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Sample records for murine mesenchymal stem

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Reduce Murine Atherosclerosis Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frodermann, Vanessa; van Duijn, Janine; van Pel, Melissa; van Santbrink, Peter J.; Bot, Ilze; Kuiper, Johan; de Jager, Saskia C. A.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have regenerative properties, but recently they were also found to have immunomodulatory capacities. We therefore investigated whether MSCs could reduce atherosclerosis, which is determined by dyslipidaemia and chronic inflammation. We adoptively transferred MSCs into l

  2. Generation of mesenchymal stem cell lines from murine bone marrow.

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    Sreejit, P; Dilip, K B; Verma, R S

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), because of their multipotency and ease of purification and amplification, are an ideal stem cell source for cell therapies. Bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSC) can be used to develop MSC-like immortalized cell lines with large proliferation and differentiation potentialities. Their immortalized status prevents the maintenance of MSC function and characters; this can be negated by modifying the isolation and maintenance protocol. Adult murine BMSC were isolated and maintained in media without additional growth factors together with passage-dependent reseeding following trypsinization. Cells maintained over 25 passages were considered as putative cell lines and characterized. The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics and multilineage differentiation potential of the cells were assessed by morphological, phenotypic, and molecular assays at various passages. The putative BMSC cell lines showed the characteristics of MSC and were able to maintain these characteristics, even after immortalization. The phenotypic data demonstrated difference among two cell lines; this was further validated by the difference in their multilineage differentiation potential following specific induction. More importantly, no changes were observed in the genotypic level in comparison with control cells, even after more than 50 passages. Our protocol thus advances the isolation and maintenance of BMSC and the development of putative BMSC cell lines that maintain characteristics of MSC, including multilineage differentiation potential, after more than 40 passages.

  3. Hepatic differentiation of embryonic stem cells by murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells.

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    Ishii, Takamichi; Yasuchika, Kentaro; Ikai, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are a potential cell source for regenerative medicine. However, it has been technically difficult to differentiate ESCs into mature hepatocytes because the definitive growth factors and molecular mechanisms governing hepatocyte differentiation have not yet been well defined. The CD45(-)CD49f(+/-)Thy1(+)gp38(+) mesenchymal cells that reside in murine fetal livers induce hepatic progenitor cells to differentiate into mature hepatocytes by direct cell-cell contact. Utilizing these cells, we employ a two-step procedure for hepatic maturation of ESCs: first, ESCs are differentiated into endodermal cells or hepatic progenitor cells, and second, ESC-derived endodermal cells are matured into functional hepatocytes by coculture with murine fetal liver mesenchymal cells. The ESC-derived hepatocyte-like cells possess hepatic functions, including ammonia removal activity, albumin secretion ability, glycogen synthesis and storage, and cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity.

  4. Isolation of Murine Bone Marrow Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells using Twist2 Cre Transgenic Mice

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    Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Fatahi, Reza; Kronenberg, Mark; Kalajzic, Ivo; Rowe, David; Li, Yingcui; Maye, Peter

    2010-01-01

    While human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are of great interest for their potential therapeutic value, its murine equivalent remains an important basic research model that can provide critical insights into the biology of this progenitor cell population. Here we present a novel transgenic strategy that allowed for the selective identification and isolation of murine BMSCs at the early stages of stromal cell culture. This strategy involved crossing Twist2 –Cre mice with Cre reporter mice such as Z/EG or Ai9, which express EGFP or Tomato fluorescent protein, respectively, upon Cre mediated excision of a stop sequence. Using this approach, we identified an adherent fluorescent protein+ cell population (T2C+) that is present during the earliest stages of colony formation and by day 5 of culture represents ~20% of the total cell population. Cell surface profiling by flow cytometry showed that T2C+ cells are highly positive for SCA1 and CD29 and negative for CD45, CD117, TIE2, and TER119. Isolation of T2C+ cells by FACS selected for a cell population with skeletal potential that can be directed to differentiate into osteoblasts, adipocytes, or chondrocytes. We also demonstrated in a calvarial bone defect model that T2C+ cells retain a strong efficacy for osteogenic repair and can support a hematopoietic environment. Collectively, these studies provide evidence that the Twist2-Cre x Cre reporter breeding strategy can be used to positively identify and isolate multipotent murine BMSCs. PMID:20673822

  5. Barriers in contribution of human mesenchymal stem cells to murine muscle regeneration.

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    de la Garza-Rodea, Anabel S; Boersma, Hester; Dambrot, Cheryl; de Vries, Antoine Af; van Bekkum, Dirk W; Knaän-Shanzer, Shoshan

    2015-05-20

    To study regeneration of damaged human and murine muscle implants and the contribution of added xenogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Minced human or mouse skeletal muscle tissues were implanted together with human or mouse MSCs subcutaneously on the back of non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice. The muscle tissues (both human and murine) were minced with scalpels into small pieces (< 1 mm(3)) and aliquoted in portions of 200 mm(3). These portions were either cryopreserved in 10% dimethylsulfoxide or freshly implanted. Syngeneic or xenogeneic MSCs were added to the minced muscles directly before implantation. Implants were collected at 7, 14, 30 or 45 d after transplantation and processed for (immuno)histological analysis. The progression of muscle regeneration was assessed using a standard histological staining (hematoxylin-phloxin-saffron). Antibodies recognizing Pax7 and von Willebrand factor were used to detect the presence of satellite cells and blood vessels, respectively. To enable detection of the bone marrow-derived MSCs or their derivatives we used MSCs previously transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing a cytoplasmic LacZ gene. X-gal staining of the fixed tissues was used to detect β-galactosidase-positive cells and myofibers. Myoregeneration in implants of fresh murine muscle was evident as early as day 7, and progressed with time to occupy 50% to 70% of the implants. Regeneration of fresh human muscle was slower. These observations of fresh muscle implants were in contrast to the regeneration of cryopreserved murine muscle that proceeded similarly to that of fresh tissue except for day 45 (P < 0.05). Cryopreserved human muscle showed minimal regeneration, suggesting that the freezing procedure was detrimental to human satellite cells. In fresh and cryopreserved mouse muscle supplemented with LacZ-tagged mouse MSCs, β-galactosidase-positive myofibers were identified early after grafting at the well-vascularized periphery of

  6. Prospective Isolation of Murine and Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Based on Surface Markers

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    Yo Mabuchi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are currently defined as multipotent stromal cells that undergo sustained in vitro growth and can give rise to cells of multiple mesenchymal lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts. The regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of MSCs have led to numerous clinical trials exploring their utility for the treatment of a variety of diseases (e.g., acute graft-versus-host disease, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, and cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and myocardial infarction. On the other hand, conventionally cultured MSCs reflect heterogeneous populations that often contain contaminating cells due to the significant variability in isolation methods and the lack of specific MSC markers. This review article focuses on recent developments in the MSC research field, with a special emphasis on the identification of novel surface markers for the in vivo localization and prospective isolation of murine and human MSCs. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological importance of MSC subtypes in vivo with specific reference to data supporting their contribution to HSC niche homeostasis. The isolation of MSCs using selective markers (combination of PDGFRα and Sca-1 is crucial to address the many unanswered questions pertaining to these cells and has the potential to enhance their therapeutic potential enormously.

  7. Effects of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on cuprizone induced demyelination.

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    Jasmin Nessler

    Full Text Available For the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis there are no regenerative approaches to enhance remyelination. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been proposed to exert such regenerative functions. Intravenous administration of human MSC reduced the clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an animal model mimicking some aspects of multiple sclerosis. However, it is not clear if this effect was achieved by systemic immunomodulation or if there is an active neuroregeneration in the central nervous system (CNS. In order to investigate remyelination and regeneration in the CNS we analysed the effects of intravenously and intranasally applied murine and human bone marrow-derived MSC on cuprizone induced demyelination, a toxic animal model which allows analysis of remyelination without the influence of the peripheral immune system. In contrast to EAE no effects of MSC on de- and remyelination and glial cell reactions were found. In addition, neither murine nor human MSC entered the lesions in the CNS in this toxic model. In conclusion, MSC are not directed into CNS lesions in the cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier is intact and thus cannot provide support for regenerative processes.

  8. Intraventricular injections of mesenchymal stem cells activate endogenous functional remyelination in a chronic demyelinating murine model

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    Cruz-Martinez, P; González-Granero, S; Molina-Navarro, M M; Pacheco-Torres, J; García-Verdugo, J M; Geijo-Barrientos, E; Jones, J; Martinez, S

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for demyelinating diseases are generally only capable of ameliorating the symptoms, with little to no effect in decreasing myelin loss nor promoting functional recovery. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown by many researchers to be a potential therapeutic tool in treating various neurodegenerative diseases, including demyelinating disorders. However, in the majority of the cases, the effect was only observed locally, in the area surrounding the graft. Thus, in order to achieve general remyelination in various brain structures simultaneously, bone marrow-derived MSCs were transplanted into the lateral ventricles (LVs) of the cuprizone murine model. In this manner, the cells may secrete soluble factors into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and boost the endogenous oligodendrogenic potential of the subventricular zone (SVZ). As a result, oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) were recruited within the corpus callosum (CC) over time, correlating with an increased myelin content. Electrophysiological studies, together with electron microscopy (EM) analysis, indicated that the newly formed myelin correctly enveloped the demyelinated axons and increased signal transduction through the CC. Moreover, increased neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation was observed in the SVZ, possibly due to the tropic factors released by the MSCs. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that intraventricular injections of MSCs is a feasible method to elicit a paracrine effect in the oligodendrogenic niche of the SVZ, which is prone to respond to the factors secreted into the CSF and therefore promoting oligodendrogenesis and functional remyelination. PMID:27171265

  9. Prospectively defined murine mesenchymal stem cells inhibit Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced acute lung injury and improve pneumonia survival

    OpenAIRE

    Hackstein, Holger; Lippitsch, Anne; Krug, Philipp; Schevtschenko, Inna; Kranz, Sabine; Hecker, Matthias; Dietert, Kristina; Achim D Gruber; Bein, Gregor; Brendel, Cornelia; Baal, Nelli

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have described the immunosuppressive capacity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) but these studies use mixtures of heterogeneous progenitor cells for in vitro expansion. Recently, multipotent MSC have been prospectively identified in murine bone marrow (BM) on the basis of PDFGRa+ SCA1+ CD45− TER119− (PαS) expression but the immunomodulatory capacity of these MSC is unknown. Methods We isolated PαS MSC by high-purity FACS sorting of murine BM and after in vitro expans...

  10. Isolation and characterization of novel murine epiphysis derived mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Chun-Chun Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While bone marrow (BM is a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, previous studies have shown that MSCs derived from mouse BM (BMMSCs were difficult to manipulate as compared to MSCs derived from other species. The objective of this study was to find an alternative murine MSCs source that could provide sufficient MSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we described a novel type of MSCs that migrates directly from the mouse epiphysis in culture. Epiphysis-derived MSCs (EMSCs could be extensively expanded in plastic adherent culture, and they had a greater ability for clonogenic formation and cell proliferation than BMMSCs. Under specific induction conditions, EMSCs demonstrated multipotency through their ability to differentiate into adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. Immunophenotypic analysis demonstrated that EMSCs were positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD166, Sca-1 and SSEA-4, while negative for CD11b, CD31, CD34 and CD45. Notably, EMSCs did not express major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I or MHC II under our culture system. EMSCs also successfully suppressed the proliferation of splenocytes triggered by concanavalin A (Con A or allogeneic splenocytes, and decreased the expression of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α in Con A-stimulated splenocytes suggesting their anti-inflammatory properties. Moreover, EMSCs enhanced fracture repair, ameliorated necrosis in ischemic skin flap, and improved blood perfusion in hindlimb ischemia in the in vivo experiments. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCES: These results indicate that EMSCs, a new type of MSCs established by our simple isolation method, are a preferable alternative for mice MSCs due to their better growth and differentiation potentialities.

  11. An Improved Harvest and in Vitro Expansion Protocol for Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Song Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared to bone marrow (BM derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human origin or from other species, the in vitro expansion and purification of murine MSCs (mMSCs is much more difficult because of the low MSC yield and the unwanted growth of non-MSCs in the in vitro expansion cultures. We describe a modified protocol to isolate and expand murine BM derived MSCs based on the combination of mechanical crushing and collagenase digestion at the moment of harvest, followed by an immunodepletion step using microbeads coated with CD11b, CD45 and CD34 antibodies. The number of isolated mMSCs as estimated by colony forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F assay showed that this modified isolation method could yield 70.0% more primary colonies. After immunodepletion, a homogenous mMSC population could already be obtained after two passages. Immunodepleted mMSCs (ID-mMSCs are uniformly positive for stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1, CD90, CD105 and CD73 cell surface markers, but negative for the hematopoietic surface markers CD14, CD34 and CD45. Moreover the immunodepleted cell population exhibits more differentiation potential into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages. Our data illustrate the development of an efficient and reliable expansion protocol increasing the yield and purity of mMSCs and reducing the overall expansion time.

  12. Age-related molecular genetic changes of murine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

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    Webster Keith A

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are pluripotent cells, present in the bone marrow and other tissues that can differentiate into cells of all germ layers and may be involved in tissue maintenance and repair in adult organisms. Because of their plasticity and accessibility these cells are also prime candidates for regenerative medicine. The contribution of stem cell aging to organismal aging is under debate and one theory is that reparative processes deteriorate as a consequence of stem cell aging and/or decrease in number. Age has been linked with changes in osteogenic and adipogenic potential of MSCs. Results Here we report on changes in global gene expression of cultured MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of mice at ages 2, 8, and 26-months. Microarray analyses revealed significant changes in the expression of more than 8000 genes with stage-specific changes of multiple differentiation, cell cycle and growth factor genes. Key markers of adipogenesis including lipoprotein lipase, FABP4, and Itm2a displayed age-dependent declines. Expression of the master cell cycle regulators p53 and p21 and growth factors HGF and VEGF also declined significantly at 26 months. These changes were evident despite multiple cell divisions in vitro after bone marrow isolation. Conclusions The results suggest that MSCs are subject to molecular genetic changes during aging that are conserved during passage in culture. These changes may affect the physiological functions and the potential of autologous MSCs for stem cell therapy.

  13. Antioxidant properties of mesenchymal stem cells against oxidative stress in a murine model of colitis.

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    da Costa Gonçalves, Fabiany; Grings, Mateus; Nunes, Natália Schneider; Pinto, Fernanda Otesbelgue; Garcez, Tuane Nerissa Alves; Visioli, Fernanda; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Paz, Ana Helena

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effects of oxidative stress injury in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice treated with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Mice exposed to oral administration of 2% DSS over 7 days presented a high disease activity index and an intense colonic inflammation. Systemic infusion of MSC protected from severe colitis, reducing weight loss and diarrhea while lowering the infiltration of inflammatory cells. Moreover, toxic colitis injury increased oxidative stress. Administration of DSS decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels in the colon. No alteration was found in catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Otherwise, MSC transplantation was able to prevent the decrease of GSH levels and SOD activity suggestive of an antioxidant property of MSC. The oxidative stress is a pathomechanism underlying the pathophysiology of colitis and MSC play an important role in preventing the impairment of antioxidants defenses in inflamed colon.

  14. Electromagnetic Field Change the Expression of Osteogenesis Genes in Murine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongming ZHAO; Hua WU; Feng LI; Rui LI; Chaoxiong TAO

    2008-01-01

    In order to identify the differentially expressing gene of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) stimulated by electromagnetic field (EMF) with osteogenesis microarray analysis, the bone marrow MSCs of SD rats were isolated and cultured in vitro. The third-passage cells were stimulated by EMFs and total RNA was extracted, purified and then used for the synthesis of cDNA and cRNA. The cRNA of stimulated group and the control group was hybridized with the rat oligo osteogenesis microarray respectively. The hybridization signals were acquired by using X-my film after chemiluminescent detection and the data obtained were analyzed by employing the web-based completely integrated GEArray Expression Analysis Suite. RT-PCR was used to identify the target genes: Bmpl, BmpT, Egf and Egfr. The results showed that 19 differentially expressing genes were found between the stimulated group and the control group. There were 6 up-regulated genes and 13 down-regulated genes in the stimulated group. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed that the expres- sions of Bmpl, Bmp7 mRNA of the stimulated group were up-regulated (P<0.05) and those of Egf, Egfr were down-regulated (P<0.05). It was suggested that the gene expression profiles of osteogene- sis of the bone marrow MSCs were changed after EMF treatment. It is concluded that the genes are involved in skeletal development, bone mineral metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, cell ad- hesion etc.

  15. Fibromatosis stem cells rather than bone-marrow mesenchymal stem cells recapitulate a murine model of fibromatosis.

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    Wang, Jung-Pan; Hui, Yun-Ju; Wang, Shih-Tien; Huang, Yi-Chao; Chiang, En-Rung; Liu, Chien-Lin; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2011-05-06

    Palmar fibromatosis is a benign fibroproliferative tumor of unknown etiology, with a high rate of recurrence after excision. The offending cells of palmar fibromatosis are myofibroblasts and the cellular origin of other myofibroblasts has previously been reported to be the bone marrow. However, further clarification of the relationship between bone marrow precursors and palmar fibromatosis is required. Stem cells (SCs) are known to exist in various tissues, but whether SCs can be isolated from fibromatosis tissue is still unclear. The purpose of this study was to isolate and identify stem cells from human palmar fibromatosis, and to evaluate the differences in the differentiation and fibrogenic capacities of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) and fibromatosis-derived stem cells (FSCs). We found that FSCs had better fibrogenic differentiation potential than BMSCs, whereas BMSCs had better adipogenic and chondrogenic differentiation capacities. Treatment with transforming growth factor-β1 increased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, and types III and I collagen significantly more in FSCs than in BMSCs. An in vivo study further confirmed the results of fibrogenesis and suggested that FSCs can recapitulate the fibromatosis nodule. In summary, their myofibroblastic differentiation both in vivo and in vitro makes FSCs a potential cell source for future applications in murine models of fibromatosis or fibrogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural Ganglioside GD2+ Cells Define a Subpopulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Adult Murine Bone Marrow

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    Jie Xu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Due to the lack of specific markers, the isolation of pure mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from murine bone marrow remains an unsolved problem. The present study explored whether the neural ganglioside GD2 could serve as a single surface marker to uniquely distinguish murine bone marrow MSCs (mBM-MSCs from other marrow elements. Methods: Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, in combination with quantitative RT-PCR, were used to identify the expression of GD2 on culture-expanded mBM-MSCs. GD2+ and GD2- fractions from mBM-MSCs cultures were sorted by immunosorting. Flow cytometry was performed to further analyze the biomarkers of GD2-sorted and unsorted cells. Employing CFU-F assay and CCK-8 assay, we examined the clonogenic and proliferative capabilities of GD2-sorted and unsorted cells. Using oil red O and von Kossa staining assay, we also assessed the multi-lineage potential of GD2-sortedand unsorted cells. Results: We found that mBM-MSCs expressed a novel surface marker the neural ganglioside GD2. Importantly, mBM-MSCs were the only cells within bone marrow that expressed this marker. Further studies demonstrated that a homogenous population of MSCs could be obtained from bone marrow cultures in early passages by GD2 immunosorting. Compared to parental cells, GD2+-sorted cells not only possessed much higher clonogenic and proliferative capabilities but also had significantly stronger differentiation potential to adipocytes and osteoblasts. Furthermore, GD2+-sorted cells displayed enhanced expression of ES markers SSEA-1 and Nanog. Conclusion: Our observations provide the first demonstration that GD2 may serve as a maker for identification and purification of mBM-MSCs. Meanwhile, our study indicates that the cells selected by GD2 are a subpopulation of MSCs with features of primitive precursor cells.

  17. Dual Differentiation-Exogenous Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Repair in a Murine Hemisection Model

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    Hai Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation has shown tremendous promise as a therapy for repair of various tissues of the musculoskeletal, vascular, and central nervous systems. Based on this success, recent research in this field has focused on complex tissue damage, such as that which occurs from traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI. As the critical event for successful exogenous, MSC therapy is their migration to the injury site, which allows for their anti-inflammatory and morphogenic effects on fracture healing, neuronal regeneration, and functional recover. Thus, there is a need for a cost-effective in vivo model that can faithfully recapitulate the salient features of the injury, therapy, and recovery. To address this, we review the recent advances in exogenous MSC therapy for TSCI and traumatic vertebral fracture repair and the existing challenges regarding their translational applications. We also describe a novel murine model designed to take advantage of multidisciplinary collaborations between musculoskeletal and neuroscience researchers, which is needed to establish an efficacious MSC therapy for TSCI.

  18. Data from proteomic characterization of the role of Snail1 in murine mesenchymal stem cells and 3T3-L1 fibroblasts differentiation

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    A. Peláez-García

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor (TF Snail1 is a major inducer of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT during embryonic development and cancer progression. Ectopic expression of Snail in murine mesenchymal stem cells (mMSC abrogated their differentiation to osteoblasts or adipocytes. We used either stable isotopic metabolic labeling (SILAC for 3T3-L1 cells or isobaric labeling with tandem mass tags (TMT for mMSC stably transfected cells with Snail1 or control. We carried out a proteomic analysis on the nuclear fraction since Snail is a nuclear TF that mediates its effects mainly through the regulation of other TFs. Proteomics data have been deposited in ProteomeXchange via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PXD001529 and PXD002157 (Vizcaino et al., 2014 [1]. Data are associated with a research article published in Molecular and Cellular Proteomics (Pelaez-Garcia et al., 2015 [2].

  19. Therapeutic Effects of Transplantation of As-MiR-937-Expressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

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    Zhen Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Alzheimer's disease (AD is one of the most common dementias among aged people, and is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioral and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits. So far, this is no cure for AD. A therapeutic effect of transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs into murine model of AD has been reported, but remains to be further improved. Brn-4 is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in neuronal development, whereas the effects of Brn-4 overexpression in transplanted MSCs on AD are unknown. Methods: MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and induced to overexpress antisense of miRNA-937 (as-miR-937 through adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated transduction, and purified by flow cytometry based on expression of a GFP co-transgene in the cells. The Brn-4 levels in mouse MSCs were examined in miR-937-modified MSCs by RT-qPCR and by Western blot. These miR-937-modified MSCs were then transplanted into an APP/PS1 transgenic AD model in mice. The effects of saline control, MSCs and asmiR-937 MSCs on AD mice were examined by deposition of amyloid-beta peptide aggregates (Aβ, social recognition test (SR, Plus-Maze Discriminative Avoidance Task (PM-DAT and the levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the mouse brain. Results: MSCs expressed high levels of Brn-4 transcripts but low levels of Brn-4 protein. Poor protein vs mRNA levels of Brn-4 in MSCs appeared to result from the presence of high levels of miR-937 in MSCs. miR-937 inhibited translation of Brn-4 mRNA through binding to the 3'-UTR of the Brn-4 mRNA in MSCs. Expression of as-miR-937 significantly increased Brn-4 protein levels in MSCs. Transplantation of as-miR-937-expressing MSCs significantly reduced the deposition of Aβ, increased the levels of BDNF, and significantly improved the appearance in SR and PM-DAT in AD mice. Conclusion: Overexpression of as-miR-937 in MSCs may substantially improve the

  20. Therapeutic Effects of Transplantation of As-MiR-937-Expressing Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Cunfu; Wang, Xiao; Xu, Shunliang

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common dementias among aged people, and is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioral and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits. So far, this is no cure for AD. A therapeutic effect of transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into murine model of AD has been reported, but remains to be further improved. Brn-4 is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in neuronal development, whereas the effects of Brn-4 overexpression in transplanted MSCs on AD are unknown. MSCs were isolated from mouse bone marrow and induced to overexpress antisense of miRNA-937 (as-miR-937) through adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated transduction, and purified by flow cytometry based on expression of a GFP co-transgene in the cells. The Brn-4 levels in mouse MSCs were examined in miR-937-modified MSCs by RT-qPCR and by Western blot. These miR-937-modified MSCs were then transplanted into an APP/PS1 transgenic AD model in mice. The effects of saline control, MSCs and asmiR-937 MSCs on AD mice were examined by deposition of amyloid-beta peptide aggregates (Aβ), social recognition test (SR), Plus-Maze Discriminative Avoidance Task (PM-DAT) and the levels of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the mouse brain. MSCs expressed high levels of Brn-4 transcripts but low levels of Brn-4 protein. Poor protein vs mRNA levels of Brn-4 in MSCs appeared to result from the presence of high levels of miR-937 in MSCs. miR-937 inhibited translation of Brn-4 mRNA through binding to the 3'-UTR of the Brn-4 mRNA in MSCs. Expression of as-miR-937 significantly increased Brn-4 protein levels in MSCs. Transplantation of as-miR-937-expressing MSCs significantly reduced the deposition of Aβ, increased the levels of BDNF, and significantly improved the appearance in SR and PM-DAT in AD mice. Overexpression of as-miR-937 in MSCs may substantially improve the therapeutic effects of MSCs on AD, possibly through augmenting Brn

  1. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  2. Human fetal mesenchymal stem cells.

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    O'Donoghue, Keelin; Chan, Jerry

    2006-09-01

    Stem cells have been isolated at all stages of development from the early developing embryo to the post-reproductive adult organism. However, the fetal environment is unique as it is the only time in ontogeny that there is migration of stem cells in large numbers into different organ compartments. While fetal neural and haemopoietic stem cells (HSC) have been well characterised, only recently have mesenchymal stem cells from the human fetus been isolated and evaluated. Our group have characterised in human fetal blood, liver and bone marrow a population of non-haemopoietic, non-endothelial cells with an immunophenotype similar to adult bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). These cells, human fetal mesenchymal stem cells (hfMSC), are true multipotent stem cells with greater self-renewal and differentiation capacity than their adult counterparts. They circulate in first trimester fetal blood and have been found to traffic into the maternal circulation, engrafting in bone marrow, where they remain microchimeric for decades after pregnancy. Though fetal microchimerism has been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, the biological role of hfMSC microchimerism is unknown. Potential downstream applications of hfMSC include their use as a target cell for non-invasive pre-natal diagnosis from maternal blood, and for fetal cellular and gene therapy. Using hfMSC in fetal therapy offers the theoretical advantages of avoidance of immune rejection, increased engraftment, and treatment before disease pathology sets in. Aside from allogeneic hfMSC in utero transplantation, the use of autologous hfMSC has been brought a step forward with the development of early blood sampling techniques, efficient viral transduction and clonal expansion. Work is ongoing to determine hfMSC fate post-transplantation in murine models of genetic disease. In this review we will examine what is known about hfMSC biology, as well as discussing areas for future research. The

  3. Fucoidan improves bioactivity and vasculogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells in murine hind limb ischemia associated with chronic kidney disease.

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    Lee, Jun Hee; Ryu, Jung Min; Han, Yong-Seok; Zia, Mohammad Farid; Kwon, Hyog Young; Noh, Hyunjin; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Sang Hun

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular and peripheral vascular disease. Although mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy is a promising strategy for treatment of ischemic diseases associated with CKD, the associated pathophysiological conditions lead to low survival and proliferation of transplanted MSCs. To address these limitations, we investigated the effects of fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, on the bioactivity of adipose tissue-derived MSCs and the potential of fucoidan-treated MSCs to improve neovascularization in ischemic tissues of CKD mice. Treatment of MSCs with fucoidan increased their proliferative potential and the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins, such as cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 2, cyclin D1, and CDK4, via focal adhesion kinase and the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-Akt axis. Moreover, fucoidan enhanced the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs through the ERK-IDO-1 signal cascade. Fucoidan was found to augment the proliferation, incorporation, and endothelial differentiation of transplanted MSCs at ischemic sites in CKD mice hind limbs. In addition, transplantation of fucoidan-treated MSCs enhanced the ratio of blood flow and limb salvage in CKD mice with hind limb ischemia. To our knowledge, our findings are the first to reveal that fucoidan enhances the bioactivity of MSCs and improves their neovascularization in ischemic injured tissues of CKD. In conclusion, fucoidan-treated MSCs may provide an important pathway toward therapeutic neovascularization in patients with CKD.

  4. Quantifying migration and polarization of murine mesenchymal stem cells on different bone substitutes by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, J C; Chang, E; Kelantan, M; Jazayeri, L; Deisinger, U; Detsch, R; Reichert, T E; Gurtner, G C

    2010-12-01

    Cell migration is preceded by cell polarization. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the geometry of different bone substitutes on cell morphology and chemical responses in vitro. Cell polarization and migration were monitored temporally by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to follow green fluorescent protein (GFP)±mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on anorganic cancellous bovine bone (Bio-Oss(®)), β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (chronOS(®)) and highly porous calcium phosphate ceramics (Friedrich-Baur-Research-Institute for Biomaterials, Germany). Differentiation GFP±MSCs was observed using pro-angiogenic and pro-osteogenic biomarkers. At the third day of culture polarized vs. non-polarized cellular sub-populations were clearly established. Biomaterials that showed more than 40% of polarized cells at the 3rd day of culture, subsequently showed an enhanced cell migration compared to biomaterials, where non-polarized cells predominated (pculture (pculture (p=0.001). This model opens an interesting approach to understand osteoconductivity at a cellular level. MSCs are promising in bone tissue engineering considering the strong angiogenic effect before differentiation occurs. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. TSG-6 released from intradermally injected mesenchymal stem cells accelerates wound healing and reduces tissue fibrosis in murine full-thickness skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yu; Jiang, Dongsheng; Sindrilaru, Anca; Stegemann, Agatha; Schatz, Susanne; Treiber, Nicolai; Rojewski, Markus; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Vander Beken, Seppe; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Böhm, Markus; Seitz, Andreas; Scholz, Natalie; Dürselen, Lutz; Brinckmann, Jürgen; Ignatius, Anita; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2014-02-01

    Proper activation of macrophages (Mφ) in the inflammatory phase of acute wound healing is essential for physiological tissue repair. However, there is a strong indication that robust Mφ inflammatory responses may be causal for the fibrotic response always accompanying adult wound healing. Using a complementary approach of in vitro and in vivo studies, we here addressed the question of whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)-due to their anti-inflammatory properties-would control Mφ activation and tissue fibrosis in a murine model of full-thickness skin wounds. We have shown that the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-stimulated protein 6 (TSG-6) released from MSCs in co-culture with activated Mφ or following injection into wound margins suppressed the release of TNF-α from activated Mφ and concomitantly induced a switch from a high to an anti-fibrotic low transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/TGF-β3 ratio. This study provides insight into what we believe to be a previously undescribed multifaceted role of MSC-released TSG-6 in wound healing. MSC-released TSG-6 was identified to improve wound healing by limiting Mφ activation, inflammation, and fibrosis. TSG-6 and MSC-based therapies may thus qualify as promising strategies to enhance tissue repair and to prevent excessive tissue fibrosis.

  6. Osteogenic differentiation of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2-transduced murine mesenchymal stem cells and development of an immunocompetent mouse model for ex vivo osteoporosis gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Mahendra, Gandham; Nagy, Tim R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2004-12-01

    Gene therapy for osteopenic conditions including osteoporosis is a potential alternative to pharmacotherapy for cost effectiveness, long-term viability, and the ability to enhance bone mass by anabolic approaches. Increased understanding of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) lineage differentiation during osteogenesis, and of the molecular pathways involved in bone cell production, provides an opportunity for the advancement of gene therapy approaches for osteopenic conditions. The potential of MSCs in osteoblast differentiation and the relative ease of MSC isolation and culturing offer a promising resource for the development of ex vivo gene therapy for bone defects. In an effort to develop ex vivo gene therapy for osteoporosis, we used gene-modified MSCs in a preclinical mouse model to determine the efficiency of transduction of murine MSCs by recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV) vectors carrying reporter genes and determined their osteogenic potential after recombinant AAV-mediated expression of bone morphogenic protein 2, known to induce osteoblast differentiation. Although surgical ovariectomy is believed to induce progressive bone loss in mouse models, similar to an osteoporosis-like phenotype in humans, several factors, including hormonal alteration and dietary habits, significantly affect both the onset and progression of the disease. Thus, in the present study, we determined the influence of these factors and developed an immunocompetent mouse model of osteoporosis with degenerative bone loss as in the human pathology.

  7. In Vitro Generation of Vascular Wall-Resident Multipotent Stem Cells of Mesenchymal Nature from Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Steens

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The vascular wall (VW serves as a niche for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. In general, tissue-specific stem cells differentiate mainly to the tissue type from which they derive, indicating that there is a certain code or priming within the cells as determined by the tissue of origin. Here we report the in vitro generation of VW-typical MSCs from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, based on a VW-MSC-specific gene code. Using a lentiviral vector expressing the so-called Yamanaka factors, we reprogrammed tail dermal fibroblasts from transgenic mice containing the GFP gene integrated into the Nestin-locus (NEST-iPSCs to facilitate lineage tracing after subsequent MSC differentiation. A lentiviral vector expressing a small set of recently identified human VW-MSC-specific HOX genes then induced MSC differentiation. This direct programming approach successfully mediated the generation of VW-typical MSCs with classical MSC characteristics, both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self-renewal and......Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self...... of clinical applications, e.g., non-healing bone fractures and defects and also non-skeletal degenerative diseases like heart failure. Currently, the numbers of clinical trials that employ MSC are increasing. However, several biological and biotechnological challenges need to be overcome to benefit from...

  9. RUNX1 Plays an Important Role in Mediating BMP9-Induced Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Line C3H10T1/2, Murine Multi-Lineage Cells Lines C2C12 and MEFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Caixia; Liu, Xiaohua; Xu, Li; Yu, Tingting; Dong, Chaoqun; Luo, Jinyong

    2017-06-23

    As one of the least studied bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), BMP9 is highly capable of promoting osteogenic differentiation. However, the underlying mechanism involved remains largely unknown. Recent studies have demonstrated that RUNX1 (runt-related transcription factor 1) is essential in osteoblast/chondrocyte maturation. In this study, we investigated the function of RUNX1 in BMP9-induced osteogenic of murine mesenchymal stem cell line (C3H10T1/2) and murine multi-lineage cell lines (C2C12 and MEFs). Our data showed that BMP9 promoted the endogenous expression of RUNX1 in C3H10T1/2, C2C12 and MEFs. Moreover, RUNX1 was probably a direct target of BMP9/Smad signaling. BMP9-induced osteogenic differentiation was enhanced by overexpression of RUNX1, whereas inhibited by knockdown RUNX1 in C3H10T1/2, C2C12 and MEFs. Further mechanism studies demonstrated that RUNX1 might affect BMP9-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8, but not the phosphorylation of p38 and ERK1/2.Our results suggest that RUNX1 may be an essential modulator in BMP9- induced osteogenic differentiation of MSCs (Mesenchymal stem cells).

  10. Bones Morphogenic Protein-4 and retinoic acid combined treatment comparative analysis for in vitro differentiation potential of murine mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and adipose tissue into germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirzeily, Maryam H; Khanlarkhani, Neda; Amidi, Fardin; Shirzeily, Farshad H; Aval, Fereydoon S; Sobhani, Aligholi

    2017-09-18

    Nowadays, infertility is no longer considered as an unsolvable disorder due to progresses in germ cells derived from stem lineage with diverse origins. Technical and ethical challenges push researchers to investigate various tissue sources to approach more efficient gametes. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the efficacy of a combined medium, retinoic acid (RA) together with Bone Morphogenic Protein-4 (BMP4), on differentiation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BMMSCs) and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) into germ cells. Murine MSCs were obtained from both Bone Marrow (BM) and Adipose Tissue (AT) samples and were analyzed for surface markers to get further verification of their nature. BMMSCs and ADMSCs were induced into osteogenic and adipogenic lineage cells respectively, to examine their multipotency. They were finally differentiated into germ cells using media enriched with BMP4 for 4 days followed by addition of RA for 7 days (11 days in total). Analyzing of differentiation potential of BMMSCs- and ADMSCs were performed via Immunofluorescence, Flowcytometry and Real time-PCR techniques for germ cell-specific markers (Mvh, Dazl, Stra8 and Scp3). Mesenchymal surface markers (CD90 and CD44) were expressed on both BMMSCs and ADMSCs, while endothelial and hematopoietic cell markers (CD31 and CD45) had no expression. Finally, all germ-specific markers were expressed in both BM and AT. Although germ cells differentiated from ADMSCs showed faster growth and proliferation as well as easy collection, they significantly expressed germ-specific markers lower than BMMSCs. This suggests stronger differentiation potential of murine BMMSCs than ADMSCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In vitro expanded bone marrow-derived murine (C57Bl/KaLwRij) mesenchymal stem cells can acquire CD34 expression and induce sarcoma formation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Song [Department of Lung Cancer Surgery, Lung Cancer Institute, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, 300052 Tianjin (China); Stem Cell Laboratory-Division Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Department of Hematology and Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)-Myeloma Center, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); De Becker, Ann [Stem Cell Laboratory-Division Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); De Raeve, Hendrik [Department of Anatomopathology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Van Camp, Ben; Vanderkerken, Karin [Department of Hematology and Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)-Myeloma Center, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Van Riet, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.vanriet@uzbrussel.be [Stem Cell Laboratory-Division Clinical Hematology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Laarbeeklaan 101, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Department of Hematology and Immunology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB)-Myeloma Center, Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Murine MSCs can undergo spontaneously malignant transformation and form sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acquisition of CD34 is a transformation type for MSCs into sarcoma. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch/Hh/Wnt pathways are related to the malignant phenotype of transformed MSCs. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have currently generated numerous interests in pre-clinical and clinical applications due to their multiple lineages differentiation potential and immunomodulary effects. However, accumulating evidence indicates that MSCs, especially murine MSCs (mMSCs), can undergo spontaneous transformation after long-term in vitro culturing, which might reduce the therapeutic application possibilities of these stem cells. In the present study, we observed that in vitro expanded bone marrow (BM) derived mMSCs from the C57Bl/KaLwRij mouse strain can lose their specific stem cells markers (CD90 and CD105) and acquire CD34 expression, accompanied with an altered morphology and an impaired tri-lineages differentiation capacity. Compared to normal mMSCs, these transformed mMSCs exhibited an increased proliferation rate, an enhanced colony formation and migration ability as well as a higher sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs. Transformed mMSCs were highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in aggressive sarcoma formation when transplanted in non-immunocompromised mice. Furthermore, we found that Notch signaling downstream genes (hey1, hey2 and heyL) were significantly upregulated in transformed mMSCs, while Hedgehog signaling downstream genes Gli1 and Ptch1 and the Wnt signaling downstream gene beta-catenin were all decreased. Taken together, we observed that murine in vitro expanded BM-MSCs can transform into CD34 expressing cells that induce sarcoma formation in vivo. We assume that dysregulation of the Notch(+)/Hh(-)/Wnt(-) signaling pathway is associated with the malignant phenotype of the transformed mMSCs.

  12. Dynamic expression of Six family genes in the dental mesenchyme and the epithelial ameloblast stem/progenitor cells during murine tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonomura, Koji; Takahashi, Masanori; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Osumi, Noriko

    2010-01-01

    Six family transcription factor genes play multiple and crucial roles in the development of the vertebrate sensory system including the eye, olfactory epithelium and otic vesicle, and these genes are highly expressed in the neural crest-derived cranial mesenchymal cells in the mouse embryo. However, expression patterns have yet to be determined for the Six family genes in the developing tooth germ. In this study, we examined expression of six members of the Six family genes in the dental mesenchyme and the dental epithelium of the developing tooth germs in mice by in situ hybridization. We found dynamic expression patterns for Six1, Six2, Six4 and Six5 in the oral epithelium and mesenchymal cells with distinct expression patterns at the early stage before invagination of the dental epithelium. In addition, expression of Six1 and Six4 was observed in the inner enamel epithelium of the incisor and molar tooth germs at the cap stage. Expression of Six5 was maintained in the bell stage tooth germs, and intense expression of Six1 and Six4 was detected not only in the mesenchyme-derived dental follicle but also in the proliferating inner enamel epithelium of the labial cervical loop of the incisor tooth germ. Taken together, our results suggest that dynamic expression of Six family genes represents specific stages of the developing tooth germ. This dynamic expression is embodied in changes in both space and over time, and these changes in expression suggest that Six family genes may participate in tooth germ morphogenesis and the proliferation and/or differentiation of the incisor ameloblast stem/progenitor cells.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Tooth Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peng; Ling Ye; Xue-dong Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Tooth loss compromises human oral health. Although several prosthetic methods, such as artificial denture and dental implants, are clinical therapies to tooth loss problems, they are thought to have safety and usage time issues. Recently, tooth tissue engineering has attracted more and more attention. Stem cell based tissue engineering is thought to be a promising way to replace the missing tooth. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells which can differentiate into a variety of cell types. The potential MSCs for tooth regeneration mainly include stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs), adult dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs), stem cells from the apical part of the papilla (SCAPs), stem cells from the dental follicle (DFSCs), periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This review outlines the recent progress in the mesenchymal stem cells used in tooth regeneration.

  14. Notch2 Signaling Regulates the Proliferation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells via c-Myc Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yukio; Mabuchi, Yo; Miyamoto, Kenichi; Araki, Daisuke; Niibe, Kunimichi; Houlihan, Diarmaid D; Morikawa, Satoru; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Akazawa, Chihiro; Hori, Shingo; Okano, Hideyuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) reside in the bone marrow and maintain their stemness under hypoxic conditions. However, the mechanism underlying the effects of hypoxia on MSCs remains to be elucidated. This study attempted to uncover the signaling pathway of MSC proliferation. Under low-oxygen culture conditions, MSCs maintained their proliferation and differentiation abilities for a long term. The Notch2 receptor was up-regulated in MSCs under hypoxic conditions. Notch2-knockdown (Notch2-KD) MSCs lost their cellular proliferation ability and showed reduced gene expression of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α, HIF-2α, and c-Myc. Overexpression of the c-Myc gene in Notch2-KD MSCs allowed the cells to regain their proliferation capacity. These results suggested that Notch2 signaling is linked to c-Myc expression and plays a key role in the regulation of MSC proliferation. Our findings provide important knowledge for elucidating the self-replication competence of MSCs in the bone marrow microenvironment.

  15. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    stem cells ( BMDC ), which then acts in a paracrine fashion on the cancer cells to enhance their invasion [7]. Interestingly the group of Karnoub showed...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-1-0523 TITLE: Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in...DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2008 – 31 Jul 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis 5b. GRANT

  16. Long-Term Effects of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Murine Chronic Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Oh, Sun-Hee; Jang, Hui Won; Kwon, Ji-Hee; Lee, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Chung Hee; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Cheon, Jae Hee; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho

    2016-05-23

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have shown beneficial effects in experimental colitis models, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We investigated the long-term effects of BM-MSCs, particularly in mice with chronic colitis. Chronic colitis was induced by administering 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in a series of three cycles. BMMSCs were injected intravenously into DSS-treated mice three times during the first cycle. On day 33, the therapeutic effects were evaluated with clinicopathologic profiles and histological scoring. Inflammatory mediators were measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction. Systemic infusion of BM-MSCs ameliorated the severity of colitis, and body weight restoration was significantly promoted in the BMMSC- treated mice. In addition, BM-MSC treatment showed a sustained beneficial effect throughout the three cycles. Microscopic examination revealed that the mice treated with BM-MSCs had fewer inflammatory infiltrates, a lesser extent of inflammation, and less crypt structure damage compared with mice with DSS-induced colitis. Anti-inflammatory cytokine levels of interleukin-10 were significantly increased in the inflamed colons of BM-MSC-treated mice compared with DSS-induced colitis mice. Systemic infusion of BM-MSCs at the onset of disease exerted preventive and rapid recovery effects, with long-term immunosuppressive action in mice with repeated DSS-induced chronic colitis.

  17. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF THE TRANSPLANTATION OF VEGF OVEREXPRESSING BONE MARROW MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS OF MURINE MODEL OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Oliveira Garcia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer´s disease (AD is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioural and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits, such as alterations in social interactions. The major pathological features of AD are the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles together with neuronal and vascular damage. The double transgenic mouse model of AD (2xTg-AD with the APPswe/PS1dE9 mutations shows characteristics that are similar to those observed in AD patients, including social memory impairment, senile plaque formation and vascular deficits. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, when transplanted into the brain, produce positive effects by reducing Aβ deposition in transgenic APP/PS1 mice. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, exhibits neuroprotective effects against the excitotoxicity implicated in the AD neurodegeneration.The present study investigates the effects of MSCs overexpressing VEGF in hippocampal neovascularization, cognitive dysfunction and senile plaques present in 2xTg-AD transgenic mice. MSC were transfected with uP-VEGF vector, by electroporation and expanded at the 14th passage. 2xTg-AD animals at 6, 9 and 12 months old were transplanted with MSC-VEGF or MSC. The animals were tested for behavioral tasks to access locomotion, novelty exploration, learning and memory, and their brains were analyzed by IHC for vascularization and Aβ plaques. MSC-VEGF treatment favored the neovascularization and diminished senile plaques in hippocampal specific layers. Consequently, the treatment was able to provide behavioral benefits and reduce cognitive deficits by recovering the innate interest to novelty and counteracting memory deficits present in these AD transgenic animals. Therefore, this study has important therapeutic implications for the vascular damage in the neurodegeneration promoted by Alzheimer’s disease.

  18. Adoptive Transfer of Treg Cells Combined with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitates Repopulation of Endogenous Treg Cells in a Murine Acute GVHD Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Sol; Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of combined cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have recently been studied in acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) models. However, the underlying, seemingly synergistic mechanism behind combined cell therapy has not been determined. We investigated the origin of Foxp3+ Treg cells and interleukin 17 (IL-17+) cells in recipients following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) to identify the immunological effects of combined cell therapy. Treg cells were generated from eGFP-expressing C57BL/6 mice (Tregegfp cells) to distinguish the transferred Treg cells; recipients were then examined at different time points after BMT. Systemic infusion of MSCs and Treg cells improved survival and GVHD scores, effectively downregulating pro-inflammatory Th×and Th17 cells. These therapeutic effects of combined cell therapy resulted in an increased Foxp3+ Treg cell population. Compared to single cell therapy, adoptively transferred Tregegfp cells only showed prolonged survival in the combined cell therapy group on day 21 after allogeneic BMT. In addition, Foxp3+ Treg cells, generated endogenously from recipients, significantly increased. Significantly higher levels of Tregegfp cells were also detected in aGVHD target organs in the combined cell therapy group compared to the Treg cells group. Thus, our data indicate that MSCs may induce the long-term survival of transferred Treg cells, particularly in aGVHD target organs, and may increase the repopulation of endogenous Treg cells in recipients after BMT. Together, these results support the potential of combined cell therapy using MSCs and Treg cells for preventing aGVHD.

  19. Therapeutic effects of the transplantation of VEGF overexpressing bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the hippocampus of murine model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Karina O.; Ornellas, Felipe L. M.; Martin, Priscila K. Matsumoto; Patti, Camilla L.; Mello, Luiz E.; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Han, Sang W.; Longo, Beatriz M.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is clinically characterized by progressive memory loss, behavioral and learning dysfunction and cognitive deficits, such as alterations in social interactions. The major pathological features of AD are the formation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles together with neuronal and vascular damage. The double transgenic mouse model of AD (2xTg-AD) with the APPswe/PS1dE9 mutations shows characteristics that are similar to those observed in AD patients, including social memory impairment, senile plaque formation and vascular deficits. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), when transplanted into the brain, produce positive effects by reducing amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition in transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilins1 (PS1) mice. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), exhibits neuroprotective effects against the excitotoxicity implicated in the AD neurodegeneration. The present study investigates the effects of MSCs overexpressing VEGF in hippocampal neovascularization, cognitive dysfunction and senile plaques present in 2xTg-AD transgenic mice. MSC were transfected with vascular endothelial growth factor cloned in uP vector under control of modified CMV promoter (uP-VEGF) vector, by electroporation and expanded at the 14th passage. 2xTg-AD animals at 6, 9 and 12 months old were transplanted with MSC-VEGF or MSC. The animals were tested for behavioral tasks to access locomotion, novelty exploration, learning and memory, and their brains were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for vascularization and Aβ plaques. MSC-VEGF treatment favored the neovascularization and diminished senile plaques in hippocampal specific layers. Consequently, the treatment was able to provide behavioral benefits and reduce cognitive deficits by recovering the innate interest to novelty and counteracting memory deficits present in these AD transgenic animals. Therefore, this study has important therapeutic implications for the vascular damage in

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurkovic, Jasmin; Dolicanin, Zana; Mustafic, Fahrudin; Mujanovic, Rifat; Memic, Mensur; Grbovic, Vesna; Skevin, Aleksandra Jurisic; Nurkovic, Selmina

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] Regenerative medicine and rehabilitation contribute in many ways to a specific plan of care based on a patient's medical status. The intrinsic self-renewing, multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells offer great promise in the treatment of numerous autoimmune, degenerative, and graft-versus-host diseases, as well as tissue injuries. As such, mesenchymal stem cells represent a therapeutic fortune in regenerative medicine. The aim of this review is to discuss possibilities, limitations, and future clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells. [Subjects and Methods] The authors have identified and discussed clinically and scientifically relevant articles from PubMed that have met the inclusion criteria. [Results] Direct treatment of muscle injuries, stroke, damaged peripheral nerves, and cartilage with mesenchymal stem cells has been demonstrated to be effective, with synergies seen between cellular and physical therapies. Over the past few years, several researchers, including us, have shown that there are certain limitations in the use of mesenchymal stem cells. Aging and spontaneous malignant transformation of mesenchymal stem cells significantly affect the functionality of these cells. [Conclusion] Definitive conclusions cannot be made by these studies because limited numbers of patients were included. Studies clarifying these results are expected in the near future.

  1. Isolation of a mesenchymal cell population from murine dermis that contains progenitors of multiple cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigler, Lauren; Kazhanie, Amita; Yoon, Tae-Jin; Zakhari, Julia; Anders, Joanna; Taylor, Barbara; Virador, Victoria M

    2007-07-01

    The skin contains two known subpopulations of stem cells/epidermal progenitors: a basal keratinocyte population found in the interfollicular epithelium and cells residing in the bulge region of the hair follicle. The major role of the interfollicular basal keratinocyte population may be epidermal renewal, whereas the bulge population may only be activated and recruited to form a cutaneous epithelium in case of trauma. Using 3-dimensional cultures of murine skin under stress conditions in which only reserve epithelial cells would be expected to survive and expand, we demonstrate that a mesenchymal population resident in neonatal murine dermis has the unique potential to develop an epidermis in vitro. In monolayer culture, this dermal subpopulation has long-term survival capabilities in restricted serum and an inducible capacity to evolve into multiple cell lineages, both epithelial and mesenchymal, depending on culture conditions. When grafted subcutaneously, this dermal subpopulation gave rise to fusiform structures, reminiscent of disorganized muscle, that stained positive for smooth muscle actin and desmin; on typical epidermal grafts, abundant melanocytes appeared throughout the dermis that were not associated with hair follicles. The multipotential cells can be repeatedly isolated from neonatal murine dermis by a sequence of differential centrifugation and selective culture conditions. These results suggest that progenitors capable of epidermal differentiation exist in the mesenchymal compartment of an abundant tissue source and may have a function in mesenchymal-epithelial transition upon insult. Moreover, these cells could be available in sufficient quantities for lineage determination or tissue engineering applications.

  2. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical outcomes following intraoperative use of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in various oral reconstructive procedures. PubMed was searched without language restrictions from 2000 to 2011 using the search words stem cell, oral surgery, tissue engineering, sinus lift...

  4. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia de Vasconcellos Machado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; ZHAO Robert ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues. About 35% -5% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD. It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy, which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids). Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for sterold-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency, which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects. The recently elucidated immunosuppreseive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants, MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD, and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies. The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  6. Inactivated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Maintain Immunomodulatory Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luk, Franka; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Korevaar, Sander S.; Roemeling, Marieke; Franquesa, Marcella; Strini, Tanja; van den Engel, Sandra; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Roy, Debashish; Dor, Frank J. M. F.; Horwitz, Edwin M.; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are studied as a cell therapeutic agent for treatment of various immune diseases. However, therapy with living culture-expanded cells comes with safety concerns. Furthermore, development of effective MSC immunotherapy is hampered by lack of knowledge of the mechanisms of

  7. Biological Characteristics Analysis of Three Types of Murine Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells%三种不同型别小鼠骨髓来源间质干细胞的生物学特性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    惠大阳; 郭振宇; 卢志杰; 余伟华; 王涛; 雷俊霞

    2011-01-01

    [目的]间质干细胞(MSC)是一种间质来源的多潜能基质细胞,目前人和多种动物来源的MSC均已被成功分离鉴定.然而由于小鼠骨髓MSC的分离相对人和其他物种更为困难,关于小鼠骨髓MSC的克隆分析结果也相对有限且结果不尽一致.为此,本研究拟进一步探讨小鼠MSC的体外分离方法,并对MSC克隆形成单位进行生物学特性分析.[方法]取C57BL/6小鼠,冲洗股骨骨髓腔获得骨髓单个核细胞悬液,低密度接种培养,并通过有限稀释克隆挑选获得三种形态、生长特点不同的克隆形成单位(CFU).采用流式分析技术对三种类型的CFU进行表型分析,并用油红O和茜素红分别进行成脂和成骨分化诱导鉴定.[结果]低密度培养并结合克隆化培养分离技术成功获得C57BL/6小鼠骨髓间充质干细胞,并观察到偏圆形(MSC1)、长梭形(MSC2)以及纺锤形、多边形(MSC3)三种贴壁形态细胞类型;免疫表型分析显示,三种细胞均强表达Sca-1,不表达CD11b、CD45,部分表达CD90.2;体外诱导分化实验证实,MSC1仅具有向脂肪细胞分化的潜能,MSC2仅具有向成骨细胞分化的潜能;MSC3则具有成骨、成脂双向分化能力.[结论]低密度培养并结合克隆化培养分离技术可成功分离小鼠骨髓间充质干细胞;小鼠MSCs是一种高度异质性的细胞群,其中可能含有多能MSC或单一分化方向的前体细胞等处于不同分化阶段的细胞类型.%[Objective]Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are multipotential stromal cells.Now the MSC of human and many animals have been isolated and identified successfully.However, the isolation of purified murine MSC from bone marrow is far more difficult than that in human and other species, so the clonal analysis results of murine bone marrow MSC are limited and even inconsistent.Therefore, isolation of pure murine MSC in vitro and identification of the biological characteristics of colony-forming units (CFU) were

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olcay Ergurhan Kiroglu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are almost incurable, debilitating, and they might be fatal, because of limited neurogenesis in nervous system, presence of inhibitory substances and inhibition of recovery due to development of glial scar. Despite many treatment strategies of neurodegenerative diseases no full cure has been achieved. The successful results for mesenchymal stem cells applications on muscles, heart and liver diseases and the application of these cells to the damaged area in particular, hypoxia, inflammation and apoptosis promise hope of using them for neurodegenerative diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells applications constitute a vascular and neuronal phenotype in Parkinsons disease, Huntingtons disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Alzheimers disease. Stem cells release bioactive agents that lead to suppression of local immune system, reduction of free radicals, increase in angiogenesis, inhibition of fibrosis, and apoptosis. In addition, tissue stem cells, increase neuronal healing, stimulate proliferation and differentiation. These findings show that stem cells might be a hope of a cure in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and intensive work on this issue should continue.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells targeting the GVHD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Robert; ChunHua

    2009-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease(GVHD) occurs after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant and is a reaction of donor immune cells against host tissues.About 35%-50% of hematopoietic stem cell transplant(HSCT) recipients will develop acute GVHD.It is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality,particularly in patients who do not respond to primary therapy,which usually consists of glucocorticoids(steroids).Most of the available second-line and third-line treatments for steroid-refractory acute GVHD induce severe immunodeficiency,which is commonly accompanied by lethal infectious complications.Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) have been shown to mediate immunomodulatory effects.The recently elucidated immunosuppressive potential of mesenchymal stem cells has set the stage for their clinical testing as cellular immunosuppressants,MSCs have been used in patients with steroid-refractory acute GVHD,and encouraging responses have been obtained in many studies.The utility of MSCs for the treatment of GVHD is becoming clear.

  10. Cartilage Engineering from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goepfert, C.; Slobodianski, A.; Schilling, A. F.; Adamietz, P.; Pörtner, R.

    Mesenchymal progenitor cells known as multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from various tissues. Since they are able to differentiate along the mesenchymal lineages of cartilage and bone, they are regarded as promising sources for the treatment of skeletal defects. Tissue regeneration in the adult organism and in vitro engineering of tissues is hypothesized to follow the principles of embryogenesis. The embryonic development of the skeleton has been studied extensively with respect to the regulatory mechanisms governing morphogenesis, differentiation, and tissue formation. Various concepts have been designed for engineering tissues in vitro based on these developmental principles, most of them involving regulatory molecules such as growth factors or cytokines known to be the key regulators in developmental processes. Growth factors most commonly used for in vitro cultivation of cartilage tissue belong to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family, and the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) family. In this chapter, in vivo actions of members of these growth factors described in the literature are compared with in vitro concepts of cartilage engineering making use of these growth factors.

  11. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen Preben D; Heerkens Tammy; Koch Thomas G; Betts Dean H

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is lo...

  12. The secretome of mesenchymal stem cells: potential implications for neuroregeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gesine; Anisimov, Sergey V

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have shown regenerative properties in many tissues. This feature had originally been ascribed to their multipotency and thus their ability to differentiate into tissue-specific cells. However, many researchers consider the secretome of mesenchymal stem cells the most important player in the observed reparative effects of these cells. In this review, we specifically focus on the potential neuroregenerative effect of mesenchymal stem cells, summarize several possible mechanisms of neuroregeneration and list key factors mediating this effect. We illustrate examples of mesenchymal stem cell treatment in central nervous system disorders including stroke, neurodegenerative disorders (such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple system atrophy and cerebellar ataxia) and inflammatory disease (such as multiple sclerosis). We specifically highlight studies where mesenchymal stem cells have entered clinical trials.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Manage Endogenous Tissue Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2016-08-01

    angiogenesis, and stimulate mitosis and differentiation of tissue, intrinsic reparative or stem cells. These referred a trophic effects, different from the direct differentiation of MSCs into repair tissue. Thus, MSC suggested as a multidrug delivery vehicles in response of injury. In this regard, the trophic effects of MSCs may have profound clinical use. SUMMARY: Managing the body’s natural repair and regeneration capacities is the new frontier for modern medicine and the basis for the science of cell therapies. Study of MSCs become one avenue that being pursued to explore the endogenous tissue regeneration management, so that people have a great expectation to solve many severe diseases. KEYWORDS: mesenchymal stromal/stem cell, paracrine or autocrine activities, trophic mediator, inflammation, wound healing

  14. Molecular signatures of the primitive prostate stem cell niche reveal novel mesenchymal-epithelial signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Blum

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signals between stem cells and stroma are important in establishing the stem cell niche. However, very little is known about the regulation of any mammalian stem cell niche as pure isolates of stem cells and their adjacent mesenchyme are not readily available. The prostate offers a unique model to study signals between stem cells and their adjacent stroma as in the embryonic prostate stem cell niche, the urogenital sinus mesenchyme is easily separated from the epithelial stem cells. Here we investigate the distinctive molecular signals of these two stem cell compartments in a mammalian system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated fetal murine urogenital sinus epithelium and urogenital sinus mesenchyme and determined their differentially expressed genes. To distinguish transcripts that are shared by other developing epithelial/mesenchymal compartments from those that pertain to the prostate stem cell niche, we also determined the global gene expression of epidermis and dermis of the same embryos. Our analysis indicates that several of the key transcriptional components that are predicted to be active in the embryonic prostate stem cell niche regulate processes such as self-renewal (e.g., E2f and Ap2, lipid metabolism (e.g., Srebp1 and cell migration (e.g., Areb6 and Rreb1. Several of the enriched promoter binding motifs are shared between the prostate epithelial/mesenchymal compartments and their epidermis/dermis counterparts, indicating their likely relevance in epithelial/mesenchymal signaling in primitive cellular compartments. Based on differential gene expression we also defined ligand-receptor interactions that may be part of the molecular interplay of the embryonic prostate stem cell niche. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide a comprehensive description of the transcriptional program of the major regulators that are likely to control the cellular interactions in the embryonic prostatic stem cell niche, many of which may

  15. Modeling sarcomagenesis using multipotent mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rene Rodriguez; Ruth Rubio; Pablo Menendez

    2012-01-01

    Because of their unique properties,multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent one of the most promising adult stem cells being used worldwide in a wide array of clinical applications.Overall,compelling evidence supports the long-term safety of ex vivo expanded human MSCs,which do not seem to transform spontaneously.However,experimental data reveal a link between MSCs and cancer,and MSCs have been reported to inhibit or promote tumor growth depending on yet undefined conditions.Interestingly,solid evidence based on transgenic mice and genetic intervention of MSCs has placed these cells as the most likely cell of origin for certain sarcomas.This research area is being increasingly explored to develop accurate MSC-based models of sarcomagenesis,which will be undoubtedly valuable in providing a better understanding about the etiology and pathogenesis of mesenchymal cancer,eventually leading to the development of more specific therapies directed against the sarcoma-initiating cell.Unfortunately,still little is known about the mechanisms underlying MSC transformation and further studies are required to develop bona fide sarcoma models based on human MSCs.Here,we comprehensively review the existing MSC-based models of sarcoma and discuss the most common mechanisms leading to tumoral transformation of MSCs and sarcomagenesis.

  16. Viability of mesenchymal stem cells during electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Zanatta

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is a technique by which a live tissue can be re-constructed and one of its main goals is to associate cells with biomaterials. Electrospinning is a technique that facilitates the production of nanofibers and is commonly used to develop fibrous scaffolds to be used in tissue engineering. In the present study, a different approach for cell incorporation into fibrous scaffolds was tested. Mesenchymal stem cells were extracted from the wall of the umbilical cord and mononuclear cells from umbilical cord blood. Cells were re-suspended in a 10% polyvinyl alcohol solution and subjected to electrospinning for 30 min under a voltage of 21 kV. Cell viability was assessed before and after the procedure by exclusion of dead cells using trypan blue staining. Fiber diameter was observed by scanning electron microscopy and the presence of cells within the scaffolds was analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. After electrospinning, the viability of mesenchymal stem cells was reduced from 88 to 19.6% and the viability of mononuclear cells from 99 to 8.38%. The loss of viability was possibly due to the high viscosity of the polymer solution, which reduced the access to nutrients associated with electric and mechanical stress during electrospinning. These results suggest that the incorporation of cells during fiber formation by electrospinning is a viable process that needs more investigation in order to find ways to protect cells from damage.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells: A new diagnostic tool?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are progenitor cellscapable of self-renewal that can differentiate inmultiple tissues and, under specific and standardized culture conditions, expand in vitro with little phenotypicalterations. In recent years, preclinical andclinical studies have focused on MSC analysis andunderstanding the potential use of these cells as atherapy in a wide range of pathologies, and manyapplications have been tested. Clinical trials usingMSCs have been performed (e.g. , for cardiac events,stroke, multiple sclerosis, blood diseases, auto-immunedisorders, ischemia, and articular cartilage and bonepathologies), and for many genetic diseases, thesecells are considered an important resource. Consideringof the biology of MSCs, these cells may also be usefultools for understanding the physiopathology of differentdiseases, and they can be used to develop specificbiomarkers for a broad range of diseases. In thiseditorial, we discuss the literature related to the use ofMSCs for diagnostic applications and we suggest newtechnologies to improve their employment.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Angels or Demons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S. Y. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been used in cell-based therapy in various disease conditions such as graft-versus-host and heart diseases, osteogenesis imperfecta, and spinal cord injuries, and the results have been encouraging. However, as MSC therapy gains popularity among practitioners and researchers, there have been reports on the adverse effects of MSCs especially in the context of tumour modulation and malignant transformation. These cells have been found to enhance tumour growth and metastasis in some studies and have been related to anticancer-drug resistance in other instances. In addition, various studies have also reported spontaneous malignant transformation of MSCs. The mechanism of the modulatory behaviour and the tumorigenic potential of MSCs, warrant urgent exploration, and the use of MSCs in patients with cancer awaits further evaluation. However, if MSCs truly play a role in tumour modulation, they can also be potential targets of cancer treatment.

  19. Optimizing mesenchymal stem cell-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joseph; Kean, Thomas; Young, Randell; Dennis, James E; Caplan, Arnold I

    2009-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapeutics are showing significant benefit in multiple clinical trials conducted by both academic and commercial organizations, but obstacles remain for their large-scale commercial implementation. Recent studies have attempted to optimize MSC-based therapeutics by either enhancing their potency or increasing their delivery to target tissues. Overexpression of trophic factors or in vitro exposure to potency-enhancing factors are two approaches that are demonstrating success in preclinical animal models. Delivery enhancement strategies involving tissue-specific cytokine pathways or binding sites are also showing promise. Each of these strategies has its own set of distinct advantages and disadvantages when viewed with a mindset of ultimate commercialization and clinical utility.

  20. Application of Nanoscaffolds in Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ghoraishizadeh, Saman; Ghorishizadeh, Afsoon; Ghoraishizadeh, Peyman; Daneshvar,Nasibeh; Boroojerdi, Mohadese Hashem

    2014-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is an alternative solution for organ transplantation. Stem cells and nanoscaffolds are two essential components in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as primary adult stem cells with high proliferation capacity, wide differentiation potential, and immunosuppression properties which make them unique for regenerative medicine and cell therapy. Scaffolds are engineered nanofibers that provide suitable microenvironment for cell signalling whi...

  1. Labeling and Imaging Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, adipose and muscle cells. Adult derived MSCs are being actively investigated because of their potential to be utilized for therapeutic cell-based transplantation. Methods...

  2. Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0666 TITLE: Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...4Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0666 Therapeutic Evaluation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Gut Inflammation 5b...in a well-characterized mouse model of chronic colonic inflammation . Hypothesis: We propose that ex vivo-generated MSCs suppress chronic gut

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells: characteristics and clinical applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Bobis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are bone marrow populating cells, different from hematopoietic stem cells, which possess an extensive proliferative potential and ability to differentiate into various cell types, including: osteocytes, adipocytes, chondrocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes and neurons. MSCs play a key role in the maintenance of bone marrow homeostasis and regulate the maturation of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. The cells are characterized by the expression of numerous surface antigens, but none of them appears to be exclusively expressed on MSCs. Apart from bone marrow, MSCs are located in other tissues, like: adipose tissue, peripheral blood, cord blood, liver and fetal tissues. MSCs have been shown to be powerful tools in gene therapies, and can be effectively transduced with viral vectors containing a therapeutic gene, as well as with cDNA for specific proteins, expression of which is desired in a patient. Due to such characteristics, the number of clinical trials based on the use of MSCs increase. These cells have been successfully employed in graft versus host disease (GvHD treatment, heart regeneration after infarct, cartilage and bone repair, skin wounds healing, neuronal regeneration and many others. Of special importance is their use in the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, which appeared to be the only reasonable therapeutic strategy. MSCs seem to represent a future powerful tool in regenerative medicine, therefore they are particularly important in medical research.

  4. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E.; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harv...

  5. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biemann, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.biemann@medizin.uni-halle.de [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Anne [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Navarrete Santos, Alexander [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Riemann, Dagmar [Department of Immunology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Knelangen, Julia [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Blueher, Matthias [Department of Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Koch, Holger [Institute for Prevention and Occupational Medicine of the German Social Accident Insurance, Institute of the Ruhr-University Bochum (IPA), Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany); Fischer, Bernd [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Martin Luther University, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  6. Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Bhasin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cell transplantation is a ‘hype and hope’ in the current scenario. It is in the early stage of development with promises to restore function in chronic diseases. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in stroke patients has shown significant improvement by reducing clinical and functional deficits. They are feasible and multipotent and have homing characteristics. This study evaluates the safety, feasibility and efficacy of autologous MSC transplantation in patients with chronic stroke using clinical scores and functional imaging (blood oxygen level-dependent and diffusion tensor imaging techniques. Methods: Twelve chronic stroke patients were recruited; inclusion criteria were stroke lasting 3 months to 1 year, motor strength of hand muscles of at least 2, and NIHSS of 4–15, and patients had to be conscious and able to comprehend. Fugl Meyer (FM, modified Barthel index (mBI, MRC, Ashworth tone grade scale scores and functional imaging scans were assessed at baseline, and after 8 and 24 weeks. Bone marrow was aspirated under aseptic conditions and expansion of MSC took 3 weeks with animal serum-free media (Stem Pro SFM. Six patients were administered a mean of 50–60 × 106 cells i.v. followed by 8 weeks of physiotherapy. Six patients served as controls. This was a non-randomized experimental controlled trial. Results: Clinical and radiological scanning was normal for the stem cell group patients. There was no mortality or cell-related adverse reaction. The laboratory tests on days 1, 3, 5 and 7 were also normal in the MSC group till the last follow-up. The FM and mBI showed a modest increase in the stem cell group compared to controls. There was an increased number of cluster activation of Brodmann areas BA 4 and BA 6 after stem cell infusion compared to controls, indicating neural plasticity. Conclusion: MSC therapy aiming to restore function in stroke is safe and feasible. Further randomized controlled trials are needed

  7. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Heerkens, Tammy; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2007-01-01

    Background: There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non......-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low......, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal...

  8. trans-10,cis-12 CLA promotes osteoblastogenesis via SMAD mediated mechanism in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jonggun; Park, Yooheon; Park, Yeonhwa

    2014-05-01

    The inverse relationship between osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells has been linked to overall bone mass. It has previously been reported that conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) inhibits adipogenesis via a peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) mediated mechanism, while it increases osteoblastogenesis via a PPARγ-independent mechanism in mesenchymal stem cells. This suggests potential implication of CLA on improving bone mass. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine involvement of CLA on regulation of osteoblastogenesis in murine mesenchymal stem cells by focusing on the Mothers against decapentaplegic (MAD)-related family of molecules 8 (SMAD8), one of key regulators of osteoblastogenesis. The trans-10,cis-12 CLA, but not the cis-9,trans-11, significantly increased osteoblastogenesis via SMAD8, and inhibited adipogenesis independent of SMAD8, while inhibiting factors regulating osteoclastogenesis in this model. These suggest that CLA may help improve osteoblastogenesis via a SMAD8 mediated mechanism.

  9. Hepatic Stellate Cells Support Hematopoiesis and are Liver-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Kordes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hematopoiesis can occur in the liver, when the bone marrow fails to provide an adequate environment for hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatic stellate cells possess characteristics of stem/progenitor cells, but their contribution to hematopoiesis is not known thus far. Methods: Isolated hepatic stellate cells from rats were characterized with respect to molecular markers of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and treated with adipocyte or osteocyte differentiation media. Stellate cells of rats were further co-cultured with murine stem cell antigen-1+ hematopoietic stem cells selected by magnetic cell sorting. The expression of murine hematopoietic stem cell markers was analyzed by mouse specific quantitative PCR during co-culture. Hepatic stellate cells from eGFP+ rats were transplanted into lethally irradiated wild type rats. Results: Desmin-expressing stellate cells were associated with hematopoietic sites in the fetal rat liver. Hepatic stellate cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. Stellate cells supported hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during co-culture similar to bone marrow MSC, but failed to differentiate into blood cell lineages after transplantation. Conclusion: Hepatic stellate cells are liver-resident MSC and can fulfill typical functions of bone marrow MSC such as the differentiation into adipocytes or osteocytes and support of hematopoiesis.

  10. Efficient engineering of vascularized ectopic bone from human embryonic stem cell-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domev, Hagit; Amit, Michal; Laevsky, Ilana; Dar, Ayelet; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can be derived from various adult and fetal tissues. However, the quality of tissues for the isolation of adult and fetal hMSCs is donor dependent with a nonreproducible yield. In addition, tissue engineering and cell therapy require large-scale production of a pure population of lineage-restricted stem cells that can be easily induced to differentiate into a specific cell type. Therefore, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) can provide an alternative, plentiful source for generation of reproducible hMSCs. We have developed efficient differentiation protocols for derivation of hMSCs from hESCs, including coculture with murine OP9 stromal cells and feeder layer-free system. Our protocols have resulted in the generation of up to 49% of hMSCs, which expressed CD105, CD90, CD29, and CD44. The hMSCs exhibited high adipogenic, chondrocytic, and osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The latter correlated with osteocalcin secretion and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production by the differentiating hMSCs. hMSC-derived osteoblasts further differentiated and formed ectopic bone in vivo, and induced the formation of blood vessels in Matrigel implants. Our protocol enables generation of a purified population of hESC-derived MSCs, with the potential of differentiating into several mesodermal lineages, and particularly into vasculogenesis-inducing osteoblasts, which can contribute to the development of bone repair protocols.

  11. Telomere stability and telomerase in mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Graakjaer, Jesper; Kølvrå, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive genetic material that cap and thereby protect the ends of chromosomes. Each time a cell divides, telomeres get shorter. Telomere length is mainly maintained by telomerase. This enzyme is present in high concentrations in the embryonic stem cells and in fast growing...... embryonic cells, and declines with age. It is still unclear to what extent there is telomerase in adult stem cells, but since these are the founder cells of cells of all the tissues in the body, understanding the telomere dynamics and expression of telomerase in adult stem cells is very important....... In the present communication we focus on telomere expression and telomere length in stem cells, with a special focus on mesenchymal stem cells. We consider different mechanisms by which stem cells can maintain telomeres and also focus on the dynamics of telomere length in mesenchymal stem cells, both the overall...

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells: from experiment to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto William R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is currently much interest in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and their ability to differentiate into other cell types, and to partake in the anatomy and physiology of remote organs. It is now clear these cells may be purified from several organs in the body besides bone marrow. MSCs take part in wound healing by contributing to myofibroblast and possibly fibroblast populations, and may be involved in epithelial tissue regeneration in certain organs, although this remains more controversial. In this review, we examine the ability of MSCs to modulate liver, kidney, heart and intestinal repair, and we update their opposing qualities of being less immunogenic and therefore tolerated in a transplant situation, yet being able to contribute to xenograft models of human tumour formation in other contexts. However, such observations have not been replicated in the clinic. Recent studies showing the clinical safety of MSC in several pathologies are discussed. The possible opposing powers of MSC need careful understanding and control if their clinical potential is to be realised with long-term safety for patients.

  13. Exosomes Derived from Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The functional mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have become a research focus in recent years. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that MSCs act in a paracrine manner. Therefore, the biological factors in conditioned medium, including exosomes and soluble factors, derived from MSC cultures are being explored extensively. The results from most investigations show that MSC-conditioned medium or its components mediate some biological functions of MSCs. Several studies have reported that MSC-derived exosomes have functions similar to those of MSCs, such as repairing tissue damage, suppressing inflammatory responses, and modulating the immune system. However, the mechanisms are still not fully understood and the results remain controversial. Compared with cells, exosomes are more stable and reservable, have no risk of aneuploidy, a lower possibility of immune rejection following in vivo allogeneic administration, and may provide an alternative therapy for various diseases. In this review, we summarize the properties and biological functions of MSC-derived exosomes and discuss the related mechanisms.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells: cell biology and potential use in therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Kristiansen, Malthe; Abdallah, Basem M

    2004-01-01

    are currently available for isolation of the mesenchymal stem cells based on their physical and immunological characteristics. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, mesenchymal stem cells are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Recent...... studies have demonstrated that the life span of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro can be extended by increasing the levels of telomerase expression in the cells and thus allowing culture of large number of cells needed for therapy. In addition, it has been shown that it is possible to culture the cells...... for generalized diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues and organs in tissue engineering protocols. The results of these initial trials are very encouraging and several clinical trials are under way to study...

  15. Combination Cell Therapy with Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Stem Cells for Brain Stroke in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stro...

  16. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in Parkinson's disease animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugliandolo, A; Bramanti, P; Mazzon, E

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, and as a consequence, by decreased dopamine levels in the striatum. Currently available therapies are not able to stop or reverse the progression of the disease. A novel therapeutic approach is based on cell therapy with stem cells, in order to replace degenerated neurons. Among stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells seemed the most promising thanks to their capacities to differentiate toward dopaminergic neurons and to release neurotrophic factors. Indeed, mesenchymal stem cells are able to produce different molecules with immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, angiogenic, chemotactic effects and that stimulate differentiation of resident stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated for the first time from bone marrow, but can be collected also from adipose tissue, umbilical cord and other tissues. In this review, we focused our attention on mesenchymal stem cells derived from different sources and their application in Parkinson's disease animal models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Sonoyama

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla. Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated functional tooth regeneration in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoyama, Wataru; Liu, Yi; Fang, Dianji; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Seo, Byoung-Moo; Zhang, Chunmei; Liu, He; Gronthos, Stan; Wang, Cun-Yu; Wang, Songlin; Shi, Songtao

    2006-12-20

    Mesenchymal stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration is a promising approach for regenerative medicine for a wide range of applications. Here we report a new population of stem cells isolated from the root apical papilla of human teeth (SCAP, stem cells from apical papilla). Using a minipig model, we transplanted both human SCAP and periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to generate a root/periodontal complex capable of supporting a porcelain crown, resulting in normal tooth function. This work integrates a stem cell-mediated tissue regeneration strategy, engineered materials for structure, and current dental crown technologies. This hybridized tissue engineering approach led to recovery of tooth strength and appearance.

  19. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Horsman, Michael Robert; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cancer stem cells are believed to be more radiation resistant than differentiated tumour cells of the same origin. It is not known, however, whether normal nontransformed adult stem cells share the same radioresistance as their cancerous counterpart. Material and methods....... Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under...... the intercellular matrix. These results also indicate that cancer stem cells are more radiation resistant than stem cells of the same origin....

  20. Quantum dot labeling of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cascio Wayne E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells with the potential to differentiate into bone, cartilage, fat and muscle cells and are being investigated for their utility in cell-based transplantation therapy. Yet, adequate methods to track transplanted MSCs in vivo are limited, precluding functional studies. Quantum Dots (QDs offer an alternative to organic dyes and fluorescent proteins to label and track cells in vitro and in vivo. These nanoparticles are resistant to chemical and metabolic degradation, demonstrating long term photostability. Here, we investigate the cytotoxic effects of in vitro QD labeling on MSC proliferation and differentiation and use as a cell label in a cardiomyocyte co-culture. Results A dose-response to QDs in rat bone marrow MSCs was assessed in Control (no-QDs, Low concentration (LC, 5 nmol/L and High concentration (HC, 20 nmol/L groups. QD yield and retention, MSC survival, proinflammatory cytokines, proliferation and DNA damage were evaluated in MSCs, 24 -120 hrs post QD labeling. In addition, functional integration of QD labeled MSCs in an in vitro cardiomyocyte co-culture was assessed. A dose-dependent effect was measured with increased yield in HC vs. LC labeled MSCs (93 ± 3% vs. 50% ± 15%, p 90% of QD labeled cells were viable in all groups, however, at 120 hrs increased apoptosis was measured in HC vs. Control MSCs (7.2% ± 2.7% vs. 0.5% ± 0.4%, p Conclusion Fluorescent QDs label MSC effectively in an in vitro co-culture model. QDs are easy to use, show a high yield and survival rate with minimal cytotoxic effects. Dose-dependent effects suggest limiting MSC QD exposure.

  1. Cell surface engineering of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Zhao, Weian; Gupta, Ashish; Loh, Wei Li; Karnik, Rohit; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging the capacity to promote regeneration, stem cell therapies offer enormous hope for solving some of the most tragic illnesses, diseases, and tissue defects world-wide. However, a significant barrier to the effective implementation of cell therapies is the inability to target a large quantity of viable cells with high efficiency to tissues of interest. Systemic infusion is desired as it minimizes the invasiveness of cell therapy, and maximizes practical aspects of repeated doses. However, cell types such as mesenchymal stem cells exhibit a poor homing capability or lose their capacity to home following culture expansion (i.e. FASEB J 21:3197-3207, 2007; Circulation 108:863-868, 2003; Stroke: A Journal of Cerebral Circulation 32:1005-1011; Blood 104:3581-3587, 2004). To address this challenge, we have developed a simple platform technology to chemically attach cell adhesion molecules to the cell surface to improve the homing efficiency to specific tissues. This chemical approach involves a stepwise process including (1) treatment of cells with sulfonated biotinyl-N-hydroxy-succinimide to introduce biotin groups on the cell surface, (2) addition of streptavidin that binds to the biotin on the cell surface and presents unoccupied binding sites, and (3) attachment of biotinylated targeting ligands that promote adhesive interactions with vascular endothelium. Specifically, in our model system, a biotinylated cell rolling ligand, sialyl Lewisx (SLeX), found on the surface of leukocytes (i.e., the active site of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand (PSGL-1)), is conjugated on MSC surface. The SLeX engineered MSCs exhibit a rolling response on a P-selectin coated substrate under shear stress conditions. This indicates that this approach can be used to potentially target P-selectin expressing endothelium in the more marrow or at sites of inflammation. Importantly, the surface modification has no adverse impact on MSCs' native phenotype including their multilineage

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  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Levels of Human Spinal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Liam; Vangsness, C Thomas

    2017-09-06

    .: Systematic Review. .: The aim of this study was to investigate, quantify, compare and compile the various mesenchymal stem cell tissue sources within human spinal tissues to act as a compendium for clinical and research application. .: Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in academic and clinical understanding of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Previously limited to cells isolated from bone marrow, the past decade has illicited the characterization and isolation of human MSCs from adipose, bone marrow, synovium, muscle, periosteum, peripheral blood, umbilical cord, placenta and numerous other tissues. As researchers explore practical applications of cells in these tissues, the absolute levels of MSCs in specific spinal tissue will be critical to guide future research. .: The PubMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for articles relating to the harvest, characterization, isolation and quantification of human mesenchymal stem cells from spinal tissues. Selected articles were examined for relevant data, categorized according to type of spinal tissue, and when possible, standardized to facilitate comparisons between sites. .: Human mesenchymal stem cell levels varied widely between spinal tissues. Yields for Intervertebral disc demonstrated roughly 5% of viable cells to be positive for MSC surface markers. Cartilage endplate cells yielded 18,500- 61,875 cells/ 0.8 mm thick sample of cartilage end plate. Ligamentum flavum yielded 250,000- 500,000 cells per gram of tissue. Annulus fibrosus FACS treatment found 29% of cells positive for MSC marker Stro-1. Nucleus pulposus yielded mean tissue samples of 40,584-234,137 MSCs/gram of tissue. .: Numerous tissues within and surrounding the spine represent a consistent and reliable source for the harvest and isolation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Among the tissues of the spine, the annulus fibrosus and ligamentum flavum each offer considerable levels of mesenchymal stem cells, and may

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chenglin

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), an ideal cell source for regenerative therapy with no ethical issues, play an important role in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Growing evidence has demonstrated that MSCs transplantation can accelerate wound closure, ameliorate clinical parameters, and avoid amputation. In this review, we clarify the mechanism of preclinical studies, as well as safety and efficacy of clinical trials in the treatment of DFU. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), compared with MSCs derived from other tissues, may be a suitable cell type that can provide easy, effective, and cost-efficient transplantation to treat DFU and protect patients from amputation. PMID:28386568

  8. Nanoscale Mechanical Stimulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Nikukar

    2014-05-01

    We observed significant responses after 1 and 2-week stimulations in cell number, cell shapes and phenotypical markers. Microarray was performed for all groups. Cell count showed normal cell growth with stimulation. However, cell surface area, cell perimeter, and arboration after 1-week stimulation showed significant increases. Immunofluorescent studies have showed significant increase in osteocalcin production after stimulation. Conclusions: Nanoscale mechanical vibration showed significant changes in human mesenchymal stem cell behaviours. Cell morphology changed to become more polygonal and increased expression of the osteoblast markers were noted. These findings with gene regulation changes suggesting nanoscale mechanostimulation has stimulated osteoblastogenesis.  Keywords:  Mesenchymal, Nanoscale, Stem Cells.

  9. Combination cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells for brain stroke in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba; Farahmandnia, Mohammad; Razi, Zahra; Delavari, Somayeh; Shakibajahromi, Benafsheh; Sarvestani, Fatemeh Sabet; Kazemi, Sepehr; Semsar, Maryam

    2015-05-01

    Brain stroke is the second most important events that lead to disability and morbidity these days. Although, stroke is important, there is no treatment for curing this problem. Nowadays, cell therapy has opened a new window for treating central nervous system disease. In some previous studies the Mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells. In this study, we have designed an experiment to assess the combination cell therapy (Mesenchymal and Neural stem cells) effects on brain stroke. The Mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from adult rat bone marrow and the neural stem cells were isolated from ganglion eminence of rat embryo 14 days. The Mesenchymal stem cells were injected 1 day after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and the neural stem cells transplanted 7 day after MCAO. After 28 days, the neurological outcomes and brain lesion volumes were evaluated. Also, the activity of Caspase 3 was assessed in different groups. The group which received combination cell therapy had better neurological examination and less brain lesion. Also the combination cell therapy group had the least Caspase 3 activity among the groups. The combination cell therapy is more effective than Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and neural stem cell therapy separately in treating the brain stroke in rats.

  10. Derivation of multipotent mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells provide access to the earliest stages of human development and may serve as a source of specialized cells for regenerative medicine. Thus, it becomes crucial to develop protocols for the directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells into tissue-restricted precursors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we present culture conditions for the derivation of unlimited numbers of pure mesenchymal precursors from human embryonic stem cells and demonstrate multilineage differentiation into fat, cartilage, bone, and skeletal muscle cells. CONCLUSION: Our findings will help to elucidate the mechanism of mesoderm specification during embryonic stem cell differentiation and provide a platform to efficiently generate specialized human mesenchymal cell types for future clinical applications.

  11. Caspases and p38 MAPK regulate endothelial cell adhesiveness for mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A Potapova

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells natively circulating or delivered into the blood stream home to sites of injury. The mechanism of mesenchymal stem cell homing to sites of injury is poorly understood. We have shown that the development of apoptosis in endothelial cells stimulates endothelial cell adhesiveness for mesenchymal stem cells. Adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells to apoptotic endothelial cells depends on the activation of endothelial caspases and p38 MAPK. Activation of p38 MAPK in endothelial cells has a primary effect while the activation of caspases potentiates the mesenchymal stem cell adhesion. Overall, our study of the mesenchymal stem cell interaction with endothelial cells indicates that mesenchymal stem cells recognize and specifically adhere to distressed/apoptotic endothelial cells.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation Attenuates Brain Injury After Neonatal Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velthoven, Cindy T. J.; Sheldon, R. Ann; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Derugin, Nikita; Vexler, Zinaida S.; Willemen, Hanneke L. D. M.; Maas, Mirjam; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Ferriero, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Brain injury caused by stroke is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to improve outcome after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury mainly by secretion of growth factors stimulati

  13. Current view of mesenchymal stem cells biology (brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslova O. A.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Although mesenchymal stem cells (MSC are in a focus of attention, some aspects of their biology are still unclear. This paper is a review of current research on MSC biology. The use of MSC in regenerative medicine is also briefly discussed.

  14. Transition of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells to endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Crisan (Mihaela)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are heterogeneous. A fraction of these cells constitute multipotent cells that can self-renew and mainly give rise to mesodermal lineage cells such as adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into endothelial cell

  15. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid;

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are non-hematopoietic adult stromal cells that reside in a perivascular niche in close association with pericytes and endothelial cells and possess self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity. The origin, unique properties, and therapeutic benefits of MSC ...

  16. Human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Abdallah, Basem M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of cells present in bone-marrow stroma and the stroma of various organs with the capacity for mesoderm-like cell differentiation into, for example, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSC are being introduced in the clinic for the treatment...

  17. Growth and metabolism of mesenchymal stem cells cultivated on microcarriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schop, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, MSCs, are a great potential source for clinical applications in the field of tissue regeneration. Although MSCs can be isolated from several tissues of the human body, e.g. the bone marrow, the tissues does not contain clinically relevant amounts of MSCs for cell therapeutic

  18. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells transplantation in adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing; LI Geng-shan; LI Guo-cao; ZHOU Qing; LI Wen-qiang; XU Hong-xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ Recent studies have suggested benefits of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation for the regeneration of cardiac tissue and function improvement of regionally infracted myocardium, but its effects on global heart failure is still little known. This study suggested the capacity of MSCs to transdifferentiate to cardiac cells in a nonischemic cardiomyopathic setting, and the effect of the cells on heart function.

  19. Effects of EdU labeling on mesenchymal stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, Hongxiu; Albersen, Maarten; Lin, Guiting; Lue, Tom F.; Lin, Ching-Shwun

    2013-01-01

    Thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU) has recently been used for tracking mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, we tested whether EdU was cytotoxic and whether it interfered with differentiation, cytokine secretion and migration of MSCs.

  20. Glial origin of mesenchymal stem cells in a tooth model system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaukua, Nina; Shahidi, Maryam Khatibi; Konstantinidou, Chrysoula; Dyachuk, Vyacheslav; Kaucka, Marketa; Furlan, Alessandro; An, Zhengwen; Wang, Longlong; Hultman, Isabell; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars; Blom, Hans; Brismar, Hjalmar; Lopes, Natalia Assaife; Pachnis, Vassilis; Suter, Ueli; Clevers, Hans; Thesleff, Irma; Sharpe, Paul; Ernfors, Patrik; Fried, Kaj; Adameyko, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells occupy niches in stromal tissues where they provide sources of cells for specialized mesenchymal derivatives during growth and repair. The origins of mesenchymal stem cells have been the subject of considerable discussion, and current consensus holds that perivascular cells fo

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Wharton's Jelly and Amniotic Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger-Messerli, Marianne S; Marx, Caterina; Oppliger, Byron; Mueller, Martin; Surbek, Daniel V; Schoeberlein, Andreina

    2016-02-01

    The discovery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in perinatal sources, such as the amniotic fluid (AF) and the umbilical connective tissue, the so-called Wharton's jelly (WJ), has transformed them into promising stem cell grafts for the application in regenerative medicine. The advantages of AF-MSCs and WJ-MSCs over adult MSCs, such as bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs), include their minimally invasive isolation procedure, their more primitive cell character without being tumourigenic, their low immunogenicity and their potential autologous application in congenital disorders and when cryopreserved in adulthood. This chapter gives an overview of the biology of AF-MSCs and WJ-MSCs, and their regenerative potential based on the results of recent preclinical and clinical studies. In the end, open questions concerning the use of WJ-MSCs and AF-MSCs in regenerative medicine will be emphasized.

  2. Labeling of mesenchymal stem cells by bioconjugated quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhranti S; Clark, Paul A; Moioli, Eduardo K; Stroscio, Michael A; Mao, Jeremy J

    2007-10-01

    Long-term labeling of stem cells during self-replication and differentiation benefits investigations of development and tissue regeneration. We report the labeling of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with RGD-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) during self-replication, and multilineage differentiations into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic cells. QD-labeled hMSCs remained viable as unlabeled hMSCs from the same subpopulation. These findings suggest the use of bioconjugated QDs as an effective probe for long-term labeling of stem cells.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles targeting tumor stroma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2011-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology continues to evolve by characterization of further types of stem cells and by exploring their therapeutic potential for experimental and clinical applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are one of the most promising candidates simply because...... better understanding and in vivo supporting data. The homing ability of hMSCs was investigated by creating a human xenograft model by transplanting an ovarian cancer cell line into immunocompromised mice. Then, genetically engineered hMSC-telo1 cells were injected through the tail vein...

  4. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells to renal lineage in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morizane, Ryuji [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Monkawa, Toshiaki, E-mail: monkawa@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Hiroshi [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells which have the unlimited proliferative capacity and extensive differentiation potency can be an attractive source for kidney regeneration therapies. Recent breakthroughs in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have provided with another potential source for the artificially-generated kidney. The purpose of this study is to know how to differentiate mouse ES and iPS cells into renal lineage. We used iPS cells from mouse fibroblasts by transfection of four transcription factors, namely Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Real-time PCR showed that renal lineage markers were expressed in both ES and iPS cells after the induction of differentiation. It also showed that a tubular specific marker, KSP progressively increased to day 18, although the differentiation of iPS cells was slower than ES cells. The results indicated that renal lineage cells can be differentiated from both murine ES and iPS cells. Several inducing factors were tested whether they influenced on cell differentiation. In ES cells, both of GDNF and BMP7 enhanced the differentiation to metanephric mesenchyme, and Activin enhanced the differentiation of ES cells to tubular cells. Activin also enhanced the differentiation of iPS cells to tubular cells, although the enhancement was lower than in ES cells. ES and iPS cells have a potential to differentiate to renal lineage cells, and they will be an attractive resource of kidney regeneration therapy. This differentiation is enhanced by Activin in both ES and iPS cells.

  5. The Mesenchymal Stem Cells From The Veterinary Sciences Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy B. Riaño G.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of a stem cell are determined by being undifferentiated, auto renewable, and because of having the capacity of generating cells for multiple cellular lineages, with the capacity to proliferate indefinitely in cultures. The origin of the stem cells can be embryonic (blastomers and cells of the internal mass of the blastocyst or somatic (pluripotential cells from adult tissues. The source of the somatic stem cells is the bone marrow, in which the hematopoietic stem cells and the mesenchymals (MSCs are found. Diverse studies in animal models have demonstrated that MSCs constitute a potential tool for the establishment of regenerative therapies in injured tissues. This article reviews the properties of the stem cells, their potentials, their advantages and limitations in several animal models.

  6. The molecular signature of therapeutic mesenchymal stem cells exposes the architecture of the hematopoietic stem cell niche synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancardi Gianluigi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs niche of the bone marrow is comprised of HSCs, osteoblasts, endothelial cells and a stromal component of non-hematopoietic multipotent cells of mesenchymal origin named "mesenchymal stem cells" (MSCs. Results Here we studied the global transcriptional profile of murine MSCs with immuno-therapeutic potential and compared it with that of 486 publicly available microarray datasets from 12 other mouse tissues or cell types. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering identified a unique pattern of gene expression capable of distinctively classifying MSCs from other tissues and cells. We then performed an analysis aimed to identify absolute and relative abundance of transcripts in all cell types. We found that the set of transcripts uniquely expressed by MSCs is enriched in transcription factors and components of the Wnt signaling pathway. The analysis of differentially expressed genes also identified a set of genes specifically involved in the HSC niche and is complemented by functional studies that confirm the findings. Interestingly, some of these genes play a role in the maintenance of HSCs in a quiescent state supporting their survival and preventing them from proliferating and differentiating. We also show that MSCs modulate T cell functions in vitro and, upon in vivo administration, ameliorate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Conclusion Altogether, these findings provide novel and important insights on the mechanisms of T cell function regulation by MSCs and help to cement the rationale for their application in the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  7. Recruited brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells contribute to brain tumor progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnan, Jinan; Isakson, Pauline; Joel, Mrinal; Cilio, Corrado; Langmoen, Iver A; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Badn, Wiaam

    2014-05-01

    The identity of the cells that contribute to brain tumor structure and progression remains unclear. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have recently been isolated from normal mouse brain. Here, we report the infiltration of MSC-like cells into the GL261 murine glioma model. These brain tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BT-MSCs) are defined with the phenotype (Lin-Sca-1+CD9+CD44+CD166+/-) and have multipotent differentiation capacity. We show that the infiltration of BT-MSCs correlates to tumor progression; furthermore, BT-MSCs increased the proliferation rate of GL261 cells in vitro. For the first time, we report that the majority of GL261 cells expressed mesenchymal phenotype under both adherent and sphere culture conditions in vitro and that the non-MSC population is nontumorigenic in vivo. Although the GL261 cell line expressed mesenchymal phenotype markers in vitro, most BT-MSCs are recruited cells from host origin in both wild-type GL261 inoculated into green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic mice and GL261-GFP cells inoculated into wild-type mice. We show the expression of chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CXCR6 on different recruited cell populations. In vivo, the GL261 cells change marker profile and acquire a phenotype that is more similar to cells growing in sphere culture conditions. Finally, we identify a BT-MSC population in human glioblastoma that is CD44+CD9+CD166+ both in freshly isolated and culture-expanded cells. Our data indicate that cells with MSC-like phenotype infiltrate into the tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we suggest that targeting BT-MSCs could be a possible strategy for treating glioblastoma patients.

  8. Safety of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs hold great promise as therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine and autoimmune diseases, based on their differentiation abilities and immunosuppressive properties. However, the therapeutic applications raise a series of questions about the safety of culture-expanded MSCs for human use. This paper summarized recent findings about safety issues of MSCs, in particular their genetic stability in long-term in vitro expansion, their cryopreservation, banking, and the role of serum in the preparation of MSCs.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Prostate: From Birth to Death and Potential Applications in Between. Prostate Cancer Foundation Tumor Microenvironment/ Immunology Working Group...Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0304 TITLE: Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs CONTRACTING...Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions

  10. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John Isaacs; Jeffrey Karp ...clinical trials for CRPC. The team is composed of Drs. Jeffrey Karp Co-Director of Regenerative Therapeutics at the Brigham & Women’s Hospital...encapsulating a PSA-activated thapsigargin-based prodrug (G115, Fig. 5) were generated by the Karp lab with the properties outlined in Table 7. These

  11. Glucocorticoids induce autophagy in rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.; Fan, J.; Lin, Y. S.;

    2015-01-01

    and their responses to diverse stimuli, however, the role of autophagy in glucocorticoidinduced damage to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) remains unclear. The current study confirmed that glucocorticoid administration impaired the proliferation of BMSCs. Transmission electron microscopy......Glucocorticoidinduced osteoporosis (GIOP) is a widespread clinical complication following glucocorticoid therapy. This irreversible damage to boneforming and resorbing cells is essential in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Autophagy is a physiological process involved in the regulation of cells...

  12. Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have elicited a great clinical interest, particularly in the areas of regenerative medicine and induction of tolerance in allogeneic transplantation. Previous reports demonstrated the feasibility of transplanting MSCs, which generates new prospects in cellular therapy. Recently, injection of MSCs induced remission of steroid-resistant acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. This review summarizes the knowledge and possible future clinical uses of MSCs.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells in diabetes treatment: progress and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu CHENG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by relative or absolute insulin deficient or reduced sensitivity of target cells to insulin. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells with multiple differentiation potential, self-renewable and immunoregulatory properties. Accumulating evidences from clinic or animal experiments recent years showed that MSCs infusion could ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetes. The research progress of MSCs in diabetes treatment is summarized and a corresponding perspective is herewith proposed in present paper. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.16

  14. Hydroxyapatite incorporated into collagen gels for mesenchymal stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laydi, F; Rahouadj, R; Cauchois, G; Stoltz, J-F; de Isla, N

    2013-01-01

    Collagen gels could be used as carriers in tissue engineering to improve cell retention and distribution in the defect. In other respect hydroxyapatite could be added to gels to improve mechanical properties and regulate gel contraction. The aim of this work was to analyze the feasibility to incorporate hydroxyapatite into collagen gels and culture mesenchymal stem cells inside it. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC-BM) were used in this study. Gels were prepared by mixing rat tail type I collagen, hydroxyapatite microparticles and MSCs. After polymerization gels were kept in culture while gel contraction and mechanical properties were studied. In parallel, cell viability and morphology were analyzed. Gels became free-floating gels contracted from day 3, only in the presence of cells. A linear rapid contraction phase was observed until day 7, then a very slow contraction phase took place. The incorporation of hydroxyapatite improved gel stability and mechanical properties. Cells were randomly distributed on the gel and a few dead cells were observed all over the experiment. This study shows the feasibility and biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite supplemented collagen gels for the culture of mesenchymal stem cells that could be used as scaffolds for cell delivery in osteoarticular regenerative medicine.

  15. Adult stem cell and mesenchymal progenitor theories of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukada, So-Ichiro; Ma, Yuran; Uezumi, Akiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Advances in medical science and technology allow people live longer lives, which results in age-related problems. Humans cannot avoid the various aged-related alterations of aging; in other words, humans cannot remain young at molecular and cellular levels. In 1956, Harman proposed the "free radical theory of aging" to explain the molecular mechanisms of aging. Telomere length, and accumulation of DNA or mitochondrial damage are also considered to be mechanisms of aging. On the other hand, stem cells are essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis by replacing parenchymal cells; therefore, the stem cell theory of aging is also used to explain the progress of aging. Importantly, the stem cell theory of aging is likely related to other theories. In addition, recent studies have started to reveal the essential roles of tissue-resident mesenchymal progenitors/stem cells/stromal cells in maintaining tissue homeostasis, and some evidence of their fundamental roles in the progression of aging has been presented. In this review, we discuss how stem cell and other theories connect to explain the progress of aging. In addition, we consider the mesenchymal progenitor theory of aging to describing the process of aging.

  16. Adult stem cell and mesenchymal progenitor theories of aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Ichiro eFukada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in medical science and technology allow people live longer lives, which results in age-related problems. Humans cannot avoid the various aged-related alterations of aging; in other words, humans cannot remain young at molecular and cellular levels. In 1956, Harman proposed the ‘free radical theory of aging’ to explain the molecular mechanisms of aging. Telomere length, advanced glycation, and accumulation of DNA or mitochondrial damage are also considered to be mechanisms of aging. On the other hand, stem cells are essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis by replacing parenchymal cells; therefore, the stem cell theory of aging is also used to explain the progress of aging. Importantly, the stem cell theory of aging is likely related to other theories. In addition, recent studies have started to reveal the essential roles of tissue-resident mesenchymal progenitors/stem cells/stromal cells in maintaining tissue homeostasis, and some evidence of their fundamental roles in the progression of aging has been presented. In this review, we discuss how stem cell and other theories connect to explain the progress of aging. In addition, we consider the mesenchymal progenitor theory of aging to describing the process of aging.

  17. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guihong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  18. Isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from equine umbilical cord blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen Preben D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no published studies on stem cells from equine cord blood although commercial storage of equine cord blood for future autologous stem cell transplantations is available. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been isolated from fresh umbilical cord blood of humans collected non-invasively at the time of birth and from sheep cord blood collected invasively by a surgical intrauterine approach. Mesenchymal stem cells isolation percentage from frozen-thawed human cord blood is low and the future isolation percentage of MSCs from cryopreserved equine cord blood is therefore expectedly low. The hypothesis of this study was that equine MSCs could be isolated from fresh whole equine cord blood. Results Cord blood was collected from 7 foals immediately after foaling. The mononuclear cell fraction was isolated by Ficoll density centrifugation and cultured in a DMEM low glucose based media at 38.5°C in humidified atmosphere containing 5% CO2. In 4 out of 7 samples colonies with MSC morphology were observed. Cellular morphology varied between monolayers of elongated spindle-shaped cells to layered cell clusters of cuboidal cells with shorter cytoplasmic extensions. Positive Alizarin Red and von Kossa staining as well as significant calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity confirmed osteogenesis. Histology and positive Safranin O staining of matrix glycosaminoglycans illustrated chondrogenesis. Oil Red O staining of lipid droplets confirmed adipogenesis. Conclusion We here report, for the first time, the isolation of mesenchymal-like stem cells from fresh equine cord blood and their differentiation into osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes. This novel isolation of equine cord blood MSCs and their preliminary in vitro differentiation positions the horse as the ideal pre-clinical animal model for proof-of-principle studies of cord blood derived MSCs.

  19. CD271+ Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Possible Infectious Niche for Leishmania infantum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Carolina S.; Daifalla, Nada; Das, Bikul; Dias da Silva, Valdo; Campos-Neto, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a serious and fatal disease. Therapeutic drugs are toxic and non-sterilizing. The etiological agents Leishmania infantum and Leishmania donovani cause active and asymptomatic diseases. Effective drugs to treat VL exist but unfortunately, post-treatment relapses are common. Little is known why drugs are non-sterilizing or how these intracellular pathogens can escape treatment. Here, using a murine model of VL we found that CD271+/Sca1+ bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are readily infected in vitro and in vivo by L. infantum. Because BM-MSCs express potent drug efflux pumps, e.g., ABCG2 it is possible that this unique intracellular infectious niche could allow L. infantum to escape anti-parasite drugs. PMID:27622907

  20. Bone regeneration with osteogenically enhanced mesenchymal stem cells and their extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Bret H; McCarley, Matthew R; Krause, Ulf; Zeitouni, Suzanne; Froese, Jeremiah J; McNeill, Eoin P; Chaput, Christopher D; Sampson, H Wayne; Gregory, Carl A

    2015-01-01

    Although bone has remarkable regenerative capacity, about 10% of long bone fractures and 25% to 40% of vertebral fusion procedures fail to heal. In such instances, a scaffold is employed to bridge the lesion and accommodate osteoprogenitors. Although synthetic bone scaffolds mimic some of the characteristics of bone matrix, their effectiveness can vary because of biological incompatibility. Herein, we demonstrate that a composite prepared with osteogenically enhanced mesenchymal stem cells (OEhMSCs) and their extracellular matrix (ECM) has an unprecedented capacity for the repair of critical-sized defects of murine femora. Furthermore, OEhMSCs do not cause lymphocyte activation, and ECM/OEhMSC composites retain their in vivo efficacy after cryopreservation. Finally, we show that attachment to the ECM by OEhMSCs stimulates the production of osteogenic and angiogenic factors. These data demonstrate that composites of OEhMSCs and their ECM could be utilized in the place of autologous bone graft for complex orthopedic reconstructions.

  1. Isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells from caprine umbilical cord tissue matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kuldeep; Agarwal, Pranjali; Das, Kinsuk; Mili, Bhabesh; Madhusoodan, A P; Kumar, Ajay; Bag, Sadhan

    2016-12-01

    Cord tissue fills the umbilical cord around the blood vessels and contains types of stem cells (mesenchymal stem cells or MSCs) that are not generally found in cord blood. MSCs are the stem cells that give rise to many of the "support tissues" in the body, including bone, cartilage, fat and muscle. Umbilical Cord Tissue cells (UCTs) possessing the capacity to differentiate into various cell types such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes have been previously isolated from different species including human, canine, murine, avian species etc. The present study documents the existence of similar multipotential stem cells in caprine UCTs having similar growth and morphological characteristics. The cells were isolated from caprine umbilical cord and cultivated in DMEM (low glucose) supplemented with 15% FBS, L-glutamine and antibiotics. Primary culture achieved confluence in 5-7days having spindle shaped morphology. The cells were morphologically homogeneous, showed robust proliferation ability with a population doubled time of 92.07h as well as normal karyotype. In vitro self-renewal capacity was demonstrated by colony-forming unit assay (CFU). The cells expressed MSC specific markers and showed multi-differentiation capability into adipogenic and osteogeneic. The results indicated that caprine UCTs (cUCTs) were isolated and characterized from umbilical cord tissue which can be used for tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of Epigenetics on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkul, Yusuf; Galderisi, Umberto

    2016-11-01

    Changes in epigenetic marks are known to be important regulatory factors in stem cell fate determination and differentiation. In the past years, the investigation of the epigenetic regulation of stem cell biology has largely focused on embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Contrarily, less is known about the epigenetic control of gene expression during differentiation of adult stem cells (AdSCs). Among AdSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the most investigated stem cell population because of their enormous potential for therapeutic applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In this review, we analyze the main studies addressing the epigenetic changes in MSC landscape during in vitro cultivation and replicative senescence, as well as follow osteocyte, chondrocyte, and adipocyte differentiation. In these studies, histone acetylation, DNA methylation, and miRNA expression are among the most investigated phenomena. We describe also epigenetic changes that are associated with in vitro MSC trans-differentiation. Although at the at initial stage, the epigenetics of MSCs promise to have profound implications for stem cell basic and applied research. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2393-2401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells as therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Juan; Yang, Rongbing; Biswas, Sangita; Qin, Xin; Zhang, Min; Deng, Wenbin

    2015-04-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS) and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells as Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS.

  5. Use of Rats Mesenchymal Stem Cells Modified with mHCN2 Gene to Create Biologic Pacemakers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马金; 张存泰; 黄深; 王国强; 全小庆

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of rats mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modified with murine hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated 2 (mHCN2) gene as biological pacemakers in vitro was studied. The cultured MSCs were transfected with pIRES2-EGFP plasmid carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene and mHCN2 gene. The identification using restriction enzyme and sequencing indicated that the mHCN2 gene was inserted to the pIRES2-EGFP. Green fluorescence could be seen in MSCs after transfection for 24-48...

  6. Strategies to improve homing of mesenchymal stem cells for greater efficacy in stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi-Meshkin, Hojjat; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza; Bidkhori, Hamid Reza; Mirahmadi, Mahdi; Ahmadiankia, Naghmeh

    2015-01-01

    Stem/progenitor cell-based therapeutic approach in clinical practice has been an elusive dream in medical sciences, and improvement of stem cell homing is one of major challenges in cell therapy programs. Stem/progenitor cells have a homing response to injured tissues/organs, mediated by interactions of chemokine receptors expressed on the cells and chemokines secreted by the injured tissue. For improvement of directed homing of the cells, many techniques have been developed either to engineer stem/progenitor cells with higher amount of chemokine receptors (stem cell-based strategies) or to modulate the target tissues to release higher level of the corresponding chemokines (target tissue-based strategies). This review discusses both of these strategies involved in the improvement of stem cell homing focusing on mesenchymal stem cells as most frequent studied model in cellular therapies.

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: a new era for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dah-Ching; Chang, Yu-Hsun; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Lin, Shinn-Zong

    2015-01-01

    The human umbilical cord is a promising source of mesenchymal stem cells (HUCMSCs). Unlike bone marrow stem cells, HUCMSCs have a painless collection procedure and faster self-renewal properties. Different derivation protocols may provide different amounts and populations of stem cells. Stem cell populations have also been reported in other compartments of the umbilical cord, such as the cord lining, perivascular tissue, and Wharton's jelly. HUCMSCs are noncontroversial sources compared to embryonic stem cells. They can differentiate into the three germ layers that promote tissue repair and modulate immune responses and anticancer properties. Thus, they are attractive autologous or allogenic agents for the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant solid and soft cancers. HUCMCs also can be the feeder layer for embryonic stem cells or other pluripotent stem cells. Regarding their therapeutic value, storage banking system and protocols should be established immediately. This review critically evaluates their therapeutic value, challenges, and future directions for their clinical applications.

  8. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Horsman, Michael Robert; Kassem, Moustapha

    2012-01-01

    . Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under......Background. Cancer stem cells are believed to be more radiation resistant than differentiated tumour cells of the same origin. It is not known, however, whether normal nontransformed adult stem cells share the same radioresistance as their cancerous counterpart. Material and methods...... are involved in apoptosis evasion while the genes TIMP3, MMP1 and LOX are involved in regulation of the surrounding matrix. The first group may contribute to the difference in radiation resistance observed and the latter could be a major contributor to the tumourigenic capabilities by degrading...

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell subpopulations: phenotype, property and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Miaohua; Wang, Shan; Zhou, Ying; Li, Hong; Wu, Yaojiong

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are capable of differentiating into cells of multiple cell lineages and have potent paracrine effects. Due to their easy preparation and low immunogenicity, MSC have emerged as an extremely promising therapeutic agent in regenerative medicine for diverse diseases. However, MSC are heterogeneous with respect to phenotype and function in current isolation and cultivation regimes, which often lead to incomparable experimental results. In addition, there may be specific stem cell subpopulations with definite differentiation capacity toward certain lineages in addition to stem cells with multi-differentiation potential. Recent studies have identified several subsets of MSC which exhibit distinct features and biological activities, and enhanced therapeutic potentials for certain diseases. In this review, we give an overview of these subsets for their phenotypic, biological and functional properties.

  10. Recent Advances in Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds Containing Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Michel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern day tissue engineering and cellular therapies have gravitated toward using stem cells with scaffolds as a dynamic modality to aid in differentiation and tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are one of the most studied stem cells used in combination with scaffolds. These cells differentiate along the osteogenic lineage when seeded on hydroxyapatite containing scaffolds and can be used as a therapeutic option to regenerate various tissues. In recent years, the combination of hydroxyapatite and natural or synthetic polymers has been studied extensively. Due to the interest in these scaffolds, this review will cover the wide range of hydroxyapatite containing scaffolds used with MSCs for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Further, in order to maintain a progressive scope of the field this review article will only focus on literature utilizing adult human derived MSCs (hMSCs published in the last three years.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    are among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Several studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSC in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues...... and organs in tissue engineering protocols. Before their widespread use in therapy, methods allowing the generation of large number of cells without affecting their differentiation potential as well as technologies that overcome immunological rejection (in case allogenic transplantation) must be developed.......Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are clonogenic, non-hematpoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages, for example, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages, for example, neuronal...

  12. bFGF promotes adipocyte differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells derived from embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xinghui Song; Yanwei Li; Xiao Chen; Guoli Yin; Qiong Huang; Yingying Chen; Guowei Xu; Linlin Wang

    2014-01-01

    In this work we describe the establishment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and the role of bFGF in adipocyte differentiation. The totipotency of ESCs and MSCs was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and RT-PCR of totipotency factors. MSCs were successfully used to induce osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. MSCs that differentiated into adipocytes were stimulated with and without bFGF. The OD/DNA (optical density/content of total DNA) and exp...

  13. Characterization of adipocyte differentiation from human mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hai-Yan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipocyte hyperplasia is associated with obesity and arises due to adipogenic differentiation of resident multipotent stem cells in the vascular stroma of adipose tissue and remote stem cells of other organs. The mechanistic characterization of adipocyte differentiation has been researched in murine pre-adipocyte models (i.e. 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A, revealing that growth-arrest pre-adipocytes undergo mitotic clonal expansion and that regulation of the differentiation process relies on the sequential expression of three key transcription factors (C/EBPβ, C/EBPα and PPARγ. However, the mechanisms underlying adipocyte differentiation from multipotent stem cells, particularly human mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs, remain poorly understood. This study investigated cell cycle regulation and the roles of C/EBPβ, C/EBPα and PPARγ during adipocyte differentiation from hBMSCs. Results Utilising a BrdU incorporation assay and manual cell counting it was demonstrated that induction of adipocyte differentiation in culture resulted in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes but not hBMSCs undergoing mitotic clonal expansion. Knock-down and over-expression assays revealed that C/EBPβ, C/EBPα and PPARγ were required for adipocyte differentiation from hBMSCs. C/EBPβ and C/EBPα individually induced adipocyte differentiation in the presence of inducers; PPARγ alone initiated adipocyte differentiation but the cells failed to differentiate fully. Therefore, the roles of these transcription factors during human adipocyte differentiation are different from their respective roles in mouse. Conclusions The characteristics of hBMSCs during adipogenic differentiation are different from those of murine cells. These findings could be important in elucidating the mechanisms underlying human obesity further.

  14. Evaluating the Expression of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Markers in Human Hair Follicle Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Behvarz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells that replace dead or injured cells. There are adult stem cells in some regions of human tissues and hair follicle is one of the tissues that have adult stem cell source and these cells have an important role in hair life cycle. In this study, we investigated the isolation of hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs and expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers on the isolated cells.   Methods : Human hair follicles obtained from men scalp tissue by micro punch technique. Hair follicles isolated and cultured in culture flasks in DMEM-F12 + FBS. After outgrowth of stem cells from hair bulges, they analyzed by flow cytometry for detection of stem cell markers.  Results: 23 to 27 days after isolation and culture of HFSCs in uncoated cell culture flasks, cell surface markers expression studied by flow cytometry. Flow cytometric analysis showed 25.26% Stro-1, 50.85% CD90, 45.24% CD105, 61.20% CD44, 8.20% CD45, 11.86% CD146, 2.72% CD106, 7.21% CD166 and 26.74% CD19 expression in HFSCs.   Conclusion: In this study, isolated stem cells significantly expressed some of the mesenchymal stem cell markers higher than other markers. These markers give certain characteristics to HFSCs, and introduce the cells as an alternative option for cell therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

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  18. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem

    2012-01-01

    stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...

  19. Sarcoma derived from cultured mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolar, Jakub; Nauta, Alma J; Osborn, Mark J; Panoskaltsis Mortari, Angela; McElmurry, Ron T; Bell, Scott; Xia, Lily; Zhou, Ning; Riddle, Megan; Schroeder, Tania M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; McIvor, R Scott; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Szuhai, Karoly; Oseth, Leann; Hirsch, Betsy; Yant, Stephen R; Kay, Mark A; Peister, Alexandra; Prockop, Darwin J; Fibbe, Willem E; Blazar, Bruce R

    2007-02-01

    To study the biodistribution of MSCs, we labeled adult murine C57BL/6 MSCs with firefly luciferase and DsRed2 fluorescent protein using nonviral Sleeping Beauty transposons and coinfused labeled MSCs with bone marrow into irradiated allogeneic recipients. Using in vivo whole-body imaging, luciferase signals were shown to be increased between weeks 3 and 12. Unexpectedly, some mice with the highest luciferase signals died and all surviving mice developed foci of sarcoma in their lungs. Two mice also developed sarcomas in their extremities. Common cytogenetic abnormalities were identified in tumor cells isolated from different animals. Original MSC cultures not labeled with transposons, as well as independently isolated cultured MSCs, were found to be cytogenetically abnormal. Moreover, primary MSCs derived from the bone marrow of both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice showed cytogenetic aberrations after several passages in vitro, showing that transformation was not a strain-specific nor rare event. Clonal evolution was observed in vivo, suggesting that the critical transformation event(s) occurred before infusion. Mapping of the transposition insertion sites did not identify an obvious transposon-related genetic abnormality, and p53 was not overexpressed. Infusion of MSC-derived sarcoma cells resulted in malignant lesions in secondary recipients. This new sarcoma cell line, S1, is unique in having a cytogenetic profile similar to human sarcoma and contains bioluminescent and fluorescent genes, making it useful for investigations of cellular biodistribution and tumor response to therapy in vivo. More importantly, our study indicates that sarcoma can evolve from MSC cultures.

  20. Parkinson's Disease and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Potential for Cell-Based Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Masaaki Kitada; Mari Dezawa

    2012-01-01

    Cell transplantation is a strategy with great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, and many types of stem cells, including neural stem cells and embryonic stem cells, are considered candidates for transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells are a great therapeutic cell source because they are easy accessible and can be expanded from patients or donor mesenchymal tissues without posing serious ethical and technical problems. They have trophic effects for protecting damaged t...

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells and neuroregeneration in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavaski-Joksimovic, Aleksandra; Bohn, Martha C

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a progressive and extensive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and their terminals in the striatum, which results in debilitating movement disorders. This devastating disease affects over 1 million individuals in the United States and is increasing in incidence worldwide. Currently available pharmacological and surgical therapies ameliorate clinical symptoms in the early stages of disease, but they cannot stop or reverse degeneration of DA neurons. Stem cell therapies have come to the forefront of the PD research field as promising regenerative therapies. The majority of preclinical stem cell studies in experimental models of PD are focused on the idea that stem cell-derived DA neurons could be developed for replacement of diseased neurons. Alternatively, our studies and the studies from other groups suggest that stem cells also have the potential to protect and stimulate regeneration of compromised DA neurons. This review is focused on strategies based on the therapeutic potential for PD of the neurotrophic and neuroregenerative properties of a subclass of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids under microgravity conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerwinka Wolfgang H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To develop and characterize a novel cell culture method for the generation of undifferentiated and differentiated human mesenchymal stem cell 3D structures, we utilized the RWV system with a gelatin-based scaffold. 3 × 106 cells generated homogeneous spheroids and maximum spheroid loading was accomplished after 3 days of culture. Spheroids cultured in undifferentiated spheroids of 3 and 10 days retained expression of CD44, without expression of differentiation markers. Spheroids cultured in adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation media exhibited oil red O staining and von Kossa staining, respectively. Further characterization of osteogenic lineage, showed that 10 day spheroids exhibited stronger calcification than any other experimental group corresponding with significant expression of vitamin D receptor, alkaline phosphatase, and ERp60 . In conclusion this study describes a novel RWV culture method that allowed efficacious engineering of undifferentiated human mesenchymal stem cell spheroids and rapid osteogenic differentiation. The use of gelatin scaffolds holds promise to design implantable stem cell tissue of various sizes and shapes for future regenerative treatment.

  3. Molecular and environmental cues in cardiac differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramkisoensing, Arti Anushka

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis molecular and environmental cues in cardiac differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. The main conclusions were that the cardiac differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells negatively correlates with donor age. This in its own shows a negative relation

  4. Transplantation of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cell-induced neural stem cells to treat spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Li; Wei Zhao; Wei Liu; Ye Zhou; Jingqiao Jia; Lifeng Yang

    2014-01-01

    Because of their strong proliferative capacity and multi-potency, placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells have gained interest as a cell source in the ifeld of nerve damage repair. In the present study, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells were induced to differentiate into neural stem cells, which were then transplanted into the spinal cord after local spinal cord injury in rats. The motor functional recovery and pathological changes in the injured spinal cord were observed for 3 successive weeks. The results showed that human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into neuron-like cells and that induced neural stem cells contribute to the resto-ration of injured spinal cord without causing transplant rejection. Thus, these cells promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions in a rat model of spinal cord injury. Therefore, human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells may be useful as seed cells during the repair of spinal cord injury.

  5. Expression of the Argonaute protein PiwiL2 and piRNAs in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiuling; Ma, Qi; Shehadeh, Lina A.; Wilson, Amber; Xia, Linghui; Yu, Hong [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Vascular Biology Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States); Webster, Keith A., E-mail: kwebster@med.miami.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Vascular Biology Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136 (United States)

    2010-06-11

    Piwi (P-element-induced wimpy testis) first discovered in Drosophila is a member of the Argonaute family of micro-RNA binding proteins with essential roles in germ-cell development. The murine homologue of PiwiL2, also known as Mili is selectively expressed in the testes, and mice bearing targeted mutations of the PiwiL2 gene are male-sterile. PiwiL2 proteins are thought to protect the germ line genome by suppressing retrotransposons, stabilizing heterochromatin structure, and regulating target genes during meiosis and mitosis. Here, we report that PiwiL2 and associated piRNAs (piRs) may play similar roles in adult mouse mesenchymal stem cells. We found that PiwiL2 is expressed in the cytoplasm of metaphase mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow of adult and aged mice. Knockdown of PiwiL2 with a specific siRNA enhanced cell proliferation, significantly increased the number of cells in G1/S and G2/M cell cycle phases and was associated with increased expression of cell cycle genes CCND1, CDK8, microtubule regulation genes, and decreased expression of tumor suppressors Cables 1, LATS, and Cxxc4. The results suggest broader roles for Piwi in genome surveillance beyond the germ line and a possible role in regulating the cell cycle of mesenchymal stem cells.

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  17. MET: roles in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stemness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hye-Min

    2017-01-01

    In a number of cancers, deregulated MET pathway leads to aberrantly activated proliferative and invasive signaling programs that promote malignant transformation, cell motility and migration, angiogenesis, survival in hypoxia, and invasion. A better understanding of oncogenic MET signaling will help us to discover effective therapeutic approaches and to identify which tumors are likely to respond to MET-targeted cancer therapy. In this review, we will summarize the roles of MET signaling in cancer, with particular focus on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stemness. Then, we will provide update on MET targeting agents and discuss the challenges that should be overcome for the development of an effective therapy. PMID:28164090

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as skeletal therapeutics-an update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, H.; Ahsan, M.; Saleem, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells hold the promise to treat not only several congenital and acquired bone degenerative diseases but also to repair and regenerate morbid bone tissues. Utilizing MSCs, several lines of evidences advocate promising clinical outcomes in skeletal diseases and skeletal tissue repair....../regeneration. In this context, both, autologous and allogeneic cell transfer options have been utilized. Studies suggest that MSCs are transplanted either alone by mixing with autogenous plasma/serum or by loading onto repair/induction supportive resorb-able scaffolds. Thus, this review is aimed at highlighting a wide range...

  19. Embryonic stem cells conditioned medium enhances Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells expansion under hypoxic condition

    OpenAIRE

    Prasajak, Patcharee; Rattananinsruang, Piyaporn; Chotinantakul, Kamonnaree; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are accepted as a promising tool for therapeutic purposes. However, low proliferation and early senescence are still main obstacles of MSCs expansion for using as cell-based therapy. Thus, clinical scale of cell expansion is needed to obtain a large number of cells serving for further applications. In this study, we investigated the value of embryonic stem cells conditioned medium (ESCM) for in vitro expansion of Wharton’s jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ...

  20. Chitosan-collagen porous scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we successfully constructed a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffold in vitro, transplanted either the composite or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells alone into the ischemic area in animal models, and compared their effects. At 14 days after co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the hitosan-collagen scaffold, neurological function recovered noticeably. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and nestin-labeled neural precursor cells were detected in the ischemic area, surrounding tissue, hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Simultaneously, a high level of expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and a low level of expression of neuron-specific enolase were visible in BrdU-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These findings suggest that transplantation of a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffold has a neuroprotective effect following ischemic stroke.

  1. Chitosan-collagen porous scaffold and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Yan; Wei Yue; Yue-lin Zhang; Guo-chao Mao; Ke Gao; Zhen-xing Zuo; Ya-jing Zhang; Hui Lu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we successfully constructed a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chitosan-collagen scaffoldin vitro, transplanted either the composite or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells alone into the ischemic area in animal models, and compared their effects. At 14 days after co-transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and the hi-tosan-collagen scaffold, neurological function recovered noticeably. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression and nestin-labeled neural precursor cells were detected in the ischemic area, surrounding tissue, hippocampal dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Simultaneously, a high level of expression of glial ifbrillary acidic protein and a low level of expression of neuron-spe-ciifc enolase were visible in BrdU-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. These ifndings suggest that transplantation of a composite of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and a chi-tosan-collagen scaffold has a neuroprotective effect following ischemic stroke.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of mesenchymal stem cells in living mice via silica-coated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokerst, Jesse V.; Thangaraj, Mridhula; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging is crucial for stem cell therapy to monitor the location(s), numbers, and state of the implanted cells. Real-time imaging in particular can ensure proper cell delivery for best engraftment. However, established imaging tools such as MRI are limited by their temporal resolution for guidance during delivery. In contrast, photoacoustic imaging is ideally suited for real time, image-guided therapy. Here, we use silica-coated gold nanorods as photoacoustic contrast agents and deploy them to image and quantitate mesenchymal stem cells during implant into the muscle tissue of live mice. Silica-coated gold nanorods (SiGNRs) were created with standard methods and loaded into mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) without transfection agents. There was no significant (pcytokines should only minor upregulation of inflammatory markers including interleukin-6. We used electron microscopy to illustrate vacuole-bound SiGNRs inside the cells. This cell staining increased photoacoustic signal 175% relative to MSCs without contrast agent—the silica coat itself increased signal 55% relative to uncoated GNRs. Using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, we found that there were 100,000 SiGNRs per MSC. This value was 5-fold higher than a MSC population stained with GNRs in the absence of silica coat. After labeling, cells were washed and injected into murine muscle tissue to simulate a muscular dystrophy patient. Mice (N=5) treated with these SiGNRlabeled MSCs exhibited no adverse events and implants up to 5 mm deep were easily visualized. The in vivo detection limit was 90,000 cells in a 100 uL bolus in mouse thigh muscle. Here, the B-mode signal is useful for orienting the treatment area and visualizing the delivery catheter while the photoacoustic mode offers cell-specific content. The photoacoustic signal was validated with histology a long-term fluorescent tracking dye after MSC transplant.

  3. Intra-arterial delivery of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuyoshi Watanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While treatments have been developed to combat stroke, such as intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator and endovascular recanalization therapies, their ability to decrease the long-term disability that accompanies stroke is limited. Currently, stem cell research focused on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs. MSCs are multipotent, nonhematopoietic stem cells found in the stromal fraction of the bone marrow, along with the connective tissue of most organs. MSCs are an increasingly appealing cell source due to the relative ease in which they can be retrieved, developed, and handled in vitro. Despite the fact that numerous paths of stem cell transport to the brain in acute ischemic stroke (AIS exist, the intra-arterial (IA route of stem cell transport is most attractive. This is due to its great potential for clinical translation, especially considering the growing clinical application of endovascular treatment for AIS. Here, we evaluate research examining IA delivery of MSCs to the stroke region. The results of the study revealed the maximum tolerated dose and that the optimal time for administration was 24 h, following cerebral ischemia. It is important that future translational studies are performed to establish IA administration of MSCs as a widely used treatment for AIS.

  4. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volponi, A A; Gentleman, E; Fatscher, R; Pang, Y W Y; Gentleman, M M; Sharpe, P T

    2015-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy in Diabetes Mellitus: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa El-Badri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with significant morbidity and mortality due to cardiovascular, nervous, and renal complications. Attempts to cure diabetes mellitus using islet transplantation have been successful in providing a source for insulin secreting cells. However, limited donors, graft rejection, the need for continued immune suppression, and exhaustion of the donor cell pool prompted the search for a more sustained source of insulin secreting cells. Stem cell therapy is a promising alternative for islet transplantation in type 2 diabetic patients who fail to control hyperglycemia even with insulin injection. Autologous stem cell transplantation may provide the best outcome for those patients, since autologous cells are readily available and do not entail prolonged hospital stays or sustained immunotoxic therapy. Among autologous adult stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs therapy has been applied with varying degrees of success in both animal models and in clinical trials. This review will focus on the advantages of MSCs over other types of stem cells and the possible mechanisms by which MSCs transplant restores normoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients. Sources of MSCs including autologous cells from diabetic patients and the use of various differentiation protocols in relation to best transplant outcome will be discussed.

  6. Equal modulation of endothelial cell function by four distinct tissue-specific mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Zhou, Bin; Pu, William T; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate multiple end-stage mesenchymal cell types and constitute a promising population of cells for regenerative therapies. Additionally, there is increasing evidence supporting other trophic activities of MSCs, including the ability to enable formation of vasculature in vivo. Although MSCs were originally isolated from the bone marrow, the presence of these cells in the stromal vascular fraction of multiple adult tissues has been recently recognized. However, it is unknown whether the capacity to modulate vasculogenesis is ubiquitous to all MSCs regardless of their tissue of origin. Here, we demonstrated that tissue-resident MSCs isolated from four distinct tissues have equal capacity to modulate endothelial cell function, including formation of vascular networks in vivo. MSCs were isolated from four murine tissues, including bone marrow, white adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and myocardium. In culture, all four MSC populations secreted a plethora of pro-angiogenic factors that unequivocally induced proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). In vivo, co-implantation of MSCs with ECFCs into mice generated an extensive network of blood vessels with ECFCs specifically lining the lumens and MSCs occupying perivascular positions. Importantly, there were no differences among all four MSCs evaluated. Our studies suggest that the capacity to modulate the formation of vasculature is a ubiquitous property of all MSCs, irrespective of their original anatomical location. These results validate multiple tissues as potential sources of MSCs for future cell-based vascular therapies.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Nano-Bioceramics for Bone Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankilic, Berna; Köse, Sevil; Korkusuz, Petek; Timuçin, Muharrem; Korkusuz, Feza

    Orthopedic disorders and trauma usually result in bone loss. Bone grafts are widely used to replace this tissue. Bone grafts excluding autografts unfortunately have disadvantages like evoking immune response, contamination and rejection. Autografts are of limited sources and optimum biomaterials that can replace bone have been searched for several decades. Bioceramics, which have the similar inorganic structure of natural bone, are widely used to regenerate bone or coat metallic implants. As people continuously look for a higher life quality, there are developments in technology almost everyday to meet their expectations. Nanotechnology is one of such technologies and it attracts everyone's attention in biomaterial science. Nano scale biomaterials have many advantages like larger surface area and higher biocompatibility and these properties make them more preferable than micro scale. Also, stem cells are used for bone regeneration besides nano-bioceramics due to their differentiation characteristics. This review covers current research on nano-bioceramics and mesenchymal stem cells and their role in bone regeneration.

  8. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells and chronic renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Sales, Elizabeth B; Boim, Mirian A

    2016-01-01

    Renal artery stenosis is the main cause of renovascular hypertension and results in ischemic nephropathy characterized by inflammation, oxidative stress, microvascular loss, and fibrosis with consequent functional failure. Considering the limited number of strategies that effectively control renovascular hypertension and restore renal function, we propose that cell therapy may be a promising option based on the regenerative and immunosuppressive properties of stem cells. This review addresses the effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in an experimental animal model of renovascular hypertension known as 2 kidney-1 clip (2K-1C). Significant benefits of MSC treatment have been observed on blood pressure and renal structure of the stenotic kidney. The mechanisms involved are discussed.

  10. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  11. Energy Metabolism in Mesenchymal Stem Cells During Osteogenic Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Laura C.; White, Noelle S.; Mills, Bradley N.; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging interest in stem cell energy metabolism and its effect on differentiation. Bioenergetic changes in differentiating bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are poorly understood and were the focus of our study. Using bioenergetic profiling and transcriptomics, we have established that MSCs activate the mitochondrial process of oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) during osteogenic differentiation, but they maintain levels of glycolysis similar to undifferentiated cells. Consistent with their glycolytic phenotype, undifferentiated MSCs have high levels of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Osteogenically induced MSCs downregulate HIF-1 and this downregulation is required for activation of OxPhos. In summary, our work provides important insights on MSC bioenergetics and proposes a HIF-based mechanism of regulation of mitochondrial OxPhos in MSCs. PMID:26487485

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells: a new trend for cell therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin WEI; Xue YANG; Zhi-peng HAN; Fang-fang QU; Li SHAO; Yu-fang SHI

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs),the major stem cells for cell therapy,have been used in the clinic for approximately 10 years.From animal models to clinical trials,MSCs have afforded promise in the treatment of numerous diseases,mainly tissue injury and immune disorders.In this review,we summarize the recent opinions on methods,timing and cell sources for MSC administration in clinical applications,and provide an overview of mechanisms that are significant in MSC-mediated therapies.Although MSCs for cell therapy have been shown to be safe and effective,there are still challenges that need to be tackled before their wide application in the clinic.

  13. Bone-Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Organ Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are prototypical adult stem cells with the capacity for self-renewal and differentiation with a broad tissue distribution. MSCs not only differentiate into types of cells of mesodermal lineage but also into endodermal and ectodermal lineages such as bone, fat, cartilage and cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, lung epithelial cells, hepatocytes, neurons, and pancreatic islets. MSCs have been identified as an adherent, fibroblast-like population and can be isolated from different adult tissues, including bone marrow (BM, umbilical cord, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. MSCs secrete factors, including IL-6, M-CSF, IL-10, HGF, and PGE2, that promote tissue repair, stimulate proliferation and differentiation of endogenous tissue progenitors, and decrease inflammatory and immune reactions. In this paper, we focus on the role of BM-derived MSCs in organ repair.

  14. Cellular Reparative Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Retinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suet Lee Shirley Ding

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been reported as promising for the treatment of numerous degenerative disorders including the eye. In retinal degenerative diseases, MSCs exhibit the potential to regenerate into retinal neurons and retinal pigmented epithelial cells in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Delivery of MSCs was found to improve retinal morphology and function and delay retinal degeneration. In this review, we revisit the therapeutic role of MSCs in the diseased eye. Furthermore, we reveal the possible cellular mechanisms and identify the associated signaling pathways of MSCs in reversing the pathological conditions of various ocular disorders such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD, retinitis pigmentosa, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Current stem cell treatment can be dispensed as an independent cell treatment format or with the combination of other approaches. Hence, the improvement of the treatment strategy is largely subjected by our understanding of MSCs mechanism of action.

  15. Hepatogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raquel Taléns-Visconti; Ana Bonora; Ramiro Jover; Vicente Mirabet; Francisco Carbonell; José Vicente Castell; María José Gómez-Lechón

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and compare the hepatogenic transdifferentiation of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSC) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) in vitro. Transdifferentiation of BMSC into hepatic cells in vivo has been described. Adipose tissue represents an accessible source of ADSC, with similar characteristics to BMSC.METHODS: BMSCs were obtained from patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty and ADSC from human adipose tissue obtained from lipectomy. Cells were grown in medium containing 15% human serum. Cultures were serum deprived for 2 d before cultivating under similar pro-hepatogenic conditions to those of liver development using a 2-step protocol with sequential addition of growth factors, cytokines and hormones. Hepatic differentiation was RT-PCR-assessed and liver-marker genes were immunohistochemically analysed.RESULTS: BMSC and ADSC exhibited a fibroblastic morphology that changed to a polygonal shape when cells differentiated. Expression of stem cell marker Thy1 decreased in differentiated ADSC and BMSC. However, the expression of the hepatic markers, albumin and CYPs increased to a similar extent in differentiated BMSC and ADSC. Hepatic gene activation could be attributed to increased liver-enriched transcription factors (C/EBPβ and HNF4α), as demonstrated by adenoviral expression vectors.CONCLUSION: Mesenchymal stem cells can be induced to hepatogenic transdifferentiation in vitro. ADSCs have a similar hepatogenic differentiation potential to BMSC,but a longer culture period and higher proliferation capacity. Therefore, adipose tissue may be an ideal source of large amounts of autologous stem cells, and may become an alternative for hepatocyte regeneration, liver cell transplantation or preclinical drug testing.

  16. Interfacing Sca-1pos Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Biocompatible Scaffolds with Different Chemical Composition and Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Forte

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An immortalized murine mesenchymal stem cell line (mTERT-MSC enriched for Linneg/Sca-1pos fraction has been obtained through the transfection of MSC with murine TERT and single-cell isolation. Such cell line maintained the typical MSC self-renewal capacity and continuously expressed MSC phenotype. Moreover, mTERT-MSC retained the functional features of freshly isolated MSC in culture without evidence of senescence or spontaneous differentiation events. Thus, mTERT-MSC have been cultured onto PLA films, 30 and 100 μm PLA microbeads, and onto unpressed and pressed HYAFF-11 scaffolds. While the cells adhered preserving their morphology on PLA films, clusters of mTERT-MSC were detected on PLA beads and unpressed fibrous scaffolds. Finally, mTERT-MSC were not able to colonize the inner layers of pressed HYAFF-11. Nevertheless, such cell line displayed the ability to preserve Sca-1 expression and to retain multilineage potential when appropriately stimulated on all the scaffolds tested.

  17. p53 regulates the proliferation, differentiation and spontaneous transformation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armesilla-Diaz, Alejandro, E-mail: aarmesilla@cib.csic.es [Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiopathology, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu, 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Elvira, Gema; Silva, Augusto [Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiopathology, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu, 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been extensively studied and gained wide popularity due to their therapeutic potential. Spontaneous transformation of MSC, from both human and murine origin, has been reported in many studies. MSC transformation depends on the culture conditions, the origin of the cells and the time on culture; however, the precise biological characteristics involved in this process have not been fully defined yet. In this study, we investigated the role of p53 in the biology and transformation of murine bone marrow (BM)-derived MSC. We demonstrate that the MSC derived from p53KO mice showed an augmented proliferation rate, a shorter doubling time and also morphologic and phenotypic changes, as compared to MSC derived from wild-type animals. Furthermore, the MSC devoid of p53 had an increased number of cells able to generate colonies. In addition, not only proliferation but also MSC differentiation is controlled by p53 since its absence modifies the speed of the process. Moreover, genomic instability, changes in the expression of c-myc and anchorage independent growth were also observed in p53KO MSC. In addition, the absence of p53 implicates the spontaneous transformation of MSC in long-term cultures. Our results reveal that p53 plays a central role in the biology of MSC.

  18. A nanofibrous electrospun patch to maintain human mesenchymal cell stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfi, L; Furman, N Toledano; Wang, Xin; Lupo, C; Martinez, J O; Mohamed, M; Taraballi, F; Tasciotti, E

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been extensively investigated in regenerative medicine because of their crucial role in tissue healing. For these properties, they are widely tested in clinical trials, usually injected in cell suspension or in combination with tridimensional scaffolds. However, scaffolds can largely affect the fates of MSCs, inducing a progressive loss of functionality overtime. The ideal scaffold must delay MSCs differentiation until paracrine signals from the host induce their change. Herein, we proposed a nanostructured electrospun gelatin patch as an appropriate environment where human MSCs (hMSCs) can adhere, proliferate, and maintain their stemness. This patch exhibited characteristics of a non-linear elastic material and withstood degradation up to 4 weeks. As compared to culture and expansion in 2D, hMSCs on the patch showed a similar degree of proliferation and better maintained their progenitor properties, as assessed by their superior differentiation capacity towards typical mesenchymal lineages (i.e. osteogenic and chondrogenic). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis and longitudinal non-invasive imaging of inflammatory response revealed no sign of foreign body reaction for 3 weeks. In summary, our results demonstrated that our biocompatible patch favored the maintenance of undifferentiated hMSCs for up to 21 days and is an ideal candidate for tridimensional delivery of hMSCs. The present work reports a nanostructured patch gelatin-based able to maintain in vitro hMSCs stemness features. Moreover, hMSCs were able to differentiate toward osteo- and chondrogenic lineages once induces by differentiative media, confirming the ability of this patch to support stem cells for a potential in vivo application. These attractive properties together with the low inflammatory response in vivo make this patch a promising platform in regenerative medicine.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for cutaneous radiation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Sadanori; Akino, Kozo; Hirano, Akiyoshi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2010-06-01

    Systemic and local radiation injuries caused by nuclear power reactor accidents, therapeutic irradiation, or nuclear terrorism should be prevented or properly treated in order to improve wound management and save lives. Currently, regenerative surgical modalities should be attempted with temporal artificial dermis impregnated and sprayed with a local angiogenic factor such as basic fibroblast growth factor, and secondary reconstruction can be a candidate for demarcation and saving the donor morbidity. Human mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells, together with angiogenic and mitogenic factor of basic fibroblast growth factor and an artificial dermis, were applied over the excised irradiated skin defect and were tested for differentiation and local stimulation effects in the radiation-exposed wounds. The perforator flap and artificial dermal template with growth factor were successful for reconstruction in patients who were suffering from complex underlying disease. Patients were uneventfully treated with minimal morbidities. In the experiments, the hMSCs are strongly proliferative even after 20 Gy irradiation in vitro. In vivo, 4 Gy rat whole body irradiation demonstrated that sustained marrow stromal (mesenchymal stem) cells survived in the bone marrow. Immediate artificial dermis application impregnated with cells and the cytokine over the 20 Gy irradiated skin and soft tissues demonstrated the significantly improved fat angiogenesis, architected dermal reconstitution, and less inflammatory epidermal recovery. Detailed understanding of underlying diseases and rational reconstructive procedures brings about good outcomes for difficult irradiated wound healing. Adipose-derived stem cells are also implicated in the limited local injuries for short cell harvesting and processing time in the same subject.

  20. Implications of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminekoo, Saber; Movassaghpour, Aliakbar; Rahimzadeh, Amirbahman; Talebi, Mehdi; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a population of multipotent progenitors which reside in bone marrow, fat, and some other tissues and can be isolated from various adult and fetal tissues. Self-renewal potential and multipotency are MSC's hallmarks. They have the capacity of proliferation and differentiation into a variety of cell lineages like osteoblasts, condrocytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, cardiomyocytes. MSCs can be identified by expression of some surface molecules like CD73, CD90, CD105, and lack of hematopoietic specific markers including CD34, CD45, and HLA-DR. They are hopeful tools for regenerative medicine for repairing injured tissues. Many studies have focused on two significant features of MSC therapy: (I) systemically administered MSCs home to sites of ischemia or injury, and (II) MSCs can modulate T-cell-mediated immunological responses. MSCs express chemokine receptors and ligands involved in cells migration and homing process. MSCs induce immunomedulatory effects on the innate (dendritic cells, monocyte, natural killer cells, and neutrophils) and the adaptive immune system cells (T helper-1, cytotoxic T lymphocyte, and B lymphocyte) by secreting soluble factors like TGF-β, IL-10, IDO, PGE-2, sHLA-G5, or by cell-cell interaction. In this review, we discuss the main applications of mesenchymal stem in Regenerative Medicine and known mechanisms of homing and Immunomodulation of MSCs.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells: Emerging mechanisms of immunomodulation and therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Justin; D; Glenn; Katharine; A; Whartenby

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) are a pleiotropic population of cells that are self-renewing and capable of differentiating into canonical cells of the mesenchyme, including adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They employ multi-faceted approaches to maintain bone marrow niche homeostasis and promote wound healing during injury. Biomedical research has long sought to exploit their pleiotropic properties as a basis for cell therapy for a variety of diseases and to facilitate hematopoietic stem cell establishment and stromal reconstruction in bone marrow transplantation. Early results demonstrated their usage as safe, and there was little host response to these cells. The discovery of their immunosuppressive functions ushered in a new interest in MSCs as a promising therapeutic tool to suppress inflammation and down-regulate pathogenic immune responses in graft-versus-host and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, autoimmune diabetes, and rheumatoid arthritis. MSCs produce a large number of soluble and membrane-bound factors, some of which inhibit immune responses. However, the full range of MSC-mediated immune-modulation remains incompletely understood, as emerging reports also reveal that MSCs can adopt an immunogenic phenotype, stimulate immune cells, and yield seemingly contradictory results in experimental animal models of inflammatory disease. The present review describes the large body of literature that has been accumulated on the fascinating biology of MSCs and their complex effects on immune responses.

  2. Development of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell culture in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; PENG Li-pan; WU Nan; LI Le-ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the in vitro development of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells culture (BM-MSC).Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed.The search terms were “bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell" and "cell culture".Study selection Articles regarding the in vitro development of BM-MSCs culture,as well as the challenge of optimizing cell culture environment in two-dimensional (2D) vs.3D.Results Improving the culture conditions increases the proliferation and reduces the differentiation.Optimal values for many culture parameters remain to be identified.Expansion of BM-MSCs under defined conditions remains challenging,including the development of optimal culture conditions for BMSC and large-volume production systems.Conclusions Expansion of BM-MSCs under defined conditions remains challenges,including the development of optimal culture conditions for BMSC and scale-up to large-volume production systems.Optimal values for many culture parameters remain to be identified.

  3. Induction of mesenchymal stem cell chondrogenesis by polyacrylate substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon-Alty, Laurence; Williams, Rachel; Dixon, Simon; Murray, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can generate chondrocytes in vitro, but typically need to be cultured as aggregates in the presence of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), which makes scale-up difficult. Here we investigated if polyacrylate substrates modelled on the functional group composition and distribution of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin-binding site could induce MSCs to undergo chondrogenesis in the absence of exogenous TGF-β. Within a few days of culture on the biomimetic polyacrylates, both mouse and human MSCs, and a mesenchymal-like mouse-kidney-derived stem cell line, began to form multi-layered aggregates and started to express the chondrocyte-specific markers, Sox9, collagen II and aggrecan. Moreover, collagen II tended to be expressed in the centre of the aggregates, similarly to developing limb buds in vivo. Surface analysis of the substrates indicated that those with the highest surface amine content were most effective at promoting MSC chondrogenesis. These results highlight the importance of surface group functionality and the distribution of those groups in the design of substrates to induce MSC chondrogenesis.

  4. Current Perspectives in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapies for Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldur Kristjánsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a degenerative joint disease most commonly occurring in the ageing population. It is a slow progressive condition resulting in the destruction of hyaline cartilage followed by pain and reduced activity. Conventional treatments have little effects on the progression of the condition often leaving surgery as the last option. In the last 10 years tissue engineering utilising mesenchymal stem cells has been emerging as an alternative method for treating OA. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent progenitor cells found in various tissues, most commonly bone marrow and adipose tissue. MSCs are capable of differentiating into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Autologous MSCs can be easily harvested and applied in treatment, but allogenic cells can also be employed. The early uses of MSCs focused on the implantations of cell rich matrixes during open surgeries, resulting in the formation of hyaline-like durable cartilage. More recently, the focus has completely shifted towards direct intra-articular injections where a great number of cells are suspended and injected into affected joints. In this review the history and early uses of MSCs in cartilage regeneration are reviewed and different approaches in current trends are explained and evaluated.

  5. Cell therapy of congenital corneal diseases with umbilical mesenchymal stem cells: lumican null mice.

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    Hongshan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Keratoplasty is the most effective treatment for corneal blindness, but suboptimal medical conditions and lack of qualified medical personnel and donated cornea often prevent the performance of corneal transplantation in developing countries. Our study aims to develop alternative treatment regimens for congenital corneal diseases of genetic mutation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human mesenchymal stem cells isolated from neonatal umbilical cords were transplanted to treat thin and cloudy corneas of lumican null mice. Transplantation of umbilical mesenchymal stem cells significantly improved corneal transparency and increased stromal thickness of lumican null mice, but human umbilical hematopoietic stem cells failed to do the same. Further studies revealed that collagen lamellae were re-organized in corneal stroma of lumican null mice after mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. Transplanted umbilical mesenchymal stem cells survived in the mouse corneal stroma for more than 3 months with little or no graft rejection. In addition, these cells assumed a keratocyte phenotype, e.g., dendritic morphology, quiescence, expression of keratocyte unique keratan sulfated keratocan and lumican, and CD34. Moreover, umbilical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation improved host keratocyte functions, which was verified by enhanced expression of keratocan and aldehyde dehydrogenase class 3A1 in lumican null mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Umbilical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is a promising treatment for congenital corneal diseases involving keratocyte dysfunction. Unlike donated corneas, umbilical mesenchymal stem cells are easily isolated, expanded, stored, and can be quickly recovered from liquid nitrogen when a patient is in urgent need.

  6. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

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    Ya-jing Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administration via the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve fibers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and fluorogold-labeled nerve fibers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was markedly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  7. Propofol promotes spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-jing Zhou; Jian-min Liu; Shu-ming Wei; Yun-hao Zhang; Zhen-hua Qu; Shu-bo Chen

    2015-01-01

    Propofol is a neuroprotective anesthetic. Whether propofol can promote spinal cord injury repair by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains poorly understood. We used rats to investigate spinal cord injury repair using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation combined with propofol administrationvia the tail vein. Rat spinal cord injury was clearly alleviated; a large number of newborn non-myelinated and myelinated nerve ifbers appeared in the spinal cord, the numbers of CM-Dil-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and lfuorogold-labeled nerve ifbers were increased and hindlimb motor function of spinal cord-injured rats was mark-edly improved. These improvements were more prominent in rats subjected to bone marrow mesenchymal cell transplantation combined with propofol administration than in rats receiving monotherapy. These results indicate that propofol can enhance the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on spinal cord injury in rats.

  8. Dedifferentiation-reprogrammed mesenchymal stem cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Xiaohu; Chen, Rui; Sun, Tingting; Fok, Kin Lam; Dong, Jianda; Tsang, Lai Ling; Yi, Shaoqiong; Ruan, Yechun; Guo, Jinghui; Yu, Mei Kuen; Tian, Yuemin; Chung, Yiu Wa; Yang, Mo; Xu, Wenming; Chung, Chin Man; Li, Tingyu; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation has been shown to improve functional outcome in degenerative and ischemic disorders. However, low in vivo survival and differentiation potential of the transplanted cells limits their overall effectiveness and thus clinical usage. Here we show that, after in vitro induction of neuronal differentiation and dedifferentiation, on withdrawal of extrinsic factors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow, which have already committed to neuronal lineage, revert to a primitive cell population (dedifferentiated MSCs) retaining stem cell characteristics but exhibiting a reprogrammed phenotype distinct from their original counterparts. Of therapeutic interest, the dedifferentiated MSCs exhibited enhanced cell survival and higher efficacy in neuronal differentiation compared to unmanipulated MSCs both in vitro and in vivo, with significantly improved cognition function in a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rat model. Increased expression of bcl-2 family proteins and microRNA-34a appears to be the important mechanism giving rise to this previously undefined stem cell population that may provide a novel treatment strategy with improved therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Clinical application of mesenchymal stem cells for aseptic bone necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Aoyama

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, we had started clinical trial using mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs for the treatment of aseptic bone necrosis as a first clinical trial permitted by Japanese Health, Labour and Welfare Ministry.Aseptic bone necrosis of the femoral head commonly occurs in patients with two to four decades, causing severe musculoskeletal disability. Although its diagnosis is easy with X-ray and MRI, there has been no gold standard invented for treatment of this disease. MSCs represent a stem cell population in adult tissues that can be isolated and expanded in culture, and differentiate into cells with different nature. Combination with β-tri-calcium phosphate and vascularized bone graft, we succeeded to treat bone necrosis of the femoral head.Regenerative medicine using stem cells is hopeful and shed a light on intractable disease. To become widespread, Basic, Translational, Application, and Developmental study is needed.? From an experience of cell therapy using MSCs, we started to research induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS for clinical application.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyles CC

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody C Wyles,1 Matthew T Houdek,2 Atta Behfar,3 Rafael J Sierra,21Mayo Medical School, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 3Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cell, osteoarthritis, treatment, regenerative medicine, cell therapy

  11. A Biological Pacemaker Restored by Autologous Transplantation of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Xiao-qing; PU Jie-lin; ZHANG Shu; MENG Liang; WANG Fang-zheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To restore cardiac autonomic pace function by autologous transplantation and committed differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, and explore the technique for the treatment of sick sinus syndrome. Methods:Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from canine bone marrow were culture-expanded and differentiated in vitro by 5-azacytidine. The models of sick sinus syndrome in canines were established by ablating sinus node with radio-frequency technique. Differentiated mesenchymal stem cells labeled by BrdU were autologously transplanted into sinus node area through direct injection. The effects of autologous transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells on cardiac autonomic pace function in sick sinus syndrome models were evaluated by electrocardiography, pathologic and immunohistochemical staining technique.Results:There was distinct improvement on pace function of sick sinus syndrome animal models while differentiated mesenchymal stem cells were auto-transplanted into sinus node area. Mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in sinus node area were differentiated into similar sinus node cells and endothelial cells in vivo, and established gap junction with native cardiomyocytes. Conclusion:The committed-induced mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into sinus node area can differentiate into analogous sinus node cells and improve pace function in canine sick sinus syndrome models.

  12. RNA-Seq Reveals the Angiogenesis Diversity between the Fetal and Adults Bone Mesenchyme Stem Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Han, Yingmin; Liang, Yu; Nie, Chao; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze 23 single cell samples and 2 bulk cells sample from human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. The results from the research demonstrated that there were big differences between two cell lines. Adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines showed a strong trend on the blood vessel differentiation and cell motion, 48/49 vascular related differential expressed genes showed higher expression in adult bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Abmsc) than fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell lines (Fbmsc). 96/106 cell motion related genes showed the same tendency. Further analysis showed that genes like ANGPT1, VEGFA, FGF2, PDGFB and PDGFRA showed higher expression in Abmsc. This work showed cell heterogeneity between human adult bone mesenchyme stem cell line and human fetal bone mesenchyme stem cell line. Also the work may give an indication that Abmsc had a better potency than Fbmsc in the future vascular related application.

  13. Myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells for muscle regeneration in urinary tract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bin; ZHENG Jun-hua; ZHANG Yuan-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective This article was to review the current status of adult mesenchymal stem cells transplantation for muscle regeneration in urinary tract and propose the future prospect in this field.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly obtained from articles listed in Medline and PubMed (2000-2013).The search terms were "mesenchymal stem cells","bladder","stress urinary incontinence" and "tissue engineering".Study selection Articles regarding the adult mesenchymal stem cells for tissue engineering of bladder and stress urinary incontinence were selected and reviewed.Results Adult mesenchymal stem cells had been identified and well characterized in human bone marrow,adipose tissue,skeletal muscle and urine,and demonstrated the capability of differentiating into smooth muscle cells and skeletal muscle cells under myogenic differentiation conditions in vitro.Multiple preclinical and clinical studies indicated that adult mesenchymal stem cells could restore and maintain the structure and function of urinary muscle tissues after transplanted,and potentially improve the quality of life in patients.Conclusions Smooth or skeletal myogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells with regenerative medicine technology may provide a novel approach for muscle regeneration and tissue repair in urinary tract.The long-term effect and safety of mesenchymal stem cell transplantation should be further evaluated before this approach becomes widely used in patients.

  14. CD13 Promotes Mesenchymal Stem Cell-mediated regeneration of ischemic muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mamunur eRahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent, tissue-resident cells that can facilitate tissue regeneration and thus show great promise as potential therapeutic agents. Functional MSCs have been isolated and characterized from a wide array of adult tissues and are universally identified by the shared expression of a core panel of MSCs markers. One of these markers is the multifunctional cell surface peptidase CD13 that has been shown to be expressed on human and murine MSCs from many tissues. To investigate whether this universal expression indicates a functional role for CD13 in MSC biology we isolated, expanded and characterized MSCs from bone marrow of wild type (WT and CD13KO mice. Characterization of these cells demonstrated that both WT and CD13KO MSCs expressed the full complement of MSC markers (CD29, CD44, CD49e, CD105, Sca1, showed comparable proliferation rates and were capable of differentiating toward the adipogenic and osteogenic lineages. However, MSCs lacking CD13 were unable to differentiate into vascular cells, consistent with our previous characterization of CD13 as an angiogenic regulator. Compared to WT MSCs, adhesion and migration on various extracellular matrices of CD13KO MSCs were significantly impaired, which correlated with decreased phospho-FAK levels and cytoskeletal alterations. Crosslinking human MSCs with activating CD13 antibodies increased cell adhesion to endothelial monolayers and induced FAK activation in a time dependent manner. In agreement with these in vitro data, intramuscular injection of CD13KO MSCs in a model of severe ischemic limb injury resulted in significantly poorer perfusion, decreased ambulation, increased necrosis and impaired vascularization compared to those receiving WT MSCs. This study suggests that CD13 regulates FAK activation to promote MSC adhesion and migration, thus contributing to MSC-mediated tissue repair. CD13 may present a viable target to enhance the efficacy of mesenchymal

  15. Guidance of mesenchymal stem cells on fibronectin structured hydrogel films.

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    Annika Kasten

    Full Text Available Designing of implant surfaces using a suitable ligand for cell adhesion to stimulate specific biological responses of stem cells will boost the application of regenerative implants. For example, materials that facilitate rapid and guided migration of stem cells would promote tissue regeneration. When seeded on fibronectin (FN that was homogeneously immmobilized to NCO-sP(EO-stat-PO, which otherwise prevents protein binding and cell adhesion, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC revealed a faster migration, increased spreading and a more rapid organization of different cellular components for cell adhesion on fibronectin than on a glass surface. To further explore, how a structural organization of FN controls the behavior of MSC, adhesive lines of FN with varying width between 10 µm and 80 µm and spacings between 5 µm and 20 µm that did not allow cell adhesion were generated. In dependance on both line width and gaps, cells formed adjacent cell contacts, were individually organized in lines, or bridged the lines. With decreasing sizes of FN lines, speed and directionality of cell migration increased, which correlated with organization of the actin cytoskeleton, size and shape of the nuclei as well as of focal adhesions. Together, defined FN lines and gaps enabled a fine tuning of the structural organization of cellular components and migration. Microstructured adhesive substrates can mimic the extracellular matrix in vivo and stimulate cellular mechanisms which play a role in tissue regeneration.

  16. Characterization of mesenchymal stem cells derived from equine adipose tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Carvalho

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has shown promising results in tendinitis and osteoarthritis in equine medicine. The purpose of this work was to characterize the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSCs in horses through (1 the assessment of the capacity of progenitor cells to perform adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation; and (2 flow cytometry analysis using the stemness related markers: CD44, CD90, CD105 and MHC Class II. Five mixed-breed horses, aged 2-4 years-old were used to collect adipose tissue from the base of the tail. After isolation and culture of AdMSCs, immunophenotypic characterization was performed through flow cytometry. There was a high expression of CD44, CD90 and CD105, and no expression of MHC Class II markers. The tri-lineage differentiation was confirmed by specific staining: adipogenic (Oil Red O, osteogenic (Alizarin Red, and chondrogenic (Alcian Blue. The equine AdMSCs are a promising type of adult progenitor cell for tissue engineering in veterinary medicine.

  17. Postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in bioengineered amelogenesis and dentinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Mo; Schiff, Michael D; Lee, Chang H; Kong, Kimi; Embree, Mildred C; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J

    2014-02-01

    Rodent incisors provide a classic model for studying epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in development. However, postnatal stem/progenitor cells in rodent incisors have not been exploited for tooth regeneration. Here, we characterized postnatal rat incisor epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells and found that they formed enamel- and dentin-like tissues in vivo. Epithelium and mesenchyme cells were harvested separately from the apical region of postnatal 4-5 day rat incisors. Epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes were confirmed by immunocytochemistry, CFU assay and/or multi-lineage differentiation. CK14+, Sox2+ and Lgr5+ epithelium stem cells from the cervical loop enhanced amelogenin and ameloblastin expression upon BMP4 or FGF3 stimulation, signifying their differentiation towards ameloblast-like cells, whereas mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells upon BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a treatment robustly expressed Dspp, a hallmark of odontoblastic differentiation. We then control-released microencapsulated BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a in transplants of epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in the renal capsule of athymic mice in vivo. Enamel and dentin-like tissues were generated in two integrated layers with specific expression of amelogenin and ameloblastin in the newly formed, de novo enamel-like tissue, and DSP in dentin-like tissue. These findings suggest that postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells can be primed towards bioengineered tooth regeneration.

  18. Runx2 expression: A mesenchymal stem marker for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Maria Teresa; Serafini, Paola; Innamorati, Giulio; Gili, Anna; Cheri, Samuele; Bassi, Claudio; Dalle Carbonare, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) is a master gene implicated in the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, and thus serves a determinant function in bone remodelling and skeletal integrity. Various signalling pathways regulate Runx2 abundance, which requires a number of molecules to finely modulate its expression. Furthermore, this gene may be ectopically-expressed in cancer cells. Recent studies have reported the involvement of Runx2 in cell proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, apoptosis and metastatic processes, suggesting it may represent a useful therapeutic target in cancer treatment. However, studies evaluating this gene as a cancer marker are lacking. In the present study, Runx2 expression was analysed in 11 different cancer cell lines not derived from bone tumour. In addition, the presence of Runx2-related cell-free RNA was examined in the peripheral blood of 41 patients affected by different forms of tumours. The results demonstrated high expression levels of Runx2 in the cancer cell lines and identified the presence of Runx2-related cell-free RNA in the peripheral blood of patients with cancer. As compared with normal individuals, the expression level was increased by 14.2-fold in patients with bone metastases and by 4.01-fold in patients without metastases. The results of the present study therefore opens up the possibility to exploit Runx2 expression as a cancer biomarker allowing the use of minimally invasive approaches for diagnosis and follow-up. PMID:27895787

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devang M. Patel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are stromal cells that have the ability to self-renew and also exhibit multilineage differentiation into both mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. The intrinsic properties of these cells make them an attractive candidate for clinical applications. MSCs are of keen interest because they can be isolated from a small aspirate of bone marrow or adipose tissues and can be easily expanded in vitro. Moreover, their ability to modulate immune responses makes them an even more attractive candidate for regenerative medicine as allogeneic transplant of these cells is feasible without a substantial risk of immune rejection. MSCs secrete various immunomodulatory molecules which provide a regenerative microenvironment for a variety of injured tissues or organ to limit the damage and to increase self-regulated tissue regeneration. Autologous/allogeneic MSCs delivered via the bloodstream augment the titers of MSCs that are drawn to sites of tissue injury and can accelerate the tissue repair process. MSCs are currently being tested for their potential use in cell and gene therapy for a number of human debilitating diseases and genetic disorders. This paper summarizes the current clinical and nonclinical data for the use of MSCs in tissue repair and potential therapeutic role in various diseases.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells: key players in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Sarah M; Sullivan, Francis J; Glynn, Sharon A

    2017-02-01

    Tumour progression is dependent on the interaction between tumour cells and cells of the surrounding microenvironment. The tumour is a dynamic milieu consisting of various cell types such as endothelial cells, fibroblasts, cells of the immune system and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). MSCs are multipotent stromal cells that are known to reside in various areas such as the bone marrow, fat and dental pulp. MSCs have been found to migrate towards inflammatory sites and studies have shown that they also migrate towards and incorporate into the tumour. The key question is how they interact there. MSCs may interact with tumour cells through paracrine signalling. On the other hand, MSCs have the capacity to differentiate to various cell types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes and adipocytes and it is possible that MSCs differentiate at the site of the tumour. More recently it has been shown that cross-talk between tumour cells and MSCs has been shown to increase metastatic potential and promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. This review will focus on the role of MSCs in tumour development at various stages of progression from growth of the primary tumour to the establishment of distant metastasis.

  1. Good manufacturing practices production of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensebé, Luc; Bourin, Philippe; Tarte, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Because of their multi/pluripotency and immunosuppressive properties mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are important tools for treating immune disorders and for tissue repair. The increasing use of MSCs has led to production processes that need to be in accordance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP). In cellular therapy, safety remains one of the main concerns and refers to donor validation, choice of starting material, processes, and the controls used, not only at the batch release level but also during the development of processes. The culture processes should be reproducible, robust, and efficient. Moreover, they should be adapted to closed systems that are easy to use. Implementing controls during the manufacturing of clinical-grade MSCs is essential. The controls should ensure microbiological safety but also avoid potential side effects linked to genomic instability driving transformation and senescence or decrease of cell functions (immunoregulation, differentiation potential). In this rapidly evolving field, a new approach to controls is needed.

  2. Mesenchymal Stem Cells after Polytrauma: Actor and Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Huber-Lang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are multipotent cells that are considered indispensable in regeneration processes after tissue trauma. MSCs are recruited to damaged areas via several chemoattractant pathways where they function as “actors” in the healing process by the secretion of manifold pro- and anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, pro- and anticoagulatory, and trophic/angiogenic factors, but also by proliferation and differentiation into the required cells. On the other hand, MSCs represent “targets” during the pathophysiological conditions after severe trauma, when excessively generated inflammatory mediators, complement activation factors, and damage- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns challenge MSCs and alter their functionality. This in turn leads to complement opsonization, lysis, clearance by macrophages, and reduced migratory and regenerative abilities which culminate in impaired tissue repair. We summarize relevant cellular and signaling mechanisms and provide an up-to-date overview about promising future therapeutic MSC strategies in the context of severe tissue trauma.

  3. [Immunomodulatory properties of stem mesenchymal cells in autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Berná, Isabel; Santiago-Díaz, Carlos; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan

    2015-01-20

    Autoimmune diseases are a cluster of disorders characterized by a failure of the immune tolerance and a hyperactivation of the immune system that leads to a chronic inflammation state and the damage of several organs. The medications currently used to treat these diseases usually consist of immunosuppressive drugs that have significant systemic toxic effects and are associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. Recently, several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells have immunomodulatory properties, a feature that make them candidates to be used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we reviewed the role of this therapy in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis, as well as the potential risks associated with its use.

  4. Prenatal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry KY Chan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI can be a severe disorder that can be diagnosed before birth. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC has the potential to improve the bone structure, growth and fracture healing. In this review we give an introduction to OI and MSC, and the basis for prenatal and postnatal transplantation in OI. We also summarize the two patients with OI who has received prenatal and postnatal transplantation of MSC.The findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic MSC in OI is safe. The cell therapy is of likely clinical benefit with improved linear growth, mobility and reduced fracture incidence. Unfortunately, the effect is transient. For this reason postnatal booster infusions using same-donor MSC have been performed with clinical benefit, and without any adverse events.So far there is limited experience in this specific field and proper studies are required to accurately conclude on clinical benefits of MSC transplantation to treat OI.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Two steps forward, one step back

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankrum, James; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is poised to establish a new clinical paradigm; however, recent trials have produced mixed results. Although MSC were originally considered to treat connective tissue defects, preclinical studies revealed potent immunomodulatory properties that prompted the use of MSC to treat numerous inflammatory conditions. Unfortunately, although clinical trials have met safety endpoints, efficacy has not been demonstrated. We believe the challenge to demonstrate efficacy can be attributed in part to an incomplete understanding of the fate of MSC following infusion. Here, we highlight the clinical status of MSC therapy and discuss the importance of cell-tracking techniques, which have advanced our understanding of the fate and function of systemically infused MSC and might improve clinical application. PMID:20335067

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic tool to treat sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleuterio Lombardo; Tom van der Poll; Olga DelaRosa; Wilfried Dalemans

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome caused by a deregulatedhost response to an infection. Sepsis is the mostfrequent cause of death in hospitalized patients.Although knowledge of the pathogenesis of sepsishas increased substantially during the last decades,attempts to design effective and specific therapiestargeting components of the derailed host responsehave failed. Therefore, there is a dramatic need fornew and mechanistically alternative therapies to treatthis syndrome. Based on their immunomodulatoryproperties, adult mesenchymal stem or stromal cells(MSCs) can be a novel therapeutic tool to treat sepsis.Indeed, MSCs reduce mortality in experimental modelsof sepsis by modulating the deregulated inflammatoryresponse against bacteria through the regulation ofmultiple inflammatory networks, the reprogrammingof macrophages and neutrophils towards a more antiinflammatoryphenotype and the release of antimicrobialpeptides. This report will review the currentknowledge on the effects of MSC treatment in preclinicalexperimental small animal models of sepsis.

  7. Prenatal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteogenesis imperfecta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Götherström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be a severe disorder that can be diagnosed before birth. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has the potential to improve the bone structure, growth, and fracture healing. In this review, we give an introduction to OI and MSC, and the basis for pre- and postnatal transplantation in OI. We also summarize the two patients with OI who have received pre- and postnatal transplantation of MSC. The findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic MSC in OI is safe. The cell therapy is of likely clinical benefit with improved linear growth, mobility, and reduced fracture incidence. Unfortunately, the effect is transient. For this reason, postnatal booster infusions using same-donor MSC have been performed with clinical benefit, and without any adverse events. So far there is limited experience in this specific field and proper studies are required to accurately conclude on clinical benefits of MSC transplantation to treat OI. PMID:25346689

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell ingrowth and differentiation on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Stiehler, Maik; Baatrup, Anette

    2007-01-01

    Culture of osteogenic cells on a porous scaffold could offer a new solution to bone grafting using autologous human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) from the patient. We compared coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with pore sizes of 200 and 500 microm for expansion and differentiation of hMSCs. We......MSC in a particular direction. We found that dynamic spinner flask cultivation of hMSC/scaffold constructs resulted in increased proliferation, differentiation and distribution of cells in scaffolds. Therefore, spinner flask cultivation is an easy-to-use inexpensive system for cultivating hMSCs on small...... cultivated the hMSC statically or in spinner flasks for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days and found that the 200-microm pore scaffolds exhibited a faster rate of osteogenic differentiation than did the 500-microm pore scaffolds as shown by an alkaline phosphatase activity assay and real-time reverse transcriptase...

  9. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  10. Patterns of amino acid metabolism by proliferating human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera, G.A.; Schop, D.; Spitters, T.W.; Dijkhuizen, R.; Bracke, M.; Bruijn, J.D.; Martens, D.E.; Karperien, M.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Blitterswijk, van C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The nutritional requirements of stem cells have not been determined; in particular, the amino acid metabolism of stem cells is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the amino acid metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), with focus on two questions: Which amino acids are consume

  11. Are Sertoli cells a kind of mesenchymal stem cells?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Daoyuan; Zhang, Chunfu; Li, Tao; Zhang, Jiahui; Zhang, Nannan; Tao, Zehua; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sertoli cells (SCs) are a major component of testis which secrete a variety of cytokines and immunosuppressive factors, providing nutritional support and immune protection for sperm growth and development. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between SCs and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in order to provide a theoretical basis for better application of SCs. Methods: We used the adherence method to isolate Sprague-Dawley rat SCs and BMSCs. Cells surface markers were detected by flow cytometry. The capacity of cells to differentiate was determined by osteogenic and adipogenic induction. Assessment of cell proliferation was performed by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide] assay. Changes in the nucleus were analyzed by Hoechst nuclear staining. Cell aging was observed with β-galactosidase, which is a biological marker of senescence. RT-PCR was employed to detect the expression of cytokines. Results: From the aforementioned experiments, we found that the surface markers of SCs and BMSCs were almost exactly the same. Proliferation of SCs, as well as osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation, were weaker than in BMSCs. Compared with BMSCs, Hoechst nuclear staining showed that the chromatin of SCs began to aggregate and was slightly larger. β-galactosidase staining showed that SCs were in a slightly aging state. The secretion of cytokines from SCs was slightly less than the secretion from BMSCs. Conclusion: SCs are a kind of mesenchymal stem cells which have begun the process of differentiation. PMID:28386334

  12. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo (Jose); L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPS

  13. A Murine ESC-like State Facilitates Transgenesis and Homologous Recombination in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose Maria; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPSC reprogramm

  14. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo (Jose); L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPS

  15. A Murine ESC-like State Facilitates Transgenesis and Homologous Recombination in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose Maria; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPSC reprogramm

  16. Regenerative Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Contribution of Muse Cells, a Novel Pluripotent Stem Cell Type that Resides in Mesenchymal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mari Dezawa; Taeko Shigemoto; Fumitaka Ogura; Shohei Wakao; Yasumasa Kuroda

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are easily accessible and safe for regenerative medicine. MSCs exert trophic, immunomodulatory, anti-apoptotic, and tissue regeneration effects in a variety of tissues and organs, but their entity remains an enigma. Because MSCs are generally harvested from mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, or umbilical cord as adherent cells, MSCs comprise crude cell populations and are heterogeneous. The specific cells responsible for each effect have no...

  17. Study on phenotypic and cytogenetic characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in myelodysplastic syndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋陆茜

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate phenotype,cell differentiation and cytogenetic properties of bone marrow(BM) mesenchymal stem cells(MSC)separated from the myelodysplastic syndrome(MDS) patients,and to analyze cytogenetic

  18. Imaging gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells: from small to large animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willmann, Jürgen K; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of reporter gene imaging in implanted human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in porcine myocardium by using clinical positron emission tomography (PET)-computed tomography (CT) scanning....

  19. Evaluation of Proliferation and Development of Mesenchymal Stem Cell on Nanoporous PLLA Membrane Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Porghara

    2015-08-01

    Conclusion: Due to the biodegradable and non-toxic properties of nano PLLA membrane, it could increase the adhesion and proliferation of mesenchymal stem cells and these effects will exacerbated over time.

  20. Intravenous transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural regeneration after traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fatemeh Anbari; Mohammad Ali Khalili; Ahmad Reza Bahrami; Arezoo Khoradmehr; Fatemeh Sadeghian; Farzaneh Fesahat; Ali Nabi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the supplement of lost nerve cells in rats with traumatic brain injury by intrave-nous administration of allogenic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, this study established a Wistar rat model of traumatic brain injury by weight drop impact acceleration method and ad-ministered 3 × 106 rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells via the lateral tail vein. At 14 days after cell transplantation, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into neurons and astrocytes in injured rat cerebral cortex and rat neurological function was improved significant-ly. These findings suggest that intravenously administered bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can promote nerve cell regeneration in injured cerebral cortex, which supplement the lost nerve cells.

  1. TAZ: a beta-catenin-like molecule that regulates mesenchymal stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jeong-Ho; Yaffe, Michael B

    2006-01-01

    Regulating the switch between proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is critical for the development of normal tissues, and the prevention of tumors. How mesenchymal stem cells exit from the cell cycle and differentiate into alternative cell fates such as bone, fat, and muscle, is incompletely understood. We recently discovered that a WW domain-containing molecule, TAZ, functions as a transcriptional modulator to stimulate bone development while simultaneous blocking the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into fat. These developmental effects occur through direct interaction between TAZ and the transcription factors Runx2 and PPARgamma, resulting in transcriptional enhancement and repression, respectively of selective programs of gene expression. We propose that TAZ, as well as a highly related molecule YAP, are functionally, though not structurally, similar to beta-catenin and integrate extracellular, membrane, and cytoskeletal-derived signals to influence mesenchymal stem cell fate.

  2. Tumour-Derived Interleukin-1 Beta Induces Pro-inflammatory Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alajez, Nehad M; Al-toub, Mashael; Almusa, Abdulaziz

    Problem Studying cancer tumors microenvironment may reveal a novel role in driving cancer progression and metastasis. The biological interaction between stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) and cancer cells remains incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the effects of tumor cells’ se...

  3. Tumour-Derived Interleukin-1 Beta Induces Pro-inflammatory Response in Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alajez, Nehad M; Al-toub, Mashael; Almusa, Abdulaziz

    Problem Studying cancer tumors microenvironment may reveal a novel role in driving cancer progression and metastasis. The biological interaction between stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) and cancer cells remains incompletely understood. Herein, we investigated the effects of tumor cells’ se...

  4. Citalopram increases the differentiation efifcacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javad Verdi; Seyed Abdolreza Mortazavi-Tabatabaei; Shiva Sharif; Hadi Verdi; Alireza Shoae-Hassani

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. It is hypothesized that citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, can promote the neuronal differentiation of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Citalopram strongly enhanced neuronal characteristics of the cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The rate of cell death was decreased in citalopram-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells than in control cells in neurobasal medium. In addition, the cumulative population doubling level of the citalopram-treated cells was signiifcantly increased compared to that of control cells. Also BrdU incorporation was elevated in citalopram-treated cells. These ifndings suggest that citalopram can improve the neuronal-like cell differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by increasing cell proliferation and survival while maintaining their neuronal characteristics.

  5. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Its Application in Human Disease Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkinson, Conrad P; Gomez, José A.; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J.

    2010-01-01

    Hodgkinson and colleagues review the current status of knowledge with respect to the genetic modifications being explored as a means to improve mesenchymal stem cell therapy for human diseases, with a particular focus on cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Acetylcholine secretion by motor neuron-like cells from umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueyuan Liu; Dehua Li; Dong Jiang; Yan Fang

    2013-01-01

    Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s were isolated by a double enzyme digestion method. The third passage of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s was induced with heparin and/or basic fi-broblast growth factor. Results confirmed that cel morphology did not change after induction with basic fibroblast growth factor alone. However, neuronal morphology was visible, and microtu-bule-associated protein-2 expression and acetylcholine levels increased fol owing induction with heparin alone or heparin combined with basic fibroblast growth factor. Hb9 and choline acetyl-transferase expression was high fol owing inductive with heparin combined with basic fibroblast growth factor. Results indicate that the inductive effect of basic fibroblast growth factor alone was not obvious. Heparin combined with basic fibroblast growth factor noticeably promoted the differen-tiation of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s into motor neuron-like cel s. Simultaneously, um-bilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s could secrete acetylcholine.

  7. Citalopram increases the differentiation efficacy of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into neuronal-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Javad; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, Seyed Abdolreza; Sharif, Shiva; Verdi, Hadi; Shoae-Hassani, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    Several studies have demonstrated that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants can promote neuronal cell proliferation and enhance neuroplasticity both in vitro and in vivo. It is hypothesized that citalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, can promote the neuronal differentiation of adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Citalopram strongly enhanced neuronal characteristics of the cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. The rate of cell death was decreased in citalopram-treated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells than in control cells in neurobasal medium. In addition, the cumulative population doubling level of the citalopram-treated cells was significantly increased compared to that of control cells. Also BrdU incorporation was elevated in citalopram-treated cells. These findings suggest that citalopram can improve the neuronal-like cell differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by increasing cell proliferation and survival while maintaining their neuronal characteristics.

  8. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT): A biological process in the development, stem cell differentiation, and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tong; You, Yanan; Jiang, Hua; Wang, Zack Z

    2017-12-01

    The lineage transition between epithelium and mesenchyme is a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), by which polarized epithelial cells lose their adhesion property and obtain mesenchymal cell phenotypes. EMT is a biological process that is often involved in embryogenesis and diseases, such as cancer invasion and metastasis. The EMT and the reverse process, mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET), also play important roles in stem cell differentiation and de-differentiation (or reprogramming). In this review, we will discuss current research progress of EMT in embryonic development, cellular differentiation and reprogramming, and cancer progression, all of which are representative models for researches of stem cell biology in normal and in diseases. Understanding of EMT and MET may help to identify specific markers to distinguish normal stem cells from cancer stem cells in future. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuli; Yin, Ying; Jiang, Fei; Chen, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Human amnion mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs) can be obtained from human amniotic membrane, a highly abundant and readily available tissue. HAMSC sources present fewer ethical issues, have low immunogenicity, anti-inflammatory properties, considerable advantageous characteristics, and are considered an attractive potential treatment material in the field of regenerative medicine. We used a co-culture system to determine whether HAMSCs could promote osteogenesis in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs). We isolated HAMSCs from discarded amnion samples and collected them using pancreatin/collagenase digestion. We cultured HAMSCs and HBMSCSs in basal medium. Activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an early osteogenesis marker, was increased in the co-culture system compared to the control single cultures, which we also confirmed by ALP staining. We used immunofluorescence testing to investigate the effects of co-culturing with HAMSCs on HBMSC proliferation, which revealed that the co-culturing enhanced EdU expression in HBMSCs. Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR indicated that co-culturing promoted osteogenesis in HBMSCs. Furthermore, Alizarin red S staining revealed that extracellular matrix calcium levels in mineralized nodule formation produced by the co-cultures were higher than that in the controls. Using the same co-culture system, we further observed the effects of HAMSCs on osteogenic differentiation in primary osteoblasts by Western blotting, which better addressed the mechanism for HAMSCs in bone regeneration. The results showed HAMSCs are osteogenic and not only play a role in promoting HBMSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation but also in osteoblasts, laying the foundation for new regenerative medicine methods.

  10. Umbilical Cord as Prospective Source for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Arutyunyan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents current evidence on the properties of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells, including origin, proliferative potential, plasticity, stability of karyotype and phenotype, transcriptome, secretome, and immunomodulatory activity. A review of preclinical studies and clinical trials using this cell type is performed. Prospects for the use of mesenchymal stem cells, derived from the umbilical cord, in cell transplantation are associated with the need for specialized biobanking and transplant standardization criteria.

  11. Umbilical Cord as Prospective Source for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents current evidence on the properties of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells, including origin, proliferative potential, plasticity, stability of karyotype and phenotype, transcriptome, secretome, and immunomodulatory activity. A review of preclinical studies and clinical trials using this cell type is performed. Prospects for the use of mesenchymal stem cells, derived from the umbilical cord, in cell transplantation are associated with the need for specialized biobanking and transplant standardization criteria. PMID:27651799

  12. Eccentric exercise facilitates mesenchymal stem cell appearance in skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Carmen Valero

    Full Text Available Eccentric, or lengthening, contractions result in injury and subsequently stimulate the activation and proliferation of satellite stem cells which are important for skeletal muscle regeneration. The discovery of alternative myogenic progenitors in skeletal muscle raises the question as to whether stem cells other than satellite cells accumulate in muscle in response to exercise and contribute to post-exercise repair and/or growth. In this study, stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1 positive, non-hematopoetic (CD45⁻ cells were evaluated in wild type (WT and α7 integrin transgenic (α7Tg mouse muscle, which is resistant to injury yet liable to strain, 24 hr following a single bout of eccentric exercise. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ stem cells were increased 2-fold in WT muscle post-exercise. The α7 integrin regulated the presence of Sca-1⁺ cells, with expansion occurring in α7Tg muscle and minimal cells present in muscle lacking the α7 integrin. Sca-1⁺CD45⁻ cells isolated from α7Tg muscle following exercise were characterized as mesenchymal-like stem cells (mMSCs, predominantly pericytes. In vitro multiaxial strain upregulated mMSC stem cells markers in the presence of laminin, but not gelatin, identifying a potential mechanistic basis for the accumulation of these cells in muscle following exercise. Transplantation of DiI-labeled mMSCs into WT muscle increased Pax7⁺ cells and facilitated formation of eMHC⁺DiI⁻ fibers. This study provides the first demonstration that mMSCs rapidly appear in skeletal muscle in an α7 integrin dependent manner post-exercise, revealing an early event that may be necessary for effective repair and/or growth following exercise. The results from this study also support a role for the α7 integrin and/or mMSCs in molecular- and cellular-based therapeutic strategies that can effectively combat disuse muscle atrophy.

  13. Matrices secreted during simultaneous osteogenesis and adipogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells affect stem cells differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Hoshiba, Takashi; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-15

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a pivotal role in regulating stem cell functions. The ECM dynamically changes during tissue development. It remains a great challenge to mimic the dynamically changing ECM. In this study, we prepared novel types of extracellular matrices that could mimic the dynamic variation of extracellular matrices, which were derived from simultaneous osteogenesis and adipogenesis of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Four ECMs simultaneously mimicking early osteogenesis and early adipogenesis (EOEA), early osteogenesis and late adipogenesis (EOLA), late osteogenesis and early adipogenesis (LOEA), late osteogenesis and late adipogenesis (LOLA) were prepared. The stepwise osteogenesis-co-adipogenesis-mimicking matrices had different compositions and different effects on the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of MSCs. The matrices could provide very useful tools to investigate the interaction between ECM and stem cells and the role of ECM on stem cell differentiation. Extracellular matrices (ECMs) are dynamically remodeled to regulate stem cell functions during tissue development. Until now, mimicking the ECM variation during stem cell differentiation to single cell type has been reported. However, there is no report on simultaneous mimicking of stem cell differentiation to two types of cells. In this study, we prepared the mixture ECMs derived from simultaneous osteogenesis and adipogenesis of MSCs at different stages and found that they could regulate stem cell differentiation. The concept is new and the ECMs are novel. No such ECMs have been reported previously. The matrices will provide very useful tools to investigate the interaction between ECM and stem cells and the role of ECM on stem cell differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inducible immortality in hTERT-human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Samantha L; Wang, Miqi; Yamamoto, Akira; Malek, Farbod; Luu, Andrew; Kuo, Alfred C; Kim, Hubert T

    2012-12-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are attractive candidates for tissue engineering and cell-based therapy because of their multipotentiality and availability in adult donors. However, in vitro expansion and differentiation of these cells is limited by replicative senescence. The proliferative capacity of hMSCs can be enhanced by ectopic expression of telomerase, allowing for long-term culture. However, hMSCs with constitutive telomerase expression demonstrate unregulated growth and even tumor formation. To address this problem, we used an inducible Tet-On gene expression system to create hMSCs in which ectopic telomerase expression can be induced selectively by the addition of doxycycline (i-hTERT hMSCs). i-hTERT hMSCs have inducible hTERT expression and telomerase activity, and are able to proliferate significantly longer than wild type hMSCs when hTERT expression is induced. They stop proliferating when hTERT expression is turned off and can be rescued when expression is re-induced. They retain multipotentiality in vitro even at an advanced age. We also used a selective inhibitor of telomere elongation to show that the mechanism driving immortalization of hMSCs by hTERT is dependent upon maintenance of telomere length. Thanks to their extended lifespan, preserved multipotentiality and controlled growth, i-hTERT hMSCs may prove to be a useful tool for the development and testing of novel stem cell therapies. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  15. Human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells promote recovery after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Ko, Tsui-Ling; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Lin, Maan-Yuh Anya; Fu, Tz-Win; Hsiao, Hsiao-Sheng; Hsu, Jung-Yu C; Fu, Yu-Show

    2011-07-01

    Stroke is a cerebrovascular defect that leads to many adverse neurological complications. Current pharmacological treatments for stroke remain unclear in their effectiveness, whereas stem cell transplantation shows considerable promise. Previously, we have shown that human umbilical mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can differentiate into neurons in neuronal-conditioned medium. Here we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HUMSC transplantation for ischemic stroke in rats. Focal cerebral ischemia was produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. The HUMSCs treated with neuronal-conditioned medium or not treated were transplanted into the ischemic cortex 24 hours after surgery. Histology and MRI revealed that rats implanted with HUMSCs treated with neuronal-conditioned medium or not treated exhibited a trend toward less infarct volume and significantly less atrophy compared with the control group, which received no HUMSCs. Moreover, rats receiving HUMSCs showed significant improvements in motor function, greater metabolic activity of cortical neurons, and better revascularization in the infarct cortex. Implanted HUMSCs, treated or not treated, survived in the infarct cortex for at least 36 days and released neuroprotective and growth-associated cytokines, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, platelet-derived growth factor-AA, basic fibroblast growth factor, angiopoietin-2, CXCL-16, neutrophil-activating protein-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic benefits of HUMSC transplantation for ischemic stroke, likely due to the ability of the cells to produce growth-promoting factors. Thus, HUMSC transplantation may be an effective therapy in the future.

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Dental Pulp: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Ledesma-Martínez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mesenchymal stem cells of dental pulp (DPSCs were isolated and characterized for the first time more than a decade ago as highly clonogenic cells that were able to generate densely calcified colonies. Now, DPSCs are considered to have potential as stem cell source for orthopedic and oral maxillofacial reconstruction, and it has been suggested that they may have applications beyond the scope of the stomatognathic system. To date, most studies have shown that, regardless of their origin in third molars, incisors, or exfoliated deciduous teeth, DPSCs can generate mineralized tissue, an extracellular matrix and structures type dentin, periodontal ligament, and dental pulp, as well as other structures. Different groups worldwide have designed and evaluated new efficient protocols for the isolation, expansion, and maintenance of clinically safe human DPSCs in sufficient numbers for various therapeutics protocols and have discussed the most appropriate route of administration, the possible contraindications to their clinical use, and the parameters to be considered for monitoring their clinical efficacy and proper biological source. At present, DPSC-based therapy is promising but because most of the available evidence was obtained using nonhuman xenotransplants, it is not a mature technology.

  17. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Mateos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  18. Proteomic Applications in the Study of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Jesús; Fernández Pernas, Pablo; Fafián Labora, Juan; Blanco, Francisco; Arufe, María del Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are undifferentiated cells with an unlimited capacity for self-renewal and able to differentiate towards specific lineages under appropriate conditions. MSCs are, a priori, a good target for cell therapy and clinical trials as an alternative to embryonic stem cells, avoiding ethical problems and the chance for malignant transformation in the host. However, regarding MSCs, several biological implications must be solved before their application in cell therapy, such as safe ex vivo expansion and manipulation to obtain an extensive cell quantity amplification number for use in the host without risk accumulation of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities. Cell surface markers for direct characterization of MSCs remain unknown, and the precise molecular mechanisms whereby growth factors stimulate their differentiation are still missing. In the last decade, quantitative proteomics has emerged as a promising set of techniques to address these questions, the answers to which will determine whether MSCs retain their potential for use in cell therapy. Proteomics provides tools to globally analyze cellular activity at the protein level. This proteomic profiling allows the elucidation of connections between broad cellular pathways and molecules that were previously impossible to determine using only traditional biochemical analysis. However; thus far, the results obtained must be orthogonally validated with other approaches. This review will focus on how these techniques have been applied in the evaluation of MSCs for their future applications in safe therapies.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells support hepatocyte function in engineered liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshie; Yagi, Hiroshi; Inomata, Kenta; Matsubara, Kentaro; Hibi, Taizo; Abe, Yuta; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that organ decellularization is a promising approach to facilitate the clinical application of regenerative therapy by providing a platform for organ engineering. This unique strategy uses native matrices to act as a reservoir for the functional cells which may show therapeutic potential when implanted into the body. Appropriate cell sources for artificial livers have been debated for some time. The desired cell type in artificial livers is primary hepatocytes, but in addition, other supportive cells may facilitate this stem cell technology. In this context, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is an option meeting the criteria for therapeutic organ engineering. Ideally, supportive cells are required to (1) reduce the hepatic cell mass needed in an engineered liver by enhancing hepatocyte function, (2) modulate hepatic regeneration in a paracrine fashion or by direct contact, and (3) enhance the preservability of parenchymal cells during storage. Here, we describe enhanced hepatic function achieved using a strategy of sequential infusion of cells and illustrate the advantages of co-cultivating bone marrow-derived MSCs with primary hepatocytes in the engineered whole-liver scaffold. These co-recellularized liver scaffolds colonized by MSCs and hepatocytes were transplanted into live animals. After blood flow was established, we show that expression of adhesion molecules and proangiogenic factors was upregulated in the graft.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for osteoarthritis: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyles, Cody C; Houdek, Matthew T; Behfar, Atta; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a painful chronic condition with a significant impact on quality of life. The societal burden imposed by OA is increasing in parallel with the aging population; however, no therapies have demonstrated efficacy in preventing the progression of this degenerative joint disease. Current mainstays of therapy include activity modification, conservative pain management strategies, weight loss, and if necessary, replacement of the affected joint. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a multipotent endogenous population of progenitors capable of differentiation to musculoskeletal tissues. MSCs have a well-documented immunomodulatory role, managing the inflammatory response primarily through paracrine signaling. Given these properties, MSCs have been proposed as a potential regenerative cell therapy source for patients with OA. Research efforts are focused on determining the ideal source for derivation, as MSCs are native to several tissues. Furthermore, optimizing the mode of delivery remains a challenge both for appropriate localization of MSCs and for directed guidance toward stemming the local inflammatory process and initiating a regenerative response. Scaffolds and matrices with growth factor adjuvants may prove critical in this effort. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current state of MSC-based therapeutics for OA and discuss potential barriers that must be overcome for successful implementation of cell-based therapy as a routine treatment strategy in orthopedics.

  1. Genetic Engineering of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Walczak, Piotr; Janowski, Miroslaw; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can be obtained from various organs and easily propagated in vitro, are one of the most extensively used types of stem cells and have been shown to be efficacious in a broad set of diseases. The unique and highly desirable properties of MSCs include high migratory capacities toward injured areas, immunomodulatory features, and the natural ability to differentiate into connective tissue phenotypes. These phenotypes include bone and cartilage, and these properties predispose MSCs to be therapeutically useful. In addition, MSCs elicit their therapeutic effects by paracrine actions, in which the metabolism of target tissues is modulated. Genetic engineering methods can greatly amplify these properties and broaden the therapeutic capabilities of MSCs, including transdifferentiation toward diverse cell lineages. However, cell engineering can also affect safety and increase the cost of therapy based on MSCs; thus, the advantages and disadvantages of these procedures should be discussed. In this review, the latest applications of genetic engineering methods for MSCs with regenerative medicine purposes are presented.

  2. Impairment of mesenchymal stem cells derived from oral leukoplakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhihui; Song, Jiangyuan; Han, Ying; Mu, Dongdong; Su, Sha; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Oral leukoplakia is one of the common precancerous lesions in oral mucosa. To compare the biological characteristics and regenerative capacities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from oral leukoplakia (epithelial hyperplasia and dysplasia) and normal oral mucosa, MSCs were isolated by enzyme digestion. Then these cells were identified by the expression of MSC related markers, STRO-1, CD105 and CD90, with the absent for the hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34 by flow cytometric detection. The self-renewal ability of MSCs from oral leukoplakia was enhanced, while the multipotent differentiation was descended, compared with MSCs from normal oral mucosa. Fibrin gel was used as a carrier for MSCs transplanted into immunocompromised mice to detect their regenerative capacity. The regenerative capacities of MSCs from oral leukoplakia became impaired partly. Collagen IV (Col IV) and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were selected to analyze the potential mechanism for the functional changes of MSCs from oral leukoplakia by immunochemical and western blot analysis. The expression of Col IV was decreased and that of MMP-9 was increased by MSCs with the progression of oral leukoplakia, especially in MSCs from epithelial dysplasia. The imbalance between regenerative and metabolic self-regulatory functions of MSCs from oral leukoplakia may be related to the progression of this premalignant disorder.

  3. Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary progress in understanding several key features of stem cells has been made in the last ten years, including definition of the niche, and identification of signals regulating mobilization and homing as well as partial understanding of the mechanisms controlling self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation. This progress produced invaluable tools for the development of rational cell therapy protocols that have yielded positive results in preclinical models of genetic and acquired diseases and, in several cases, have entered clinical experimentation with positive outcome. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic cells with multilineage potential to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. They can be isolated from bone marrow and other tissues and have the capacity to extensively proliferate in vitro. Moreover, MSCs have also been shown to produce anti-inflammatory molecules which can modulate humoral and cellular immune responses. Considering their regenerative potential and immunoregulatory effect, MSC therapy is a promising tool in the treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. It is obvious that much work remains to be done to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development, homeostasis, and tissue repair and thus to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials.

  4. Geometric cues for directing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilian, Kristopher A.; Bugarija, Branimir; Lahn, Bruce T.; Mrksich, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Significant efforts have been directed to understanding the factors that influence the lineage commitment of stem cells. This paper demonstrates that cell shape, independent of soluble factors, has a strong influence on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from bone marrow. When exposed to competing soluble differentiation signals, cells cultured in rectangles with increasing aspect ratio and in shapes with pentagonal symmetry but with different subcellular curvature—and with each occupying the same area—display different adipogenesis and osteogenesis profiles. The results reveal that geometric features that increase actomyosin contractility promote osteogenesis and are consistent with in vivo characteristics of the microenvironment of the differentiated cells. Cytoskeletal-disrupting pharmacological agents modulate shape-based trends in lineage commitment verifying the critical role of focal adhesion and myosin-generated contractility during differentiation. Microarray analysis and pathway inhibition studies suggest that contractile cells promote osteogenesis by enhancing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular related kinase (ERK1/2) activation in conjunction with elevated wingless-type (Wnt) signaling. Taken together, this work points to the role that geometric shape cues can play in orchestrating the mechanochemical signals and paracrine/autocrine factors that can direct MSCs to appropriate fates. PMID:20194780

  5. The hematopoietic growth factor "erythropoietin" enhances the therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairallah, M I; Kassem, L A; Yassin, N A; El Din, M A Gamal; Zekri, M; Attia, M

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder clinically characterized by cognitive dysfunction and by deposition of amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. The study investigated the therapeutic effect of combined mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin on Alzheimer's disease. Five groups of mice were used: control group, Alzheimer's disease was induced in four groups by a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.8 mg kg(-1) lipopolysaccharide and divided as follows: Alzheimer's disease group, mesenchymal stem cells treated group by injecting mesenchymal stem cells into the tail vein (2 x 10(6) cells), erythropoietin treated group (40 microg kg(-1) b.wt.) injected intraperitoneally 3 times/week for 5 weeks and mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin treated group. Locomotor activity and memory were tested using open field and Y-maze. Histological, histochemical, immunohistochemical studies, morphometric measurements were examined in brain sections of all groups. Choline transferase activity, brain derived neurotrophic factor expression and mitochondrial swellings were assessed in cerebral specimens. Lipopolysaccharide decreased locomotor activity, memory, choline transferase activity and brain derived neurotrophic factor. It increased mitochondrial swelling, apoptotic index and amyloid deposition. Combined mesenchymal stem cells and erythropoietin markedly improved all these parameters. This study proved the effective role of mesenchymal stem cells in relieving Alzheimer's disease symptoms and manifestations; it highlighted the important role of erythropoietin in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Use of FK506 and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for rat hind limb allografts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youxin Song; Zhujun Wang; Zhixue Wang; Hong Zhang; Xiaohui Li; Bin Chen

    2012-01-01

    Dark Agouti rat donor hind limbs were orthotopically transplanted into Lewis rat recipients to verify the effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on neural regeneration and functional recovery of allotransplanted limbs in the microenvironment of immunotolerance. bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were intramuscularly (gluteus maximus) injected with FK506 (tacrolimus) daily, and were transplanted to the injured nerves. Results indicated that the allograft group not receiving therapy showed severe rejection, with transplanted limbs detaching at 10 days after transplantation with complete necrosis. The number of myelinated axons and Schwann cells in the FK506 and FK506 + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells groups were significantly increased. We observed a lesser degree of gastrocnemius muscle degeneration, and increased polymorphic fibers along with other pathological changes in the FK506 + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group. The FK506 + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group showed significantly better recovery than the autograft and FK506 groups. The results demonstrated that FK506 improved the immune microenvironment. FK506 combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells significantly promoted sciatic nerve regeneration, and improved sensory recovery and motor function in hind limb allotransplant.

  7. Cardiac differentiation and electrophysiology characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo-wu; AI Shi-yi; L(U) An-lin; HOU Jing; HUANG Wei; LI Yao; HOU Zhao-lei; HOU Hong; DA Jing; YANG Na

    2012-01-01

    Objective To review the progress of cardiac differentiation and electrophysiological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.Data sources The databases of PubMed,Springer Link,Science Direct and CNKI were retrieved for papers published from January 2000 to January 2012 with the key words of “bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,cardiac or heart,electrophysiology or electrophysiological characteristics”.Study selection The articles concerned cardiac differentiation and electrophysiological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were collected.After excluding papers that study purposes are not coincident with this review or contents duplicated,56 papers were internalized at last.Results For the treatment of myocardial infarction and myocardiac disease,the therapeutic effects of transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells which have the ability to develop into functional myocardial cells by lots of methods have been proved by many researches.But the arrhythmogenic effect on ventricles affer transplantation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells derived myocardial cells is still controversial in animal models.Certainly,the low differentiation efficiency and heterogeneous development of electricial function could be the most important risk for proarrhythmia.Conclusion Many studies of cardiac differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have paid attention to improve the cardiac differentiation rate,and the electrophysiology characteristics of the differentiated cells should be concerned for the risk for proarrhythmia as well.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for the Treatment of Vocal Fold Scarring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Vibe Lindeblad; Grønhøj Larsen, Christian; Jensen, David H;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Therapy with mesenchymal stem cells exhibits potential for the development of novel interventions for many diseases and injuries. The use of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative therapy for vocal fold scarring exhibited promising results to reduce stiffness and enhance the biomechan......OBJECTIVES: Therapy with mesenchymal stem cells exhibits potential for the development of novel interventions for many diseases and injuries. The use of mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative therapy for vocal fold scarring exhibited promising results to reduce stiffness and enhance...... the biomechanical properties of injured vocal folds. This study evaluated the biomechanical effects of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for the treatment of vocal fold scarring. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and Google Scholar were searched. METHODS: Controlled studies that assessed...... the biomechanical effects of mesenchymal stem cell therapy for the treatment of vocal fold scarring were included. Primary outcomes were viscoelastic properties and mucosal wave amplitude. RESULTS: Seven preclinical animal studies (n = 152 single vocal folds) were eligible for inclusion. Evaluation of viscoelastic...

  9. Activation of protein kinase A and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP promotes adipocyte differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jia, Bingbing; Madsen, Lise; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed;

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells are primary multipotent cells capable of differentiating into several cell types including adipocytes when cultured under defined in vitro conditions. In the present study we investigated the role of cAMP signaling and its downstream effectors, protein kinase A (PKA......) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) in adipocyte conversion of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (hMADS). We show that cAMP signaling involving the simultaneous activation of both PKA- and Epac-dependent signaling is critical for this process even in the presence......(2)) may fully substitute for the cAMP-elevating agent isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX). Moreover, selective activation of Epac-dependent signaling promoted adipocyte differentiation when the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) was inhibited. Unlike the case for murine preadipocytes cell lines, long...

  10. Conditioned medium from hypoxic bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells enhances wound healing in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Growing evidence indicates that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs enhance wound repair via paracrine. Because the extent of environmental oxygenation affects the innate characteristics of BM-MSCs, including their stemness and migration capacity, the current study set out to elucidate and compare the impact of normoxic and hypoxic cell-culture conditions on the expression and secretion of BM-MSC-derived paracrine molecules (e.g., cytokines, growth factors and chemokines that hypothetically contribute to cutaneous wound healing in vivo. Semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analyses of normoxic and hypoxic BM-MSCs and their conditioned medium fractions showed that the stem cells expressed and secreted significantly higher amounts of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF,vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A interleukin 6 (IL-6 and interleukin 8 (IL-8 under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, hypoxic BM-MSC-derived conditioned medium (hypoCM vs. normoxic BM-MSC-derived conditioned medium (norCM or vehicle control medium significantly enhanced the proliferation of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, the migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and monocytes, and the formation of tubular structures by endothelial cells cultured on Matrigel matrix. Consistent with these in vitro results, skin wound contraction was significantly accelerated in Balb/c nude mice treated with topical hypoCM relative to norCM or the vehicle control. Notably increased in vivo cell proliferation, neovascularization as well as recruitment of inflammatory macrophages and evidently decreased collagen I, and collagen III were also found in the hypoCM-treated group. These findings suggest that BM-MSCs promote murine skin wound healing via hypoxia-enhanced paracrine.

  11. The endometrium as a source of mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Levent; Hufnagel, Demetra; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell therapies have opened new frontiers in medicine with the possibility of regenerating lost or damaged cells. Embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells have been used to derive mature cell types for tissue regeneration and repair. However, the endometrium has emerged as an attractive, novel source of adult stem cells that are easily accessed and demonstrate remarkable differentiation capacity. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of endometrial stem cells and their therapeutic potential in regenerative medicine.

  12. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments.

  13. Clinical Trials With Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillaro, Tiziana; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    In the last year, the promising features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including their regenerative properties and ability to differentiate into diverse cell lineages, have generated great interest among researchers whose work has offered intriguing perspectives on cell-based therapies for various diseases. Currently the most commonly used adult stem cells in regenerative medicine, MSCs, can be isolated from several tissues, exhibit a strong capacity for replication in vitro, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. However, heterogeneous procedures for isolating and cultivating MSCs among laboratories have prompted the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to issue criteria for identifying unique populations of these cells. Consequently, the isolation of MSCs according to ISCT criteria has produced heterogeneous, nonclonal cultures of stromal cells containing stem cells with different multipotent properties, committed progenitors, and differentiated cells. Though the nature and functions of MSCs remain unclear, nonclonal stromal cultures obtained from bone marrow and other tissues currently serve as sources of putative MSCs for therapeutic purposes, and several findings underscore their effectiveness in treating different diseases. To date, 493 MSC-based clinical trials, either complete or ongoing, appear in the database of the US National Institutes of Health. In the present article, we provide a comprehensive review of MSC-based clinical trials conducted worldwide that scrutinizes biological properties of MSCs, elucidates recent clinical findings and clinical trial phases of investigation, highlights therapeutic effects of MSCs, and identifies principal criticisms of the use of these cells. In particular, we analyze clinical trials using MSCs for representative diseases, including hematological disease, graft-versus-host disease, organ transplantation, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and diseases in the liver, kidney

  14. Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cell-derived exosomes: A promising cell-free therapeutic strategy in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motavaf, M; Pakravan, K; Babashah, S; Malekvandfard, F; Masoumi, M; Sadeghizadeh, M

    2016-06-30

    Mesenchymal stem cells have emerged as promising therapeutic candidates in regenerative medicine. The mechanisms underlying mesenchymal stem cells regenerative properties were initially attributed to their engraftment in injured tissues and their subsequent transdifferentiation to repair and replace damaged cells. However, studies in animal models and patients indicated that the low number of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells localize to the target tissue and transdifferentiate to appropriate cell lineage. Instead the regenerative potential of mesenchymal stem cells has been found - at least in part - to be mediated via their paracrine actions. Recently, a secreted group of vesicles, called "exosome" has been identified as major mediator of mesenchymal stem cells therapeutic efficacy. In this review, we will summarize the current literature on administration of exosomes released by mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine and suggest how they could help to improve tissue regeneration following injury.

  15. Function of mesenchymal stem cells following loading of gold nanotracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    et al

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Laura M Ricles1, Seung Yun Nam1,2, Konstantin Sokolov3,1, Stanislav Y Emelianov1,3, Laura J Suggs11Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 3Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USABackground: Stem cells can differentiate into multiple cell types, and therefore can be used for cellular therapies, including tissue repair. However, the participation of stem cells in tissue repair and neovascularization is not well understood. Therefore, implementing a noninvasive, long-term imaging technique to track stem cells in vivo is needed to obtain a better understanding of the wound healing response. Generally, we are interested in developing an imaging approach to track mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in vivo after delivery via a polyethylene glycol modified fibrin matrix (PEGylated fibrin matrix using MSCs loaded with gold nanoparticles as nanotracers. The objective of the current study was to assess the effects of loading MSCs with gold nanoparticles on cellular function.Methods: In this study, we utilized various gold nanoparticle formulations by varying size and surface coatings and assessed the efficiency of cell labeling using darkfield microscopy. We hypothesized that loading cells with gold nanotracers would not significantly alter cell function due to the inert and biocompatible characteristics of gold. The effect of nanoparticle loading on cell viability and cytotoxicity was analyzed using a LIVE/DEAD stain and an MTT assay. The ability of MSCs to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes after nanoparticle loading was also examined. In addition, nanoparticle loading and retention over time was assessed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS.Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that loading MSCs with gold nanotracers does not alter cell function and, based on the ICP

  16. Immortalized mesenchymal stem cells: an alternative to primary mesenchymal stem cells in neuronal differentiation and neuroregeneration associated studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Min

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be induced to differentiate into neuronal cells under appropriate cellular conditions and transplanted in brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases animal models for neuroregeneration studies. In contrast to the embryonic stem cells (ESCs, MSCs are easily subject to aging and senescence because of their finite ability of self-renewal. MSCs senescence seriously affected theirs application prospects as a promising tool for cell-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study, we established a reversible immortalized mesenchymal stem cells (IMSCs line by using SSR#69 retrovirus expressing simian virus 40 large T (SV40T antigen as an alternative to primary MSCs. Methods The retroviral vector SSR#69 expressing simian virus 40 large T (SV40T antigen was used to construct IMSCs. IMSCs were identified by flow cytometry to detect cell surface makers. To investigate proliferation and differentiation potential of IMSCs, cell growth curve determination and mesodermal trilineage differentiation tests were performed. Neuronal differentiation characteristics of IMSCs were detected in vitro. Before IMSCs transplantation, we excluded its tumorigenicity in nude mice firstly. The Morris water maze tests and shuttle box tests were performed five weeks after HIBD models received cells transplantation therapy. Results In this study, reversible IMSCs were constructed successfully and had the similar morphology and cell surface makers as primary MSCs. IMSCs possessed better ability of proliferation and anti-senescence compared with primary MSCs, while maintained multilineage differentiation capacity. Neural-like cells derived from IMSCs had similar expressions of neural-specific genes, protein expression patterns and resting membrane potential (RMP compared with their counterparts derived from primary MSCs. There was no bump formation in nude mice subcutaneously injected with IMSCs. IMSCs

  17. Células-tronco mesenquimais Mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betânia Souza Monteiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Dentre todas as células-tronco estudadas até o presente momento, as mesenquimais (MSC destacam-se por sua elevada plasticidade, podendo originar tecidos mesodermais e não mesodermais. Além disso, possuem características imunomoduladoras e imunossupressoras que ampliam as possibilidades de utilização terapêutica. As MSC secretam uma grande variedade de citocinas pró e anti-inflamatórias e fatores de crescimento e, por meio dessas moléculas bioativas, proporcionam a modulação da resposta inflamatória, o restabelecimento do suprimento vascular e a reparação adequada do tecido, contribuindo para a homeostasia tissular e imunológica sob condições fisiológicas. Também podem induzir as demais células presentes no nicho tecidual a secretarem outros fatores solúveis que estimulam a diferenciação dessas células indiferenciadas, favorecendo o processo de reparação. A terapia celular com MSC é uma alternativa terapêutica promissora, porém a compreensão da biologia dessas células ainda é uma ciência em formação. Este artigo tem por objetivo realizar uma breve revisão sobre as células mesenquimais indiferenciadas.Of all the stem cells studied so far, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSC stand out for their high plasticity and capacity of generating mesodermal and non-mesodermal tissues. In addition, immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive features that expand possibilities for therapeutic use are present in these cells. A variety of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors are secrete for MSC and provide a modulation of inflammatory response, re-establishment of vascular supply and adequate repair of the tissue, contributing to tissue homeostasis under physiologic conditions. Therefore, they can induce secretion of soluble factors that stimulate their differentiation by other cells present at the niche's tissue, promoting the repair process. Cell therapy using MSC is a promises therapeutic alternative, but

  18. Transcriptional Dynamics of Immortalized Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells during Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression along with neoplastic transformation in human cells provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying transformation. To further address these questions, we performed whole transcriptome analysis to the human mesenchymal stem cell line, UE6E7T-3, which was immortalized with hTERT and human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 genes, in association with progress of transformation in these cells. At early stages of culture, UE6E7T-3 cells preferentially lost one copy of chromosome 13, as previously described; in addition, tumor suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and apoptosis-activating genes were overexpressed. After the loss of chromosome 13, additional aneuploidy and genetic alterations that drove progressive transformation, were observed. At this stage, the cell line expressed oncogenes as well as genes related to anti-apoptotic functions, cell-cycle progression, and chromosome instability (CIN; these pro-tumorigenic changes were concomitant with a decrease in tumor suppressor gene expression. At later stages after prolong culture, the cells exhibited chromosome translocations, acquired anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity in nude mice, (sarcoma and exhibited increased expression of genes encoding growth factor and DNA repair genes, and decreased expression of adhesion genes. In particular, glypican-5 (GPC5, which encodes a cell-surface proteoglycan that might be a biomarker for sarcoma, was expressed at high levels in association with transformation. Patched (Ptc1, the cell surface receptor for hedgehog (Hh signaling, was also significantly overexpressed and co-localized with GPC5. Knockdown of GPC5 expression decreased cell proliferation, suggesting that it plays a key role in growth in U3-DT cells (transformants derived from UE6E7T-3 cells through the Hh signaling pathway. Thus, the UE6E7T-3 cell culture model is a useful tool for assessing the functional

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke:mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guihong Li; Fengbo Yu; Ting Lei; Haijun Gao; Peiwen Li; Yuxue Sun; Haiyan Huang; Qingchun Mu

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have conifrmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research.

  20. Visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-ping Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T 7-8 . Superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cord via the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic field was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunofluorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guidance. Our data confirm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic field guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively tracked in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  1. 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seyed Mojtaba Hosseini; Mohammad Farahmandnia; Zahra Razi; Somayeh Delavarifar; Benafsheh Shakibajahromi

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy using stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia has been reported. However, it remains controversial regarding the optimal time for cell transplantation and the transplantation route. Rat models of cerebral ischemia were established by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. At 1, 12 hours, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after cerebral ischemia, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were injected via the tail vein. At 28 days after cerebral ischemia, rat neurological function was evaluated using a 6-point grading scale and the pathological change of ischemic cerebral tissue was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Under the lfuorescence microscope, the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was examined by PKH labeling. Caspase-3 activity was measured using spectrophotometry. The optimal neurological function recovery, lowest degree of ischemic cerebral damage, greatest number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrating to peri-ischemic area, and lowest caspase-3 activity in the ischemic cerebral tissue were observed in rats that underwent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation at 12 hours after cerebral ischemia. These ifndings suggest that 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for tail vein injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia, and the strongest neuroprotective effect of this cell therapy appears at this time.

  2. visual bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in the repair of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-ping Zhang; Cheng Xu; Yin Liu; Jian-ding Li; Jun Xie

    2015-01-01

    An important factor in improving functional recovery from spinal cord injury using stem cells is maximizing the number of transplanted cells at the lesion site. Here, we established a contusion model of spinal cord injury by dropping a weight onto the spinal cord at T7–8. Superparamagnet-ic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured spinal cordvia the subarachnoid space. An outer magnetic ifeld was used to successfully guide the labeled cells to the lesion site. Prussian blue staining showed that more bone marrow mesen-chymal stem cells reached the lesion site in these rats than in those without magnetic guidance or superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling, and immunolfuorescence revealed a greater number of complete axons at the lesion site. Moreover, the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale scores were the highest in rats with superparamagnetic labeling and magnetic guid-ance. Our data conifrm that superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles effectively label bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and impart sufficient magnetism to respond to the external magnetic ifeld guides. More importantly, superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can be dynamically and non-invasively trackedin vivo using magnetic resonance imaging. Superparamagnetic iron oxide labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells coupled with magnetic guidance offers a promising avenue for the clinical treatment of spinal cord injury.

  3. 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mojtaba Hosseini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy using stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia has been reported. However, it remains controversial regarding the optimal time for cell transplantation and the transplantation route. Rat models of cerebral ischemia were established by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. At 1, 12 hours, 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after cerebral ischemia, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were injected via the tail vein. At 28 days after cerebral ischemia, rat neurological function was evaluated using a 6-point grading scale and the pathological change of ischemic cerebral tissue was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining. Under the fluorescence microscope, the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was examined by PKH labeling. Caspase-3 activity was measured using spectrophotometry. The optimal neurological function recovery, lowest degree of ischemic cerebral damage, greatest number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrating to peri-ischemic area, and lowest caspase-3 activity in the ischemic cerebral tissue were observed in rats that underwent bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation at 12 hours after cerebral ischemia. These findings suggest that 12 hours after cerebral ischemia is the optimal time for tail vein injection of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation against cerebral ischemia, and the strongest neuroprotective effect of this cell therapy appears at this time.

  4. Titanium phosphate glass microcarriers induce enhanced osteogenic cell proliferation and human mesenchymal stem cell protein expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilay J Lakhkar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed 50- to 100-µm-sized titanium phosphate glass microcarriers (denoted as Ti5 that show enhanced proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and MG63 osteosarcoma cells, as well as enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell expression of bone differentiation markers, in comparison with commercially available glass microspheres at all time points. We also demonstrate that these microcarriers provide superior human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation with conventional Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle medium than with a specially developed commercial stem cell medium. The microcarrier proliferative capacity is revealed by a 24-fold increase in MG63 cell numbers in spinner flask bioreactor studies performed over a 7-day period, versus only a 6-fold increase in control microspheres under the same conditions; the corresponding values of Ti5 and control microspheres under static culture are 8-fold and 7-fold, respectively. The capability of guided osteogenic differentiation is confirmed by ELISAs for bone morphogenetic protein-2 and osteopontin, which reveal significantly greater expression of these markers, especially osteopontin, by human mesenchymal stem cells on the Ti5 microspheres than on the control. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy images reveal favorable MG63 and human mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on the Ti5 microsphere surfaces. Thus, the results demonstrate the suitability of the developed microspheres for use as microcarriers in bone tissue engineering applications.

  5. Epigenetic dysregulation in mesenchymal stem cell aging and spontaneous differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs hold great promise for the treatment of difficult diseases. As MSCs represent a rare cell population, ex vivo expansion of MSCs is indispensable to obtain sufficient amounts of cells for therapies and tissue engineering. However, spontaneous differentiation and aging of MSCs occur during expansion and the molecular mechanisms involved have been poorly understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human MSCs in early and late passages were examined for their expression of genes involved in osteogenesis to determine their spontaneous differentiation towards osteoblasts in vitro, and of genes involved in self-renewal and proliferation for multipotent differentiation potential. In parallel, promoter DNA methylation and hostone H3 acetylation levels were determined. We found that MSCs underwent aging and spontaneous osteogenic differentiation upon regular culture expansion, with progressive downregulation of TERT and upregulation of osteogenic genes such as Runx2 and ALP. Meanwhile, the expression of genes associated with stem cell self-renewal such as Oct4 and Sox2 declined markedly. Notably, the altered expression of these genes were closely associated with epigenetic dysregulation of histone H3 acetylation in K9 and K14, but not with methylation of CpG islands in the promoter regions of most of these genes. bFGF promoted MSC proliferation and suppressed its spontaneous osteogenic differentiation, with corresponding changes in histone H3 acetylation in TERT, Oct4, Sox2, Runx2 and ALP genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that histone H3 acetylation, which can be modulated by extrinsic signals, plays a key role in regulating MSC aging and differentiation.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cell conditioning promotes rat oligodendroglial cell maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Joachim Jadasz

    Full Text Available Oligodendroglial progenitor/precursor cells (OPCs represent the main cellular source for the generation of new myelinating oligodendrocytes in the adult central nervous system (CNS. In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS myelin repair activities based on recruitment, activation and differentiation of resident OPCs can be observed. However, the overall degree of successful remyelination is limited and the existence of an MS-derived anti-oligodendrogenic milieu prevents OPCs from contributing to myelin repair. It is therefore of considerable interest to understand oligodendroglial homeostasis and maturation processes in order to enable the development of remyelination therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been shown to exert positive immunomodulatory effects, reduce demyelination, increase neuroprotection and to promote adult neural stem cell differentiation towards the oligodendroglial lineage. We here addressed whether MSC secreted factors can boost the OPC's oligodendrogenic capacity in a myelin non-permissive environment. To this end, we analyzed cellular morphologies, expression and regulation of key factors involved in oligodendroglial fate and maturation of primary rat cells upon incubation with MSC-conditioned medium. This demonstrated that MSC-derived soluble factors promote and accelerate oligodendroglial differentiation, even under astrocytic endorsing conditions. Accelerated maturation resulted in elevated levels of myelin expression, reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression and was accompanied by downregulation of prominent inhibitory differentiation factors such as Id2 and Id4. We thus conclude that apart from their suggested application as potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory MS treatment, these cells might also be exploited to support endogenous myelin repair activities.

  7. Platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates support growth and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Mjoll Jonsdottir-Buch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose of this study was to produce human platelet lysates from expired, blood bank-approved platelet concentrates and evaluate their use as growth supplement in the culture of mesenchymal stem cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with one of three culture supplements; fetal bovine serum, lysates from freshly prepared human platelet concentrates, or lysates from expired human platelet concentrates. The effects of these platelet-derived culture supplements on basic mesenchymal stem cell characteristics were evaluated. All cultures maintained the typical mesenchymal stem cell surface marker expression, trilineage differentiation potential, and the ability to suppress in vitro immune responses. However, mesenchymal stem cells supplemented with platelet lysates proliferated faster than traditionally cultured cells and increased the expression of the osteogenic marker gene RUNX-2; yet no difference between the use of fresh and expired platelet concentrates was observed. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that human platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum for mesenchymal stem cell culture to the same extent as lysates from fresh platelets.

  8. Calcium phosphate thin films enhance the response of human mesenchymal stem cells to nanostructured titanium surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura M McCafferty

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of biomaterial surfaces possessing the topographical cues that can promote mesenchymal stem cell recruitment and, in particular, those capable of subsequently directing osteogenic differentiation is of increasing importance for the advancement of tissue engineering. While it is accepted that it is the interaction with specific nanoscale topography that induces mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, the potential for an attendant bioactive chemistry working in tandem with such nanoscale features to enhance this effect has not been considered to any great extent. This article presents a study of mesenchymal stem cell response to conformal bioactive calcium phosphate thin films sputter deposited onto a polycrystalline titanium nanostructured surface with proven capability to directly induce osteogenic differentiation in human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells. The sputter deposited surfaces supported high levels of human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cell adherence and proliferation, as determined by DNA quantification. Furthermore, they were also found to be capable of directly promoting significant levels of osteogenic differentiation. Specifically, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene expression and immunocytochemical localisation of key osteogenic markers revealed that the nanostructured titanium surfaces and the bioactive calcium phosphate coatings could direct the differentiation towards an osteogenic lineage. Moreover, the addition of the calcium phosphate chemistry to the topographical profile of the titanium was found to induce increased human bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cell differentiation compared to that observed for either the titanium or calcium phosphate coating without an underlying nanostructure. Hence, the results presented here highlight that a clear benefit can be achieved from a surface engineering strategy that combines a defined surface topography with an attendant, conformal

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells in human placental chorionic villi reside in a vascular Niche

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castrechini, N. M.; Murthi, P.; Gude, N. M.; Erwich, J. J. H. M.; Gronthos, S.; Zannettino, A.; Brennecke, S. R.; Kalionis, B.; Brennecke, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    The chorionic villi of human term placentae are a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) The stem cell "niche" within the chorionic villi regulates how PMSCs participate in placental tissue generation, maintenance and repair, but the anatomic location of the niche has not been defined A numbe

  10. IFNγ and B7-H1 in the immunology of mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are found in multiple organs in the fetus,cord blood and adult tissues [1]. However, in adults, the bone marrow is the major source of these stem cells. MSCs surround the blood vessels of bone marrow and are also in contact with the trabeculae [2].

  11. Clopidogrel Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation Following Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coimbra, L S; Steffens, J P; Alsadun, S; Albiero, M L; Rossa, C; Pignolo, R J; Spolidorio, L C; Graves, D T

    2015-12-01

    Bone formation is dependent on the differentiation of osteoblasts from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In addition to serving as progenitors, MSCs reduce inflammation and produce factors that stimulate tissue formation. Upon injury, MSCs migrate to the periodontium, where they contribute to regeneration. We examined the effect of clopidogrel and aspirin on MSCs following induction of periodontitis in rats by placement of ligatures. We showed that after the removal of ligatures, which induces resolution of periodontal inflammation, clopidogrel had a significant effect on reducing the inflammatory infiltrate. It also increased the number of osteoblasts and MSCs. Mechanistically, the latter was linked to increased proliferation of MSCs in vivo and in vitro. When given prior to inducing periodontitis, clopidogrel had little effect on MSC or osteoblasts numbers. Applying aspirin before or after induction of periodontitis did not have a significant effect on the parameters measured. These results suggest that clopidogrel may have a positive effect on MSCs in conditions where a reparative process has been initiated.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells for treatment of aortic aneurysms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aika; Yamawaki-Ogata; Ryotaro; Hashizume; Xian-Ming; Fu; Akihiko; Usui; Yuji; Narita

    2014-01-01

    An aortic aneurysm(AA) is a silent but life-threatening disease that involves rupture. It occurs mainly in aging and severe atherosclerotic damage of the aortic wall. Even though surgical intervention is effective to prevent rupture, surgery for the thoracic and thoraco-abdom-inal aorta is an invasive procedure with high mortality and morbidity. Therefore, an alternative strategy for treatment of AA is required. Recently, the molecular pathology of AA has been clarified. AA is caused by an imbalance between the synthesis and degradation of extracellular matrices in the aortic wall. Chronic inflam-mation enhances the degradation of matrices directly and indirectly, making control of the chronic inflamma-tion crucial for aneurysmal development. Meanwhile, mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) are known to be ob-tained from an adult population and to differentiate into various types of cells. In addition, MSCs have not only the potential anti-inflammatory and immunosuppres-sive properties but also can be recruited into damagedtissue. MSCs have been widely used as a source for celltherapy to treat various diseases involving graft-versus-host disease, stroke, myocardial infarction, and chronicinflammatory disease such as Crohn’s disease clinically.Therefore, administration of MSCs might be availableto treat AA using anti-inflammatory and immnosup-pressive properties. This review provides a summary ofseveral studies on "Cell Therapy for Aortic Aneurysm"including our recent data, and we also discuss the pos-sibility of this kind of treatment.

  13. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations: Application for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Pérez-Silos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs continues to progress rapidly. Nevertheless, the field faces several challenges, such as inherent cell heterogeneity and the absence of unique MSCs markers. Due to MSCs’ ability to differentiate into multiple tissues, these cells represent a promising tool for new cell-based therapies. However, for tissue engineering applications, it is critical to start with a well-defined cell population. Additionally, evidence that MSCs subpopulations may also feature distinct characteristics and regeneration potential has arisen. In this report, we present an overview of the identification of MSCs based on the expression of several surface markers and their current tissue sources. We review the use of MSCs subpopulations in recent years and the main methodologies that have addressed their isolation, and we emphasize the most-used surface markers for selection, isolation, and characterization. Next, we discuss the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation from MSCs subpopulations. We conclude that MSCs subpopulation selection is not a minor concern because each subpopulation has particular potential for promoting the differentiation into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The accurate selection of the subpopulation advances possibilities suitable for preclinical and clinical studies and determines the safest and most efficacious regeneration process.

  14. Intra-articular Implantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Justin J.; Chahla, Jorge; McCarty, Eric C.; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) after partial or total meniscectomy is a prevalent issue that patients must face. Various methods of replacing meniscal tissue have been studied to avoid this progression, including meniscal allograft transplantation, meniscal scaffolds, and synthetic meniscus replacement. Studies have shown that meniscal scaffolds may improve symptoms but have not been shown to prevent progression of OA. Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed as a possible biological therapy for meniscal regeneration. Several animal studies and 1 human study have evaluated the effect of transplanting MSCs into the knee joint after partial meniscectomy. The purpose of this review was to assess the outcomes of intra-articular transplantation of MSCs on meniscal regeneration in animals and humans after partial meniscectomy. Limited results from animal studies suggest that there is some potential for intra-articular injection of MSCs for the regeneration of meniscal tissue. However, further studies are necessary to determine the quality of regenerated meniscal tissue through histological and biomechanical testing. PMID:28203596

  15. Mesenchymal stem cell ingrowth and differentiation on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mygind, Tina; Stiehler, Maik; Baatrup, Anette; Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Kassem, Moustapha; Bünger, Cody

    2007-02-01

    Culture of osteogenic cells on a porous scaffold could offer a new solution to bone grafting using autologous human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) from the patient. We compared coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with pore sizes of 200 and 500 microm for expansion and differentiation of hMSCs. We cultivated the hMSC statically or in spinner flasks for 1, 7, 14 and 21 days and found that the 200-microm pore scaffolds exhibited a faster rate of osteogenic differentiation than did the 500-microm pore scaffolds as shown by an alkaline phosphatase activity assay and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for 10 osteogenic markers. The 500-microm scaffolds had increased proliferation rates and accommodated a higher number of cells (shown by DNA content, scanning electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy). Thus the porosity of a 3D microporous biomaterial may be used to steer hMSC in a particular direction. We found that dynamic spinner flask cultivation of hMSC/scaffold constructs resulted in increased proliferation, differentiation and distribution of cells in scaffolds. Therefore, spinner flask cultivation is an easy-to-use inexpensive system for cultivating hMSCs on small to intermediate size 3D scaffolds.

  16. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  17. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Morphology and Migration on Microtextured Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Brittany L.; Riley, Thomas R.; Platt, Christina J.; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    The implant used in spinal fusion procedures is an essential component to achieving successful arthrodesis. At the cellular level, the implant impacts healing and fusion through a series of steps: first, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) need to adhere and proliferate to cover the implant; second, the MSCs must differentiate into osteoblasts; third, the osteoid matrix produced by the osteoblasts needs to generate new bone tissue, thoroughly integrating the implant with the vertebrate above and below. Previous research has demonstrated that microtextured titanium is advantageous over smooth titanium and PEEK implants for both promoting osteogenic differentiation and integrating with host bone tissue; however, no investigation to date has examined the early morphology and migration of MSCs on these surfaces. This study details cell spreading and morphology changes over 24 h, rate and directionality of migration 6–18 h post-seeding, differentiation markers at 10 days, and the long-term morphology of MSCs at 7 days, on microtextured, acid-etched titanium (endoskeleton), smooth titanium, and smooth PEEK surfaces. The results demonstrate that in all metrics, the two titanium surfaces outperformed the PEEK surface. Furthermore, the rough acid-etched titanium surface presented the most favorable overall results, demonstrating the random migration needed to efficiently cover a surface in addition to morphologies consistent with osteoblasts and preosteoblasts. PMID:27243001

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Subpopulations: Application for Orthopedic Regenerative Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Morales, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Research on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) continues to progress rapidly. Nevertheless, the field faces several challenges, such as inherent cell heterogeneity and the absence of unique MSCs markers. Due to MSCs' ability to differentiate into multiple tissues, these cells represent a promising tool for new cell-based therapies. However, for tissue engineering applications, it is critical to start with a well-defined cell population. Additionally, evidence that MSCs subpopulations may also feature distinct characteristics and regeneration potential has arisen. In this report, we present an overview of the identification of MSCs based on the expression of several surface markers and their current tissue sources. We review the use of MSCs subpopulations in recent years and the main methodologies that have addressed their isolation, and we emphasize the most-used surface markers for selection, isolation, and characterization. Next, we discuss the osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation from MSCs subpopulations. We conclude that MSCs subpopulation selection is not a minor concern because each subpopulation has particular potential for promoting the differentiation into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. The accurate selection of the subpopulation advances possibilities suitable for preclinical and clinical studies and determines the safest and most efficacious regeneration process. PMID:27725838

  19. Novel supplier of mesenchymal stem cell: subacromial bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhee, S-H; Jo, Y H; Kim, B Y; Nam, B M; Nemeno, J G; Lee, S; Yang, W; Lee, J I

    2013-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stromal elements that can differentiate into a variety of cell types. MSCs are good sources of therapeutic cells for degenerative diseases. For these reason, many researchers have focused on searching for other sources of MSCs. To obtain MSCs for clinical use requires surgery of the donor that therefore can induce donor morbidity, since the common sources at present are bone marrow and adipose tissues. In this study, we investigated the existence of MSCs in postoperative discarded tissues. Subacromial bursal tissues were obtained from the shoulders of 3 injured patients. The cells from the bursa tissues were isolated through treatment with collagenase. The isolated cells were then seeded and expanded by serial passaging under normal culture system. To evaluate MSC characteristics of the cells, their MSC markers were confirmed by mRNA and protein expression. Multipotent ability was assessed using differentiation media and immunohistochemistry. Cells from the bursa expressed MSCs markers-CD29, CD73, CD90, and PDGFRB (platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta). Moreover, as to their multipotency, bursal cells differentiated into adipocytes (fat cells), osteocytes (bone cells), and chondrocytes (cartilage cells). In summary, we showed that MSCs could be generated from the subacromial bursa, which is medical waste after surgery.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells: potential in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanna, Tanmay; Sachan, Vatsal

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Marrow Stromal Cells (MSCs) have long been viewed as a potent tool for regenerative cell therapy. MSCs are easily accessible from both healthy donor and patient tissue and expandable in vitro on a therapeutic scale without posing significant ethical or procedural problems. MSC based therapies have proven to be effective in preclinical studies for graft versus host disease, stroke, myocardial infarction, pulmonary fibrosis, autoimmune disorders and many other conditions and are currently undergoing clinical trials at a number of centers all over the world. MSCs are also being extensively researched as a therapeutic tool against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MSCs have been discussed with regard to two aspects in the context of neurodegenerative diseases: their ability to transdifferentiate into neural cells under specific conditions and their neuroprotective and immunomodulatory effects. When transplanted into the brain, MSCs produce neurotrophic and growth factors that protect and induce regeneration of damaged tissue. Additionally, MSCs have also been explored as gene delivery vehicles, for example being genetically engineered to over express glial-derived or brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the brain. Clinical trials involving MSCs are currently underway for MS, ALS, traumatic brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and stroke. In the present review, we explore the potential that MSCs hold with regard to the aforementioned neurodegenerative diseases and the current scenario with reference to the same.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Nanette; Annett, Geralyn; Wirthlin, Louisa; Olson, Scott; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells/marrow stromal cells (MSCs) present a promising tool for cell therapy, and are currently being tested in US FDA-approved clinical trials for myocardial infarction, stroke, meniscus injury, limb ischemia, graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune disorders. They have been extensively tested and proven effective in preclinical studies for these and many other disorders. There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of MSCs to treat neurodegenerative diseases, in particular for those that are fatal and difficult to treat, such as Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Proposed regenerative approaches to neurological diseases using MSCs include cell therapies in which cells are delivered via intracerebral or intrathecal injection. Upon transplantation into the brain, MSCs promote endogenous neuronal growth, decrease apoptosis, reduce levels of free radicals, encourage synaptic connection from damaged neurons and regulate inflammation, primarily through paracrine actions. MSCs transplanted into the brain have been demonstrated to promote functional recovery by producing trophic factors that induce survival and regeneration of host neurons. Therapies will capitalize on the innate trophic support from MSCs or on augmented growth factor support, such as delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor or glial-derived neurotrophic factor into the brain to support injured neurons, using genetically engineered MSCs as the delivery vehicles. Clinical trials for MSC injection into the CNS to treat traumatic brain injury and stroke are currently ongoing. The current data in support of applying MSC-based cellular therapies to the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  2. Expression of Neural Markers by Undifferentiated Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Foudah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous expression of neural markers by mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been considered to be a demonstration of MSCs’ predisposition to differentiate towards neural lineages. In view of their application in cell therapy for neurodegenerative diseases, it is very important to deepen the knowledge about this distinctive biological property of MSCs. In this study, we evaluated the expression of neuronal and glial markers in undifferentiated rat MSCs (rMSCs at different culture passages (from early to late. rMSCs spontaneously expressed neural markers depending on culture passage, and they were coexpressed or not with the neural progenitor marker nestin. In contrast, the number of rMSCs expressing mesengenic differentiation markers was very low or even completely absent. Moreover, rMSCs at late culture passages were not senescent cells and maintained the MSC immunophenotype. However, their differentiation capabilities were altered. In conclusion, our results support the concept of MSCs as multidifferentiated cells and suggest the existence of immature and mature neurally fated rMSC subpopulations. A possible correlation between specific MSC subpopulations and specific neural lineages could optimize the use of MSCs in cell transplantation therapy for the treatment of neurological diseases.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells and cancer: friends or enemies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, In-Sun; Lee, Hwa-Yong; Kang, Kyung-Sun

    2014-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate and engraft into tumor sites and exert stimulatory effects on cancer cell growth, invasion and even metastasis through direct and/or indirect interaction with tumor cells. However, these pro-tumorigenic effects of MSCs are still being discovered and may even involve opposing effects. MSCs can be friends or enemies of cancer cells: they may stimulate tumor development by regulating immune surveillance, growth, and angiogenesis. On the other hand, they may inhibit tumor growth by inhibiting survival signaling such as Wnt and Akt pathway. MSCs have also been proposed as an attractive candidate for the delivery of anti-tumor agents, owing to their ability to home into tumor sites and to secrete cytokines. Detailed information about the mutual interactions between tumor cells and MSCs will undoubtedly lead to safer and more effective clinical therapy for tumors. In this article, we summarize a number of findings to provide current information on the potential roles of MSCs in tumor development; we then discuss the therapeutic potential of engineered MSCs to reveal any meaningful clinical applications.

  4. Immunomodulatory effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella eFranquesa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The research on T cell immunosuppression therapies has attracted most of the attention in clinical transplantation. However, B cells and humoral immune responses are increasingly acknowledged as crucial mediators of chronic allograft rejection. Indeed, humoral immune responses can lead to renal allograft rejection even in patients whose cell-mediated immune responses are well controlled. On the other hand, newly studied B cell subsets with regulatory effects have been linked to tolerance achievement in transplantation. Better understanding of the regulatory and effector B cell responses may therefore lead to new therapeutic approaches.Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC are arising as a potent therapeutic tool in transplantation due to their regenerative and immunomodulatory properties. The research on MSCs has mainly focused on their effects on T cells and although data regarding the modulatory effects of MSCs on alloantigen-specific humoral response in humans is scarce, it has been demonstrated that MSCs significantly affect B cell functioning. In the present review we will analyze and discuss the results in this field.

  5. Chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells: challenges and unfulfilled expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Rodrigo A; Welter, Jean F; Correa, Diego; Caplan, Arnold I

    2014-12-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration provides a substantial challenge in Regenerative Medicine because of the high degree of morphological and mechanical complexity intrinsic to hyaline cartilage due, in part, to its extracellular matrix. Cartilage remains one of the most difficult tissues to heal; even state-of-the-art regenerative medicine technology cannot yet provide authentic cartilage resurfacing. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were once believed to be the panacea for cartilage repair and regeneration, but despite years of research, they have not fulfilled these expectations. It has been observed that MSCs have an intrinsic differentiation program reminiscent of endochondral bone formation, which they follow after exposure to specific reagents as a part of current differentiation protocols. Efforts have been made to avoid the resulting hypertrophic fate of MSCs; however, so far, none of these has recreated a fully functional articular hyaline cartilage without chondrocytes exhibiting a hypertrophic phenotype. We reviewed the current literature in an attempt to understand why MSCs have failed to regenerate articular cartilage. The challenges that must be overcome before MSC-based tissue engineering can become a front-line technology for successful articular cartilage regeneration are highlighted.

  6. Chondrogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Challenges and Unfulfilled Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somoza, Rodrigo A.; Welter, Jean F.; Correa, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair and regeneration provides a substantial challenge in Regenerative Medicine because of the high degree of morphological and mechanical complexity intrinsic to hyaline cartilage due, in part, to its extracellular matrix. Cartilage remains one of the most difficult tissues to heal; even state-of-the-art regenerative medicine technology cannot yet provide authentic cartilage resurfacing. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were once believed to be the panacea for cartilage repair and regeneration, but despite years of research, they have not fulfilled these expectations. It has been observed that MSCs have an intrinsic differentiation program reminiscent of endochondral bone formation, which they follow after exposure to specific reagents as a part of current differentiation protocols. Efforts have been made to avoid the resulting hypertrophic fate of MSCs; however, so far, none of these has recreated a fully functional articular hyaline cartilage without chondrocytes exhibiting a hypertrophic phenotype. We reviewed the current literature in an attempt to understand why MSCs have failed to regenerate articular cartilage. The challenges that must be overcome before MSC-based tissue engineering can become a front-line technology for successful articular cartilage regeneration are highlighted. PMID:24749845

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Anwarul; Deeb, George; Rahal, Rahaf; Atwi, Khairallah; Mondello, Stefania; Marei, Hany Elsayed; Gali, Amr; Sleiman, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by a disruption in the normal function of the brain due to an injury following a trauma, which can potentially cause severe physical, cognitive, and emotional impairment. The primary insult to the brain initiates secondary injury cascades consisting of multiple complex biochemical responses of the brain that significantly influence the overall severity of the brain damage and clinical sequelae. The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) offers huge potential for application in the treatment of TBI. MSCs have immunosuppressive properties that reduce inflammation in injured tissue. As such, they could be used to modulate the secondary mechanisms of injury and halt the progression of the secondary insult in the brain after injury. Particularly, MSCs are capable of secreting growth factors that facilitate the regrowth of neurons in the brain. The relative abundance of harvest sources of MSCs also makes them particularly appealing. Recently, numerous studies have investigated the effects of infusion of MSCs into animal models of TBI. The results have shown significant improvement in the motor function of the damaged brain tissues. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI. The review starts with a brief introduction of the pathophysiology of TBI, followed by the biology of MSCs, and the application of MSCs in TBI treatment. The challenges associated with the application of MSCs in the treatment of TBI and strategies to address those challenges in the future have also been discussed.

  8. Engineering mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative medicine and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Sun; Suryaprakash, Smruthi; Lao, Yeh-Hsing; Leong, Kam W

    2015-08-01

    Researchers have applied mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to a variety of therapeutic scenarios by harnessing their multipotent, regenerative, and immunosuppressive properties with tropisms toward inflamed, hypoxic, and cancerous sites. Although MSC-based therapies have been shown to be safe and effective to a certain degree, the efficacy remains low in most cases when MSC are applied alone. To enhance their therapeutic efficacy, researchers have equipped MSC with targeted delivery functions using genetic engineering, therapeutic agent incorporation, and cell surface modification. MSC can be genetically modified virally or non-virally to overexpress therapeutic proteins that complement their innate properties. MSC can also be primed with non-peptidic drugs or magnetic nanoparticles for enhanced efficacy and externally regulated targeting, respectively. Furthermore, MSC can be functionalized with targeting moieties to augment their homing toward therapeutic sites using enzymatic modification, chemical conjugation, or non-covalent interactions. These engineering techniques are still works in progress, requiring optimization to improve the therapeutic efficacy and targeting effectiveness while minimizing any loss of MSC function. In this review, we will highlight the advanced techniques of engineering MSC, describe their promise and the challenges of translation into clinical settings, and suggest future perspectives on realizing their full potential for MSC-based therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell seeding promotes reendothelialization of the endovascular stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue; Wang, Guixue; Tang, Chaojun; Zhang, Dechuan; Li, Zhenggong; Du, Dingyuan; Zhang, Zhengcai

    2011-09-01

    This study is designed to make a novel cell seeding stent and to evaluate reendothelialization and anti-restenosis after the stent implantation. In comparison with cell seeding stents utilized in previous studies, Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have advantages on promoting of issue repair. Thus it was employed to improve the reendothelialization effects of endovascular stent in present work. MSCs were isolated by density gradient centrifugation and determined as CD29(+) CD44(+) CD34(-) cells by immunofluorescence and immunocytochemistry; gluten and polylysine coated stents were prepared by ultrasonic atomization spray, and MSCs seeded stents were made through rotation culture according to the optimized conditions that were determined in previous studies. The results from animal experiments, in which male New Zealand white rabbits were used, show that the reendothelialization of MSCs coated stents can be completed within one month; in comparison with 316L stainless steel stents (316L SS stents) and gluten and polylysine coated stents, the intimal hyperplasia and in-stent restenosis are significantly inhibited by MSCs coated stents. Endovascular stent seeded with MSCs promotes reendothelialization and inhibits the intimal hyperplasia and in-stent restenosis compared with the 316L SS stents and the gluten and polylysine coated stents.

  10. Insight into Reepithelialization: How Do Mesenchymal Stem Cells Perform?

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    Deyun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound reepithelialization is a cooperative multifactorial process dominated by keratinocyte migration, proliferation, and differentiation that restores the intact epidermal barrier to prevent infection and excessive moisture loss. However, in wounds that exhibit impaired wound healing, such as chronic nonhealing wounds or hypertrophic scars, the reepithelialization process has failed. Thus, it is necessary to explore a suitable way to mitigate these abnormalities to promote reepithelialization and achieve wound healing. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have the capacity for self-renewal as well as potential multipotency. These cells play important roles in many biological processes, including anti-inflammation, cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation, and signal pathway activation or inhibition. The mechanism of the involvement of MSCs in reepithelialization is still not fully understood. An abundance of evidence has shown that MSCs participate in reepithelialization by inhibiting excessive inflammatory responses, secreting important factors, differentiating into multiple skin cell types, and recruiting other host cells. This review describes the evidence for the roles that MSCs appear to play in the reepithelialization process.

  11. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells drive lymphangiogenesis.

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    Ludovic Maertens

    Full Text Available It is now well accepted that multipotent Bone-Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BM-MSC contribute to cancer progression through several mechanisms including angiogenesis. However, their involvement during the lymphangiogenic process is poorly described. Using BM-MSC isolated from mice of two different backgrounds, we demonstrate a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC both in vivo and in vitro. Co-injection of BM-MSC and tumor cells in mice increased the in vivo tumor growth and intratumoral lymphatic vessel density. In addition, BM-MSC or their conditioned medium stimulated the recruitment of lymphatic vessels in vivo in an ear sponge assay, and ex vivo in the lymphatic ring assay (LRA. In vitro, MSC conditioned medium also increased the proliferation rate and the migration of both primary lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC and an immortalized lymphatic endothelial cell line. Mechanistically, these pro-lymphangiogenic effects relied on the secretion of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF-A by BM-MSC that activates VEGF Receptor (VEGFR-2 pathway on LEC. Indeed, the trapping of VEGF-A in MSC conditioned medium by soluble VEGF Receptors (sVEGFR-1, -2 or the inhibition of VEGFR-2 activity by a specific inhibitor (ZM 323881 both decreased LEC proliferation, migration and the phosphorylation of their main downstream target ERK1/2. This study provides direct unprecedented evidence for a paracrine lymphangiogenic action of BM-MSC via the production of VEGF-A which acts on LEC VEGFR-2.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell mechanobiology and emerging experimental platforms.

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    MacQueen, Luke; Sun, Yu; Simmons, Craig A

    2013-07-06

    Experimental control over progenitor cell lineage specification can be achieved by modulating properties of the cell's microenvironment. These include physical properties of the cell adhesion substrate, such as rigidity, topography and deformation owing to dynamic mechanical forces. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) generate contractile forces to sense and remodel their extracellular microenvironments and thereby obtain information that directs broad aspects of MSC function, including lineage specification. Various physical factors are important regulators of MSC function, but improved understanding of MSC mechanobiology requires novel experimental platforms. Engineers are bridging this gap by developing tools to control mechanical factors with improved precision and throughput, thereby enabling biological investigation of mechanics-driven MSC function. In this review, we introduce MSC mechanobiology and review emerging cell culture platforms that enable new insights into mechanobiological control of MSCs. Our main goals are to provide engineers and microtechnology developers with an up-to-date description of MSC mechanobiology that is relevant to the design of experimental platforms and to introduce biologists to these emerging platforms.

  13. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Treatment Induces Specific Alloantibodies in Horses

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    Sean D. Owens

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unknown whether horses that receive allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs injections develop specific humoral immune response. Our goal was to develop and validate a flow cytometric MSC crossmatch procedure and to determine if horses that received allogeneic MSCs in a clinical setting developed measurable antibodies following MSC administration. Methods. Serum was collected from a total of 19 horses enrolled in 3 different research projects. Horses in the 3 studies all received unmatched allogeneic MSCs. Bone marrow (BM or adipose tissue derived MSCs (ad-MSCs were administered via intravenous, intra-arterial, intratendon, or intraocular routes. Anti-MSCs and anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were detected via flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results. Overall, anti-MSC antibodies were detected in 37% of the horses. The majority of horses (89% were positive for anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA antibodies prior to and after MSC injection. Finally, there was no correlation between the amount of anti-BSA antibody and the development of anti-MSC antibodies. Conclusion. Anti allo-MSC antibody development was common; however, the significance of these antibodies is unknown. There was no correlation between either the presence or absence of antibodies and the percent antibody binding to MSCs and any adverse reaction to a MSC injection.

  14. mTOR and the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

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    Xinxin Xiang; Jing Zhao; Geyang Xu; Yin Li; Weizhen Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine-threonine protein kinase,belongs to the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-related kinase family, which contains a lipid kinase-like domain within their C-terminal region. Recent studies have revealed that mTOR as a critical intracellular molecule can sense the extracellular energy status and regulate the cell growth and proliferation in a variety of cells and tissues. This review summarizes our current understanding about the effects of mTOR on cell differentiation and tissue development, with an emphasis on the lineage determination of mesenchymal stem cells, mTOR can promote adipogenesis in white adipocytes, brown adipocytes, and muscle satellite cells, while rapamycin inhibits the adipogenic function of mTOR. mTOR signaling may function to affect osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, however, rapamycin has been reported to either inhibit or promote osteogenesis. Although the precise mechanism remains unclear, mTOR is indispensable for myogenesis. Depending on the cell type, rapamycin has been reported to inhibit, promote, or have no effect on myogenesis.

  15. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

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    Brandl, Anita [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Nerlich, Michael [Department of Anesthesiology, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany); Angele, Peter, E-mail: Peter.Angele@klinik.uni-regensburg.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93042 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  16. The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell in Cancer Development

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    Hiroshi eYagi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cancer development is still controversial. MSCs may promote tumor progression through immune modulation, but other tumor suppressive effects of MSCs have also been described. The discrepancy between these results may arise from issues related to different tissue sources, individual donor variability, and injection timing of MSCs. The expression of critical receptors such as Toll-like receptor (TLR is variable at each time point of treatment, which may also determine the effects of MSCs on tumor progression. However, factors released from malignant cells, as well as surrounding tissues and the vasculature, are still regarded as a black box. Thus, it is still difficult to clarify the specific role of MSCs in cancer development. Whether MSCs support or suppress tumor progression is currently unclear, but it is clear that systemically administered MSCs can be recruited and migrate toward tumors. These findings are important because they can be used as a basis for initiating studies to explore the incorporation of engineered MSCs as novel anti-tumor carriers, for the development of tumor-targeted therapies.

  17. Hydrophilic polyurethane matrix promotes chondrogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalluri, Sandeep M; Krishnan, G Rajesh; Cheah, Calvin; Arzumand, Ayesha; Yuan, Yuan; Richardson, Caley A; Yang, Shuying; Sarkar, Debanjan

    2015-09-01

    Segmental polyurethanes exhibit biphasic morphology and can control cell fate by providing distinct matrix guided signals to increase the chondrogenic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Polyethylene glycol (PEG) based hydrophilic polyurethanes can deliver differential signals to MSCs through their matrix phases where hard segments are cell-interactive domains and PEG based soft segments are minimally interactive with cells. These coordinated communications can modulate cell-matrix interactions to control cell shape and size for chondrogenesis. Biphasic character and hydrophilicity of polyurethanes with gel like architecture provide a synthetic matrix conducive for chondrogenesis of MSCs, as evidenced by deposition of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix. Compared to monophasic hydrogels, presence of cell interactive domains in hydrophilic polyurethanes gels can balance cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These results demonstrate the correlation between lineage commitment and the changes in cell shape, cell-matrix interaction, and cell-cell adhesion during chondrogenic differentiation which is regulated by polyurethane phase morphology, and thus, represent hydrophilic polyurethanes as promising synthetic matrices for cartilage regeneration.

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Respond to Hypoxia by Increasing Diacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Kinga; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Merkely, Béla; Nolta, Jan A; Fierro, Fernando A

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently being tested clinically for a plethora of conditions, with most approaches relying on the secretion of paracrine signals by MSC to modulate the immune system, promote wound healing, and induce angiogenesis. Hypoxia has been shown to affect MSC proliferation, differentiation, survival and secretory profile. Here, we investigate changes in the lipid composition of human bone marrow-derived MSC after exposure to hypoxia. Using mass spectrometry, we compared the lipid profiles of MSC derived from five different donors, cultured for two days in either normoxia (control) or hypoxia (1% oxygen). Hypoxia induced a significant increase of total triglycerides, fatty acids and diacylglycerols (DG). Remarkably, reduction of DG levels using the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 inhibited the secretion of VEGF and Angiopoietin-2, but increased the secretion of interleukin-8, without affecting significantly their respective mRNA levels. Functionally, incubation of MSC in hypoxia with D609 inhibited the potential of the cells to promote migration of human endothelial cells in a wound/scratch assay. Hence, we show that hypoxia induces in MSC an increase of DG that may affect the angiogenic potential of these cells.

  19. Epigenetic remodeling of chromatin architecture: exploring tumor differentiation therapies in mesenchymal stem cells and sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Sara; Mills, Joslyn; Matushansky, Igor

    2010-03-01

    Sarcomas are the mesenchymal-derived malignant tumors of connective tissues (e.g., fat, bone, and cartilage) presumed to arise from aberrant development or differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Appropriate control of stem cell maintenance versus differentiation allows for normal connective tissue development. Current theories suggest that loss of this control--through accumulation of genetic lesions in MSCs at various points in the differentiation process--leads to development of sarcomas, including undifferentiated, high grade sarcoma tumors. The initiation of stem cell differentiation is highly associated with alteration of gene expression, which depends on chromatin remodeling. Epigenetic chromatin modifying agents have been shown to induce cancer cell differentiation and are currently being used clinically to treat cancer. This review will focus on the importance of epigenetic chromatin remodeling in the context of mesenchymal stem cells, sarcoma tumorigenesis and differentiation therapy.

  20. The Role of Wharton’s Jelly Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Skin Reconstruction

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    Rostamzadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Stem cell therapy, especially in the segment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, is one of the most promising areas of regenerative medicine. Evidence Acquisition According to research conducted by various researchers, Wharton’s Jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJMSCs have several advantages compared to others sources, in regenerative medicine: WJMSCs are more primary cells; WJMSCs can be easily isolated and without invasive procedures; WJMSCs have no ethical problems; WJMSCs are more cost effective than other sources of MSCs. Also, WJMSCs were demonstrated to express stem cell mesenchymal markers. Results Similar to bone marrow MSCs, WJMSCs express major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules. Conclusions Although the aforementioned challenges must still be addressed, the potential of WJMSCs in skin regenerative clinical treatments is promising.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic tool in tissue and organ regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bajek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering is an interdisciplinary field that offers new opportunities for regeneration of diseased and damaged tissue with the use of many different cell types,including adult stem cells. In tissue engineering and regenerative medicine the most popular are mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from bone marrow. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells are a potential source of progenitor cells for osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, skeletal muscles and cardiomyocytes. It has also been shown that these cells can differentiate into ecto- and endodermal cells, e.g. neuronal cells, glial cells, keratinocytes and hepatocytes. The availability of autologous MSCs, their proliferative potential and multilineage differentiation capacity make them an excellent tool for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The aim of this publication is to present characteristic and biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from bone marrow.

  2. Use of murine embryonic stem cells in embryotoxicity assays: the embryonic stem cell test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Andrea E M; Buesen, Roland; Visan, Anke; Spielmann, Horst

    2006-01-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) takes advantage of the potential of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells to differentiate in culture to test embryotoxicity in vitro. The EST represents a scientifically validated in vitro system for the classification of compounds according to their teratogenic potential based on the morphological analysis of beating cardiomyocytes in embryoid body outgrowths compared to cytotoxic effects on murine ES cells and differentiated 3T3 fibroblasts. Through a number of prevalidation and validation studies, the EST has been demonstrated to be a reliable alternative method for embryotoxicity testing based on the most important mechanisms in embryotoxicity-cytotoxicity and differentiation--as well as on differences in sensitivity between differentiated and embryonic tissues. Improvements of the EST protocol using flow cytometry analysis showed that differential expression of sarcomeric myosin heavy chain and alpha-actinin proteins quantified under the influence of a test compound is a useful marker for detecting potential teratogenicity. The in vitro embryotoxicity test described in this chapter is rapid, simple, and sensitive and can be usefully employed as a component of the risk/hazard assessment process.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells in the dental tissues: perspectives for tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Alencar, Ana Helena Gonçalves de; Kitten, Gregory Thomas; Vencio, Eneida Franco; Gava, Elisandra

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, stem cell research has grown exponentially owing to the recognition that stem cell-based therapies have the potential to improve the life of patients with conditions that range from Alzheimer's disease to cardiac ischemia and regenerative medicine, like bone or tooth loss. Based on their ability to rescue and/or repair injured tissue and partially restore organ function, multiple types of stem/progenitor cells have been speculated. Growing evidence demonstrates that stem cells are primarily found in niches and that certain tissues contain more stem cells than others. Among these tissues, the dental tissues are considered a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells that are suitable for tissue engineering applications. It is known that these stem cells have the potential to differentiate into several cell types, including odontoblasts, neural progenitors, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. In dentistry, stem cell biology and tissue engineering are of great interest since may provide an innovative for generation of clinical material and/or tissue regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells were demonstrated in dental tissues, including dental pulp, periodontal ligament, dental papilla, and dental follicle. These stem cells can be isolated and grown under defined tissue culture conditions, and are potential cells for use in tissue engineering, including, dental tissue, nerves and bone regeneration. More recently, another source of stem cell has been successfully generated from human somatic cells into a pluripotent stage, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells), allowing creation of patient- and disease-specific stem cells. Collectively, the multipotency, high proliferation rates, and accessibility make the dental stem cell an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. This review describes new findings in the field of dental stem cell research and on their potential use in the tissue regeneration.

  4. Pro-coagulant activity of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Barbara A; Herzig, Maryanne C; Montgomery, Robbie K; Delavan, Christopher; Bynum, James A; Reddoch, Kristin M; Cap, Andrew P

    2017-04-05

    Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show great potential for the treatment of military and civilian trauma, based on their reduced immunogenicity and ability to modulate inflammation and immune function in the recipient. Although generally considered to be safe, MSCs express tissue factor (TF), a potent activator of coagulation. In the current study, we evaluated multiple MSC populations for tissue factor expression and pro-coagulant activity in order to characterize safety considerations for systemic use of MSCs in trauma patients who may have altered coagulation homeostasis. Multiple MSC populations derived from either human adipose tissue or bone marrow were expanded in the recommended stem cell media. Stem cell identity was confirmed using a well-characterized panel of positive and negative markers. Tissue factor expression on the cell surface was evaluated by flow cytometry with anti-CD142 antibody. Effects on blood coagulation were determined by thromboelastography (TEG) and calibrated automated thrombogram (CAT) assays using platelet poor plasma or whole blood. MSCs express tissue factor on their surfaces and are pro-coagulant in the presence of blood or plasma. The adipose-derived MSCs (Ad-MSC) evaluated were more pro-coagulant and expressed more tissue factor than bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs), which showed a greater variability in TF expression. BM-MSCs were identified that exhibited low pro-coagulant activity, whereas all Ad-MSCs examined exhibited high pro-coagulant activity. The percentage of cells in a given population expressing surface tissue factor correlates roughly with functional pro-coagulant activity. MSC tissue factor expression and pro-coagulant activity change over time in culture. All MSC populations are not equivalent; care should be taken to select cells for clinical use that minimize potential safety problems and maximize chance of patient benefit. Adipose-derived MSCs appear more consistently pro-coagulant than BM-MSCs, presenting a

  5. GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy seems a promising avenue in regenerative medicine. Within various stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells have progressively used for cellular therapy. Because of the age-related decreasing in the frequency and differentiating capacity of adult MSCs, fetal tissues such as fetal liver, lung, pancreas, spleen, etc. have been introduced as an alternative source of MSCs for cellular therapy. On the other hand, using stem cells as advanced therapy medicinal products, must be performed in compliance with cGMP as a quality assurance system to ensure the safety, quality, and identity of cell products during translation from the basic stem cell sciences into clinical cell transplantation. In this chapter the authors have demonstrated the manufacturing of GMP-grade human fetal liver-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

  6. The Three-Dimensional Collagen Scaffold Improves the Stemness of Rat Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sufang Han; Yannan Zhao; Zhifeng Xiao; Jin Han; Bing Chen; Lei Chen; Jianwu Dai

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) show the great promise for the treatment of a variety of diseases because of their self-renewal and multipotential abilities.MSCs are generally cultured on two-dimensional (2D) substrate in vitro.There are indications that they may simultaneously lose their stemness and multipotentiality as the result of prolonged 2D culture.In this study,we used three-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolds as rat MSCs carrier and compared the properties of MSCs on 3D collagen scaffolds with monolayer cultured MSCs.The results demonstrated that collagen scaffolds were suitable for rat MSCs adherence and proliferation.More importantly,compared to MSCs under 2D culture,3D MSCs significantly maintained higher expression levels of stemness genes (Oct4,Sox2,Rex-1 and Nanog),yielded high frequencies of colony-forming units-fibroblastic (CFU-F) and showed enhanced osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation efficiency upon induction.Thus,3D collagen scaffolds may be beneficial for expanding rat MSCs while maintaining the stem cell properties in vitro.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

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    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  8. Adipose Stem Cells as Alternatives for Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Oral Ulcer Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz Aly, Lobna Abdel; Menoufy, Hala El-; Ragae, Alyaa; Rashed, Laila Ahmed; Sabry, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Methods and Results Oral ulcers were induced by topical application of formocresol in the oral cavity of dogs. Transplantation of undifferentiated GFP-labeled Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell (BMSCs), Adipose Derived Stem Cell (ADSCs) or vehicle (saline) was injected around the ulcer in each group. The healing process of the ulcer was monitored clinically and histopathologically. Gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was detected in MSCs by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR). Expression of VEGF and collagen genes was detected in biopsies from all ulcers. Results: MSCs expressed mRNA for VEGF MSCs transplantation significantly accelerated oral ulcer healing compared with controls. There was increased expression of both collagen and VEGF genes in MSCs-treated ulcers compared to controls. Conclusions MSCs transplantation may help to accelerate oral ulcer healing, possibly through the induction of angiogenesis by VEGF together with increased intracellular matrix formation as detected by increased collagen gene expression. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials as an alternative for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in oral ulcer healing. PMID:24298363

  9. Dorsal root ganglion neurons promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-xun Zhang; Xiao-rui Jiang; Lei Wang; Fang-min Chen; Lin Xu; Fei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary animal experiments have conifrmed that sensory nerve ifbers promote osteoblast differentiation, but motor nerve ifbers have no promotion effect. Whether sensory neurons pro-mote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains unclear. No results at the cellular level have been reported. In this study, dorsal root ganglion neurons (sensory neurons) from Sprague-Dawley fetal rats were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with green lfuorescent protein 3 weeks after osteo-genic differentiationin vitro, while osteoblasts derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells served as the control group. The rat dorsal root ganglion neurons promoted the prolifera-tion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblasts at 3 and 5 days of co-culture, as observed by lfuorescence microscopy. The levels of mRNAs for osteogenic differentiation-re-lated factors (including alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and bone morphogenetic protein 2) in the co-culture group were higher than those in the control group, as detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Our ifndings indicate that dorsal root ganglion neurons promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which pro-vides a theoretical basis forin vitro experiments aimed at constructing tissue-engineered bone.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue are not affected by renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemeling-van Rhijn, Marieke; Reinders, Marlies E J; de Klein, Annelies; Douben, Hannie; Korevaar, Sander S; Mensah, Fane K F; Dor, Frank J M F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Betjes, Michiel G H; Baan, Carla C; Weimar, Willem; Hoogduijn, Martin J

    2012-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are a potential therapeutic agent in renal disease and kidney transplantation. Autologous cell use in kidney transplantation is preferred to avoid anti-HLA reactivity; however, the influence of renal disease on mesenchymal stem cells is unknown. To investigate the feasibility of autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease, we isolated these cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy controls and patients with renal disease and compared them phenotypically and functionally. The mesenchymal stem cells from both groups showed similar morphology and differentiation capacity, and were both over 90% positive for CD73, CD105, and CD166, and negative for CD31 and CD45. They demonstrated comparable population doubling times, rates of apoptosis, and were both capable of inhibiting allo-antigen- and anti-CD3/CD28-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation. In response to immune activation they both increased the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors. These mesenchymal stem cells were genetically stable after extensive expansion and, importantly, were not affected by uremic serum. Thus, mesenchymal stem cells of patients with renal disease have similar characteristics and functionality as those from healthy controls. Hence, our results indicate the feasibility of their use in autologous cell therapy in patients with renal disease.

  11. Cell culture density affects the stemness gene expression of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Seong; Lee, Myoung Woo; Lee, Tae-Hee; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe; Yoo, Keon Hee

    2017-03-01

    The results of clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are controversial due to the heterogeneity of human MSCs and differences in culture conditions. In this regard, it is important to identify gene expression patterns according to culture conditions, and to determine how the cells are expanded and when they should be clinically used. In the current study, stemness gene expression was investigated in adipose tissue-derived MSCs (AT-MSCs) harvested following culture at different densities. AT-MSCs were plated at a density of 200 or 5,000 cells/cm(2). After 7 days of culture, stemness gene expression was examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis. The proliferation rate of AT-MSCs harvested at a low density (~50% confluent) was higher than that of AT-MSCs harvested at a high density (~90% confluent). Although there were differences in the expression levels of stemness gene, such as octamer-binding transcription factor 4, nanog homeobox (Nanog), SRY-box 2, Kruppel like factor 4, v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (c-Myc), and lin-28 homolog A, in the AT-MSCs obtained from different donors, RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated differential gene expression patterns according to the cell culture density. Expression levels of stemness genes, particularly Nanog and c-Myc, were upregulated in AT-MSCs harvested at a low density (~50% confluent) in comparison to AT-MSCs from the same donor harvested at a high density (~90% confluent). These results imply that culture conditions, such as the cell density at harvesting, modulate the stemness gene expression and proliferation of MSCs.

  12. Regenerative Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Contribution of Muse Cells, a Novel Pluripotent Stem Cell Type that Resides in Mesenchymal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Ogura, Fumitaka; Shigemoto, Taeko; Dezawa, Mari

    2012-11-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are easily accessible and safe for regenerative medicine. MSCs exert trophic, immunomodulatory, anti-apoptotic, and tissue regeneration effects in a variety of tissues and organs, but their entity remains an enigma. Because MSCs are generally harvested from mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, or umbilical cord as adherent cells, MSCs comprise crude cell populations and are heterogeneous. The specific cells responsible for each effect have not been clarified. The most interesting property of MSCs is that, despite being adult stem cells that belong to the mesenchymal tissue lineage, they are able to differentiate into a broad spectrum of cells beyond the boundary of mesodermal lineage cells into ectodermal or endodermal lineages, and repair tissues. The broad spectrum of differentiation ability and tissue-repairing effects of MSCs might be mediated in part by the presence of a novel pluripotent stem cell type recently found in adult human mesenchymal tissues, termed multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse) cells. Here we review recently updated studies of the regenerative effects of MSCs and discuss their potential in regenerative medicine.

  13. Regenerative Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Contribution of Muse Cells, a Novel Pluripotent Stem Cell Type that Resides in Mesenchymal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Dezawa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible and safe for regenerative medicine. MSCs exert trophic, immunomodulatory, anti-apoptotic, and tissue regeneration effects in a variety of tissues and organs, but their entity remains an enigma. Because MSCs are generally harvested from mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, or umbilical cord as adherent cells, MSCs comprise crude cell populations and are heterogeneous. The specific cells responsible for each effect have not been clarified. The most interesting property of MSCs is that, despite being adult stem cells that belong to the mesenchymal tissue lineage, they are able to differentiate into a broad spectrum of cells beyond the boundary of mesodermal lineage cells into ectodermal or endodermal lineages, and repair tissues. The broad spectrum of differentiation ability and tissue-repairing effects of MSCs might be mediated in part by the presence of a novel pluripotent stem cell type recently found in adult human mesenchymal tissues, termed multilineage-differentiating stress enduring (Muse cells. Here we review recently updated studies of the regenerative effects of MSCs and discuss their potential in regenerative medicine.

  14. Expansion of intestinal epithelial stem cells during murine development.

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    Jeffrey J Dehmer

    Full Text Available Murine small intestinal crypt development is initiated during the first postnatal week. Soon after formation, overall increases in the number of crypts occurs through a bifurcating process called crypt fission, which is believed to be driven by developmental increases in the number of intestinal stem cells (ISCs. Recent evidence suggests that a heterogeneous population of ISCs exists within the adult intestine. Actively cycling ISCs are labeled by Lgr5, Ascl2 and Olfm4; whereas slowly cycling or quiescent ISC are marked by Bmi1 and mTert. The goal of this study was to correlate the expression of these markers with indirect measures of ISC expansion during development, including quantification of crypt fission and side population (SP sorting. Significant changes were observed in the percent of crypt fission and SP cells consistent with ISC expansion between postnatal day 14 and 21. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for the various ISC marker mRNAs demonstrated divergent patterns of expression. mTert surged earliest, during the first week of life as crypts are initially being formed, whereas Lgr5 and Bmi1 peaked on day 14. Olfm4 and Ascl2 had variable expression patterns. To assess the number and location of Lgr5-expressing cells during this period, histologic sections from intestines of Lgr5-EGFP mice were subjected to quantitative analysis. There was attenuated Lgr5-EGFP expression at birth and through the first week of life. Once crypts were formed, the overall number and percent of Lgr5-EGFP positive cells per crypt remain stable throughout development and into adulthood. These data were supported by Lgr5 in situ hybridization in wild-type mice. We conclude that heterogeneous populations of ISCs are expanding as measured by SP sorting and mRNA expression at distinct developmental time points.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Maria E.; Martin, Emily E.; Talha Anwar; Caroline Arellano-Garcia; Natasha Medhora; Arjun Lama; Yu-Chih Chen; Kevin S. Tanager; Euisik Yoon; Kidwell, Kelley M.; Chunxi Ge; Franceschi, Renny T.; Celina G. Kleer

    2017-01-01

    Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC)-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC) promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with co...

  16. Distribution and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in tumor tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hai-feng; CHEN Jun; XU Zhi-shun; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor has an ability to become enriched in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and of guiding MSCs to migrate to tumor tissue. But there are lack of relevant reports on the distribution and differentiation of MSCs in tumor tissue and the effect on tumor growth after MSCs engrafted in tumor tissue. In this study, we observed the distribution of bone marrow MSCs in tumor tissue and the possibility of MSCs differentiating into myofibroblast under the induction of local tumor microenvironment.Methods Twenty-four New Zealand rabbits were randomly classified into the control group and the test group. MSCs were isolated and cultured for each animal, vx-2 tumor tissue was transplanted under the bladder mucosa of each animal. One week after the transplantation, the self F2 passage MSCs marked by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole were transplanted into tumor tissue in the test group while only Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-low glucose was infused into the control group. Ultrasonography was performed for each animal 1,2, 3 and 4 week(s) after the vx-2 tumor mass was transplanted. The maximum bladder tumor diameter of each animal was recorded and the mean value of each group was calculated. One animal from each group was sacrificed in the third week and the remaining animals in the fourth week to observe the tumor development. Another animal treated the same as the test group was sacrificed to observe the distribution of MSCs in tumor tissue one week after self MSCs transplantation. Immunofluorescence was used to trace MSCs in tumor tissue. The double labeling immunofluorescence for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin was performed to identify whether the MSCs can differentiate into myofibroblast.Results The ultrasonography showed no tumor mass one week after the vx-2 tumor mass transplantation. The mean maximum tumor diameter of the control group and test group was (0.70±0.14) cm and (0.78±0.14) cm, respectively, and there was no significant difference (t=1

  17. Pluripotent stem cells isolated from umbilical cord form embryonic like bodies in a mesenchymal layer culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagias, Nikos; Kouzi-Koliakos, Kokkona; Karagiannis, Vasileios; Tsikouras, P; Koliakos, George G

    2015-03-01

    Recently the matrix of umbilical cord began to use as an alternative source of stem cells additionally to the blood of umbilical cord. Umbilical cord has been used mainly for mesenchymal stem cell banking. The immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells in combination with their ability to avoid rejection make them an attractive biological material for transplantations. In this study the isolation of small in size pluripotent stem cells from umbilical cord expressing early transcription factors with characteristics that resemble to embryonic stem cells is investigated. Pluripotent stem cells were isolated from human umbilical cords, by a new strategy method based on unique characteristics such as the small size and the positivity on early transcription factors OCT and Nanog. An enriched population of CXCR4(+) OCT(+) Nanog(+) CD45(-) small stem cells from the cord was isolated. This fraction was able to create alkaline phosphatase positive like spheres forms in a mesenchymal layer with multilineage differentiation capacity. Our results were assessed by RT PCR and electophoresis for the pluripotent genes. These data suggest that umbilical cord provides an attractive source not only of mesenchymal stem cells but moreover of pluripotent stem cells. The method described herein should be applied in the field of stem cell banking in addition to the classical umbilical cord harvesting method. Isolation of a population of cells with pluripotent characteristics from umbilical cord. Adoption of a second centrifugation step for the pluripotent stem isolation. Increasing the value of the cord and explaining the pluripotency. This work will enhance the value of umbilical cord harvesting.

  18. Defining human mesenchymal stem cell efficacy in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lennon Donald P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs can suppress graft versus host disease (GvHD and have profound anti-inflammatory and regenerative capacity in stroke, infarct, spinal cord injury, meniscus regeneration, tendinitis, acute renal failure, and heart disease in human and animal models of disease. There is significant clinical hMSC variability in efficacy and the ultimate response in vivo. The challenge in hMSC based therapy is defining the efficacy of hMSC in vivo. Models which may provide insight into hMSC bioactivity in vivo would provide a means to distinguish hMSCs for clinical utility. hMSC function has been described as both regenerative and trophic through the production of bioactive factors. The regenerative component involves the multi-potentiality of hMSC progenitor differentiation. The secreted factors generated by the hMSCs are milieu and injury specific providing unique niches for responses in vivo. These bioactive factors are anti-scarring, angiogenic, anti-apoptotic as well as regenerative. Further, from an immunological standpoint, hMSC's can avoid host immune response, providing xenographic applications. To study the in vivo immuno-regulatory effectiveness of hMSCs, we used the ovalbumin challenge model of acute asthma. This is a quick 3 week in vivo pulmonary inflammation model with readily accessible ways of measuring effectiveness of hMSCs. Our data show that there is a direct correlation between the traditional ceramic cube score to hMSCs attenuation of cellular recruitment due to ovalbumin challenge. The results from these studies verify the in vivo immuno-modulator effectiveness of hMSCs and support the potential use of the ovalbumin model as an in vivo model of hMSC potency and efficacy. Our data also support future directions toward exploring hMSCs as an alternative therapeutic for the treatment of airway inflammation associated with asthma.

  19. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Ischemic Stroke: Progress and Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Ferri, Anna Lucia; Bersano, Anna; Lisini, Daniela; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Frigerio, Simona; Parati, Eugenio

    2016-05-27

    Stroke is the most common neurological cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries, afflicting 15 million people every year. The numbers are expected to increase, mostly due to aging populations. One in five stroke patients dies, and one in three are left with permanent disabilities. Although some acute phase therapies such as intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) andendovascular treatment have been shown to improve ischemic stroke outcome, these therapies are available only for a small proportion of patients. The use of stem cells to replace brain cells lost during stroke is a long-term goal, and one which is difficult to achieve given that transplanted cells must integrate and restore neural pathways to regain function of damaged parts of the brain. Over the past decade the use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) as therapy has emerged as a particularly attractive option. MSCs are a class of multipotent, self-renewing cells that give rise to differentiated progeny when implanted into appropriate tissues. Herein, we present a review of the application of MSCs in ischemic stroke, including the source of MSCs, the route and timing of their delivery into the brain and the endpoints measured. Experimental data of transplantation of MSCs in animal stroke models suggest an improved functional recovery. The transplantation of MSCs influences a wide range of events by modulating the inflammatory environment, stimulating endogenous neurogenesis and angiogenesis and reducing the formation of glial scar, although the precise, underlying mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. The results from early clinical trials highlight the need to optimize variables such as cell selection and route of administration in order to translate these results into safe and successful clinical applications.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardones, Rodrigo; Jofré, Claudio M.; Tobar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study was performed to investigate the safety and efficacy of the intra-articular infusion of ex vivo expanded autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) to a cohort of patients with articular cartilage defects in the hip. The above rationale is sustained by the notion that MSCs express a chondrocyte differential potential and produce extracellular matrix molecules as well as regulatory signals, that may well contribute to cure the function of the damaged hip joint. A cohort of 10 patients with functional and radiological evidences of hip osteoarthritis, either in one or both legs, was included in the study. BM-MSC (the cell product) were prepared and infused into the damaged articulation(s) of each patient (60 × 106 cells in 3 weekly/doses). Before and after completion of the cell infusion scheme, patients were evaluated (hip scores for pain, stiffness, physical function, range of motion), to assess whether the infusion of the respective cell product was beneficial. The intra-articular injection of three consecutive weekly doses of ex vivo expanded autologous BM-MSC to patients with articular cartilage defects in the hip and proved to be a safe and clinically effective treatment in the restoration of hip function and range of motion. In addition, the statistical significance of the above data is in line with the observation that the radiographic scores (Tönnis Classification of Osteoarthritis) of the damaged leg(s) remained without variation in 9 out of 10 patients, after the administration of the cell product. PMID:28630737

  1. Human dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells isolation and osteoblast differentiation

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    Moustafa Alkhalil

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim This study was focused on the isolation and characterization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs from human dental pulp (DPSC. Methods The study was performed in the Department for Oral and Cranio-Maxillo- Facial Surgey Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar and Weill Cornell Medical Colleague Doha, Qatar, in period 2010-2011. Dental pulp was extracted from premolars and third molars of 19 healthy patients. The pulp was digested in a solution of 3 mg/mL collagenase type I and 4 mg/mL dispase for 1 hour at 37C. After filtration, cells were cultured in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM Low Glucoses with 20% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS, 2mM L-glutamine and antibiotics (100 U/mL penicillin, 100 ug/mL streptomycin at 37 °C under 5% CO2. Cultures were treated with osteoinductive medium for differentiation MSC in to the osteoblast cell line. Staining with Alizarin red were used for the detection of the osteoblast production and calcification new formed tissue. Results On the total of three out of 19 patients it was possible to isolate DPMSCs after 2 to 3 weeks: in one patient it was not possible to expand MSCs because of infection, and in other two patients positive Alizarin red staining reaction showed osteogenic differentiation capability and strong mineralization in vitro. Conclusion The main advantage of using DPSC is absence of morbidity. MSCs could be isolated noninvasively from teeth, routinely extracted in the clinic and discarded as medical waste. Standardization of clinical and laboratory protocols for DPMSCs isolation and team work coordination could lead to significantly improved result.

  2. Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Dogs With Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Maura K. W.; Barros, Michele A.; Martins, João Flávio P.; Vasconcellos, Jose Paulo C.; Morais, Bruna P.; Pompeia, Celine; Bittencourt, Matheus Domingues; Evangelho, Karine dos Santos; Kerkis, Irina; Wenceslau, Cristiane V.

    2016-01-01

    Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) is a dysfunction in tear production associated with clinical signs, which include conjunctival hyperemia, ocular discharge, discomfort, pain, and, eventually, corneal vascularization and pigmentation. Immunosuppressive drugs are routinely administrated for long periods to treat KCS but with side effects and limited results. Evaluation of the clinical benefits of intralacrimal transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in dogs with mild–moderate and severe KCS was done. A total of 24 eyes with KCS from 15 dogs of different breeds were enrolled in the present study. A single transplantation of MSCs (1 × 106) directly into lacrimal glands (dorsal and third eyelid) was performed. The Schirmer tear tests (STTs) and ocular surface improvements were used to assess short- and long-term effects of these cells. The STTs were carried out on day 0 (before MSCs transplantation) and on days 7, 14, 21, and 28, as well as 6 and 12 months after MSC transplantation. Our data demonstrate that allogeneic MSC transplantation in KCS dogs is safe since no adverse effects were observed immediately after transplantation and in short- and long-term follow-ups. A statistically significant increase in the STT and ocular surface improvements was found in all eyes studied. In all the eyes with mild–moderate KCS, STT values reverted to those of healthy eyes, while in eyes with severe KCS, although complete reversion was not found, there was improvement in tear production and in other clinical signs. Our study shows that a single dose of a low number of MSCs can be used to treat KCS in dogs. In contrast to immunosuppressive drug use, MSC transplantation has an effect over a long period (up to 12 months), even after a single administration, and does not require daily drug administration. PMID:28003932

  3. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp

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    Aileen I. Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify predictors of success rate of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC isolation from human deciduous teeth pulp. A total of 161 deciduous teeth were extracted at the dental clinic of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The MSCs were isolated from dental pulps using a standard protocol. In total, 128 colonies of MSCs were obtained and the success rate was 79.5%. Compared to teeth not yielding MSCs successfully, those successfully yielding MSCs were found to have less severe dental caries (no/mild-to-moderate/severe: 63.3/24.2/12.5% versus 12.5/42.4/42.4%, P<0.001 and less frequent pulpitis (no/yes: 95.3/4.7% versus 51.5/48.5%, P<0.001. In a multivariate regression model, it was confirmed that the absence of dental caries (OR = 4.741, 95% CI = 1.564–14.371, P=0.006 and pulpitis (OR = 9.111, 95% CI = 2.921–28.420, P<0.001 was significant determinants of the successful procurement of MSCs. MSCs derived from pulps with pulpitis expressed longer colony doubling time than pulps without pulpitis. Furthermore, there were higher expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin- (IL- 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein- (MCP- 1, P<0.01, and innate immune response [toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1 and TLR8, P<0.05; TLR2, TLR3, and TLR6, P<0.01] in the inflamed than noninflamed pulps. Therefore, a carious deciduous tooth or tooth with pulpitis was relatively unsuitable for MSC processing and isolation.

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived molecules reverse fulminant hepatic failure.

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    Biju Parekkadan

    Full Text Available Modulation of the immune system may be a viable alternative in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure (FHF and can potentially eliminate the need for donor hepatocytes for cellular therapies. Multipotent bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been shown to inhibit the function of various immune cells by undefined paracrine mediators in vitro. Yet, the therapeutic potential of MSC-derived molecules has not been tested in immunological conditions in vivo. Herein, we report that the administration of MSC-derived molecules in two clinically relevant forms-intravenous bolus of conditioned medium (MSC-CM or extracorporeal perfusion with a bioreactor containing MSCs (MSC-EB-can provide a significant survival benefit in rats undergoing FHF. We observed a cell mass-dependent reduction in mortality that was abolished at high cell numbers indicating a therapeutic window. Histopathological analysis of liver tissue after MSC-CM treatment showed dramatic reduction of panlobular leukocytic infiltrates, hepatocellular death and bile duct duplication. Furthermore, we demonstrate using computed tomography of adoptively transferred leukocytes that MSC-CM functionally diverts immune cells from the injured organ indicating that altered leukocyte migration by MSC-CM therapy may account for the absence of immune cells in liver tissue. Preliminary analysis of the MSC secretome using a protein array screen revealed a large fraction of chemotactic cytokines, or chemokines. When MSC-CM was fractionated based on heparin binding affinity, a known ligand for all chemokines, only the heparin-bound eluent reversed FHF indicating that the active components of MSC-CM reside in this fraction. These data provide the first experimental evidence of the medicinal use of MSC-derived molecules in the treatment of an inflammatory condition and support the role of chemokines and altered leukocyte migration as a novel therapeutic modality for FHF.

  5. Secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines by mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dobroslav; Kyurkchiev; Ivan; Bochev; Ekaterina; Ivanova-Todorova; Milena; Mourdjeva; Tsvetelina; Oreshkova; Kalina; Belemezova; Stanimir; Kyurkchiev

    2014-01-01

    According to the minimal criteria of the International Society of Cellular Therapy, mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) are a population of undifferentiated cells defined by their ability to adhere to plastic surfaces when cultured under standard conditions, express a certain panel of phenotypic markers and can differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages when cultured in specific inducing media. In parallel with their major role as undifferentiated cell reserves, MSCs have immunomodulatory functions which are exerted by direct cell-to-cell contacts, secretion of cytokines and/or by a combination of both mechanisms. There are no convincing data about a principal difference in the profile of cytokines secreted by MSCs isolated from different tissue sources, although some papers report some quantitative but not qualitative differences in cytokine secretion. The present review focuses on the basic cytokines secreted by MSCs as described in the literature by which the MSCs exert immunodulatory effects. It should be pointed out that MSCs themselves are objects of cytokine regulation. Hypothetical mechanisms by which the MSCs exert their immunoregulatory effects are also discussed in this review. These mechanisms may either influence the target immune cells directly or indirectly by affecting the activities of predominantly dendritic cells. Chemokines are also discussed as participants in this process by recruiting cells of the immune systems and thus making them targets of immunosuppression. This review aims to present and discuss the published data and the personal experience of the authors regarding cytokines secreted by MSCs and their effects on the cells of the immune system.

  6. Isolation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Deciduous Teeth Pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Aileen I.; Hong, Hsiang-Hsi; Fu, Jen-Fen; Chang, Chih-Chun; Wang, I-Kuan; Huang, Wen-Hung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Hsu, Ching-Wei

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify predictors of success rate of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) isolation from human deciduous teeth pulp. A total of 161 deciduous teeth were extracted at the dental clinic of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. The MSCs were isolated from dental pulps using a standard protocol. In total, 128 colonies of MSCs were obtained and the success rate was 79.5%. Compared to teeth not yielding MSCs successfully, those successfully yielding MSCs were found to have less severe dental caries (no/mild-to-moderate/severe: 63.3/24.2/12.5% versus 12.5/42.4/42.4%, P < 0.001) and less frequent pulpitis (no/yes: 95.3/4.7% versus 51.5/48.5%, P < 0.001). In a multivariate regression model, it was confirmed that the absence of dental caries (OR = 4.741, 95% CI = 1.564–14.371, P = 0.006) and pulpitis (OR = 9.111, 95% CI = 2.921–28.420, P < 0.001) was significant determinants of the successful procurement of MSCs. MSCs derived from pulps with pulpitis expressed longer colony doubling time than pulps without pulpitis. Furthermore, there were higher expressions of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin- (IL-) 6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein- (MCP-) 1, P < 0.01, and innate immune response [toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1) and TLR8, P < 0.05; TLR2, TLR3, and TLR6, P < 0.01] in the inflamed than noninflamed pulps. Therefore, a carious deciduous tooth or tooth with pulpitis was relatively unsuitable for MSC processing and isolation. PMID:28377925

  7. Stroke Induces Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration to Infarcted Brain Areas Via CXCR4 and C-Met Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Oh Young; Moon, Gyeong Joon; Kim, Dong Hee; Lee, Ji Hyun; Kim, Sooyoon; Son, Jeong Pyo; Cho, Yeon Hee; Chang, Won Hyuk; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-05-25

    Mesenchymal stem cells circulate between organs to repair and maintain tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured with fetal bovine serum have therapeutic effects when intravenously administered after stroke. However, only a small number of mesenchymal stem cells reach the brain. We hypothesized that the serum from stroke patients increases mesenchymal stem cells trophism toward the infarcted brain area. Mesenchymal stem cells were grown in fetal bovine serum, normal serum from normal rats, or stroke serum from ischemic stroke rats. Compared to the fetal bovine serum group, the stroke serum group but not the normal serum group showed significantly greater migration toward the infarcted brain area in the in vitro and in vivo models (p stroke serum group than the others. The enhanced mesenchymal stem cells migration of the stroke serum group was abolished by inhibition of signaling. Serum levels of chemokines, cytokines, matrix metalloproteinase, and growth factors were higher in stroke serum than in normal serum. Behavioral tests showed a significant improvement in the recovery after stroke in the stroke serum group than the others. Stroke induces mesenchymal stem cells migration to the infarcted brain area via C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 and c-Met signaling. Culture expansion using the serum from stroke patients could constitute a novel preconditioning method to enhance the therapeutic efficiency of mesenchymal stem cells.

  8. Encapsulation of factor IX-engineered mesenchymal stem cells in fibrinogen-alginate microcapsules enhances their viability and transgene secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyar, Bahareh; Dodd, Megan; Wen, Jianping; Ma, Shirley; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Hortelano, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation holds significant promise as a strategy for cellular therapies; however, inadequate survival and functionality of the enclosed cells limit its application in hemophilia treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of alginate-based microcapsules to enhance the viability and transgene secretion of human cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional cultures. Given the positive effects of extracellular matrix molecules on mesenchymal stem cell growth, we tested whether fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules can improve the efficiency of encapsulated factor IX-engineered mesenchymal stem cells as a treatment of hemophilia B. We found that fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules (a) significantly enhanced the viability and proliferation of factor IX-engineered mesenchymal stem cells and (b) increased factor IX secretion by mesenchymal stem cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells in nonsupplemented microcapsules. Moreover, we observed the osteogenic, but not chondrogenic or adipogenic, differentiation capability of factor IX-engineered cord blood mesenchymal stem cells and their efficient factor IX secretion while encapsulated in fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules. Thus, the use of engineered mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in fibrinogen-modified microcapsules may have potential application in the treatment of hemophilia or other protein deficiency diseases.

  9. Encapsulation of factor IX–engineered mesenchymal stem cells in fibrinogen–alginate microcapsules enhances their viability and transgene secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Sayyar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Cell microencapsulation holds significant promise as a strategy for cellular therapies; however, inadequate survival and functionality of the enclosed cells limit its application in hemophilia treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of alginate-based microcapsules to enhance the viability and transgene secretion of human cord blood–derived mesenchymal stem cells in three-dimensional cultures. Given the positive effects of extracellular matrix molecules on mesenchymal stem cell growth, we tested whether fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules can improve the efficiency of encapsulated factor IX–engineered mesenchymal stem cells as a treatment of hemophilia B. We found that fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules (a significantly enhanced the viability and proliferation of factor IX–engineered mesenchymal stem cells and (b increased factor IX secretion by mesenchymal stem cells compared to mesenchymal stem cells in nonsupplemented microcapsules. Moreover, we observed the osteogenic, but not chondrogenic or adipogenic, differentiation capability of factor IX–engineered cord blood mesenchymal stem cells and their efficient factor IX secretion while encapsulated in fibrinogen-supplemented alginate microcapsules. Thus, the use of engineered mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in fibrinogen-modified microcapsules may have potential application in the treatment of hemophilia or other protein deficiency diseases.

  10. Reconstitution of mammary epithelial morphogenesis by murine embryonic stem cells undergoing hematopoietic stem cell differentiation.

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    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammary stem cells are maintained within specific microenvironments and recruited throughout lifetime to reconstitute de novo the mammary gland. Mammary stem cells have been isolated through the identification of specific cell surface markers and in vivo transplantation into cleared mammary fat pads. Accumulating evidence showed that during the reformation of mammary stem cell niches by dispersed epithelial cells in the context of the intact epithelium-free mammary stroma, non-mammary epithelial cells may be sequestered and reprogrammed to perform mammary epithelial cell functions and to adopt mammary epithelial characteristics during reconstruction of mammary epithelium in regenerating mammary tissue in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To examine whether other types of progenitor cells are able to contribute to mammary branching morphogenesis, we examined the potential of murine embryonic stem (mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to support mammary reconstitution in vivo. We observed that cells from day 14 embryoid bodies (EBs under hematopoietic differentiation condition, but not supernatants derived from these cells, when transplanted into denuded mammary fat pads, were able to contribute to both the luminal and myoepithelial lineages in branching ductal structures resembling the ductal-alveolar architecture of the mammary tree. No teratomas were observed when these cells were transplanted in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data provide evidence for the dominance of the tissue-specific mammary stem cell niche and its role in directing mES cells, undergoing hematopoietic differentiation, to reprogram into mammary epithelial cells and to promote mammary epithelial morphogenesis. These studies should also provide insights into regeneration of damaged mammary gland and the role of the mammary microenvironment in reprogramming cell fate.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jose E.; Ravasi, Timothy; Kosel, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured on magnetic nanowire substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E

    2016-12-28

    Stem cells have been shown to respond to extracellular mechanical stimuli by regulating their fate through the activation of specific signaling pathways. In this work, an array of iron nanowires (NWs) aligned perpendicularly to the surface was fabricated by pulsed electrodepositon in porous alumina templates followed by a partial removal of the alumina to reveal 2-3 μm of the NWs. This resulted in alumina substrates with densely arranged NWs of 33 nm in diameter separated by 100 nm. The substrates were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) energy dispersive x-ray analysis and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NW array was then used as a platform for the culture of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The cells were stained for the cell nucleus and actin filaments, as well as immuno-stained for the focal adhesion protein vinculin, and then observed by fluorescence microscopy in order to characterize their spreading behavior. Calcein AM/ethidium homodimer-1 staining allowed the determination of cell viability. The interface between the cells and the NWs was studied using SEM. Results showed that hMSCs underwent a re-organization of actin filaments that translated into a change from an elongated to a spherical cell shape. Actin filaments and vinculin accumulated in bundles, suggesting the attachment and formation of focal adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Though the overall number of cells attached on the NWs was lower compared to the control, the attached cells maintained a high viability (>90%) for up to 6 d. Analysis of the interface between the NWs and the cells confirmed the re-organization of F-actin and revealed the adhesion points of the cells on the NWs. Additionally, a net of filopodia surrounded each cell, suggesting the probing of the array to find additional adhesion points. The cells maintained their round shape for up to 6 d of culture. Overall, the NW array is a promising nanostructured platform for studying and influencing h

  13. Ionizing radiation augments glioma tropism of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jonathan G; Parker Kerrigan, Brittany C; Hossain, Anwar; Gumin, Joy; Shinojima, Naoki; Nwajei, Felix; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Love, Patrice; Sulman, Erik P; Lang, Frederick F

    2017-03-31

    OBJECTIVE Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to localize to gliomas after intravascular delivery. Because these cells home to areas of tissue injury, the authors hypothesized that the administration of ionizing radiation (IR) to tumor would enhance the tropism of MSCs to gliomas. Additionally, they sought to identify which radiation-induced factors might attract MSCs. METHODS To assess the effect of IR on MSC migration in vitro, transwell assays using conditioned medium (CM) from an irradiated commercially available glioma cell line (U87) and from irradiated patient-derived glioma stem-like cells (GSCs; GSC7-2 and GSC11) were employed. For in vivo testing, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled MSCs were injected into the carotid artery of nude mice harboring orthotopic U87, GSC7-2, or GSC17 xenografts that were treated with either 0 or 10 Gy of IR, and brain sections were quantitatively analyzed by immunofluorescence for GFP-positive cells. These GSCs were used because GSC7-2 is a weak attractor of MSCs at baseline, whereas GSC17 is a strong attractor. To determine the factors implicated in IR-induced tropism, CM from irradiated GSC7-2 and from GSC11 was assayed with a cytokine array and quantitative ELISA. RESULTS Transwell migration assays revealed statistically significant enhanced MSC migration to CM from irradiated U87, GSC7-2, and GSC11 compared with nonirradiated controls and in a dose-dependent manner. After their intravascular delivery into nude mice harboring orthotopic gliomas, MSCs engrafted more successfully in irradiated U87 (p = 0.036), compared with nonirradiated controls. IR also significantly increased the tropism of MSCs to GSC7-2 xenografts (p = 0.043), which are known to attract MSCs only poorly at baseline (weak-attractor GSCs). Ionizing radiation also increased the engraftment of MSCs in strong-attractor GSC17 xenografts, but these increases did not reach statistical significance. The chemokine CCL2 was released by GSC7-2 and GSC

  14. Migration capacity of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells towards glioma in vivo*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cungang Fan; Dongliang Wang; Qingjun Zhang; Jingru Zhou

    2013-01-01

    High-grade glioma is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. The poor prognosis of glioma, combined with a resistance to currently available treatments, necessitates the ment of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem cel-based therapies are emerging as novel cel-based delivery vehicle for therapeutic agents. In the present study, we successful y isolated human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s by explant culture. The human umbilical cord senchymal stem cel s were adherent to plastic surfaces, expressed specific surface phenotypes of mesenchymal stem cel s as demonstrated by flow cytometry, and possessed multi-differentiation potentials in permissive induction media in vitro. Furthermore, human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s demonstrated excel ent glioma-specific targeting capacity in established rat glioma models after intratumoral injection or contralateral ventricular administration in vivo. The excellent glioma-specific targeting ability and extensive intratumoral distribution of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cel s indicate that they may serve as a novel cel ular vehicle for delivering the-rapeutic molecules in glioma therapy.

  15. Gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡庆柳; 朴英杰; 邹飞

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the gene expression profiles of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells.Methods Total RNA extracted from human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells and tendon cells underwent reverse transcription, and the products were labeled with α-32P dCTP. The cDNA probes of total RNA were hybridized to cDNA microarray with 1176 genes, and then the signals were analyzed by AtlasImage analysis software Version 1.01a.Results Fifteen genes associated with cell proliferation and signal transduction were up-regulated, and one gene that takes part in cell-to-cell adhesion was down-regulated in tendon cells.Conclusion The 15 up-regulated and one down-regulated genes may be beneficial to the orientational differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into tendon cells.

  16. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofeng Yang; Yanxiang Wu; Xinping Liu; Yifeng Xu; Naiwu Lü; Yibin Zhang; Hongmei Wang; Xin Lü; Jiping Cui; Jinxu Zhou; Hong Shan

    2011-01-01

    Due to their relative abundance, stable biological properties and excellent reproductive activity,umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells have previously been utilized for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, which is a muscular atrophy disease. Three patients who were clinically and pathologically diagnosed with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were transplanted with umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells by intravenous infusion, in combination with multi-point intramuscular injection. They were followed up for 12 months after cell transplantation. Results showed that clinical symptoms significantly improved, daily living activity and muscle strength were enhanced,the sero-enzyme, electromyogram, and MRI scans showed improvement, and dystrophin was expressed in the muscle cell membrane. Hematoxylin-eosin staining of a muscle biopsy revealed that muscle fibers were well arranged, fibrous degeneration was alleviated, and fat infiltration was improved. These pieces of evidence suggest that umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation can be considered as a new regimen for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  17. Characterization of neural stemness status through the neurogenesis process for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Maeda H; Al-Shammari, Ahmed M; Al-Juboory, Ahmad Adnan; Yaseen, Nahi Y

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro isolation, identification, differentiation, and neurogenesis characterization of the sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were investigated to produce two types of cells in culture: neural cells and neural stem cells (NSCs). These types of stem cells were used as successful sources for the further treatment of central nervous system defects and injuries. The mouse bone marrow MSCs were used as the source of the stem cells in this study. β-Mercaptoethanol (BME) was used as the main inducer of the neurogenesis pathway to induce neural cells and to identify NSCs. Three types of neural markers were used: nestin as the immaturation stage marker, neurofilament light chain as the early neural marker, and microtubule-associated protein 2 as the maturation marker through different time intervals in the neurogenesis process starting from the MSCs, (as undifferentiated cells), NSCs, production stages, and toward neuron cells (as differentiated cells). The results of different exposure times to BME of the neural markers analysis done by immunocytochemistry and real time-polymerase chain reaction helped us to identify the exact timing for the neural stemness state. The results showed that the best exposure time that may be used for the production of NSCs was 6 hours. The best maintenance media for NSCs were also identified. Furthermore, we optimized exposure to BME with different times and concentrations, which could be an interesting way to modulate specific neuronal differentiation and obtain autologous neuronal phenotypes. This study was able to characterize NSCs in culture under differentiation for neurogenesis in the pathway of the neural differentiation process by studying the expressed neural genes and the ability to maintain these NSCs in culture for further differentiation in thousands of functional neurons for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries and defects.

  18. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Transplantation May Enhance or Inhibit 4T1 Murine Breast Adenocarcinoma through Different Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jazedje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs aiming to treat cancer has shown very contradictory results. In an attempt to clarify the contradictory results reported in the literature and the possible role of human fallopian tube Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (htMSCs against breast cancer, the aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical effect of htMSCs in murine mammary adenocarcinoma using two different approaches: (1 coinjections of htMSCs and 4T1 murine tumor cell lineage and (2 injections of htMSCs in mice at the initial stage of mammary adenocarcinoma development. Coinjected animals had a more severe course of the disease and a reduced survival, while tumor-bearing animals treated with 2 intraperitoneal injections of 106 htMSCs showed significantly reduced tumor growth and increased lifespan as compared with control animals. Coculture of htMSCs and 4T1 tumor cells revealed an increase in IL-8 and MCP-1 and decreased VEGF production. For the first time, we show that MSCs isolated from a single source and donor when injected in the same animal model and tumor can lead to opposite results depending on the experimental protocol. Also, our results demonstrated that htMSCs can have an inhibitory effect on the development of murine mammary adenocarcinoma.

  19. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells and its application in human disease therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkinson, Conrad P; Gomez, José A; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J

    2010-11-01

    The use of stem cells for tissue regeneration and repair is advancing both at the bench and bedside. Stem cells isolated from bone marrow are currently being tested for their therapeutic potential in a variety of clinical conditions including cardiovascular injury, kidney failure, cancer, and neurological and bone disorders. Despite the advantages, stem cell therapy is still limited by low survival, engraftment, and homing to damage area as well as inefficiencies in differentiating into fully functional tissues. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells is being explored as a means to circumvent some of these problems. This review presents the current understanding of the use of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells in human disease therapy with emphasis on genetic modifications aimed to improve survival, homing, angiogenesis, and heart function after myocardial infarction. Advancements in other disease areas are also discussed.

  20. Notch signaling: targeting cancer stem cells and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espinoza I

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ingrid Espinoza,1,2 Radhika Pochampally,1,2 Fei Xing,1 Kounosuke Watabe,1,3 Lucio Miele1,4 1Cancer Institute, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Microbiology, 4Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in cell fate control during development, stem cell self-renewal, and postnatal tissue differentiation. Roles for Notch in carcinogenesis, the biology of cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT have been reported. This review describes the role of Notch in the “stemness” program in cancer cells and in metastases, together with a brief update on the Notch inhibitors currently under investigation in oncology. These agents may be useful in targeting cancer stem cells and to reverse the EMT process. Keywords: Notch signaling, EMT, cancer stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, metastases, Notch inhibitors

  1. Stem cells for hepatic regeneration: the role of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Hagiwara, Keitaro; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2010-06-01

    Severe hepatic dysfunctions including hepatic cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma are life-threatening conditions for which effective medical treatments are needed. With the only effective treatment to date being orthotropic liver transplantation, alternative approaches are needed because of the limited number of donors and the possibility of immune-rejection. One alternative is regenerative medicine, which holds promise for the development of a cell-based therapy enabling hepatic regeneration through transplantation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AT-MSCs) or hepatocyte-like cells generated from AT-MSCs. When compared with embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, the use of AT-MSCs as regenerative cells would be advantageous in regard to ethical and safety issues since AT-MSCs are somatic cells and have the potential to be used without in vitro culture. These autologous cells are immuno-compatible and exhibit controlled differentiation and multi-functional abilities and do not undergo post-transplantation rejection or unwanted differentiation such as formation of teratomas. AT-MSC-based therapies may provide a novel approach for hepatic regeneration and hepatocyte differentiation and thereby support hepatic function in diseased individuals.

  2. Towards Personalized Regenerative Cell Therapy: Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Bolund, Lars; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells with the capacity of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, and can be isolated from several adult tissues. However, isolating MSCs from adult tissues for cell therapy is hampered by the invasive procedure, the rarity of the cells and their attenuated proliferation capacity when cultivated and expanded in vitro. Human MSCs derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-MSCs) have now evolved as a promising alternative cell source for MSCs and regenerative medicine. Several groups, including ours, have reported successful derivation of functional iPSC-MSCs and applied these cells in MSC-based therapeutic testing. Still, the current experience and understanding of iPSC-MSCs with respect to production methods, safety and efficacy are primitive. In this review, we highlight the methodological progress in iPSC-MSC research, describing the importance of choosing the right sources of iPSCs, iPSC reprogramming methods, iPSC culture systems, embryoid body intermediates, pathway inhibitors, basal medium, serum, growth factors and culture surface coating. We also highlight some progress in the application of iPSC-MSCs in direct cell therapy, tissue engineering and gene therapy.

  3. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhenhua [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Department of Anatomy, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhiguo, E-mail: chenzhiguo@gmail.com [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Zhang, Y. Alex, E-mail: yaz@bjsap.org [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  4. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Beerling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells may adapt transient and reversible states. Here, we have tested the existence and role of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in metastasis of mammary tumors without artificially modifying EMT regulators. In these tumors, we found by intravital microscopy that the motile tumor cells have undergone EMT, while their epithelial counterparts were not migratory. Moreover, we found that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity renders any EMT-induced stemness differences, as reported previously, irrelevant for metastatic outgrowth, because mesenchymal cells that arrive at secondary sites convert to the epithelial state within one or two divisions, thereby obtaining the same stem cell potential as their arrived epithelial counterparts. We conclude that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity supports migration but additionally eliminates stemness-enhanced metastatic outgrowth differences.

  5. Role of whole bone marrow, whole bone marrow cultured cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in chronic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Menocal, Luis; Shareef, Shahjahan; Salgado, Marcela; Shabbir, Arsalan; Van Badiavas, Evangelos

    2015-03-13

    Recent evidence has shown that bone marrow cells play critical roles during the inflammatory, proliferative and remodeling phases of cutaneous wound healing. Among the bone marrow cells delivered to wounds are stem cells, which can differentiate into multiple tissue-forming cell lineages to effect, healing. Gaining insight into which lineages are most important in accelerating wound healing would be quite valuable in designing therapeutic approaches for difficult to heal wounds. In this report we compared the effect of different bone marrow preparations on established in vitro wound healing assays. The preparations examined were whole bone marrow (WBM), whole bone marrow (long term initiating/hematopoietic based) cultured cells (BMC), and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). We also applied these bone marrow preparations in two murine models of radiation induced delayed wound healing to determine which had a greater effect on healing. Angiogenesis assays demonstrated that tube formation was stimulated by both WBM and BMC, with WBM having the greatest effect. Scratch wound assays showed higher fibroblast migration at 24, 48, and 72 hours in presence of WBM as compared to BM-MSC. WBM also appeared to stimulate a greater healing response than BMC and BM-MSC in a radiation induced delayed wound healing animal model. These studies promise to help elucidate the role of stem cells during repair of chronic wounds and reveal which cells present in bone marrow might contribute most to the wound healing process.

  6. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells for traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jindou Jiang; Xingyao Bu; Meng Liu; Peixun Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Results from the present study demonstrated that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the lesion site in rat brain significantly ameliorated brain tissue pathological changes and brain edema, attenuated glial cell proliferation, and increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression. In addition, the number of cells double-labeled for 5-bromodeoxyuridine/glial fibrillary acidic protein and cells expressing nestin increased. Finally, blood vessels were newly generated, and the rats exhibited improved motor and cognitive functions. These results suggested that transplantation of autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promoted brain remodeling and improved neurological functions following traumatic brain injury.

  7. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Ma, Yongbin; Chen, Xiang; Ji, Xianyan; Gao, Jianyi; Zhang, Lei; Ye, Kai; Qiao, Fuhao; Dai, Yao; Wang, Hui; Wen, Xiangmei; Lin, Jiang; Hu, Jiabo

    2017-08-01

    Human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSCs) are able to inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSC‑MVs) might play an important part in antitumor activity. Microvesicles were isolated by ultracentrifugation and identified under a scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope separately. After 48-h cocultured with hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs, the number of K562 and HL60 was counted and tumor cell viability was measured by CCK8 assay. The expression of proteins Bcl-2 and Bax were estimated by western blotting. Transmission electron microscope and western blot analysis were adopted to evaluate the autophagy level. Results showed that both hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs inhibited proliferation of leukemia cells in a concentration-dependent manner. hESC‑MSC‑MVs reduced the ratio of Bcl/Bax, enhanced the protein level of Beclin-1 and LC3-II conversion, thus upregulating autophagy and apoptosis. In conclusion, microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibited tumor growth and stimulated autophagy and excessive autophagy might induce apoptosis.

  8. Biological conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix to treat long-segment sciatic nerve defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of polylactic glycolic acid conduits combining bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and extracellular matrix gel for the repair of sciatic nerve injury is effective in some respects, but few data comparing the biomechanical factors related to the sciatic nerve are available. In the present study, rabbit models of 10-mm sciatic nerve defects were prepared. The rabbit models were repaired with autologous nerve, a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, or a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel. After 24 weeks, mechanical testing was performed to determine the stress relaxation and creep parameters. Following sciatic nerve injury, the magnitudes of the stress decrease and strain increase at 7,200 seconds were largest in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group, followed by the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group, and then the autologous nerve group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that compared with the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells group and the autologous nerve group, a more complete sciatic nerve regeneration was found, including good myelination, regularly arranged nerve fibers, and a completely degraded and resorbed conduit, in the polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel group. These results indicate that bridging 10-mm sciatic nerve defects with a polylactic glycolic acid conduit + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells + extracellular matrix gel construct increases the stress relaxation under a constant strain, reducing anastomotic tension. Large elongations under a constant physiological load can limit the anastomotic opening and shift, which is beneficial for the regeneration and functional reconstruction of sciatic nerve. Better

  9. Isolation and characterization of exosome from human embryonic stem cell-derived c-myc-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Padmanabhan, Jayanthi; Choo, Andre; De Kleijn, Dominique P V; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently the cell type of choice in many cell therapy trials. The number of therapeutic applications for MSCs registered as product IND submissions with the FDA and initiation of registered clinical trials has increased substantially in recent years, in particular b

  10. Expression of heregulin and ErbB receptors in mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUI Chun; WANG Jian-an; HE Ai-na; CHEN Tie-long; LIU Xian-bao; LUO Rong-hua; JIANG Jun

    2008-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells are a promising cell type for cell transplantation in myocardial infarction.Type Ⅰ neuregulins-1,also known as heregulin,can promote the survival of cardiomyocytes and stimulate angiogenesis.The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of heregulin and ErbB receptors in mesenchymaI stem cells,then further detect the secretion of heregulin and the changes in expression of heregulin and ErbB receptors under conditions of serum deprivation and hypoxia.Methods Mesenchymal stem cells lsolated frOm bone marrow of 180 g male Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured.Passage 3 cells were detected experimentally by regular reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR),quantitative real time PCR and Western blotting.Results Heregulin and ErbB receptors were expressed in mesenchymal stem cells,and all three ErbB receptors mRNA expressions were significantly down-regulated by serum deprivation and hypoxia,but serum deprivation and hypoxia significantly increased the protein expression of heregulin.Serum deprivation and hypoxia more than 12 hours could induce the secretion of heregulin.Conclusions Mesenchymal stem cells can express all three ErbB receptors and heregulin.Serum deprivation and hypoxia decrease the mRNA expression of ErbB receptors,increase the expression of heregulin,and activate the secretion of heregulin.

  11. CCR7 expressing mesenchymal stem cells potently inhibit graft-versus-host disease by spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Jiang, Yan-Ming; Sun, Yan-Feng; Li, Ping; Dang, Rui-Jie; Ning, Hong-Mei; Li, Yu-Hang; Zhang, Ying-Jie; Jiang, Xiao-Xia; Guo, Xi-Min; Wen, Ning; Han, Yan; Mao, Ning; Chen, Hu; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The clinical acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD)-therapy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is not as satisfactory as expected. Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are the major niches serve to initiate immune responses or induce tolerance. Our previous study showed that CCR7 guide murine MSC line C3H10T1/2 migrating to SLOs. In this study, CCR7 gene was engineered into murine MSCs by lentivirus transfection system (MSCs/CCR7). The immunomodulatory mechanism of MSCs/CCR7 was further investigated. Provoked by inflammatory cytokines, MSCs/CCR7 increased the secretion of nitric oxide and calmed down the T cell immune response in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining results showed that transfused MSCs/CCR7 can migrate to and relocate at the appropriate T cell-rich zones within SLOs in vivo. MSCs/CCR7 displayed enhanced effect in prolonging the survival and alleviating the clinical scores of the GvHD mice than normal MSCs. Owing to the critical relocation sites, MSCs/CCR7 co-infusion potently made the T cells in SLOs more naïve like, thus control T cells trafficking from SLOs to the target organs. Through spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet, MSCs/CCR7 potently inhibited the development of GvHD. The study here provides a novel therapeutic strategy of MSCs/CCR7 infusion at a low dosage to give potent immunomodulatory effect for clinical immune disease therapy.

  12. CCR7 expressing mesenchymal stem cells potently inhibit graft-versus-host disease by spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Li

    Full Text Available The clinical acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD-therapy of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is not as satisfactory as expected. Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs are the major niches serve to initiate immune responses or induce tolerance. Our previous study showed that CCR7 guide murine MSC line C3H10T1/2 migrating to SLOs. In this study, CCR7 gene was engineered into murine MSCs by lentivirus transfection system (MSCs/CCR7. The immunomodulatory mechanism of MSCs/CCR7 was further investigated. Provoked by inflammatory cytokines, MSCs/CCR7 increased the secretion of nitric oxide and calmed down the T cell immune response in vitro. Immunofluorescent staining results showed that transfused MSCs/CCR7 can migrate to and relocate at the appropriate T cell-rich zones within SLOs in vivo. MSCs/CCR7 displayed enhanced effect in prolonging the survival and alleviating the clinical scores of the GvHD mice than normal MSCs. Owing to the critical relocation sites, MSCs/CCR7 co-infusion potently made the T cells in SLOs more naïve like, thus control T cells trafficking from SLOs to the target organs. Through spoiling the fourth supplemental Billingham's tenet, MSCs/CCR7 potently inhibited the development of GvHD. The study here provides a novel therapeutic strategy of MSCs/CCR7 infusion at a low dosage to give potent immunomodulatory effect for clinical immune disease therapy.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cells exhibit firm adhesion, crawling, spreading and transmigration across aortic endothelial cells: effects of chemokines and shear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giselle Chamberlain

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties and may be useful in the therapy of diseases such as arteriosclerosis. MSCs have some ability to traffic into inflamed tissues, however to exploit this therapeutically their migratory mechanisms need to be elucidated. This study examines the interaction of murine MSCs (mMSCs with, and their migration across, murine aortic endothelial cells (MAECs, and the effects of chemokines and shear stress. The interaction of mMSCs with MAECs was examined under physiological flow conditions. mMSCs showed lack of interaction with MAECs under continuous flow. However, when the flow was stopped (for 10 min and then started, mMSCs adhered and crawled on the endothelial surface, extending fine microvillous processes (filopodia. They then spread extending pseudopodia in multiple directions. CXCL9 significantly enhanced the percentage of mMSCs adhering, crawling and spreading and shear forces markedly stimulated crawling and spreading. CXCL9, CXCL16, CCL20 and CCL25 significantly enhanced transendothelial migration across MAECs. The transmigrated mMSCs had down-regulated receptors CXCR3, CXCR6, CCR6 and CCR9. This study furthers the knowledge of MSC transendothelial migration and the effects of chemokines and shear stress which is of relevance to inflammatory diseases such as arteriosclerosis.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells correct impaired diabetic wound healing by decreasing ECM proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junwang; Zgheib, Carlos; Hodges, Maggie M; Caskey, Robert C; Hu, Junyi; Liechty, Kenneth W

    2017-10-01

    Impaired diabetic wound healing is associated with a dermal extracellular matrix protein profile favoring proteolysis; within the healing diabetic wound, this is represented by an increase in activated matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs). Treatment of diabetic wounds with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has been shown to improve wound healing; however, there has not yet been an assessment of their ability to correct dysregulation of MMPs in diabetic wounds. Furthermore, there has been no prior assessment of the role of microRNA29b (miR-29b), an inhibitory regulatory molecule that targets MMP-9 mRNA. Using in vitro models of fibroblast coculture with MSCs and in vivo murine wound healing models, we tested the hypothesis that MSCs correct dysregulation of MMPs in a microRNA-29b-dependent mechanism. In this study, we first demonstrated that collagen I and III protein content is significantly reduced in diabetic wounds, and treatment with MSCs significantly improves collagen I content in both nondiabetic and diabetic wounds. We then found that MMP-9 gene expression and protein content were significantly upregulated in diabetic wounds, indicating elevated proteolysis. Treatment with MSCs resulted in a decrease in MMP-9 gene expression and protein content level in diabetic wounds 3 and 7 days after wounding. Zymographic analysis indicated that MSC treatment also decreased the amount of activated MMP-9 present in diabetic wounds. Furthermore, miR-29b expression was inversely associated with MMP-9 gene expression; miR-29b expression was decreased in diabetic wounds and diabetic fibroblast. Following treatment of diabetic wounds with MSCs, as well as in diabetic fibroblasts cocultured with MSCs, miR-29b was significantly increased. These findings suggest a potential mechanism through which MSCs enhance diabetic wound healing by improving collagen I content in diabetic wounds through decreasing MMP-9 expression and increasing miR-29b expression. Copyright © 2017 the American

  15. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell administration does not improve corneal graft survival outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherezade Fuentes-Julián

    Full Text Available The effect of local and systemic injections of mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (AD-MSC into rabbit models of corneal allograft rejection with either normal-risk or high-risk vascularized corneal beds was investigated. The models we present in this study are more similar to human corneal transplants than previously reported murine models. Our aim was to prevent transplant rejection and increase the length of graft survival. In the normal-risk transplant model, in contrast to our expectations, the injection of AD-MSC into the graft junction during surgery resulted in the induction of increased signs of inflammation such as corneal edema with increased thickness, and a higher level of infiltration of leukocytes. This process led to a lower survival of the graft compared with the sham-treated corneal transplants. In the high-risk transplant model, in which immune ocular privilege was undermined by the induction of neovascularization prior to graft surgery, we found the use of systemic rabbit AD-MSCs prior to surgery, during surgery, and at various time points after surgery resulted in a shorter survival of the graft compared with the non-treated corneal grafts. Based on our results, local or systemic treatment with AD-MSCs to prevent corneal rejection in rabbit corneal models at normal or high risk of rejection does not increase survival but rather can increase inflammation and neovascularization and break the innate ocular immune privilege. This result can be partially explained by the immunomarkers, lack of immunosuppressive ability and immunophenotypical secretion molecules characterization of AD-MSC used in this study. Parameters including the risk of rejection, the inflammatory/vascularization environment, the cell source, the time of injection, the immunosuppression, the number of cells, and the mode of delivery must be established before translating the possible benefits of the use of MSCs in corneal transplants to clinical

  16. Tumor Irradiation Increases the Recruitment of Circulating Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopp, Ann H.; Spaeth, Erika L.; Dembinski, Jennifer L.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Munshi, Anupama; Meyn, Raymond E.; Cox, James D.; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) migrate to and proliferate within sites of inflammation and tumors as part of the tissue remodeling process. Radiation increases the expression of inflammatory mediators that could enhance the recruitment of MSC into the tumor microenvironment. To investigate this, bilateral murine 4T1 breast carcinomas (expressing renilla luciferase) were irradiated unilaterally (1 or 2 Gy). Twenty-four hours later, 2 × 105 MSC-expressing firefly luciferase were injected i.v. Mice were then monitored with bioluminescent imaging for expression of both renilla (tumor) and firefly (MSC) luciferase. Forty-eight hours postirradiation, levels of MSC engraftment were 34% higher in tumors receiving 2 Gy (P = 0.004) than in the contralateral unirradiated limb. Immunohistochemical staining of tumor sections from mice treated unilaterally with 2 Gy revealed higher levels of MSC in the parenchyma of radiated tumors, whereas a higher proportion of MSC remained vasculature-associated in unirradiated tumors. To discern the potential mediators involved in MSC attraction, in vitro migration assays showed a 50% to 80% increase in MSC migration towards conditioned media from 1 to 5 Gy-irradiated 4T1 cells compared with unirradiated 4T1 cells. Irradiated 4T1 cells had increased expression of the cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and this up-regulation was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in tumors irradiated in vivo. Interestingly, the chemokine receptor CCR2 was found to be up-regulated in MSC exposed to irradiated tumor cells and inhibition of CCR2 led to a marked decrease of MSC migration in vitro. In conclusion, clinically relevant low doses of irradiation increase the tropism for and engraftment of MSC in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:18089798

  17. Notch signaling: targeting cancer stem cells and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Ingrid; Pochampally, Radhika; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Miele, Lucio

    2013-09-06

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in cell fate control during development, stem cell self-renewal, and postnatal tissue differentiation. Roles for Notch in carcinogenesis, the biology of cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported. This review describes the role of Notch in the "stemness" program in cancer cells and in metastases, together with a brief update on the Notch inhibitors currently under investigation in oncology. These agents may be useful in targeting cancer stem cells and to reverse the EMT process.

  18. Activation of protein kinase A and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP promotes adipocyte differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingbing Jia

    Full Text Available Human mesenchymal stem cells are primary multipotent cells capable of differentiating into several cell types including adipocytes when cultured under defined in vitro conditions. In the present study we investigated the role of cAMP signaling and its downstream effectors, protein kinase A (PKA and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac in adipocyte conversion of human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissue (hMADS. We show that cAMP signaling involving the simultaneous activation of both PKA- and Epac-dependent signaling is critical for this process even in the presence of the strong adipogenic inducers insulin, dexamethasone, and rosiglitazone, thereby clearly distinguishing the hMADS cells from murine preadipocytes cell lines, where rosiglitazone together with dexamethasone and insulin strongly promotes adipocyte differentiation. We further show that prostaglandin I(2 (PGI(2 may fully substitute for the cAMP-elevating agent isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX. Moreover, selective activation of Epac-dependent signaling promoted adipocyte differentiation when the Rho-associated kinase (ROCK was inhibited. Unlike the case for murine preadipocytes cell lines, long-chain fatty acids, like arachidonic acid, did not promote adipocyte differentiation of hMADS cells in the absence of a PPARγ agonist. However, prolonged treatment with the synthetic PPARδ agonist L165041 promoted adipocyte differentiation of hMADS cells in the presence of IBMX. Taken together our results emphasize the need for cAMP signaling in concert with treatment with a PPARγ or PPARδ agonist to secure efficient adipocyte differentiation of human hMADS mesenchymal stem cells.

  19. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Is Mesenchymal Stem Cell Personalized Therapy the Future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Siniscalco

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders. They are enigmatic conditions that have their origins in the interaction of genes and environmental factors. ASDs are characterized by dysfunctions in social interaction and communication skills, in addition to repetitive and stereotypic verbal and nonverbal behaviours. Immune dysfunction has been confirmed with autistic children. There are no defined mechanisms of pathogenesis or curative therapy presently available. Indeed, ASDs are still untreatable. Available treatments for autism can be divided into behavioural, nutritional, and medical approaches, although no defined standard approach exists. Nowadays, stem cell therapy represents the great promise for the future of molecular medicine. Among the stem cell population, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs show probably best potential good results in medical research. Due to the particular immune and neural dysregulation observed in ASDs, mesenchymal stem cell transplantation could offer a unique tool to provide better resolution for this disease.

  20. Magnetically levitated mesenchymal stem cell spheroids cultured with a collagen gel maintain phenotype and quiescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha S Lewis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular spheroids are an established system for three-dimensional cell culture. Spheroids are typically generated using hanging drop or non-adherent culture; however, an emerging technique is to use magnetic levitation. Herein, mesenchymal stem cell spheroids were generated using magnetic nanoparticles and subsequently cultured within a type I collagen gel, with a view towards developing a bone marrow niche environment. Cells were loaded with magnetic nanoparticles, and suspended beneath an external magnet, inducing self-assembly of multicellular spheroids. Cells in spheroids were viable and compared to corresponding monolayer controls, maintained stem cell phenotype and were quiescent. Interestingly, core spheroid necrosis was not observed, even with increasing spheroid size, in contrast to other commonly used spheroid systems. This mesenchymal stem cell spheroid culture presents a potential platform for modelling in vitro bone marrow stem cell niches, elucidating interactions between cells, as well as a useful model for drug delivery studies.

  1. Comparative analysis of mesenchymal stem cells from adult mouse adipose, muscle, and fetal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hulong; Yu, Bing; Huang, Zhiqing; Yang, Xuerong; Liu, Zehui; Mao, Xiangbing; Tian, Gang; He, Jun; Han, Guoquan; Chen, Hong; Mao, Qian; Chen, Daiwen

    2013-02-01

    Recently, increasing evidence supports that adult stem cells are the part of a natural system for tissue growth and repair. This study focused on the differences of mesenchymal stem cells from adult adipose (ADSCs), skeletal muscle (MDSCs) and fetal muscle (FMSCs) in biological characteristics, which is the key to cell therapy success. Stem cell antigen 1 (Sca-1) expression of MDSCs and FMSCs at passage 3 was two times more than that at passage 1 (P cells (P fetal muscle expressed higher OCN and OPN than ADSCs after 28 days osteogenic induction (P cell source and developmental stage had great impacts on biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells, and proper consideration of all the issues is necessary.

  2. Secreted microvesicular miR-31 inhibits osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weilner, Sylvia; Schraml, Elisabeth; Wieser, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Damage to cells and tissues is one of the driving forces of aging and age-related diseases. Various repair systems are in place to counteract this functional decline. In particular, the property of adult stem cells to self-renew and differentiate is essential for tissue homeostasis and regeneration....... However, their functionality declines with age (Rando, 2006). One organ that is notably affected by the reduced differentiation capacity of stem cells with age is the skeleton. Here, we found that circulating microvesicles impact on the osteogenic differentiation capacity of mesenchymal stem cells....... As a potential source of its secretion, we identified senescent endothelial cells, which are known to increase during aging in vivo (Erusalimsky, 2009). Endothelial miR-31 is secreted within senescent cell-derived microvesicles and taken up by mesenchymal stem cells where it inhibits osteogenic differentiation...

  3. The clinical application of mesenchymal stromal cells in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Zhao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent stem cells well known for repairing tissue, supporting hematopoiesis, and modulating immune and inflammation response. These outstanding properties make MSCs as an attractive candidate for cellular therapy in immune-based disorders, especially hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. In this review, we outline the progress of MSCs in preventing and treating engraftment failure (EF, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD following HSCT and critically discuss unsolved issues in clinical applications.

  4. The effects of topical mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in canine experimental cutaneous wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ju-Won; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Lyoo, Young S.; JUNG, Dong-In; Park, Hee-Myung

    2013-01-01

    Background Adult stem cells have been widely investigated in bioengineering approaches for tissue repair therapy. We evaluated the clinical value and safety of the application of cultured bone marrow-derived allogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treating skin wounds in a canine model. Hypothesis Topical allogenic MSC transplantation can accelerate the closure of experimental full-thickness cutaneous wounds and attenuate local inflammation. Animals Adult healthy beagle dogs (n = 10; 3–6 ...

  5. Exosome: A Novel and Safer Therapeutic Refinement of Mesenchymal Stem Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Tan, Kok Hian; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) has just been approved as the first “off-the-shelf” stem cell pharmaceutical drug with an anticipation of more approvals following completion of numerous rigorous clinical trials. Despite this progress, the rationale for MSC therapeutic efficacy remains tenuous and is increasingly rationalized on a secretion rather than differentiation mechanism. Recent studies identifying exosome as the secreted agent mediating MSC therapeutic efficacy coul...

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Gonzalez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2 is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Induced DDR2 Mediates Stromal-Breast Cancer Interactions and Metastasis Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Maria E; Martin, Emily E; Anwar, Talha; Arellano-Garcia, Caroline; Medhora, Natasha; Lama, Arjun; Chen, Yu-Chih; Tanager, Kevin S; Yoon, Euisik; Kidwell, Kelley M; Ge, Chunxi; Franceschi, Renny T; Kleer, Celina G

    2017-01-31

    Increased collagen deposition by breast cancer (BC)-associated mesenchymal stem/multipotent stromal cells (MSC) promotes metastasis, but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we report that the collagen receptor discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is essential for stromal-BC communication. In human BC metastasis, DDR2 is concordantly upregulated in metastatic cancer and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells. In MSCs isolated from human BC metastasis, DDR2 maintains a fibroblastic phenotype with collagen deposition and induces pathological activation of DDR2 signaling in BC cells. Loss of DDR2 in MSCs impairs their ability to promote DDR2 phosphorylation in BC cells, as well as BC cell alignment, migration, and metastasis. Female ddr2-deficient mice homozygous for the slie mutation show inefficient spontaneous BC metastasis. These results point to a role for mesenchymal stem cell DDR2 in metastasis and suggest a therapeutic approach for metastatic BC.

  8. Sox10 Regulates Stem/Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell States in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dravis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To discover mechanisms that mediate plasticity in mammary cells, we characterized signaling networks that are present in the mammary stem cells responsible for fetal and adult mammary development. These analyses identified a signaling axis between FGF signaling and the transcription factor Sox10. Here, we show that Sox10 is specifically expressed in mammary cells exhibiting the highest levels of stem/progenitor activity. This includes fetal and adult mammary cells in vivo and mammary organoids in vitro. Sox10 is functionally relevant, as its deletion reduces stem/progenitor competence whereas its overexpression increases stem/progenitor activity. Intriguingly, we also show that Sox10 overexpression causes mammary cells to undergo a mesenchymal transition. Consistent with these findings, Sox10 is preferentially expressed in stem- and mesenchymal-like breast cancers. These results demonstrate a signaling mechanism through which stem and mesenchymal states are acquired in mammary cells and suggest therapeutic avenues in breast cancers for which targeted therapies are currently unavailable.

  9. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO{sub 2} laser modified polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, D.G., E-mail: d.waugh@chester.ac.uk [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Hussain, I. [School of Life Sciences, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Lawrence, J.; Smith, G.C. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Cosgrove, D. [School of Life Sciences, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Toccaceli, C. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO{sub 2} laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3 μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1 atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000 cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response.

  10. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO2 laser modified polymeric material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, D G; Hussain, I; Lawrence, J; Smith, G C; Cosgrove, D; Toccaceli, C

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO2 laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO2 laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO2 laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO2 laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response.

  11. Regenerative medicine in dental and oral tissues: Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janti Sudiono

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative medicine is a new therapeutic modality using cell, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies. Purpose. To describe the regenerative capacity of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cell. Review. In dentistry, stem cell and tissue engineering technologies develop incredibly and attract great interest, due to the capacity to facilitate innovation in dental material and regeneration of dental and oral tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells derived from dental pulp, periodontal ligament and dental follicle, can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into various cells, so that can be useful for regeneration of dental, nerves, periodontal and bone tissues. Tissue engineering is a technology in reconstructive biology, which utilizes mechanical, cellular, or biological mediators to facilitate regeneration or reconstruction of a particular tissue. The multipotency, high proliferation rates and accessibility, make dental pulp as an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells for tissue regeneration. Revitalized dental pulp and continued root development is the focus of regenerative endodontic while biological techniques that can restore lost alveolar bone, periodontal ligament, and root cementum is the focus of regenerative periodontic. Conclucion. Dentin-derived morphogens such as BMP are known to be involved in the regulation of odontogenesis. The multipotency and angiogenic capacity of DPSCs as the regenerative capacity of human dentin / pulp complex indicated that dental pulp may contain progenitors that are responsible for dentin repair. The human periodontal ligament is a viable alternative source for possible primitive precursors to be used in stem cell therapy.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells maintain TGF-beta-mediated chondrogenic phenotype in alginate bead culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlhorn, A T; Schmal, H; Kaiser, S

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the stability of chondrogenic phenotype and the transdifferentiation potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) at distinct stages of differentiation. Differentiated MSCs were expected to maintain cartilage-like gene expression pattern in the absence of ...

  13. Effects of high glucose on mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yu-Ming; Schilling, Tatjana; Benisch, Peggy

    2007-01-01

    High glucose (HG) concentrations impair cellular functions and induce apoptosis. Exposition of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to HG was reported to reduce colony forming activity and induce premature senescence. We characterized the effects of HG on human MSC in vitro using telomerase-immortalized...

  14. Characterization of lipid metabolism in insulin-sensitive adipocytes differentiated from immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prawitt, Janne; Niemeier, Andreas; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    There is a great demand for cell models to study human adipocyte function. Here we describe the adipogenic differentiation of a telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell line (hMSC-Tert) that maintains numerous features of terminally differentiated adipocytes even after prolonged...

  15. Expansion of mesenchymal stem cells using a microcarrier-based cultivation system: growth and metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schop, D.; Janssen, F.W.; Borgart, E.; Bruijn, de J.D.; Dijkhuizen-Radersma, van R.

    2008-01-01

    For the continuous and fast expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), microcarriers have gained increasing interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the growth and metabolism profiles of MSCs, expanded in a microcarrier-based cultivation system. We investigated various cultivation conditions

  16. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, M.; Mygind, Tina;

    2007-01-01

    the interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4...

  17. Inflammatory conditions affect gene expression and function of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Crop (Meindert); C.C. Baan (Carla); S.S. Korevaar (Sander); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); M. Pescatori (Mario); A. Stubbs (Andrew); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); M.H. Dahlke (Marc); E. Eggenhofer (Elke); W. Weimar (Willem); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThere is emerging interest in the application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases, graft-versus-host disease and allograft rejection. It is, however, unknown how inflammatory conditions affect phenotype and function of MSC. Adipose tiss

  18. Enhanced adipogenic differentiation of bovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Until now, the isolation and characterization of bovine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (bBM-MSCs) have not been established, which prompted us to optimize the differentiation protocol for bBM-MSCs. In this study, bBM-MSCs were freshly isolated from three 6-month-old cattle and used for p...

  19. Genotoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles with different surface chemistry on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Jiang, Pengfei; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The surface chemistry of nanoparticles (NPs) is one of the critical factors determining their cellular responses. In this study, the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of copper oxide (CuO) NPs with a similar size but different surface chemistry to rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were...

  20. The effect of marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on pulmonary fibrosis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄坤

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the possible mechanisms of marrow mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) in therapy of bleomycin(BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats. Methods Fifty-four female Wistar rats were randomly divided into a control group,a BLM group and a MSC group. The control group receivel intratracheal normal

  1. Epigenetic rejuvenation of mesenchymal stromal cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frobel, Joana; Hemeda, Hatim; Lenz, Michael; Abagnale, Giulio; Joussen, Sylvia; Denecke, Bernd; Sarić, Tomo; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) remains a major obstacle in regenerative medicine. Starting material and culture expansion affect cell preparations and render comparison between studies difficult. In contrast, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) assimilate toward a ground stat

  2. MicroRNA-138 regulates osteogenic differentiation of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Tilde; Taipaleenmäki, H.; Stenvang, Jan;

    2011-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular mechanisms that regulate human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cell (hMSC) differentiation into osteogenic lineage is important for the development of anabolic therapies for treatment of osteoporosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short, noncoding RNAs that act as key regulators...

  3. Recent advances in mesenchymal stem cell immunomodulation: the role of microvesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierabracci, Alessandra; Del Fattore, Andrea; Luciano, Rosa; Muraca, Marta; Teti, Anna; Muraca, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells are the most widely used cell phenotype for therapeutic applications, the main reasons being their well-established abilities to promote regeneration of injured tissues and to modulate immune responses. Efficacy was reported in the treatment of several animal models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and, in clinical settings, for the management of disorders such as GVHD, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. The effects of mesenchymal stem cells are believed to be largely mediated by paracrine signals, and several secreted molecules have been identified as contributors to the net biological effect. Recently, it has been recognized that bioactive molecules can be shuttled from cell to cell packed in microvesicles, tiny portions of cytoplasm surrounded by a membrane. Coding and noncoding RNAs are also carried in such microvesicles, transferring relevant biological activity to target cells. Several reports indicate that the regenerative effect of mesenchymal stem cells can be reproduced by microvesicles isolated from their culture medium. More recent evidence suggests that the immunomodulatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells are also at least partially mediated by secreted microvesicles. These findings allow better understanding of the mechanisms involved in cell-to-cell interaction and may have interesting implications for the development of novel therapeutic tools in place of the parent cells.

  4. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Protection and Repair of Injured Vital Organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poll, D.; Parekkadan, B.; Rinkes, I. H. M. Borel; Tilles, A. W.; Yarmush, M. L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been a paradigm shift in what is considered to be the therapeutic promise of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in diseases of vital organs. Originally, research focused on MSCs as a source of regenerative cells by differentiation of transplanted cells into lost cell types. It is now c

  5. Intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain damage : long-term cognitive and sensorimotor improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donega, Vanessa; van Velthoven, Cindy T J; Nijboer, Cora H; van Bel, Frank; Kas, Martien J H; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration via the intranasal route could become an effective therapy to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. We analyzed long-term effects of intranasal MSC treatment on lesion size, sensorimotor and cognitive behavior, and determined the therapeutic wi

  6. Oxymatrine could promote mesenchymal stem cell therapy in hepatic fibrosis rats:an experimental research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴宁莉

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether oxymatrine (OM) could promote mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy in CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis (HF) in rats and to initially explore its mechanisms.Methods Totally 50 male SD rats were randomly divided into five groups,i.e.,nor-

  7. Human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates axonal injur y in stroke rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Xu; Shiwei Du; Xinguang Yu; Xiao Han; Jincai Hou; Hao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promotes neural functional recovery after stroke, but the neurorestorative mechanisms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that functional recovery of myelinated axons may be one of underlying mechanisms. In this study, an ischemia/reperfusion rat model was established using the middle cerebral artery occlusion method. Rats were used to test the hypothesis that in-travenous transplantation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through the femoral vein could exert neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia via a mechanism associated with the ability to attenuate axonal injury. The results of behavioral tests, infarction volume analysis and immunohistochemistry showed that cerebral ischemia caused severe damage to the myelin sheath and axons. After rats were intravenously transplanted with human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, the levels of axon and myelin sheath-related proteins, including mi-crotubule-associated protein 2, myelin basic protein, and growth-associated protein 43, were elevated, infarct volume was decreased and neural function was improved in cerebral ischemic rats. These ifndings suggest that intravenously transplanted human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells promote neural function. Possible mechanisms underlying these beneifcial effects in-clude resistance to demyelination after cerebral ischemia, prevention of axonal degeneration, and promotion of axonal regeneration.

  8. 2012478 Biological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and JAK2 mutation in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田竑

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the biological characteristics of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells(BMSCs) and detect JAK2 mutation in BMSCs from myeloproliferative neoplasms(MPN) patients. Methods JAK2 V617F mutation and exon 12 mutation in 70 MPN patients’ blood or bone marrow samples were detected.

  9. Tumour microenvironment and radiation response in sarcomas originating from tumourigenic human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo Peder; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Burns, Jorge S.;

    2012-01-01

    Background: Resistance to radiation therapy remains a serious impediment to cancer therapy. We previously reported heterogeneity for clonogenic survival when testing in vitro radiation resistance among single cell derived clones from a human mesenchymal cancer stem cell model (hMSC). Here we aimed...

  10. 3D tissue formation : the kinetics of human mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Higuera Sierra, Gustavo Andrés

    2010-01-01

    The main thesis in this book proposes that physical phenomena underlies the formation of three-dimensional (3D) tissue. In this thesis, tissue regeneration with mesenchymal stem cells was studied through the law of conservation of mass. MSCs proliferation and 3D tissue formation were explored from 2

  11. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerling, Evelyne; Seinstra, Daniëlle; de Wit, Elzo; Kester, Lennart; van der Velden, Daphne; Maynard, Carrie; Schäfer, Ronny; van Diest, Paul; Voest, Emile; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Vrisekoop, Nienke; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells m

  12. Impact of Mesenchymal Stem Cell secreted PAI-1 on colon cancer cell migration and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Niamh M. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Joyce, Myles R. [Department of Colorectal Surgery, University College Hospital, Galway (Ireland); Murphy, J. Mary; Barry, Frank P.; O’Brien, Timothy [Regenerative Medicine Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Kerin, Michael J. [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Dwyer, Roisin M., E-mail: roisin.dwyer@nuigalway.ie [Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •MSCs were directly co-cultured with colorectal cancer (CRC) cells on 3D scaffolds. •MSCs influence CRC protein/gene expression, proliferation and migration. •We report a significant functional role of MSC-secreted PAI-1 in colon cancer. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal Stem Cells are known to engraft and integrate into the architecture of colorectal tumours, with little known regarding their fate following engraftment. This study aimed to investigate mediators of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) and colon cancer cell (CCC) interactions. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and colon cancer cells (HT29 and HCT-116) were cultured individually or in co-culture on 3-dimensional scaffolds. Conditioned media containing all secreted factors was harvested at day 1, 3 and 7. Chemokine secretion and expression were analyzed by Chemi-array, ELISA (Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1)) and RQ-PCR. Colon cancer cell migration and proliferation in response to recombinant PAI-1, MSCs and MSCs + antibody to PAI-1 was analyzed using Transwell inserts and an MTS proliferation assay respectively. Chemi-array revealed secretion of a wide range of factors by each cell population, including PAI-1and MIF. ELISA analysis revealed Mesenchymal Stem Cells to secrete the highest levels of PAI-1 (MSC mean 10.6 ng/mL, CCC mean 1.01 ng/mL), while colon cancer cells were the principal source of MIF. MSC-secreted PAI-1 stimulated significant migration of both CCC lines, with an antibody to the chemokine shown to block this effect (67–88% blocking,). A cell-line dependant effect on CCC proliferation was shown for Mesenchymal Stem Cell-secreted PAI-1 with HCT-116 cells showing decreased proliferation at all concentrations, and HT29 cells showing increased proliferation in the presence of higher PAI-1 levels. This is the first study to identify PAI-1 as an important mediator of Mesenchymal Stem Cell/colon cancer cell interactions and highlights the

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial-induced neuroglial cell differentiation in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoguang Luo; Chunlin Ge; Yan Ren; Hongmei Yu; Zhe Wu; Qiushuang Wang; Chaodong Zhang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Microglia are very sensitive to environmental changes, often becoming activated by pathological conditions. Activated microglia can exert a dual role in injury and repair in various diseases of the central nervous system, including cerebral ischemia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. OBJECTIVE: An immortal microglial cell line, BV2, was treated with varying concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce a pathological situation. Supernatant was harvested and incubated with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and, concomitantly, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation was observed. DESIGN: A controlled observation, in vitro experiment. SETTING: Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of China Medical University. MATERIALS: Five male 2-3-week-old Sprague Dawley rats were purchased from Animal Laboratory Center of China Medical University and included in this study. The protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals. The microglial cell line BV2 was produced by Cell Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Sciences. LPS was produced by Sigma Company, USA. METHODS: This study was performed in the Central Laboratory of China Medical University from September 2006 to March 2007. Rat femoral and tibial bone marrow was collected for separation and primary culture of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell cultures were divided into 5 groups: control group, non-activated group, as well as low-, medium-, and high-dose LPS groups. In the control group, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) supplemented with fetal bovine serum (volume fraction 0.1). In the non-activated group, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were incubated with non-activated BV2 supernatant. In the low-, medium-, and high-dose LPS groups, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were incubated with LPS (0.01, 0.1 and 1

  14. Successful implantation of intravenously administered stem cells correlates with severity of inflammation in murine myocarditis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malek, S.; Kaplan, E.; Wang, J.F.; Ke, Q.; Rana, J.S.; Chen, Y.; Rahim, B.G.; Li, M.; Huang, Q.; Xiao, Y.F.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Morgan, J.P.; Min, J.Y.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether cardiac inflammation is important for the successful homing of stem cells to the heart after intravenous injection in a murine myocarditis model. Male Bagg albino/c mice were infected with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) to produce myocarditis. S

  15. Serum-Free Media and the Immunoregulatory Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vivo and In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stem cells are capable of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation. They are used extensively to treat several diseases. Traditionally, mesenchymal stem cells are cultured in serum-containing media, typically supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS. However, the variability of FBS is likely to skew experimental results. Although serum-free media used to expand mesenchymal stem cells has facilitated remarkable achievements, immunomodulation of these cells in under serum-free conditions is poorly understood. We hypothesized that mesenchymal stem cells expanded in serum-free media will retain powerful immunoregulatory functions in vitro and in vivo. Design and Methods: Immunosuppressive activity and the immunomodulatory cytokines produced by mesenchymal stem cells in serum-free media were characterized in vitro. Immunomodulation by serum-free mesenchymal stem cell expansion in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension was explored in vivo. Results: Similar to cells in serum-containing media, mesenchymal stem cells expanded in serum-free media inhibited proliferation and apoptosis of CD4+T cells. They also exhibited strong immunosuppressive activities and secreted high levels of immunomodulatory cytokines such as PGE2, IDO1, COX2, IL-6, and IL-1β, but not HGF. On the other hand, growth of mesenchymal stem cells in serum-free media attenuated pulmonary vascular remodeling and inhibited mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-18. Conclusions: Mesenchymal stem cells in serum-free media maintained powerful immunomodulatory function in vitro and in vivo; serum-free media may replace serum-containing media for basic research and clinical applications.

  16. Hypoxia and Stem Cell-Based Engineering of Mesenchymal Tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Teng; Grayson, Warren L.; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells have the ability for prolonged self-renewal and differentiation into mature cells of various lineages, which makes them important cell sources for tissue engineering applications. Their remarkable ability to replenish and differentiate in vivo is regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic cellular mechanisms. The anatomical location where the stem cells reside, known as the “stem cell niche or microenvironment,” provides signals conducive to the maintenance of definitive stem cell p...

  17. Properties of Dental Pulp-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and the Effects of Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Noda, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Mioko; Okiji, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPMSCs) highly express mesenchymal stem cell markers and possess the potential to differentiate into neural cells, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Thus, DPMSCs are considered suitable for tissue regeneration. The colony isolation method has commonly been used to collect relatively large amounts of heterogeneous DPMSCs. Homogenous DPMSCs can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using antibodies against mesenchymal stem cell markers, although this method yields a limited number of cells. Both quality and quantity of DPMSCs are critical to regenerative therapy, and cell culture methods need to be improved. We thus investigated the properties of DPMSCs cultured with different methods. DPMSCs in a three-dimensional spheroid culture system, which is similar to the hanging drop culture for differentiation of embryonic stem cells, showed upregulation of odonto-/osteoblastic markers and mineralized nodule formation. This suggests that this three-dimensional spheroid culturing system for DPMSCs may be suitable for inducing hard tissues. We further examined the effect of cell culture density on the properties of DPMSCs because the properties of stem cells can be altered depending on the cell density. DPMSCs cultured under the confluent cell density condition showed slight downregulation of some mesenchymal stem cell markers compared with those under the sparse condition. The ability of DPMSCs to differentiate into hard tissue-forming cells was found to be enhanced in the confluent condition, suggesting that the confluent culture condition may not be suitable for maintaining the stemness of DPMSCs. When DPMSCs are to be used for hard tissue regeneration, dense followed by sparse cell culture conditions may be a better alternative strategy. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Platelet-rich fibrin-induced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell differentiation into osteoblast-like cells and neural cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Li; Yajun Geng; Lei Lu; Tingting Yang; Mingrui Zhang; Yanmin Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were allowed to develop for 14 days in a platelet-rich fibrin environment. Results demonstrated that platelet-rich fibrin significantly promoted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell proliferation. In addition, there was a dose-dependent increase in Runt-related transcription factor-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-2 mRNA expression, as well as neuron-specific enolase and glial acidic protein. Results showed that platelet-rich fibrin promoted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastlike cells and neural cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Tumorigenic heterogeneity in cancer stem cells evolved from long-term cultures of telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, Jorge S; Abdallah, Basem M; Guldberg, Per

    2005-01-01

    Long-term cultures of telomerase-transduced adult human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) may evolve spontaneous genetic changes leading to tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice (e.g., hMSC-TERT20). We wished to clarify whether this unusual phenotype reflected a rare but dominant subpopulation...... or if the stem cell origin allowed most cells to behave as cancer stem cells. Cultures of the hMSC-TERT20 strain at population doubling 440 were highly clonogenic (94%). From 110 single-cell clones expanded by 20 population doublings, 6 underwent detailed comparison. Like the parental population, each clone had...... tumorigenicity correlated with good viability plus capillary morphogenesis on serum starvation and high cyclin D1 expression. Thus, hMSC-TERT20 clones represent cancer stem cells with hierarchical tumorigenicity, providing new models to explore the stem cell hypothesis for cancer....

  20. Overexpression of microRNA-124 promotes the neuronal differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Defeng Zou; Yi Chen; Yaxin Han; Chen Lv; Guanjun Tu

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important regulatory role in the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In this study, we examined the effects of miRNA-124 (miR-124) overexpression in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, we focused on the effect of overexpression on the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. First, we used GeneChip technology to analyze the expression of miRNAs inbone marrow-derived mesen-chymal stem cells, neural stem cells and neurons. miR-124 expression was substantially reduced inbone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells compared with the other cell types. We con-structed a lentiviral vector overexpressing miR-124 and transfected it intobone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Intracellular expression levels of the neuronal early markersβ-III tu-bulin and microtubule-associated protein-2 were signiifcantly increased, and apoptosis induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation was reduced in transfected cells. After miR-124-transfected bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were transplanted into the injured rat spinal cord, a large number of cells positive for the neuronal marker neurofilament-200 were observed in the transplanted region. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotion scores showed that the motor function of the hind limb of rats with spinal cord injury was substantially improved. These re-sults suggest that miR-124 plays an important role in the differentiation ofbone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neurons. Our ifndings should facilitate the development of novel strategies for enhancing the therapeutic efifcacy ofbone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury.

  1. Targeted Eradication of Prostate Cancer Mediated by Engineered Mesenchymal Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    mesenchymal tissues , such as bone, cartilage, adipose and connective tissues . Early studies demonstrated that mouse marrow stroma cell line...CBFV) using transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD), together with additional indices including salivary cortisol and subjective state. Two studies at...detrimental side effects to the patients. Even though the exact mechanism of preferential prostate cancer bone metastasis has not yet been well

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells and their subpopulation, pluripotent muse cells, in basic research and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gained a great deal of attention for regenerative medicine because they can be obtained from easy accessible mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, and have trophic and immunosuppressive effects to protect tissues. The most outstanding property of MSCs is their potential for differentiation into cells of all three germ layers. MSCs belong to the mesodermal lineage, but they are known to cross boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal and endodermal lineages, and differentiate into a variety of cell types both in vitro and in vivo. Such behavior is exceptional for tissue stem cells. As observed with hematopoietic and neural stem cells, tissue stem cells usually generate cells that belong to the tissue in which they reside, and do not show triploblastic differentiation. However, the scientific basis for the broad multipotent differentiation of MSCs still remains an enigma. This review summarizes the properties of MSCs from representative mesenchymal tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, to demonstrate their similarities and differences. Finally, we introduce a novel type of pluripotent stem cell, multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, a small subpopulation of MSCs, which can explain the broad spectrum of differentiation ability in MSCs.

  3. Canine articular cartilage regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams Asenjan, K.; Dehdilani, N.; Parsa, H.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Mesenchymal stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various cell types, and thus have emerged as promising alternatives to chondrocytes in cell-based cartilage repair methods. The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells combined with platelet rich fibrin on osteochondral defect repair and articular cartilage regeneration in a canine model. Methods Osteochondral defects were created on the medial femoral condyles of 12 adult male mixed breed dogs. They were either treated with stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin or left empty. Macroscopic and histological evaluation of the repair tissue was conducted after four, 16 and 24 weeks using the International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and the O’Driscoll histological grading systems. Results were reported as mean and standard deviation (sd) and compared at different time points between the two groups using the Mann-Whitney U test, with a value regeneration. It is postulated that platelet rich fibrin creates a suitable environment for proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by releasing endogenous growth factors resulting in creation of a hyaline-like reparative tissue. Cite this article: D. Kazemi, K. Shams Asenjan, N. Dehdilani, H. Parsa. Canine articular cartilage regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells seeded on platelet rich fibrin: Macroscopic and histological assessments. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:98–107. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.62.BJR-2016-0188.R1. PMID:28235767

  4. The Potential for Resident Lung Mesenchymal Stem Cells to Promote Functional Tissue Regeneration: Understanding Microenvironmental Cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Majka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, pulmonary fibrosis (PF, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  5. Isolation, Culturing, Characterization and Aging of Adipose Tissue-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Brief Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezzatollah Fathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this review was to describe the current state-of-the-art regarding isolation, characterization and aging of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have recently received widespread attention because of their potential use in tissue-engineering applications. Various studies have indicated that MSCs with a fibroblast-like morphology migrate to the sites of injury and help to regenerate damaged tissue. Over the past few years, it has been recognized that fat is not only an energy supply, but also a rich source of multipotent stem cells that can be easily harvested, isolated and selected as compared with other tissues. ADSCs are particularly interesting because of their rapid proliferation and multidirectional differentiation potential.

  6. The potential for resident lung mesenchymal stem cells to promote functional tissue regeneration: understanding microenvironmental cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foronjy, Robert F; Majka, Susan M

    2012-12-01

    Tissue resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are important regulators of tissue repair or regeneration, fibrosis, inflammation, angiogenesis and tumor formation. Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are currently being considered and tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in patients with such inflammatory lung diseases including, but not limited to, chronic lung disease, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), pulmonary fibrosis (PF), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/emphysema and asthma. However, our current understanding of tissue resident lung MSCs remains limited. This review addresses how environmental cues impact on the phenotype and function of this endogenous stem cell pool. In addition, it examines how these local factors influence the efficacy of cell-based treatments for lung diseases.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lent, Peter L E M; van den Berg, Wim B

    2013-03-20

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis.

  8. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and the treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Fu-jiang; FENG Shi-qing

    2009-01-01

    Objective To review the recent studies about human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) and advances in the treatment of spinal cord injury, Data sources Published articles (1983-2007) about hUCMSCs and spinal cord injury were selected using Medline. Study selection Articles selected were relevant to development of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for transplantation in spinal cord injury therapy. Of 258 originally identifiied arises 51 were selected that specifically addressed the stated purpose. Results Recent work has revealed that hUCMSCs share most of the characteristics with MSCs derived from bone marrow and are more appropriate to transplantation for cell based therapies. Conclusions Human umbilical cord could be regarded as a source of MSCs for experimental and clinical needs. In addition, as a peculiar source of stem cells, hUCMSCs may play an important role in the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  9. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through transplantation of placental derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Tian, Kewei; Wang, Beibei; Han, Shu

    2017-01-01

    Placental derived mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) have been suggested as a possible source of cells to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) due to their immunomodulatory functions, lack of ethical concerns, and potential to differentiate into neurons and oligodendrocytes. To investigate whether PMSCs share similar characteristics with embryonic mesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs), and if transplanted PMSCs have the ability to integrate and replace degenerated neural cells, we transplanted rat PMSCs and EMSCs into the central nervous system (CNS) of Lewis rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Our findings demonstrated that transplanted PMSCs, similar to EMSCs, were effective in decreasing infiltrating inflammatory cells, preserving axons, and ameliorating demyelination, thereby improving the neurological functions of animals. Moreover, both PMSCs and EMSCs had the ability to migrate into inflamed tissues and express neural–glial lineage markers. These findings suggest that PMSCs may replace EMSCs as a source of cells in MS stem cell therapy. PMID:28186117

  10. MicroRNAs as Regulators of Adipogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamam, Dana; Ali, Dalia; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute complex regulatory network, fine tuning the expression of a myriad of genes involved in different biological and physiological processes, including stem cell differentiation. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma......, and the stroma of many other tissues, and can give rise to a number of mesoderm-type cells including adipocytes and osteoblasts, which form medullary fat and bone tissues, respectively. The role of bone marrow fat in bone mass homeostasis is an area of intensive investigation with the aim of developing novel...

  11. β-Catenin Does Not Confer Tumorigenicity When Introduced into Partially Transformed Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajida Piperdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents, its cell of origin and the genetic alterations are unclear. Previous studies have shown that serially introducing hTERT, SV40 large TAg, and H-Ras transforms human mesenchymal stem cells into two distinct sarcomas cell populations, but they do not form osteoid. In this study, β-catenin was introduced into mesenchymal stem cells already containing hTERT and SV40 large TAg to analyze if this resulted in a model which more closely recapitulated osteosarcoma. Results. Regardless of the level of induced β-catenin expression in the stable transfectants, there were no marked differences induced in their phenotype or invasion and migration capacity. Perhaps more importantly, none of them formed tumors when injected into immunocompromised mice. Moreover, the resulting transformed cells could be induced to osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation but not to adipogenic differentiation. Conclusions. β-catenin, although fostering osteogenic differentiation, does not induce the malignant features and tumorigenicity conveyed by oncogenic H-RAS when introduced into partly transformed mesenchymal stem cells. This may have implications for the role of β-catenin in osteosarcoma pathogenesis. It also may suggest that adipogenesis is an earlier branch point than osteogenesis and chondrogenesis in normal mesenchymal differentiation.

  12. Expression of Odontogenic Genes in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Sara Bagheri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tooth loss is a common problem and since current tooth replacement methods cannot counter balance with biological tooth structures, regenerating natural tooth structures has become an ideal goal. A challenging problem in tooth regeneration is to find a proper clinically feasible cell to seed.This study was designed to investigate the odontogenic potential of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs for seeding in tooth regeneration.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, three pregnant Sprague Dawley (SD rats were used at the eleventh embryonic day and rat fetuses were removed surgically using semilunar flap under general anesthesia. The primary mandible was cut using a stereomicroscope. The epithelial and mesenchymal components were separated and the dissected oral epithelium was cultured for 3 days. We used flow cytometry analysis to confirm presence of mesenchymal stem cells and not hematopoietic cells and to demonstrate the presence of oral epithelium. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs and cultured oral epithelium were then co-cultured for 14 days. BMSCs cultured alone were used as controls. Expression of two odontogenic genes Pax9 and DMP1 was assessed using quantitative reverse transcription- polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR.Results: Expression of two odontogenic genes, Pax9 and DMP1, were detected in BMSCs co-cultured with oral epithelium but not in the control group.Conclusion: Expression of Pax9 and DMP1 by human BMSCs in the proximity of odontogenic epithelium indicates odontogenic potential of these cells.

  13. Intravenous administration of auto serum-expanded autologous mesenchymal stem cells in stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honmou, Osamu; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Matsunaga, Takuya; Niitsu, Yoshiro; Ishiai, Sumio; Onodera, Rie; Waxman, Stephen G; Kocsis, Jeffery D

    2011-06-01

    Transplantation of human mesenchymal stem cells has been shown to reduce infarct size and improve functional outcome in animal models of stroke. Here, we report a study designed to assess feasibility and safety of transplantation of autologous human mesenchymal stem cells expanded in autologous human serum in stroke patients. We report an unblinded study on 12 patients with ischaemic grey matter, white matter and mixed lesions, in contrast to a prior study on autologous mesenchymal stem cells expanded in foetal calf serum that focused on grey matter lesions. Cells cultured in human serum expanded more rapidly than in foetal calf serum, reducing cell preparation time and risk of transmissible disorders such as bovine spongiform encephalomyelitis. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells were delivered intravenously 36-133 days post-stroke. All patients had magnetic resonance angiography to identify vascular lesions, and magnetic resonance imaging prior to cell infusion and at intervals up to 1 year after. Magnetic resonance perfusion-imaging and 3D-tractography were carried out in some patients. Neurological status was scored using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and modified Rankin scores. We did not observe any central nervous system tumours, abnormal cell growths or neurological deterioration, and there was no evidence for venous thromboembolism, systemic malignancy or systemic infection in any of the patients following stem cell infusion. The median daily rate of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale change was 0.36 during the first week post-infusion, compared with a median daily rate of change of 0.04 from the first day of testing to immediately before infusion. Daily rates of change in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores during longer post-infusion intervals that more closely matched the interval between initial scoring and cell infusion also showed an increase following cell infusion. Mean lesion volume as assessed by magnetic

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration to the Site of Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Kollar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (both referred to as MSC have been shown in some studies to have a beneficial effect on myocardial recovery after infarct. Current strategies for MSC delivery to heart involve intravenous, intraarterial, and intramuscular delivery. Different routes of MSC delivery and a lack of knowledge of the mechanisms that MSC utilise to migrate in vivo has most likely led to the marked variations in results that have been found. This review aims to summarise the current knowledge of MSC migratory mechanisms and looks to future methods of MSC manipulation prior to delivery in order to enhance MSC migration and engraftment.

  15. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Seeding on Biofunctionalized Calcium Phosphate Cements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WahWah TheinHan; Jun Liu; Minghui Tang; Wenchuan Chen; Linzhao Cheng; Hockin H. K. Xu

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have great potential due to their proliferation and differentiation capability. The objectives of this study were to generate iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (iPSC-MSCs), and investigate iPSC-MSC proliferation and osteogenic differentiation on calcium phosphate cement (CPC) containing biofunctional agents for the first time. Human iPSCs were derived from marrow CD34+ cells which were reprogrammed by a single episomal vector. iPSCs were cultured to form embryoid bodies (EBs), and MSCs migrated out of EBs. Five biofunctional agents were incorporated into CPC:RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptides, fibronectin (Fn), fibronectin-like engineered polymer protein (FEPP), extracellular matrix Geltrex, and platelet concentrate. iPSC-MSCs were seeded on five biofunctionalized CPCs:CPC-RGD, CPC-Fn, CPC-FEPP, CPC-Geltrex, and CPC-Platelets. iPSC-MSCs on biofunctional CPCs had enhanced proliferation, actin fiber expression, osteogenic differentiation and mineralization, compared to control. Cell proliferation was greatly increased on biofunctional CPCs. iPSC-MSCs underwent osteogenic differentiation with increased alkaline phosphatase, Runx2 and collagen-I expressions. Mineral synthesis by iPSC-MSCs on CPC-Platelets was 3-fold that of CPC control. In conclusion, iPSCs showed high potential for bone engineering. iPSC-MSCs on biofunctionalized CPCs had cell proliferation and bone mineralization that were much better than traditional CPC. iPSC-MSC-CPC constructs are promising to promote bone regeneration in craniofacial/orthopedic repairs.

  16. Effect of F68 on cryopreservation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from human tooth germ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ayşegül; Yalvaç, Mehmet Emir; Yılmaz, Aysu; Rizvanov, Albert; Sahin, Fikrettin

    2013-12-01

    The use of stem-cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine and in the treatment of disorders such as Parkinson, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, spinal cord injuries, and cancer has been shown to be promising. Among all stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were reported to have anti-apoptotic, immunomodulatory, and angiogenic effects which are attributed to the restorative capacity of these cells. Human tooth germ stem cells (HTGSCs) having mesenchymal stem cell characteristics have been proven to exert high proliferation and differentiation capacity. Unlike bone-marrow-derived MSCs, HTGSCs can be easily isolated, expanded, and cryopreserved, which makes them an alternative stem cell source. Regardless of their sources, the stem cells are exposed to physical and chemical stresses during cryopreservation, hindering their therapeutic capacity. Amelioration of the side effects of cryopreservation on MSCs seems to be a priority in order to maximize the therapeutic efficacy of these cells. In this study, we tested the effect of Pluronic 188 (F68) on HTGSCs during long-term cryopreservation and repeated freezing and defrosting cycles. Our data revealed that F68 has a protective role on survival and differentiation of HTGSCs in long-term cryopreservation.

  17. Epithelial and mesenchymal stem cells from the umbilical cord lining membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ivor J; Phan, Toan Thang

    2014-01-01

    Intense scientific research over the past two decades has yielded much knowledge about embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow, as well as epithelial stem cells from the skin and cornea. However, the billions of dollars spent in this research have not overcome the fundamental difficulties intrinsic to these stem cell strains related to ethics (embryonic stem cells), as well as to technical issues such as accessibility, ease of cell selection and cultivation, and expansion/mass production, while maintaining consistency of cell stemness (all of the stem cell strains already mentioned). Overcoming these technical hurdles has made stem cell technology expensive and any potential translational products unaffordable for most patients. Commercialization efforts have been rendered unfeasible by this high cost. Advanced biomedical research is on the rise in Asia, and new innovations have started to overcome these challenges. The Nobel Prize-winning Japanese development of iPSCs has effectively introduced a possible replacement for embryonic stem cells. For non-embryonic stem cells, cord lining stem cells (CLSCs) have overcome the preexisting difficulties inherent to mesenchymal stem cells from the bone marrow as well as epithelial stem cells from the skin and cornea, offering a realistic, practical, and affordable alternative for tissue repair and regeneration. This novel CLSC technology was developed in Singapore in 2004 and has 22 international patents granted to date, including those from the US and UK. CLSCs are derived from the umbilical cord outer lining membrane (usually regarded as medical waste) and is therefore free from ethical dilemmas related to its collection. The large quantity of umbilical cord lining membrane that can be collected translates to billions of stem cells that can be grown in primary stem cell culture and therefore very rapid and inexpensive cell cultivation and expansion for clinical translational therapies. Both

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Bone Marrow Provide a Supportive Niche for Early Disseminated Breast Tumor Initiating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Polyak K, Weinberg RA: Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states: acquisition of malignant and stem cell traits. Nat Rev Cancer 2009, 9(4...distant metastases. Breast Cancer Res 5: R217– R222. 50. Polyak K, Weinberg RA (2009) Transitions between epithelial and mesenchymal states: acquisition

  19. Human Amnion-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Osteogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells by Influencing the ERK1/2 Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amnion-derived mesenchymal stem cells (HAMSCs are considered to be an important resource in the field of tissue engineering because of their anti-inflammatory properties and fewer ethical issues associated with their use compared with other sources of stem cells. HAMSCs can be obtained from human amniotic membranes, a readily available and abundant tissue. However, the potential of HAMSCs as seed cells for treating bone deficiency is unknown. In this study, HAMSCs were used to promote proliferation and osteoblastic differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (HBMSCs in a Transwell coculture system. Proliferation levels were investigated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence staining of 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU. Osteoblastic differentiation and mineralization were evaluated in chromogenic alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity substrate assays, Alizarin red S staining, and RT-PCR analysis of early HBMSCs osteogenic marker expression. We demonstrated that HAMSCs stimulated increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity, mRNA expression of osteogenic marker genes, and mineralized matrix deposition. Moreover, the effect of HAMSCs was significantly inhibited by U0126, a highly selective inhibitor of extracellular signaling-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 signaling. We demonstrate that HAMSCs promote osteogenic differentiation in HBMSCs by influencing the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. These observations confirm the potential of HAMSCs as a seed cell for the treatment of bone deficiency.

  20. The effect of lentivirus-mediated PSPN genetic engineering bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on Parkinson's disease rat model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yin, Xiaofeng; Xu, Huamin; Jiang, Yunxia; Deng, Wenshuai; Wu, Zeyu; Xiang, Hengwei; Sun, Peng; Xie, Junxia

    2014-01-01

    ...) which have been found to promote the survival of specific populations of neurons. The aim of this study was to assess the potential therapeutic function of gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs...

  1. An experimental study of preventing and treating acute radioactive enteritis with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Wang; Wei Yuan; Qiang Zhao; Peng Song; Ji Yue; Shi-De Lin; Ting-Bao Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To test the curative effect of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells on rat acute radioactive enteritis and thus to provide clinical therapeutic basis for radiation sickness.Methods:Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultivatedin vitro and the model of acute radioactive enteritis of rats was established.Then, the umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells were injected into the rats via tail vein.Visual and histopathological changes of the experimental rats were observed.Results:After the injection, the rats in the prevention group and treatment group had remarkably better survival status than those in the control group.The histological observations revealed that the former also had better intestinal mucosa structure, more regenerative cells and stronger proliferation activity than the latter.Conclusions:Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells have a definite therapeutic effect on acute radioactive enteritis in rats.

  2. Transplantation of neurotrophin-3-transfected bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells for the repair of spinal cord injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuzhen Dong; Libin Yang; Lin Yang; Hongxing Zhao; Chao Zhang; Dapeng Wu

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation has been shown to be therapeutic in the repair of spinal cord injury. However, the low survival rate of transplanted bone marrow mesen-chymal stem cells in vivo remains a problem. Neurotrophin-3 promotes motor neuron survival and it is hypothesized that its transfection can enhance the therapeutic effect. We show that in vitro transfection of neurotrophin-3 gene increases the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the region of spinal cord injury. These results indicate that neurotrophin-3 can promote the survival of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into the region of spinal cord injury and potentially enhance the therapeutic effect in the repair of spinal cord injury.

  3. Gelatin-Based Hydrogels Promote Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Salamon

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the weak regeneration potential of cartilage, there is a high clinical incidence of articular joint disease, leading to a strong demand for cartilaginous tissue surrogates. The aim of this study was to evaluate a gelatin-based hydrogel for its suitability to support chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells. Gelatin-based hydrogels are biodegradable, show high biocompatibility, and offer possibilities to introduce functional groups and/or ligands. In order to prove their chondrogenesis-supporting potential, a hydrogel film was developed and compared with standard cell culture polystyrene regarding the differentiation behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells. Cellular basis for this study were human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which exhibit differentiation potential along the adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineage. The results obtained show a promotive effect of gelatin-based hydrogels on chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and therefore encourage subsequent in vivo studies.

  4. Expression of collagen type I and II, aggrecan and SOX9 genes in mesenchymal stem cells on different bioscaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Ghiasi

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The use of natural fibrin glue scaffold can be considered as a suitable environment for proliferation and differentiation of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells in cartilage tissue engineering.

  5. Comparison of viability of adipose-derived Mesenchymal stem cells on agarose and fibrin glue scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Tafvizi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Utilizing tissue engineering techniques and designing similar structures of the damaged tissues require the use of tools such as scaffolds, cells, and bioactive molecules in vitro. Meanwhile, appropriate cell cultures with the ability to divide and differentiate on the natural scaffolds lacking features like immunogenicity and tumorgenesis is particularly important. Adipose tissue has attracted researchers’ attention due to its abundance of mesenchymal stem cells and its availability through a liposuction. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the reproducibility and viability of the adipose-derived stem cells on natural scaffolds of fibrin glue and agarose. Methods: In the present experimental study, the isolation and identification of the mesenchymal stem cells was performed on tissue obtained from liposuction. The tissues were extensively washed with PBS and were digested with collagenase I, then the mesenchymal stem cells were isolated. The cells were cultured in RPMI medium supplemented with antibiotic. Subsequently, the expression of cell surface markers including CD34, CD44, CD90, and CD105 were analyzed by flow cytometry to confirm the mesenchymal cells. After preparing fibrin glue and agarose scaffolds, the viability and proliferation of the adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were examined at the period of 24, 48, and 72 hours by MTT and ELISA assays. The obtained results were analyzed by SPSS ver.19. Results: The results of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells culture on the fibrin glue and agarose scaffolds indicated that cell viability on fibrin glue and agarose scaffold were 68.22% and 89.75% in 24 hrs, 64.04% and 66.97% in 48 hours, 222.87% and 1089.68% in 72 hours respectively. Significant proliferation and viability cells on a synthesized agarose scaffold were seen compared to the fibrin glue scaffold after 72 hrs. The viability of the cells significantly increased on the

  6. Detonation nanodiamond complexes with cancer stem cells inhibitors or paracrine products of mesenchymal stem cells as new potential medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplyannikov, A. G.; Alekseenskiy, A. E.; Zlotin, S. G.; Smirnov, B. B.; Kalsina, S. Sh.; Lepehina, L. A.; Semenkova, I. V.; Agaeva, E. V.; Baboyan, S. B.; Rjumshina, E. A.; Nosachenko, V. V.; Konoplyannikov, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Combined use of complexes of the most active chemotherapeutic drugs and detonation nanodiamonds (DND) is a new trend in cancer therapy, which is probably related to selective chemotherapeutic drug delivery by DND to the zone of so-called cancer stem cells (CSC). Stable DND complexes of 4-5 nm size with salinomycin—a strong CSC inhibitor—have been obtained (as a suspension). It has been demonstrated that a complex administration considerably increases the drug antitumor effect on the transplantable tumor of LLC mice. A similar effect has been observed in CSC models in vivo, obtained by exposure of stem cells of normal mice tissues to a carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine. It has also been found out, that administration of DND complexes with the conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) cultures to mice results in a considerable stimulation of stem cell pools in normal mice tissues, which can be used in regenerative medicine.

  7. Self-renewal of embryonic-stem-cell-derived progenitors by organ-matched mesenchyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Julie B; Borowiak, Malgorzata; Melton, Douglas A

    2012-11-29

    One goal of regenerative medicine, to use stem cells to replace cells lost by injury or disease, depends on producing an excess of the relevant cell for study or transplantation. To this end, the stepwise differentiation of stem cells into specialized derivatives has been successful for some cell types, but a major problem remains the inefficient conversion of cells from one stage of differentiation to the next. If specialized cells are to be produced in large numbers it will be necessary to expand progenitor cells, without differentiation, at some steps of the process. Using the pancreatic lineage as a model for embryonic-stem-cell differentiation, we demonstrate that this is a solvable problem. Co-culture with organ-matched mesenchyme permits proliferation and self-renewal of progenitors, without differentiation, and enables an expansion of more than a million-fold for human endodermal cells with full retention of their developmental potential. This effect is specific both to the mesenchymal cell and to the progenitor being amplified. Progenitors that have been serially expanded on mesenchyme give rise to glucose-sensing, insulin-secreting cells when transplanted in vivo. Theoretically, the identification of stage-specific renewal signals can be incorporated into any scheme for the efficient production of large numbers of differentiated cells from stem cells and may therefore have wide application in regenerative biology.

  8. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Cryopreservation and Thawing Decrease α4-Integrin Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Irioda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The effects of cryopreservation on adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are not clearly documented, as there is a growing body of evidence about the importance of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to analyze human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells phenotypic expression (CD34, CD45, CD73, CD90, CD105, and CD49d, colony forming unit ability, viability, and differentiation potential before and after cryopreservation. Materials and Methods. 12 samples of the adipose tissue were collected from a healthy donor using the liposuction technique. The cell isolation was performed by enzymatic digestion and then the cells were cultured up to passage 2. Before and after cryopreservation the immunophenotype, cellular viability analysis by flow cytometer, colony forming units ability, differentiation potential into adipocytes and osteoblasts as demonstrated by Oil Red O and Alizarin Red staining, respectively. Results. The immunophenotypic markers expression was largely preserved, and their multipotency was maintained. However, after cryopreservation, the cells decreased α4-integrin expression (CD49d, cell viability, and number of colony forming units. Conclusions. These findings suggest that ADMSC transplanted after cryopreservation might compromise the retention of transplanted cells in the host tissue. Therefore, further studies are warranted to standardize protocols related to cryopreservation to attain full benefits of stem cell therapy.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells Adhering to Adipocytes in Canine Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsing-Yi; Fujita, Naoki; Endo, Kentaro; Morita, Maresuke; Takeda, Tae; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2017-03-15

    The ceiling culture method has been used to isolate mature adipocytes from adipose tissue that can be dedifferentiated into fibroblastic cells, also known as dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells that self-renew and are multipotent, with much higher homogeneity and colony-forming efficiency than those of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. We cultured adipocytes from canine bone marrow using this technique, with the expectation of obtaining DFAT cells. However, contrary to our expectations, continuous monitoring of ceiling cultures by time-lapse microscopy revealed many small cells adhering to adipocytes that proliferated rapidly into cells with a fibroblastic morphology and without any dedifferentiation from adipocytes. We named these cells bone marrow peri-adipocyte cells (BM-PACs) and demonstrated the multipotent properties of BM-PACs compared to that of conventionally cultured canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs). BM-PACs showed significantly greater clonogenicity and proliferation ability than BMMSCs. An in vitro trilineage differentiation assay revealed that BM-PACs possess adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic capacities superior to those of BMMSCs. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the expression of CD73, which plays an important role in cell growth and differentiation, was significantly higher in BM-PACs than in BMMSCs. These results indicate that canine BM-PACs have stem cell characteristics that are superior to those of BMMSCs, and that these mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) appear to be a feasible source for cell-based therapies in dogs.

  10. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells from the oral cavity and their potential value in tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Antonio R; Carrión, Flavio S; Chaparro, Alejandra P

    2015-02-01

    Periodontal disease is one of the most common conditions affecting humans, and current treatment strategies, which focus on the removal and long-term control of dental plaque, are generally successful in eliminating active disease and promoting tissue repair. However, regeneration of the supporting structures of the tooth remains an elusive goal and a challenge. The formation of new bone and cementum with supportive periodontal ligament is the ultimate objective, but current regeneration therapies are incapable of achieving this in a predictable way. The regeneration of periodontal tissue requires a combination of fundamental events, such as appropriate level and sequencing of regulatory signals, the presence of progenitor cells, an extracellular matrix or carrier and an adequate blood supply. Based on tissue-engineering concepts, the regeneration process may be modulated by manipulating the signaling pathways of regulatory molecules, the extracellular matrix or scaffold, or the cellular components. The identification of mesenchymal stem cells from bone marrow started a new era in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering using mesenchymal stem cells became a therapeutic option with several advantages, including high-quality regeneration of damaged tissues without the formation of fibrous tissue, minimal donor-site morbidity compared with autografts and a low risk of autoimmune rejection and disease transmission. The aim of this review was to describe the main sources of mesenchymal stem cells from tissues in the oral cavity and the potential of these cells in regenerative therapy. Special attention is paid to gingival tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells because they represent the most accessible source of stem cells in the human mouth.

  12. The Use of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cell Therapy of Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushkevich, Yu N; Kosmacheva, S M; Zabrodets, G V; Ignatenko, S I; Goncharova, N V; Severin, I N; Likhachev, S A; Potapnev, M P

    2015-08-01

    We studied a new method of treatment of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with autologous mesenchymal stem cells. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells were injected intravenously (intact cells) or via lumbar puncture (cells committed to neuronal differentiation). Evaluation of the results of cell therapy after 12-month follow-up revealed slowing down of the disease progression in 10 patients in comparison with the control group consisting of 15 patients. The cell therapy was safe for the patients.

  13. [Analysis of factors related to the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y P; Zheng, Y H; Zhang, Z G

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To analyze related factors on the number of mesenchymal stem cells in the synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provide an research basis for understanding of the source and biological role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ. Methods: One hundred and twenty-two synovial fluid samples from 91 temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients who visited in Department of TMJ Center, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University from March 2013 to December 2013 were collected in this study, and 6 TMJ synovial fluid samples from 6 normal volunteers who were studying in the North Campus of Sun Yat-sen University were also collected, so did their clinical information. Then the relation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and the health status of the joints, age of donor, disc perforation, condylar bony destruction, blood containing and visual analogue scale score of pain were investigated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman rank correlation test. Results: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid had no significant relation with visual analogue scale score of pain (r=0.041, P=0.672), blood containing (P=0.063), condylar bony destruction (P= 0.371). Linear correlation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and age of donor was very week (r=0.186, P=0.043). The number of mesenchymal stem cells up-regulated when the joint was in a disease state (P=0.001). The disc perforation group had more mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid than without disc perforation group (P=0.042). Conclusions: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ has no correlation with peripheral blood circulation and condylar bony destruction, while has close relation with soft tissue structure damage of the joint.

  14. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianchao Li; Wensheng Hou; Xiaoying Wu; Wei Jiang; Haiyan Chen; Nong Xiao; Ping Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hy-poxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efifciencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migra-tion and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2, an increasing number of green lfuorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 106 bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm2 for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental ifndings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypox-ic-ischemic brain damage.

  15. 660 nm red light-enhanced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchao; Hou, Wensheng; Wu, Xiaoying; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Nong; Zhou, Ping

    2014-02-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. However, the in vivo transplantation effects are poor and their survival, colonization and differentiation efficiencies are relatively low. Red or near-infrared light from 600-1,000 nm promotes cellular migration and prevents apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the combination of red light with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation would be effective for the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. In this study, the migration and colonization of cultured bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on primary neurons after oxygen-glucose deprivation were detected using Transwell assay. The results showed that, after a 40-hour irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2), an increasing number of green fluorescence-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells migrated towards hypoxic-ischemic damaged primary neurons. Meanwhile, neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage were given an intraperitoneal injection of 1 × 10(6) bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, followed by irradiation under red light-emitting diodes at 660 nm and 60 mW/cm(2) for 7 successive days. Shuttle box test results showed that, after phototherapy and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, the active avoidance response rate of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats was significantly increased, which was higher than that after bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation alone. Experimental findings indicate that 660 nm red light emitting diode irradiation promotes the migration of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, thereby enhancing the contribution of cell transplantation in the treatment of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  16. Autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells are involved in rat liver regeneration following repeat partial hepatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Tao; MU, HONG; Shen, Zhongyang; SONG, ZHUOLUN; Chen, Xiaobo; Wang, Yuliang

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) have been considered to be attractive and readily available adult mesenchymal stem cells, and they are becoming increasingly popular for use in regenerative cell therapy, as they are readily accessible through minimally invasive techniques. The present study investigated whether autologous ADSC transplantation promoted liver regeneration following a repeat partial hepatectomy in rats. The rats were divided into three groups as follows: 70%...

  17. Therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced changes in the hippocampus of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saravana Kumar Sampath Kumar; Saraswathi Perumal; Vijayaraghavan Rajagopalan

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cold stress induced neuronal changes in hippocampal CA1 region of Wistar rats. Bone marrow mes-enchymal stem cells were isolated from a 6-week-old Wistar rat. Bone marrow from adult femora and tibia was collected and mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in minimal essential medium containing 10% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum and were sub-cultured. Passage 3 cells were analyzed by lfow cytometry for positive expression of CD44 and CD90 and negative expression of CD45. Once CD44 and CD90 positive expression was achieved, the cells were cultured again to 90% conlfuence for later experiments. Twenty-four rats aged 8 weeks old were randomly and evenly divided into normal control, cold water swim stress (cold stress), cold stress + PBS (intra-venous infusion), and cold stress + bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (1 × 106; intravenous infusion) groups. The total period of study was 60 days which included 1 month stress period followed by 1 month treatment. Behavioral functional test was performed during the entire study period. After treatment, rats were sacriifced for histological studies. Treatment with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells signiifcantly increased the number of neuronal cells in hippocampal CA1 region. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells injected by intravenous administration show potential therapeutic effects in cognitive decline associated with stress-related lesions.

  18. Effects of benzene inhalation on murine pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronkite, E P; Inoue, T; Carsten, A L; Miller, M E; Bullis, J E; Drew, R T

    1982-03-01

    Effects of benzene inhalation on mouse pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells have been evaluated. Male mice 8--12 wk old were exposed to 400 ppm benzene for 6 h/d, 5 d/wk, for up to 9 1/2 wk. At various time intervals exposed and control animals were killed, and cardiac blood was evaluated for changes in white blood cell (WBC) and red blood cell (RBC) content. In addition, femora and tibiae were evaluated for total marrow cellularity, stem cell content (as measured by the spleen colony technique), and the percent of stem cells in DNA synthesis (as determined by the tritiated thymidine cytocide technique). Exogenous spleen colonies grown from marrow of exposed animals were counted, identified, and scored by histological type. Exposure to benzene caused significant depressions of RBCs and WBCs throughout the exposure period, which continued for at least 14 d after exposure. Bone marrow cellularity and stem cell content were also depressed in exposed animals throughout the study. Tritiated thymidine cytocide of spleen colony-forming cells was generally increased in exposed animals, perhaps indicating a compensatory response to the reduction of circulating cells. Spleen colonies of all types were depressed after exposure to benzene. The significance of the reduction in cellularity, stem cell content, and changes in morphology of spleen colonies is discussed in relation to cellular toxicity and residual injury.

  19. Sertoli cell condition medium can induce germ like cells from bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Mahdieh Hajian; Minaee, Bagher; Rastegar, Tayebeh; Khrazinejad, Ebrahim; Barbarestani, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    Although many researchers have confirmed induction of germ cells from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs), there are no reports that confirm spontaneous differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs. In this study, we have evaluated the effect of adult Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) as a mutative factor in the induction of germ cells from BMMSCs. BMMSCs were collected from the bone marrow of 6-8-week old NMRI mice and their mesenchymal entities were proven using superficial markers (expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expresion of CD45 and CD11b) by fow cytometry. Their multi-potential entities were proved with differentiation to osteogenic and adipogenic cells for 21 days. Also isolated Sertoli cells were enriched using lectin coated plates and Sertoli cell condition medium (SCCM) was collected. Sertoli cells were identified by immunocytochemistry and Vimentin marker. The cells were then differentiated into germ cells with SCCM for 2 weeks. Finally induced cells were evaluated by RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblast and adipocyte showed their multi-potential property. Expression of CD44 and CD73 and non-expression of CD45 and CD11b confirmed mesenchyme cells. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR results showed expression of germ cells specific marker (Mvh). This study confirmed the effect of SCCM as a motivational factor that can used for differentiation of germ cells from BMMSCs.

  20. [Phase III clinical trial using autologous mesenchymal stem cells for stroke patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honmou, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    We conduct a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (Phase III: confirmatory trial) of intravenous infusion of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for cerebral infarction patients. The objectives of this study were to examine feasibility, safety, and efficacy of cell therapy using auto serum-expanded autologous mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow in the stroke patients. Inclusion criteria is (1) Cerebral infarction onset within 40 days, (2) Supra-tentorial cerebral infarction(NINDS-III 1990) diagnosed by MRI(or CT), MRA (3D-CTA or DSA), ECG, chest X-ray etc., (3) Classified under grade 4 or 5 of mRS (modified Rankin scale), (4) Age between 20 to 80, (5) The written informed consent from subjects and legal representative is provided.

  1. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana I Voldgorn

    Full Text Available Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  2. In vitro evaluation of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for canine mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oduvaldo Câmara Marques Pereira-Junior

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro ability the of three different biomaterials - purified hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix and castor oil-based polyurethane - as biocompatible 3D scaffolds for canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC intending bone tissue engineering. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow, characterized and cultivated for seven days with the biomaterials. Cell proliferation and adhesion to the biomaterial surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy while differentiation into osteogenic lineage was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and Sp7/Osterix surface antibody marker. RESULTS: The biomaterials allowed cellular growth, attachment and proliferation. Osteogenic differentiation occurred in the presence of hydroxyapatite, and matrix deposition commenced in the presence of the castor oil-based polyurethane. CONCLUSION: All the tested biomaterials may be used as mesenchymal stem cell scaffolds in cell-based orthopedic reconstructive therapy.

  3. Adipose tissue as mesenchymal stem cells source in equine tendinitis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando de Mattos Carvalho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tendinitis is an important high-relapse-rate disease, which compromises equine performance and may result in early athletic life end to affected animals. Many therapies have been set to treat equine tendinitis; however, just few result in improved relapse rates, quality of extracellular matrix (ECM and increased biomechanical resistance of the treated tissue. Due to advances in the regenerative medicine, promising results were initially obtained through the implantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC derived from the bone marrow in the equine tendon injury. Since then, many studies have been using MSCs from different sources for therapeutic means in equine. The adipose tissue has appeared as feasible MSC source. There are promising results involving equine tendinitis therapy using mesenchymal stem cells from adipose tissue (AdMSCs.

  4. Sr-substituted bone cements direct mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panseri, Silvia; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Tampieri, Anna; Sprio, Simone

    2017-01-01

    Strontium-substituted apatitic bone cements enriched with sodium alginate were developed as a potential modulator of bone cells fate. The biological impact of the bone cement were investigated in vitro through the study of the effect of the nanostructured apatitic composition and the doping of strontium on mesenchymal stem cells, pre-osteoblasts and osteoclasts behaviours. Up to 14 days of culture the bone cells viability, proliferation, morphology and gene expression profiles were evaluated. The results showed that different concentrations of strontium were able to evoke a cell-specific response, in fact an inductive effect on mesenchymal stem cells differentiation and pre-osteoblasts proliferation and an inhibitory effect on osteoclasts activity were observed. Moreover, the apatitic structure of the cements provided a biomimetic environment suitable for bone cells growth. Therefore, the combination of biological features of this bone cement makes it as promising biomaterials for tissue regeneration. PMID:28196118

  5. Osteogenic commitment of mesenchymal stem cells in apatite nanorod-aligned ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Sun, Zhihui; Li, Yanyan; Hong, Youliang

    2014-12-24

    It is significant to process the clinically used biomaterials into a scaffold with specific nanotopographies, which can act as physical cues to regulate the osteogenic commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, hydroxyapatite (HAP) was considered as the processed objective and a facile, hydrothermal method was developed to grow the vertically oriented HAP nanorods in porous HAP ceramics. Experiments demonstrated that the formation of the HAP nanorods in porous ceramics was decided by a novel epitaxial growth mechanism and length of nanorods could be well-controlled by the growth time. Cell experiments demonstrated that such novel stereotopographical cues could regulate bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into the osteogenic lineage, thereby displaying that the porous ceramics with the HAP nanorods-aligned stereotopographies have a good prospect for applications in regenerative medicine of hard tissues.

  6. Adhesion and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells on titanium nanopores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Lavenus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Titanium implants are widely used in orthopaedic and dental surgery. Surface properties play a major role in cell and tissue interactions. The adhesion and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells were studied as a function of nanostructures. Titanium surfaces with nanopores 30, 150 and 300 nm in diameter were prepared by physical vapour deposition. PCR arrays indicated that the expression of integrins was modulated by the nanopore size. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSCs exhibited more branched cell morphology on Ti30 than on other surfaces. Ti30 and Ti150 induced osteoblastic differentiation while Ti300 had a limited effect. Overall, nanopores of 30 nm may promote early osteoblastic differentiation and, consequently, rapid osseointegration of titanium implants.

  7. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells increase dopamine synthesis in the injured striatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Huang; Cheng Chang; Jiewen Zhang; Xiaoqun Gao

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that tyrosine hydroxylase or neurturin gene-modified cells transplanted into rats with Parkinson's disease significantly improved behavior and increased striatal dopamine content. In the present study, we transplanted tyrosine hydroxylase and neurturin gene-modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the damaged striatum of Parkinson's disease model rats. Several weeks after cell transplantation, in addition to an improvement of motor function, tyrosine hydroxylase and neurturin proteins were up-regulated in the injured striatum, and importantly, levels of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid increased significantly. Furthermore, the density of the D2 dopamine receptor in the postsynaptic membranes of dopaminergic neurons was decreased. These results indicate that transplantation of tyrosine hydroxylase and neurturin gene-modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells increases dopamine synthesis and significantly improves the behavior of rats with Parkinson's disease.

  8. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voldgorn, Yana I; Adilgereeva, Elmira P; Nekrasov, Evgeny D; Lavrov, Alexander V

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  9. Hydrogel-based nanocomposites and mesenchymal stem cells: a promising synergistic strategy for neurodegenerative disorders therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Diego; Gloria, Antonio; Giordano, Carmen; Rodilossi, Serena; Russo, Teresa; D'Amora, Ugo; Tunesi, Marta; Cigada, Alberto; Ambrosio, Luigi; Forloni, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogel-based materials are widely employed in the biomedical field. With regard to central nervous system (CNS) neurodegenerative disorders, the design of injectable nanocomposite hydrogels for in situ drug or cell release represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution that might play a key role in the development of successful treatments. In particular, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels can be designed as specific injectable tools and loaded with nanoparticles (NPs), to improve and to tailor their viscoelastic properties upon injection and release profile. An intriguing application is hydrogel loading with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) that are a very promising therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative or traumatic disorders of the CNS. This multidisciplinary review will focus on the basic concepts to design acellular and cell-loaded materials with specific and tunable rheological and functional properties. The use of hydrogel-based nanocomposites and mesenchymal stem cells as a synergistic strategy for nervous tissue applications will be then discussed.

  10. Reconstruction of the adenosine system by bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huicong Kang; Qi Hu; Xiaoyan Liu; Yinhe Liu; Feng Xu; Xiang Li; Suiqiang Zhu

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we transplanted bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the CA3 area of the hippocampus of chronic epilepsy rats kindled by lithium chloride-pilocarpine. Immunofluorescence and western blotting revealed an increase in adenosine A1 receptor expression and a decrease in adenosine A2a receptor expression in the brain tissues of epileptic rats 3 months after transplantation. Moreover, the imbalance in the A1 adenosine receptor/A2a adenosine receptor ratio was improved. Electroencephalograms showed that frequency and amplitude of spikes in the hippocampus and frontal lobe were reduced. These results suggested that mesenchymal stem cell transplantation can reconstruct the normal function of the adenosine system in the brain and greatly improve epileptiform discharges.

  11. Hydrogel-Based Nanocomposites and Mesenchymal Stem Cells: A Promising Synergistic Strategy for Neurodegenerative Disorders Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Albani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogel-based materials are widely employed in the biomedical field. With regard to central nervous system (CNS neurodegenerative disorders, the design of injectable nanocomposite hydrogels for in situ drug or cell release represents an interesting and minimally invasive solution that might play a key role in the development of successful treatments. In particular, biocompatible and biodegradable hydrogels can be designed as specific injectable tools and loaded with nanoparticles (NPs, to improve and to tailor their viscoelastic properties upon injection and release profile. An intriguing application is hydrogel loading with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs that are a very promising therapeutic tool for neurodegenerative or traumatic disorders of the CNS. This multidisciplinary review will focus on the basic concepts to design acellular and cell-loaded materials with specific and tunable rheological and functional properties. The use of hydrogel-based nanocomposites and mesenchymal stem cells as a synergistic strategy for nervous tissue applications will be then discussed.

  12. Cell-based delivery of glucagon-like peptide-1 using encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallrapp, Christine; Thoenes, Eric; Thürmer, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) CellBeads are cell-based implants for the sustained local delivery of bioactive factors. They consist of GLP-1 secreting mesenchymal stem cells encapsulated in a spherically shaped immuno-isolating alginate matrix. A highly standardized and reproducible encapsulation...... and quality control is performed in compliance with good manufacturing practice and fulfils all regulatory requirements for human clinical use. GLP-1 CellBeads combine the neuro- and cardioprotective properties of both GLP-1 and mesenchymal stem cells. First promising results were obtained from preclinical...... method is described for the manufacturing of homogeneous CellBeads. Viability and sustained secretion was shown for the recombinant GLP-1 and the cell endogenous bioactive factors like vascular endothelial growth factor, neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. Manufacturing...

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell transition to tumor-associated fibroblasts contributes to fibrovascular network expansion and tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Spaeth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor associated fibroblasts (TAF, are essential for tumor progression providing both a functional and structural supportive environment. TAF, known as activated fibroblasts, have an established biological impact on tumorigenesis as matrix synthesizing or matrix degrading cells, contractile cells, and even blood vessel associated cells. The production of growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, matrix-degrading enzymes, and immunomodulatory mechanisms by these cells augment tumor progression by providing a suitable environment. There are several suggested origins of the TAF including tissue-resident, circulating, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transitioned cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We provide evidence that TAF are derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC that acquire a TAF phenotype following exposure to or systemic recruitment into adenocarcinoma xenograft models including breast, pancreatic, and ovarian. We define the MSC derived TAF in a xenograft ovarian carcinoma model by the immunohistochemical presence of 1 fibroblast specific protein and fibroblast activated protein; 2 markers phenotypically associated with aggressiveness, including tenascin-c, thrombospondin-1, and stromelysin-1; 3 production of pro-tumorigenic growth factors including hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-6; and 4 factors indicative of vascularization, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and vascular endothelial growth factor. We demonstrate that under long-term tumor conditioning in vitro, MSC express TAF-like proteins. Additionally, human MSC but not murine MSC stimulated tumor growth primarily through the paracrine production of secreted IL6. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest the dependence of in vitro Skov-3 tumor cell proliferation is due to the presence of tumor-stimulated MSC secreted IL6. The subsequent TAF phenotype arises from the MSC which ultimately promotes tumor growth through the

  14. Establishment and Molecular Characterization of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Lines Derived From Human Visceral & Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Sutar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, myocytes and adipocytes. We utilized adipose tissue as our primary source, since it is a rich source of MSCs as well as it can be harvested using a minimally invasive surgical procedure. Both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue (VSAT, SCAT respectively samples were cultured using growth medium without using any substratum for their attachment. We observed growth of mesenchymal like cells within 15 days of culturing. In spite of the absence of any substratum, the cells adhered to the bottom of the petri dish, and spread out within 2 hours. Presently VSAT cells have reached at passage 10 whereas; SCAT cells have reached at passage 14. Morphologically MSCs obtained from visceral adipose tissue were larger in shape than subcutaneous adipose tissue. We checked these cells for presence or absence of specific stem cell molecular markers. We found that VSAT and SCAT cells confirmed their MSC phenotype by expression of specific MSC markers CD 105 and CD13 and absence of CD34 and CD 45 markers which are specific for haematopoietic stem cells. These cells also expressed SOX2 gene confirming their ability of self-renewal as well as expressed OCT4, LIF and NANOG for their properties for pluripotency & plasticity. Overall, it was shown that adipose tissue is a good source of mesenchymal stem cells. It was also shown that MSCs, isolated from adipose tissue are multipotent stem cells that can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, cardiomyocytes, adipocytes and liver cells which may open a new era for cell based regenerative therapies for bone, cardiac and liver disorders.

  15. Amide-type local anesthetics and human mesenchymal stem cells: clinical implications for stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dregalla, Ryan C; Lyons, Nicolette F; Reischling, Patrick D; Centeno, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    In the realm of regenerative medicine, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are gaining attention as a cell source for the repair and regeneration of tissues spanning an array of medical disciplines. In orthopedics, hMSCs are often delivered in a site-specific manner at the area of interest and may require the concurrent application of local anesthetics (LAs). To address the implications of using hMSCs in combination with anesthetics for intra-articular applications, we investigated the effect that clinically relevant doses of amide-type LAs have on the viability of bone marrow-derived hMSCs and began to characterize the mechanism of LA-induced hMSC death. In our study, culture-expanded hMSCs from three donors were exposed to the amide-type LAs ropivacaine, lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine. To replicate the physiological dilution of LAs once injected into the synovial capsule, each anesthetic was reduced to 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the stock solution and incubated with each hMSC line for 40 minutes, 120 minutes, 360 minutes, and 24 hours. At each time point, cell viability assays were performed. We found that extended treatment with LAs for 24 hours had a significant impact on both hMSC viability and adhesion. In addition, hMSC treatment with three of the four anesthetics resulted in cell death via apoptosis following brief exposures. Ultimately, we concluded that amide-type LAs induce hMSC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner that may threaten clinical outcomes, following a similar trend that has been established between these particular anesthetics and articular chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Amide-Type Local Anesthetics and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Clinical Implications for Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Nicolette F.; Reischling, Patrick D.; Centeno, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    In the realm of regenerative medicine, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are gaining attention as a cell source for the repair and regeneration of tissues spanning an array of medical disciplines. In orthopedics, hMSCs are often delivered in a site-specific manner at the area of interest and may require the concurrent application of local anesthetics (LAs). To address the implications of using hMSCs in combination with anesthetics for intra-articular applications, we investigated the effect that clinically relevant doses of amide-type LAs have on the viability of bone marrow-derived hMSCs and began to characterize the mechanism of LA-induced hMSC death. In our study, culture-expanded hMSCs from three donors were exposed to the amide-type LAs ropivacaine, lidocaine, bupivacaine, and mepivacaine. To replicate the physiological dilution of LAs once injected into the synovial capsule, each anesthetic was reduced to 12.5%, 25%, and 50% of the stock solution and incubated with each hMSC line for 40 minutes, 120 minutes, 360 minutes, and 24 hours. At each time point, cell viability assays were performed. We found that extended treatment with LAs for 24 hours had a significant impact on both hMSC viability and adhesion. In addition, hMSC treatment with three of the four anesthetics resulted in cell death via apoptosis following brief exposures. Ultimately, we concluded that amide-type LAs induce hMSC apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner that may threaten clinical outcomes, following a similar trend that has been established between these particular anesthetics and articular chondrocytes both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24436443

  17. Allogeneic guinea pig mesenchymal stem cells ameliorate neurological changes in experimental colitis

    OpenAIRE

    Stavely, Rhian; Robinson, Ainsley M.; Miller, Sarah; Boyd, Richard; Sakkal, Samy; Nurgali, Kulmira

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to treat inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is of great interest because of their immunomodulatory properties. Damage to the enteric nervous system (ENS) is implicated in IBD pathophysiology and disease progression. The most commonly used model to study inflammation-induced changes to the ENS is 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene-sulfonate acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in guinea pigs; however, no studies using guinea pig MSCs in colitis have been performed. ...

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell interaction with ultra smooth nanostructured diamond for wear resistant orthopaedic implants

    OpenAIRE

    Clem, William C.; Chowdhury, Shafiul; Catledge, Shane A.; Weimer, Jeffrey J.; Shaikh, Faheem M; Hennessy, Kristin M; Konovalov, Valery V.; Hill, Michael R; Waterfeld, Alfred; Bellis, Susan L.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2008-01-01

    Ultra smooth nanostructured diamond (USND) can be applied to greatly increase the wear resistance of orthopaedic implants over conventional designs. Herein we describe surface modification techniques and cytocompatibility studies performed on this new material. We report that hydrogen (H) -terminated USND surfaces supported robust mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) adhesion and survival, while oxygen (O) and fluorine (F) -terminated surfaces resisted cell adhesion, indicating that USND can be modifi...

  19. Therapeutic Efficacy of Fresh, Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Severe Refractory Gingivostomatitis in Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Arzi, Boaz; Mills-Ko, Emily; Frank J.M. Verstraete; Kol, Amir; Walker, Naomi J.; Badgley, Megan R.; Fazel, Nasim; William J. Murphy; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Borjesson, Dori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising therapy for immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders, because of their potent immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we investigated the use of fresh, autologous, adipose-derived MSCs (ASCs) for feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS), a chronic, debilitating, idiopathic, oral mucosal inflammatory disease. Nine cats with refractory FCGS were enrolled in this pilot study. Each cat received 2 intravenous injections of 20 million autologous AS...

  20. Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells with immunosuppressive activity can be easily isolated from dental pulp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierdomenico, Laura; Bonsi, Laura; Calvitti, Mario

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being investigated in preclinical and clinical settings because of their multipotent differentiative capacity or, alternatively, their immunosuppressive function. The aim of this study was to evaluate dental pulp (DP) as a potent...... characteristics of DP-MSCs may prompt future studies aimed at using these cells in the treatment or prevention of T-cell alloreactivity in hematopoietic or solid organ allogeneic transplantation....