment of smaller tumors still in avascular phase of growth, as well as on bigger tumors, already well vascularized. In support to the observations on predominantly vascular targeted effects of endoglin, histological analysis has demonstrated an increase in necrosis and a decrease in the number of blood vessels in therapeutic groups. A significant antitumor effect was observed in tumors in avascular and vascular phase of growth, possibly due to both, the antiangiogenic and the vascular disrupting effect. Furthermore, the study indicates on the potential use of TS plasmid in cancer gene therapy since the same efficacy as of CON plasmid was determined.

  9. Murine nephrotoxic nephritis as a model of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, M. K.E.; Kvist, P. H.; Jensen, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Using the nonaccelerated murine nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) as a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could provide an easily inducible model that enables a rapid test of treatments. Originally, the NTN model was developed as an acute model of glomerulonephritis, but in this study we evaluate...... progressive mesangial expansion and significant renal fibrosis within three weeks suggesting CKD development. CD1 and C57BL/6 females showed a similar disease progression, but female mice seemed more susceptible to NTS compared to male mice. The presence of albuminuria, GFR decline, mesangial expansion...

  10. Efficacy and immunological actions of FAHF-2 in a murine model of multiple food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kamal D; Bardina, Ludmilla; Sampson, Hugh A; Li, Xiu-Min

    2012-05-01

    Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2 (FAHF-2) prevents anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. Multiple food allergies (MFA) are common and associated with a higher risk of anaphylaxis. No well-characterized murine model of sensitization to multiple food allergens exists, and no satisfactory therapy for MFA is currently available. To determine the effect of FAHF-2 in a murine model of MFA. C3H/HeJ mice were orally sensitized to peanut, codfish, and egg concurrently. Oral FAHF-2 treatment commenced 1 day after completing sensitization and continued daily for 7 weeks. Mice were subsequently orally challenged with each allergen. Antibodies in sera from mice simultaneously sensitized with peanut, codfish, and egg recognized major allergens of all 3 foods, demonstrating sensitization to multiple unrelated food allergens (MFA mice). Sham-treated MFA mice exhibited anaphylactic symptoms accompanied by elevation of plasma histamine and hypothermia. In contrast, FAHF-2-treated MFA mice showed no anaphylactic symptoms, normal body temperature, and histamine levels after challenge with each allergen. Protection was accompanied by reduction in allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels. Allergen-stimulated Th2 cytokine interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 production levels decreased, whereas the Th1 cytokine interferon-γ levels were elevated in cultured splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells in FAHF-2-treated mice. We established the first murine model of MFA. FAHF-2 prevents peanut, egg, and fish-induced anaphylactic reactions in this model, suggesting that FAHF-2 may have potential for treating human MFA. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Downregulation of BTLA on NKT Cells Promotes Tumor Immune Control in a Mouse Model of Mammary Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Divya; Govene, Luisa; Del Río, María-Luisa; Sirait-Fischer, Evelyn; Fink, Annika F; Brüne, Bernhard; Rodriguez-Barbosa, José I; Weigert, Andreas

    2018-03-07

    Natural Killer T cells (NKT cells) are emerging as critical regulators of pro- and anti-tumor immunity, both at baseline and in therapeutic settings. While type I NKT cells can promote anti-tumor immunity, their activity in the tumor microenvironment may be limited by negative regulators such as inhibitory immune checkpoints. We observed dominant expression of B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) on type I NKT cells in polyoma middle T oncogene-driven (PyMT) murine autochthonous mammary tumors. Other immune checkpoint receptors, such as programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) were equally distributed among T cell populations. Interference with BTLA using neutralizing antibodies limited tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis in the PyMT model in a therapeutic setting, correlating with an increase in type I NKT cells and expression of cytotoxic marker genes. While therapeutic application of an anti-PD-1 antibody increased the number of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and elevated IL-12 expression, tumor control was not established. Expression of ZBTB16, the lineage-determining transcription factor of type I NKT cells, was correlated with a favorable patient prognosis in the METABRIC dataset, and BTLA levels were instrumental to further distinguish prognosis in patents with high ZBTB16 expression. Taken together, these data support a role of BTLA on type I NKT cells in limiting anti-tumor immunity.

  12. Downregulation of BTLA on NKT Cells Promotes Tumor Immune Control in a Mouse Model of Mammary Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sekar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer T cells (NKT cells are emerging as critical regulators of pro- and anti-tumor immunity, both at baseline and in therapeutic settings. While type I NKT cells can promote anti-tumor immunity, their activity in the tumor microenvironment may be limited by negative regulators such as inhibitory immune checkpoints. We observed dominant expression of B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA on type I NKT cells in polyoma middle T oncogene-driven (PyMT murine autochthonous mammary tumors. Other immune checkpoint receptors, such as programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 were equally distributed among T cell populations. Interference with BTLA using neutralizing antibodies limited tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis in the PyMT model in a therapeutic setting, correlating with an increase in type I NKT cells and expression of cytotoxic marker genes. While therapeutic application of an anti-PD-1 antibody increased the number of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and elevated IL-12 expression, tumor control was not established. Expression of ZBTB16, the lineage-determining transcription factor of type I NKT cells, was correlated with a favorable patient prognosis in the METABRIC dataset, and BTLA levels were instrumental to further distinguish prognosis in patents with high ZBTB16 expression. Taken together, these data support a role of BTLA on type I NKT cells in limiting anti-tumor immunity.

  13. Distribution of alarin in the mouse brain and in tumors of the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, N.

    2011-01-01

    Alarin is a 25 amino acid peptide that belongs to the galanin neuropeptide family and is a splice variant of the galanin-like peptide (GALP) gene. It was first identified in gangliocytes of neuroblastic tumors and recently, alarin was demonstrated to stimulate food intake as well as the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in rodents. However, mRNA and protein expression of alarin in the central nervous system have not been described yet. Therefore, we investigated GALP/alarin promoter activity using a transgenic reporter mouse model. This mouse model expresses YFP when the GALP/alarin promoter is active and therefore is a suitable tool to indicate nuclei where GALP/alarin mRNA is expressed. Immunohistochemical analysis of YFP expression in these transgenic mice revealed a wide distribution of GALP/alarin promoter activity throughout the whole murine brain. As the promoter activity studies cannot discriminate between GALP and alarin expression the next aim was to determine the distribution of alarin peptide- in the adult murine brain with an anti-alarin antibody. The specificity of the antibody against alarin was demonstrated by the absence of labeling after pre-absorption of the antiserum with synthetic alarin peptide and in transgenic mouse brains depleted of cells expressing the GALP/alarin gene. In wild type animals alarin-like immunoreacitivity (alarin-LI) was observed in different areas of the murine brain including the accessory olfactory bulb, medial preoptic area and the hypothalamus. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis of alarin expression in peripheral tissues revealed high alarin levels in the testis of adult mice, whereas no alarin-Li was detected in the oesophagus of mice and trachea of rats. The galanin peptide family is known to play a role in cancer and alarin was first described in human neuroblastic tumors. Therefore, alarin expression in different CNS-tumor types was determined in the present study. Immunohistochemical analysis of a variety

  14. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase accelerates postoperative tumor growth by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing resistance to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. Novel role for an old enemy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coffey, J Calvin

    2012-02-03

    Tumor removal remains the principal treatment modality in the management of solid tumors. The process of tumor removal may potentiate the resurgent growth of residual neoplastic tissue. Herein, we describe a novel murine model in which flank tumor cytoreduction is followed by accelerated local tumor recurrence. This model held for primary and recurrent tumors generated using a panel of human and murine (LS174T, DU145, SW480, SW640, and 3LL) cell lines and replicated accelerated tumor growth following excisional surgery. In investigating this further, epithelial cells were purified from LS174T primary and corresponding recurrent tumors for comparison. Baseline as well as tumor necrosis factor apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis were significantly reduced in recurrent tumor epithelia. Primary and recurrent tumor gene expression profiles were then compared. This identified an increase and reduction in the expression of p110gamma and p85alpha class Ia phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) subunits in recurrent tumor epithelia. These changes were further confirmed at the protein level. The targeting of PI3K ex vivo, using LY294002, restored sensitivity to TRAIL in recurrent tumor epithelia. In vivo, adjuvant LY294002 prolonged survival and significantly attenuated recurrent tumor growth by greatly enhancing apoptosis levels. Hence, PI3K plays a role in generating the antiapoptotic and chemoresistant phenotype associated with accelerated local tumor recurrence.

  15. Diagnosing hypoxia in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis from reflectance multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinton, Sophie; Naylor, Amy J.; Claridge, Ela

    2017-07-01

    Spectra computed from multispectral images of murine models of Rheumatoid Arthritis show a characteristic decrease in reflectance within the 600-800nm region which is indicative of the reduction in blood oxygenation and is consistent with hypoxia.

  16. T cell receptor (TCR-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quatromoni Jon G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN, were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer.

  17. Establishment of a new murine elastase-induced aneurysm model combined with transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzanna Rowinska

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to develop a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm formation combined with aortic transplantation.Adult male mice (n = 6-9 per group underwent infrarenal, orthotopic transplantation of the aorta treated with elastase or left untreated. Subsequently, both groups of mice were monitored by ultrasound until 7 weeks after grafting.Mice receiving an elastase-pretreated aorta developed aneurysms and exhibited a significantly increased diastolic vessel diameter compared to control grafted mice at 7 week after surgery (1.11 ± 0.10 mm vs. 0.75 ± 0.03 mm; p ≤ 0,001. Histopathological examination revealed disruption of medial elastin, an increase in collagen content and smooth muscle cells, and neointima formation in aneurysm grafts.We developed a reproducible murine model of elastase-induced aneurysm combined with aortic transplantation. This model may be suitable to investigate aneurysm-specific inflammatory processes and for use in gene-targeted animals.

  18. A comparative study of the biologic and molecular basis of murine mammary carcinoma: a model for human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlom, J.; Kufe, D.; Hehlman, R.; Spiegelman, S.; Bentvelzen, P.; Michalides, R.; Hageman, P.

    1976-01-01

    Tritiated-DNA complementary to mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) RNA was synthesized in an endogeneous reaction with MMTV particles. This DNA was used as a probe via molecular hybridization to detect MMTV-specific RNA in 'spontaneous' mammary tumors of several strains of mice, including the 'nonproducer' BALB/c mammary tumors. MMTV-specific RNA was also found in certain normal tissues (spleen, kidney, and epididymis) of a high-mammary-cancer strain (GR). Aging or treatment with nonviral carcinogens also induced the appearance of MMTV-specific RNA in certain normal tissues of the low-mammary-cancer strains, C57BL and BALB/c. The relationship of the presence of MMTV-specific RNA to the etiology and pathogenesis of murine mammary neoplasia and its potential application to human breast cancer are discussed

  19. Enhancement of anticancer effect of interferon-γ gene transfer against interferon-γ-resistant tumor by depletion of tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Yuki; Watcharanurak, Kanitta; Nishikawa, Makiya; Ohara, Saori; Ando, Mitsuru; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2014-05-05

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) negatively affect the therapeutic effects of anticancer agents. To examine the role of TAMs in interferon (IFN)-γ gene therapy, we selected two types of solid tumors, which varied in the number of TAMs, and investigated the effects of IFN-γ gene transfer on tumor growth. Many TAMs were detected in the solid tumors of murine adenocarcinoma colon-26 cells, whereas few TAMs were detected in murine melanoma B16-BL6 cells. IFN-γ gene transfer hardly suppressed the growth of colon-26 tumors, whereas it was effective in suppressing the growth of B16-BL6 tumors. The antiproliferative effects of IFN-γ on cultured colon-26 cells were similar to those on cultured B16-BL6 cells. To evaluate the role of TAMs, we injected clodronate liposomes (CLs) modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to functionally deplete TAMs in tumor-bearing mice. Repeated injections of PEG-CLs significantly retarded the growth of colon-26 tumors and combination with IFN-γ gene transfer further inhibited the growth. In contrast, PEG-CLs hardly retarded the growth of B16-BL6 tumors. These results clearly indicate that TAM depletion is effective in enhancing the therapeutic effect of IFN-γ in TAM-repleted and IFN-γ-resistant tumors.

  20. Optimizing the dosing schedule of l-asparaginase improves its anti-tumor activity in breast tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoya Shiromizu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells is nutritionally dependent on the external supply of asparagine. l-asparaginase, an enzyme hydrolyzing l-asparagine in blood, is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemic and other related blood cancers. Although previous studies demonstrated that l-asparaginase suppresses the proliferation of cultured solid tumor cells, it remains unclear whether this enzyme prevents the growth of solid tumors in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of optimizing dosing schedules for the anti-tumor activity of l-asparaginase in 4T1 breast tumor-bearing mice. Cultures of several types of murine solid tumor cells were dependent on the external supply of asparagine. Among them, we selected murine 4T1 breast cancer cells and implanted them into BALB/c female mice kept under standardized light/dark cycle conditions. The growth of 4T1 tumor cells implanted in mice was significantly suppressed by intravenous administration of l-asparaginase during the light phase, whereas its administration during the dark phase failed to show significant anti-tumor activity. Decreases in plasma asparagine levels due to the administration of l-asparaginase were closely related to the dosing time-dependency of its anti-tumor effects. These results suggest that the anti-tumor efficacy of l-asparaginase in breast tumor-bearing mice is improved by optimizing the dosing schedule. Keywords: l-asparaginase, Asparagine, Solid tumor, Chrono-pharmacotherapy

  1. {sup 89}Zr-labeled nivolumab for imaging of T-cell infiltration in a humanized murine model of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Christopher G.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Ellison, Paul A.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Jiang, Dawei [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Rekoske, Brian T. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); McNeel, Douglas G. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Huang, Peng [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Nivolumab is a human monoclonal antibody specific for programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), a negative regulator of T-cell activation and response. Acting as an immune checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab binds to PD-1 expressed on the surface of many immune cells and prevents ligation by its natural ligands. Nivolumab is only effective in a subset of patients, and there is limited evidence supporting its use for diagnostic, monitoring, or stratification purposes. {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab was synthesized to map the biodistribution of PD-1-expressing tumor infiltrating T-cells in vivo using a humanized murine model of lung cancer. The tracer was developed by radiolabeling the antibody with the positron emitter zirconium-89 ({sup 89}Zr). Imaging results were validated by ex vivo biodistribution studies, and PD-1 expression was validated by immunohistochemistry. Data obtained from PET imaging were used to determine human dosimetry estimations. The tracer showed elevated binding to stimulated PD-1 expressing T-cells in vitro and in vivo. PET imaging of {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab allowed for clear delineation of subcutaneous tumors through targeting of localized activated T-cells expressing PD-1 in the tumors and salivary glands of humanized A549 tumor-bearing mice. In addition to tumor uptake, salivary and lacrimal gland infiltration of T-cells was noticeably visible and confirmed via histological analysis. These data support our claim that PD-1-targeted agents allow for tumor imaging in vivo, which may assist in the design and development of new immunotherapies. In the future, noninvasive imaging of immunotherapy biomarkers may assist in disease diagnostics, disease monitoring, and patient stratification. (orig.)

  2. Experimental rat lung tumor model with intrabronchial tumor cell implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Antero; Simão, Antônio Felipe Leite; Miranda, Samuel de Paula; Mourão, Lívia Talita Cajaseiras; Bezerra, Nilfácio Prado; Almeida, Paulo Roberto Carvalho de; Ribeiro, Ronaldo de Albuquerque

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a rat lung tumor model for anticancer drug testing. Sixty-two female Wistar rats weighing 208 +/- 20 g were anesthetized intraperitoneally with 2.5% tribromoethanol (1 ml/100 g live weight), tracheotomized and intubated with an ultrafine catheter for inoculation with Walker's tumor cells. In the first step of the experiment, a technique was established for intrabronchial implantation of 10(5) to 5 x 10(5) tumor cells, and the tumor take rate was determined. The second stage consisted of determining tumor volume, correlating findings from high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) with findings from necropsia and determining time of survival. The tumor take rate was 94.7% for implants with 4 x 10(5) tumor cells, HRCT and necropsia findings matched closely (r=0.953; p<0.0001), the median time of survival was 11 days, and surgical mortality was 4.8%. The present rat lung tumor model was shown to be feasible: the take rate was high, surgical mortality was negligible and the procedure was simple to perform and easily reproduced. HRCT was found to be a highly accurate tool for tumor diagnosis, localization and measurement and may be recommended for monitoring tumor growth in this model.

  3. Anticonvulsive evaluation of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole kindling model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Charlotte; Boddum, Kim; von Schoubye, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    . Evaluation of THIP as a potential anticonvulsant has given contradictory results in different animal models and for this reason, we reevaluated the anticonvulsive properties of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. As loss of δ-GABAA R in the dentate gyrus has been associated...... the observed upregulation of δ-GABAA Rs. Even in the demonstrated presence of functional δ-GABAA Rs, THIP (0.5-4 mg/kg) showed no anticonvulsive effect in the PTZ kindling model using a comprehensive in vivo evaluation of the anticonvulsive properties....

  4. Therapeutic effects of anti-CD115 monoclonal antibody in mouse cancer models through dual inhibition of tumor-associated macrophages and osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Fend

    Full Text Available Tumor progression is promoted by Tumor-Associated Macrophages (TAMs and metastasis-induced bone destruction by osteoclasts. Both myeloid cell types depend on the CD115-CSF-1 pathway for their differentiation and function. We used 3 different mouse cancer models to study the effects of targeting cancer host myeloid cells with a monoclonal antibody (mAb capable of blocking CSF-1 binding to murine CD115. In mice bearing sub-cutaneous EL4 tumors, which are CD115-negative, the anti-CD115 mAb depleted F4/80(+ CD163(+ M2-type TAMs and reduced tumor growth, resulting in prolonged survival. In the MMTV-PyMT mouse model, the spontaneous appearance of palpable mammary tumors was delayed when the anti-CD115 mAb was administered before malignant transition and tumors became palpable only after termination of the immunotherapy. When administered to mice already bearing established PyMT tumors, anti-CD115 treatment prolonged their survival and potentiated the effect of chemotherapy with Paclitaxel. As shown by immunohistochemistry, this therapeutic effect correlated with the depletion of F4/80(+CD163(+ M2-polarized TAMs. In a breast cancer model of bone metastasis, the anti-CD115 mAb potently blocked the differentiation of osteoclasts and their bone destruction activity. This resulted in the inhibition of cancer-induced weight loss. CD115 thus represents a promising target for cancer immunotherapy, since a specific blocking antibody may not only inhibit the growth of a primary tumor through TAM depletion, but also metastasis-induced bone destruction through osteoclast inhibition.

  5. A Novel Tumor Antigen and Foxp3 Dual Targeting Tumor Cell Vaccine Enhances the Immunotherapy in a Murine Model of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    MDSCs facilitate tumor progression by impairing T-cell and natural killer (NK)–cell activation (9) and by modulating angiogenesis. Preclinical data...tasquinimod. Left, tumor growth curves by serial calipermeasurements. Right, tumor weights at the endpoint. B, mice were inoculated s.c. with B16...25 mg/kg) was given as daily i.v. injections on days 3 to 6. Left, tumor growth curves by serial caliper measurements. Right, end-of-treatment tumor

  6. Optimizing the dosing schedule of l-asparaginase improves its anti-tumor activity in breast tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromizu, Shoya; Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2018-04-01

    Proliferation of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells is nutritionally dependent on the external supply of asparagine. l-asparaginase, an enzyme hydrolyzing l-asparagine in blood, is used for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemic and other related blood cancers. Although previous studies demonstrated that l-asparaginase suppresses the proliferation of cultured solid tumor cells, it remains unclear whether this enzyme prevents the growth of solid tumors in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of optimizing dosing schedules for the anti-tumor activity of l-asparaginase in 4T1 breast tumor-bearing mice. Cultures of several types of murine solid tumor cells were dependent on the external supply of asparagine. Among them, we selected murine 4T1 breast cancer cells and implanted them into BALB/c female mice kept under standardized light/dark cycle conditions. The growth of 4T1 tumor cells implanted in mice was significantly suppressed by intravenous administration of l-asparaginase during the light phase, whereas its administration during the dark phase failed to show significant anti-tumor activity. Decreases in plasma asparagine levels due to the administration of l-asparaginase were closely related to the dosing time-dependency of its anti-tumor effects. These results suggest that the anti-tumor efficacy of l-asparaginase in breast tumor-bearing mice is improved by optimizing the dosing schedule. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Baicalein induces cell death in murine T cell lymphoma via inhibition of thioredoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Pal, Debojyoti; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K

    2017-10-01

    We have earlier demonstrated the radioprotective potential of baicalein using murine splenic lymphocytes. Here, we have studied the effect of baicalein on murine T cell lymphoma EL4 cells and investigated the underlying mechanism of action. We observed that baicalein induced a dose dependent cell death in EL4 cells in vitro and significantly reduced the frequency of cancer stem cells. Previously, we have reported that murine and human T cell lymphoma cells have increased oxidative stress tolerance capacity due to active thioredoxin system. Hence, we monitored the effect of baicalein on thioredoxin system in EL4 cells. Docking studies revealed that baicalein could bind to the active site of thioredoxin reductase. Baicalein treatment led to significant reduction in the activity of thioredoxin reductase and nuclear levels of thioredoxin-1 thereby increasing ASK1 levels and caspase-3 activity. Interestingly, CRISPR-Cas9 based knock-out of ASK1 or over-expression of thioredoxin-1 abolished anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells. Further, baicalein administration significantly reduced intra-peritoneal tumor burden of EL4 cells in C57BL/6 mice. Thus, our study describes anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells via inhibition of thioredoxin system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  9. Xenograft tumors derived from malignant pleural effusion of the patients with non-small-cell lung cancer as models to explore drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunhua; Zhang, Feifei; Pan, Xiaoqing; Wang, Guan; Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Wen, Danyi; Lu, Shun

    2018-05-09

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fusions show dramatic responses to specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs); however, after 10-12 months, secondary mutations arise that confer resistance. We generated a murine xenograft model using patient-derived NSCLC cells isolated from the pleural fluid of two patients with NSCLC to investigate the mechanisms of resistance against the ALK- and EGFR-targeted TKIs crizotinib and osimertinib, respectively. Genotypes of patient biopsies and xenograft tumors were determined by whole exome sequencing (WES), and patients and xenograft-bearing mice received targeted treatment (crizotinib or osimertinib) accordingly. Xenograft mice were also treated for prolonged periods to identify whether the development of drug resistance and/or treatment responses were associated with tumor size. Finally, the pathology of patients biopsies and xenograft tumors were compared histologically. The histological characteristics and chemotherapy responses of xenograft tumors were similar to the actual patients. WES showed that the genotypes of the xenograft and patient tumors were similar (an echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like 4-ALK (EML4-ALK) gene fusion (patient/xenograft: CTC15035 EML4-ALK ) and EGFR L858R and T790M mutations (patient/xenograft: CTC15063 EGFR L858R, T790M )). After continuous crizotinib or osimertinib treatment, WES data suggested that acquired ALK E1210K mutation conferred crizotinib resistance in the CTC15035 EML4-ALK xenograft, while decreased frequencies of EGFR L858R and T790M mutations plus the appearance of v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) G7V mutations and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit type 2 alpha (PIK3C2A) A86fs frame shift mutations led to osimertinib resistance in the CTC15063 EGFR L858R, T790M xenografts. We successfully developed a new method of generating

  10. Silencing of Foxp3 delays the growth of murine melanomas and modifies the tumor immunosuppressive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco-Molina MA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Moisés A Franco-Molina,* Diana F Miranda-Hernández,* Edgar Mendoza-Gamboa, Pablo Zapata-Benavides, Erika E Coronado-Cerda, Crystel A Sierra-Rivera, Santiago Saavedra-Alonso, Reyes S Taméz-Guerra, Cristina Rodríguez-Padilla Immunology and Virology Department, Biological Sciences Faculty, University Autonoma of Nuevo León (UANL, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León, Mexico*These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Forkhead box p3 (Foxp3 expression was believed to be specific for T-regulatory cells but has recently been described in non-hematopoietic cells from different tissue origins and in tumor cells from both epithelial and non-epithelial tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Foxp3 in murine melanoma. The B16F10 cell line Foxp3 silenced with small interference Foxp3 plasmid transfection was established and named B16F10.1. These cells had lower levels of Foxp3 mRNA (quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [0.235-fold], protein (flow cytometry [0.02%], CD25+ expression (0.06%, cellular proliferation (trypan blue staining, and interleukin (IL-2 production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [72.35 pg/mL] than those in B16F10 wild-type (WT cells (P<0.05. Subcutaneous inoculation of the B16F10.1 cell line into C57BL/6 mice delayed the time of visible tumor appearance, increased the time of survival, and affected the weight of tumors, and also decreased the production of IL-10, IL-2, and transforming growth factor beta compared with mice inoculated with the B16F10 WT cell line. The B16F10.1 cells derived from tumors and free of T-cells (isolated by Dynabeads and plastic attachment expressed relatively lower levels of Foxp3 and CD25+ than B16F10 WT cells (P<0.05 in a time-dependent manner. The population of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of T CD4+ cells (CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ increased in a time-dependent manner (P<0.05 in tumors derived from B16F10 WT cells

  11. Altered tumor growth in vivo after immunization of mice with antitumor antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorczynski, R.M.; Kennedy, M.; Polidoulis, I.; Price, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    A comparison has been made between the growth patterns of two spontaneously appearing mammary adenocarcinomas in murine bone marrow radiation chimeras and in mice preimmunized with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) detecting embryo-associated antigenic determinants. A correlation was seen between the ability of the embryo-immunized chimeras to produce cytotoxic antibody to the tumors, as assessed by an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assay, and the permissiveness of the mice for growth of a tumor transplant. In addition, mice deliberately preimmunized with cytotoxic MAb (antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assay) allowed more rapid growth specifically of that tumor earlier found to be most sensitive to the MAb used for immunization. By comparing the changing antigenic phenotype of tumor cells serially passaged through different immunized, nonimmunized mice, evidence was found suggesting that immunization could cause either antigen modulation of transferred tumor cells or a (transient) selective advantage to antigenically discrete subpopulations within the heterogeneous tumor population. Finally, a study has been made of the growth pattern of tumor cells transplanted into mice immunized with rabbit antibodies directed against the murine MAb. In this case, tumor growth was slowed preferentially for the tumor reactive with the specific MAb, and again, predictable changes in the antigenic spectrum of tumor cells harvested from these animals were observed. Our overall findings are interpreted in terms of the involvement of networks of antibodies reacting with embryo-associated antigens in the regulation of growth of the murine mammary adenocarcinomas studied

  12. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R Promotes Tumoricidal CD8+ T Cell Tumor Infiltration and Arrests Growth and Metastasis in a Syngeneic Pancreatic-Cancer Orthotopic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Kiyuna, Tasuku; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Miyake, Kentaro; Homma, Yuki; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    The present study determined the effect of the tumor-targeting strain Salmonella typhimurium A1-R (S. typhimurium A1-R) on CD8 + tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a syngeneic pancreatic-cancer orthotopic mouse model. The effect of tumor-targeting S. typhimurium A1-R on CD8 + TILs was determined on the Pan02 murine pancreatic-adenocarcinoma implanted orthotopically in the pancreatic tail of C57BL/6 immunocompromised mice. Three weeks after orthotopic implantation, mice were randomized as follows G1: untreated control group (n = 8); and G2: S. typhimurium A1-R-treatment group (n = 8, 1 × 10 7 colony forming units [CFU]/body, iv, weekly, 3 weeks). On the 22nd day from initial treatment, all mice were sacrificed and tumors were harvested. The tumor-volume ratio was defined as ratio of tumor volume on the 22nd day relative to the 1st day. The tumor volume ratio was significantly lower in the S. typhimurium A1-R-treated group (G2) (3.0 ± 2.8) than the untreated control (G1) (39.9 ± 30.7, P R-treated mice (G2). Six mice in G1 had peritoneal dissemination, whereas no mice showed peritoneal dissemination in G2 (P R promotes CD8 + T cell infiltration and inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis. J. Cell. Biochem. 119: 634-639, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Murine models of osteosarcoma: A piece of the translational puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Mannu K; Castillo-Tandazo, Wilson; Mutsaers, Anthony J; Martin, Thomas John; Walkley, Carl R

    2018-06-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common cancer of bone in children and young adults. Despite extensive research efforts, there has been no significant improvement in patient outcome for many years. An improved understanding of the biology of this cancer and how genes frequently mutated contribute to OS may help improve outcomes for patients. While our knowledge of the mutational burden of OS is approaching saturation, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to OS initiation and maintenance is less clear. Murine models of OS have now been demonstrated to be highly valid recapitulations of human OS. These models were originally based on the frequent disruption of p53 and Rb in familial OS syndromes, which are also common mutations in sporadic OS. They have been applied to significantly improve our understanding about the functions of recurrently mutated genes in disease. The murine models can be used as a platform for preclinical testing and identifying new therapeutic targets, in addition to testing the role of additional mutations in vivo. Most recently these models have begun to be used for discovery based approaches and screens, which hold significant promise in furthering our understanding of the genetic and therapeutic sensitivities of OS. In this review, we discuss the mouse models of OS that have been reported in the last 3-5 years and newly identified pathways from these studies. Finally, we discuss the preclinical utilization of the mouse models of OS for identifying and validating actionable targets to improve patient outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF with radiotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wonwoo; Seong, Jinsil; Oh, Hae-Jin; Koom, Woong-Sub; Choi, Kyung-Joo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing interleukin 12 (IL-12) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with radiation was investigated for antitumor and antimetastatic effect in a murine hepatic cancer (HCa-I) model. Tumor bearing syngeneic mice were treated with radiation, armed oncolytic virus Ad-ΔE1Bmt7 (dB7) expressing both IL-12 and GM-CSF (armed dB7), or a combination of both. The adenovirus was administered by intratumoral injection 1 x 10 8 plaque forming units (PFU) per tumor in 50 μl of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) four times every other day. Tumor response to treatment was determined by a tumor growth delay assay. Metastatic potential was evaluated by a lung metastasis model. To understand the underlying mechanism, the level of apoptosis was examined as well as the change in microvessel density and expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c. The combination of armed dB7 and radiation resulted in significant growth delay of murine hepatic cancer, HCa-1, with an enhancement factor of 4.3. The combination treatment also resulted in significant suppression of lung metastasis. Increase of apoptosis level as well as decrease of microvessel density was shown in the combination treatment, suggesting an underlying mechanism for the enhancement of antitumor effect. Expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c also increased in the combination treatment. This study showed that a novel combination treatment of radiotherapy with armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF was effective in suppressing primary tumor growth. (author)

  15. Comparison of microwave and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia radiosensitization in murine breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Hoopes, Paul J.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer. Its utility as a clinical modality has been limited by a minimally selective tumor sensitivity and the inability to be delivered in a tumor-specific manner. Recent in vivo studies (rodent and human) have shown that cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity can be effectively and safely delivered via iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) and an appropriately matched noninvasive alternating magnetic field (AMF). To explore the tumor radiosensitization potential of mNP hyperthermia we used a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model, dextran-coated 110 nm hydrodynamic diameter mNP and a 169 kHz / 450 Oe (35.8 kA/m) AMF. Intradermally implanted (flank) tumors (150 +/- 40 mm3) were treated by injection of 0.04 ml mNP (7.5 mg Fe) / cm3 into the tumor and an AMF (35.8 kA/m and 169 kHz) exposure necessary to achieve a CEM (cumulative equivalent minute) thermal dose of 60 (CEM 60). Tumors were treated with mNP hyperthermia (CEM 60), radiation alone (15 Gy, single dose) and in combination. Compared to the radiation and heat alone treatments, the combined treatment resulted in a greater than two-fold increase in tumor regrowth tripling time (tumor treatment efficacy). None of the treatments resulted in significant normal tissue toxicity or morbidity. Studies were also conducted to compare the radiosensitization effect of mNP hyperthermia with that of microwave-induced hyperthermia. The effects of incubation of nanoparticles within tumors (to allow nanoparticles to be endocytosed) before application of AMF and radiation were determined. This preliminary information suggests cancer cell specific hyperthermia (i.e. antibody-directed or anatomically-directed mNP) is capable of providing significantly greater radiosensitization / therapeutic ratio enhancement than other forms of hyperthermia delivery.

  16. Tumor cell culture on collagen–chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Mahmoudzadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen–chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen–chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen–chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies.

  17. Tumor cell culture on collagen-chitosan scaffolds as three-dimensional tumor model: A suitable model for tumor studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Aziz; Mohammadpour, Hemn

    2016-07-01

    Tumor cells naturally live in three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments, while common laboratory tests and evaluations are done in two-dimensional (2D) plates. This study examined the impact of cultured 4T1 cancer cells in a 3D collagen-chitosan scaffold compared with 2D plate cultures. Collagen-chitosan scaffolds were provided and passed confirmatory tests. 4T1 tumor cells were cultured on scaffolds and then tumor cells growth rate, resistance to X-ray radiation, and cyclophosphamide as a chemotherapy drug were analyzed. Furthermore, 4T1 cells were extracted from the scaffold model and were injected into the mice. Tumor growth rate, survival rate, and systemic immune responses were evaluated. Our results showed that 4T1 cells infiltrated the scaffolds pores and constructed a 3D microenvironment. Furthermore, 3D cultured tumor cells showed a slower proliferation rate, increased levels of survival to the X-ray irradiation, and enhanced resistance to chemotherapy drugs in comparison with 2D plate cultures. Transfer of extracted cells to the mice caused enhanced tumor volume and decreased life span. This study indicated that collagen-chitosan nanoscaffolds provide a suitable model of tumor that would be appropriate for tumor studies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Prophylactic role of curcumin in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Hossam M M; Hemeida, Ramadan A; El-Bahrawy, Ali I M; Hamada, Farid M A

    2009-06-01

    We have addressed in this study the possible protective role of the main principle of turmeric pigment; curcumin on a murine model of ulcerative colitis (UC). Colitis was induced by administration of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) (3% W/V) in drinking water to male Swiss albino rats for 5 consecutive days. DSS challenge induced UC model that was well characterized morphologically and biochemically. DSS produced shrinkage of colon length and increased the relative colon weight/length ratio accompanied by mucosal edema and bloody stool. Histologically, DSS produced submucosal erosions, ulceration, inflammatory cell infiltration and crypt abscess as well as epithelioglandular hyperplasia. The model was confirmed biochemically, and the test battery entailed elevated serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and colonic activity of myleoperoxidase (MPO). Colonic glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity and its substrate concentration; GSH, were notably reduced, while lipid peroxidation, expressed as malondialdehyde (MDA) level, and total nitric oxide (NO) were significantly increased. Prior administration of curcumin (100mg/kg, IP) for 7 consecutive days ahead of DSS challenge mitigated the injurious effects of DSS and ameliorated all the altered biochemical parameters. These results suggest that curcumin could possibly have a protective role in ulcerative colitis probably via regulation of oxidant/anti-oxidant balance and modulation of the release of some inflammatory endocoids, namely TNF-alpha and NO.

  19. Proteomic characterization of EL4 lymphoma-derived tumors upon chemotherapy treatment reveals potential roles for lysosomes and caspase-6 during tumor cell death in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David A; Eldeeb, Mohamed A; Wuest, Melinda; Mercer, John; Fahlman, Richard P

    2017-06-01

    The murine mouse lymphoblastic lymphoma cell line (EL4) tumor model is an established in vivo apoptosis model for the investigation of novel cancer imaging agents and immunological treatments due to the rapid and significant response of the EL4 tumors to cyclophosphamide and etoposide combination chemotherapy. Despite the utility of this model system in cancer research, little is known regarding the molecular details of in vivo tumor cell death. Here, we report the first in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of the changes that occur in these tumors upon cyclophosphamide and etoposide treatment in vivo. Using a label-free quantitative proteomic approach a total of 5838 proteins were identified in the treated and untreated tumors, of which 875 were determined to change in abundance with statistical significance. Initial analysis of the data reveals changes that may have been predicted, such as the downregulation of ribosomes, but demonstrates the robustness of the dataset. Analysis of the dataset also reveals the unexpected downregulation of caspase-3 and an upregulation of caspase-6 in addition to a global upregulation of lysosomal proteins in the bulk of the tumor. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Virus Delivery of CRISPR Guides to the Murine Prostate for Gene Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Maria; Berthelsen, Martin F; Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F; Thomsen, Martin K

    2018-04-27

    With an increasing incidence of prostate cancer, identification of new tumor drivers or modulators is crucial. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMM) for prostate cancer are hampered by tumor heterogeneity and its complex microevolution dynamics. Traditional prostate cancer mouse models include, amongst others, germline and conditional knockouts, transgenic expression of oncogenes, and xenograft models. Generation of de novo mutations in these models is complex, time-consuming, and costly. In addition, most of traditional models target the majority of the prostate epithelium, whereas human prostate cancer is well known to evolve as an isolated event in only a small subset of cells. Valuable models need to simulate not only prostate cancer initiation, but also progression to advanced disease. Here we describe a method to target a few cells in the prostate epithelium by transducing cells by viral particles. The delivery of an engineered virus to the murine prostate allows alteration of gene expression in the prostate epithelia. Virus type and quantity will hereby define the number of targeted cells for gene alteration by transducing a few cells for cancer initiation and many cells for gene therapy. Through surgery-based injection in the anterior lobe, distal from the urinary track, the tumor in this model can expand without impairing the urinary function of the animal. Furthermore, by targeting only a subset of prostate epithelial cells the technique enables clonal expansion of the tumor, and therefore mimics human tumor initiation, progression, as well as invasion through the basal membrane. This novel technique provides a powerful prostate cancer model with improved physiological relevance. Animal suffering is limited, and since no additional breeding is required, overall animal count is reduced. At the same time, analysis of new candidate genes and pathways is accelerated, which in turn is more cost efficient.

  1. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: a chimeric antibody, C225, inhibits EGFR activation and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, John; Prewett, Marie; Rockwell, Patricia; Goldstein, Neil I

    2015-01-15

    Murine mAb 225 was effective against the EGFR tyrosine kinase and inhibited tumor growth in preclinical studies. A phase I trial showed safety, tumor localization, and satisfactory pharmacokinetics. Human:murine chimeric C225 retained biologic activity, which was essential for the conduct of subsequent combination therapy trials and eventual regulatory approval. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong, E-mail: chengongzlp@hotmail.com; Zheng, Shan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis.

  3. microRNA-222 modulates liver fibrosis in a murine model of biliary atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Wen-jun; Dong, Rui; Chen, Gong; Zheng, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The RRV infected group showed cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. • miR-222 was highly expressed, and PPP2R2A was inhibited in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine biliary atresia model. • miR-222 might represent a potential target for improving biliary atresia prognosis. - Abstract: microRNA-222 (miR-222) has been shown to initiate the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of miR-22 in a mouse model of biliary atresia (BA) induced by Rhesus Rotavirus (RRV) infection. New-born Balb/c mice were randomized into control and RRV infected groups. The extrahepatic bile ducts were evaluated. The experimental group was divided into BA group and negative group based on histology. The expression of miR-222, protein phosphatase 2 regulatory subunit B alpha (PPP2R2A), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phospho-Akt were detected. We found that the experimental group showed signs of cholestasis, retardation and extrahepatic biliary atresia. No abnormalities were found in the control group. In the BA group, miR-222, PCNA and Akt were highly expressed, and PPP2R2A expression was significantly inhibited. Our findings suggest that miR-222 profoundly modulated the process of fibrosis in the murine BA model, which might represent a potential target for improving BA prognosis

  4. Mathematical models of tumor growth: translating absorbed dose to tumor control probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgouros, G.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The dose-rate in internal emitter therapy is low and time-dependent as compared to external beam radiotherapy. Once the total absorbed dose delivered to a target tissue is calculated, however, most dosimetric analyses of radiopharmaceuticals are considered complete. To translate absorbed dose estimates obtained for internal emitter therapy to biologic effect, the growth characteristics, repair capacity, and radiosensitivity of the tumor must be considered. Tumor growth may be represented by the Gompertz equation in which tumor cells increase at an exponential growth rate that is itself decreasing at an exponential rate; as the tumor increases in size, the growth rate diminishes. The empirical Gompertz expression for tumor growth may be derived from a mechanistic model in which growth is represented by a balance between tumor-cell birth and loss. The birth rate is assumed to be fixed, while the cell loss rate is time-dependent and increases with tumor size. The birth rate of the tumors may be related to their potential doubling time. Multiple biopsies of individual tumors have demonstrated a heterogeneity in the potential doubling time of tumors. By extending the mechanistic model described above to allow for sub-populations of tumor cells with different birth rates, the effect of kinetic heterogeneity within a tumor may be examined. Model simulations demonstrate that the cell kinetic parameters of a tumor are predicted to change over time and measurements obtained using a biopsy are unlikely to reflect the kinetics of the tumor throughout its growth history. A decrease in overall tumor mass, in which each sub-population is reduced in proportion to its cell number, i.e., the log-kill assumption, leads to re-growth of a tumor that has a greater proliferation rate. Therapy that is linked to the potential doubling time or to the effective proliferation rate of the tumor may lead to re-growth of a tumor that is kinetically unchanged. The simplest model of

  5. Anti-tumor effects of ONC201 in combination with VEGF-inhibitors significantly impacts colorectal cancer growth and survival in vivo through complementary non-overlapping mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jessica; Kline, C Leah; Zhou, Lanlan; Khazak, Vladimir; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2018-01-22

    Small molecule ONC201 is an investigational anti-tumor agent that upregulates intra-tumoral TRAIL expression and the integrated stress response pathway. A Phase I clinical trial using ONC201 therapy in advanced cancer patients has been completed and the drug has progressed into Phase II trials in several cancer types. Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer worldwide and metastatic disease has a poor prognosis. Clinical trials in CRC and other tumor types have demonstrated that therapeutics targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway, such as bevacizumab, are effective in combination with certain chemotherapeutic agents. We investigated the potential combination of VEGF inhibitors such as bevacizumab and its murine-counterpart; along with other anti-angiogenic agents and ONC201 in both CRC xenograft and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. We utilized non-invasive imaging and immunohistochemistry to determine potential mechanisms of action. Our results demonstrate significant tumor regression or complete tumor ablation in human xenografts with the combination of ONC201 with bevacizumab, and in syngeneic MC38 colorectal cancer xenografts using a murine VEGF-A inhibitor. Imaging demonstrated the impact of this combination on decreasing tumor growth and tumor metastasis. Our results indicate that ONC201 and anti-angiogenic agents act through distinct mechanisms while increasing tumor cell death and inhibiting proliferation. With the use of both a murine VEGF inhibitor in syngeneic models, and bevacizumab in human cell line-derived xenografts, we demonstrate that ONC201 in combination with anti-angiogenic therapies such as bevacizumab represents a promising approach for further testing in the clinic for the treatment of CRC.

  6. Induction of Apoptosis and expression of Apoptosis-related gene products in response to radiation in murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, J. S.

    1997-01-01

    To analyze the involvement of apoptosis regulatory genes p53, p21 waf1/cip1 , bax and bcl-2 in induction of apoptosis by radiation in murine tumors. The radiation-sensitive ovarian carcinoma OCa-I and the radiation-resistant hepatocarcinoma HCa-I were used. Tumors, 8mm in diameter, were irradiated with 25Gy and at various times after irradiation, ranging from 1 to 48 h, were analyzed histologically for apoptosis and by western blot for alterations in the expression of these genes. The p53 status of the tumors were determined by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism assay. Both tumors were positive for wild-type p53. Radiation induced apoptosis in OCa-I but not in HCa-I. Apoptosis developed rapidly, peaked at 2 h after irradiation and returned to almost the background level at 48 h. In OCa-I radiation upregulated the expression of p53, p21 waf1/cip1 , and the bcl-2/bax ratio was decreased. In HCa-I radiation increased the expression of both p53 and p21 waf1/cip1 , although the increase of the latter was small. The bcl-2/bax ratio was greatly increased. In general the observed changes occurred within a few hours after irradiation, and either preceded or coincided with development of apoptosis. The development of apoptosis required upregulation of both p53 and p21 waf1/cip1 as well as a decrease in bcl-2/bax ratio. In contrast, an increase in bcl-2/bax ratio prevented apoptosis in the presence of upregulated p53 and p21 waf1/cip1 . These findings identified the involvement of multiple oncogenes in apoptosis regulation in vivo and demonstrate the complexity that may be associated with the use of a single oncogene assessment for predicting the outcome of cancer therapy with cytotoxic agents. (author)

  7. Induction of Apoptosis and expression of Apoptosis-related gene products in response to radiation in murine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, J S [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Hunter, N R; Milas, L [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    To analyze the involvement of apoptosis regulatory genes p53, p21{sup waf1/cip1}, bax and bcl-2 in induction of apoptosis by radiation in murine tumors. The radiation-sensitive ovarian carcinoma OCa-I and the radiation-resistant hepatocarcinoma HCa-I were used. Tumors, 8mm in diameter, were irradiated with 25Gy and at various times after irradiation, ranging from 1 to 48 h, were analyzed histologically for apoptosis and by western blot for alterations in the expression of these genes. The p53 status of the tumors were determined by the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism assay. Both tumors were positive for wild-type p53. Radiation induced apoptosis in OCa-I but not in HCa-I. Apoptosis developed rapidly, peaked at 2 h after irradiation and returned to almost the background level at 48 h. In OCa-I radiation upregulated the expression of p53, p21{sup waf1/cip1}, and the bcl-2/bax ratio was decreased. In HCa-I radiation increased the expression of both p53 and p21{sup waf1/cip1}, although the increase of the latter was small. The bcl-2/bax ratio was greatly increased. In general the observed changes occurred within a few hours after irradiation, and either preceded or coincided with development of apoptosis. The development of apoptosis required upregulation of both p53 and p21{sup waf1/cip1} as well as a decrease in bcl-2/bax ratio. In contrast, an increase in bcl-2/bax ratio prevented apoptosis in the presence of upregulated p53 and p21{sup waf1/cip1}. These findings identified the involvement of multiple oncogenes in apoptosis regulation in vivo and demonstrate the complexity that may be associated with the use of a single oncogene assessment for predicting the outcome of cancer therapy with cytotoxic agents. (author).

  8. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  9. Antigen localization controls T cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; van Maren, Wendy W C; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Den Brok, Martijn H M G M; Wagenaars, Jori A L; van der Schaaf, Alie; Jansen, Eric J R; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde; Figdor, Carl G; Adema, Gosse J

    2011-08-01

    Effective antitumor immunotherapy requires the identification of suitable target Ags. Interestingly, many of the tumor Ags used in clinical trials are present in preparations of secreted tumor vesicles (exosomes). In this study, we compared T cell responses elicited by murine MCA101 fibrosarcoma tumors expressing a model Ag at different localizations within the tumor cell in association with secreted vesicles (exosomes), as a nonsecreted cell-associated protein, or as secreted soluble protein. Remarkably, we demonstrated that only the tumor-secreting vesicle-bound Ag elicited a strong Ag-specific CD8(+) T cell response, CD4(+) T cell help, Ag-specific Abs, and a decrease in the percentage of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells in the tumor. Moreover, in a therapeutic tumor model of cryoablation, only in tumors secreting vesicle-bound Ag could Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells still be detected up to 16 d after therapy. We concluded that the localization of an Ag within the tumor codetermines whether a robust immunostimulatory response is elicited. In vivo, vesicle-bound Ag clearly skews toward a more immunogenic phenotype, whereas soluble or cell-associated Ag expression cannot prevent or even delay outgrowth and results in tumor tolerance. This may explain why particular immunotherapies based on these vesicle-bound tumor Ags are potentially successful. Therefore, we conclude that this study may have significant implications in the discovery of new tumor Ags suitable for immunotherapy and that their location should be taken into account to ensure a strong antitumor immune response.

  10. Rediscovering peritoneal macrophages in a murine endometriosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Li, Dong; An, Min; Li, Qiuju; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Guoyun

    2017-01-01

    What are the features of peritoneal macrophage subgroups and T helper cells in the development of murine endometriosis? During the development of endometriosis in a murine model, large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs) and small peritoneal macrophages (SPMs) are polarized into M1 and M2 cells, respectively, and the proportions of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and T regulatory (T reg ) cells are increased. Numerous studies investigating the etiology and pathogenesis of endometriosis have focused on the polarization states of peritoneal macrophages in endometriosis models and patients, but the results are inconclusive. Further studies indicate that peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs, although their roles in endometriosis are unknown. This study involves a prospective and randomized experiment. Fifty C57BL/6 female mice were randomly allocated to five control and five experimental groups (n = 5/group) according to the presence or absence of transplantation. The transplant periods are 0.25, 3, 14, 28 and 42 days. C57BL/6 mice were utilized to establish an endometriosis model by i.p. injection of allogeneic endometrial segments. Dynamic changes of peritoneal macrophage subsets and polarization profiles were evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). Macrophage morphology and density were assessed by cell counting under a microscope. Dynamic changes of Th1, Th2, Th17 and T reg cells were estimated by FCM. Peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs. The proportion of SPMs increased immediately after peritoneal injection of endometrial tissues, whereas LPMs showed an opposite trend. Peritoneal macrophages differentiated into both M1 and M2 macrophages. The bidirectional polarization of macrophages was caused by the inverse trends of polarization of LPMs and SPMs. Consistently, the proportions of Th1, Th17 and T reg cells were all increased in mice with endometriosis. N/A. In this study, detection was only performed in a

  11. In vivo preclinical low field MRI monitoring of tumor growth following a suicide gene therapy in an ortho-topic mice model of human glioblastoma;Controle par IRM bas champ in vivo de l'efficacite d'une therapie genique par gene suicide dans un modele murin de glioblastome orthotopique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, E.; Goetz, Ch.; Aubertin, G.; Constantinesco, A.; Choquet, Ph. [Service de biophysique et medecine nucleaire, hopital de Hautepierre, CHRU de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Institut de mecanique des fluides et des solides, CNRS, universite de Strasbourg, 67 - Strasbourg (France); Kintz, J.; Accart, N.; Grellier, B.; Erbs, Ph.; Rooke, R. [Transgene SA, parc d' innovation, 67 - Illkirch Graffenstaden (France)

    2010-03-15

    Purpose The aim of this study was to monitor in vivo with low field MRI growth of a murine ortho-topic glioma model following a suicide gene therapy. Methods The gene therapy consisted in the stereotactic injection in the mice brain of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara (M.V.A.) vector encoding for a suicide gene (FCU1) that transforms a non toxic pro-drug 5-fluoro-cytosine (5-F.C.) to its highly cytotoxic derivatives 5-fluorouracil (5-F.U.) and 5-fluoro-uridine-5 monophosphate (5-F.U.M.P.). Using a warmed-up imaging cell, sequential 3D T1 and T2 0.1T MRI brain examinations were performed on 16 Swiss female nu/nu mice bearing ortho-topic human glioblastoma (U 87-MG cells). The 6-week in vivo MRI follow-up consisted in a weekly measurement of the intracerebral tumor volume leading to a total of 65 examinations. Mice were divided in four groups: sham group (n = 4), sham group treated with 5-F.C. only (n = 4), sham group with injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector only (n = 4), therapy group administered with M.V.A.-FCU1 vector and 5-F.C. (n = 4). Measurements of tumor volumes were obtained after manual segmentation of T1- and T2-weighted images. Results Intra-observer and inter-observer tumor volume measurements show no significant differences. No differences were found between T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups. A significant statistical difference (p < 0.05) in T1 and T2 volume tumor doubling times between the three sham groups and the animals treated with the intratumoral injection of M.V.A.-FCU1 vector in combination with 2 weeks per os 5-F.C. administration was demonstrated. Conclusion Preclinical low field MRI was able to monitor efficacy of suicide gene therapy in delaying the tumor growth in an in vivo mouse model of ortho-topic glioblastoma. (authors)

  12. Concepts for treatment of micrometastases developed in murine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabel, F.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Current knowledge of tumor cell population growth kinetics indicates that the growth fraction (viable tumor cells undergoing active cell replication) is inversely related to population size. Tumor cells in micrometastases should, therefore, be more sensitive to anticancer drugs active against anabolizing cells than are tumor cells in the larger, grossly apparent primary tumor from which they were derived. This indicates the probability that micrometastases will be effectively responsive to more drugs than is the primary and clinically apparent tumor from which they came. Studies with at least four metastatic and uniformly fatal murine solid tumors (lung, breast, colon, and melanoma) have demonstrated significantly improved cure rates with drug treatment following surgical removal of the grossly apparent primary tumor than can be obtained with either surgery or drug treatment when used alone. Further, both disease staging and drug dosage have been shown to influence cure rates of combined-modality treatment. With several mouse tumors, a significantly smaller number of viable tumor cells can establish lethal tumors in the presence of radiation-inactivated tumor cells than in their absence. This suggests that small numbers of residual viable tumor cells in radiation-treated tumor sites may be a greater threat to clinical cure than smaller tumor cell populations remaining in situ after surgery

  13. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Manbok, E-mail: manbok66@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Rahman, Masmudur M. [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Cogle, Christopher R. [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); McFadden, Grant [Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases.

  14. Prevention of EBV lymphoma development by oncolytic myxoma virus in a murine xenograft model of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Cogle, Christopher R.; McFadden, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with a variety of epithelial and hematologic malignancies, including B-, T- and NK cell-lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease (HD), post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (LPDs), nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinomas, smooth muscle tumors, and HIV-associated lymphomas. Currently, treatment options for EBV-associated malignancies are limited. We have previously shown that myxoma virus specifically targets various human solid tumors and leukemia cells in a variety of animal models, while sparing normal human or murine tissues. Since transplant recipients of bone marrow or solid organs often develop EBV-associated post-transplant LPDs and lymphoma, myxoma virus may be of utility to prevent EBV-associated malignancies in immunocompromised transplant patients where treatment options are frequently limited. In this report, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of myxoma virus purging as a prophylactic strategy for preventing post-transplant EBV-transformed human lymphomas, using a highly immunosuppressed mouse xenotransplantation model. This provides support for developing myxoma virus as a potential oncolytic therapy for preventing EBV-associated LPDs following transplantation of bone marrow or solid organ allografts. - Highlights: • Myxoma virus effectively infects and purges EBV lymphoma cells in vivo. • Oncolytic myxoma virus effectively eradicates oncogenic EBV tumorigenesis. • Ex vivo pre-treatment of myxoma virus can be effective as a preventive treatment modality for post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases

  15. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martey, Orleans; Nimick, Mhairi; Taurin, Sebastien; Sundararajan, Vignesh; Greish, Khaled; Rosengren, Rhonda J

    2017-01-01

    Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71), that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA) micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks) also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg) for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles.

  16. In vivo relaxation time measurements on a murine tumor model--prolongation of T1 after photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y H; Hawk, R M; Ramaprasad, S

    1995-01-01

    RIF tumors implanted on mice feet were investigated for changes in relaxation times (T1 and T2) after photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photodynamic therapy was performed using Photofrin II as the photosensitizer and laser light at 630 nm. A home-built proton solenoid coil in the balanced configuration was used to accommodate the tumors, and the relaxation times were measured before, immediately after, and up to several hours after therapy. Several control experiments were performed untreated tumors, tumors treated with Photofrin II alone, or tumors treated with laser light alone. Significant increases in T1s of water protons were observed after PDT treatment. In all experiments, 31P spectra were recorded before and after the therapy to study the tumor status and to confirm the onset of PDT. These studies show significant prolongation of T1s after the PDT treatment. The spin-spin relaxation measurements, on the other hand, did not show such prolongation in T2 values after PDT treatment.

  17. Self-targeting of TNF-releasing cancer cells in preclinical models of primary and metastatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Dobroff, Andrey S; Marchiò, Serena; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Hosoya, Hitomi; Libutti, Steven K; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-23

    Circulating cancer cells can putatively colonize distant organs to form metastases or to reinfiltrate primary tumors themselves through a process termed "tumor self-seeding." Here we exploit this biological attribute to deliver tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), a potent antitumor cytokine, directly to primary and metastatic tumors in a mechanism that we have defined as "tumor self-targeting." For this purpose, we genetically engineered mouse mammary adenocarcinoma (TSA), melanoma (B16-F10), and Lewis lung carcinoma cells to produce and release murine TNF. In a series of intervention trials, systemic administration of TNF-expressing tumor cells was associated with reduced growth of both primary tumors and metastatic colonies in immunocompetent mice. We show that these malignant cells home to tumors, locally release TNF, damage neovascular endothelium, and induce massive cancer cell apoptosis. We also demonstrate that such tumor-cell-mediated delivery avoids or minimizes common side effects often associated with TNF-based therapy, such as acute inflammation and weight loss. Our study provides proof of concept that genetically modified circulating tumor cells may serve as targeted vectors to deliver anticancer agents. In a clinical context, this unique paradigm represents a personalized approach to be translated into applications potentially using patient-derived circulating tumor cells as self-targeted vectors for drug delivery.

  18. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  19. Synthesis and evaluation of novel Tc-99m labeled NGR-containing hexapeptides as tumor imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Weung; Kim, Woo Hyoung; Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn

    2015-02-01

    Asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR)-containing peptides targeting aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 can be an excellent candidate for targeting ligands in molecular tumor imaging. In this study, we developed two NGR-containing hexapeptides, and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m labeled hexapeptides as molecular imaging agents in an HT-1080 fibrosarcoma-bearing murine model. Peptides were synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiochemical purity of Tc-99m was evaluated using instant thin-layer chromatography. The uptake of two NGR-containing hexapeptides within HT-1080 cells was evaluated in vitro. In HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumor-bearing mice, gamma images were acquired. A biodistribution study was performed to calculate percentage of the injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g). Two hexapeptides, glutamic acid-cysteine-glycine (ECG)-NGR and NGR-ECG were successfully synthesized. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, the complexes Tc-99m hexapeptides were prepared in high yield. The uptake of Tc-99m ECG-NGR within the tumor cells had been assured by in vitro studies. The gamma camera imaging in the murine model showed that Tc-99m ECG-NGR was accumulated substantially in the subcutaneously engrafted tumor. However, Tc-99m NGR-ECG was accumulated minimally in the tumor. Two NGR-containing hexapeptides, ECG-NGR and NGR-ECG were developed as molecular imaging agents to target APN/CD13 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma. Tc-99m ECG-NGR showed a significant uptake in the tumor, and it is a good candidate for tumor imaging. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Vaccination directed against the human endogenous retrovirus-K (HERV-K) gag protein slows HERV-K gag expressing cell growth in a murine model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Benjamin; Fischer, Katrin; Sliva, Katja; Schnierle, Barbara S

    2014-03-26

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are remnants of ancestral infections and chromosomally integrated in all cells of an individual, are transmitted only vertically and are defective in viral replication. However enhanced expression of HERV-K accompanied by the emergence of anti-HERV-K-directed immune responses has been observed inter-alia in HIV-infected individuals and tumor patients. Therefore HERV-K might serve as a tumor-specific antigen or even as a constant target for the development of an HIV vaccine. To verify our hypothesis, we tested the immunogenicity of HERV-K Gag by using a recombinant vaccinia virus (MVA-HKcon) expressing the HERV-K Gag protein and established an animal model to test its vaccination efficacy. Murine renal carcinoma cells (Renca) were genetically altered to express E. coli beta-galactosidase (RLZ cells) and the HERV-K Gag protein (RLZ-HKGag cells). Subcutaneous application of RLZ-HKGag cells into syngenic BALB/c mice resulted in the formation of local tumors in MVA vaccinated mice. MVA-HKcon vaccination reduced the tumor growth. Furthermore, intravenous injection of RLZ-HKGag cells led to the formation of pulmonary metastases. Vaccination of tumor-bearing mice with MVA-HKcon drastically reduced the number of pulmonary RLZ-HKGag tumor nodules compared to vaccination with wild-type MVA. The data demonstrate that HERV-K Gag is a useful target for vaccine development and might offer new treatment opportunities for cancer patients.

  1. Tyrosine isomers mediate the classical phenomenon of concomitant tumor resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; di Gianni, Pedro; Isturiz, Martín A; Linskens, Susana; Speziale, Norma; Meiss, Roberto P; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2011-11-15

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon originally described in 1906 in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although recent studies have indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In this study, we identify this serum factor as tyrosine in its meta and ortho isoforms. In three different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. In addition, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isoforms were mediated, in part, by early inhibition of mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors, an issue of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients. ©2011 AACR

  2. A murine model of graft-versus-host disease induced by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiangwei; Jin Jiangang; Ning Hongmei; Yu Liquan; Feng Kai; Chen Hu; Wang Lisha

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish the model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in mice with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Methods: Bone marrow cells were combined with spleen cells of male donor C57BL/6 mice according to different proportions, then were transfused into female postradiation recipient BALB/c mice. General state, life span and histopathology of the recipient mice and detected chimera were observed. Results and Conclusion:The recipient mice groups which accepted above 5 x 10 6 donor spleen cells developed acute GVHD after different peroids of time. The GVHD model in mice after allo-BMT was successfully established. The transfusion of 5 x 10 6 -5 x 10 7 spleen cells may be adequate to establish the murine model of GVHD for the prevention and treatment of GVHD. The number of murine spleen cells can be chosen according to the experimental requirement. (authors)

  3. Pathogenesis of Candida albicans infections in the alternative chorio-allantoic membrane chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse D Jacobsen

    Full Text Available Alternative models of microbial infections are increasingly used to screen virulence determinants of pathogens. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of Candida albicans and C. glabrata infections in chicken embryos infected via the chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM and analyzed the virulence of deletion mutants. The developing immune system of the host significantly influenced susceptibility: With increasing age, embryos became more resistant and mounted a more balanced immune response, characterized by lower induction of proinflammatory cytokines and increased transcription of regulatory cytokines, suggesting that immunopathology contributes to pathogenesis. While many aspects of the chicken embryo response resembled murine infections, we also observed significant differences: In contrast to systemic infections in mice, IL-10 had a beneficial effect in chicken embryos. IL-22 and IL-17A were only upregulated after the peak mortality in the chicken embryo model occurred; thus, the role of the Th17 response in this model remains unclear. Abscess formation occurs frequently in murine models, whereas the avian response was dominated by granuloma formation. Pathogenicity of the majority of 15 tested C. albicans deletion strains was comparable to the virulence in mouse models and reduced virulence was associated with significantly lower transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. However, fungal burden did not correlate with virulence and for few mutants like bcr1Δ and tec1Δ different outcomes in survival compared to murine infections were observed. C. albicans strains locked in the yeast stage disseminated significantly more often from the CAM into the embryo, supporting the hypothesis that the yeast morphology is responsible for dissemination in systemic infections. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections in the chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections but also differs in some aspects. Despite

  4. Studies on murine plasmocytoma treatment with mistletoe lectin I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, F.; Storch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Mistletoe lectin I was tested in vivo and in vitro for its cytotoxic activity against murine plasmacytoma cells P3/X63-Ag8. As a result of this treatment, 30 to 60% of the BALB/c mice developed complete tumor regressions. 83% of the mice treated with mistletoe lectin I were resistant to viable tumor cell challenge after 100 days. The cytotoxic activity in vitro tested by 3 H-thymidine incorporation into P3/X63-Ag8 cells was very high. The rate was markedly reduced at concentrations up to 0.07 ng/ml. (author)

  5. Response of melanoma tumor phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea: a high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aïcha; Madelmont, Jean-Claude

    2003-07-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is tightly involved in tumor growth regulation and tumor cell survival. The response of phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea treatment is investigated in a murine B16 melanoma model. Measurements of phospholipid derivatives are performed on intact tumor tissue samples using one- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. During the tumor growth inhibition phase under treatment, tumors overexpress phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine, whereas phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine levels are maintained to control levels. During re-growth, which remained quantitatively much below control growth, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors overexpress phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine only. In treated melanoma, phosphatidylcholine levels show an inverse relationship with tumor growth rates. In conclusion, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors maintain their phosphatidylcholine levels and exhibit transformed phospholipid metabolism phenotype, by mechanisms that could participate in tumor cell survival.

  6. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN - ) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10 -6 M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied

  7. Immunohistochemical expression of protein 53, murine double minute 2, B-cell lymphoma 2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Hebel Cavalcanti; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel Antonio; de Amorim, Rivadavio Fernandes Batista; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lelia Batista

    2013-01-01

    Even though odontogenic cysts share a similar histogenesis, they show different growth and differentiation profile due to differences in the proliferative cellular activity. We perform an immunohistochemical assessment of protein 53 (p53), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2), and murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor analyzing their correlation with the biological behavior of these lesions. By the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with antibodies against p53, PCNA, bcl-2, and MDM2 proteins, 11 radicular cysts, 11 dentigerous cysts, and 11 keratocystic odontogenic tumor were analyzed. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskall-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05) were used to analyze the data. Immunopositivity for PCNA was observed in all cases appraised, predominantly in the suprabasal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor epithelial lining (SD ± 19.44), but no significant differences were found among the groups of lesions. Bcl-2 immunoexpression was observed especially in the basal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PCNA LI was significantly higher than bcl-2 LI in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. MDM2 and p53 immunoexpression were not detected in the lesions studied. Among the evaluated lesions, the keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed different immunoexpression of the proliferation and apoptosis markers. The results of this study suggest that the keratocystic odontogenic tumor presents distinct biological behavior of the odontogenic cysts, as for the processes of proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, reinforcing the information in favor of the neoplastic nature of this lesion.

  8. The Next Generation of Orthotopic Thyroid Cancer Models: Immunocompetent Orthotopic Mouse Models of BRAFV600E-Positive Papillary and Anaplastic Thyroid Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Borre, Pierre; McFadden, David G.; Gunda, Viswanath; Sadow, Peter M.; Varmeh, Shohreh; Bernasconi, Maria; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Background: While the development of new treatments for aggressive thyroid cancer has advanced in the last 10 years, progress has trailed headways made with other malignancies. A lack of reliable authenticated human cell lines and reproducible animal models is one major roadblock to preclinical testing of novel therapeutics. Existing xenograft and orthotopic mouse models of aggressive thyroid cancer rely on the implantation of highly passaged human thyroid carcinoma lines in immunodeficient mice. Genetically engineered models of papillary and undifferentiated (anaplastic) thyroid carcinoma (PTC and ATC) are immunocompetent; however, slow and stochastic tumor development hinders high-throughput testing. Novel models of PTC and ATC in which tumors arise rapidly and synchronously in immunocompetent mice would facilitate the investigation of novel therapeutics and approaches. Methods: We characterized and utilized mouse cell lines derived from PTC and ATC tumors arising in genetically engineered mice with thyroid-specific expression of endogenous BrafV600E/WT and deletion of either Trp53 (p53) or Pten. These murine thyroid cancer cells were transduced with luciferase- and GFP-expressing lentivirus and implanted into the thyroid glands of immunocompetent syngeneic B6129SF1/J mice in which the growth characteristics were assessed. Results: Large locally aggressive thyroid tumors form within one week of implantation. Tumors recapitulate their histologic subtype, including well-differentiated PTC and ATC, and exhibit CD3+, CD8+, B220+, and CD163+ immune cell infiltration. Tumor progression can be followed in vivo using luciferase and ex vivo using GFP. Metastatic spread is not detected at early time points. Conclusions: We describe the development of the next generation of murine orthotopic thyroid cancer models. The implantation of genetically defined murine BRAF-mutated PTC and ATC cell lines into syngeneic mice results in rapid and synchronous tumor formation. This

  9. Murine Models of Sepsis and Trauma: Can We Bridge the Gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Julie A; Raymond, Steven L; Mira, Juan C; Moldawer, Lyle L; Mohr, Alicia M; Efron, Philip A

    2017-07-01

    Sepsis and trauma are both leading causes of death in the United States and represent major public health challenges. Murine models have largely been used in sepsis and trauma research to better understand the pathophysiological changes that occur after an insult and to develop potential life-saving therapeutic agents. Mice are favorable subjects for this type of research given the variety of readily available strains including inbred, outbred, and transgenic strains. In addition, they are relatively easy to maintain and have a high fecundity. However, pharmacological therapies demonstrating promise in preclinical mouse models of sepsis and trauma often fail to demonstrate similar efficacy in human clinical trials, prompting considerable criticism surrounding the capacity of murine models to recapitulate complex human diseases like sepsis and traumatic injury. Fundamental differences between the two species include, but are not limited to, the divergence of the transcriptomic response, the mismatch of temporal response patterns, differences in both innate and adaptive immunity, and heterogeneity within the human population in comparison to the homogeneity of highly inbred mouse strains. Given the ongoing controversy, this narrative review aims to not only highlight the historical importance of the mouse as an animal research model but also highlight the current benefits and limitations of the model as it pertains to sepsis and trauma. Lastly, this review will propose future directions that may promote further use of the model. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  10. Ovarian Aging-Like Phenotype in the Hyperandrogenism-Induced Murine Model of Polycystic Ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Rezvanfar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are prominently similar symptoms, effectors, and commonalities in the majority of characteristics between ovarian aging and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS. Despite the approved role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of PCOS and aging, to our knowledge, the link between the PCO(S and aging has not been investigated yet. In this study we investigated the possible exhibition of ovarian aging phenotype in murine model of PCO induced by daily oral administration of letrozole (1 mg/kg body weight for 21 consecutive days in the female Wistar rats. Hyperandrogenization showed irregular cycles and histopathological characteristics of PCO which was associated with a significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO and reactive oxygen species (ROS and decrease in total antioxidant capacity (TAC in serum and ovary. Moreover, serum testosterone, insulin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α levels, and ovarian matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 were increased in PCO rats compared with healthy controls, while estradiol and progesterone diminished. Almost all of these findings are interestingly found to be common with the characteristics identified with (ovarian aging showing that hyperandrogenism-induced PCO in rat is associated with ovarian aging-like phenotypes. To our knowledge, this is the first report that provides evidence regarding the phenomenon of aging in PCO.

  11. SEP-induced activity and its thermographic cortical representation in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Klaus-Peter; Ruff, Roman; Kirsch, Matthias

    2013-06-01

    This article is a methodical report on the generation of reproducible changes in brain activity in a murine model. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) are used to generate synchronized cortical activity. After electrical stimulation of mice forelimbs, the potentials were recorded with a flexible thin-film polyimide electrode structure directly from the cortex. Every registration included a simultaneous recording from both hemispheres that repeated four times to reproduce and compare the results. The SEPs in the murine model were shown to generate a very stable signal. The latency of the second positive wave (P2 wave) ranged between 16 and 19 ms, and the N1-P2 amplitude ranged between 39 and 48 µV. In addition, the temperature distribution of the cortex was acquired using infrared thermography. Surface cortical temperature changed during electrical stimulation without a clear hemispheric correlation. These initial results could be a step toward a better understanding of the different synchronized cortical activities and basic methods of evaluation of various mathematical algorithms to detect them.

  12. Selumetinib Attenuates Skeletal Muscle Wasting in Murine Cachexia Model through ERK Inhibition and AKT Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan-Jun, Yang; Yan, Huo; Yong-Long, Han; Li-Li, Wan; Jie, Li; Jin-Lu, Huang; Jin, Lu; Peng-Guo, Chen; Run, Gan; Cheng, Guo

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome affecting the skeletal muscle. Previous clinical trials showed that treatment with MEK inhibitor selumetinib resulted in skeletal muscle anabolism. However, it is conflicting that MAPK/ERK pathway controls the mass of the skeletal muscle. The current study investigated the therapeutic effect and mechanisms of selumetinib in amelioration of cancer cachexia. The classical cancer cachexia model was established via transplantation of CT26 colon adenocarcinoma cells into BALB/c mice. The effect of selumetinib on body weight, tumor growth, skeletal muscle, food intake, serum proinflammatory cytokines, E3 ligases, and MEK/ERK-related pathways was analyzed. Two independent experiments showed that 30 mg/kg/d selumetinib prevented the loss of body weight in murine cachexia mice. Muscle wasting was attenuated and the expression of E3 ligases, MuRF1 and Fbx32, was inhibited following selumetinib treatment of the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, selumetinib efficiently reduced tumor burden without influencing the cancer cell proliferation, cumulative food intake, and serum cytokines. These results indicated that the role of selumetinib in attenuating muscle wasting was independent of cancer burden. Detailed analysis of the mechanism revealed AKT and mTOR were activated, while ERK, FoxO3a, and GSK3β were inhibited in the selumetinib -treated cachexia group. These indicated that selumetinib effectively prevented skeletal muscle wasting in cancer cachexia model through ERK inhibition and AKT activation in gastrocnemius muscle via cross-inhibition. The study not only elucidated the mechanism of MEK/ERK inhibition in skeletal muscle anabolism, but also validated selumetinib therapy as an effective intervention against cancer cachexia. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 334-43. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia amin.oroji@siswa.um.edu.my, mohd@um.edu.my (Malaysia); Yarahmadian, Shantia [Mathematics Department Mississippi State University, USA Syarahmadian@math.msstate.edu (United States)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan.

  14. A new ODE tumor growth modeling based on tumor population dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oroji, Amin; Omar, Mohd bin; Yarahmadian, Shantia

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new mathematical model for the population of tumor growth treated by radiation is proposed. The cells dynamics population in each state and the dynamics of whole tumor population are studied. Furthermore, a new definition of tumor lifespan is presented. Finally, the effects of two main parameters, treatment parameter (q), and repair mechanism parameter (r) on tumor lifespan are probed, and it is showed that the change in treatment parameter (q) highly affects the tumor lifespan

  15. Utilization of metabonomics to identify serum biomarkers in murine H22 hepatocarcinoma and deduce antitumor mechanism of Rhizoma Paridis saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Peiyu; Man, Shuli; Yang, He; Fan, Wei; Yu, Peng; Gao, Wenyuan

    2016-08-25

    Murine H22 hepatocarcinoma model is so popular to be used for the preclinical anticancer candidate's evaluation. However, the metabolic biomarkers of this model were not identified. Meanwhile, Rhizoma Paridis saponins (RPS) as natural products have been found to show strong antitumor activity, while its anti-cancer mechanism is not clear. To search for potential metabolite biomarkers of this model, serum metabonomics approach was applied to detect the variation of metabolite biomarkers and the related metabolism genes and signaling pathway were used to deduce the antitumor mechanisms of RPS. As a result, ten serum metabolites were identified in twenty-four mice including healthy mice, non-treated cancer mice, RPS-treated cancer mice and RPS-treated healthy mice. RPS significantly decreased tumor weight correlates to down-regulating lactate, acetate, N-acetyl amino acid and glutamine signals (p < 0.05), which were marked metabolites screened according to the very important person (VIP), loading plot and receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) tests. For the analysis of metabolic enzyme related genes, RPS reversed the aerobic glycolysis through activating tumor suppressor p53 and PTEN, and suppressed FASN to inhibit lipogenesis. What's more, RPS repressed Myc and GLS expression and decreased glutamine level. The regulating PI3K/Akt/mTOR and HIF-1α/Myc/Ras networks also participated in these metabolic changes. Taken together, RPS suppressed ATP product made the tumor growth slow, which indicated a good anti-cancer effect and new angle for understanding the mechanism of RPS. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the utility of (1)H NMR metabolic profiles taken together with tumor weight and viscera index was a promising screening tool for evaluating the antitumor effect of candidates. In addition, RPS was a potent anticancer agent through inhibiting cancer cellular metabolism to suppress proliferation in hepatoma H22 tumor murine, which promoted the

  16. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  17. Molecular mechanism behind the synergistic activity of diphenylmethyl selenocyanate and Cisplatin against murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Pramita; Roy, Somnath Singha; Bhattacharya, Sudin

    2015-01-01

    Various preclinical, clinical and epidemiological studies have already well established the cancer chemopreventive and chemoprotective potential of selenium compounds. In addition to its protective efficacy, recent studies have also proved the abilities of selenium compounds to induce cell death specifically in malignant cells. Therefore, our intention is to improve the therapeutic efficacy of an alkylating agent, cisplatin, by the adjuvant use of an organoselenium compound, diphenylmethyl selenocyanate (DMSE). It was observed that combined treatment decreased the tumor burden significantly through reactive oxygen species generation and modulation of antioxidant and detoxifying enzyme system in tumor cells. These activities ultimately led to significant DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor cells. Study of the molecular pathway disclosed that the adjuvant treatment caused induction of p53, Bax and suppressed Bcl-2 followed by the activation of caspase cascade. Furthermore, a concomitant decrease in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and hematopoietic toxicity by DMSE might also have enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin and provided survival advantage to the host. Results suggested that the combination treatment with DMSE and cisplatin may offer potential therapeutic benefit, and utilization of cisplatin in cancer chemotherapy exempt of its limitations.

  18. Systemic agonistic anti-CD40 treatment of tumor bearing mice modulates hepatic myeloid suppressive cells and causes immune-mediated liver damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Ma, Chi; Duffy, Austin; Eggert, Tobias; Hawk, Nga; Kleiner, David E.; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F.

    2015-01-01

    Immune stimulatory monoclonal antibodies are currently evaluated as anti tumor agents. Although overall toxicity appears to be moderate, liver toxicities have been reported and are not completely understood. We studied the effect of systemic CD40 antibody treatment on myeloid cells in spleen and liver. Naïve and tumor-bearing mice were treated systemically with agonistic anti-CD40 antibody. Immune cell subsets in liver and spleen, serum transaminases and liver histologies were analyzed after antibody administration. Nox2−/−, Cd40−/− as well as bone marrow chimeric mice were used to study the mechanism by which agonistic anti-CD40 mediates its effects in vivo. Suppressor function of murine and human tumor-induced myeloid derived suppressive cells was studied upon CD40 ligation. Agonistic CD40 antibody caused liver damage within 24 hours after injection in two unrelated tumor models and mice strains. Using bone marrow chimeras we demonstrated that CD40 antibody-induced hepatitis in tumor-bearing mice was dependent on the presence of CD40-expressing hematopoietic cells. Agonistic CD40 ligation-dependent liver damage was induced by the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, agonistic CD40 antibody resulted in increased CD80 and CD40 positive liver CD11b+Gr-1+ immature myeloid cells. CD40 ligation on tumor-induced murine and human CD14+HLA-DRlow PBMC from cancer patients reduced their immune suppressor function. Collectively, agonistic CD40 antibody treatment activated tumor-induced, myeloid cells, caused myeloid dependent hepatotoxicity and ameliorated the suppressor function of murine and human MDSC. Collectively, our data suggests that CD40 may mature immunosuppressive myeloid cells and thereby cause liver damage in mice with an accumulation of tumor-induced hepatic MDSC. PMID:25637366

  19. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    , and a comparison of these models with the human AD transcriptomic fingerprint is lacking. We sought to evaluate the transcriptomic profiles of six common murine models and determine how they relate to human AD skin. Transcriptomic profiling was performed using microarrays and qRT-PCR on biopsies from NC/Nga, flaky...

  20. In vitro and in vivo investigation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic tumor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprague, Jennifer E. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Li Wenping [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Liang Kexian [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Achilefu, Samuel [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Anderson, Carolyn J. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)]. E-mail: andersoncj@wustl.edu

    2006-02-15

    Introduction: Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, has been correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types including lung, colon and breast. Noninvasive detection of MMP expression might allow physicians to better determine when more aggressive cancer therapy is appropriate. The peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) was identified as a selective inhibitor of MMP-2/9 that inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer xenografts. Methods: CTT was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) for radiolabeling with {sup 64}Cu (t {sub 1/2}=12.7 h, 17.4% {beta}{sup +}, 39% {beta}{sup -}), a radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET). In vitro affinity was determined in a fluorogenic substrate assay. Tumor gelatinase targeting was evaluated in both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results: Cu(II)-DOTA-CTT inhibited hMMP-2 (EC{sub 5}=8.7 {mu}M) and mMMP-9 (EC{sub 5}=18.2 {mu}M) with similar affinity to CTT (hMMP-2 EC{sub 5}=13.2 {mu}M; mMMP-9 EC{sub 5}=11.0 {mu}M). In biodistribution and microPET imaging studies, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT was taken up by MMP-2/9-positive B16F10 murine melanoma tumors. Subsequently, imaging studies using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT were performed on MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice. With zymography, tumor MMP-2/9 expression in this model was shown to be inconsistent, resulting in microPET detection of the MDA-MB-435 tumor in only 1 of 24 imaged mice. Following limited imaging success, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT was shown to have poor in vivo stability. Conclusions: Despite some evidence for selective uptake of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT by gelatinase-expressing tumors, the low affinity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in vivo instability make this an inadequate radioligand for in vivo tumor evaluation.

  1. In vitro and in vivo investigation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, Jennifer E.; Li Wenping; Liang Kexian; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, has been correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types including lung, colon and breast. Noninvasive detection of MMP expression might allow physicians to better determine when more aggressive cancer therapy is appropriate. The peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) was identified as a selective inhibitor of MMP-2/9 that inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer xenografts. Methods: CTT was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) for radiolabeling with 64 Cu (t 1/2 =12.7 h, 17.4% β + , 39% β - ), a radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET). In vitro affinity was determined in a fluorogenic substrate assay. Tumor gelatinase targeting was evaluated in both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results: Cu(II)-DOTA-CTT inhibited hMMP-2 (EC 5 =8.7 μM) and mMMP-9 (EC 5 =18.2 μM) with similar affinity to CTT (hMMP-2 EC 5 =13.2 μM; mMMP-9 EC 5 =11.0 μM). In biodistribution and microPET imaging studies, 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT was taken up by MMP-2/9-positive B16F10 murine melanoma tumors. Subsequently, imaging studies using 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT were performed on MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice. With zymography, tumor MMP-2/9 expression in this model was shown to be inconsistent, resulting in microPET detection of the MDA-MB-435 tumor in only 1 of 24 imaged mice. Following limited imaging success, 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT was shown to have poor in vivo stability. Conclusions: Despite some evidence for selective uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT by gelatinase-expressing tumors, the low affinity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in vivo instability make this an inadequate radioligand for in vivo tumor evaluation

  2. In Vivo Imaging of Prostate Cancer Tumors and Metastasis Using Non-Specific Fluorescent Nanoparticles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Genevois

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available With the growing interest in the use of nanoparticles (NPs in nanomedicine, there is a crucial need for imaging and targeted therapies to determine NP distribution in the body after systemic administration, and to achieve strong accumulation in tumors with low background in other tissues. Accumulation of NPs in tumors results from different mechanisms, and appears extremely heterogeneous in mice models and rather limited in humans. Developing new tumor models in mice, with their low spontaneous NP accumulation, is thus necessary for screening imaging probes and for testing new targeting strategies. In the present work, accumulation of LipImageTM 815, a non-specific nanosized fluorescent imaging agent, was compared in subcutaneous, orthotopic and metastatic tumors of RM1 cells (murine prostate cancer cell line by in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging techniques. LipImageTM 815 mainly accumulated in liver at 24 h but also in orthotopic tumors. Limited accumulation occurred in subcutaneous tumors, and very low fluorescence was detected in metastasis. Altogether, these different tumor models in mice offered a wide range of NP accumulation levels, and a panel of in vivo models that may be useful to further challenge NP targeting properties.

  3. Tumor heterogeneity and progression: conceptual foundations for modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greller, L D; Tobin, F L; Poste, G

    1996-01-01

    A conceptual foundation for modeling tumor progression, growth, and heterogeneity is presented. The purpose of such models is to aid understanding, test ideas, formulate experiments, and to model cancer 'in machina' to address the dynamic features of tumor cell heterogeneity, progression, and growth. The descriptive capabilities of such an approach provides a consistent language for qualitatively reasoning about tumor behavior. This approach provides a schema for building conceptual models that combine three key phenomenological driving elements: growth, progression, and genetic instability. The growth element encompasses processes contributing to changes in tumor bulk and is distinct from progression per se. The progression element subsumes a broad collection of processes underlying phenotypic progression. The genetics elements represents heritable changes which potentially affect tumor character and behavior. Models, conceptual and mathematical, can be built for different tumor situations by drawing upon the interaction of these three distinct driving elements. These models can be used as tools to explore a diversity of hypotheses concerning dynamic changes in cellular populations during tumor progression, including the generation of intratumor heterogeneity. Such models can also serve to guide experimentation and to gain insight into dynamic aspects of complex tumor behavior.

  4. Gender and dose dependent ovalbumin induced hypersensitivity responses in murine model of food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    While federal regulations mandate the labeling of major food allergens, allowable food allergen thresholds have yet to be determined. Therefore the aim of this project was to identify the lowest egg allergen ovalbumin (OVA) dose causing hypersensitization using a validated murine model. Mice were or...

  5. Oxaliplatin but Not Irinotecan Impairs Posthepatectomy Liver Regeneration in a Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry A. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We examined the murine hepatectomy model of liver regeneration (LR in the setting of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were randomized to receive neoadjuvant intraperitoneal (IP injections of a control, oxaliplatin (15 mg/kg, or irinotecan (100 mg/Kg or 250 mg/Kg solution. Hepatectomy (70% was performed 14 days after the final IP treatment. Animals were sacrificed at postoperative day (D 0, 1, 2, 3, and 7. Liver remnants and serum were collected for analysis. -tests for independent samples were used for statistical comparisons. Results. For oxaliplatin, percent LR did not differ at D1 or D2 but was significantly less at D3 (89.0% versus 70.0%, =0.048 with no difference on D7 (=0.21. Irinotecan-treated mice at both dose levels (100 mg/Kg and 250 mg/Kg showed no significant differences in LR. BrdU incorporation was significantly decreased in oxaliplatin-treated animals (D1,2,3. Conclusions. Neoadjuvant oxaliplatin but not irinotecan impairs early LR in a posthepatectomy murine model which correlates with decreased DNA synthesis.

  6. Oxaliplatin but Not Irinotecan Impairs Posthepatectomy Liver Regeneration in a Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Perry A.; Liu, Nian; Castillo, Erick; Foster, Brock; Artinyan, Avo; Kim, Joseph; Huang, Wendong; Wagman, Lawrence D.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. We examined the murine hepatectomy model of liver regeneration (LR) in the setting of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods. C57BL/6 mice were randomized to receive neoadjuvant intraperitoneal (IP) injections of a control, oxaliplatin (15 mg/kg), or irinotecan (100 mg/Kg or 250 mg/Kg) solution. Hepatectomy (70%) was performed 14 days after the final IP treatment. Animals were sacrificed at postoperative day (D) 0, 1, 2, 3, and 7. Liver remnants and serum were collected for analysis. T-tests for independent samples were used for statistical comparisons. Results. For oxaliplatin, percent LR did not differ at D1 or D2 but was significantly less at D3 (89.0% versus 70.0%, P = 0.048) with no difference on D7 (P = 0.21). Irinotecan-treated mice at both dose levels (100 mg/Kg and 250 mg/Kg) showed no significant differences in LR. BrdU incorporation was significantly decreased in oxaliplatin-treated animals (D1,2,3). Conclusions. Neoadjuvant oxaliplatin but not irinotecan impairs early LR in a posthepatectomy murine model which correlates with decreased DNA synthesis. PMID:22164336

  7. Silibinin inhibits accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth of murine breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forghani, Parvin; Khorramizadeh, Mohammad R; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC)s increase in blood and accumulate in the tumor microenvironment of tumor-bearing animals, contributing to immune suppression in cancer. Silibinin, a natural flavonoid from the seeds of milk thistle, has been developed as an anti-inflammatory agent and supportive care agent to reduce the toxicity of cancer chemotherapy. The goals of this study were to evaluate the effect of silibinin on MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice and antitumor activity of silibinin in a mouse model of breast cancer. 4T1 luciferase-transfected mammary carcinoma cells were injected into in the mammary fat pad female BALB/c mice, and female CB17-Prkdc Scid/J mice. Silibinin treatment started on day 4 or day 14 after tumor inoculation continued every other day. Tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescent imaging (BLI) measuring total photon flux. Flow cytometry measured total leukocytes, CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSC, and T cells in the blood and tumors of tumor-bearing mice. The effects of silibinin on 4T1 cell viability in vitro were measured by BLI. Treatment with silibinin increased overall survival in mice harboring tumors derived from the 4T1-luciferase breast cancer cell line, and reduced tumor volumes and numbers of CD11b + Gr-1 + MDSCs in the blood and tumor, and increased the content of T cells in the tumor microenvironment. Silibinin failed to inhibit tumor growth in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency mice, supporting the hypothesis that anticancer effect of silibinin is immune-mediated. The antitumor activity of silibinin requires an intact host immune system and is associated with decreased accumulation of blood and tumor-associated MDSCs

  8. Genetic modelling of PIM proteins in cancer: proviral tagging, cooperation with oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and carcinogens.

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    Enara eAguirre

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The PIM proteins, which were initially discovered as proviral insertion sites in Moloney murine leukemia virus infection, are a family of highly homologous serine/threonine kinases that have been reported to be overexpressed in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. The PIM proteins have also been associated with metastasis and overall treatment responses and implicated in the regulation of apoptosis, metabolism, the cell cycle, and homing and migration, which makes these proteins interesting targets for anticancer drug discovery. The use of retroviral insertional mutagenesis and refined approaches such as complementation tagging has allowed the identification of myc, pim and a third group of genes (including bmi1 and gfi1 as complementing genes in lymphomagenesis. Moreover, mouse modeling of human cancer has provided an understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in tumor initiation and progression at the physiological level. In particular, genetically modified mice have allowed researchers to further elucidate the role of each of the Pim isoforms in various tumor types. PIM kinases have been identified as weak oncogenes because experimental overexpression in lymphoid tissue, prostate and liver induces tumors at a relatively low incidence and with a long latency. However, very strong synergistic tumorigenicity between Pim1/2 and c-Myc and other oncogenes has been observed in lymphoid tissues. Mouse models have also been used to study whether the inhibition of specific PIM isoforms is required to prevent carcinogen-induced sarcomas, indicating that the absence of Pim2 and Pim3 greatly reduces sarcoma growth and bone invasion; the extent of this effect is similar to that observed in the absence of all 3 isoforms. This review will summarize some of the animal models that have been used to understand the isoform-specific contribution of PIM kinases to tumorigenesis.

  9. Effect of a mouse mammary tumor virus-derived protein vaccine on primary tumor development in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, P.; Ouwehand, J.; Bentveizen, P.

    1978-01-01

    The vaccines used in this study were derived from purified murine mammary tumor virus (MuMTV) preparations. Approximately 60% of the protein fractions consisted of the major viral membrane glycoprotein gp52. Inoculation sc of 10 pg MuMTV-S-derived vaccine significantly delayed the appearance of

  10. Histone modification enhances the effectiveness of IL-13 receptor targeted immunotoxin in murine models of human pancreatic cancer

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    Puri Raj K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-13 Receptor α2 (IL-13Rα2 is a tumor-associated antigen and target for cancer therapy. Since IL-13Rα2 is heterogeneously overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, it would be highly desirable to uniformly upregulate IL-13Rα2 expression in tumors for optimal targeting. Methods We examined epigenetic regulation of IL-13Rα2 in a murine model of human pancreatic cancer by Bisulfite-PCR, sequencing for DNA methylation and chromatin immunoprecipitation for histone modification. Reverse transcription-PCR was performed for examining changes in IL-13Rα2 mRNA expression after treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC and c-jun inhibitors. In vitro cytotoxicity assays and in vivo testing in animal tumor models were performed to determine whether HDAC inhibitors could enhance anti-tumor effects of IL-13-PE in pancreatic cancer. Mice harboring subcutaneous tumors were treated with HDAC inhibitors systemically and IL-13-PE intratumorally. Results We found that CpG sites in IL-13Rα2 promoter region were not methylated in all pancreatic cancer cell lines studied including IL-13Rα2-positive and IL-13Rα2-negative cell lines and normal cells. On the other hand, histones at IL-13Rα2 promoter region were highly-acetylated in IL-13Rα2-positive but much less in receptor-negative pancreatic cancer cell lines. When cells were treated with HDAC inhibitors, not only histone acetylation but also IL-13Rα2 expression was dramatically enhanced in receptor-negative pancreatic cancer cells. In contrast, HDAC inhibition did not increase IL-13Rα2 in normal cell lines. In addition, c-jun in IL-13Rα2-positive cells was expressed at higher level than in negative cells. Two types of c-jun inhibitors prevented increase of IL-13Rα2 by HDAC inhibitors. HDAC inhibitors dramatically sensitized cancer cells to immunotoxin in the cytotoxicity assay in vitro and increased IL-13Rα2 in the tumors subcutaneously implanted in the immunodeficient

  11. Tumor-specific CD4+ T cells develop cytotoxic activity and eliminate virus-induced tumor cells in the absence of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Schimmer, Simone; Brandau, Sven; Altenhoff, Petra; Sparwasser, Tim; Dittmer, Ulf

    2013-02-01

    The important role of tumor-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells is well defined in the immune control of the tumors, but the role of effector CD4(+) T cells is poorly understood. In the current research, we have used a murine retrovirus-induced tumor cell line of C57BL/6 mouse origin, namely FBL-3 cells, as a model to study basic mechanisms of immunological control and escape during tumor formation. This study shows that tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells are able to protect against virus-induced tumor cells. We show here that there is an expansion of tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells producing cytokines and cytotoxic molecule granzyme B (GzmB) in the early phase of tumor growth. Importantly, we demonstrate that in vivo depletion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD8(+) T cells in FBL-3-bearing DEREG transgenic mice augments IL-2 and GzmB production by CD4(+) T cells and increases FV-specific CD4(+) T-cell effector and cytotoxic responses leading to the complete tumor regression. Therefore, the capacity to reject tumor acquired by tumor-reactive CD4(+) T cells largely depends on the direct suppressive activity of Tregs. We suggest that a cytotoxic CD4(+) T-cell immune response may be induced to enhance resistance against oncovirus-associated tumors.

  12. Pulsed Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Cisplatin Results in Superior Tumor Growth Delay in a Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kurt; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Thomas G.; Hanna, Alaa; Dabjan, Mohamad; Hege, Katie M.; Wilson, George D.; Grills, Inga; Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 3-week schedules of low-dose pulsed radiation treatment (PRT) and standard radiation therapy (SRT), with concurrent cisplatin (CDDP) in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous UT-SCC-14 tumors were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. A total of 30 Gy was administered as 2 Gy/d, 5 d/wk for 3 weeks, either by PRT (10 × 0.2 Gy/d, with a 3-minute break between each 0.2-Gy dose) or SRT (2 Gy/d, uninterrupted delivery) in combination with concurrent 2 mg/kg CDDP 3 times per week in the final 2 weeks of radiation therapy. Treatment-induced growth delays were defined from twice-weekly tumor volume measurements. Tumor hypoxia was assessed by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging, and calculated maximum standardized uptake values compared with tumor histology. Tumor vessel density and hypoxia were measured by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Normal tissues effects were evaluated in gut and skin. Results: Untreated tumors grew to 1000 mm{sup 3} in 25.4 days (±1.2), compared with delays of 62.3 days (±3.5) for SRT + CDDP and 80.2 days (±5.0) for PRT + CDDP. Time to reach 2× pretreatment volume ranged from 8.2 days (±1.8) for untreated tumors to 67.1 days (±4.7) after PRT + CDDP. Significant differences in tumor growth delay were observed for SRT versus SRT + CDDP (P=.04), PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.035), and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.033), and for survival between PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.017) and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.008). Differences in tumor hypoxia were evident by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging between SRT and PRT (P=.025), although not with concurrent CDDP. Tumor vessel density differed between SRT + CDDP and PRT + CDDP (P=.011). No differences in normal tissue parameters were seen. Conclusions: Concurrent CDDP was more effective in combination PRT than SRT at

  13. Cyclophosphamide Enhances Human Tumor Growth in Nude Rat Xenografted Tumor Models

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    Yingjen Jeffrey Wu

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the immunomodulatory chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide (CTX on tumor growth was investigated in primary and metastatic intracerebral and subcutaneous rat xenograft models. Nude rats were treated with CTX (100 mg/kg, intraperitoneally 24 hours before human ovarian carcinoma (SKOV3, small cell lung carcinoma (LX-1 SCLC, and glioma (UW28, U87MG, and U251 tumor cells were inoculated subcutaneously, intraperitoneally, or in the right cerebral hemisphere or were infused into the right internal carotid artery. Tumor development was monitored and recorded. Potential mechanisms were further investigated. Only animals that received both CTX and Matrigel showed consistent growth of subcutaneous tumors. Cyclophosphamide pretreatment increased the percentage (83.3% vs 0% of animals showing intraperitoneal tumors. In intracerebral implantation tumor models, CTX pretreatment increased the tumor volume and the percentage of animals showing tumors. Cyclophosphamide increased lung carcinoma bone and facial metastases after intra-arterial injection, and 20% of animals showed brain metastases. Cyclophosphamide transiently decreased nude rat white blood cell counts and glutathione concentration, whereas serum vascular endothelial growth factor was significantly elevated. Cyclophosphamide also increased CD31 reactivity, a marker of vascular endothelium, and macrophage (CD68-positive infiltration into glioma cell-inoculated rat brains. Cyclophosphamide may enhance primary and metastatic tumor growth through multiple mechanisms, including immune modulation, decreased response to oxidative stress, increased tumor vascularization, and increased macrophage infiltration. These findings may be clinically relevant because chemotherapy may predispose human cancer subjects to tumor growth in the brain or other tissues.

  14. The raccoon polyomavirus genome and tumor antigen transcription are stable and abundant in neuroglial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostoff, Terza; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Church, Molly E; Woolard, Kevin D; Pesavento, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) is associated with 100% of neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons. Other tumor-associated polyomaviruses (PyVs), including simian virus 40 (SV40), murine PyV, and Merkel cell PyV, are found integrated in the host genome in neoplastic cells, where they constitutively express splice variants of the tumor antigen (TAg) gene. We have previously reported that RacPyV exists only as an episome (nonintegrated) in neuroglial tumors. Here, we have investigated TAg transcription in primary tumor tissue by transcriptome analysis, and we identified the alternatively spliced TAg transcripts for RacPyV. We also determined that TAg was highly transcribed relative to host cellular genes. We further colocalized TAg DNA and mRNA by in situ hybridization and found that the majority of tumor cells showed positive staining. Lastly, we examined the stability of the viral genome and TAg transcription by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in cultured tumor cells in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model. When tumor cells were cultured in vitro, TAg transcription increased nearly 2 log-fold over that of parental tumor tissue by passage 17. Both episomal viral genome and TAg transcription were faithfully maintained in culture and in tumors arising from xenotransplantation of cultured cells in mice. This study represents a minimal criterion for RacPyV's association with neuroglial tumors and a novel mechanism of stability for a polyomavirus in cancer. The natural cycle of polyomaviruses in mammals is to persist in the host without causing disease, but they can cause cancer in humans or in other animals. Because this is an unpredictable and rare event, the oncogenic potential of polyomavirus is primarily evaluated in laboratory animal models. Recently, raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) was identified in neuroglial tumors of free-ranging raccoons. Viral copy number was consistently high in these tumors but was low or undetectable in nontumor tissue or in

  15. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated RL71 micelles suppress tumor growth in a murine xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer

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    Martey O

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Orleans Martey,1 Mhairi Nimick,1 Sebastien Taurin,1 Vignesh Sundararajan,1 Khaled Greish,2 Rhonda J Rosengren1 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 2Department of Molecular Medicine, College of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Patients with triple negative breast cancer have a poor prognosis due in part to the lack of targeted therapies. In the search for novel drugs, our laboratory has developed a second-generation curcumin derivative, 3,5-bis(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzylidene-1-methylpiperidine-4-one (RL71, that exhibits potent in vitro cytotoxicity. To improve the clinical potential of this drug, we have encapsulated it in styrene maleic acid (SMA micelles. SMA-RL71 showed improved biodistribution, and drug accumulation in the tumor increased 16-fold compared to control. SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg, intravenously, two times a week for 2 weeks also significantly suppressed tumor growth compared to control in a xenograft model of triple negative breast cancer. Free RL71 was unable to alter tumor growth. Tumors from SMA-RL71-treated mice showed a decrease in angiogenesis and an increase in apoptosis. The drug treatment also modulated various cell signaling proteins including the epidermal growth factor receptor, with the mechanisms for tumor suppression consistent with previous work with RL71 in vitro. The nanoformulation was also nontoxic as shown by normal levels of plasma markers for liver and kidney injury following weekly administration of SMA-RL71 (10 mg/kg for 90 days. Thus, we report clinical potential following encapsulation of a novel curcumin derivative, RL71, in SMA micelles. Keywords: curcumin derivatives, nanomedicine, EGFR, biodistribution

  16. Haploidentical hematopoietic SCT increases graft-versus-tumor effect against renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budak-Alpdogan, T; Sauter, C T; Bailey, C P; Biswas, C S; Panis, M M; Civriz, S; Flomenberg, N; Alpdogan, O

    2013-08-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT) has been shown to be an effective treatment option for advanced renal cell cancer (RCC). However, tumor resistance/relapse remains as the main post transplant issue. Therefore, enhancing graft-versus-tumor (GVT) activity without increasing GVHD is critical for improving the outcome of HSCT. We explored the GVT effect of haploidentical-SCT (haplo-SCT) against RCC in murine models. Lethally irradiated CB6F1 (H2K(b/d)) recipients were transplanted with T-cell-depleted BM cells from B6CBAF1 (H2K(b/k)) mice. Haplo-SCT combined with a low-dose haploidentical (HI) T-cell infusion (1 × 10(5)) successfully provided GVT activity without incurring GVHD. This effect elicited murine RCC growth control and consequently displayed a comparative survival advantage of haplo-SCT recipients when compared with MHC-matched (B6D2F1CB6F1) and parent-F1 (B6CB6F1) transplant recipients. Recipients of haplo-SCT had an increase in donor-derived splenic T-cell numbers, T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ-secreting donor-derived T-cells, a critical aspect for anti-tumor activity. The splenocytes from B6CBAF1 mice had a higher cytotoxicity against RENCA cells than the splenocytes from B6 and B6D2F1 donors after tumor challenge. These findings suggest that haplo-SCT might be an innovative immunotherapeutic platform for solid tumors, particularly for renal cell carcinoma.

  17. Anti-inflammatory effects of rebamipide eyedrop administration on ocular lesions in a murine model of primary Sjögren's syndrome.

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    Rieko Arakaki

    Full Text Available Topical therapy is effective for dry eye, and its prolonged effects should help in maintaining the quality of life of patients with dry eye. We previously reported that the oral administration of rebamipide (Reb, a mucosal protective agent, had a potent therapeutic effect on autoimmune lesions in a murine model of Sjögren's syndrome (SS. However, the effects of topical treatment with Reb eyedrops on the ocular lesions in the murine model of SS are unknown.Reb eyedrops were administered to the murine model of SS aged 4-8 weeks four times daily. Inflammatory lesions of the extraorbital and intraorbital lacrimal glands and Harderian gland tissues were histologically evaluated. The direct effects of Reb on the lacrimal glands were analyzed using cultured lacrimal gland cells. Tear secretions of Reb-treated mice were significantly increased compared with those of untreated mice. In addition to the therapeutic effect of Reb treatment on keratoconjunctivitis, severe inflammatory lesions of intraorbital lacrimal gland tissues in this model of SS were resolved. The mRNA expression levels of IL-10 and mucin 5Ac in conjunctival tissues from Reb-treated mice was significantly increased compared with those of control mice. Moreover, lactoferrin production from lacrimal gland cells was restored by Reb treatment.Topical Reb administration had an anti-inflammatory effect on the ocular autoimmune lesions in the murine model of SS and a protective effect on the ocular surfaces.

  18. Uptake of radiolabeled anti-CEA antibodies in human colorectal primary tumors as a function of tumor mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.E.; Bares, R.B.; Buell, U.; Fass, J.; Schumpelick, V.; Hauptmann, S.

    1993-01-01

    An inverse correlation has been demonstrated between tumor uptake (u, in units of % injected dose/kg) of monoclonal antibody (Mab) and tumor mass (m, in units of g) for colorectal carcinoma in a series of 19 consecutive patients. The correlation (ρ=-0.510), developed using surgical samples was of the form u=ab b and was significant at the 2% level of confidence. All tumors were positive for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and the radiopharmaceutical was in iodine-131 labeled anti-CEA Mab. Such correlations have been predicted earlier from murine and rat tumor uptake data. The slope parameter (b) was -0.362, a number consistent with the previous value (-0.382) found in anti-CEA experiments in mice bearing human xenograft LS174T tumors. (orig.)

  19. Optimization of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) to retard breast cancer tumor growth and vascularity

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Ivan L; Markov, Marko S; Hardman, W Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background This study provided additional data on the effects of a therapeutic electromagnetic field (EMF) device on growth and vascularization of murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma cells implanted in C3H/HeJ mice. Methods The therapeutic EMF device generated a defined 120 Hz semi sine wave pulse signal of variable intensity. Murine 16/C mammary adenocarcinoma tumor fragments were implanted subcutaneously between the scapulae of syngeneic C3H mice. Once the tumor grew to 100 mm3, daily EMF tr...

  20. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase contributes to the anti-inflammatory effect of antimicrobial triclocarban in a murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junyan; Qiu Hong; Morisseau, Christophe; Hwang, Sung Hee; Tsai, Hsing-Ju; Ulu, Arzu; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2011-01-01

    The increasing use of the antimicrobial triclocarban (TCC) in personal care products (PCPs) has resulted in concern regarding environmental pollution. TCC is a potent inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH). Inhibitors of sEH (sEHIs) are anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and cardio-protective in multiple animal models. However, the in vivo effects anticipated from a sEHI have not been reported for TCC. Here we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects in vivo of TCC in a murine model. TCC was employed in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine model. Systolic blood pressure, plasma levels of several inflammatory cytokines and chemokine, and metabolomic profile of plasma oxylipins were determined. TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. TCC significantly repressed the increased release of inflammatory cytokines and chemokine caused by LPS. Furthermore, TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo in a time-dependent manner towards resolution of inflammation as expected from a sEHI. These results demonstrated that at the doses used TCC is anti-inflammatory in the murine model. This study suggests that TCC may provide some benefits in humans in addition to its antimicrobial activities due to its potent inhibition of sEH. It may be a promising starting point for developing new low volume high value applications of TCC. However these biological effects also caution against the general over use of TCC in PCPs. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: → Anti-microbial triclocarban (TCC) is anti-inflammatory in a murine model. → TCC significantly shifted the oxylipin profile in vivo as expected from a sEHI. → TCC significantly reversed LPS-induced morbid hypotension in a time-dependent manner. → TCC significantly repressed LPS-induced increased release of inflammatory cytokines.

  1. Isolated tumor endothelial cells maintain specific character during long-term culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Kohei; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Muraki, Chikara; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kurosu, Takuro; Akino, Tomoshige; Shih, Shou-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is necessary for solid tumor progression and metastasis. Increasing evidence indicates that tumor endothelial cells (TECs) are more relevant to the study of tumor angiogenesis than normal endothelial cells (NECs) because their morphologies and gene expression are different from NECs. However, it is challenging to isolate and culture large numbers of pure ECs from tumor tissue since the percentage of ECs is only about 1-2% and tumor cells and fibroblasts easily overgrow them. In addition, there has been concern that isolated TECs may lose their special phenotype once they are dissociated from tumor cells. In this study, we have successfully purified murine TECs from four different human tumor xenografts and NECs from murine dermal tissue. Isolated ECs expressed endothelial markers, such as CD31, VE-cadherin (CD144), and endoglin (CD105), for more than 3 months after isolation. TECs maintained tumor endothelial-specific markers, such as tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) and aminopeptidase N (APN), as in tumor blood vessels in vivo. In addition, TECs were more proliferative and motile than NECs. TECs showed a higher response to VEGF and higher expression of VEGF receptors-1 and -2 than NECs did. Stem cell antigen-1 was up-regulated in all four TECs, suggesting that they have a kind of stemness. Cultured TECs maintain distinct biological differences from NECs as in vivo. In conclusion, it was suggested that TECs are relevant material for tumor angiogenesis research.

  2. Combined therapy of interleukin-12 and interleukin-18 against cryptococcus neoformans infection in a murine model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore adverse effects of combined treatment of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) against cryptococcosis in a murine model.Methods Infected mice were treated with a combination of IL-12 and IL-18. Their body weight and intake of water and food were observed and recorded. Serum levels of leptin were detected with an enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA).Results In the combined treatment group, the intake volume of water and food were reduced, leading to weight loss and undetectable levels of leptin in the serum. These adverse effects were more profound in mice that had received higher doses of cytokines, which sometimes led to a fatal outcome. There was a significant difference compared with the control group. Neutralization of endogenous tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by its specific mAb did not alter the wasting effect of this treatment.Conclusions The combined IL-12/IL-18 treatment may cause a number of adverse effects independent of TNF-α and leptin synthesis. Further investigations for resolving these adverse effects are required before clinical application of these cytokines.

  3. Development of effective tumor immunotherapy using a novel dendritic cell-targeting Toll-like receptor ligand.

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    Nadeeka H De Silva

    Full Text Available Although dendritic cell (DC-based immunotherapy shows little toxicity, improvements should be necessary to obtain satisfactory clinical outcome. Using interferon-gamma injection along with DCs, we previously obtained significant clinical responses against small or early stage malignant tumors in dogs. However, improvement was necessary to be effective to largely developed or metastatic tumors. To obtain effective methods applicable to those tumors, we herein used a DC-targeting Toll-like receptor ligand, h11c, and examined the therapeutic effects in murine subcutaneous and visceral tumor models and also in the clinical treatment of canine cancers. In murine experiments, most and significant inhibition of tumor growth and extended survival was observed in the group treated with the combination of h11c-activated DCs in combination with interferon-gamma and a cyclooxygenase2 inhibitor. Both monocytic and granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells were significantly reduced by the combined treatment. Following the successful results in mice, the combined treatment was examined against canine cancers, which spontaneously generated like as those in human. The combined treatment elicited significant clinical responses against a nonepithelial malignant tumor and a malignant fibrous histiocytoma. The treatment was also successful against a bone-metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma. In the successful cases, the marked increase of tumor-responding T cells and decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells was observed in their peripheral blood. Although the combined treatment permitted the growth of lung cancer of renal carcinoma-metastasis, the marked elevated and long-term maintaining of the tumor-responding T cells was observed in the patient dog. Overall, the combined treatment gave rise to emphatic amelioration in DC-based cancer therapy.

  4. Ochronosis in a murine model of alkaptonuria is synonymous to that in the human condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A.M.; Preston, A.J.; Paulk, N.K.; Sutherland, H.; Keenan, C.M.; Wilson, P.J.M.; Wlodarski, B.; Grompe, M.; Ranganath, L.R.; Gallagher, J.A.; Jarvis, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease which results in severe early onset osteoarthropathy. It has recently been shown that the subchondral interface is of key significance in disease pathogenesis. Human surgical tissues are often beyond this initial stage and there is no published murine model of pathogenesis, to study the natural history of the disease. The murine genotype exists but it has been reported not to demonstrate ochronotic osteoarthropathy consistent with the human disease. Recent anecdotal evidence of macroscopic renal ochronosis in a mouse model of tyrosinaemia led us to perform histological analysis of tissues of these mice that are known to be affected in human AKU. Design The homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase Hgd+/−Fah−/− mouse can model either hereditary tyrosinaemia type I (HT1) or AKU depending on selection conditions. Mice having undergone Hgd reversion were sacrificed at various time points, and their tissues taken for histological analysis. Sections were stained with haematoxylin eosin (H&E) and Schmorl’s reagent. Results Early time point observations at 8 months showed no sign of macroscopic ochronosis of tissues. Macroscopic examination at 13 months revealed ochronosis of the kidneys. Microscopic analysis of the kidneys revealed large pigmented nodules displaying distinct ochre colouration. Close microscopic examination of the distal femur and proximal fibula at the subchondral junctions revealed the presence of numerous pigmented chondrocytes. Conclusions Here we present the first data showing ochronosis of tissues in a murine model of AKU. These preliminary histological observations provide a stimulus for further studies into the natural history of the disease to provide a greater understanding of this class of arthropathy. PMID:22542924

  5. Immune tolerance induction using fetal directed placental injection in rodent models: a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    Full Text Available Induction of the immune response is a major problem in replacement therapies for inherited protein deficiencies. Tolerance created in utero can facilitate postnatal treatment. In this study, we aimed to induce immune tolerance towards a foreign protein with early gestational cell transplantation into the chorionic villi under ultrasound guidance in the murine model.Pregnant C57BL/6 (B6 mice on day 10 of gestation were anesthetized and imaged by high resolution ultrasound. Murine embryos and their placenta were positioned to get a clear view in B-mode with power mode of the labyrinth, which is the equivalent of chorionic villi in the human. Bone marrow cells (BMCs from B6-Green Fluorescence Protein (B6GFP transgenic mice were injected into the fetal side of the placenta which includes the labyrinth with glass microcapillary pipettes. Each fetal mouse received 2 x 105 viable GFP-BMCs. After birth, we evaluated the humoral and cell-mediated immune response against GFP.Bone marrow transfer into fetal side of placenta efficiently distributed donor cells to the fetal mice. The survival rate of this procedure was 13.5%(5 out of 37. Successful engraftment of the B6-GFP donor skin grafts was observed in all recipient (5 out of 5 mice 6 weeks after birth. Induction of anti-GFP antibodies was completely inhibited. Cytotoxic immune reactivity of thymic cells against cells harboring GFP was suppressed by ELISPOT assay.In this study, we utilized early gestational placental injection targeting the murine fetus, to transfer donor cells carrying a foreign protein into the fetal circulation. This approach is sufficient to induce both humoral and cell-mediated immune tolerance against the foreign protein.

  6. Oncolytic adenovirus targeting cyclin E overexpression repressed tumor growth in syngeneic immunocompetent mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Pei-Hsin; Rao, Xiao-Mei; Wechman, Stephen L.; Li, Xiao-Feng; McMasters, Kelly M.; Zhou, Heshan Sam

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials have indicated that preclinical results obtained with human tumor xenografts in mouse models may overstate the potential of adenovirus (Ad)-mediated oncolytic therapies. We have previously demonstrated that the replication of human Ads depends on cyclin E dysregulation or overexpression in cancer cells. ED-1 cell derived from mouse lung adenocarcinomas triggered by transgenic overexpression of human cyclin E may be applied to investigate the antitumor efficacy of oncolytic Ads. Ad-cycE was used to target cyclin E overexpression in ED-1 cells and repress tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model for investigation of oncolytic virotherapies. Murine ED-1 cells were permissive for human Ad replication and Ad-cycE repressed ED-1 tumor growth in immunocompetent FVB mice. ED-1 cells destroyed by oncolytic Ads in tumors were encircled in capsule-like structures, while cells outside the capsules were not infected and survived the treatment. Ad-cycE can target cyclin E overexpression in cancer cells and repress tumor growth in syngeneic mouse models. The capsule structures formed after Ad intratumoral injection may prevent viral particles from spreading to the entire tumor. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1731-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  7. Tenascin-C Prevents Articular Cartilage Degeneration in Murine Osteoarthritis Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yuriyo; Hasegawa, Masahiro; Iino, Takahiro; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2018-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine whether intra-articular injections of tenascin-C (TNC) could prevent cartilage damage in murine models of osteoarthritis (OA). Design Fluorescently labeled TNC was injected into knee joints and its distribution was examined at 1 day, 4 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks postinjection. To investigate the effects of TNC on cartilage degeneration after surgery to knee joints, articular spaces were filled with 100 μg/mL (group I), 10 μg/mL (group II) of TNC solution, or control (group III). TNC solution of 10 μg/mL was additionally injected twice after 3 weeks (group IV) or weekly after 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks (group V). Joint tissues were histologically assessed using the Mankin score and the modified Chambers system at 2 to 8 weeks after surgery. Results Exogenous TNC was maintained in the cartilage and synovium for 1 week after administration. Histological scores in groups I and II were better than scores in group III at 4 and 6 weeks, but progressive cartilage damage was seen in all groups 8 weeks postoperatively. Sequential TNC injections (groups IV and V) showed significantly better Mankin score than single injection (group II) at 8 weeks. Conclusion TNC administered exogenously remained in the cartilage of knee joints for 1 week, and could decelerate articular cartilage degeneration in murine models of OA. We also showed that sequential administration of TNC was more effective than a single injection. TNC could be an important molecule for prevention of articular cartilage damage.

  8. Immune response to uv-induced tumors: transplantation immunity and lymphocyte populations exhibiting anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced murine skin tumors were analyzed for their ability to induce tumor-specific and cross-protective transplantation immunity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. These studies revealed that progressor UV-tumors, like regressor UV-tumors, possess tumor-specific transplantation antigens. Cross-protective transplantation immunity to UV-tumors, however, was associated with sensitization to the serum used to culture the tumor lines rather than to cross-reactive or common determinants on UV-tumors. An analysis of the cytolytic activity of lymphocytes from the spleens of mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors revealed a striking difference between the two immune splenocyte populations. From regressor tumor-immune animals, cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes with specificity for the immunizing tumor were found. However, the analysis of splenic lymphocytes from progressor tumor immune animals revealed no such effector cells. To more effectively examine those lymphocytes exhibiting cytolytic activity in vitro, T lymphocyte cloning technology was used as a means of isolating homogeneous lymphocyte populations with the effector activities described above. The mechanisms where NK cells and other nonspecific effector cells could be induced in tumor-immune animals are discussed in the context of class II restricted immune responses

  9. Experimental parameters differentially affect the humoral response of the cholera-toxin-based murine model of food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroghsbo, S.; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2003-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have developed a murine model of IgE-mediated food allergy based on oral coadministration of antigen and cholera toxin (CT) to establish a maximal response for studying immunopathogenic mechanisms and immunotherapeutic strategies. However, for studying subtle...... interested in characterizing the individual effects of the parameters in the CT-based model: CT dose, antigen type and dose, and number of immunizations. Methods: BALB/c mice were orally sensitized weekly for 3 or 7 weeks with graded doses of CT and various food antigens (soy-trypsin inhibitor, ovalbumin...... of the antibody response depended on the type of antigen and number of immunizations. Conclusions: The critical parameters of the CT-based murine allergy model differentially control the intensity and kinetics of the developing immune response. Adjustment of these parameters could be a key tool for tailoring...

  10. Molecular characterization of murine models of squamous carcinomas of preclinical application; Caracterización molecular de modelos múridos de carcinomas escamosos de aplicación preclínica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornachea Gomez, O.; Berdugo Zamora, A.

    2015-07-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium affected by numerous pathologies, including cancer, being the tumors originated in this tissue more than half of the epithelial tumors diagnosed every year. Animal models are an essential tool for cancer research, as they provide information to understand how a homologous gene may cause or contribute to the disease in humans. The p53 CE and Rb CE; p53 CE murine models develop undifferentiated epidermal tumors with high metastatic potential that show a strong transcriptional similarity to many human tumors with poor prognosis. Numerous studies have associated the p53 tumor suppressor with deregulation of microRNAs involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis processes. Furthermore, tumors in p53 EC models show an early repression of p63 whose predominant isoform in keratinocytes of the basal layer is Np63. Our results indicate that miR21 helps to provide metastatic capacity to p53-deficient mouse skin tumors. The increased expression of miR21 correlates with active signaling pathways that can be inhibited pharmacologically. Moreover, miR21 expression is elevated in human metastatic lung tumors with poor prognosis. Besides, we also show that ?Np63? expression in p53-deficient cells partially reduces the metastatic behavior, most probably through the modulation microRNAs and transcription factors involved in the EMT process. These facts point to p53-deficient epidermal animal models as excellent candidates for preclinical analysis of human metastatic tumors characterized by TP53 alterations. Finally we developed a model in which the three members of the retinoblastoma family are ablated in the basal cells of stratified epithelia in a tamoxifen inducible manner: Rb1F/F ; Rbl2F/F;Rbl1-/-;K14CreErT2 (TKO). Previously our laboratory had shown that, in the absence of pRb, malignant conversion occurred when p53 is lost. At high doses of tamoxifen these animals show early lethality. When we adjust the dose

  11. Bone marrow-derived CD13+ cells sustain tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Non-malignant cells found within neoplastic lesions express alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP, best known as CD13), and CD13-null mice exhibit limited tumor growth and angiogenesis. We have recently demonstrated that a subset of bone marrow-derived CD11b+CD13+ myeloid cells accumulate within neoplastic lesions in several murine models of transplantable cancer to promote angiogenesis. If these findings were confirmed in clinical settings, CD11b+CD13+ myeloid cells could become a non-malignant target for the development of novel anticancer regimens. PMID:25339996

  12. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  13. Malignant myoepithelial cells are associated with the differentiated papillary structure and metastatic ability of a syngeneic murine mammary adenocarcinoma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bumaschny, Viviana; Urtreger, Alejandro; Diament, Miriam; Krasnapolski, Martín; Fiszman, Gabriel; Klein, Slobodanka; Joffé, Elisa Bal de Kier

    2004-01-01

    The normal duct and lobular system of the mammary gland is lined with luminal and myoepithelial cell types. Although evidence suggests that myoepithelial cells might suppress tumor growth, invasion and angiogenesis, their role remains a major enigma in breast cancer biology and few models are currently available for exploring their influence. Several years ago a spontaneous transplantable mammary adenocarcinoma (M38) arose in our BALB/c colony; it contains a malignant myoepithelial cell component and is able to metastasize to draining lymph nodes and lung. To characterize this tumor further, primary M38 cultures were established. The low-passage LM38-LP subline contained two main cell components up to the 30th subculture, whereas the higher passage LM38-HP subline was mainly composed of small spindle-shaped cells. In addition, a large spindle cell clone (LM38-D2) was established by dilutional cloning of the low-passage MM38-LP cells. These cell lines were studied by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and ploidy, and syngeneic mice were inoculated subcutaneously and intravenously with the different cell lines, either singly or combined to establish their tumorigenic and metastatic capacity. The two subpopulations of LM38-LP cultures were characterized as luminal and myoepithelium-like cells, whereas LM38-HP was mainly composed of small, spindle-shaped epithelial cells and LM38-D2 contained only large myoepithelial cells. All of them were tumorigenic when inoculated into syngeneic mice, but only LM38-LP cultures containing both conserved luminal and myoepithelial malignant cells developed aggressive papillary adenocarcinomas that spread to lung and regional lymph nodes. The differentiated histopathology and metastatic ability of the spontaneous transplantable M38 murine mammary tumor is associated with the presence and/or interaction of both luminal and myoepithelial tumor cell types

  14. Blockade of MMP14 Activity in Murine Breast Carcinomas: Implications for Macrophages, Vessels, and Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager, Eleanor I.; Kozin, Sergey V.; Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Seano, Giorgio; Kodack, David P.; Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Huang, Yuhui; Goel, Shom; Snuderl, Matija; Muzikansky, Alona; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Dransfield, Daniel T.; Devy, Laetitia; Boucher, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background: Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 14 may mediate tumor progression through vascular and immune-modulatory effects. Methods: Orthotopic murine breast tumors (4T1 and E0771 with high and low MMP14 expression, respectively; n = 5–10 per group) were treated with an anti-MMP14 inhibitory antibody (DX-2400), IgG control, fractionated radiation therapy, or their combination. We assessed primary tumor growth, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, macrophage phenotype, and vascular parameters. A linear mixed model with repeated observations, with Mann-Whitney or analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc adjustment, was used to determine statistical significance. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: DX-2400 inhibited tumor growth compared with IgG control treatment, increased macrophage numbers, and shifted the macrophage phenotype towards antitumor M1-like. These effects were associated with a reduction in active TGFβ and SMAD2/3 signaling. DX-2400 also transiently increased iNOS expression and tumor perfusion, reduced tissue hypoxia (median % area: control, 20.2%, interquartile range (IQR) = 6.4%-38.9%; DX-2400: 1.2%, IQR = 0.2%-3.2%, P = .044), and synergistically enhanced radiation therapy (days to grow to 800mm3: control, 12 days, IQR = 9–13 days; DX-2400 plus radiation, 29 days, IQR = 26–30 days, P < .001) in the 4T1 model. The selective iNOS inhibitor, 1400W, abolished the effects of DX-2400 on vessel perfusion and radiotherapy. On the other hand, DX-2400 was not capable of inducing iNOS expression or synergizing with radiation in E0771 tumors. Conclusion: MMP14 blockade decreased immunosuppressive TGFβ, polarized macrophages to an antitumor phenotype, increased iNOS, and improved tumor perfusion, resulting in reduced primary tumor growth and enhanced response to radiation therapy, especially in high MMP14-expressing tumors. PMID:25710962

  15. Molecular characterization of radon-induced rat lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet Bastide, K.

    2008-11-01

    The radon gas is a well known lung carcinogenic factor in human at high doses but the cancer risk at low doses is not established. Indeed, epidemiological studies at low doses are difficult to conduct because of the human exposure to other lung carcinogenic factors. These data underlined the necessity to conduct experiments on lung tumors developed on animal model. The aim of this work was to characterize rat lung tumors by working on a series of radon-induced tumors that included adenocarcinomas (A.C.), squamous cell carcinomas (S.C.C.) and adeno-squamous carcinomas (A.S.C.), that are mixed tumors with both A.C. and S.C.C. cellular components. A C.G.H. analysis of the three types of tumors allowed us to define chromosomal recurrent unbalances and to target candidate genes potentially implicated in lung carcinogenesis, as p16Ink4a, p19Arf, Rb1, K-Ras or c-Myc. A more precise analysis of the p16Ink4a/Cdk4/Rb1 and p19Arf/Mdm2/Tp53 pathways was performed and indicated that the Rb1 pathway was frequently inactivated through an absence of p16 Ink4a protein expression, indicating that it has a major role in rat lung carcinogenesis. Finally, a comparative transcriptomic analysis of the three types of tumors allowed us to show for the first time that the complex tumors A.S.C. have a transcriptomic profile in accordance with their mixed nature but that they also display their own expression profiles specificities. This work allowed us to find molecular characteristics common to murine and human lung tumors, indicating that the model of lung tumors in rat is pertinent to search for radiation-induced lung tumors specificities and to help for a better molecular identification of this type of tumors in human. (author)

  16. [Anti-FGF23 antibody therapy for patients with tumor-induced osteomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Yuka; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a disease caused by fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) secreted from the causative tumor. This disease is cured by complete surgical removal of the tumor. However, there are several difficult cases in which the responsible tumors cannot be found, are incompletely removed, or relapse after the surgery. Anti-FGF23 antibody is being studied as a novel therapy for FGF23-related hypophosphatemic diseases. The efficacy of anti-FGF23 antibodies were confirmed using a murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLHR) , which is the most common heritable form of FGF23-related hypophosphatemic disease. In addition, results of phase I study of single injection of humanized anti-FGF23 antibody for adult patients with XLHR were recently published and the safety and effectiveness of this antibody was shown. This antibody therapy may be useful for patients with TIO with similar pathogenesis to that of XLHR.

  17. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Kopelovich, Levy [Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Blvd., Suite 2114, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Avenue South, VH 509, Birmingham, AL 35294-0019 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  18. Vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor attenuates epidermoid squamous cell carcinoma growth by dampening mTOR signaling pathway in a human xenograft murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurundkar, Deepali; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Chaudhary, Sandeep C.; Ballestas, Mary E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are potent anticancer agents and show efficacy against various human neoplasms. Vorinostat is a potent HDAC inhibitor and has shown potential to inhibit growth of human xenograft tumors. However, its effect on the growth of skin neoplasm remains undefined. In this study, we show that vorinostat (2 μM) reduced expression of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 7 in epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Consistently, it increased acetylation of histone H3 and p53. Vorinostat (100 mg/kg body weight, IP) treatment reduced human xenograft tumor growth in highly immunosuppressed nu/nu mice. Histologically, the vorinostat-treated tumor showed features of well-differentiation with large necrotic areas. Based on proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) staining and expression of cyclins D1, D2, E, and A, vorinostat seems to impair proliferation by down-regulating the expression of these proteins. However, it also induced apoptosis. The mechanism by which vorinostat blocks proliferation and makes tumor cells prone to apoptosis, involved inhibition of mTOR signaling which was accompanied by reduction in cell survival AKT and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Our data provide a novel mechanism-based therapeutic intervention for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Vorinostat may be utilized to cure skin neoplasms in organ transplant recipient (OTR). These patients have high morbidity and surgical removal of these lesions which frequently develop in these patients, is difficult. -- Highlights: ► Vorinostat reduces SCC growth in a xenograft murine model. ► Vorinostat dampens proliferation and induces apoptosis in tumor cells. ► Diminution in mTOR, Akt and ERK signaling underlies inhibition in proliferation. ► Vorinostat by inhibiting HDACs inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition.

  19. Small GSK-3 Inhibitor Shows Efficacy in a Motor Neuron Disease Murine Model Modulating Autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía de Munck

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a progressive motor neuron degenerative disease that has no effective treatment up to date. Drug discovery tasks have been hampered due to the lack of knowledge in its molecular etiology together with the limited animal models for research. Recently, a motor neuron disease animal model has been developed using β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (L-BMAA, a neurotoxic amino acid related to the appearing of ALS. In the present work, the neuroprotective role of VP2.51, a small heterocyclic GSK-3 inhibitor, is analysed in this novel murine model together with the analysis of autophagy. VP2.51 daily administration for two weeks, starting the first day after L-BMAA treatment, leads to total recovery of neurological symptoms and prevents the activation of autophagic processes in rats. These results show that the L-BMAA murine model can be used to test the efficacy of new drugs. In addition, the results confirm the therapeutic potential of GSK-3 inhibitors, and specially VP2.51, for the disease-modifying future treatment of motor neuron disorders like ALS.

  20. A cytotoxic Petiveria alliacea dry extract induces ATP depletion and decreases β-F1-ATPase expression in breast cancer cells and promotes survival in tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Hernández

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic plasticity in cancer cells assures cell survival and cell proliferation under variable levels of oxygen and nutrients. Therefore, new anticancer treatments endeavor to target such plasticity by modifying main metabolic pathways as glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation. In American traditional medicine Petiveria alliacea L., Phytolaccacea, leaf extracts have been used for leukemia and breast cancer treatments. Herein, we study cytotoxicity and antitumoral effects of P. alliacea extract in tumor/non-tumorigenic cell lines and murine breast cancer model. Breast cancer cells treated with P. alliacea dry extract showed reduction in β-F1-ATPase expression, glycolytic flux triggering diminished intracellular ATP levels, mitochondrial basal respiration and oxygen consumption. Consequently, a decline in cell proliferation was observed in conventional and three-dimension spheres breast cancer cells culture. Additionally, in vivo treatment of BALB/c mice transplanted with the murine breast cancer TS/A tumor showed that P. alliacea extract via i.p. decreases the primary tumor growth and increases survival in the TS/A model.

  1. Enhancement by gamma-interferon of in vivo tumor radiolocalization by a monoclonal antibody against HLA-DR antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlinson, G.; Balkwill, F.; Snook, D.; Hooker, G.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    Athymic nu/nu (nude) mice bearing s.c. human breast tumors were treated systemically with recombinant human gamma-interferon. These tumors were phenotypically negative for HLA-DR prior to therapy, but after 4 days of treatment, 80% of the cells expressed this antigen in vivo as assessed by immunoperoxidase (F. R. Balkwill et al., Eur. J. Cancer Clin. Oncol., in press, 1986). A radioiodine-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (TAL-1B5) against HLA-DR specifically localized to the tumors in recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated but not in control mice. An isotype-identical murine monoclonal antibody that did not react with control or recombinant human gamma-interferon-treated tumors did not show any specific localization. These results demonstrate that specific localization to tumors of radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies to HLA-DR can be facilitated by systemic therapy with gamma-interferon

  2. Interleukin 37 limits monosodium urate crystal-induced innate immune responses in human and murine models of gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Xue, Yu; Zhu, Yingfeng; Xuan, Dandan; Yang, Xue; Liang, Minrui; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jiong; Zou, Hejian

    2016-11-18

    Interleukin (IL)-37 has emerged as a fundamental inhibitor of innate immunity. Acute gout is a self-limiting inflammatory response to monosodium urate (MSU) crystals. In the current study, we assessed the preventive and therapeutic effect of recombinant human IL-37 (rhIL-37) in human and murine gout models. We investigated the expression of IL-37 in patients with active and inactive gouty arthritis and assessed the effect of rhIL-37 in human and murine gout models: a human monocyte cell line (THP-1) and human synovial cells (containing macrophage-like and fibroblast-like synoviocytes) exposed to MSU crystals, a peritoneal murine model of gout and a murine gouty arthritis model. After inhibition of Mer receptor tyrosine kinase (Mertk), levels of IL-1β, IL-8 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL-2) were detected by ELISA and expression of mammalian homologs of the drosophila Mad gene 3 (Smad), suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), NACHT-LRR-PYD-containing protein 3 (NLRP3), and IL-8R of THP-1 were assessed by qPCR and western blot to explore the molecular mechanisms. Our studies strongly indicated that rhIL-37 played a potent immunosuppressive role in the pathogenesis of experimental gout models both in vitro and in vivo, by downregulating proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, markedly reducing neutrophil and monocyte recruitment, and mitigating pathological joint inflammation. In our studies, rhIL-37 suppressed MSU-induced innate immune responses by enhancing expression of Smad3 and IL-1R8 to trigger multiple intracellular switches to block inflammation, including inhibition of NLRP3 and activation of SOCS3. Mertk signaling participated in rhIL-37 inhibitory pathways in gout models. By inhibition of Mertk, the anti-inflammatory effect of rhIL-37 was partly abrogated, and IL-1R8, Smad3 and S​OCS3 expression were suppressed, whereas NLRP3 expression was reactivated. Our studies reveal that IL-37 limits runaway inflammation initiated by MSU crystal

  3. Molecular events in the induction of murine tumors by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, K.L.

    1993-01-01

    A new method is presented to identify and clone novel transforming genes from radiation-induced tumors. It involves the creation of a cDNA expression library from radiation-induced tumors. The library is transfected into non-transformed cells, and the nude mouse tumorigenicity assay functionally defines the acquisition of a transformed phenotype. cDNA clones responsible for transformation are rescued by PCR amplification. This method is applicable to a variety of mammalian systems. The only requirement is a functional assay with which to measure the acquisition of an altered phenotype following transfection of a cDNA library. This method has identified a cDNA for the 16 kD subunit of v-H + -ATPase, which has been associated with cellular transformation. Two protocols were used to generate radiation-induced tumors. One experiment utilizing fractionated doses of ionizing radiation had a much greater tumor yield than the second protocol using a single dose of 11.25 Gy. To determine if the mechanism of gene activation is different in radiation- and chemically-induced tumors, the expression pattern of five tumor-associated genes was analyzed. The expression patterns of mals 1-4 were not significantly different. However, transin, a secreted protease, was overexpressed in radiation-induced papillomas and undetectable in chemically-induced papillomas. Transin degrades basement membrane proteins and may be involved in the progression of benign, encapsulated tumors to malignant, invasive squamous cell carcinomas. Isolation and characterization of genes with dominant transforming activity from radiation-induced tumors will provide information to bridge the gap between the initial ionizing radiation event and the subsequent development of malignant tumors. The function of these genes may also provide information about the development of human malignancies. An understanding the natural biology of cells will help elucidate the pathogenesis cancer and other diseases

  4. Anatomy and Histology of the Human and Murine Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael

    2018-05-01

    The human and murine prostate glands have similar functional roles in the generation of seminal fluid to assist in reproduction. There are significant differences in the anatomy and histology of murine and human prostate and knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the murine prostate is essential to interpreting changes in genetically engineered mouse models. In this review, the normal anatomy and histology of both human and mouse prostate will be described. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring of Tumor Growth with [(18)F]-FET PET in a Mouse Model of Glioblastoma: SUV Measurements and Volumetric Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzgreve, Adrien; Brendel, Matthias; Gu, Song; Carlsen, Janette; Mille, Erik; Böning, Guido; Mastrella, Giorgia; Unterrainer, Marcus; Gildehaus, Franz J; Rominger, Axel; Bartenstein, Peter; Kälin, Roland E; Glass, Rainer; Albert, Nathalie L

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive tumor growth monitoring is of particular interest for the evaluation of experimental glioma therapies. This study investigates the potential of positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-(18)F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ([(18)F]-FET) to determine tumor growth in a murine glioblastoma (GBM) model-including estimation of the biological tumor volume (BTV), which has hitherto not been investigated in the pre-clinical context. Fifteen GBM-bearing mice (GL261) and six control mice (shams) were investigated during 5 weeks by PET followed by autoradiographic and histological assessments. [(18)F]-FET PET was quantitated by calculation of maximum and mean standardized uptake values within a universal volume-of-interest (VOI) corrected for healthy background (SUVmax/BG, SUVmean/BG). A partial volume effect correction (PVEC) was applied in comparison to ex vivo autoradiography. BTVs obtained by predefined thresholds for VOI definition (SUV/BG: ≥1.4; ≥1.6; ≥1.8; ≥2.0) were compared to the histologically assessed tumor volume (n = 8). Finally, individual "optimal" thresholds for BTV definition best reflecting the histology were determined. In GBM mice SUVmax/BG and SUVmean/BG clearly increased with time, however at high inter-animal variability. No relevant [(18)F]-FET uptake was observed in shams. PVEC recovered signal loss of SUVmean/BG assessment in relation to autoradiography. BTV as estimated by predefined thresholds strongly differed from the histology volume. Strikingly, the individual "optimal" thresholds for BTV assessment correlated highly with SUVmax/BG (ρ = 0.97, p GBM mouse model. PVEC is beneficial to improve accuracy of [(18)F]-FET PET SUV quantification. Although SUVmax/BG and SUVmean/BG increase during the disease course, these parameters do not correlate with the respective tumor size. For the first time, we propose a histology-verified method allowing appropriate individual BTV estimation for volumetric in vivo monitoring of tumor growth

  6. Regional and temporal differences in gene expression of LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Samuel K; Pina, Yolanda; Clarke, Jennifer; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Scott, William K; Nathanson, Lubov; Schefler, Amy C; Murray, Timothy G

    2011-07-23

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate by microarray the hypothesis that LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma tumors exhibit regional and temporal variations in gene expression. LH(BETA)T(AG) mice aged 12, 16, and 20 weeks were euthanatized (n = 9). Specimens were taken from five tumor areas (apex, anterior lateral, center, base, and posterior lateral). Samples were hybridized to gene microarrays. The data were preprocessed and analyzed, and genes with a P 2.5 were considered to be differentially expressed. Differentially expressed genes were analyzed for overlap with known networks by using pathway analysis tools. There were significant temporal (P regional differences in gene expression for LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma tumors. At P 2.5, there were significant changes in gene expression of 190 genes apically, 84 genes anterolaterally, 126 genes posteriorly, 56 genes centrally, and 134 genes at the base. Differentially expressed genes overlapped with known networks, with significant involvement in regulation of cellular proliferation and growth, response to oxygen levels and hypoxia, regulation of cellular processes, cellular signaling cascades, and angiogenesis. There are significant temporal and regional variations in the LH(BETA)T(AG) retinoblastoma model. Differentially expressed genes overlap with key pathways that may play pivotal roles in murine retinoblastoma development. These findings suggest the mechanisms involved in tumor growth and progression in murine retinoblastoma tumors and identify pathways for analysis at a functional level, to determine significance in human retinoblastoma. Microarray analysis of LH(BETA)T(AG) retinal tumors showed significant regional and temporal variations in gene expression, including dysregulation of genes involved in hypoxic responses and angiogenesis.

  7. Immunological quality and performance of tumor vessel-targeting CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP for clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoo, Kanako; Inagaki, Ryo; Fujiwara, Kento; Sasawatari, Shigemi; Kamigaki, Takashi; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that tumor vessel-redirected T cells, which were genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), demonstrated significant antitumor effects in various murine solid tumor models. In the present study, we prepared anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells by CAR-coding mRNA electroporation (mRNA-EP) and analyzed their immunological characteristics and functions for use in clinical research. The expression of anti-VEGFR2 CAR on murine and human T cells was detected with approximately 100% efficiency for a few days, after peaking 6-12 hours after mRNA-EP. Triple transfer of murine anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells into B16BL6 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated an antitumor effect comparable to that for the single transfer of CAR-T cells engineered with retroviral vector. The mRNA-EP did not cause any damage or defects to human T-cell characteristics, as determined by viability, growth, and phenotypic parameters. Additionally, two kinds of human anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells, which expressed different CAR construction, differentiated to effector phase with cytokine secretion and cytotoxic activity in antigen-specific manner. These results indicate that our anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP have the potential in terms of quality and performance to offer the prospect of safety and efficacy in clinical research as cellular medicine.

  8. Immunological quality and performance of tumor vessel-targeting CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP for clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Inoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that tumor vessel-redirected T cells, which were genetically engineered with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR specific for vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2, demonstrated significant antitumor effects in various murine solid tumor models. In the present study, we prepared anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells by CAR-coding mRNA electroporation (mRNA-EP and analyzed their immunological characteristics and functions for use in clinical research. The expression of anti-VEGFR2 CAR on murine and human T cells was detected with approximately 100% efficiency for a few days, after peaking 6–12 hours after mRNA-EP. Triple transfer of murine anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells into B16BL6 tumor-bearing mice demonstrated an antitumor effect comparable to that for the single transfer of CAR-T cells engineered with retroviral vector. The mRNA-EP did not cause any damage or defects to human T-cell characteristics, as determined by viability, growth, and phenotypic parameters. Additionally, two kinds of human anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells, which expressed different CAR construction, differentiated to effector phase with cytokine secretion and cytotoxic activity in antigen-specific manner. These results indicate that our anti-VEGFR2 CAR-T cells prepared by mRNA-EP have the potential in terms of quality and performance to offer the prospect of safety and efficacy in clinical research as cellular medicine.

  9. Brain Tumor Segmentation Using a Generative Model with an RBM Prior on Tumor Shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael; Puonti, Oula; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a fully automated generative method for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method is based on the type of generative model often used for segmenting healthy brain tissues, where tissues are modeled by Gaussian mixture models combined...... the use of the intensity information in the training images. Experiments on public benchmark data of patients suffering from low- and high-grade gliomas show that the method performs well compared to current state-of-the-art methods, while not being tied to any specific imaging protocol....... with a spatial atlas-based tissue prior. We extend this basic model with a tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines (cRBMs) to model the shape of both tumor core and complete tumor, which includes edema and core. The cRBMs are trained on expert segmentations of training images, without...

  10. Acanthus ilicifolius plant extract prevents DNA alterations in a transplantable Ehrlich ascites carcinoma-bearing murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Tridib; Bhuniya, Dipak; Chatterjee, Mary; Rahaman, Mosiur; Singha, Dipak; Chatterjee, Baidya Nath; Datta, Subrata; Rana, Ajay; Samanta, Kartick; Srivastawa, Sunil; Maitra, Sankar K; Chatterjee, Malay

    2007-12-28

    To investigate the chemopreventive efficacy of the Indian medicinal plant Acanthus ilicifolius L Acanthaceae in a transplantable Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC)-bearing murine model. Male Swiss albino mice were divided into four groups: Group A was the untreated normal control; Group B was the EAC control mice group that received serial, intraperitoneal (ip) inoculations of rapidly proliferating 2 x 10(5) viable EAC cells in 0.2 mL of sterile phosphate buffered saline; Group C was the plant extract-treated group that received the aqueous leaf extract (ALE) of the plant at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight by single ip injections, once daily for 10, 20 and 30 consecutive days following tumour inoculation (ALE control); and Group D was the EAC + ALE-treatment group. The chemopreventive potential of the ALE was evaluated in a murine model by studying various biological parameters and genotoxic markers, such as tumour cell count, mean survival of the animals, haematological indices, hepatocellular histology, immunohistochemical expression of liver metallothionein (MT) protein, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs), and DNA alterations. Treatment of the EAC-bearing mice with the ALE significantly (P decrement (P single-strand breaks (SSBs) by 38.53% (3.14 +/- 0.31 vs 1.93 +/- 0.23, P < 0.01) in EAC-bearing murine liver. Our data indicate that, ALE is beneficial in restoring haematological and hepatic histological profiles and in lengthening the survival of the animals against the proliferation of ascites tumour in vivo. Finally, the chemopreventive efficacy of the ALE is manifested in limiting MT expression and in preventing DNA alterations in murine liver. The promising results of this study suggest further investigation into the chemopreventive mechanisms of the medicinal plant A. ilicifolius in vivo and in vitro.

  11. A spinal cord window chamber model for in vivo longitudinal multimodal optical and acoustic imaging in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Figley

    Full Text Available In vivo and direct imaging of the murine spinal cord and its vasculature using multimodal (optical and acoustic imaging techniques could significantly advance preclinical studies of the spinal cord. Such intrinsically high resolution and complementary imaging technologies could provide a powerful means of quantitatively monitoring changes in anatomy, structure, physiology and function of the living cord over time after traumatic injury, onset of disease, or therapeutic intervention. However, longitudinal in vivo imaging of the intact spinal cord in rodent models has been challenging, requiring repeated surgeries to expose the cord for imaging or sacrifice of animals at various time points for ex vivo tissue analysis. To address these limitations, we have developed an implantable spinal cord window chamber (SCWC device and procedures in mice for repeated multimodal intravital microscopic imaging of the cord and its vasculature in situ. We present methodology for using our SCWC to achieve spatially co-registered optical-acoustic imaging performed serially for up to four weeks, without damaging the cord or induction of locomotor deficits in implanted animals. To demonstrate the feasibility, we used the SCWC model to study the response of the normal spinal cord vasculature to ionizing radiation over time using white light and fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence tomography (OCT in vivo. In vivo power Doppler ultrasound and photoacoustics were used to directly visualize the cord and vascular structures and to measure hemoglobin oxygen saturation through the complete spinal cord, respectively. The model was also used for intravital imaging of spinal micrometastases resulting from primary brain tumor using fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging. Our SCWC model overcomes previous in vivo imaging challenges, and our data provide evidence of the broader utility of hybridized optical-acoustic imaging methods for obtaining

  12. Spherical Cancer Models in Tumor Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Bastien Weiswald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D in vitro models have been used in cancer research as an intermediate model between in vitro cancer cell line cultures and in vivo tumor. Spherical cancer models represent major 3D in vitro models that have been described over the past 4 decades. These models have gained popularity in cancer stem cell research using tumorospheres. Thus, it is crucial to define and clarify the different spherical cancer models thus far described. Here, we focus on in vitro multicellular spheres used in cancer research. All these spherelike structures are characterized by their well-rounded shape, the presence of cancer cells, and their capacity to be maintained as free-floating cultures. We propose a rational classification of the four most commonly used spherical cancer models in cancer research based on culture methods for obtaining them and on subsequent differences in sphere biology: the multicellular tumor spheroid model, first described in the early 70s and obtained by culture of cancer cell lines under nonadherent conditions; tumorospheres, a model of cancer stem cell expansion established in a serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors; tissue-derived tumor spheres and organotypic multicellular spheroids, obtained by tumor tissue mechanical dissociation and cutting. In addition, we describe their applications to and interest in cancer research; in particular, we describe their contribution to chemoresistance, radioresistance, tumorigenicity, and invasion and migration studies. Although these models share a common 3D conformation, each displays its own intrinsic properties. Therefore, the most relevant spherical cancer model must be carefully selected, as a function of the study aim and cancer type.

  13. Model organoids provide new research opportunities for ductal pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boj, Sylvia F; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A; Engle, Dannielle D; Tuveson, David A; Clevers, Hans

    We recently established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. These organoids exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics and, after orthotopic transplantation, recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor progression. Pancreatic organoid technology

  14. Styrene maleic acid-encapsulated paclitaxel micelles: antitumor activity and toxicity studies following oral administration in a murine orthotopic colon cancer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parayath NN

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Neha N Parayath,1 Hayley Nehoff,1 Samuel E Norton,2 Andrew J Highton,2 Sebastien Taurin,1,3 Roslyn A Kemp,2 Khaled Greish1,4 1Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 4Princess Al-Jawhara Centre for Molecular Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain Abstract: Oral administration of paclitaxel (PTX, a broad spectrum anticancer agent, is challenged by its low uptake due to its poor bioavailability, efflux through P-glycoprotein, and gastrointestinal toxicity. We synthesized PTX nanomicelles using poly(styrene-co-maleic acid (SMA. Oral administration of SMA-PTX micelles doubled the maximum tolerated dose (60 mg/kg vs 30 mg/kg compared to the commercially available PTX formulation (PTX [Ebewe]. In a murine orthotopic colon cancer model, oral administration of SMA-PTX micelles at doses 30 mg/kg and 60 mg/kg reduced tumor weight by 54% and 69%, respectively, as compared to the control group, while no significant reduction in tumor weight was observed with 30 mg/kg of PTX (Ebewe. In addition, toxicity of PTX was largely reduced by its encapsulation into SMA. Furthermore, examination of the tumors demonstrated a decrease in the number of blood vessels. Thus, oral delivery of SMA-PTX micelles may provide a safe and effective strategy for the treatment of colon cancer. Keywords: oral delivery, anticancer nanomedicine, CT-26, enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect, HUVEC, antiangiogenic

  15. Assessment of tumor energy and oxygenation status by bioluminescence, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cryospectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Klieser, W; Schaefer, C; Walenta, S; Rofstad, E K; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1990-03-15

    The energy and oxygenation status of tumors from two murine sarcoma lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI) were assessed using three independent techniques. Tumor energy metabolism was investigated in vivo by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. After nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, tumors were frozen in liquid nitrogen to determine the tissue ATP concentration by imaging bioluminescence and to register the intracapillary oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation using the cryospectrophotometric method. There was a positive correlation between the nucleoside triphosphate beta/total resonance ratio or a negative correlation between the Pi/total resonance ratio and the model ATP concentration obtained by bioluminescence, respectively. This was true for small tumors with no extended necrosis irrespective of tumor type. Moreover, a positive correlation was obtained between the HbO2 saturations and the ATP concentration measured with bioluminescence. The results demonstrate the potential of combined studies using noninvasive, integrating methods and high-resolution imaging techniques for characterizing the metabolic milieu in tumors.

  16. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  17. Adipocytes enhance murine pancreatic cancer growth via a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kathryn M; Considine, Robert V; True, Eben; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Obesity accelerates the development and progression of pancreatic cancer, though the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Adipocytes are biologically active, producing factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that may influence tumor progression. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that adipocyte-secreted factors including HGF accelerate pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Murine pancreatic cancer cells (Pan02 and TGP-47) were grown in a) conditioned medium (CM) from murine F442A preadipocytes, b) HGF-knockdown preadipocyte CM, c) recombinant murine HGF at increasing doses, and d) CM plus HGF-receptor (c-met) inhibitor. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay. ANOVA and t-test were applied; p TGP-47 cell proliferation relative to control (59 ± 12% and 34 ± 12%, p TGP-47 cells remained unchanged. Recombinant HGF dose-dependently increased Pan02, but not TGP-47, proliferation (p TGP-47 cells. These experiments demonstrate that adipocyte-derived factors accelerate murine pancreatic cancer proliferation. In the case of Pan02 cells, HGF is responsible, in part, for this proliferation. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Bap1 and Pbrm1: Determinants of Tumor Grade and mTOR Activation in VHL-Deficient Mouse Models of Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Janet Y; Kim, William Y

    2017-08-01

    Large genome sequencing efforts have identified frequent mutations in the histone-modifying and chromatin-remodeling genes BAP1 and PBRM1 in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In this issue of Cancer Discovery , Gu and colleagues model these genetic events in mice and report that dual inactivation of Vhl with either Bap1 or Pbrm1 results in faithful genetically engineered murine models of ccRCC. Moreover, their work establishes that Bap1 and Pbrm1 are determinants of tumor grade and mTORC1 activation and provocatively suggests that the cell of origin of ccRCC may lie in PAX8-expressing Bowman capsule cells. Cancer Discov; 7(8); 802-4. ©2017 AACR See related article by Gu et al., p. 900 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. In silico modeling for tumor growth visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanquartier, Fleur; Jean-Quartier, Claire; Cemernek, David; Holzinger, Andreas

    2016-08-08

    Cancer is a complex disease. Fundamental cellular based studies as well as modeling provides insight into cancer biology and strategies to treatment of the disease. In silico models complement in vivo models. Research on tumor growth involves a plethora of models each emphasizing isolated aspects of benign and malignant neoplasms. Biologists and clinical scientists are often overwhelmed by the mathematical background knowledge necessary to grasp and to apply a model to their own research. We aim to provide a comprehensive and expandable simulation tool to visualizing tumor growth. This novel Web-based application offers the advantage of a user-friendly graphical interface with several manipulable input variables to correlate different aspects of tumor growth. By refining model parameters we highlight the significance of heterogeneous intercellular interactions on tumor progression. Within this paper we present the implementation of the Cellular Potts Model graphically presented through Cytoscape.js within a Web application. The tool is available under the MIT license at https://github.com/davcem/cpm-cytoscape and http://styx.cgv.tugraz.at:8080/cpm-cytoscape/ . In-silico methods overcome the lack of wet experimental possibilities and as dry method succeed in terms of reduction, refinement and replacement of animal experimentation, also known as the 3R principles. Our visualization approach to simulation allows for more flexible usage and easy extension to facilitate understanding and gain novel insight. We believe that biomedical research in general and research on tumor growth in particular will benefit from the systems biology perspective.

  20. Relationship between cyclin D1 expression and poor radioresponse of murine carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milas, Luka; Akimoto, Tetsuo; Hunter, Nancy R.; Mason, Kathyrn A.; Buchmiller, Lara; Yamakawa, Michitaka; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Ang, K. Kian

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We recently reported that overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) positively correlated with radioresistance of murine carcinomas. Because cyclin D1 is a downstream sensor of EGFR activation, the present study investigated whether a relationship exists between the extent of cyclin D1 expression and in vivo radiocurability of murine tumors. We further investigated the influence of radiation on cyclin D1 expression and the expression of p27, an inhibitor of the cyclin D1 downstream pathway, as well as the relationship of these molecular determinants to cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in tumors exposed to radiation. Methods and Materials: Cyclin D1 expression was assayed in nine carcinomas syngeneic to C3Hf/Kam mice using Western blot analysis. These tumors greatly differed in their radioresponse as assessed by TCD 50 . The expression of cyclin D1 and p27 proteins was determined by Western blotting. Cell proliferative activity in tumors was determined by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunochemistry. The effect of irradiation on the expression of cyclin D1 or p27 proteins and on PCNA positivity was determined in the radiosensitive OCa-I and in the radioresistant SCC-VII tumors. Results: Cyclin D1 expression varied among tumors by 40-fold, and its magnitude positively correlated with poorer tumor radioresponse (higher TCD 50 values). The level of cyclin D1 expression paralleled that of EGFR. A 15-Gy dose reduced constitutive expression of cyclin D1 in the radiosensitive OCa-I tumors, but had no influence on expression of cyclin D1 in the radioresistant SCC-VII tumors. In contrast, 15 Gy increased the expression of p27 in radiosensitive tumors and reduced it in radioresistant tumors. Radiation induced no significant apoptosis or change in the percentage of PCNA-positive (proliferating) cells in SCC-VII tumors with high cyclin D1 levels, but it induced significant apoptosis and a decrease in the percentage of proliferating

  1. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Li

    Full Text Available Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.

  2. Lactoferrin dampens high-fructose corn syrup-induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Chieh; Hsieh, Chang-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome are related obesity, type 2 diabetes/insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here we investigated how the anti-inflammatory properties of lactoferrin can protect against the onset of hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome by using a murine model administered with high-fructose corn syrup. Our results show that a high-fructose diet stimulates intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increases intestinal permeability, leading to the introduction of endotoxin into blood circulation and liver. Immunohistochemical staining of Toll-like receptor-4 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin indicated that lactoferrin can modulate lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory cascade. The important regulatory roles are played by adipokines including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and adiponectin, ultimately reducing hepatitis and decreasing serum alanine aminotransferase release. These beneficial effects of lactoferrin related to the downregulation of the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cascade in the liver. Furthermore, lactoferrin reduced serum and hepatic triglycerides to prevent lipid accumulation in the liver, and reduced lipid peroxidation, resulting in 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation. Lactoferrin reduced oral glucose tolerance test and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance. Lactoferrin administration thus significantly lowered liver weight, resulting from a decrease in the triglyceride and cholesterol synthesis that activates hepatic steatosis. Taken together, these results suggest that lactoferrin protected against high-fructose corn syrup induced hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Dual Role of Host Par2 in a Murine Model of Spontaneous Metastatic B16 Melanoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejár, Tomáš; Větvička, D.; Zadinová, M.; Poučková, P.; Kukal, J.; Ježek, Petr; Matěj, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 7 (2014), s. 3511-3515 ISSN 0250-7005 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : PAR2 * melanoma * metastasis * murine model Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.826, year: 2014

  4. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Madera

    Full Text Available Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-6, and CCL2 in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS while production of interleukin-10 remained unchanged. The increased LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was transient and correlated with enhanced cytokine production in response to other Toll-like receptor agonists, including peptidoglycan and flagellin. In addition, 4T1-conditioned BMDMs exhibited strengthened LPS-induced nitric oxide production and enhanced phagocytosis of Escherichia coli. 4T1-mediated augmentation of macrophage responses to LPS was partially dependent on the NFκB pathway, macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and actin polymerization, as well as the presence of 4T1-secreted extracellular vesicles. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages obtained from 4T1 tumor-bearing mice displayed enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in response to LPS. These results suggest that uptake of 4T1-secreted factors and actin-mediated ingestion of 4T1-secreted exosomes by macrophages cause a transient enhancement of innate inflammatory responses. Mammary carcinoma-mediated regulation of innate immunity may have significant implications for our understanding of host defense and cancer progression.

  5. Influence of WR-2721 on metastatic tumor spread after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, R.L.; Jernigan, M.C.; Yuhas, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The Line 1 alveolar cell carcinoma is a transplantable murine tumor which, unlike most others, kills the host by means of metastatic spread. Attempts to cure this tumor with localized radiation therapy often fail, in spite of local tumor control, because the metastases evade the treatment. These facts suggest that host-tumor interactions may play a particularly important role in determining the ultimate survival of the tumor bearing animal. In order to initially evaluate the possible importance of normal regional tissues in host-tumor interactions the influence of WR-2721, a radioprotective drug, was examined for local tumor control and subsequent survival of the tumor bearing animal after localized radiation. Results indicated that WR-2721 can decrease metastasis. (U.S.)

  6. X-ray microbeams: Tumor therapy and central nervous system research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Qu, Y.; Liu, S.; Cool, C.D.; Gilbert, J.; Hainfeld, J.F.; Kruse, C.A.; Laterra, J.; Lenihan, D.; Nawrocky, M.M.; Pappas, G.; Sze, C.-I.; Yuasa, T.; Zhong, N.; Zhong, Z.; McDonald, J.W.

    2005-01-01

    Irradiation with parallel arrays of thin, planar slices of X-ray beams (microplanar beams, or microbeams) spares normal tissue, including the central nervous system (CNS), and preferentially damages tumors. The effects are mediated, at least in part, by the tissue's microvasculature that seems to effectively repair itself in normal tissue but fails to do so in tumors. Consequently, the therapeutic index of single-fraction unidirectional microbeam irradiations has been shown to be larger than that of single-fraction unidirectional unsegmented beams in treating the intracranial rat 9L gliosarcoma tumor model (9LGS) and the subcutaneous murine mammary carcinoma EMT-6. This paper presents results demonstrating that individual microbeams, or arrays of parallel ones, can also be used for targeted, selective cell ablation in the CNS, and also to induce demyelination. The results highlight the value of the method as a powerful tool for studying the CNS through selective cell ablation, besides its potential as a treatment modality in clinical oncology

  7. Molecular Checkpoint Decisions Made by Subverted Vascular Niche Transform Indolent Tumor Cells into Chemoresistant Cancer Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhongwei; Scandura, Joseph M; Inghirami, Giorgio G; Shido, Koji; Ding, Bi-Sen; Rafii, Shahin

    2017-01-09

    Tumor-associated endothelial cells (TECs) regulate tumor cell aggressiveness. However, the core mechanism by which TECs confer stem cell-like activity to indolent tumors is unknown. Here, we used in vivo murine and human tumor models to identify the tumor-suppressive checkpoint role of TEC-expressed insulin growth factor (IGF) binding protein-7 (IGFBP7/angiomodulin). During tumorigenesis, IGFBP7 blocks IGF1 and inhibits expansion and aggresiveness of tumor stem-like cells (TSCs) expressing IGF1 receptor (IGF1R). However, chemotherapy triggers TECs to suppress IGFBP7, and this stimulates IGF1R + TSCs to express FGF4, inducing a feedforward FGFR1-ETS2 angiocrine cascade that obviates TEC IGFBP7. Thus, loss of IGFBP7 and upregulation of IGF1 activates the FGF4-FGFR1-ETS2 pathway in TECs and converts naive tumor cells to chemoresistant TSCs, thereby facilitating their invasiveness and progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. STI571 (Gleevec) improves tumor growth delay and survival in irradiated mouse models of glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Ling; Shinohara, Eric T.; Kim, Dong; Tan Jiahuai; Osusky, Kate; Shyr, Yu; Hallahan, Dennis E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a devastating brain neoplasm that is essentially incurable. Although radiation therapy prolongs survival, GBMs progress within areas of irradiation. Recent studies in invertebrates have shown that STI571 (Gleevec; Novartis, East Hanover, NJ) enhances the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the effectiveness of STI571 in combination with radiation was studied in mouse models of GBM. Methods and Materials: Murine GL261 and human D54 GBM cell lines formed tumors in brains and hind limbs of C57BL6 and nude mice, respectively. GL261 and D54 cells were treated with 5 μmol/L of STI571 for 1 h and/or irradiated with 3 Gy. Protein was analyzed by Western immunoblots probed with antibodies to caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, phospho-Akt, Akt, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) α and β. Tumor volumes were assessed in mice bearing GL261 or D54 tumors treated with 21 Gy administered in seven fractionated doses. Histologic sections from STI571-treated mice were stained with phospho-Akt and phospho-PDGFR β antibodies. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used to study the response of mice bearing intracranial implants of GL261. Results: STI571 penetrated the blood-brain barrier, which resulted in a reduction in phospho-PDGFR in GBM. STI571-induced apoptosis in GBM was significantly enhanced by irradiation. STI571 combined with irradiation induced caspase 3 cleavage in GBM cells. Glioblastoma multiforme response to therapy correlated with an increase in tumor growth delay and survival when STI571 was administered in conjunction with daily irradiation. Conclusion: These findings suggest that STI571 has the potential to augment radiotherapy and thereby improve median survival

  9. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danciu, Corina; Berkó, Szilvia; Varju, Gábor; Balázs, Boglárka; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István Balázs; Cioca, Andreea; Petruș, Alexandra; Dehelean, Cristina; Cosmin, Citu Ioan; Amaricai, Elena; Toma, Claudia Crina

    2015-07-08

    A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen) was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema). Although hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE), or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) antibody.

  10. The Effect of Electroporation of a Lyotroic Liquid Crystal Genistein-Based Formulation in the Recovery of Murine Melanoma Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Danciu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A lamellar lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-Gen was prepared in order to increase the aqueous solubility of the lipophilic phytocompound genistein. The formulation was applied locally, in a murine model of melanoma, with or without electroporation. The results demonstrated that, when the formulation was applied by electroporation, the tumors appeared later. During the 21 days of the experiment, the LLC-Gen formulation decreased the tumor volume, the amount of melanin and the degree of erythema, but when electroporation was applied, all these parameters indicated a better prognosis even (lower tumor volume, amount of melanin and degree of erythema. Although hematoxylin–eosin (HE staining confirmed the above events, application of the LLC-Gen formulation by electroporation did not lead to a significant effect in terms of the serum concentrations of the protein S100B and serum neuron specific enolase (NSE, or the tissue expression of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ antibody.

  11. Fractional laser exposure induces neutrophil infiltration (N1 phenotype into the tumor and stimulates systemic anti-tumor immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Kawakubo

    Full Text Available Ablative fractional photothermolysis (aFP using a CO2 laser generates multiple small diameter tissue lesions within the irradiation field. aFP is commonly used for a wide variety of dermatological indications, including treatment of photodamaged skin and dyschromia, drug delivery and modification of scars due to acne, surgical procedures and burns. In this study we explore the utility of aFP for treating oncological indications, including induction of local tumor regression and inducing anti-tumor immunity, which is in marked contrast to current indications of aFP.We used a fractional CO2 laser to treat a tumor established by BALB/c colon carcinoma cell line (CT26.CL25, which expressed a tumor antigen, beta-galactosidase (beta-gal. aFP treated tumors grew significantly slower as compared to untreated controls. Complete remission after a single aFP treatment was observed in 47% of the mice. All survival mice from the tumor inoculation rejected re-inoculation of the CT26.CL25 colon carcinoma cells and moreover 80% of the survival mice rejected CT26 wild type colon carcinoma cells, which are parental cells of CT26.CL25 cells. Histologic section of the FP-treated tumors showed infiltrating neutrophil in the tumor early after aFP treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes showed aFP treatment abrogated the increase in regulatory T lymphocyte (Treg, which suppresses anti-tumor immunity and elicited the expansion of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which were required to mediate the tumor-suppressing effect of aFP.We have demonstrated that aFP is able to induce a systemic anti-tumor adaptive immunity preventing tumor recurrence in a murine colon carcinoma in a mouse model. This study demonstrates a potential role of aFP treatments in oncology and further studies should be performed.

  12. Radioiodinated VEGF to image tumor angiogenesis in a LS180 tumor xenograft model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Kinuya, Seigo; Kawashima, Atsuhiro; Nishii, Ryuichi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kawai, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth or metastasis. A method involving noninvasive detection of angiogenic activity in vivo would provide diagnostic information regarding antiangiogenic therapy targeting vascular endothelial cells as well as important insight into the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (flt-1 and KDR) system in tumor biology. We evaluated radioiodinated VEGF 121 , which displays high binding affinity for KDR, and VEGF 165 , which possesses high binding affinity for flt-1 and low affinity for KDR, as angiogenesis imaging agents using the LS180 tumor xenograft model. Methods: VEGF 121 and VEGF 165 were labeled with 125 I by the chloramine-T method. Biodistribution was observed in an LS180 human colon cancer xenograft model. Additionally, autoradiographic imaging and immunohistochemical staining of tumors were performed with 125 I-VEGF 121 . Results: 125 I-VEGF 121 and 125 I-VEGF 165 exhibited strong, continuous uptake by tumors and the uterus, an organ characterized by angiogenesis. 125 I-VEGF 121 uptake in tumors was twofold higher than that of 125 I-VEGF 165 (9.12±98 and 4.79±1.08 %ID/g at 2 h, respectively). 125 I-VEGF 121 displayed higher tumor to nontumor (T/N) ratios in most normal organs in comparison with 125 I-VEGF 165 . 125 I-VEGF 121 accumulation in tumors decreased with increasing tumor volume. Autoradiographic and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed that the difference in 125 I-VEGF 121 tumor accumulation correlated with degree of tumor vascularity. Conclusion: Radioiodinated VEGF 121 is a promising tracer for noninvasive delineation of angiogenesis in vivo

  13. Experimental model of ultrasound thermotherapy in rats inoculated with Walker-236 tumor Modelo experimental de termoterapia ultrassônica em ratos inoculados com tumor de Walker-236

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Carlos Otaviano David Morano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a model to evaluate the effects of focal pulsed ultrasound (US waves as a source of heat for treatment of murine subcutaneous implanted Walker tumor. METHODS: An experimental, controlled, comparative study was conducted. Twenty male Wistar rats (160-300 g randomized in 2 equal groups (G-1: Control and G-2: Hyperthermia were inoculated with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tumor. After 5 days G-2 rats were submitted to 45ºC hyperthermia. Heat was delivered directly to the tumor by an ultrasound (US equipment (3 MHz frequency, 1,5W/cm³. Tumor temperature reached 45º C in 3 minutes and was maintained at this level for 5 minutes. Tumor volume was measured on days 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 post inoculation in both groups. Unpaired t-test was used for comparison. POBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo para avaliar os efeitos do ultra-som focal pulsado como fonte de calor para o tratamento de tumores de Walker subcutâneos implantados em ratos. MÉTODOS: Um estudo experimental, controlado, comparativo foi realizado. Vinte ratos Wistar machos (160-300 g divididos em dois grupos (G-1: Controle e G-2: hipertermia foram inoculados com tumor de Walker carcinossarcoma-256. Após cinco dias os ratos do grupo G-2 ratos foram submetidos a hipertermia (45ºC. O calor foi aplicado diretamente no tumor por um equipamento de ultrassonografia (3 MHz, 1,5 W/cm³. A temperatura no tumor atingiu 45ºC em 3 minutos e foi mantida nesse nível por 5 minutos. O volume do tumor foi medido nos dias 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 após a inoculação, em ambos os grupos. Teste t não pareado foi utilizado para comparação. P <0,05 foi considerado significante. RESULTADOS: O volume do tumor foi significativamente maior no 5º dia e diminuiu nos dias 11, 14 e 17 nos ratos tratados. Animais submetidos à hipertermia sobreviveram mais tempo que os animais do grupo controle. No 29º dia após a inoculação do tumor, 40% dos ratos do grupo controle e 77,78% dos ratos tratados com

  14. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC

  15. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Angileri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1 is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH, an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethylbenzoyl] cyclohexane-1,3-dione. However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  16. Heat Shock Response Associated with Hepatocarcinogenesis in a Murine Model of Hereditary Tyrosinemia Type I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angileri, Francesca; Morrow, Geneviève; Roy, Vincent; Orejuela, Diana; Tanguay, Robert M., E-mail: robert.tanguay@ibis.ulaval.ca [Laboratory of Cell and Developmental Genetics, Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Institut de Biologie Intégrative et des Systèmes (IBIS) and PROTEO, 1030 avenue de la médecine, Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-04-23

    Hereditary Tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a metabolic liver disease caused by genetic defects of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), an enzyme necessary to complete the breakdown of tyrosine. The severe hepatic dysfunction caused by the lack of this enzyme is prevented by the therapeutic use of NTBC (2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]cyclohexane-1,3-dione). However despite the treatment, chronic hepatopathy and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are still observed in some HT1 patients. Growing evidence show the important role of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in many cellular processes and their involvement in pathological diseases including cancer. Their survival-promoting effect by modulation of the apoptotic machinery is often correlated with poor prognosis and resistance to therapy in a number of cancers. Here, we sought to gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms associated with liver dysfunction and tumor development in a murine model of HT1. Differential gene expression patterns in livers of mice under HT1 stress, induced by drug retrieval, have shown deregulation of stress and cell death resistance genes. Among them, genes coding for HSPB and HSPA members, and for anti-apoptotic BCL-2 related mitochondrial proteins were associated with the hepatocarcinogenetic process. Our data highlight the variation of stress pathways related to HT1 hepatocarcinogenesis suggesting the role of HSPs in rendering tyrosinemia-affected liver susceptible to the development of HCC.

  17. Therapeutic Implications from Sensitivity Analysis of Tumor Angiogenesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleszczuk, Jan; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Enderling, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic cancer treatments induce tumor starvation and regression by targeting the tumor vasculature that delivers oxygen and nutrients. Mathematical models prove valuable tools to study the proof-of-concept, efficacy and underlying mechanisms of such treatment approaches. The effects of parameter value uncertainties for two models of tumor development under angiogenic signaling and anti-angiogenic treatment are studied. Data fitting is performed to compare predictions of both models and to obtain nominal parameter values for sensitivity analysis. Sensitivity analysis reveals that the success of different cancer treatments depends on tumor size and tumor intrinsic parameters. In particular, we show that tumors with ample vascular support can be successfully targeted with conventional cytotoxic treatments. On the other hand, tumors with curtailed vascular support are not limited by their growth rate and therefore interruption of neovascularization emerges as the most promising treatment target. PMID:25785600

  18. A transgenic mouse model for trilateral retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, J.M.; Marcus, D.M.; Bernards, R.A.; Carpenter, J.L.; Windle, J.J.; Mellon, P.; Albert, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    We present a murine model of trilateral retinoblastoma. Ocular retinoblastoma and central nervous system tumors are observed in a line of mice formed by the transgenic expression of SV40 T-antigen. An oncogenic protein known to bind to the retinoblastoma gene product (p105-Rb) is specifically

  19. Validation of diffuse correlation spectroscopy sensitivity to nicotinamide-induced blood flow elevation in the murine hindlimb using the fluorescent microsphere technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Ashley R.; Ramirez, Gabriel A.; Han, Songfeng; Liu, Ziping; Bubel, Tracy M.; Choe, Regine

    2018-03-01

    Nicotinamide has been shown to affect blood flow in both tumor and normal tissues, including skeletal muscle. Intraperitoneal injection of nicotinamide was used as a simple intervention to test the sensitivity of noninvasive diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to changes in blood flow in the murine left quadriceps femoris skeletal muscle. DCS was then compared with the gold-standard fluorescent microsphere (FM) technique for validation. The nicotinamide dose-response experiment showed that relative blood flow measured by DCS increased following treatment with 500- and 1000-mg / kg nicotinamide. The DCS and FM technique comparison showed that blood flow index measured by DCS was correlated with FM counts quantified by image analysis. The results of this study show that DCS is sensitive to nicotinamide-induced blood flow elevation in the murine left quadriceps femoris. Additionally, the results of the comparison were consistent with similar studies in higher-order animal models, suggesting that mouse models can be effectively employed to investigate the utility of DCS for various blood flow measurement applications.

  20. Application and evaluation of a molecular approach for detection of the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® (myrrh in the murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael M. Lotfy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The conventional PCR technique was used for studying the schistosomicidal effect of Mirazid® in the murine model. Results of the molecular study were compared with the parasitological results (ova and worm count. The used PCR technique was more sensitive than the Kato-Katz thick smears. Mirazid® showed some schistosomicidal effects against murine Schistosoma mansoni. However, it was not efficient enough to cure any of the studied mice.

  1. Thrombospondin-1 in a Murine Model of Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida P Lopez-Dee

    Full Text Available Colorectal Cancer (CRC is one of the late complications observed in patients suffering from inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. Carcinogenesis is promoted by persistent chronic inflammation occurring in IBD. Understanding the mechanisms involved is essential in order to ameliorate inflammation and prevent CRC. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1 is a multidomain glycoprotein with important roles in angiogenesis. The effects of TSP-1 in colonic tumor formation and growth were analyzed in a model of inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. WT and TSP-1 deficient mice (TSP-1-/- of the C57BL/6 strain received a single injection of azoxymethane (AOM and multiple cycles of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS to induce chronic inflammation-related cancers. Proliferation and angiogenesis were histologically analyzed in tumors. The intestinal transcriptome was also analyzed using a gene microarray approach. When the area containing tumors was compared with the entire colonic area of each mouse, the tumor burden was decreased in AOM/DSS-treated TSP-1-/- versus wild type (WT mice. However, these lesions displayed more angiogenesis and proliferation rates when compared with the WT tumors. AOM-DSS treatment of TSP-1-/- mice resulted in significant deregulation of genes involved in transcription, canonical Wnt signaling, transport, defense response, regulation of epithelial cell proliferation and metabolism. Microarray analyses of these tumors showed down-regulation of 18 microRNAs in TSP-1-/- tumors. These results contribute new insights on the controversial role of TSP-1 in cancer and offer a better understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of CRC.

  2. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A.; van Beek, Adriaan A.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT with inhibitors of PDT-induced survival pathways. In this respect, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) has been identified as a potential pharmacological target, albeit inhibition of NF-κB may concurrently dampen the subsequent anti-tumor immune response required for complete tumor eradication and abscopal effects. In contrast to these postulations, this study demonstrated that siRNA knockdown of NF-κB in murine breast carcinoma (EMT-6) cells increased survival signaling in these cells and exacerbated the inflammatory response in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. These results suggest a pro-death and immunosuppressive role of NF-κB in PDT-treated cells that concurs with a hyperstimulated immune response in innate immune cells. PMID:26307977

  3. A model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with tumor microenvironment in breast carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Bassem; Bor-Angelier, Catherine; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Breast carcinomas are cancers that arise from the epithelial cells of the breast, which are the cells that line the lobules and the lactiferous ducts. Breast carcinoma is the most common type of breast cancer and can be divided into different subtypes based on architectural features and growth patterns, recognized during a histopathological examination. Tumor microenvironment (TME) is the cellular environment in which tumor cells develop. Being composed of various cell types having different biological roles, TME is recognized as playing an important role in the progression of the disease. The architectural heterogeneity in breast carcinomas and the spatial interactions with TME are, to date, not well understood. Developing a spatial model of tumor architecture and spatial interactions with TME can advance our understanding of tumor heterogeneity. Furthermore, generating histological synthetic datasets can contribute to validating, and comparing analytical methods that are used in digital pathology. In this work, we propose a modeling method that applies to different breast carcinoma subtypes and TME spatial distributions based on mathematical morphology. The model is based on a few morphological parameters that give access to a large spectrum of breast tumor architectures and are able to differentiate in-situ ductal carcinomas (DCIS) and histological subtypes of invasive carcinomas such as ductal (IDC) and lobular carcinoma (ILC). In addition, a part of the parameters of the model controls the spatial distribution of TME relative to the tumor. The validation of the model has been performed by comparing morphological features between real and simulated images.

  4. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, Kathleen T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); McAvoy, Thomas J. [Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Institute of Systems Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); George, Rohini [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dieterich, Sonja [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); D' Souza, Warren D., E-mail: wdsou001@umaryland.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fischell Department of Bioengineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor-surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor-surrogate correlation and the precision in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor-surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3-3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.

  5. Monitoring multiple myeloma by idiotype-specific peptide binders of tumor-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccino, Enrico; Mimmi, Selena; Dattilo, Vincenzo; Marino, Fabiola; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Loria, Antonio; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pisano, Antonio; Albano, Francesco; Vecchio, Eleonora; Ceglia, Simona; Golino, Gaetanina; Lupia, Antonio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2017-10-13

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TDEs) play a pivotal role in tumor establishment and progression, and are emerging biomarkers for tumor diagnosis in personalized medicine. To date, there is a lack of efficient technology platforms for exosome isolation and characterization. Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-cell malignancy due to the rapid development of drug-resistance. MM-released exosomes express the immunoglobulin B-cell receptor (Ig-BCR) of the tumor B-cells, which can be targeted by Idiotype-binding peptides (Id-peptides). In this study, we analyzed the production of MM-released exosomes in the murine 5T33MM multiple myeloma model as biomarkers of tumor growth. To this end, we selected Id-peptides by screening a phage display library using as bait the Ig-BCR expressed by 5T33MM cells. By FACS, the FITC-conjugated Id-peptides detected the MM-released exosomes in the serum of 5T33MM-engrafted mice, levels of which are correlated with tumor progression at an earlier time point compared to serum paraprotein. These results indicate that Id-peptide-based recognition of MM-released exosomes may represent a very sensitive diagnostic approach for clinical evaluation of disease progression.

  6. Mechanisms of Bone Metastasis from Breast Cancer Using a Clinically Relevant Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anderson, Robin

    2001-01-01

    .... We have developed a murine model of breast cancer that actively mimics the human disease. After implantation of tumor cells into the mammary gland, a primary tumour develops and subsequently metastasises to the lymph nodes, lung and bone...

  7. Skull base tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Nader, Remi; van Doormaal, Tristan; Kamel, Mahmoud; Voormolen, Eduard H J; Lasio, Giovanni; Aboud, Emad; Regli, Luca; Tulleken, Cornelius A F; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2010-11-01

    Resident duty-hours restrictions have now been instituted in many countries worldwide. Shortened training times and increased public scrutiny of surgical competency have led to a move away from the traditional apprenticeship model of training. The development of educational models for brain anatomy is a fascinating innovation allowing neurosurgeons to train without the need to practice on real patients and it may be a solution to achieve competency within a shortened training period. The authors describe the use of Stratathane resin ST-504 polymer (SRSP), which is inserted at different intracranial locations to closely mimic meningiomas and other pathological entities of the skull base, in a cadaveric model, for use in neurosurgical training. Silicone-injected and pressurized cadaveric heads were used for studying the SRSP model. The SRSP presents unique intrinsic metamorphic characteristics: liquid at first, it expands and foams when injected into the desired area of the brain, forming a solid tumorlike structure. The authors injected SRSP via different passages that did not influence routes used for the surgical approach for resection of the simulated lesion. For example, SRSP injection routes included endonasal transsphenoidal or transoral approaches if lesions were to be removed through standard skull base approach, or, alternatively, SRSP was injected via a cranial approach if the removal was planned to be via the transsphenoidal or transoral route. The model was set in place in 3 countries (US, Italy, and The Netherlands), and a pool of 13 physicians from 4 different institutions (all surgeons and surgeons in training) participated in evaluating it and provided feedback. All 13 evaluating physicians had overall positive impressions of the model. The overall score on 9 components evaluated--including comparison between the tumor model and real tumor cases, perioperative requirements, general impression, and applicability--was 88% (100% being the best possible

  8. Selective anti-tumor activity of the novel fluoropyrimidine polymer F10 towards G48a orthotopic GBM tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmeiner, William H; Lema-Tome, Carla; Gibo, Denise; Jennings-Gee, Jamie; Milligan, Carol; Debinski, Waldemar

    2014-02-01

    F10 is a novel anti-tumor agent with minimal systemic toxicity in vivo and which displays strong cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma (GBM) cells in vitro. Here we investigate the cytotoxicity of F10 towards GBM cells and evaluate the anti-tumor activity of locally-administered F10 towards an orthotopic xenograft model of GBM. The effects of F10 on thymidylate synthase (TS) inhibition and Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) cleavage complex formation were evaluated using TS activity assays and in vivo complex of enzyme bioassays. Cytotoxicity of F10 towards normal brain was evaluated using cortices from embryonic (day 18) mice. F10 displays minimal penetrance of the blood-brain barrier and was delivered by intra-cerebral (i.c.) administration and prospective anti-tumor response towards luciferase-expressing G48a human GBM tumors in nude mice was evaluated using IVIS imaging. Histological examination of tumor and normal brain tissue was used to assess the selectivity of anti-tumor activity. F10 is cytotoxic towards G48a, SNB-19, and U-251 MG GBM cells through dual targeting of TS and Top1. F10 is not toxic to murine primary neuronal cultures. F10 is well-tolerated upon i.c. administration and induces significant regression of G48a tumors that is dose-dependent. Histological analysis from F10-treated mice revealed tumors were essentially completely eradicated in F10-treated mice while vehicle-treated mice displayed substantial infiltration into normal tissue. F10 displays strong efficacy for GBM treatment with minimal toxicity upon i.c. administration establishing F10 as a promising drug-candidate for treating GBM in human patients.

  9. In-111-oxine-labeled negative liposomes in tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Guihard, D.; Bardy, A.; Pasqualini, R.

    1983-01-01

    The distribution of In-111-oxine-labelled liposomes in C 57 Bl 6 mice bearing a Lewis lung tumor and the variations contingent on modification of certain parameters have been studied. The distribution has been compared with that of Ga-67 citrate which is known for its affinity for lung tumors. In conclusion, it may be said that In-111-labeled negatively charged liposomes handled in oxygen-free conditions and having a size smaller than 80 nm make it possible to visualize a murine tumor as well, and even better, than does Ga-67 citrate

  10. Quantification of tumor fluorescence during intraoperative optical cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judy, Ryan P; Keating, Jane J; DeJesus, Elizabeth M; Jiang, Jack X; Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Nie, Shuming; Holt, David E; Arlauckas, Sean P; Low, Phillip S; Delikatny, E James; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-11-13

    Intraoperative optical cancer imaging is an emerging technology in which surgeons employ fluorophores to visualize tumors, identify tumor-positive margins and lymph nodes containing metastases. This study compares instrumentation to measure tumor fluorescence. Three imaging systems (Spectropen, Glomax, Flocam) measured and quantified fluorescent signal-to-background ratios (SBR) in vitro, murine xenografts, tissue phantoms and clinically. Evaluation criteria included the detection of small changes in fluorescence, sensitivity of signal detection at increasing depths and practicality of use. In vitro, spectroscopy was superior in detecting incremental differences in fluorescence than luminescence and digital imaging (Ln[SBR] = 6.8 ± 0.6, 2.4 ± 0.3, 2.6 ± 0.1, p = 0.0001). In fluorescent tumor cells, digital imaging measured higher SBRs than luminescence (6.1 ± 0.2 vs. 4.3 ± 0.4, p = 0.001). Spectroscopy was more sensitive than luminometry and digital imaging in identifying murine tumor fluorescence (SBR = 41.7 ± 11.5, 5.1 ± 1.8, 4.1 ± 0.9, p = 0.0001), and more sensitive than digital imaging at detecting fluorescence at increasing depths (SBR = 7.0 ± 3.4 vs. 2.4 ± 0.5, p = 0.03). Lastly, digital imaging was the most practical and least time-consuming. All methods detected incremental differences in fluorescence. Spectroscopy was the most sensitive for small changes in fluorescence. Digital imaging was the most practical considering its wide field of view, background noise filtering capability, and sensitivity to increasing depth.

  11. EXCI-CEST: Exploiting pharmaceutical excipients as MRI-CEST contrast agents for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Dario Livio; Moustaghfir, Fatima Zzahra; Zerbo, Alexandre; Consolino, Lorena; Anemone, Annasofia; Bracesco, Martina; Aime, Silvio

    2017-06-15

    Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) approach is a novel tool within magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that allows visualization of molecules possessing exchangeable protons with water. Many molecules, employed as excipients for the formulation of finished drug products, are endowed with hydroxyl, amine or amide protons, thus can be exploitable as MRI-CEST contrast agents. Their high safety profiles allow them to be injected at very high doses. Here we investigated the MRI-CEST properties of several excipients (ascorbic acid, sucrose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, meglumine and 2-pyrrolidone) and tested them as tumor-detecting agents in two different murine tumor models (breast and melanoma cancers). All the investigated molecules showed remarkable CEST contrast upon i.v. administration in the range 1-3ppm according to the type of mobile proton groups. A marked increase of CEST contrast was observed in tumor regions up to 30min post injection. The combination of marked tumor contrast enhancement and lack of toxicity make these molecules potential candidates for the diagnosis of tumors within the MRI-CEST approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha blockade exacerbates murine psoriasis-like disease by enhancing Th17 function and decreasing expansion of Treg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hak-Ling; Napierata, Lee; Stedman, Nancy; Benoit, Stephen; Collins, Mary; Nickerson-Nutter, Cheryl; Young, Deborah A

    2010-02-01

    Patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis respond well to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) blockers in general; however, there is now mounting evidence that a small cohort of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who receive TNFalpha blockers develop psoriasis. This study was undertaken to explore the mechanisms underlying TNFalpha blockade-induced exacerbation of skin inflammation in murine psoriasis-like skin disease. Skin inflammation was induced in BALB/c scid/scid mice after they received CD4+CD45RB(high)CD25- (naive CD4) T cells from donor mice. These mice were treated with either anti-interleukin-12 (anti-IL-12)/23p40 antibody or murine TNFRII-Fc fusion protein and were examined for signs of disease, including histologic features, various cytokine levels in the serum, and cytokine or FoxP3 transcripts in the affected skin and draining lymph node (LN) cells. In a separate study, naive CD4+ T cells were differentiated into Th1 or Th17 lineages with anti-CD3/28 magnetic beads and appropriate cytokines in the presence or absence of TNFalpha. Cytokine gene expression from these differentiated cells was also determined. Neutralization of TNFalpha exacerbated skin inflammation and markedly enhanced the expression of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-17, IL-21, and IL-22 but suppressed FoxP3 expression in the skin and reduced the number of FoxP3-positive Treg cells in the draining LNs. TNFalpha also demonstrated a divergent role during priming and reactivation of naive T cells. These results reveal a novel immunoregulatory role of TNFalpha on Th17 and Treg cells in some individuals, which may account for the exacerbation of skin inflammation in some patients who receive anti-TNF treatments.

  13. Effect of anemia on tumor radiosensitivity under normo and hyperbaric conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F.A.; Smith, K.A.; Soranson, J.A.; Randhawa, V.S.; Stratford, M.R.; Denekamp, J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of chronic anemia on tumor radiosensitivity in a murine tumor has been investigated. Anemia was induced by bilateral kidney irradiation given several months before tumor implantation. Anemic, anemic transfused, and normal non-anemic age-matched tumor bearing animals were irradiated with X rays (2 F/24 hr) either in air, air plus misonidazole, or under hyperbaric oxygen. The most resistant response was that of tumors grown in normal mice treated in air. Anemia produced an increase in radiosensitivity which was further enhanced by red blood cell replacement. The most sensitive overall response was seen in the anemic-transfused group treated with HBO

  14. Validation and Comparison of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Mediated By Boron-Rich Liposomes in Multiple Murine Tumor Models

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    Charles A Maitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT was performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor in mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma flank tumors and the results were compared with previously performed studies with mice bearing EMT6 breast cancer flank tumors. Mice were implanted with CT26 tumors subcutaneously in the caudal flank and were given two separate tail vein injections of unilamellar liposomes composed of cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycer-3-phosphocholine, and K[nido-7-CH3(CH215–7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer and encapsulated Na3[1-(2`-B10H9-2-NH3B10H8] within the liposomal core. Mice were irradiated 30 hours after the second injection in a thermal neutron beam for various lengths of time. The tumor size was monitored daily for 72 days. Despite relatively lower tumor boron concentrations, as compared to EMT6 tumors, a 45 minute neutron irradiation BNCT resulted in complete resolution of the tumors in 50% of treated mice, 50% of which never recurred. Median time to tumor volume tripling was 38 days in BNCT treated mice, 17 days in neutron-irradiated mice given no boron compounds, and 4 days in untreated controls. Tumor response in mice with CT26 colon carcinoma was markedly more pronounced than in previous reports of mice with EMT6 tumors, a difference which increased with dose. The slope of the dose response curve of CT26 colon carcinoma tumors is 1.05 times tumor growth delay per Gy compared to 0.09 times tumor growth delay per Gy for EMT6 tumors, indicating that inherent radiosensitivity of tumors plays a role in boron neutron capture therapy and should be considered in the development of clinical applications of BNCT in animals and man.

  15. Onconase-induced changes in radiation response and physiological parameters in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.; Shui, C.; Shogen, K.; Mikulski, S.M.; Nunno, M.; Wallner, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Onconase (ONC), previously known as P-30 protein, is a novel basic amphibian protein isolated from eggs of the leopard frog. The original study conducted by Darzynkiewicz et al. (Cell Tissue Kinetics, 1988) demonstrated that ONC shows anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activities against several tumor cell lines in vitro. Since then, to our knowledge, no studies regarding the inhibitory effect of ONC in solid tumor models were performed. ONC is also known to inhibit cell-cycle progression from the radiation-sensitive G 1 phase to the radiation-resistant S phase. Thus, we examined the effect of ONC as a potential radiation sensitizer. The radiation response and physiological parameters were evaluated in C3H mice and/or nude mice bearing various (murine and/or human) tumor models. Materials and Method: First, we examined the effect of ONC on the cellular proliferative, as well as the clonogenic, response of various cell lines (i.e., H4IIE rat hepatoma, AsPC-1 human pancreas adenocarcinoma, DU145 human prostate carcinoma, LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma, A549 human lung carcinoma, MCaIV murine adenocarcinoma, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma, and CCL-209 bovine artery pulmonary endothelial cells) by using the MTT and clonogenic cell survival assays. Second, we determined the enhancement of radiation response before, during, and after treatment with ONC in several cell lines. Third, we determined whether ONC can inhibit the growth of solid tumors in vivo (i.e., FSaII and MCaIV in C3H mice, LS174T in nude mice). Fourth, we examined whether minocycline, an antiangiogenic agent, could amplify the tumoricidal efficacy of ONC in solid tumors. To test our hypothesis: if ONC could eradicate the outgrowth of tumor cells in confined spaces, it could lower the elevated pressure in solid tumors, we measured tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) using the wick-in-needle method, and systemic pressure using the right carotid artery cannulation method after treatment with ONC

  16. Interferon-Tau has Antiproliferative effects, Represses the Expression of E6 and E7 Oncogenes, Induces Apoptosis in Cell Lines Transformed with HPV16 and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Quirarte, Herbey Oswaldo; Trejo-Moreno, Cesar; Fierros-Zarate, Geny; Castañeda, Jhoseline Carnalla; Palma-Irizarry, Marie; Hernández-Márquez, Eva; Burguete-Garcia, Ana Isabel; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a promising alternative antiviral and immunotherapeutic agent in a wide variety of diseases including infectious, neurodegenerative, autoimmune and cancer due to its low toxicity in comparison with other type I interferon´s. The objective of our study was established the effect of the bovine IFN-τ on human (SiHa) and murine (BMK-16/myc) cells transformed with HPV 16 and evaluates the antitumor effect in a murine tumor model HPV 16 positive. We determine that bovine IFN-τ has antiproliferative effects, pro-apoptotic activity and induces repression of viral E6 and E7 oncogenes (time- and dose-dependent) on human and murine cells transformed with HPV 16 similar to the effects of IFN-β. However, IFN-τ induces greater antiproliferative effect, apoptosis and repression of both oncogenes in BMK-16/myc cells compared to SiHa cells. The differences were explained by the presence and abundance of the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) in each cell line. On the other hand, we treated groups of tumor-bearing mice (HPV16 positive) with IFN-τ and showed the inhibition tumor growth effect in vivo. Our finding indicates that bovine IFN-τ may be a good candidate for immunotherapy against cervical cancer. PMID:27994659

  17. Expression and function of the protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J (PTPRJ in normal mammary epithelial cells and breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanel E Smart

    Full Text Available The protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor J, PTPRJ, is a tumor suppressor gene that has been implicated in a range of cancers, including breast cancer, yet little is known about its role in normal breast physiology or in mammary gland tumorigenesis. In this paper we show that PTPRJ mRNA is expressed in normal breast tissue and reduced in corresponding tumors. Meta-analysis revealed that the gene encoding PTPRJ is frequently lost in breast tumors and that low expression of the transcript associated with poorer overall survival at 20 years. Immunohistochemistry of PTPRJ protein in normal human breast tissue revealed a distinctive apical localisation in the luminal cells of alveoli and ducts. Qualitative analysis of a cohort of invasive ductal carcinomas revealed retention of normal apical PTPRJ localization where tubule formation was maintained but that tumors mostly exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic staining, indicating that dysregulation of localisation associated with loss of tissue architecture in tumorigenesis. The murine ortholog, Ptprj, exhibited a similar localisation in normal mammary gland, and was differentially regulated throughout lactational development, and in an in vitro model of mammary epithelial differentiation. Furthermore, ectopic expression of human PTPRJ in HC11 murine mammary epithelial cells inhibited dome formation. These data indicate that PTPRJ may regulate differentiation of normal mammary epithelia and that dysregulation of protein localisation may be associated with tumorigenesis.

  18. Murine Models of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valero-Muñoz, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is characterized by signs and symptoms of heart failure in the presence of a normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Despite accounting for up to 50% of all clinical presentations of heart failure, the mechanisms implicated in HFpEF are poorly understood, thus precluding effective therapy. The pathophysiological heterogeneity in the HFpEF phenotype also contributes to this disease and likely to the absence of evidence-based therapies. Limited access to human samples and imperfect animal models that completely recapitulate the human HFpEF phenotype have impeded our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings that exist in this disease. Aging and comorbidities such as atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes and obesity, pulmonary hypertension, and renal dysfunction are highly associated with HFpEF, yet the relationship and contribution between them remains ill-defined. This review discusses some of the distinctive clinical features of HFpEF in association with these comorbidities and highlights the advantages and disadvantage of commonly used murine models used to study the HFpEF phenotype.

  19. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  20. Minocycline attenuates cardiac dysfunction in tumor-burdened mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Raymond D; Eichenseer, Clayton M; Wold, Loren E

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction as a result of tumor burden is becoming a recognized complication; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. A murine model of cancer cachexia has shown marked increases of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), known mediators of cardiac remodeling, in the left ventricle. The extent to which MMPs are involved in remodeling remains obscured. To this end a common antibiotic, minocycline, with MMP inhibitory properties was used to elucidate MMP involvement in tumor induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Tumor-bearing mice showed decreased cardiac function with reduced posterior wall thickness (PWTs) during systole, increased MMP and collagen expression consistent with fibrotic remodeling. Administration of minocycline preserved cardiac function in tumor bearing mice and decreased collagen RNA expression in the left ventricle. MMP protein levels were unaffected by minocycline administration, with the exception of MMP-9, indicating minocycline inhibition mechanisms are directly affecting MMP activity. Cancer induced cardiovascular dysfunction is an increasing concern; novel therapeutics are needed to prevent cardiac complications. Minocycline is a well-known antibiotic and recently has been shown to possess MMP inhibitory properties. Our findings presented here show that minocycline could represent a novel use for a long established drug in the prevention and treatment of cancer induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coupled Hybrid Continuum-Discrete Model of Tumor Angiogenesis and Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lyu

    Full Text Available The processes governing tumor growth and angiogenesis are codependent. To study the relationship between them, we proposed a coupled hybrid continuum-discrete model. In this model, tumor cells, their microenvironment (extracellular matrixes, matrix-degrading enzymes, and tumor angiogenic factors, and their network of blood vessels, described by a series of discrete points, were considered. The results of numerical simulation reveal the process of tumor growth and the change in microenvironment from avascular to vascular stage, indicating that the network of blood vessels develops gradually as the tumor grows. Our findings also reveal that a tumor is divided into three regions: necrotic, semi-necrotic, and well-vascularized. The results agree well with the previous relevant studies and physiological facts, and this model represents a platform for further investigations of tumor therapy.

  2. Cyclosporin safety in a simplified rat brain tumor implantation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco H. C. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is the second neurological cause of death. A simplified animal brain tumor model using W256 (carcinoma 256, Walker cell line was developed to permit the testing of novel treatment modalities. Wistar rats had a cell tumor solution inoculated stereotactically in the basal ganglia (right subfrontal caudate. This model yielded tumor growth in 95% of the animals, and showed absence of extracranial metastasis and systemic infection. Survival median was 10 days. Estimated tumor volume was 17.08±6.7 mm³ on the 7th day and 67.25±19.8 mm³ on 9th day post-inoculation. Doubling time was 24.25 h. Tumor growth induced cachexia, but no hematological or biochemical alterations. This model behaved as an undifferentiated tumor and can be promising for studying tumor cell migration in the central nervous system. Dexamethasone 3.0 mg/kg/day diminished significantly survival in this model. Cyclosporine 10 mg/kg/day administration was safely tolerated.

  3. Organoid Models of Human and Mouse Ductal Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boj, Sylvia F.; Hwang, Chang-Il; Baker, Lindsey A.; Chio, Iok In Christine; Engle, Dannielle D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Jager, Myrthe; Ponz-Sarvise, Mariano; Tiriac, Hervé; Spector, Mona S.; Gracanin, Ana; Oni, Tobiloba; Yu, Kenneth H.; van Boxtel, Ruben; Huch, Meritxell; Rivera, Keith D.; Wilson, John P.; Feigin, Michael E.; Öhlund, Daniel; Handly-Santana, Abram; Ardito-Abraham, Christine M.; Ludwig, Michael; Elyada, Ela; Alagesan, Brinda; Biffi, Giulia; Yordanov, Georgi N.; Delcuze, Bethany; Creighton, Brianna; Wright, Kevin; Park, Youngkyu; Morsink, Folkert H.M.; Molenaar, I. Quintus; Borel Rinkes, Inne H.; Cuppen, Edwin; Hao, Yuan; Jin, Ying; Nijman, Isaac J.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine; Leach, Steven D.; Pappin, Darryl J.; Hammell, Molly; Klimstra, David S.; Basturk, Olca; Hruban, Ralph H.; Offerhaus, George Johan; Vries, Robert G.J.; Clevers, Hans; Tuveson, David A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies due to its late diagnosis and limited response to treatment. Tractable methods to identify and interrogate pathways involved in pancreatic tumorigenesis are urgently needed. We established organoid models from normal and neoplastic murine and human pancreas tissues. Pancreatic organoids can be rapidly generated from resected tumors and biopsies, survive cryopreservation and exhibit ductal- and disease stage-specific characteristics. Orthotopically transplanted neoplastic organoids recapitulate the full spectrum of tumor development by forming early-grade neoplasms that progress to locally invasive and metastatic carcinomas. Due to their ability to be genetically manipulated, organoids are a platform to probe genetic cooperation. Comprehensive transcriptional and proteomic analyses of murine pancreatic organoids revealed genes and pathways altered during disease progression. The confirmation of many of these protein changes in human tissues demonstrates that organoids are a facile model system to discover characteristics of this deadly malignancy. PMID:25557080

  4. Decreased decorin expression in the tumor microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoky, Benedek; Savchenko, Andrii; Guven, Hayrettin; Ponten, Fredrik; Klein, George; Szekely, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    Decorin is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, synthesized and deposited by fibroblasts in the stroma where it binds to collagen I. It sequesters several growth factors and antagonizes numerous members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. In experimental murine systems, it acted as a potent tumor suppressor. Examining the Human Protein Atlas online database of immunostained tissue samples we have surveyed decorin expression in silico in several different tumor types, comparing them with corresponding normal tissues. We found that decorin is abundantly secreted and deposited in normal connective tissue but its expression is consistently decreased in the tumor microenvironment. We developed a software to quantitate the difference in expression. The presence of two closely related proteoglycans in the newly formed tumor stroma indicated that the decreased decorin expression was not caused by the delay in proteoglycan deposition in the newly formed connective tissue surrounding the tumor

  5. Improvement of Antitumor Therapies Based on Vaccines and Immune-Checkpoint Inhibitors by Counteracting Tumor-Immunostimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Chiarella

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune-checkpoint inhibitors and antitumor vaccines may produce both tumor-inhibitory and tumor-stimulatory effects on growing tumors depending on the stage of tumor growth at which treatment is initiated. These paradoxical results are not necessarily incompatible with current tumor immunology but they might better be explained assuming the involvement of the phenomenon of tumor immunostimulation. This phenomenon was originally postulated on the basis that the immune response (IR evoked in Winn tests by strong chemical murine tumors was not linear but biphasic, with strong IR producing inhibition and weak IR inducing stimulation of tumor growth. Herein, we extended those former observations to weak spontaneous murine tumors growing in pre-immunized, immune-competent and immune-depressed mice. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the interaction of specifical T cells and target tumor cells at low stimulatory ratios enhanced the production of chemokines aimed to recruit macrophages at the tumor site, which, upon activation of toll-like receptor 4 and p38 signaling pathways, would recruit and activate more macrophages and other inflammatory cells which would produce growth-stimulating signals leading to an accelerated tumor growth. On this basis, the paradoxical effects achieved by immunological therapies on growing tumors could be explained depending upon where the therapy-induced IR stands on the biphasic IR curve at each stage of tumor growth. At stages where tumor growth was enhanced (medium and large-sized tumors, counteraction of the tumor-immunostimulatory effect with anti-inflammatory strategies or, more efficiently, with selective inhibitors of p38 signaling pathways enabled the otherwise tumor-promoting immunological strategies to produce significant inhibition of tumor growth.

  6. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor attenuates melanoma tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Dillenburg-Pilla

    Full Text Available Melanoma is a very aggressive tumor that does not respond well to standard therapeutic approaches, such as radio- and chemotherapies. Furthermore, acquiring the ability to metastasize in melanoma and many other tumor types is directly related to incurable disease. The B1 kinin receptor participates in a variety of cancer-related pathophysiological events, such as inflammation and angiogenesis. Therefore, we investigated whether this G protein-coupled receptor plays a role in tumor progression. We used a murine melanoma cell line that expresses the kinin B1 receptor and does not express the kinin B2 receptor to investigate the precise contribution of activation of the B1 receptor in tumor progression and correlated events using various in vitro and in vivo approaches. Activation of the kinin B1 receptor in the absence of B2 receptor inhibits cell migration in vitro and decreases tumor formation in vivo. Moreover, tumors formed from cells stimulated with B1-specific agonist showed several features of decreased aggressiveness, such as smaller size and infiltration of inflammatory cells within the tumor area, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines implicated in the host anti-tumor immune response, lower number of cells undergoing mitosis, a poorer vascular network, no signs of invasion of surrounding tissues or metastasis and increased animal survival. Our findings reveal that activation of the kinin B1 receptor has a host protective role during murine melanoma tumor progression, suggesting that the B1 receptor could be a new anti-tumor GPCR and provide new opportunities for therapeutic targeting.

  7. Radioimmunodetection of human tumor xenografts by monoclonal antibody F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlyn, D.; Munz, D.L.; Herlyn, M.; Koprowski, H.; Powe, J.; Alavi, A.; Meinken, G.E.; Srivastava, S.C.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures are described for the radiolocalization of human tumors by murine monoclonal antibodies (MAb) in animal model systems. Visualization of tumor xenografts was clearer in nude mice compared to experimentally immunosuppressed mice due to the higher tumor viability. MAb localization in tumor tissue was greatly enhanced when F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments rather than intact antibody molecules were used. Although tumors could be visualized with /sup 131/I-, /sup 123/I-or /sup 111/In-labeled MAb fragments without background subtraction, tumor-to-background ratios of radioactivity were highest for /sup 131/I-labeled fragments. /sup 131/I-labeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments of eight MAb against human colorectal carcinoma, melanoma or lung carcinoma localized specifically only in those tumors that bound the MAb in vitro and not in unrelated tumors. Radiolabeled fragments of MAb with other specificities (anti-hepatitis virus MAb) did not localize in tumors. All MAb that inhibited tumor growth in nude mice effectively localized these tumors by ..gamma..-scintigraphy. Some MAb were effective in localizing tumors but ineffective in inhibiting their growth. The ability of the specific radiolabeled F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments to localize in tumor grafts correlated significantly with MAb binding affinity and density of antigenic sites on tumor cells together, but not with either in vitro binding parameter alone.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bujak, Emil [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah [Philochem AG, Libernstrasse 3, CH-8112 Otelfingen (Switzerland); Neri, Dario, E-mail: neri@pharma.ethz.ch [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  10. Immunotoxicity and allergic potential induced by topical application of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey E.; Franko, Jennifer; Anderson, Katie L.; Munson, Albert E.; Lukomska, Ewa; Meade, B. Jean

    2015-01-01

    Dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is an industrial chemical, used as a paint and adhesive solvent, with the potential for significant increases in production. Using select immune function assays, the purpose of these studies was to evaluate the immunotoxicity of DMC following dermal exposure using a murine model. Following a 28-day exposure, DMC produced a significant decrease in thymus weight at concentrations of 75% and greater. No effects on body weight, hematological parameters (erythrocytes, leukocytes, and their differentials), or immune cell phenotyping (B-cells, T-cells, and T-cell sub-sets) were identified. The IgM antibody response to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was significantly reduced in the spleen but not the serum. DMC was not identified to be an irritant and evaluation of the sensitization potential, conducted using the local lymph node assay (LLNA) at concentrations ranging from 50–100%, did not identify increases in lymphocyte proliferation. These results demonstrate that dermal exposure to DMC induces immune suppression in a murine model and raise concern about potential human exposure and the need for occupational exposure regulations. PMID:22953780

  11. Immunogenic multistage recombinant protein vaccine confers partial protection against experimental toxoplasmosis mimicking natural infection in murine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaprak Gedik

    2016-01-01

    To generate a protective vaccine against toxoplasmosis, multistage vaccines and usage of challenging models mimicking natural route of infection are critical cornerstones. In this study, we generated a BAG1 and GRA1 multistage vaccine that induced strong immune response in which the protection was not at anticipated level. In addition, the murine model was orally challenged with tissue cysts to mimic natural route of infection.

  12. Mitigating Errors in External Respiratory Surrogate-Based Models of Tumor Position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Kathleen T.; McAvoy, Thomas J.; George, Rohini; Dieterich, Sonja; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of tumor site, measurement precision, tumor–surrogate correlation, training data selection, model design, and interpatient and interfraction variations on the accuracy of external marker-based models of tumor position. Methods and Materials: Cyberknife Synchrony system log files comprising synchronously acquired positions of external markers and the tumor from 167 treatment fractions were analyzed. The accuracy of Synchrony, ordinary-least-squares regression, and partial-least-squares regression models for predicting the tumor position from the external markers was evaluated. The quantity and timing of the data used to build the predictive model were varied. The effects of tumor–surrogate correlation and the precision in both the tumor and the external surrogate position measurements were explored by adding noise to the data. Results: The tumor position prediction errors increased during the duration of a fraction. Increasing the training data quantities did not always lead to more accurate models. Adding uncorrelated noise to the external marker-based inputs degraded the tumor–surrogate correlation models by 16% for partial-least-squares and 57% for ordinary-least-squares. External marker and tumor position measurement errors led to tumor position prediction changes 0.3–3.6 times the magnitude of the measurement errors, varying widely with model algorithm. The tumor position prediction errors were significantly associated with the patient index but not with the fraction index or tumor site. Partial-least-squares was as accurate as Synchrony and more accurate than ordinary-least-squares. Conclusions: The accuracy of surrogate-based inferential models of tumor position was affected by all the investigated factors, except for the tumor site and fraction index.

  13. Comparison of vectorial ion transport in primary murine airway and human sinonasal air-liquid interface cultures, models for studies of cystic fibrosis, and other airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoyan; Fortenberry, James A; Cohen, Noam A; Sorscher, Eric J; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vectorial ion transport within murine trachea, murine nasal septa, and human sinonasal cultured epithelium. Our hypothesis is that murine septal epithelium, rather than trachea, will more closely mimic the electrophysiology properties of human sinonasal epithelium. Epithelium from murine trachea, murine septa, and human sinonasal tissue were cultured at an air-liquid interface to confluence and full differentiation. A limited number of homozygous dF508 epithelia were also cultured. Monolayers were mounted in modified Ussing chambers to investigate pharmacologic manipulation of ion transport. The change in forskolin-stimulated current (delta-I(SC), expressed as micro-A/cm(2)) in murine septal (n = 19; 16.84 +/- 2.09) and human sinonasal (n = 18; 12.15 +/- 1.93) cultures was significantly increased over murine tracheal cultures (n = 15; 6.75 +/- 1.35; p = 0.035 and 0.0005, respectively). Forskolin-stimulated I(SC) was inhibited by the specific cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) inhibitor INH-172 (5 microM). No forskolin-stimulated I(SC) was shown in cultures of dF508 homozygous murine septal epithelium (n = 3). Murine septal I(SC) was largely inhibited by amiloride (12.03 +/- 0.66), whereas human sinonasal cultures had a very limited response (0.70 +/- 0.47; p < 0.0001). The contribution of CFTR to stimulated chloride current as measured by INH-172 was highly significantly different between all groups (murine septa, 19.51 +/- 1.28; human sinonasal, 11.12 +/- 1.58; murine trachea, 4.85 +/- 0.49; p < 0.0001). Human sinonasal and murine septal epithelial cultures represent a useful model for studying CFTR activity and may provide significant advantages over lower airway tissues for investigating upper and lower respiratory pathophysiology.

  14. Interleukin-2 treatment potentiates induction of oral tolerance in a murine model of autoimmunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, L V; Miller-Rivero, N E; Chan, C C; Wiggert, B; Nussenblatt, R B; Caspi, R R

    1994-01-01

    The present study addresses the feasibility of potentiating oral tolerance by immunomanipulation, using the murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced by immunization with the retinal antigen interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP). Three feedings of 0.2 mg IRBP every other day before immunization did not protect against EAU, whereas a similar regimen of five doses was protective. However, supplementing the nonprotective 3x regimen with as little as one inj...

  15. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  16. IL-12 Expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus promotes anti-tumor activity and immunologic control of metastatic ovarian cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Eric D; Meza-Perez, Selene; Bevis, Kerri S; Randall, Troy D; Gillespie, G Yancey; Langford, Catherine; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2016-10-27

    sterile phosphate buffer solution. Our pilot study demonstrates that an interleukin-12-expressing oncolytic herpes simplex virus effectively kills both murine and human ovarian cancer cell lines and promotes tumor antigen-specific CD8 + T-cell responses in the peritoneal cavity and omentum, leading to reduced peritoneal metastasis and improved survival in a mouse model.

  17. Expression of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in rodent lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swafford, D.S.; Tesfaigzi, J.; Belinsky, S.A.

    1995-12-01

    Aberrations on the short arm of chromosome 9 are among the earliest genetic changes in human cancer. p16{sup INK4a} is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that lies within human 9p21, a chromosome region associated with frequent loss of heterozygosity in human lung tumors. The p16{sup INK4a} protein functions as an inhibitor of cyclin D{sub 1}-dependent kinases that phosphorylate the retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor gene product enabling cell-cycle progression. Thus, overexpression of cyclin D{sub 1}, mutation of cyclin-dependent kinase genes, or loss of p16{sup INK4a} function, can all result in functional inactivation of Rb. Inactivation of Rb by mutation or deletion can result in an increase in p16{sup INK4a} transcription, suggesting that an increased p16{sup INK4a} expression in a tumor cell signals dysfunction of the pathway. The p16{sup (INK4a)} gene, unlike some tumor suppressor genes, is rarely inactivated by mutation. Instead, the expression of this gene is suppressed in some human cancers by hypermethylation of the CpG island within the first exon or by homozygous deletion: 686. Chromosome losses have been observed at 9p21 syntenic loci in tumors of the mouse and rat, two species often used as animal models for pulmonary carcinogenesis. Expression of p16{sup INK4a} is lost in some mouse tumor cell lines, often due to homozygous deletion. These observations indicate that p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction may play a role in the development of neoplasia in rodents as well as humans. The purpose of the current investigation was to define the extent to which p16{sup INK4a} dysfunction contributes to the development of rodent lung tumors and to determine the mechanism of inactivation of the gene. There is no evidence to suggest a loss of function of the p16{sup INK4a} tumor suppressor gene in these primary murine lung tumors by mutation, deletion, or methylation.

  18. T1 ρ mapping for the evaluation of high intensity focused ultrasound tumor treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hectors, Stefanie J. C. G.; Moonen, Rik P. M.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Nicolay, Klaas

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to assess the effects of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) thermal ablation on tumor T1ρ . In vivo T1ρ measurements of murine tumors at various spin-lock amplitudes (B1 = 0-2000 Hz) were performed before (n = 13), directly after (n = 13) and 3 days (n = 7) after HIFU

  19. Peritoneal macrophages mediated delivery of chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle to the lesion site in a murine radiation-induced fibrosis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawroth, Isabel; Alsner, Jan; Deleuran, B.W.

    2013-01-01

    of chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles directed towards silencing TNF alpha in local macrophage populations, but the mechanism for the therapeutic effect at the lesion site remains unclear. Methods. Using the same murine RIF model we utilized an optical imaging technique and fluorescence microscopy to investigate...... the uptake of chitosan/fluorescently labeled siRNA nanoparticles by peritoneal macrophages and their subsequent migration to the inflamed tissue in the RIF model. Results. We observed strong accumulation of the fluorescent signal in the lesion site of the irradiated leg up to 24 hours using the optical...... imaging system. We further confirm by immunohistochemical staining that Cy3 labeled siRNA resides in macrophages of the irradiated leg. Conclusion. We provide a proof-of-concept for host macrophage trafficking towards the inflamed region in a murine RIF model, which thereby suggests that the chitosan...

  20. Ribosomopathy-like properties of murine and human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheta Kulkarni

    Full Text Available Ribosomopathies comprise a heterogeneous group of hematologic and developmental disorders, often characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal and other developmental abnormalities and cancer predisposition. They are associated with mutations and/or haplo-insufficiencies of ribosomal proteins (RPs and inefficient ribosomal RNA (rRNA processing. The resulting ribosomal stress induces the canonical p19ARF/Mdm2/p53 tumor suppressor pathway leading to proliferative arrest and/or apoptosis. It has been proposed that this pathway is then inactivated during subsequent neoplastic evolution. We show here that two murine models of hepatoblastoma (HB and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC unexpectedly possess features that mimic the ribosomopathies. These include loss of the normal stoichiometry of RP transcripts and proteins and the accumulation of unprocessed rRNA precursors. Silencing of p19ARF, cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, binding to and inactivation of Mdm2 by free RPs, and up-regulation of the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 may further cooperate to drive tumor growth and survival. Consistent with this notion, re-instatement of constitutive p19ARF expression in the HB model completely suppressed tumorigenesis. In >2000 cases of human HCC, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer, RP transcript deregulation was a frequent finding. In HCC and breast cancer, the severity of this dysregulation was associated with inferior survival. In HCC, the presence of RP gene mutations, some of which were identical to those previously reported in ribosomopathies, were similarly negatively correlated with long-term survival. Taken together, our results indicate that many if not all cancers possess ribosomopathy-like features that may affect their biological behaviors.

  1. E-selectin mediates stem cell adhesion and formation of blood vessels in a murine model of infantile hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smadja, David M; Mulliken, John B; Bischoff, Joyce

    2012-12-01

    Hemangioma stem cells (HemSCs) are multipotent cells isolated from infantile hemangioma (IH), which form hemangioma-like lesions when injected subcutaneously into immune-deficient mice. In this murine model, HemSCs are the primary target of corticosteroid, a mainstay therapy for problematic IH. The relationship between HemSCs and endothelial cells that reside in IH is not clearly understood. Adhesive interactions might be critical for the preferential accumulation of HemSCs and/or endothelial cells in the tumor. Therefore, we studied the interactions between HemSCs and endothelial cells (HemECs) isolated from IH surgical specimens. We found that HemECs isolated from proliferating phase IH, but not involuting phase, constitutively express E-selectin, a cell adhesion molecule not present in quiescent endothelial cells. E-selectin was further increased when HemECs were exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor-A or tumor necrosis factor-α. In vitro, HemSC migration and adhesion was enhanced by recombinant E-selectin but not P-selectin; both processes were neutralized by E-selectin-blocking antibodies. E-selectin-positive HemECs also stimulated migration and adhesion of HemSCs. In vivo, neutralizing antibodies to E-selectin strongly inhibited formation of blood vessels when HemSCs and HemECs were co-implanted in Matrigel. These data suggest that endothelial E-selectin could be a major ligand for HemSCs and thereby promote cellular interactions and vasculogenesis in IH. We propose that constitutively expressed E-selectin on endothelial cells in the proliferating phase is one mediator of the stem cell tropism in IH. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Exchange of cytosolic content between T cells and tumor cells activates CD4 T cells and impedes cancer growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hardtke-Wolenski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: T cells are known to participate in the response to tumor cells and react with cytotoxicity and cytokine release. At the same time tumors established versatile mechanisms for silencing the immune responses. The interplay is far from being completely understood. In this study we show contacts between tumor cells and lymphocytes revealing novel characteristics in the interaction of T cells and cancer cells in a way not previously described. METHODS/ FINDINGS: Experiments are based on the usage of a hydrophilic fluorescent dye that occurs free in the cytosol and thus transfer of fluorescent cytosol from one cell to the other can be observed using flow cytometry. Tumor cells from cell lines of different origin or primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC cells were incubated with lymphocytes from human and mice. This exposure provoked a contact dependent uptake of tumor derived cytosol by lymphocytes--even in CD4⁺ T cells and murine B cells--which could not be detected after incubation of lymphocytes with healthy cells. The interaction was a direct one, not requiring the presence of accessory cells, but independent of cytotoxicity and TCR engagement. Electron microscopy disclosed 100-200 nm large gaps in the cell membranes of connected cells which separated viable and revealed astonishing outcome. While the lymphocytes were induced to proliferate in a long term fashion, the tumor cells underwent a temporary break in cell division. The in vitro results were confirmed in vivo using a murine acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL model. The arrest of tumor proliferation resulted in a significant prolonged survival of challenged mice. CONCLUSIONS: The reported cell-cell contacts reveal new characteristics i.e. the enabling of cytosol flow between the cells including biological active proteins that influence the cell cycle and biological behaviour of the recipient cells. This adds a completely new aspect in tumor induced immunology.

  3. Local effect of zoledronic acid on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion with demineralized bone matrix in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Pawel; Farei-Campagna, Jan; Jentzsch, Thorsten; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Werner, Clément M

    2018-01-01

    Posterolateral spinal fusion is a common orthopaedic surgery performed to treat degenerative and traumatic deformities of the spinal column. In posteriolateral spinal fusion, different osteoinductive demineralized bone matrix products have been previously investigated. We evaluated the effect of locally applied zoledronic acid in combination with commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty on new bone formation in posterolateral spinal fusion in a murine in vivo model. A posterolateral sacral spine fusion in murine model was used to evaluate the new bone formation. We used the sacral spine fusion model to model the clinical situation in which a bone graft or demineralized bone matrix is applied after dorsal instrumentation of the spine. In our study, group 1 received decortications only (n = 10), group 2 received decortication, and absorbable collagen sponge carrier, group 3 received decortication and absorbable collagen sponge carrier with zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg, group 4 received demineralized bone matrix putty (DBM putty) plus decortication (n = 10), and group 5 received DBM putty, decortication and locally applied zoledronic acid in dose 10 µg. Imaging was performed using MicroCT for new bone formation assessment. Also, murine spines were harvested for histopathological analysis 10 weeks after surgery. The surgery performed through midline posterior approach was reproducible. In group with decortication alone there was no new bone formation. Application of demineralized bone matrix putty alone produced new bone formation which bridged the S1-S4 laminae. Local application of zoledronic acid to demineralized bone matrix putty resulted in significant increase of new bone formation as compared to demineralized bone matrix putty group alone. A single local application of zoledronic acid with DBM putty during posterolateral fusion in sacral murine spine model increased significantly new bone formation in situ in our model. Therefore, our

  4. Dietary Phosphate Restriction Normalizes Biochemical and Skeletal Abnormalities in a Murine Model of Tumoral Calcinosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ichikawa, Shoji; Austin, Anthony M.; Gray, Amie K.; Allen, Matthew R.; Econs, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the GALNT3 gene cause tumoral calcinosis characterized by ectopic calcifications due to persistent hyperphosphatemia. We recently developed Galnt3 knockout mice in a mixed background, which had hyperphosphatemia with increased bone mineral density (BMD) and infertility in males. To test the effect of dietary phosphate intake on their phenotype, Galnt3 knockout mice were generated in the C57BL/6J strain and fed various phosphate diets: 0.1% (low), 0.3% (low normal), 0.6% (normal),...

  5. A dominantly acting murine allele of Mcm4 causes chromosomal abnormalities and promotes tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce N Bagley

    Full Text Available Here we report the isolation of a murine model for heritable T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL called Spontaneous dominant leukemia (Sdl. Sdl heterozygous mice develop disease with a short latency and high penetrance, while mice homozygous for the mutation die early during embryonic development. Sdl mice exhibit an increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes, and T-ALLs from Sdl mice harbor small amplifications and deletions, including activating deletions at the Notch1 locus. Using exome sequencing it was determined that Sdl mice harbor a spontaneously acquired mutation in Mcm4 (Mcm4(D573H. MCM4 is part of the heterohexameric complex of MCM2-7 that is important for licensing of DNA origins prior to S phase and also serves as the core of the replicative helicase that unwinds DNA at replication forks. Previous studies in murine models have discovered that genetic reductions of MCM complex levels promote tumor formation by causing genomic instability. However, Sdl mice possess normal levels of Mcms, and there is no evidence for loss-of-heterozygosity at the Mcm4 locus in Sdl leukemias. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that the Sdl mutation produces a biologically inactive helicase. Together, these data support a model in which chromosomal abnormalities in Sdl mice result from the ability of MCM4(D573H to incorporate into MCM complexes and render them inactive. Our studies indicate that dominantly acting alleles of MCMs can be compatible with viability but have dramatic oncogenic consequences by causing chromosomal abnormalities.

  6. A dominantly acting murine allele of Mcm4 causes chromosomal abnormalities and promotes tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, Bruce N; Keane, Thomas M; Maklakova, Vilena I; Marshall, Jonathon G; Lester, Rachael A; Cancel, Michelle M; Paulsen, Alex R; Bendzick, Laura E; Been, Raha A; Kogan, Scott C; Cormier, Robert T; Kendziorski, Christina; Adams, David J; Collier, Lara S

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the isolation of a murine model for heritable T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (T-ALL) called Spontaneous dominant leukemia (Sdl). Sdl heterozygous mice develop disease with a short latency and high penetrance, while mice homozygous for the mutation die early during embryonic development. Sdl mice exhibit an increase in the frequency of micronucleated reticulocytes, and T-ALLs from Sdl mice harbor small amplifications and deletions, including activating deletions at the Notch1 locus. Using exome sequencing it was determined that Sdl mice harbor a spontaneously acquired mutation in Mcm4 (Mcm4(D573H)). MCM4 is part of the heterohexameric complex of MCM2-7 that is important for licensing of DNA origins prior to S phase and also serves as the core of the replicative helicase that unwinds DNA at replication forks. Previous studies in murine models have discovered that genetic reductions of MCM complex levels promote tumor formation by causing genomic instability. However, Sdl mice possess normal levels of Mcms, and there is no evidence for loss-of-heterozygosity at the Mcm4 locus in Sdl leukemias. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicate that the Sdl mutation produces a biologically inactive helicase. Together, these data support a model in which chromosomal abnormalities in Sdl mice result from the ability of MCM4(D573H) to incorporate into MCM complexes and render them inactive. Our studies indicate that dominantly acting alleles of MCMs can be compatible with viability but have dramatic oncogenic consequences by causing chromosomal abnormalities.

  7. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells

  8. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Apoorva; Akram, Khondoker M; Williams, Debbie; Armes, Hannah; Russell, Catherine; Hood, Derek; Armstrong, Stuart; Stewart, James P; Brown, Steve D M; Bingle, Lynne; Bingle, Colin D

    2016-11-01

    Otitis media (OM), or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME) epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs) at an air-liquid interface (ALI) that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host-pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mulay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs at an air–liquid interface (ALI that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development.

  10. Enteric serotonin and oxytocin: endogenous regulation of severity in a murine model of necrotizing enterocolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross Margolis, Kara; Vittorio, Jennifer; Talavera, Maria; Gluck, Karen; Li, Zhishan; Iuga, Alina; Stevanovic, Korey; Saurman, Virginia; Israelyan, Narek; Welch, Martha G; Gershon, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a gastrointestinal inflammatory disease of unknown etiology that may also affect the liver, causes a great deal of morbidity and mortality in premature infants. We tested the hypothesis that signaling molecules, which are endogenous to the bowel, regulate the severity of intestinal and hepatic damage in an established murine NEC model. Specifically, we postulated that mucosal serotonin (5-HT), which is proinflammatory, would exacerbate experimental NEC and that oxytocin (OT), which is present in enteric neurons and is anti-inflammatory, would oppose it. Genetic deletion of the 5-HT transporter (SERT), which increases and prolongs effects of 5-HT, was found to increase the severity of systemic manifestations, intestinal inflammation, and associated hepatotoxicity of experimental NEC. In contrast, genetic deletion of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), which is responsible for 5-HT biosynthesis in enterochromaffin (EC) cells of the intestinal mucosa, and TPH inhibition with LP-920540 both decrease the severity of experimental NEC in the small intestine and liver. These observations suggest that 5-HT from EC cells helps to drive the inflammatory damage to the gut and liver that occurs in the murine NEC model. Administration of OT decreased, while the OT receptor antagonist atosiban exacerbated, the intestinal inflammation of experimental NEC. Data from the current investigation are consistent with the tested hypotheses-that the enteric signaling molecules, 5-HT (positively) and OT (negatively) regulate severity of inflammation in a mouse model of NEC. Moreover, we suggest that mucosally restricted inhibition of 5-HT biosynthesis and/or administration of OT may be useful in the treatment of NEC. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Serotonin (5-HT) and oxytocin reciprocally regulate the severity of intestinal inflammation and hepatotoxicity in a murine model of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Selective depletion of mucosal 5-HT through genetic deletion or

  11. Characterisation of Neutropenia-Associated Neutrophil Elastase Mutations in a Murine Differentiation Model In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wiesmeier

    Full Text Available Severe congenital neutropenia (SCN is characterised by a differentiation block in the bone marrow and low neutrophil numbers in the peripheral blood, which correlates with increased risk of bacterial infections. Several underlying gene defects have been identified in SCN patients. Mutations in the neutrophil elastase (ELANE gene are frequently found in SCN and cyclic neutropenia. Both mislocalization and misfolding of mutant neutrophil elastase protein resulting in ER stress and subsequent induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR have been proposed to be responsible for neutrophil survival and maturation defects. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms still remain unclear, in part due to the lack of appropriate in vitro and in vivo models. Here we used a system of neutrophil differentiation from immortalised progenitor lines by conditional expression of Hoxb8, permitting the generation of mature near-primary neutrophils in vitro and in vivo. NE-deficient Hoxb8 progenitors were reconstituted with murine and human forms of typical NE mutants representative of SCN and cyclic neutropenia, and differentiation of the cells was analysed in vitro and in vivo. ER stress induction by NE mutations could be recapitulated during neutrophil differentiation in all NE mutant-reconstituted Hoxb8 cells. Despite ER stress induction, no change in survival, maturation or function of differentiating cells expressing either murine or human NE mutants was observed. Further analysis of in vivo differentiation of Hoxb8 cells in a murine model of adoptive transfer did not reveal any defects in survival or differentiation in the mouse. Although the Hoxb8 system has been found to be useful for dissection of defects in neutrophil development, our findings indicate that the use of murine systems for analysis of NE-mutation-associated pathogenesis is complicated by differences between humans and mice in the physiology of granulopoiesis, which may go beyond possible

  12. GPBAR1/TGR5 mediates bile acid-induced cytokine expression in murine Kupffer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyu Lou

    Full Text Available GPBAR1/TGR5 is a novel plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled bile acid (BA receptor. BAs are known to induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver with unknown mechanism. Here we show that without other external stimuli, TGR5 activation alone induced the expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 or murine Kupffer cells. The TGR5-mediated increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was suppressed by JNK inhibition. Moreover, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse liver by 1% cholic acid (CA diet was blunted in JNK-/- mice. TGR5 activation by its ligands enhanced the phosphorylation levels, DNA-binding and trans-activities of c-Jun and ATF2 transcription factors. Finally, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells by TGR5 activation correlated with the suppression of Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1 expression in murine hepatocytes. These results suggest that TGR5 mediates the BA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in murine Kupffer cells through JNK-dependent pathway. This novel role of TGR5 may correlate to the suppression of Cyp7a1 expression in hepatocytes and contribute to the delicate BA feedback regulation.

  13. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with common tumor antigens on UV-induced tumors also react with hyperplastic UV-irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Beauchamp, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Most murine skin tumors induced by ultraviolet light (UVB, 280-340 nm) can be successfully transplanted only into syngeneic hosts that have received subcarcinogenic doses of UVB. The tumor susceptible state is long-lived and mediated by T suppressor cells that control effector responses against common antigens on UV-induced tumors. Because antigen specific suppression arises prior to the appearance of a tumor, questions arise about the source of the original antigen. They have previously reported transplantation studies indicating that UV-irradiated skin is antigenically cross-reactive with UV-induced tumors. They now report on flow cytometry analyses showing that a series of MoAb reactive with common antigens expressed by UV-induced tumors are also reactive on cells from UV-irradiated skin. Various antigens appear at different times in the UV irradiation scheme, and some persist while others are transient. They speculate that the common antigens detected may be the ones to which functional suppression is directed. If true, these results suggest that successful tumors need not escape host defenses to emerge. Rather, tumors may arise and grow progressively if they express antigens that cross-react with specificities to which the host has previously mounted a suppressive response

  15. Local control of murine melanoma xenografts in nude mice by neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Corderoy-Buck, S.; Moore, D.E.; Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years considerable progress has been made in the development and implementation of neutron capture therapy (NCT) for the treatment of cancer. In particular, the boron analogue of the melanin precursor phenylalanine, i.e., DL-p-boronophenylalanine (BPA), has been used to demonstrate the regression and cure of Harding-Passey (HP) melanoma in syngeneic mice. However, 18 to 25% cures were obtained for neutron irradiations without boron, suggesting that the neutron dose alone plays an important role. Neutron capture therapy of B-16 melanoma xenografts in nude mice showed substantial tumor regression over 35 days, but the survival rate of NCT treated mice after 7 weeks was only 40-60%. In this paper the authors demonstrate the equivalence of the nude mouse model with a syngeneic model, using the same Harding-Passey murine melanoma line, and delineate the conditions required for maximum differential response between neutron irradiation with and without BPA administration, with complete local control as the end point

  16. Concomitant tumor resistance: the role of tyrosine isomers in the mechanisms of metastases control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Raúl A; Bruzzo, Juan; Chiarella, Paula; Bustuoabad, Oscar D; Meiss, Roberto P; Pasqualini, Christiane D

    2012-03-01

    Concomitant tumor resistance (CR) is a phenomenon in which a tumor-bearing host is resistant to the growth of secondary tumor implants and metastasis. Although previous studies indicated that T-cell-dependent processes mediate CR in hosts bearing immunogenic small tumors, manifestations of CR induced by immunogenic and nonimmunogenic large tumors have been associated with an elusive serum factor. In a recently published study, we identified this factor as meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine, 2 isomers of tyrosine that would not be present in normal proteins. In 3 different murine models of cancer that generate CR, both meta- and ortho-tyrosine inhibited tumor growth. Additionally, we showed that both isoforms of tyrosine blocked metastasis in a fourth model that does not generate CR but is sensitive to CR induced by other tumors. Mechanistic studies showed that the antitumor effects of the tyrosine isomers were mediated in part by early inhibition of the MAP/ERK pathway and inactivation of STAT3, potentially driving tumor cells into a state of dormancy in G(0)-phase. Other mechanisms, putatively involving the activation of an intra-S-phase checkpoint, would also inhibit tumor proliferation by accumulating cells in S-phase. By revealing a molecular basis for the classical phenomenon of CR, our findings may stimulate new generalized approaches to limit the development of metastases that arise after resection of primary tumors or after other stressors that may promote the escape of metastases from dormancy, an issue that is of pivotal importance to oncologists and their patients.

  17. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-09-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam.

  18. Effect of anesthetics on the radiosensitivity of a murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheldon, P.W.; Chu, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of four anesthetics on the single dose of x rays required to locally control 50% of implanted MT tumors was investigated. Compared with unanesthetized animals, no change in radiosensitivity was observed if mice were irradiated under either tribromoethanol or fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam anesthesia. However, a small but significant degree of radioprotection was observed under chloral hydrate or pentobarbital anesthesia. Hypothermia or increased hypoxia are considered unlikely mechanisms for the protection, a direct chemical action being most probable. The preferred method for immobilizing the mice in order to locally irradiate the tumors was by simple physical restraint (with care taken to minimize physiological stress). However, if anesthesia was a necessity, the present work suggests that for the MT tumor at least the nonprotecting tribromoethanol and fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam are preferable to the protecting chloral hydrate and pentobarbital. Tribromoethanol is preferable to fetanyl-fluanisone-diazepam in that it produces a smaller drop in temperature. However, it is only a short-acting anesthetic, and prolongation of the state of anesthesia by repeated doses simply prolongs the temperature decline so that there may be no real benefit over fentanyl-fluanisone-diazepam

  19. Clearance of 131I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody from patients' blood by intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.S.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hird, V.; Davies, K.A.; Walport, M.; Ritter, M.A.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Five patients treated with intraperitoneal 131I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody for ovarian cancer also received i.v. exogenous polyclonal human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. The pharmacokinetics of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in these patients were compared with those of 28 other patients receiving i.p.-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody for the first time without exogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin, and who had no preexisting endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Patients receiving i.v. human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody demonstrated a rapid clearance of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody from their circulation. The (mean) maximum 131I blood content was 11.4% of the injected activity in patients receiving human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody compared to 23.3% in patients not given human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody decreased the radiation dose to bone marrow (from 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in the vascular compartment) 4-fold. Following the injection of human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody, 131I-monoclonal/human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody immune complexes were rapidly transported to the liver. Antibody dehalogenation in the liver was rapid, with 87% of the injected 131I excreted in 5 days. Despite the efficient hepatic uptake of immune complexes, dehalogenation of monoclonal antibody was so rapid that the radiation dose to liver parenchyma from circulating 131I was decreased 4-fold rather than increased. All patients developed endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody 2 to 3 weeks after treatment

  20. Pharmacological doses of daily ascorbate protect tumors from radiation damage after a single dose of radiation in an intracranial mouse glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Carole; Fabre, Marie-Sophie; Collis, Sarah V; Castro, M Leticia; Field, Cameron S; Schleich, Nanette; McConnell, Melanie J; Herst, Patries M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological ascorbate is currently used as an anti-cancer treatment, potentially in combination with radiation therapy, by integrative medicine practitioners. In the acidic, metal-rich tumor environment, ascorbate acts as a pro-oxidant, with a mode of action similar to that of ionizing radiation; both treatments kill cells predominantly by free radical-mediated DNA damage. The brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is very resistant to radiation; radiosensitizing GBM cells will improve survival of GBM patients. Here, we demonstrate that a single fraction (6 Gy) of radiation combined with a 1 h exposure to ascorbate (5 mM) sensitized murine glioma GL261 cells to radiation in survival and colony-forming assays in vitro. In addition, we report the effect of a single fraction (4.5 Gy) of whole brain radiation combined with daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (1 mg/kg) in an intracranial GL261 glioma mouse model. Tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: one group received a single dose of 4.5 Gy to the brain 8 days after tumor implantation, a second group received daily intraperitoneal injections of ascorbate (day 8-45) after implantation, a third group received both treatments and a fourth control group received no treatment. While radiation delayed tumor progression, intraperitoneal ascorbate alone had no effect on tumor progression. Tumor progression was faster in tumor-bearing mice treated with radiation and daily ascorbate than in those treated with radiation alone. Histological analysis showed less necrosis in tumors treated with both radiation and ascorbate, consistent with a radio-protective effect of ascorbate in vivo. Discrepancies between our in vitro and in vivo results may be explained by differences in the tumor microenvironment, which determines whether ascorbate remains outside the cell, acting as a pro-oxidant, or whether it enters the cells and acts as an anti-oxidant.

  1. Diclofenac Inhibits Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Pancreatic Cancer by Modulation of VEGF Levels and Arginase Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorek, Nina; Naftali-Shani, Nili; Grunewald, Myriam

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Diclofenac is one of the oldest anti-inflammatory drugs in use. In addition to its inhibition of cyclooxygenases (COX), diclofenac potently inhibits phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)), thus yielding a broad anti-inflammatory effect. Since inflammation is an important factor in the development of pancreatic tumors we explored the potential of diclofenac to inhibit tumor growth in mice inoculated with PANCO2 cells orthotopically. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that diclofenac tre...

  2. A Simple Diet- and Chemical-Induced Murine NASH Model with Rapid Progression of Steatohepatitis, Fibrosis and Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Takuma; Lee, Youngmin A; Fujiwara, Naoto; Ybanez, Maria; Allen, Brittany; Martins, Sebastiao; Fiel, M Isabel; Goossens, Nicolas; Chou, Hsin-I; Hoshida, Yujin; Friedman, Scott L

    2018-03-20

    Although the majority of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have only steatosis without progression, a sizable fraction develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many established diet-induced mouse models for NASH require 24-52 weeks, which makes testing for drug response costly and time consuming. We have sought to establish a murine NASH model with rapid progression of extensive fibrosis and HCC by using a western diet (WD), which is high-fat, high-fructose and high-cholesterol, combined with low dose weekly intraperitoneal carbon tetrachloride (CCl 4 ), which served as an accelerator. C57BL/6J mice were fed a normal chow diet (ND) ± CCl 4 or WD ± CCl 4 for 12 and 24 weeks. Addition of CCl 4 exacerbated histological features of NASH, fibrosis, and tumor development induced by WD, which resulted in stage 3 fibrosis at 12 weeks and HCC development at 24 weeks. Furthermore, whole liver transcriptomic analysis indicated that dysregulated molecular pathways in WD/CCl 4 mice and immunologic features were closely similar to those of human NASH. Our mouse NASH model exhibits rapid progression of advanced fibrosis and HCC, and mimics histological, immunological and transcriptomic features of human NASH, suggesting that it will be a useful experimental tool for preclinical drug testing. A carefully characterized model has been developed in mice that recapitulates the progressive stages of human fatty liver disease, from simple steatosis, to inflammation, fibrosis and cancer. The functional pathways of gene expression and immune abnormalities in this model closely resemble human disease. The ease and reproducibility of this model makes it ideal to study disease pathogenesis and test new treatments. Copyright © 2018 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adoptively transferred human lung tumor specific cytotoxic T cells can control autologous tumor growth and shape tumor phenotype in a SCID mouse xenograft model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrone Soldano

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anti-tumor efficacy of human immune effector cells, such as cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs, has been difficult to study in lung cancer patients in the clinical setting. Improved experimental models for the study of lung tumor-immune cell interaction as well as for evaluating the efficacy of adoptive transfer of immune effector cells are needed. Methods To address questions related to the in vivo interaction of human lung tumor cells and immune effector cells, we obtained an HLA class I + lung tumor cell line from a fresh surgical specimen, and using the infiltrating immune cells, isolated and characterized tumor antigen-specific, CD8+ CTLs. We then established a SCID mouse-human tumor xenograft model with the tumor cell line and used it to study the function of the autologous CTLs provided via adoptive transfer. Results The tumor antigen specific CTLs isolated from the tumor were found to have an activated memory phenotype and able to kill tumor cells in an antigen specific manner in vitro. Additionally, the tumor antigen-specific CTLs were fully capable of homing to and killing autologous tumors in vivo, and expressing IFN-γ, each in an antigen-dependent manner. A single injection of these CTLs was able to provide significant but temporary control of the growth of autologous tumors in vivo without the need for IL-2. The timing of injection of CTLs played an essential role in the outcome of tumor growth control. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of surviving tumor cells following CTL treatment indicated that the surviving tumor cells expressed reduced MHC class I antigens on their surface. Conclusion These studies confirm and extend previous studies and provide additional information regarding the characteristics of CTLs which can be found within a patient's tumor. Moreover, the in vivo model described here provides a unique window for observing events that may also occur in patients undergoing adoptive cellular

  4. Cationized gelatin-HVJ envelope with sodium borocaptate improved the BNCT efficacy for liver tumors in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Hitoshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Sawa, Yoshiki; Lee, Chun Man; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Komoda, Hiroshi; Sasai, Masao; Suzuki, Minoru; Asano, Tomoyuki; Doki, Yuichiro; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Ono, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cell-selective radiation therapy that uses the alpha particles and lithium nuclei produced by the boron neutron capture reaction. BNCT is a relatively safe tool for treating multiple or diffuse malignant tumors with little injury to normal tissue. The success or failure of BNCT depends upon the 10 B compound accumulation within tumor cells and the proximity of the tumor cells to the body surface. To extend the therapeutic use of BNCT from surface tumors to visceral tumors will require 10 B compounds that accumulate strongly in tumor cells without significant accumulation in normal cells, and an appropriate delivery method for deeper tissues. Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan Envelope (HVJ-E) is used as a vehicle for gene delivery because of its high ability to fuse with cells. However, its strong hemagglutination activity makes HVJ-E unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we developed a novel vector for 10 B (sodium borocaptate: BSH) delivery using HVJ-E and cationized gelatin for treating multiple liver tumors with BNCT without severe adverse events. We developed cationized gelatin conjugate HVJ-E combined with BSH (CG-HVJ-E-BSH), and evaluated its characteristics (toxicity, affinity for tumor cells, accumulation and retention in tumor cells, boron-carrying capacity to multiple liver tumors in vivo, and bio-distribution) and effectiveness in BNCT therapy in a murine model of multiple liver tumors. CG-HVJ-E reduced hemagglutination activity by half and was significantly less toxic in mice than HVJ-E. Higher 10 B concentrations in murine osteosarcoma cells (LM8G5) were achieved with CG-HVJ-E-BSH than with BSH. When administered into mice bearing multiple LM8G5 liver tumors, the tumor/normal liver ratios of CG-HVJ-E-BSH were significantly higher than those of BSH for the first 48 hours (p < 0.05). In suppressing the spread of tumor cells in mice, BNCT treatment was as effective with CG-HVJ-E-BSH as with BSH

  5. Cationized gelatin-HVJ envelope with sodium borocaptate improved the BNCT efficacy for liver tumors in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ono Koji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT is a cell-selective radiation therapy that uses the alpha particles and lithium nuclei produced by the boron neutron capture reaction. BNCT is a relatively safe tool for treating multiple or diffuse malignant tumors with little injury to normal tissue. The success or failure of BNCT depends upon the 10B compound accumulation within tumor cells and the proximity of the tumor cells to the body surface. To extend the therapeutic use of BNCT from surface tumors to visceral tumors will require 10B compounds that accumulate strongly in tumor cells without significant accumulation in normal cells, and an appropriate delivery method for deeper tissues. Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan Envelope (HVJ-E is used as a vehicle for gene delivery because of its high ability to fuse with cells. However, its strong hemagglutination activity makes HVJ-E unsuitable for systemic administration. In this study, we developed a novel vector for 10B (sodium borocaptate: BSH delivery using HVJ-E and cationized gelatin for treating multiple liver tumors with BNCT without severe adverse events. Methods We developed cationized gelatin conjugate HVJ-E combined with BSH (CG-HVJ-E-BSH, and evaluated its characteristics (toxicity, affinity for tumor cells, accumulation and retention in tumor cells, boron-carrying capacity to multiple liver tumors in vivo, and bio-distribution and effectiveness in BNCT therapy in a murine model of multiple liver tumors. Results CG-HVJ-E reduced hemagglutination activity by half and was significantly less toxic in mice than HVJ-E. Higher 10B concentrations in murine osteosarcoma cells (LM8G5 were achieved with CG-HVJ-E-BSH than with BSH. When administered into mice bearing multiple LM8G5 liver tumors, the tumor/normal liver ratios of CG-HVJ-E-BSH were significantly higher than those of BSH for the first 48 hours (p . In suppressing the spread of tumor cells in mice, BNCT treatment was as

  6. A Big Bang model of human colorectal tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sottoriva, Andrea; Kang, Haeyoun; Ma, Zhicheng; Graham, Trevor A; Salomon, Matthew P; Zhao, Junsong; Marjoram, Paul; Siegmund, Kimberly; Press, Michael F; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina

    2015-03-01

    What happens in early, still undetectable human malignancies is unknown because direct observations are impractical. Here we present and validate a 'Big Bang' model, whereby tumors grow predominantly as a single expansion producing numerous intermixed subclones that are not subject to stringent selection and where both public (clonal) and most detectable private (subclonal) alterations arise early during growth. Genomic profiling of 349 individual glands from 15 colorectal tumors showed an absence of selective sweeps, uniformly high intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) and subclone mixing in distant regions, as postulated by our model. We also verified the prediction that most detectable ITH originates from early private alterations and not from later clonal expansions, thus exposing the profile of the primordial tumor. Moreover, some tumors appear 'born to be bad', with subclone mixing indicative of early malignant potential. This new model provides a quantitative framework to interpret tumor growth dynamics and the origins of ITH, with important clinical implications.

  7. Downregulation of adaptor protein MyD88 compromises the angiogenic potential of B16 murine melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Paula; Nuñez, Nicolás Gonzalo; Mena, Hebe Agustina; Bocco, José Luis; Negrotto, Soledad; Maccioni, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms that link inflammatory responses to cancer development remain a subject of intense investigation, emphasizing the need to better understand the cellular and molecular pathways that create a tumor promoting microenvironment. The myeloid differentiation primary response protein MyD88 acts as a main adaptor molecule for the signaling cascades initiated from Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and the interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R). MyD88 has been shown to contribute to tumorigenesis in many inflammation-associated cancer models. In this study, we sought to better define the role of MyD88 in neoplastic cells using a murine melanoma model. Herein, we have demonstrated that MyD88 expression is required to maintain the angiogenic switch that supports B16 melanoma growth. By knocking down MyD88 we reduced TLR-mediated NF-κB activation with no evident effects over cell proliferation and survival. In addition, MyD88 downregulation was associated with a decrease of HIF1α levels and its target gene VEGF, in correlation with an impaired capability to induce capillary sprouting and tube formation of endothelial cells. Melanomas developed from cells lacking MyD88 showed an enhanced secretion of chemoattractant ligands such as CCL2, CXCL10 and CXCL1 and have an improved infiltration of macrophages to the tumor site. Our results imply that cell-autonomous signaling through MyD88 is required to sustain tumor growth and underscore its function as an important positive modulator of tumor angiogenesis. PMID:28662055

  8. Allosteric MEK1/2 Inhibitor Refameti