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Sample records for murine centromeric transcripts

  1. Differential Regulation of Strand-Specific Transcripts from Arabidopsis Centromeric Satellite Repeats.

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    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres interact with the spindle apparatus to enable chromosome disjunction and typically contain thousands of tandemly arranged satellite repeats interspersed with retrotransposons. While their role has been obscure, centromeric repeats are epigenetically modified and centromere specification has a strong epigenetic component. In the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, long heterochromatic repeats are transcribed and contribute to centromere function via RNA interference (RNAi. In the higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana, as in mammalian cells, centromeric satellite repeats are short (180 base pairs, are found in thousands of tandem copies, and are methylated. We have found transcripts from both strands of canonical, bulk Arabidopsis repeats. At least one subfamily of 180-base pair repeats is transcribed from only one strand and regulated by RNAi and histone modification. A second subfamily of repeats is also silenced, but silencing is lost on both strands in mutants in the CpG DNA methyltransferase MET1, the histone deacetylase HDA6/SIL1, or the chromatin remodeling ATPase DDM1. This regulation is due to transcription from Athila2 retrotransposons, which integrate in both orientations relative to the repeats, and differs between strains of Arabidopsis. Silencing lost in met1 or hda6 is reestablished in backcrosses to wild-type, but silencing lost in RNAi mutants and ddm1 is not. Twenty-four-nucleotide small interfering RNAs from centromeric repeats are retained in met1 and hda6, but not in ddm1, and may have a role in this epigenetic inheritance. Histone H3 lysine-9 dimethylation is associated with both classes of repeats. We propose roles for transcribed repeats in the epigenetic inheritance and evolution of centromeres.

  2. RNA Pol II promotes transcription of centromeric satellite DNA in beetles.

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    Zeljka Pezer

    Full Text Available Transcripts of centromeric satellite DNAs are known to play a role in heterochromatin formation as well as in establishment of the kinetochore. However, little is known about basic mechanisms of satellite DNA expression within constitutive heterochromatin and its regulation. Here we present comprehensive analysis of transcription of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, PRAT from beetle Palorus ratzeburgii (Coleoptera. This satellite is characterized by preservation and extreme sequence conservation among evolutionarily distant insect species. PRAT is expressed in all three developmental stages: larvae, pupae and adults at similar level. Transcripts are abundant comprising 0.033% of total RNA and are heterogeneous in size ranging from 0.5 kb up to more than 5 kb. Transcription proceeds from both strands but with 10 fold different expression intensity and transcripts are not processed into siRNAs. Most of the transcripts (80% are not polyadenylated and remain in the nucleus while a small portion is exported to the cytoplasm. Multiple, irregularly distributed transcription initiation sites as well as termination sites have been mapped within the PRAT sequence using primer extension and RLM-RACE. The presence of cap structure as well as poly(A tails in a portion of the transcripts indicate RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription and a putative polymerase II promoter site overlaps the most conserved part of the PRAT sequence. The treatment of larvae with alpha-amanitin decreases the level of PRAT transcripts at concentrations that selectively inhibit pol II activity. In conclusion, stable, RNA polymerase II dependant transcripts of abundant centromeric satellite DNA, not regulated by RNAi, have been identified and characterized. This study offers a basic understanding of expression of highly abundant heterochromatic DNA which in beetle species constitutes up to 50% of the genome.

  3. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

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    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  4. De Novo Centromere Formation and Centromeric Sequence Expansion in Wheat and its Wide Hybrids.

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    Xiang Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres typically contain tandem repeat sequences, but centromere function does not necessarily depend on these sequences. We identified functional centromeres with significant quantitative changes in the centromeric retrotransposons of wheat (CRW contents in wheat aneuploids (Triticum aestivum and the offspring of wheat wide hybrids. The CRW signals were strongly reduced or essentially lost in some wheat ditelosomic lines and in the addition lines from the wide hybrids. The total loss of the CRW sequences but the presence of CENH3 in these lines suggests that the centromeres were formed de novo. In wheat and its wide hybrids, which carry large complex genomes or no sequenced genome, we performed CENH3-ChIP-dot-blot methods alone or in combination with CENH3-ChIP-seq and identified the ectopic genomic sequences present at the new centromeres. In adcdition, the transcription of the identified DNA sequences was remarkably increased at the new centromere, suggesting that the transcription of the corresponding sequences may be associated with de novo centromere formation. Stable alien chromosomes with two and three regions containing CRW sequences induced by centromere breakage were observed in the wheat-Th. elongatum hybrid derivatives, but only one was a functional centromere. In wheat-rye (Secale cereale hybrids, the rye centromere-specific sequences spread along the chromosome arms and may have caused centromere expansion. Frequent and significant quantitative alterations in the centromere sequence via chromosomal rearrangement have been systematically described in wheat wide hybridizations, which may affect the retention or loss of the alien chromosomes in the hybrids. Thus, the centromere behavior in wide crosses likely has an important impact on the generation of biodiversity, which ultimately has implications for speciation.

  5. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses TREX Components for Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral Transcripts

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    Toshie Sakuma

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1 pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts.

  6. A comprehensive collection of experimentally validated primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction quantitation of murine transcript abundance

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    Wang Xiaowei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR is a widely applied analytical method for the accurate determination of transcript abundance. Primers for QPCR have been designed on a genomic scale but non-specific amplification of non-target genes has frequently been a problem. Although several online databases have been created for the storage and retrieval of experimentally validated primers, only a few thousand primer pairs are currently present in existing databases and the primers are not designed for use under a common PCR thermal profile. Results We previously reported the implementation of an algorithm to predict PCR primers for most known human and mouse genes. We now report the use of that resource to identify 17483 pairs of primers that have been experimentally verified to amplify unique sequences corresponding to distinct murine transcripts. The primer pairs have been validated by gel electrophoresis, DNA sequence analysis and thermal denaturation profile. In addition to the validation studies, we have determined the uniformity of amplification using the primers and the technical reproducibility of the QPCR reaction using the popular and inexpensive SYBR Green I detection method. Conclusion We have identified an experimentally validated collection of murine primer pairs for PCR and QPCR which can be used under a common PCR thermal profile, allowing the evaluation of transcript abundance of a large number of genes in parallel. This feature is increasingly attractive for confirming and/or making more precise data trends observed from experiments performed with DNA microarrays.

  7. Isolation of Blastomyces dermatitidis yeast from lung tissue during murine infection for in vivo transcriptional profiling.

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    Marty, Amber J; Wüthrich, Marcel; Carmen, John C; Sullivan, Thomas D; Klein, Bruce S; Cuomo, Christina A; Gauthier, Gregory M

    2013-07-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis belongs to a group of thermally dimorphic fungi that grow as sporulating mold in the soil and convert to pathogenic yeast in the lung following inhalation of spores. Knowledge about the molecular events important for fungal adaptation and survival in the host remains limited. The development of high-throughput analytic tools such as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has potential to provide novel insight on fungal pathogenesis especially if applied in vivo during infection. However, in vivo transcriptional profiling is hindered by the low abundance of fungal cells relative to mammalian tissue and difficulty in isolating fungal cells from the tissues they infect. For the purpose of obtaining B. dermatitidis RNA for in vivo transcriptional analysis by RNA-Seq, we developed a simple technique for isolating yeast from murine lung tissue. Using a two-step approach of filtration and centrifugation following lysis of murine lung cells, 91% of yeast cells causing infection were isolated from lung tissue. B. dermatitidis recovered from the lung yielded high-quality RNA with minimal murine contamination and was suitable for RNA-Seq. Approximately 87% of the sequencing reads obtained from the recovered yeast aligned with the B. dermatitidis genome. This was similar to 93% alignment for yeast grown in vitro. The use of near-freezing temperature along with short ex vivo time minimized transcriptional changes that would have otherwise occurred with higher temperature or longer processing time. In conclusion, we have developed a technique that recovers the majority of yeast causing pulmonary infection and yields high-quality fungal RNA with minimal contamination by mammalian RNA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expression of mink cell focus-forming murine leukemia virus-related transcripts in AKR mice

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    Khan, A.S.; Laigret, F.; Rodi, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used a synthetic 16-base-pair mink cell focus-forming (MCF) env-specific oligomer as radiolabeled probe to study MCF murine leukemia virus (MuLV)-related transcripts in brain, kidney, liver, spleen, and thymus tissues of AKR mice ranging from 5 weeks to 6 months (mo) of age. Tissue-specific expression of poly(A) + RNAs was seen. In addition, all the tissues tested contained 3.0-kb messages. The transcription of these MCF-related mRNAs was independent of the presence of ecotropic and xenotropic MuLVs. In general, expression of the MCF env-related transcripts appeared to peak at 2 mo of age; these messages were barely detectable in brain, kidney, liver, and spleen tissues after 2 mo and in thymus tissue after 4 mo of age. All of the subgenomic MCF env-related mRNAs appeared to contain the 190-base-pair cellular DNA insert, characteristic of the long terminal repeats associated with endogenous MCF env-related proviruses. No genomic-size (8.4-kb) transcripts corresponding to endogenous MCF-related proviruses were detected. An 8.4-kb MCF env-related mRNA was first seen at 3 mo of age, exclusively in thymus tissue. This species most likely represents the first appearance of a recombinant MCF-related MuLV genome. The transcripts which were detected in thymus tissue might be involved in the generation of leukemogenic MCF viruses

  9. SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor Fun30 supports point centromere function in S. cerevisiae.

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    Mickaël Durand-Dubief

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Budding yeast centromeres are sequence-defined point centromeres and are, unlike in many other organisms, not embedded in heterochromatin. Here we show that Fun30, a poorly understood SWI/SNF-like chromatin remodeling factor conserved in humans, promotes point centromere function through the formation of correct chromatin architecture at centromeres. Our determination of the genome-wide binding and nucleosome positioning properties of Fun30 shows that this enzyme is consistently enriched over centromeres and that a majority of CENs show Fun30-dependent changes in flanking nucleosome position and/or CEN core micrococcal nuclease accessibility. Fun30 deletion leads to defects in histone variant Htz1 occupancy genome-wide, including at and around most centromeres. FUN30 genetically interacts with CSE4, coding for the centromere-specific variant of histone H3, and counteracts the detrimental effect of transcription through centromeres on chromosome segregation and suppresses transcriptional noise over centromere CEN3. Previous work has shown a requirement for fission yeast and mammalian homologs of Fun30 in heterochromatin assembly. As centromeres in budding yeast are not embedded in heterochromatin, our findings indicate a direct role of Fun30 in centromere chromatin by promoting correct chromatin architecture.

  10. Dynamic epigenetic states of maize centromeres

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    Yalin eLiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region identified as the major constriction, upon which the kinetochore complex is formed, ensuring accurate chromosome orientation and segregation during cell division. The rapid evolution of centromere DNA sequence and the conserved centromere function are two contradictory aspects of centromere biology. Indeed, the sole presence of genetic sequence is not sufficient for centromere formation. Various dicentric chromosomes with one inactive centromere have been recognized. It has also been found that de novo centromere formation is common on fragments in which centromeric DNA sequences are lost. Epigenetic factors play important roles in centromeric chromatin assembly and maintenance. Nondisjunction of the supernumerary B chromosome early prophase of meiosis I requires an active centromere. This review discusses recent studies in maize about genetic and epigenetic elements regulating formation and maintenance of centromere chromatin, as well as centromere behavior in meiosis.

  11. Recent advances in plant centromere biology.

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    Feng, Chao; Liu, YaLin; Su, HanDong; Wang, HeFei; Birchler, James; Han, FangPu

    2015-03-01

    The centromere, which is one of the essential parts of a chromosome, controls kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. While centromere function is conserved in eukaryotes, the centromeric DNA sequences evolve rapidly and have few similarities among species. The histone H3 variant CENH3 (CENP-A in human), which mostly exists in centromeric nucleosomes, is a universal active centromere mark in eukaryotes and plays an essential role in centromere identity determination. The relationship between centromeric DNA sequences and centromere identity determination is one of the intriguing questions in studying centromere formation. Due to the discoveries in the past decades, including "neocentromeres" and "centromere inactivation", it is now believed that the centromere identity is determined by epigenetic mechanisms. This review will present recent progress in plant centromere biology.

  12. The major horse satellite DNA family is associated with centromere competence.

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    Cerutti, Federico; Gamba, Riccardo; Mazzagatti, Alice; Piras, Francesca M; Cappelletti, Eleonora; Belloni, Elisa; Nergadze, Solomon G; Raimondi, Elena; Giulotto, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The centromere is the specialized locus required for correct chromosome segregation during cell division. The DNA of most eukaryotic centromeres is composed of extended arrays of tandem repeats (satellite DNA). In the horse, we previously showed that, although the centromere of chromosome 11 is completely devoid of tandem repeat arrays, all other centromeres are characterized by the presence of satellite DNA. We isolated three horse satellite DNA sequences (37cen, 2P1 and EC137) and described their chromosomal localization in four species of the genus Equus. In the work presented here, using the ChIP-seq methodology, we showed that, in the horse, the 37cen satellite binds CENP-A, the centromere-specific histone-H3 variant. The 37cen sequence bound by CENP-A is GC-rich with 221 bp units organized in a head-to-tail fashion. The physical interaction of CENP-A with 37cen was confirmed through slot blot experiments. Immuno-FISH on stretched chromosomes and chromatin fibres demonstrated that the extension of satellite DNA stretches is variable and is not related to the organization of CENP-A binding domains. Finally, we proved that the centromeric satellite 37cen is transcriptionally active. Our data offer new insights into the organization of horse centromeres. Although three different satellite DNA families are cytogenetically located at centromeres, only the 37cen family is associated to the centromeric function. Moreover, similarly to other species, CENP-A binding domains are variable in size. The transcriptional competence of the 37cen satellite that we observed adds new evidence to the hypothesis that centromeric transcripts may be required for centromere function.

  13. Frequent dual initiation of reverse transcription in murine leukemia virus-based vectors containing two primer-binding sites

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    Voronin, Yegor A.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2003-01-01

    Retroviruses package two copies of viral RNA into each virion. Although each RNA contains a primer-binding site for initiation of DNA synthesis, it is unknown whether reverse transcription is initiated on both RNAs. To determine whether a single virion is capable of initiating reverse transcription more than once, we constructed a murine leukemia virus-based vector containing a second primer-binding site (PBS) derived from spleen necrosis virus and inserted the green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) between the two PBSs. Initiation of reverse transcription at either PBS results in a provirus that expresses GFP. However, initiation at both PBSs can result in the deletion of GFP, which can be detected by flow cytometry and Southern blotting analysis. Approximately 22-29% of the proviruses formed deleted the GFP in a single replication cycle, indicating the minimum proportion of virions that initiated reverse transcription on both PBSs. These results show that a significant proportion of MLV-based vectors containing two PBSs have the capacity to initiate reverse transcription more than once

  14. Transcription factors ETF, E2F, and SP-1 are involved in cytokine-independent proliferation of murine hepatocytes.

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    Zellmer, Sebastian; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Godoy, Patricio; Weng, Honglei; Meyer, Christoph; Lehmann, Thomas; Sparna, Titus; Schormann, Wiebke; Hammad, Seddik; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Thürmann, Petra A; Merfort, Irmgard; Guthke, Reinhard; Dooley, Steven; Hengstler, Jan G; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    The cellular basis of liver regeneration has been intensely investigated for many years. However, the mechanisms initiating hepatocyte "plasticity" and priming for proliferation are not yet fully clear. We investigated alterations in gene expression patterns during the first 72 hours of C57BL/6N mouse hepatocyte culture on collagen monolayers (CM), which display a high basal frequency of proliferation in the absence of cytokines. Although many metabolic genes were down-regulated, genes related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and cell cycle were up-regulated. The latter genes showed an overrepresentation of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for ETF (TEA domain family member 2), E2F1 (E2F transcription factor 1), and SP-1 (Sp1 transcription factor) (P ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 and displayed increased expression of E2F1. Cultivation of murine hepatocytes on CM primes cells for proliferation through cytokine-independent activation of MAPK signaling. The transcription factors ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 seem to play a pronounced role in mediating proliferation-dependent differential gene expression. Similar events, but on a shorter time-scale, occur very early after liver damage in vivo. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  15. Effects of intracellular chelatable iron and oxidative stress on transcription of classical cellular glutathione peroxidase gene in murine erythroleukemia cells

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    Fuchs, O.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of intracellular chelatable iron levels and of oxidative stress on nuclear classical cellular glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx-1) RNA nascent chain elongation (run-on transcription) and on the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA was investigated in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. The amount in the intracellular low molecular mass iron pool was changed by incubation of MEL cells transformed by Friend virus with iron donors or iron chelators. Transcription in vitro in isolated nuclei from treated cells showed that the treatment with chelators (desferrioxamine (DFO), pyridoxal isonicotinoyl hydrazone) decrease the rate of nuclear GSHPx-1 RNA nascent chain elongation in both un-induced and with 5 mmol hexamethylenebisacetamide to erythroid differentiation induced MEL cells. Iron donors (diferric transferrin,, Fe-PIH or their combination) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) had the opposite effect on GSHPx-1 gene transcription in run-on experiments. On the other hand, 50 μmol DFO or 2.5 μmol t-BuOOH did not change the stability of cytoplasmic GSHPx-1 mRNA in both un-induced and induced MEL cells treated with 5 μmol actinomycin D and with or without these agents for 9 h. These findings indicate that iron and oxidative stress play their role at the transcriptional level of GSHPx-1 gene expression. (author)

  16. Neocentromeres Provide Chromosome Segregation Accuracy and Centromere Clustering to Multiple Loci along a Candida albicans Chromosome.

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    Laura S Burrack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of kinetochore complexes, involving greater than one hundred proteins, is essential for chromosome segregation and genome stability. Neocentromeres, or new centromeres, occur when kinetochores assemble de novo, at DNA loci not previously associated with kinetochore proteins, and they restore chromosome segregation to chromosomes lacking a functional centromere. Neocentromeres have been observed in a number of diseases and may play an evolutionary role in adaptation or speciation. However, the consequences of neocentromere formation on chromosome missegregation rates, gene expression, and three-dimensional (3D nuclear structure are not well understood. Here, we used Candida albicans, an organism with small, epigenetically-inherited centromeres, as a model system to study the functions of twenty different neocentromere loci along a single chromosome, chromosome 5. Comparison of neocentromere properties relative to native centromere functions revealed that all twenty neocentromeres mediated chromosome segregation, albeit to different degrees. Some neocentromeres also caused reduced levels of transcription from genes found within the neocentromere region. Furthermore, like native centromeres, neocentromeres clustered in 3D with active/functional centromeres, indicating that formation of a new centromere mediates the reorganization of 3D nuclear architecture. This demonstrates that centromere clustering depends on epigenetically defined function and not on the primary DNA sequence, and that neocentromere function is independent of its distance from the native centromere position. Together, the results show that a neocentromere can form at many loci along a chromosome and can support the assembly of a functional kinetochore that exhibits native centromere functions including chromosome segregation accuracy and centromere clustering within the nucleus.

  17. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

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    Zhou Qing; Plath Kathrin; Fan Guoping; Mason Mike J; Horvath Steve

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs) regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES) cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we...

  18. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

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    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Lee, Jamie; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response.

  19. The immediate and late effects of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine) on murine coagulation gene transcription.

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    Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Boelen, Anita; Reitsma, Pieter H; van Vlijmen, Bart J M

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is associated with changes in coagulation. The aim of our study was to gain more insight into the role of thyroid hormone in coagulation control. C57Black/6J mice received a low-iodine diet and drinking water supplemented with perchlorate to suppress endogenous triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) production. Under these conditions, the impact of exogenous T3 on plasma coagulation, and hepatic and vessel-wall-associated coagulation gene transcription was studied in a short- (4 hours) and long-term (14 days) setting. Comparing euthyroid conditions (normal mice), with hypothyroidism (conditions of a shortage of thyroid hormone) and those with replacement by incremental doses of T3, dosages of 0 and 0.5 μg T3/mouse/day were selected to study the impact of T3 on coagulation gene transcription. Under these conditions, a single injection of T3 injection increased strongly hepatic transcript levels of the well-characterized T3-responsive genes deiodinase type 1 (Dio1) and Spot14 within 4 hours. This coincided with significantly reduced mRNA levels of Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, and Serpin10, and the reduction of the latter three persisted upon daily treatment with T3 for 14 days. Prolonged T3 treatment induced a significant down-regulation in factor (F) 2, F9 and F10 transcript levels, while F11 and F12 levels increased. Activity levels in plasma largely paralleled these mRNA changes. Thbd transcript levels in the lung (vessel-wall-associated coagulation) were significantly up-regulated after a single T3 injection, and persisted upon prolonged T3 exposure. Two-week T3 administration also resulted in increased Vwf and Tfpi mRNA levels, whereas Tf levels decreased. These data showed that T3 has specific effects on coagulation, with Fgg, Serpinc1, Proc, Proz, Serpin10 and Thbd responding rapidly, making these likely direct thyroid hormone receptor targets. F2, F9, F10, F11, F12, Vwf, Tf and Tfpi are late responding genes and probably indirectly

  20. Sex-related differences in murine hepatic transcriptional and proteomic responses to TCDD

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    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D. [Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Lee, Jamie [Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Pohjanvirta, Raimo [Laboratory of Toxicology, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio Finland (Finland); Department of Food Hygiene and Environmental Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Boutros, Paul C., E-mail: Paul.Boutros@oicr.on.ca [Informatics and Bio-computing Program, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto (Canada); Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is an environmental contaminant that produces myriad toxicities in most mammals. In rodents alone, there is a huge divergence in the toxicological response across species, as well as among different strains within a species. But there are also significant differences between males and females animals of a single strain. These differences are inconsistent across model systems: the severity of toxicity is greater in female rats than males, while male mice and guinea pigs are more sensitive than females. Because the specific events that underlie this difference remain unclear, we characterized the hepatic transcriptional response of adult male and female C57BL/6 mice to 500 μg/kg TCDD at multiple time-points. The transcriptional profile diverged significantly between the sexes. Female mice demonstrated a large number of altered transcripts as early as 6 h following treatment, suggesting a large primary response. Conversely, male animals showed the greatest TCDD-mediated response 144 h following exposure, potentially implicating significant secondary responses. Nr1i3 was statistically significantly induced at all time-points in the sensitive male animals. This mRNA encodes the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), a transcription factor involved in the regulation of xenobiotic metabolism, lipid metabolism, cell cycle and apoptosis. Surprisingly though, changes at the protein level (aside from the positive control, CYP1A1) were modest, with only FMO3 showing clear induction, and no genes with sex-differences. Thus, while male and female mice show transcriptional differences in their response to TCDD, their association with TCDD-induced toxicities remains unclear. - Highlights: • Differences exist between the toxicity phenotypes to TCDD in male and female mice. • TCDD-mediated transcriptomic differences were identified between the sexes. • Resistant female mice displayed a large, early-onset, transcriptomic response.

  1. Telomere-Centromere-Driven Genomic Instability Contributes to Karyotype Evolution in a Mouse Model of Melanoma

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    Amanda Gonçalves dos Santos Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN are hallmarks of most solid tumors. These alterations may result from inaccurate chromosomal segregation during mitosis, which can occur through several mechanisms including defective telomere metabolism, centrosome amplification, dysfunctional centromeres, and/or defective spindle checkpoint control. In this work, we used an in vitro murine melanoma model that uses a cellular adhesion blockade as a transforming factor to characterize telomeric and centromeric alterations that accompany melanocyte transformation. To study the timing of the occurrence of telomere shortening in this transformation model, we analyzed the profile of telomere length by quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization and found that telomere length significantly decreased as additional rounds of cell adhesion blockages were performed. Together with it, an increase in telomere-free ends and complex karyotypic aberrations were also found, which include Robertsonian fusions in 100% of metaphases of the metastatic melanoma cells. These findings are in agreement with the idea that telomere length abnormalities seem to be one of the earliest genetic alterations acquired in the multistep process of malignant transformation and that telomere abnormalities result in telomere aggregation, breakage-bridge-fusion cycles, and CIN. Another remarkable feature of this model is the abundance of centromeric instability manifested as centromere fragments and centromeric fusions. Taken together, our results illustrate for this melanoma model CIN with a structural signature of centromere breakage and telomeric loss.

  2. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Rice Centromeres

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    Jiang, Jiming

    2010-02-04

    The centromere is the most characteristic landmark of eukaryotic chromosomes. Centromeres function as the site for kinetochore assembly and spindle attachment, allowing for the faithful pairing and segregation of sister chromatids during cell division. Characterization of centromeric DNA is not only essential to understand the structure and organization of plant genomes, but it is also a critical step in the development of plant artificial chromosomes. The centromeres of most model eukaryotic species, consist predominantly of long arrays of satellite DNA. Determining the precise DNA boundary of a centromere has proven to be a difficult task in multicellular eukaryotes. We have successfully cloned and sequenced the centromere of rice chromosome 8 (Cen8), representing the first fully sequenced centromere from any multicellular eukaryotes. The functional core of Cen8 spans ~800 kb of DNA, which was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) using an antibody against the rice centromere-specific H3 histone. We discovered 16 actively transcribed genes distributed throughout the Cen8 region. In addition to Cen8, we have characterized eight additional rice centromeres using the next generation sequencing technology. We discovered four subfamilies of the CRR retrotransposon that is highly enriched in rice centromeres. CRR elements are constitutively transcribed and different CRR subfamilies are differentially processed by RNAi. These results suggest that different CRR subfamilies may play different roles in the RNAi-mediated pathway for formation and maintenance of centromeric chromatin.

  3. The first murine zygotic transcription is promiscuous and uncoupled from splicing and 3' processing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abe, K.; Yamamoto, R.; Franke, V.; Cao, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Suzuki, M.G.; Vlahovicek, K.; Svoboda, Petr; Schultz, R. M.; Aoki, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 11 (2015), s. 1523-1537 ISSN 0261-4189. [GBP305/12/G034. CZ] EU Projects: European Commission(BE) 315997 Grant - others:GA MŠk LH13084; GA AV ČR M200521202; NIH(US) HD022681; Croatian Ministry of Science, Education and Sports(HR) 119-0982913-1211 Program:LH Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gene expression * preimplantation mouse embryo * pre-mRNA splicing * RNA-Seq * transcription Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.643, year: 2015

  4. Early transcriptional alteration of histone deacetylases in a murine model of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Piotrowska

    Full Text Available Doxorubicin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent that is widely-used to treat a variety of cancers but causes acute and chronic cardiac injury, severely limiting its use. Clinically, the acute side effects of doxorubicin are mostly manageable, whereas the delayed consequences can lead to life-threatening heart failure, even decades after cancer treatment. The cardiotoxicity of doxorubicin is subject to a critical cumulative dose and so dosage limitation is considered to be the best way to reduce these effects. Hence, a number of studies have defined a "safe dose" of the drug, both in animal models and clinical settings, with the aim of avoiding long-term cardiac effects. Here we show that a dose generally considered as safe in a mouse model can induce harmful changes in the myocardium, as early as 2 weeks after infusion. The adverse changes include the development of fibrotic lesions, disarray of cardiomyocytes and a major transcription dysregulation. Importantly, low-dose doxorubicin caused specific changes in the transcriptional profile of several histone deacetylases (HDACs which are epigenetic regulators of cardiac remodelling. This suggests that cardioprotective therapies, aimed at modulating HDACs during doxorubicin treatment, deserve further exploration.

  5. Delayed Mesoderm and Erythroid Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells in the Absence of the Transcriptional Regulator FUBP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Wesely

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator far upstream binding protein 1 (FUBP1 is essential for fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal, and the constitutive absence of FUBP1 activity during early development leads to embryonic lethality in homozygous mutant mice. To investigate the role of FUBP1 in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs and in particular during differentiation into hematopoietic lineages, we generated Fubp1 knockout (KO ESC clones using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Although FUBP1 is expressed in undifferentiated ESCs and during spontaneous differentiation following aggregation into embryoid bodies (EBs, absence of FUBP1 did not affect ESC maintenance. Interestingly, we observed a delayed differentiation of FUBP1-deficient ESCs into the mesoderm germ layer, as indicated by impaired expression of several mesoderm markers including Brachyury at an early time point of ESC differentiation upon aggregation to EBs. Coculture experiments with OP9 cells in the presence of erythropoietin revealed a diminished differentiation capacity of Fubp1 KO ESCs into the erythroid lineage. Our data showed that FUBP1 is important for the onset of mesoderm differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the erythroid lineage, a finding that is supported by the phenotype of FUBP1-deficient mice.

  6. Spatial and temporal expression of the Grainyhead-like transcription factor family during murine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auden, Alana; Caddy, Jacinta; Wilanowski, Tomasz; Ting, Stephen B; Cunningham, John M; Jane, Stephen M

    2006-10-01

    The Drosophila transcription factor Grainyhead (grh) is expressed in ectoderm-derived tissues where it regulates several key developmental events including cuticle formation, tracheal elongation and dorsal closure. Our laboratory has recently identified three novel mammalian homologues of the grh gene, Grainyhead-like 1, -2 and -3 (Grhl1-3) that rewrite the phylogeny of this family. Using gene targeting in mice, we have shown that Grhl3 is essential for neural tube closure, skin barrier formation and wound healing. Despite their extensive sequence homology, Grhl1 and Grhl2 are unable to compensate for loss of Grhl3 in these developmental processes. To explore this lack of redundancy, and to gain further insights into the functions of this gene family in mammalian development we have performed an extensive in situ hybridisation analysis. We demonstrate that, although all three Grhl genes are highly expressed in the developing epidermis, they display subtle differences in the timing and level of expression. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate differential expression patterns in non-ectoderm-derived tissues, including the heart, the lung, and the metanephric kidney. These findings expand our understanding of the unique role of Grhl3 in neurulation and epidermal morphogenesis, and provide a focus for further functional analysis of the Grhl genes during mouse embryogenesis.

  7. Centromeric heterochromatin: the primordial segregation machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Kerry S

    2014-01-01

    Centromeres are specialized domains of heterochromatin that provide the foundation for the kinetochore. Centromeric heterochromatin is characterized by specific histone modifications, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CENP-A), and the enrichment of cohesin, condensin, and topoisomerase II. Centromere DNA varies orders of magnitude in size from 125 bp (budding yeast) to several megabases (human). In metaphase, sister kinetochores on the surface of replicated chromosomes face away from each other, where they establish microtubule attachment and bi-orientation. Despite the disparity in centromere size, the distance between separated sister kinetochores is remarkably conserved (approximately 1 μm) throughout phylogeny. The centromere functions as a molecular spring that resists microtubule-based extensional forces in mitosis. This review explores the physical properties of DNA in order to understand how the molecular spring is built and how it contributes to the fidelity of chromosome segregation.

  8. Down-regulation of transcription of the proapoptotic gene BNip3 in cultured astrocytes by murine coronavirus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Yingyun; Liu Yin; Yu Dongdong; Zhang Xuming

    2003-01-01

    Murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) causes encephalitis and demyelination in the central nervous system of susceptible rodents. Astrocytes are the major target for MHV persistence. However, the mechanisms by which astrocytes survive MHV infection and permit viral persistence are not known. Here we performed DNA microarray analysis on differential gene expression in astrocyte DBT cells by MHV infection and found that the mRNA of the proapoptotic gene BNip3 was significantly decreased following MHV infection. This finding was further confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blot analysis, and BNip3-promoter-luciferase reporter system. Interestingly, infection with live and ultraviolet light-inactivated viruses equally repressed BNip3 expression, indicating that the down-regulation of BNip3 expression does not require virus replication and is mediated during cell entry. Furthermore, treatment of cells with chloroquine, which blocks the acidification of endosomes, significantly inhibited the repression of the BNip3 promoter activity induced by the acidic pH-dependent MHV mutant OBLV60, which enters cells via endocytosis, indicating that the down-regulation of BNip3 expression is mediated by fusion between viral envelope and cell membranes during entry. Deletion analysis showed that the sequence between nucleotides 262 and 550 of the 588-base-pair BNip3 promoter is necessary and sufficient for driving the BNip3 expression and that it contains signals that are responsible for MHV-induced down-regulation of BNip3 expression in DBT cells. These results may provide insights into the mechanisms by which MHV evades host antiviral defense and promotes cell survival, thereby allowing its persistence in the host astrocytes

  9. Ascorbic Acid-Induced Cardiac Differentiation of Murine Pluripotent Stem Cells: Transcriptional Profiling and Effect of a Small Molecule Synergist of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Ivanyuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reproducible and efficient differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs to cardiomyocytes (CMs is essential for their use in regenerative medicine, drug testing and disease modeling. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of some previously reported cardiogenic substances on cardiac differentiation of mouse PSCs. Methods: Differentiation was performed by embryoid body (EB-based method using three different murine PSC lines. The differentiation efficiency was monitored by RT-qPCR, immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry, and the effect mechanistically evaluated by transcriptome analysis of treated EBs. Results: Among the five tested compounds (ascorbic acid, dorsomorphin, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, cardiogenol C, cyclosporin A only ascorbic acid (AA exerted a strong and reproducible cardiogenic effect in CGR8 cells which was less consistent in other two PSC lines. AA induced only minor changes in transcriptome of CGR8 cells after administration during the initial two days of differentiation. Cardiospecific genes and transcripts involved in angiogenesis, erythropoiesis and hematopoiesis were up-regulated on day 5 but not on days 2 or 3 of differentiation. The cardiac differentiation efficiency was improved when QS11, a small-molecule synergist of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, was added to cultures after AA-treatment. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that only minor transcriptional changes are sufficient for enhancement of cardiogenesis of murine PSCs by AA and that AA and QS11 exhibit synergistic effects and enhance the efficiency of CM differentiation of murine PSCs.

  10. The murine cytomegalovirus M35 protein antagonizes type I IFN induction downstream of pattern recognition receptors by targeting NF-κB mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baca Chan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is imperative for the establishment of the early antiviral immune response. Here we report the identification of the first type I IFN antagonist encoded by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV that shuts down signaling following pattern recognition receptor (PRR sensing. Screening of an MCMV open reading frame (ORF library identified M35 as a novel and strong negative modulator of IFNβ promoter induction following activation of both RNA and DNA cytoplasmic PRR. Additionally, M35 inhibits the proinflammatory cytokine response downstream of Toll-like receptors (TLR. Using a series of luciferase-based reporters with specific transcription factor binding sites, we determined that M35 targets NF-κB-, but not IRF-mediated, transcription. Expression of M35 upon retroviral transduction of immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages (iBMDM led to reduced IFNβ transcription and secretion upon activation of stimulator of IFN genes (STING-dependent signaling. On the other hand, M35 does not antagonize interferon-stimulated gene (ISG 56 promoter induction or ISG transcription upon exogenous stimulation of the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR. M35 is present in the viral particle and, upon MCMV infection of fibroblasts, is immediately shuttled to the nucleus where it exerts its immunomodulatory effects. Deletion of M35 from the MCMV genome and hence from the viral particle resulted in elevated type I IFN transcription and secretion in vitro and in vivo. In the absence of M35, lower viral titers are observed during acute infection of the host, and productive infection in the salivary glands was not detected. In conclusion, the M35 protein is released by MCMV immediately upon infection in order to deftly inhibit the antiviral type I IFN response by targeting NF-κB-mediated transcription. The identification of this novel viral protein reinforces the importance of timely countermeasures in the complex relationship between virus and host.

  11. β-adrenergic receptor-dependent alterations in murine cardiac transcript expression are differentially regulated by gefitinib in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Talarico

    Full Text Available β-adrenergic receptor (βAR-mediated transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR has been shown to promote cardioprotection in a mouse model of heart failure and we recently showed that this mechanism leads to enhanced cell survival in part via regulation of apoptotic transcript expression in isolated primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Thus, we hypothesized that this process could regulate cardiac transcript expression in vivo. To comprehensively assess cardiac transcript alterations in response to acute βAR-dependent EGFR transactivation, we performed whole transcriptome analysis of hearts from C57BL/6 mice given i.p. injections of the βAR agonist isoproterenol in the presence or absence of the EGFR antagonist gefitinib for 1 hour. Total cardiac RNA from each treatment group underwent transcriptome analysis, revealing a substantial number of transcripts regulated by each treatment. Gefitinib alone significantly altered the expression of 405 transcripts, while isoproterenol either alone or in conjunction with gefitinib significantly altered 493 and 698 distinct transcripts, respectively. Further statistical analysis was performed, confirming 473 transcripts whose regulation by isoproterenol were significantly altered by gefitinib (isoproterenol-induced up/downregulation antagonized/promoted by gefinitib, including several known to be involved in the regulation of numerous processes including cell death and survival. Thus, βAR-dependent regulation of cardiac transcript expression in vivo can be modulated by the EGFR antagonist gefitinib.

  12. DNA topoisomerase III localizes to centromeres and affects centromeric CENP-A levels in fission yeast.

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    Ulrika Norman-Axelsson

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specialized chromatin regions marked by the presence of nucleosomes containing the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, which is essential for chromosome segregation. Assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes is intimately linked to DNA topology, and DNA topoisomerases have previously been implicated in the dynamics of canonical H3 nucleosomes. Here we show that Schizosaccharomyces pombe Top3 and its partner Rqh1 are involved in controlling the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeres. Both top3 and rqh1 mutants display defects in chromosome segregation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarrays, we show that Top3, unlike Top1 and Top2, is highly enriched at centromeric central domains, demonstrating that Top3 is the major topoisomerase in this region. Moreover, centromeric Top3 occupancy positively correlates with CENP-A(Cnp1 occupancy. Intriguingly, both top3 and rqh1 mutants display increased relative enrichment of CENP-A(Cnp1 at centromeric central domains. Thus, Top3 and Rqh1 normally limit the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1 in this region. This new role is independent of the established function of Top3 and Rqh1 in homologous recombination downstream of Rad51. Therefore, we hypothesize that the Top3-Rqh1 complex has an important role in controlling centromere DNA topology, which in turn affects the dynamics of CENP-A(Cnp1 nucleosomes.

  13. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is essen......During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  14. Simultaneous RNA-seq based transcriptional profiling of intracellular Brucella abortus and B. abortus-infected murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hop, Huynh Tan; Arayan, Lauren Togonon; Reyes, Alisha Wehdnesday Bernardo; Huy, Tran Xuan Ngoc; Min, WonGi; Lee, Hu Jang; Son, Jee Soo; Kim, Suk

    2017-12-01

    Brucella is a zoonotic pathogen that survives within macrophages; however the replicative mechanisms involved are not fully understood. We describe the isolation of sufficient Brucella abortus RNA from primary host cell environment using modified reported methods for RNA-seq analysis, and simultaneously characterize the transcriptional profiles of intracellular B. abortus and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) from BALB/c mice at 24 h (replicative phase) post-infection. Our results revealed that 25.12% (801/3190) and 16.16% (515/3190) of the total B. abortus genes were up-regulated and down-regulated at >2-fold, respectively as compared to the free-living B. abortus. Among >5-fold differentially expressed genes, the up-regulated genes are mostly involved in DNA, RNA manipulations as well as protein biosynthesis and secretion while the down-regulated genes are mainly involved in energy production and metabolism. On the other hand, the host responses during B. abortus infection revealed that 14.01% (6071/43,346) of BMM genes were reproducibly transcribed at >5-fold during infection. Transcription of cytokines, chemokines and transcriptional factors, such as tumor necrosis factor (Tnf), interleukin-1α (Il1α), interleukin-1β (Il1β), interleukin-6 (Il6), interleukin-12 (Il12), chemokine C-X-C motif (CXCL) family, nuclear factor kappa B (Nf-κb), signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (Stat1), that may contribute to host defense were markedly induced while transcription of various genes involved in cell proliferation and metabolism were suppressed upon B. abortus infection. In conclusion, these data suggest that Brucella modulates gene expression in hostile intracellular environment while simultaneously alters the host pathways that may lead to the pathogen's intracellular survival and infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso (ZBTB33 induces inflammation and progenitor cell differentiation in the murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali Chaudhary

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, several studies have implicated the POZ-ZF protein Kaiso in both developmental and tumorigenic processes. However, most of the information regarding Kaiso's function to date has been gleaned from studies in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian cultured cells. To examine Kaiso's role in a relevant, mammalian organ-specific context, we generated and characterized a Kaiso transgenic mouse expressing a murine Kaiso transgene under the control of the intestine-specific villin promoter. Kaiso transgenic mice were viable and fertile but pathological examination of the small intestine revealed distinct morphological changes. Kaiso transgenics (Kaiso(Tg/+ exhibited a crypt expansion phenotype that was accompanied by increased differentiation of epithelial progenitor cells into secretory cell lineages; this was evidenced by increased cell populations expressing Goblet, Paneth and enteroendocrine markers. Paradoxically however, enhanced differentiation in Kaiso(Tg/+ was accompanied by reduced proliferation, a phenotype reminiscent of Notch inhibition. Indeed, expression of the Notch signalling target HES-1 was decreased in Kaiso(Tg/+ animals. Finally, our Kaiso transgenics exhibited several hallmarks of inflammation, including increased neutrophil infiltration and activation, villi fusion and crypt hyperplasia. Interestingly, the Kaiso binding partner and emerging anti-inflammatory mediator p120(ctn is recruited to the nucleus in Kaiso(Tg/+ mice intestinal cells suggesting that Kaiso may elicit inflammation by antagonizing p120(ctn function.

  16. A minimal murine Msx-1 gene promoter. Organization of its cis-regulatory motifs and their role in transcriptional activation in cells in culture and in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Guron, C; Shetty, S; Matsui, H; Raghow, R

    1997-09-05

    To dissect the cis-regulatory elements of the murine Msx-1 promoter, which lacks a conventional TATA element, a putative Msx-1 promoter DNA fragment (from -1282 to +106 base pairs (bp)) or its congeners containing site-specific alterations were fused to luciferase reporter and introduced into NIH3T3 and C2C12 cells, and the expression of luciferase was assessed in transient expression assays. The functional consequences of the sequential 5' deletions of the promotor revealed that multiple positive and negative regulatory elements participate in regulating transcription of the Msx-1 gene. Surprisingly, however, the optimal expression of Msx-1 promoter in either NIH3T3 or C2C12 cells required only 165 bp of the upstream sequence to warrant detailed examination of its structure. Therefore, the functional consequences of site-specific deletions and point mutations of the cis-acting elements of the minimal Msx-1 promoter were systematically examined. Concomitantly, potential transcriptional factor(s) interacting with the cis-acting elements of the minimal promoter were also studied by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting. Combined analyses of the minimal promoter by DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and super shift assays with specific antibodies revealed that 5'-flanking regions from -161 to -154 and from -26 to -13 of the Msx-1 promoter contains an authentic E box (proximal E box), capable of binding a protein immunologically related to the upstream stimulating factor 1 (USF-1) and a GC-rich sequence motif which can bind to Sp1 (proximal Sp1), respectively. Additionally, we observed that the promoter activation was seriously hampered if the proximal E box was removed or mutated, and the promoter activity was eliminated completely if the proximal Sp1 site was similarly altered. Absolute dependence of the Msx-1 minimal promoter on Sp1 could be demonstrated by transient expression assays in the Sp1-deficient

  17. Eto2/MTG16 and MTGR1 are heteromeric corepressors of the TAL1/SCL transcription factor in murine erythroid progenitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Ying; Xu, Zhixiong; Xie, Jingping [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Ham, Amy-Joan L. [Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Koury, Mark J. [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Tennessee Valley VA Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States); Hiebert, Scott W. [Department of Biochemistry, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Brandt, Stephen J., E-mail: stephen.brandt@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Tennessee Valley VA Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37212 (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The TAL1 (or SCL) gene, originally discovered through its involvement by a chromosomal translocation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor essential for hematopoietic and vascular development. To identify its interaction partners, we expressed a tandem epitope-tagged protein in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and characterized affinity-purified Tal1-containing complexes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. In addition to known interacting proteins, two proteins related to the Eight-Twenty-One (ETO) corepressor, Eto2/Mtg16 and Mtgr1, were identified from the peptide fragments analyzed. Tal1 interaction with Eto2 and Mtgr1 was verified by coimmunoprecipitation analysis in Tal1, Eto2-, and Mtgr1-transfected COS-7 cells, MEL cells expressing V5 epitope-tagged Tal1 protein, and non-transfected MEL cells. Mapping analysis with Gal4 fusion proteins demonstrated a requirement for the bHLH domain of Tal1 and TAF110 domain of Eto2 for their interaction, and transient transfection and glutathione S-transferase pull-down analysis showed that Mtgr1 and Eto2 enhanced the other's association with Tal1. Enforced expression of Eto2 in differentiating MEL cells inhibited the promoter of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of TAL1 in erythroid progenitors, and transduction of Eto2 and Mtgr1 augmented Tal1-mediated gene repression. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Eto2 occupancy of the P4.2 promoter in MEL cells decreased with differentiation, in parallel with a decline in Eto2 protein abundance. These results identify Eto2 and Mtgr1 as authentic interaction partners of Tal1 and suggest they act as heteromeric corepressors of this bHLH transcription factor during erythroid differentiation.

  18. Eto2/MTG16 and MTGR1 are heteromeric corepressors of the TAL1/SCL transcription factor in murine erythroid progenitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Ying; Xu, Zhixiong; Xie, Jingping; Ham, Amy-Joan L.; Koury, Mark J.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The TAL1 (or SCL) gene, originally discovered through its involvement by a chromosomal translocation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, encodes a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor essential for hematopoietic and vascular development. To identify its interaction partners, we expressed a tandem epitope-tagged protein in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells and characterized affinity-purified Tal1-containing complexes by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. In addition to known interacting proteins, two proteins related to the Eight-Twenty-One (ETO) corepressor, Eto2/Mtg16 and Mtgr1, were identified from the peptide fragments analyzed. Tal1 interaction with Eto2 and Mtgr1 was verified by coimmunoprecipitation analysis in Tal1, Eto2-, and Mtgr1-transfected COS-7 cells, MEL cells expressing V5 epitope-tagged Tal1 protein, and non-transfected MEL cells. Mapping analysis with Gal4 fusion proteins demonstrated a requirement for the bHLH domain of Tal1 and TAF110 domain of Eto2 for their interaction, and transient transfection and glutathione S-transferase pull-down analysis showed that Mtgr1 and Eto2 enhanced the other's association with Tal1. Enforced expression of Eto2 in differentiating MEL cells inhibited the promoter of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of TAL1 in erythroid progenitors, and transduction of Eto2 and Mtgr1 augmented Tal1-mediated gene repression. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that Eto2 occupancy of the P4.2 promoter in MEL cells decreased with differentiation, in parallel with a decline in Eto2 protein abundance. These results identify Eto2 and Mtgr1 as authentic interaction partners of Tal1 and suggest they act as heteromeric corepressors of this bHLH transcription factor during erythroid differentiation.

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of Centromere Chromatin Stability by Dietary and Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Saavedra, Diego; Strakovsky, Rita S; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2017-11-01

    The centromere is a genomic locus required for the segregation of the chromosomes during cell division. This chromosomal region together with pericentromeres has been found to be susceptible to damage, and thus the perturbation of the centromere could lead to the development of aneuploidic events. Metabolic abnormalities that underlie the generation of cancer include inflammation, oxidative stress, cell cycle deregulation, and numerous others. The micronucleus assay, an early clinical marker of cancer, has been shown to provide a reliable measure of genotoxic damage that may signal cancer initiation. In the current review, we will discuss the events that lead to micronucleus formation and centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin instability, as well transcripts emanating from these regions, which were previously thought to be inactive. Studies were selected in PubMed if they reported the effects of nutritional status (macro- and micronutrients) or environmental toxicant exposure on micronucleus frequency or any other chromosomal abnormality in humans, animals, or cell models. Mounting evidence from epidemiologic, environmental, and nutritional studies provides a novel perspective on the origination of aneuploidic events. Although substantial evidence exists describing the role that nutritional status and environmental toxicants have on the generation of micronuclei and other nuclear aberrations, limited information is available to describe the importance of macro- and micronutrients on centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin stability. Moving forward, studies that specifically address the direct link between nutritional status, excess, or deficiency and the epigenetic regulation of the centromere will provide much needed insight into the nutritional and environmental regulation of this chromosomal region and the initiation of aneuploidy. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  20. Global gene transcription patterns in in vitro-cultured fertilized embryos and diploid and haploid murine parthenotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiangshun; Li Xingyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2007-01-01

    To gain insights into the roles the paternal genome and chromosome number play in pre-implantation development, we cultured fertilized embryos and diploid and haploid parthenotes (DPs and HPs, respectively), and compared their development and gene expression patterns. The DPs and fertilized embryos did not differ in developmental ability but HPs development was slower and characterized by impaired compaction and blastocoel formation. Microarray analysis revealed that fertilized blastocysts expressed several genes at higher levels than DP blastocysts; these included the Y-chromosome-specific gene eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2, subunit 3, structural gene Y-linked (Eif2s3y) and the imprinting gene U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein auxiliary factor 1, related sequence 1 (U2af1-rs1). We also found that when DPs and HPs were both harvested at 44 and 58 h of culture, they differed in the expression of 38 and 665 genes, respectively. However, when DPs and HPs were harvested at the midpoints of 4-cell stage (44 and 49 h, respectively), no differences in expression was observed. Similarly, when the DPs and HPs were harvested when they became blastocysts (102 and 138 h, respectively), only 15 genes showed disparate expression. These results suggest that while transcripts needed for early development are delayed in HPs, it does progress sufficiently for the generation of the various developmental stages despite the lack of genetic components

  1. Impaired Transcriptional Response of the Murine Heart to Cigarette Smoke in the Setting of High Fat Diet and Obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilton, Susan C.; Karin, Norman J.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Mikheev, Vladimir B.; Lee, K. M.; Corley, Richard A.; Pounds, Joel G.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2013-07-01

    Smoking and obesity are each well-established risk factors for cardiovascular heart disease, which together impose earlier onset and greater severity of disease. To identify early signaling events in the response of the heart to cigarette smoke exposure within the setting of obesity, we exposed normal weight and high fat diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6 mice to repeated inhaled doses of mainstream (MS) or sidestream (SS) cigarette smoke administered over a two week period, monitoring effects on both cardiac and pulmonary transcriptomes. MS smoke (250 μg wet total particulate matter (WTPM)/L, 5 h/day) exposures elicited robust cellular and molecular inflammatory responses in the lung with 1466 differentially expressed pulmonary genes (p < 0.01) in normal weight animals and a much-attenuated response (463 genes) in the hearts of the same animals. In contrast, exposures to SS smoke (85 μg WTPM/L) with a CO concentration equivalent to that of MS smoke (250 CO ppm) induced a weak pulmonary response (328 genes) but an extensive cardiac response (1590 genes). SS smoke and to a lesser extent MS smoke preferentially elicited hypoxia- and stress-responsive genes as well as genes predicting early changes of vascular smooth muscle and endothelium, precursors of cardiovascular disease. The most sensitive smoke-induced cardiac transcriptional changes of normal weight mice were largely absent in DIO mice after smoke exposure, while genes involved in fatty acid utilization were unaffected. At the same time, smoke exposure suppressed multiple proteome maintenance genes induced in the hearts of DIO mice. Together, these results underscore the sensitivity of the heart to SS smoke and reveal adaptive responses in healthy individuals that are absent in the setting of high fat diet and obesity.

  2. Comparative transcriptional profiling of 3 murine models of SLE nephritis reveals both unique and shared regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Bethunaickan

    Full Text Available To define shared and unique features of SLE nephritis in mouse models of proliferative and glomerulosclerotic renal disease.Perfused kidneys from NZB/W F1, NZW/BXSB and NZM2410 mice were harvested before and after nephritis onset. Affymetrix based gene expression profiles of kidney RNA were analyzed using Genomatix Pathway Systems and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Gene expression patterns were confirmed using real-time PCR.955, 1168 and 755 genes were regulated in the kidneys of nephritic NZB/W F1, NZM2410 and NZW/BXSB mice respectively. 263 genes were regulated concordantly in all three strains reflecting immune cell infiltration, endothelial cell activation, complement activation, cytokine signaling, tissue remodeling and hypoxia. STAT3 was the top associated transcription factor, having a binding site in the gene promoter of 60/263 regulated genes. The two strains with proliferative nephritis shared a macrophage/DC infiltration and activation signature. NZB/W and NZM2410 mice shared a mitochondrial dysfunction signature. Dominant T cell and plasma cell signatures in NZB/W mice reflected lymphoid aggregates; this was the only strain with regulatory T cell infiltrates. NZW/BXSB mice manifested tubular regeneration and NZM2410 mice had the most metabolic stress and manifested loss of nephrin, indicating podocyte loss.These findings identify shared inflammatory mechanisms of SLE nephritis that can be therapeutically targeted. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity of effector mechanisms suggests that individualized therapy might need to be based on biopsy findings. Some common mechanisms are shared with non-immune-mediated renal diseases, suggesting that strategies to prevent tissue hypoxia and remodeling may be useful in SLE nephritis.

  3. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals the Transcriptional Landscape and Heterogeneity of Aortic Macrophages in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochain, Clément; Vafadarnejad, Ehsan; Arampatzi, Panagiota; Jaroslav, Pelisek; Winkels, Holger; Ley, Klaus; Wolf, Dennis; Saliba, Antoine-Emmanuel; Zernecke, Alma

    2018-03-15

    Rationale: It is assumed that atherosclerotic arteries contain several macrophage subsets endowed with specific functions. The precise identity of these subsets is poorly characterized as they ha ve been defined by the expression of a restricted number of markers. Objective: We have applied single-cell RNA-seq as an unbiased profiling strategy to interrogate and classify aortic macrophage heterogeneity at the single-cell level in atherosclerosis. Methods and Results: We performed single-cell RNA sequencing of total aortic CD45 + cells extracted from the non-diseased (chow fed) and atherosclerotic (11 weeks of high fat diet) aorta of Ldlr -/- mice. Unsupervised clustering singled out 13 distinct aortic cell clusters. Among the myeloid cell populations, Resident-like macrophages with a gene expression profile similar to aortic resident macrophages were found in healthy and diseased aortae, whereas monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDC), and two populations of macrophages were almost exclusively detectable in atherosclerotic aortae, comprising Inflammatory macrophages showing enrichment in I l1b , and previously undescribed TREM2 hi macrophages. Differential gene expression and gene ontology enrichment analyses revealed specific gene expression patterns distinguishing these three macrophage subsets and MoDC, and uncovered putative functions of each cell type. Notably, TREM2 hi macrophages appeared to be endowed with specialized functions in lipid metabolism and catabolism, and presented a gene expression signature reminiscent of osteoclasts, suggesting a role in lesion calcification. TREM2 expression was moreover detected in human lesional macrophages. Importantly, these macrophage populations were present also in advanced atherosclerosis and in Apoe -/- aortae, indicating relevance of our findings in different stages of atherosclerosis and mouse models. Conclusions: These data unprecedentedly uncovered the transcriptional landscape and phenotypic

  4. Repeatless and Repeat-Based Centromeres in Potato: Implications for Centromere Evolution[C][W

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gong, Z.; Wu, Y.; Koblížková, Andrea; Torres, G.A.; Wang, K.; Iovene, M.; Neumann, Pavel; Zhang, W.; Novák, Petr; Buell, C.R.; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 9 (2012), s. 3559-3574 ISSN 1040-4651 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11058 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : repetitive sequences * plant satellite repeats * Arabidopsis thaliana * rice centromere * wild potatoes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.251, year: 2012

  5. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  6. The Past, Present, and Future of Human Centromere Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E. Aldrup-MacDonald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The centromere is the chromosomal locus essential for chromosome inheritance and genome stability. Human centromeres are located at repetitive alpha satellite DNA arrays that compose approximately 5% of the genome. Contiguous alpha satellite DNA sequence is absent from the assembled reference genome, limiting current understanding of centromere organization and function. Here, we review the progress in centromere genomics spanning the discovery of the sequence to its molecular characterization and the work done during the Human Genome Project era to elucidate alpha satellite structure and sequence variation. We discuss exciting recent advances in alpha satellite sequence assembly that have provided important insight into the abundance and complex organization of this sequence on human chromosomes. In light of these new findings, we offer perspectives for future studies of human centromere assembly and function.

  7. Positioning of chromosomes in human spermatozoa is determined by ordered centromere arrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga S Mudrak

    Full Text Available The intranuclear positioning of chromosomes (CHRs is a well-documented fact; however, mechanisms directing such ordering remain unclear. Unlike somatic cells, human spermatozoa contain distinct spatial markers and have asymmetric nuclei which make them a unique model for localizing CHR territories and matching peri-centromere domains. In this study, we established statistically preferential longitudinal and lateral positioning for eight CHRs. Both parameters demonstrated a correlation with the CHR gene densities but not with their sizes. Intranuclear non-random positioning of the CHRs was found to be driven by a specific linear order of centromeres physically interconnected in continuous arrays. In diploid spermatozoa, linear order of peri-centromeres was identical in two genome sets and essentially matched the arrangement established for haploid cells. We propose that the non-random longitudinal order of CHRs in human spermatozoa is generated during meiotic stages of spermatogenesis. The specific arrangement of sperm CHRs may serve as an epigenetic basis for differential transcription/replication and direct spatial CHR organization during early embryogenesis.

  8. Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins promote lipid accumulation and apolipoprotein B-48 receptor transcriptional activity in human circulating and murine bone marrow neutrophils in a fatty acid-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Gómez, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes M; López, Sergio; Montserrat de la Paz, Sergio; Sánchez, Rosario; Muriana, Francisco J G; Bermúdez, Beatriz; Abia, Rocío

    2017-09-01

    Postprandial triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TRLs) promote atherosclerosis. Recent research points the bone marrow (BM) as a primary site in atherosclerosis. We elucidated how the acute administration of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) MUFAs, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) PUFAs and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) affects human circulating and murine BM neutrophil lipid accumulation and functionality. Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia was induced in healthy subjects and Apoe -/- mice by the acute administration of dietary fats enriched in MUFAs, PUFAs, or SFAs. Postprandial hypertriglyceridemia increased apolipoprotein-B48 receptor (ApoB48R) transcriptional activity that was linearly correlated with intracellular triglycerides (TGs) TGs accumulation in human circulating and murine BM neutrophils. MUFA and omega-3 PUFAs attenuated ApoB48R gene expression and intracellular TG accumulation compared to SFAs. TRLs induced apoB48R-dependent TG accumulation in human neutrophils ex vivo. Murine BM neutrophils showed a decrease in surface L-selectin and an increase in TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expressions only after SFAs administration. TRLs enriched in SFAs induced BM neutrophil degranulation ex vivo suggesting cell priming/activation. Postprandial TRLs disrupts the normal biology and function of circulating and BM neutrophils. MUFA- and omega-3 PUFA-rich dietary fats such as virgin olive oil or fish oil has the potential to prevent excessive neutrophil lipid accumulation and activation by targeting the fatty acid composition of TRLs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The TubR-centromere complex adopts a double-ring segrosome structure in Type III partition systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Bárbara; Martín-González, Alejandro; Carrasco, Carolina; Hernández-Arriaga, Ana M; Ruíz-Quero, Rubén; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Aicart-Ramos, Clara; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Oliva, María A

    2018-05-14

    In prokaryotes, the centromere is a specialized segment of DNA that promotes the assembly of the segrosome upon binding of the Centromere Binding Protein (CBP). The segrosome structure exposes a specific surface for the interaction of the CBP with the motor protein that mediates DNA movement during cell division. Additionally, the CBP usually controls the transcriptional regulation of the segregation system as a cell cycle checkpoint. Correct segrosome functioning is therefore indispensable for accurate DNA segregation. Here, we combine biochemical reconstruction and structural and biophysical analysis to bring light to the architecture of the segrosome complex in Type III partition systems. We present the particular features of the centromere site, tubC, of the model system encoded in Clostridium botulinum prophage c-st. We find that the split centromere site contains two different iterons involved in the binding and spreading of the CBP, TubR. The resulting nucleoprotein complex consists of a novel double-ring structure that covers part of the predicted promoter. Single molecule data provides a mechanism for the formation of the segrosome structure based on DNA bending and unwinding upon TubR binding.

  10. Centromere Destiny in Dicentric Chromosomes: New Insights from the Evolution of Human Chromosome 2 Ancestral Centromeric Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiatante, Giorgia; Giannuzzi, Giuliana; Calabrese, Francesco Maria; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2017-07-01

    Dicentric chromosomes are products of genomic rearrangements that place two centromeres on the same chromosome. Due to the presence of two primary constrictions, they are inherently unstable and overcome their instability by epigenetically inactivating and/or deleting one of the two centromeres, thus resulting in functionally monocentric chromosomes that segregate normally during cell division. Our understanding to date of dicentric chromosome formation, behavior and fate has been largely inferred from observational studies in plants and humans as well as artificially produced de novo dicentrics in yeast and in human cells. We investigate the most recent product of a chromosome fusion event fixed in the human lineage, human chromosome 2, whose stability was acquired by the suppression of one centromere, resulting in a unique difference in chromosome number between humans (46 chromosomes) and our most closely related ape relatives (48 chromosomes). Using molecular cytogenetics, sequencing, and comparative sequence data, we deeply characterize the relicts of the chromosome 2q ancestral centromere and its flanking regions, gaining insight into the ancestral organization that can be easily broadened to all acrocentric chromosome centromeres. Moreover, our analyses offered the opportunity to trace the evolutionary history of rDNA and satellite III sequences among great apes, thus suggesting a new hypothesis for the preferential inactivation of some human centromeres, including IIq. Our results suggest two possible centromere inactivation models to explain the evolutionarily stabilization of human chromosome 2 over the last 5-6 million years. Our results strongly favor centromere excision through a one-step process. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Sense and antisense transcripts of the developmentally regulated murine hsp70.2 gene are expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping areas in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashov, A. K.; Wolgemuth, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined the spatial pattern of expression of a member of the hsp70 gene family, hsp70.2, in the mouse central nervous system. Surprisingly, RNA blot analysis and in situ hybridization revealed abundant expression of an 'antisense' hsp70.2 transcript in several areas of adult mouse brain. Two different transcripts recognized by sense and antisense riboprobes for the hsp70.2 gene were expressed in distinct and only partially overlapping neuronal populations. RNA blot analysis revealed low levels of the 2.7 kb transcript of hsp70.2 in several areas of the brain, with highest signal in the hippocampus. Abundant expression of a slightly larger (approximately 2.8 kb) 'antisense' transcript was detected in several brain regions, notably in the brainstem, cerebellum, mesencephalic tectum, thalamus, cortex, and hippocampus. In situ hybridization revealed that the sense and antisense transcripts were both predominantly neuronal and localized to the same cell types in the granular layer of the cerebellum, trapezoid nucleus of the superior olivary complex, locus coeruleus and hippocampus. The hsp70.2 antisense transcripts were particularly abundant in the frontal cortex, dentate gyrus, subthalamic nucleus, zona incerta, superior and inferior colliculi, central gray, brainstem, and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Our findings have revealed a distinct cellular and spatial localization of both sense and antisense transcripts, demonstrating a new level of complexity in the function of the heat shock genes.

  12. The centromeric/nucleolar chromatin protein ZFP-37 may function to specify neuronal nuclear domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Payen; T. Verkerk (Ton); D. Michalovich (David); S.D. Dreyer; A. Winterpacht; B. Lee (Brendan); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); N.J. Galjart (Niels); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractMurine ZFP-37 is a member of the large family of C2H2 type zinc finger proteins. It is characterized by a truncated NH2-terminal Kruppel-associated box and is thought to play a role in transcriptional regulation. During development Zfp-37 mRNA is most

  13. What on "irf" is this gene 4? Irf4 transcription-factor-dependent dendritic cells are required for T helper 2 cell responses in murine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flutter, Barry; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-10-17

    Interferon regulatory factors play an important role in the transcriptional regulation of immunity. In this issue of Immunity, Kumamoto et al. (2013) and Gao et al. (2013) identify an Irf4-dependent migratory dendritic cell subset required for T helper 2 cell polarization following cutaneous challenge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction

  15. Transcription of tandemly repetitive DNA: functional roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Canapa, Adriana; Forconi, Mariko; Olmo, Ettore; Barucca, Marco

    2015-09-01

    A considerable fraction of the eukaryotic genome is made up of satellite DNA constituted of tandemly repeated sequences. These elements are mainly located at centromeres, pericentromeres, and telomeres and are major components of constitutive heterochromatin. Although originally satellite DNA was thought silent and inert, an increasing number of studies are providing evidence on its transcriptional activity supporting, on the contrary, an unexpected dynamicity. This review summarizes the multiple structural roles of satellite noncoding RNAs at chromosome level. Indeed, satellite noncoding RNAs play a role in the establishment of a heterochromatic state at centromere and telomere. These highly condensed structures are indispensable to preserve chromosome integrity and genome stability, preventing recombination events, and ensuring the correct chromosome pairing and segregation. Moreover, these RNA molecules seem to be involved also in maintaining centromere identity and in elongation, capping, and replication of telomere. Finally, the abnormal variation of centromeric and pericentromeric DNA transcription across major eukaryotic lineages in stress condition and disease has evidenced the critical role that these transcripts may play and the potentially dire consequences for the organism.

  16. Recombination patterns reveal information about centromere location on linkage maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Limborg, Morten T.; McKinney, Garrett J.; Seeb, Lisa W.

    2016-01-01

    . mykiss) characterized by low and unevenly distributed recombination – a general feature of male meiosis in many species. Further, a high frequency of double crossovers along chromosome arms in barley reduced resolution for locating centromeric regions on most linkage groups. Despite these limitations...

  17. Evolutionary movement of centromeres in horse, donkey, and zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Lucia; Nergadze, Solomon G; Magnani, Elisa; Misceo, Doriana; Francesca Cardone, Maria; Roberto, Roberta; Bertoni, Livia; Attolini, Carmen; Francesca Piras, Maria; de Jong, Pieter; Raudsepp, Terje; Chowdhary, Bhanu P; Guérin, Gérard; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Giulotto, Elena

    2006-06-01

    Centromere repositioning (CR) is a recently discovered biological phenomenon consisting of the emergence of a new centromere along a chromosome and the inactivation of the old one. After a CR, the primary constriction and the centromeric function are localized in a new position while the order of physical markers on the chromosome remains unchanged. These events profoundly affect chromosomal architecture. Since horses, asses, and zebras, whose evolutionary divergence is relatively recent, show remarkable morphological similarity and capacity to interbreed despite their chromosomes differing considerably, we investigated the role of CR in the karyotype evolution of the genus Equus. Using appropriate panels of BAC clones in FISH experiments, we compared the centromere position and marker order arrangement among orthologous chromosomes of Burchelli's zebra (Equus burchelli), donkey (Equus asinus), and horse (Equus caballus). Surprisingly, at least eight CRs took place during the evolution of this genus. Even more surprisingly, five cases of CR have occurred in the donkey after its divergence from zebra, that is, in a very short evolutionary time (approximately 1 million years). These findings suggest that in some species the CR phenomenon could have played an important role in karyotype shaping, with potential consequences on population dynamics and speciation.

  18. Noncanonical Expression of a Murine Cytomegalovirus Early Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope as an Immediate Early Epitope Based on Transcription from an Upstream Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral CD8 T-cell epitopes, represented by viral peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I glycoproteins, are often identified by “reverse immunology”, a strategy not requiring biochemical and structural knowledge of the actual viral protein from which they are derived by antigen processing. Instead, bioinformatic algorithms predicting the probability of C-terminal cleavage in the proteasome, as well as binding affinity to the presenting MHC-I molecules, are applied to amino acid sequences deduced from predicted open reading frames (ORFs based on the genomic sequence. If the protein corresponding to an antigenic ORF is known, it is usually inferred that the kinetic class of the protein also defines the phase in the viral replicative cycle during which the respective antigenic peptide is presented for recognition by CD8 T cells. We have previously identified a nonapeptide from the predicted ORFm164 of murine cytomegalovirus that is presented by the MHC-I allomorph H-2 Dd and that is immunodominant in BALB/c (H-2d haplotype mice. Surprisingly, although the ORFm164 protein gp36.5 is expressed as an Early (E phase protein, the m164 epitope is presented already during the Immediate Early (IE phase, based on the expression of an upstream mRNA starting within ORFm167 and encompassing ORFm164.

  19. Induction of transcription from the long terminal repeat of Moloney murine sarcoma provirus by UV-irradiation, x-irradiation, and phorbol ester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.S.; Goldthwait, D.A.; Samols, D.

    1990-01-01

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of Moloney murine sarcoma virus (Mo-MuSV) was used as a model system to study the stress response of mammalian cells to physical carcinogens. The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was inserted between two Mo-MuSV LTRs, and the LTR-CAT-LTR construct was used for virus production and was integrated into the genome of NIH 3T3 cells in the proviral form. This construct was used to assure that the integrated CAT gene was driven by the promoter of the LTR. Expression of the CAT gene was stimulated 4-fold by UV irradiation, and the peak of activity was observed at 18 hr. In contrast, stimulation of the CAT expression after x-irradiation was 2-fold and occurred at 6 hr. Phorbol myristate acetate also stimulated CAT activity 4-fold with a peak at 6 hr. Down-regulation of protein kinase C blocked totally the response to x-irradiation but only partially the response to UV. The protein kinase inhibitor H7 blocked the response to treatment by UV, x-ray, and phorbol ester

  20. Genome-wide analysis reveals a cell cycle–dependent mechanism controlling centromere propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sylvia; Mellone, Barbara G.; Betts, Craig M.; Zhang, Weiguo; Karpen, Gary H.; Straight, Aaron F.

    2008-01-01

    Centromeres are the structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation, spindle attachment, and chromosome segregation. In this study, we isolated factors required for centromere propagation using genome-wide RNA interference screening for defects in centromere protein A (CENP-A; centromere identifier [CID]) localization in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified the proteins CAL1 and CENP-C as essential factors for CID assembly at the centromere. CID, CAL1, and CENP-C coimmunoprecipitate and are mutually dependent for centromere localization and function. We also identified the mitotic cyclin A (CYCA) and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) inhibitor RCA1/Emi1 as regulators of centromere propagation. We show that CYCA is centromere localized and that CYCA and RCA1/Emi1 couple centromere assembly to the cell cycle through regulation of the fizzy-related/CDH1 subunit of the APC. Our findings identify essential components of the epigenetic machinery that ensures proper specification and propagation of the centromere and suggest a mechanism for coordinating centromere inheritance with cell division. PMID:19047461

  1. Genome-wide analysis reveals a cell cycle-dependent mechanism controlling centromere propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Sylvia; Mellone, Barbara G; Betts, Craig M; Zhang, Weiguo; Karpen, Gary H; Straight, Aaron F

    2008-12-01

    Centromeres are the structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation, spindle attachment, and chromosome segregation. In this study, we isolated factors required for centromere propagation using genome-wide RNA interference screening for defects in centromere protein A (CENP-A; centromere identifier [CID]) localization in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified the proteins CAL1 and CENP-C as essential factors for CID assembly at the centromere. CID, CAL1, and CENP-C coimmunoprecipitate and are mutually dependent for centromere localization and function. We also identified the mitotic cyclin A (CYCA) and the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) inhibitor RCA1/Emi1 as regulators of centromere propagation. We show that CYCA is centromere localized and that CYCA and RCA1/Emi1 couple centromere assembly to the cell cycle through regulation of the fizzy-related/CDH1 subunit of the APC. Our findings identify essential components of the epigenetic machinery that ensures proper specification and propagation of the centromere and suggest a mechanism for coordinating centromere inheritance with cell division.

  2. A regulatory effect of INMAP on centromere proteins: antisense INMAP induces CENP-B variation and centromeric halo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Tan

    Full Text Available CENP-B is a highly conserved protein that facilitates the assembly of specific centromere structures both in interphase nuclei and on mitotic chromosomes. INMAP is a conserved protein that localizes at nucleus in interphase cells and at mitotic apparatus in mitotic cells. Our previous results showed that INMAP over-expression leads to spindle defects, mitotic arrest and formation of polycentrosomal and multinuclear cells, indicating that INMAP may modulate the function of (a key protein(s in mitotic apparatus. In this study, we demonstrate that INMAP interacts with CENP-B and promotes cleavage of the N-terminal DNA binding domain from CENP-B. The cleaved CENP-B cannot associate with centromeres and thus lose its centromere-related functions. Consistent with these results, CENP-B in INMAP knockdown cells becomes more diffused around kinetochores. Although INMAP knockdown cells do not exhibit gross defects in mitotic spindle formation, these cells go through mitosis, especially prophase and metaphase, with different relative timing, indicating subtle abnormality. These results identify INMAP as a model regulator of CENP-B and support the notion that INMAP regulates mitosis through modulating CENP-B-mediated centromere organization.

  3. Expressed Centromere Specific Histone 3 (CENH3 Variants in Cultivated Triploid and Wild Diploid Bananas (Musa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariuki S. Muiruri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are specified by a centromere specific histone 3 (CENH3 protein, which exists in a complex environment, interacting with conserved proteins and rapidly evolving satellite DNA sequences. The interactions may become more challenging if multiple CENH3 versions are introduced into the zygote as this can affect post-zygotic mitosis and ultimately sexual reproduction. Here, we characterize CENH3 variant transcripts expressed in cultivated triploid and wild diploid progenitor bananas. We describe both splice- and allelic-[Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP] variants and their effects on the predicted secondary structures of protein. Expressed CENH3 transcripts from six banana genotypes were characterized and clustered into three groups (MusaCENH-1A, MusaCENH-1B, and MusaCENH-2 based on similarity. The CENH3 groups differed with SNPs as well as presence of indels resulting from retained and/or skipped exons. The CENH3 transcripts from different banana genotypes were spliced in either 7/6, 5/4 or 6/5 exons/introns. The 7/6 and the 5/4 exon/intron structures were found in both diploids and triploids, however, 7/6 was most predominant. The 6/5 exon/introns structure was a result of failure of the 7/6 to splice correctly. The various transcripts obtained were predicted to encode highly variable N-terminal tails and a relatively conserved C-terminal histone fold domain (HFD. The SNPs were predicted in some cases to affect the secondary structure of protein by lengthening or shorting the affected domains. Sequencing of banana CENH3 transcripts predicts SNP variations that affect amino acid sequences and alternatively spliced transcripts. Most of these changes affect the N-terminal tail of CENH3.

  4. The Transcription Factor T-Bet Is Regulated by MicroRNA-155 in Murine Anti-Viral CD8+ T Cells via SHIP-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Hope

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We report here that the expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which is known to be required for effector cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL generation and effector memory cell formation, is regulated in CTL by microRNA-155 (miR-155. Importantly, we show that the proliferative effect of miR-155 on CD8+ T cells is mediated by T-bet. T-bet levels in CTL were controlled in vivo by miR-155 via SH2 (Src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase-1 (SHIP-1, a known direct target of miR-155, and SHIP-1 directly downregulated T-bet. Our studies reveal an important and unexpected signaling axis between miR-155, T-bet, and SHIP-1 in in vivo CTL responses and suggest an important signaling module that regulates effector CTL immunity.

  5. Uncoupling of satellite DNA and centromeric function in the genus Equus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Francesca M; Nergadze, Solomon G; Magnani, Elisa; Bertoni, Livia; Attolini, Carmen; Khoriauli, Lela; Raimondi, Elena; Giulotto, Elena

    2010-02-12

    In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1) several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs), seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2) satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs.

  6. Uncoupling of satellite DNA and centromeric function in the genus Equus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Piras

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, we showed that centromere repositioning, that is the shift along the chromosome of the centromeric function without DNA sequence rearrangement, has occurred frequently during the evolution of the genus Equus. In this work, the analysis of the chromosomal distribution of satellite tandem repeats in Equus caballus, E. asinus, E. grevyi, and E. burchelli highlighted two atypical features: 1 several centromeres, including the previously described evolutionary new centromeres (ENCs, seem to be devoid of satellite DNA, and 2 satellite repeats are often present at non-centromeric termini, probably corresponding to relics of ancestral now inactive centromeres. Immuno-FISH experiments using satellite DNA and antibodies against the kinetochore protein CENP-A demonstrated that satellite-less primary constrictions are actually endowed with centromeric function. The phylogenetic reconstruction of centromere repositioning events demonstrates that the acquisition of satellite DNA occurs after the formation of the centromere during evolution and that centromeres can function over millions of years and many generations without detectable satellite DNA. The rapidly evolving Equus species gave us the opportunity to identify different intermediate steps along the full maturation of ENCs.

  7. Genome-wide characterization of centromeric satellites from multiple mammalian genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Can; Cardone, Maria Francesca; Catacchio, Claudia Rita; Antonacci, Francesca; O'Brien, Stephen J; Ryder, Oliver A; Purgato, Stefania; Zoli, Monica; Della Valle, Giuliano; Eichler, Evan E; Ventura, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Despite its importance in cell biology and evolution, the centromere has remained the final frontier in genome assembly and annotation due to its complex repeat structure. However, isolation and characterization of the centromeric repeats from newly sequenced species are necessary for a complete understanding of genome evolution and function. In recent years, various genomes have been sequenced, but the characterization of the corresponding centromeric DNA has lagged behind. Here, we present a computational method (RepeatNet) to systematically identify higher-order repeat structures from unassembled whole-genome shotgun sequence and test whether these sequence elements correspond to functional centromeric sequences. We analyzed genome datasets from six species of mammals representing the diversity of the mammalian lineage, namely, horse, dog, elephant, armadillo, opossum, and platypus. We define candidate monomer satellite repeats and demonstrate centromeric localization for five of the six genomes. Our analysis revealed the greatest diversity of centromeric sequences in horse and dog in contrast to elephant and armadillo, which showed high-centromeric sequence homogeneity. We could not isolate centromeric sequences within the platypus genome, suggesting that centromeres in platypus are not enriched in satellite DNA. Our method can be applied to the characterization of thousands of other vertebrate genomes anticipated for sequencing in the near future, providing an important tool for annotation of centromeres.

  8. Centromeres Off the Hook: Massive Changes in Centromere Size and Structure Following Duplication of CenH3 Gene in Fabeae Species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Pavlíková, Zuzana; Koblížková, Andrea; Vrbová, Iva; Jedličková, Veronika; Novák, Petr; Macas, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 7 (2015), s. 1862-1879 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1843; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11058 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Centromere * CenH3 * centromere drive * chromosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 13.649, year: 2015

  9. Epigenetically-inherited centromere and neocentromere DNA replicates earliest in S-phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Koren

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic centromeres are maintained at specific chromosomal sites over many generations. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, centromeres are genetic elements defined by a DNA sequence that is both necessary and sufficient for function; whereas, in most other eukaryotes, centromeres are maintained by poorly characterized epigenetic mechanisms in which DNA has a less definitive role. Here we use the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans as a model organism to study the DNA replication properties of centromeric DNA. By determining the genome-wide replication timing program of the C. albicans genome, we discovered that each centromere is associated with a replication origin that is the first to fire on its respective chromosome. Importantly, epigenetic formation of new ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres was accompanied by shifts in replication timing, such that a neocentromere became the first to replicate and became associated with origin recognition complex (ORC components. Furthermore, changing the level of the centromere-specific histone H3 isoform led to a concomitant change in levels of ORC association with centromere regions, further supporting the idea that centromere proteins determine origin activity. Finally, analysis of centromere-associated DNA revealed a replication-dependent sequence pattern characteristic of constitutively active replication origins. This strand-biased pattern is conserved, together with centromere position, among related strains and species, in a manner independent of primary DNA sequence. Thus, inheritance of centromere position is correlated with a constitutively active origin of replication that fires at a distinct early time. We suggest a model in which the distinct timing of DNA replication serves as an epigenetic mechanism for the inheritance of centromere position.

  10. Isorhamnetin inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 in murine macrophages via anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase-1 induction and inhibition of nuclear factor-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J Y; Choi, E Y; Park, H R; Choi, J I; Choi, I S; Kim, S J

    2013-12-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key proinflammatory cytokine that has been considered to be important in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Therefore, host-modulatory agents directed at inhibiting IL-6 appear to be beneficial in terms of attenuating periodontal disease progression and potentially improving disease susceptibility. In the current study, we investigated the effect of the flavonoid isorhamnetin on the production of IL-6 in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. Lipopolysaccharide from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 was isolated using the standard hot phenol-water method. Culture supernatants were collected and assayed for IL-6. We used real-time PCR to quantify IL-6 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA expression. The expression of HO-1 protein and the levels of signaling proteins were monitored using immunoblot analyses. The DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was analyzed using ELISA-based assay kits. Isorhamnetin significantly down-regulated P. intermedia LPS-induced production of IL-6 as well as its mRNA expression in RAW264.7 cells. Isorhamnetin up-regulated the expression of HO-1 at both gene transcription and translation levels in cells stimulated with P. intermedia LPS. In addition, inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin IX blocked the inhibitory effect of isorhamnetin on IL-6 production. Isorhamnetin failed to prevent LPS from activating either c-Jun N-terminal kinase or p38 pathways. Isorhamnetin did not inhibit NF-κB transcriptional activity at the level of inhibitory κB-α degradation. Isorhamnetin suppressed NF-κB signaling through inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit and attenuated signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 signaling. Although further research is required to clarify the detailed mechanism of action, we propose

  11. Abnormal centromere-chromatid apposition (ACCA) and Peters' anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertelecki, W; Dev, V G; Superneau, D W

    1985-08-01

    Abnormal centromere-chromatid apposition (ACCA) was noted in a patient with Peters' anomaly. Previous reports of ACCA emphasized its association with tetraphocomelia and other congenital malformations (Roberts, SC Phocomelia, Pseudothalidomide Syndromes). This report expands the array of congenital malformations associated with ACCA and emphasizes the diagnostic importance of ocular defects for the ascertainment of additional cases of ACCA and its possible relationship with abnormal cell division.

  12. Phylogenetic and structural analysis of centromeric DNA and kinetochore proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Meraldi, Patrick; McAinsh, Andrew D; Rheinbay, Esther; Sorger, Peter K

    2006-01-01

    Background: Kinetochores are large multi-protein structures that assemble on centromeric DNA (CEN DNA) and mediate the binding of chromosomes to microtubules. Comprising 125 base-pairs of CEN DNA and 70 or more protein components, Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinetochores are among the best understood. In contrast, most fungal, plant and animal cells assemble kinetochores on CENs that are longer and more complex, raising the question of whether kinetochore architecture has been conserved through ...

  13. Conservation of the Centromere/Kinetochore Protein ZW10

    OpenAIRE

    Starr, Daniel A.; Williams, Byron C.; Li, Zexiao; Etemad-Moghadam, Bijan; Dawe, R. Kelly; Goldberg, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the essential Drosophila melanogaster gene zw10 disrupt chromosome segregation, producing chromosomes that lag at the metaphase plate during anaphase of mitosis and both meiotic divisions. Recent evidence suggests that the product of this gene, DmZW10, acts at the kinetochore as part of a tension-sensing checkpoint at anaphase onset. DmZW10 displays an intriguing cell cycle–dependent intracellular distribution, apparently moving from the centromere/kinetochore at prometaphase to ...

  14. Identification of the centromeric repeat in the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Jennifer N; Peichel, Catherine L

    2015-12-01

    Centromere sequences exist as gaps in many genome assemblies due to their repetitive nature. Here we take an unbiased approach utilizing centromere protein A (CENP-A) chomatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to identify the centromeric repeat sequence in the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus). A 186-bp, AT-rich repeat was validated as centromeric using both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunofluorescence combined with FISH (IF-FISH) on interphase nuclei and metaphase spreads. This repeat hybridizes strongly to the centromere on all chromosomes, with the exception of weak hybridization to the Y chromosome. Together, our work provides the first validated sequence information for the threespine stickleback centromere.

  15. Restructuring of Holocentric Centromeres During Meiosis in the Plant Rhynchospora pubera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, André; Schubert, Veit; Houben, Andreas; Pedrosa-Harand, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Centromeres are responsible for the correct segregation of chromosomes during mitosis and meiosis. Holocentric chromosomes, characterized by multiple centromere units along each chromatid, have particular adaptations to ensure regular disjunction during meiosis. Here we show by detecting CENH3, CENP-C, tubulin, and centromeric repeats that holocentromeres may be organized differently in mitosis and meiosis of Rhynchospora pubera Contrasting to the mitotic linear holocentromere organization, meiotic centromeres show several clusters of centromere units (cluster-holocentromeres) during meiosis I. They accumulate along the poleward surface of bivalents where spindle fibers perpendicularly attach. During meiosis II, the cluster-holocentromeres are mostly present in the midregion of each chromatid. A linear holocentromere organization is restored after meiosis during pollen mitosis. Thus, a not yet described case of a cluster-holocentromere organization, showing a clear centromere restructuration between mitosis and meiosis, was identified in a holocentric organism. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  16. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes : Altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Werken, C.; Avo Santos, M.; Laven, J. S E; Eleveld, C.; Fauser, B. C J M; Lens, S. M A; Baart, E. B.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? SUMMARY ANSWER Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal

  17. Plasmodium falciparum centromeres display a unique epigenetic makeup and cluster prior to and during schizogony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeijmakers, Wieteke A M; Flueck, Christian; Françoijs, Kees-Jan; Smits, Arne H; Wetzel, Johanna; Volz, Jennifer C; Cowman, Alan F; Voss, Till; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Bártfai, Richárd

    2012-09-01

    Centromeres are essential for the faithful transmission of chromosomes to the next generation, therefore being essential in all eukaryotic organisms. The centromeres of Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most severe form of malaria, have been broadly mapped on most chromosomes, but their epigenetic composition remained undefined. Here, we reveal that the centromeric histone variant PfCENH3 occupies a 4-4.5 kb region on each P. falciparum chromosome, which is devoid of pericentric heterochromatin but harbours another histone variant, PfH2A.Z. These CENH3 covered regions pinpoint the exact position of the centromere on all chromosomes and revealed that all centromeric regions have similar size and sequence composition. Immunofluorescence assay of PfCENH3 strongly suggests that P. falciparum centromeres cluster to a single nuclear location prior to and during mitosis and cytokinesis but dissociate soon after invasion. In summary, we reveal a dynamic association of Plasmodium centromeres, which bear a unique epigenetic signature and conform to a strict structure. These findings suggest that DNA-associated and epigenetic elements play an important role in centromere establishment in this important human pathogen. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Human Artificial Chromosomes with Alpha Satellite-Based De Novo Centromeres Show Increased Frequency of Nondisjunction and Anaphase Lag

    OpenAIRE

    Rudd, M. Katharine; Mays, Robert W.; Schwartz, Stuart; Willard, Huntington F.

    2003-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes have been used to model requirements for human chromosome segregation and to explore the nature of sequences competent for centromere function. Normal human centromeres require specialized chromatin that consists of alpha satellite DNA complexed with epigenetically modified histones and centromere-specific proteins. While several types of alpha satellite DNA have been used to assemble de novo centromeres in artificial chromosome assays, the extent to which they fu...

  19. Loss of maternal ATRX results in centromere instability and aneuploidy in the mammalian oocyte and pre-implantation embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Baumann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The α-thalassemia/mental retardation X-linked protein (ATRX is a chromatin-remodeling factor known to regulate DNA methylation at repetitive sequences of the human genome. We have previously demonstrated that ATRX binds to pericentric heterochromatin domains in mouse oocytes at the metaphase II stage where it is involved in mediating chromosome alignment at the meiotic spindle. However, the role of ATRX in the functional differentiation of chromatin structure during meiosis is not known. To test ATRX function in the germ line, we developed an oocyte-specific transgenic RNAi knockdown mouse model. Our results demonstrate that ATRX is required for heterochromatin formation and maintenance of chromosome stability during meiosis. During prophase I arrest, ATRX is necessary to recruit the transcriptional regulator DAXX (death domain associated protein to pericentric heterochromatin. At the metaphase II stage, transgenic ATRX-RNAi oocytes exhibit abnormal chromosome morphology associated with reduced phosphorylation of histone 3 at serine 10 as well as chromosome segregation defects leading to aneuploidy and severely reduced fertility. Notably, a large proportion of ATRX-depleted oocytes and 1-cell stage embryos exhibit chromosome fragments and centromeric DNA-containing micronuclei. Our results provide novel evidence indicating that ATRX is required for centromere stability and the epigenetic control of heterochromatin function during meiosis and the transition to the first mitosis.

  20. The rapidly evolving centromere-specific histone has stringent functional requirements in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Kwong, Pak N; Menorca, Ron M G; Valencia, Joel T; Ramahi, Joseph S; Stewart, Jodi L; Tran, Robert K; Sundaresan, Venkatesan; Comai, Luca; Chan, Simon W-L

    2010-10-01

    Centromeres control chromosome inheritance in eukaryotes, yet their DNA structure and primary sequence are hypervariable. Most animals and plants have megabases of tandem repeats at their centromeres, unlike yeast with unique centromere sequences. Centromere function requires the centromere-specific histone CENH3 (CENP-A in human), which replaces histone H3 in centromeric nucleosomes. CENH3 evolves rapidly, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. A portion of the CENH3 histone-fold domain, the CENP-A targeting domain (CATD), has been previously shown to confer kinetochore localization and centromere function when swapped into human H3. Furthermore, CENP-A in human cells can be functionally replaced by CENH3 from distantly related organisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have used cenh3-1 (a null mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana) to replace endogenous CENH3 with GFP-tagged variants. A H3.3 tail domain-CENH3 histone-fold domain chimera rescued viability of cenh3-1, but CENH3's lacking a tail domain were nonfunctional. In contrast to human results, H3 containing the A. thaliana CATD cannot complement cenh3-1. GFP-CENH3 from the sister species A. arenosa functionally replaces A. thaliana CENH3. GFP-CENH3 from the close relative Brassica rapa was targeted to centromeres, but did not complement cenh3-1, indicating that kinetochore localization and centromere function can be uncoupled. We conclude that CENH3 function in A. thaliana, an organism with large tandem repeat centromeres, has stringent requirements for functional complementation in mitosis.

  1. Meiotic Studies on Combinations of Chromosomes With Different Sized Centromeres in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangpu Han

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple centromere misdivision derivatives of a translocation between the supernumerary B chromosome and the short arm of chromosome 9 (TB-9Sb permit investigation of how centromeres of different sizes behave in meiosis in opposition or in competition with each other. In the first analysis, heterozygotes were produced between the normal TB-9Sb and derivatives of it that resulted from centromere misdivision that reduced the amounts of centromeric DNA. These heterozygotes could test whether these drastic differences would result in meiotic drive of the larger chromosome in female meiosis. Cytological determinations of the segregation of large and small centromeres among thousands of progeny of four combinations were made. The recovery of the larger centromere was at a few percent higher frequency in two of four combinations. However, examination of phosphorylated histone H2A-Thr133, a characteristic of active centromeres, showed a lack of correlation with the size of the centromeric DNA, suggesting an expansion of the basal protein features of the kinetochore in two of the three cases despite the reduction in the size of the underlying DNA. In the second analysis, plants containing different sizes of the B chromosome centromere were crossed to plants with TB-9Sb with a foldback duplication of 9S (TB-9Sb-Dp9. In the progeny, plants containing large and small versions of the B chromosome centromere were selected by FISH. A meiotic “tug of war” occurred in hybrid combinations by recombination between the normal 9S and the foldback duplication in those cases in which pairing occurred. Such pairing and recombination produce anaphase I bridges but in some cases the large and small centromeres progressed to the same pole. In one combination, new dicentric chromosomes were found in the progeny. Collectively, the results indicate that the size of the underlying DNA of a centromere does not dramatically affect its segregation properties or its ability

  2. GATA transcription factors associate with a novel class of nuclear bodies in erythroblasts and megakaryocytes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. Elefanty (Andrew); M. Antoniou (Michael); N. Custodio; M. Carmo-Fonseca; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe nuclear distribution of GATA transcription factors in murine haemopoietic cells was examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Specific bright foci of GATA-1 fluorescence were observed in erythroleukaemia cells and primary murine erythroblasts and megakaryocytes, in addition to diffuse

  3. Widespread Positive Selection Drives Differentiation of Centromeric Proteins in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Emily A; Llopart, Ana

    2015-11-25

    Rapid evolution of centromeric satellite repeats is thought to cause compensatory amino acid evolution in interacting centromere-associated kinetochore proteins. Cid, a protein that mediates kinetochore/centromere interactions, displays particularly high amino acid turnover. Rapid evolution of both Cid and centromeric satellite repeats led us to hypothesize that the apparent compensatory evolution may extend to interacting partners in the Condensin I complex (i.e., SMC2, SMC4, Cap-H, Cap-D2, and Cap-G) and HP1s. Missense mutations in these proteins often result in improper centromere formation and aberrant chromosome segregation, thus selection for maintained function and coevolution among proteins of the complex is likely strong. Here, we report evidence of rapid evolution and recurrent positive selection in seven centromere-associated proteins in species of the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup, and further postulate that positive selection on these proteins could be a result of centromere drive and compensatory changes, with kinetochore proteins competing for optimal spindle attachment.

  4. High quality maize centromere 10 sequence reveals evidence of frequent recombination events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kai Wolfgruber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ancestral centromeres of maize contain long stretches of the tandemly arranged CentC repeat. The abundance of tandem DNA repeats and centromeric retrotransposons (CR have presented a significant challenge to completely assembling centromeres using traditional sequencing methods. Here we report a nearly complete assembly of the 1.85 Mb maize centromere 10 from inbred B73 using PacBio technology and BACs from the reference genome project. The error rates estimated from overlapping BAC sequences are 7 x 10-6 and 5 x 10-5 for mismatches and indels, respectively. The number of gaps in the region covered by the reassembly was reduced from 140 in the reference genome to three. Three expressed genes are located between 92 and 477 kb of the inferred ancestral CentC cluster, which lies within the region of highest centromeric repeat density. The improved assembly increased the count of full-length centromeric retrotransposons from 5 to 55 and revealed a 22.7 kb segmental duplication that occurred approximately 121,000 years ago. Our analysis provides evidence of frequent recombination events in the form of partial retrotransposons, deletions within retrotransposons, chimeric retrotransposons, segmental duplications including higher order CentC repeats, a deleted CentC monomer, centromere-proximal inversions, and insertion of mitochondrial sequences. Double-strand DNA break (DSB repair is the most plausible mechanism for these events and may be the major driver of centromere repeat evolution and diversity. This repair appears to be mediated by microhomology, suggesting that tandem repeats may have evolved to facilitate the repair of frequent DSBs in centromeres.

  5. Rad51-Rad52 mediated maintenance of centromeric chromatin in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreyoshi Mitra

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Specification of the centromere location in most eukaryotes is not solely dependent on the DNA sequence. However, the non-genetic determinants of centromere identity are not clearly defined. While multiple mechanisms, individually or in concert, may specify centromeres epigenetically, most studies in this area are focused on a universal factor, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, often considered as the epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. In spite of variable timing of its loading at centromeres across species, a replication coupled early S phase deposition of CENP-A is found in most yeast centromeres. Centromeres are the earliest replicating chromosomal regions in a pathogenic budding yeast Candida albicans. Using a 2-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis assay, we identify replication origins (ORI7-LI and ORI7-RI proximal to an early replicating centromere (CEN7 in C. albicans. We show that the replication forks stall at CEN7 in a kinetochore dependent manner and fork stalling is reduced in the absence of the homologous recombination (HR proteins Rad51 and Rad52. Deletion of ORI7-RI causes a significant reduction in the stalled fork signal and an increased loss rate of the altered chromosome 7. The HR proteins, Rad51 and Rad52, have been shown to play a role in fork restart. Confocal microscopy shows declustered kinetochores in rad51 and rad52 mutants, which are evidence of kinetochore disintegrity. CENP-ACaCse4 levels at centromeres, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments, are reduced in absence of Rad51/Rad52 resulting in disruption of the kinetochore structure. Moreover, western blot analysis reveals that delocalized CENP-A molecules in HR mutants degrade in a similar fashion as in other kinetochore mutants described before. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation assays indicate that Rad51 and Rad52 physically interact with CENP-ACaCse4 in vivo. Thus, the HR proteins Rad51 and Rad52

  6. Mislocalization of the Drosophila centromere-specific histone CIDpromotes formation of functional ectopic kinetochores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heun, Patrick; Erhardt, Sylvia; Blower, Michael D.; Weiss,Samara; Skora, Andrew D.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2006-01-30

    The centromere-specific histone variant CENP-A (CID in Drosophila) is a structural and functional foundation for kinetochore formation and chromosome segregation. Here, we show that overexpressed CID is mislocalized into normally non-centromeric regions in Drosophila tissue culture cells and animals. Analysis of mitoses in living and fixed cells reveals that mitotic delays, anaphase bridges, chromosome fragmentation, and cell and organismal lethality are all direct consequences of CID mislocalization. In addition, proteins that are normally restricted to endogenous kinetochores assemble at a subset of ectopic CID incorporation regions. The presence of microtubule motors and binding proteins, spindle attachments, and aberrant chromosome morphologies demonstrate that these ectopic kinetochores are functional. We conclude that CID mislocalization promotes formation of ectopic centromeres and multicentric chromosomes, which causes chromosome missegregation, aneuploidy, and growth defects. Thus, CENP-A mislocalization is one possible mechanism for genome instability during cancer progression, as well as centromere plasticity during evolution.

  7. Clinical spectrum of immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial dysmorphism (ICF syndrome).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagleitner, M.M.; Lankester, A.; Maraschio, P.; Hulten, M.; Fryns, J.P.; Schuetz, C.; Gimelli, G.; Davies, E.G.; Gennery, A.R.; Belohradsky, B.H.; Groot, R. de; Gerritsen, E.J.; Mattina, T.; Howard, P.J.; Fasth, A.; Reisli, I.; Furthner, D.; Slatter, M.A.; Cant, A.J.; Cazzola, G.; Dijken, P.J. van; Deuren, M. van; Greef, J.C. de; Maarel, S.M. van der; Weemaes, C.M.R.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial dysmorphism (ICF syndrome) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterised by facial dysmorphism, immunoglobulin deficiency and branching of chromosomes 1, 9 and 16 after PHA stimulation of lymphocytes. Hypomethylation of DNA of a

  8. Premitotic assembly of human CENPs -T and -W switches centromeric chromatin to a mitotic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Prendergast

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Centromeres are differentiated chromatin domains, present once per chromosome, that direct segregation of the genome in mitosis and meiosis by specifying assembly of the kinetochore. They are distinct genetic loci in that their identity in most organisms is determined not by the DNA sequences they are associated with, but through specific chromatin composition and context. The core nucleosomal protein CENP-A/cenH3 plays a primary role in centromere determination in all species and directs assembly of a large complex of associated proteins in vertebrates. While CENP-A itself is stably transmitted from one generation to the next, the nature of the template for centromere replication and its relationship to kinetochore function are as yet poorly understood. Here, we investigate the assembly and inheritance of a histone fold complex of the centromere, the CENP-T/W complex, which is integrated with centromeric chromatin in association with canonical histone H3 nucleosomes. We have investigated the cell cycle regulation, timing of assembly, generational persistence, and requirement for function of CENPs -T and -W in the cell cycle in human cells. The CENP-T/W complex assembles through a dynamic exchange mechanism in late S-phase and G2, is required for mitosis in each cell cycle and does not persist across cell generations, properties reciprocal to those measured for CENP-A. We propose that the CENP-A and H3-CENP-T/W nucleosome components of the centromere are specialized for centromeric and kinetochore activities, respectively. Segregation of the assembly mechanisms for the two allows the cell to switch between chromatin configurations that reciprocally support the replication of the centromere and its conversion to a mitotic state on postreplicative chromatin.

  9. Centromere Locations in Brassica A and C Genomes Revealed Through Half-Tetrad Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Annaliese S; Rousseau-Gueutin, Mathieu; Morice, Jérôme; Bayer, Philipp E; Besharat, Naghmeh; Cousin, Anouska; Pradhan, Aneeta; Parkin, Isobel A P; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Batley, Jacqueline; Nelson, Matthew N

    2016-02-01

    Locating centromeres on genome sequences can be challenging. The high density of repetitive elements in these regions makes sequence assembly problematic, especially when using short-read sequencing technologies. It can also be difficult to distinguish between active and recently extinct centromeres through sequence analysis. An effective solution is to identify genetically active centromeres (functional in meiosis) by half-tetrad analysis. This genetic approach involves detecting heterozygosity along chromosomes in segregating populations derived from gametes (half-tetrads). Unreduced gametes produced by first division restitution mechanisms comprise complete sets of nonsister chromatids. Along these chromatids, heterozygosity is maximal at the centromeres, and homologous recombination events result in homozygosity toward the telomeres. We genotyped populations of half-tetrad-derived individuals (from Brassica interspecific hybrids) using a high-density array of physically anchored SNP markers (Illumina Brassica 60K Infinium array). Mapping the distribution of heterozygosity in these half-tetrad individuals allowed the genetic mapping of all 19 centromeres of the Brassica A and C genomes to the reference Brassica napus genome. Gene and transposable element density across the B. napus genome were also assessed and corresponded well to previously reported genetic map positions. Known centromere-specific sequences were located in the reference genome, but mostly matched unanchored sequences, suggesting that the core centromeric regions may not yet be assembled into the pseudochromosomes of the reference genome. The increasing availability of genetic markers physically anchored to reference genomes greatly simplifies the genetic and physical mapping of centromeres using half-tetrad analysis. We discuss possible applications of this approach, including in species where half-tetrads are currently difficult to isolate. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  10. Centromere and telomere sequence alterations reflect the rapid genome evolution within the carnivorous plant genus Genlisea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tran, T.D.; Cao, H.X.; Jovtchev, G.; Neumann, Pavel; Novák, Petr; Fojtová, M.; Vu, G.T.H.; Macas, Jiří; Fajkus, Jiří; Schubert, I.; Fuchs, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 6 (2015), s. 1087-1099 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR GA13-06943S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68081707 Keywords : Centromeric tandem repeat * centromeric retrotransposons * Genlisea nigrocaulis, hispidula Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; BO - Biophysics (BFU-R) Impact factor: 5.468, year: 2015

  11. Functional Identification of the Plasmodium Centromere and Generation of a Plasmodium Artificial Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Iwanaga, Shiroh; Khan, Shahid M.; Kaneko, Izumi; Christodoulou, Zoe; Newbold, Chris; Yuda, Masao; Janse, Chris J.; Waters, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The artificial chromosome represents a useful tool for gene transfer, both as cloning vectors and in chromosome biology research. To generate a Plasmodium artificial chromosome (PAC), we had to first functionally identify and characterize the parasite's centromere. A putative centromere (pbcen5) was cloned from chromosome 5 of the rodent parasite P. berghei based on a Plasmodium gene-synteny map. Plasmids containing pbcen5 were stably maintained in parasites during a blood-stage infec...

  12. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien Pillet

    Full Text Available Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  13. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Flavien; Passot, Fanny Marie; Pasta, Franck; Anton Leberre, Véronique; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  14. Centromeric DNA replication reconstitution reveals DNA loops and ATR checkpoint suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aze, Antoine; Sannino, Vincenzo; Soffientini, Paolo; Bachi, Angela; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    Half of the human genome is made up of repetitive DNA. However, mechanisms underlying replication of chromosome regions containing repetitive DNA are poorly understood. We reconstituted replication of defined human chromosome segments using bacterial artificial chromosomes in Xenopus laevis egg extract. Using this approach we characterized the chromatin assembly and replication dynamics of centromeric alpha-satellite DNA. Proteomic analysis of centromeric chromatin revealed replication-dependent enrichment of a network of DNA repair factors including the MSH2-6 complex, which was required for efficient centromeric DNA replication. However, contrary to expectations, the ATR-dependent checkpoint monitoring DNA replication fork arrest could not be activated on highly repetitive DNA due to the inability of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA to accumulate on chromatin. Electron microscopy of centromeric DNA and supercoil mapping revealed the presence of topoisomerase I-dependent DNA loops embedded in a protein matrix enriched for SMC2-4 proteins. This arrangement suppressed ATR signalling by preventing RPA hyper-loading, facilitating replication of centromeric DNA. These findings have important implications for our understanding of repetitive DNA metabolism and centromere organization under normal and stressful conditions.

  15. Recurrent Gene Duplication Leads to Diverse Repertoires of Centromeric Histones in Drosophila Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursel, Lisa E; Malik, Harmit S

    2017-06-01

    Despite their essential role in the process of chromosome segregation in most eukaryotes, centromeric histones show remarkable evolutionary lability. Not only have they been lost in multiple insect lineages, but they have also undergone gene duplication in multiple plant lineages. Based on detailed study of a handful of model organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, centromeric histone duplication is considered to be rare in animals. Using a detailed phylogenomic study, we find that Cid, the centromeric histone gene, has undergone at least four independent gene duplications during Drosophila evolution. We find duplicate Cid genes in D. eugracilis (Cid2), in the montium species subgroup (Cid3, Cid4) and in the entire Drosophila subgenus (Cid5). We show that Cid3, Cid4, and Cid5 all localize to centromeres in their respective species. Some Cid duplicates are primarily expressed in the male germline. With rare exceptions, Cid duplicates have been strictly retained after birth, suggesting that they perform nonredundant centromeric functions, independent from the ancestral Cid. Indeed, each duplicate encodes a distinct N-terminal tail, which may provide the basis for distinct protein-protein interactions. Finally, we show some Cid duplicates evolve under positive selection whereas others do not. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that Drosophila Cid duplicates have subfunctionalized. Thus, these gene duplications provide an unprecedented opportunity to dissect the multiple roles of centromeric histones. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  16. Transcription and evolutionary dynamics of the centromeric satellite repeat CentO in rice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lee, H.; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2006), s. 2505-2520 ISSN 0737-4038 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/04/1207 Keywords : rice * genetic modification Subject RIV: EB - Genetic s ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.726, year: 2006

  17. Cis-Acting Determinants Affecting Centromere Function, Sister-Chromatid Cohesion and Reciprocal Recombination during Meiosis in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, D. D.; Hegemann, J. H.; Shero, J. H.; Hieter, P.

    1995-01-01

    We have employed a system that utilizes homologous pairs of human DNA-derived yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) as marker chromosomes to assess the specific role (s) of conserved centromere DNA elements (CDEI, CDEII and CDEIII) in meiotic chromosome disjunction fidelity. Thirteen different centromere (CEN) mutations were tested for their effects on meiotic centromere function. YACs containing a wild-type CEN DNA sequence segregate with high fidelity in meiosis I (99% normal segregation) and...

  18. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have...... been identified and the specific roles have been investigated by genetic and cell biological methods. The present review presents an overview of the principal signaling pathways involved in regulating murine pancreatic growth, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation....

  19. Boom-Bust Turnovers of Megabase-Sized Centromeric DNA in Solanum Species: Rapid Evolution of DNA Sequences Associated with Centromeres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhang, H.Q.; Koblížková, Andrea; Wang, K.; Gong, Z.Y.; Oliveira, L.; Torres, G.A.; Wu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Novák, Petr; Buell, C.R.; Macas, Jiří; Jiang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 4 (2014), s. 1436-1447 ISSN 1040-4651 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Alpha-satellite DNA * repetitive sequences * rice centromeres Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.338, year: 2014

  20. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of a species-specific transcribed centromeric satellite repeat from the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Satellite repetitive sequences that accumulate in the heterochromatin consist a large fraction of a genome and due to their properties are suggested to be implicated in centromere function. Current knowledge of heterochromatic regions of Bactrocera oleae genome, the major pest of the olive tree, is practically nonexistent. In our effort to explore the repetitive DNA portion of B. oleae genome, a novel satellite sequence designated BoR300 was isolated and cloned. The present study describes the genomic organization, abundance and chromosomal distribution of BoR300 which is organized in tandem, forming arrays of 298 bp-long monomers. Sequence analysis showed an AT content of 60.4%, a CENP-B like-motif and a high curvature value based on predictive models. Comparative analysis among randomly selected monomers demonstrated a high degree of sequence homogeneity (88%-97% of BoR300 repeats, which are present at approximately 3,000 copies per haploid genome accounting for about 0.28% of the total genomic DNA, based on two independent qPCR approaches. In addition, expression of the repeat was also confirmed through RT-PCR, by which BoR300 transcripts were detected in both sexes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of BoR300 on mitotic metaphases and polytene chromosomes revealed signals to the centromeres of two out of the six chromosomes which indicated a chromosome-specific centromeric localization. Moreover, BoR300 is not conserved in the closely related Bactrocera species tested and it is also absent in other dipterans, but it's rather restricted to the B. oleae genome. This feature of species-specificity attributed to BoR300 satellite makes it a good candidate as an identification probe of the insect among its relatives at early development stages.

  1. Centromere separation and association in the nuclei of an interspecific hybrid between Torenia fournieri and T. baillonii (Scrophulariaceae) during mitosis and meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Shinji; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Wako, Toshiyuki; Tsujimoto, Hisashi

    2007-10-01

    In the nuclei of some interspecific hybrid and allopolyploid plant species, each genome occupies a separate spatial domain. To analyze this phenomenon, we studied localization of the centromeres in the nuclei of a hybrid between Torenia fournieri and T. baillonii during mitosis and meiosis using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) probed with species-specific centromere repeats. Centromeres of each genome were located separately in undifferentiated cells but not differentiated cells, suggesting that cell division might be the possible force causing centromere separation. However, no remarkable difference of dividing distance was detected between chromatids with different centromeres in anaphase and telophase, indicating that tension of the spindle fiber attached to each chromatid is not the cause of centromere separation in Torenia. In differentiated cells, centromeres in both genomes were not often observed for the expected chromosome number, indicating centromere association. In addition, association of centromeres from the same genome was observed at a higher frequency than between different genomes. This finding suggests that centromeres within one genome are spatially separated from those within the other. This close position may increase possibility of association between centromeres of the same genome. In meiotic prophase, all centromeres irrespective of the genome were associated in a certain portion of the nucleus. Since centromere association in the interspecific hybrid and amphiploid was tighter than that in the diploid parents, it is possible that this phenomenon may be involved in sorting and pairing of homologous chromosomes.

  2. Most Uv-Induced Reciprocal Translocations in SORDARIA MACROSPORA Occur in or near Centromere Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblon, G; Zickler, D; Lebilcot, S

    1986-02-01

    In fungi, translocations can be identified and classified by the patterns of ascospore abortion in asci from crosses of rearrangement x normal sequence. Previous studies of UV-induced rearrangements in Sordaria macrospora revealed that a major class (called type III) appeared to be reciprocal translocations that were anomalous in producing an unexpected class of asci with four aborted ascospores in bbbbaaaa linear sequence (b = black; a = abortive). The present study shows that the anomalous type III rearrangements are, in fact, reciprocal translocations having both breakpoints within or adjacent to centromeres and that bbbbaaaa asci result from 3:1 disjunction from the translocation quadrivalent.-Electron microscopic observations of synaptonemal complexes enable centromeres to be visualized. Lengths of synaptonemal complexes lateral elements in translocation quadrivalents accurately reflect chromosome arm lengths, enabling breakpoints to be located reliably in centromere regions. All genetic data are consistent with the behavior expected of translocations with breakpoints at centromeres.-Two-thirds of the UV-induced reciprocal translocations are of this type. Certain centromere regions are involved preferentially. Among 73 type-III translocations, there were but 13 of the 21 possible chromosome combinations and 20 of the 42 possible combinations of chromosome arms.

  3. APC/C-Cdc20 mediates deprotection of centromeric cohesin at meiosis II in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonak, Katarzyna; Zagoriy, Ievgeniia; Oz, Tugce; Graf, Peter; Rojas, Julie; Mengoli, Valentina; Zachariae, Wolfgang

    2017-06-18

    Cells undergoing meiosis produce haploid gametes through one round of DNA replication followed by 2 rounds of chromosome segregation. This requires that cohesin complexes, which establish sister chromatid cohesion during S phase, are removed in a stepwise manner. At meiosis I, the separase protease triggers the segregation of homologous chromosomes by cleaving cohesin's Rec8 subunit on chromosome arms. Cohesin persists at centromeres because the PP2A phosphatase, recruited by the shugoshin protein, dephosphorylates Rec8 and thereby protects it from cleavage. While chromatids disjoin upon cleavage of centromeric Rec8 at meiosis II, it was unclear how and when centromeric Rec8 is liberated from its protector PP2A. One proposal is that bipolar spindle forces separate PP2A from Rec8 as cells enter metaphase II. We show here that sister centromere biorientation is not sufficient to "deprotect" Rec8 at meiosis II in yeast. Instead, our data suggest that the ubiquitin-ligase APC/C Cdc20 removes PP2A from centromeres by targeting for degradation the shugoshin Sgo1 and the kinase Mps1. This implies that Rec8 remains protected until entry into anaphase II when it is phosphorylated concurrently with the activation of separase. Here, we provide further support for this model and speculate on its relevance to mammalian oocytes.

  4. The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Ruth N.; Campbell, Lynda J.

    2011-01-01

    Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centromere deletion in cancer cells. We review what is known about dicentric chromosomes and the mechanisms by which they can undergo stabilization in both constitutional and cancer genomes. The failure to identify centromere deletion in cancer cells until recently can be partly explained by the standard approaches to routine diagnostic cancer genome analysis, which do not identify centromeres in the context of chromosome organization. This hitherto hidden group of primary dicentric, secondary monocentric chromosomes, together with other unrecognized dicentric chromosomes, points to a greater role for dicentric chromosomes in cancer initiation and progression than is generally acknowledged. We present a model that predicts and explains a significant role for dicentric chromosomes in the formation of unbalanced translocations in malignancy. PMID:22567363

  5. SOLO: a meiotic protein required for centromere cohesion, coorientation, and SMC1 localization in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rihui; Thomas, Sharon E; Tsai, Jui-He; Yamada, Yukihiro; McKee, Bruce D

    2010-02-08

    Sister chromatid cohesion is essential to maintain stable connections between homologues and sister chromatids during meiosis and to establish correct centromere orientation patterns on the meiosis I and II spindles. However, the meiotic cohesion apparatus in Drosophila melanogaster remains largely uncharacterized. We describe a novel protein, sisters on the loose (SOLO), which is essential for meiotic cohesion in Drosophila. In solo mutants, sister centromeres separate before prometaphase I, disrupting meiosis I centromere orientation and causing nondisjunction of both homologous and sister chromatids. Centromeric foci of the cohesin protein SMC1 are absent in solo mutants at all meiotic stages. SOLO and SMC1 colocalize to meiotic centromeres from early prophase I until anaphase II in wild-type males, but both proteins disappear prematurely at anaphase I in mutants for mei-S332, which encodes the Drosophila homologue of the cohesin protector protein shugoshin. The solo mutant phenotypes and the localization patterns of SOLO and SMC1 indicate that they function together to maintain sister chromatid cohesion in Drosophila meiosis.

  6. The Role of Dicentric Chromosome Formation and Secondary Centromere Deletion in the Evolution of Myeloid Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth N. MacKinnon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dicentric chromosomes have been identified as instigators of the genome instability associated with cancer, but this instability is often resolved by one of a number of different secondary events. These include centromere inactivation, inversion, and intercentromeric deletion. Deletion or excision of one of the centromeres may be a significant occurrence in myeloid malignancy and other malignancies but has not previously been widely recognized, and our reports are the first describing centromere deletion in cancer cells. We review what is known about dicentric chromosomes and the mechanisms by which they can undergo stabilization in both constitutional and cancer genomes. The failure to identify centromere deletion in cancer cells until recently can be partly explained by the standard approaches to routine diagnostic cancer genome analysis, which do not identify centromeres in the context of chromosome organization. This hitherto hidden group of primary dicentric, secondary monocentric chromosomes, together with other unrecognized dicentric chromosomes, points to a greater role for dicentric chromosomes in cancer initiation and progression than is generally acknowledged. We present a model that predicts and explains a significant role for dicentric chromosomes in the formation of unbalanced translocations in malignancy.

  7. Replicating centromeric chromatin: Spatial and temporal control of CENP-A assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechemia-Arbely, Yael; Fachinetti, Daniele; Cleveland, Don W.

    2012-01-01

    The centromere is the fundamental unit for insuring chromosome inheritance. This complex region has a distinct type of chromatin in which histone H3 is replaced by a structurally different homologue identified in humans as CENP-A. In metazoans, specific DNA sequences are neither required nor sufficient for centromere identity. Rather, an epigenetic mark comprised of CENP-A containing chromatin is thought to be the major determinant of centromere identity. In this view, CENP-A deposition and chromatin assembly are fundamental processes for the maintenance of centromeric identity across mitotic and meiotic divisions. Several lines of evidence support CENP-A deposition in metazoans occurring at only one time in the cell cycle. Such cell cycle-dependent loading of CENP-A is found in divergent species from human to fission yeast, albeit with differences in the cell cycle point at which CENP-A is assembled. Cell cycle dependent CENP-A deposition requires multiple assembly factors for its deposition and maintenance. This review discusses the regulation of new CENP-A deposition and its relevance to centromere identity and inheritance.

  8. Centromeric DNA characterization in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon provides insights on the evolution of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinjia; Zuo, Sheng; Zhang, Zhiliang; Li, Zhanjie; Han, Jinlei; Chu, Zhaoqing; Hasterok, Robert; Wang, Kai

    2018-03-01

    Brachypodium distachyon is a well-established model monocot plant, and its small and compact genome has been used as an accurate reference for the much larger and often polyploid genomes of cereals such as Avena sativa (oats), Hordeum vulgare (barley) and Triticum aestivum (wheat). Centromeres are indispensable functional units of chromosomes and they play a core role in genome polyploidization events during evolution. As the Brachypodium genus contains about 20 species that differ significantly in terms of their basic chromosome numbers, genome size, ploidy levels and life strategies, studying their centromeres may provide important insight into the structure and evolution of the genome in this interesting and important genus. In this study, we isolated the centromeric DNA of the B. distachyon reference line Bd21 and characterized its composition via the chromatin immunoprecipitation of the nucleosomes that contain the centromere-specific histone CENH3. We revealed that the centromeres of Bd21 have the features of typical multicellular eukaryotic centromeres. Strikingly, these centromeres contain relatively few centromeric satellite DNAs; in particular, the centromere of chromosome 5 (Bd5) consists of only ~40 kb. Moreover, the centromeric retrotransposons in B. distachyon (CRBds) are evolutionarily young. These transposable elements are located both within and adjacent to the CENH3 binding domains, and have similar compositions. Moreover, based on the presence of CRBds in the centromeres, the species in this study can be grouped into two distinct lineages. This may provide new evidence regarding the phylogenetic relationships within the Brachypodium genus. © 2018 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mps1 kinase-dependent Sgo2 centromere localisation mediates cohesin protection in mouse oocyte meiosis I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Yakoubi, Warif; Buffin, Eulalie; Cladière, Damien; Gryaznova, Yulia; Berenguer, Inés; Touati, Sandra A; Gómez, Rocío; Suja, José A; van Deursen, Jan M; Wassmann, Katja

    2017-09-25

    A key feature of meiosis is the step-wise removal of cohesin, the protein complex holding sister chromatids together, first from arms in meiosis I and then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Centromeric cohesin is protected by Sgo2 from Separase-mediated cleavage, in order to maintain sister chromatids together until their separation in meiosis II. Failures in step-wise cohesin removal result in aneuploid gametes, preventing the generation of healthy embryos. Here, we report that kinase activities of Bub1 and Mps1 are required for Sgo2 localisation to the centromere region. Mps1 inhibitor-treated oocytes are defective in centromeric cohesin protection, whereas oocytes devoid of Bub1 kinase activity, which cannot phosphorylate H2A at T121, are not perturbed in cohesin protection as long as Mps1 is functional. Mps1 and Bub1 kinase activities localise Sgo2 in meiosis I preferentially to the centromere and pericentromere respectively, indicating that Sgo2 at the centromere is required for protection.In meiosis I centromeric cohesin is protected by Sgo2 from Separase-mediated cleavage ensuring that sister chromatids are kept together until their separation in meiosis II. Here the authors demonstrate that Bub1 and Mps1 kinase activities are required for Sgo2 localisation to the centromere region.

  10. Mps1 kinase-dependent Sgo2 centromere localisation mediates cohesin protection in mouse oocyte meiosis I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakoubi, W. El; Buffin, E.; Cladiere, D.; Gryaznova, Y.; Berenguer, I.; Touati, S.A.; Gomez, R.; Suja, J.A.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Wassmann, K.

    2017-01-01

    A key feature of meiosis is the step-wise removal of cohesin, the protein complex holding sister chromatids together, first from arms in meiosis I and then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Centromeric cohesin is protected by Sgo2 from Separase-mediated cleavage, in order to maintain sister

  11. Phylogeny of horse chromosome 5q in the genus Equus and centromere repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, F M; Nergadze, S G; Poletto, V; Cerutti, F; Ryder, O A; Leeb, T; Raimondi, E; Giulotto, E

    2009-01-01

    Horses, asses and zebras belong to the genus Equus and are the only extant species of the family Equidae in the order Perissodactyla. In a previous work we demonstrated that a key factor in the rapid karyotypic evolution of this genus was evolutionary centromere repositioning, that is, the shift of the centromeric function to a new position without alteration of the order of markers along the chromosome. In search of previously undiscovered evolutionarily new centromeres, we traced the phylogeny of horse chromosome 5, analyzing the order of BAC markers, derived from a horse genomic library, in 7 Equus species (E. caballus, E. hemionus onager, E. kiang, E. asinus, E. grevyi, E. burchelli and E. zebra hartmannae). This analysis showed that repositioned centromeres are present in E. asinus (domestic donkey, EAS) chromosome 16 and in E. burchelli (Burchell's zebra, EBU) chromosome 17, confirming that centromere repositioning is a strikingly frequent phenomenon in this genus. The observation that the neocentromeres in EAS16 and EBU17 are in the same chromosomal position suggests that they may derive from the same event and therefore, E. asinus and E. burchelli may be more closely related than previously proposed; alternatively, 2 centromere repositioning events, involving the same chromosomal region, may have occurred independently in different lineages, pointing to the possible existence of hot spots for neocentromere formation. Our comparative analysis also showed that, while E. caballus chromosome 5 seems to represent the ancestral configuration, centric fission followed by independent fusion events gave rise to 3 different submetacentric chromosomes in other Equus lineages. (c) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Meiosis-Specific Loading of the Centromere-Specific Histone CENH3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Maruthachalam; Shibata, Fukashi; Ramahi, Joseph S.; Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Chen, Changbin; Murata, Minoru; Chan, Simon W. L.

    2011-01-01

    Centromere behavior is specialized in meiosis I, so that sister chromatids of homologous chromosomes are pulled toward the same side of the spindle (through kinetochore mono-orientation) and chromosome number is reduced. Factors required for mono-orientation have been identified in yeast. However, comparatively little is known about how meiotic centromere behavior is specialized in animals and plants that typically have large tandem repeat centromeres. Kinetochores are nucleated by the centromere-specific histone CENH3. Unlike conventional histone H3s, CENH3 is rapidly evolving, particularly in its N-terminal tail domain. Here we describe chimeric variants of CENH3 with alterations in the N-terminal tail that are specifically defective in meiosis. Arabidopsis thaliana cenh3 mutants expressing a GFP-tagged chimeric protein containing the H3 N-terminal tail and the CENH3 C-terminus (termed GFP-tailswap) are sterile because of random meiotic chromosome segregation. These defects result from the specific depletion of GFP-tailswap protein from meiotic kinetochores, which contrasts with its normal localization in mitotic cells. Loss of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant in meiosis affects recruitment of the essential kinetochore protein MIS12. Our findings suggest that CENH3 loading dynamics might be regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. As further support for our hypothesis, we show that GFP-tailswap protein is recruited back to centromeres in a subset of pollen grains in GFP-tailswap once they resume haploid mitosis. Meiotic recruitment of the GFP-tailswap CENH3 variant is not restored by removal of the meiosis-specific cohesin subunit REC8. Our results reveal the existence of a specialized loading pathway for CENH3 during meiosis that is likely to involve the hypervariable N-terminal tail. Meiosis-specific CENH3 dynamics may play a role in modulating meiotic centromere behavior. PMID:21695238

  13. Somatic association of telocentric chromosomes carrying homologous centromeres in common wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello-Sampayo, T

    1973-01-01

    Measurements of distances between telocentric chromosomes, either homologous or representing the opposite arms of a metacentric chromosome (complementary telocentrics), were made at metaphase in root tip cells of common wheat carrying two homologous pairs of complementary telocentrics of chromosome 1 B or 6 B (double ditelosomic 1 B or 6 B). The aim was to elucidate the relative locations of the telocentric chromosomes within the cell. The data obtained strongly suggest that all four telocentrics of chromosome 1 B or 6 B are spacially and simultaneously co-associated. In plants carrying two complementary (6 B (S) and 6 B (L)) and a non-related (5 B (L)) telocentric, only the complementary chromosomes were found to be somatically associated. It is thought, therefore, that the somatic association of chromosomes may involve more than two chromosomes in the same association and, since complementary telocentrics are as much associated as homologous, that the homology between centromeres (probably the only homologous region that exists between complementary telocentrics) is a very important condition for somatic association of chromosomes. The spacial arrangement of chromosomes was studied at anaphase and prophase and the polar orientation of chromosomes at prophase was found to resemble anaphase orientation. This was taken as good evidence for the maintenance of the chromosome arrangement - the Rabl orientation - and of the peripheral location of the centromere and its association with the nuclear membrane. Within this general arrangement homologous telocentric chromosomes were frequently seen to have their centromeres associated or directed towards each other. The role of the centromere in somatic association as a spindle fibre attachment and chromosome binder is discussed. It is suggested that for non-homologous chromosomes to become associated in root tips, the only requirement needed should be the homology of centromeres such as exists between complementary

  14. Centromere pairing by a plasmid-encoded type I ParB protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringgaard, Simon; Löwe, Jan; Gerdes, Kenn

    2007-01-01

    The par2 locus of Escherichia coli plasmid pB171 encodes two trans-acting proteins, ParA and ParB, and two cis-acting sites, parC1 and parC2, to which ParB binds cooperatively. ParA is related to MinD and oscillates in helical structures and thereby positions ParB/parC-carrying plasmids regularly......, hence identifying the N terminus of ParB as a requirement for ParB-mediated centromere pairing. These observations suggest that centromere pairing is an important intermediate step in plasmid partitioning mediated by the common type I loci....

  15. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on the transcriptional landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O'Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-04-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA cofactors short interfering RNAs are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) that are antisense to germline transcripts. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here we used genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts and found that the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway promoted sense-oriented RNA polymerase II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. On the basis of these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway helps maintain the directionality of active transcription, thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions.

  16. Novel Centromeric Loci of the Wine and Beer Yeast Dekkera bruxellensis CEN1 and CEN2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishchuk, Olena P.; Vojvoda Zeljko, Tanja; Schifferdecker, Anna J.

    2016-01-01

    The wine and beer yeast Dekkera bruxellensis thrives in environments that are harsh and limiting, especially in concentrations with low oxygen and high ethanol. Its different strains' chromosomes greatly vary in number (karyotype). This study isolates two novel centromeric loci (CEN1 and CEN2...

  17. Epigenetic Histone Marks of Extended Meta-Polycentric Centromeres of Lathyrus and Pisum Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neumann, Pavel; Schubert, V.; Vrbová, Iva; Manning, Jasper Eugene; Houben, A.; Macas, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 234 (2016) ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/1843 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Centromere structure * epigenetic modifications * histone phosphorylation * histone methylation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  18. Genetic and physical mapping of two centromere-proximal regions of chromosome IV in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksenko, Alexei Y.; Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Clutterbuck, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    revision of the genetic map of the chromosome, including the position of the centromere, Comparison of physical and genetic maps indicates that meiotic recombination is low in subcentromeric DNA, its frequency being reduced from 1 crossover per 0.8 Mb to approximately 1 crossover per 5 Mb per meiosis...

  19. Correlation between centromere protein-F autoantibodies and cancer analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Morten Frisch, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Centromere protein-F (CENP-F) is a large nuclear protein of 367 kDa, which is involved in multiple mitosis-related events such as proper assembly of the kinetochores, stabilization of heterochromatin, chromosome alignment and mitotic checkpoint signaling. Several studies have shown a correlation...

  20. Nuclear organization in human sperm: preliminary evidence for altered sex chromosome centromere position in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, K A; Fonseka, K G L; Abogrein, A; Ioannou, D; Handyside, A H; Thornhill, A R; Hickson, N; Griffin, D K

    2008-06-01

    Many genetic defects with a chromosomal basis affect male reproduction via a range of different mechanisms. Chromosome position is a well-known marker of nuclear organization, and alterations in standard patterns can lead to disease phenotypes such as cancer, laminopathies and epilepsy. It has been demonstrated that normal mammalian sperm adopt a pattern with the centromeres aligning towards the nuclear centre. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that altered chromosome position in the sperm head is associated with male infertility. The average nuclear positions of fluorescence in-situ hybridization signals for three centromeric probes (for chromosomes X, Y and 18) were compared in normoozoospermic men and in men with compromised semen parameters. In controls, the centromeres of chromosomes X, Y and 18 all occupied a central nuclear location. In infertile men the sex chromosomes appeared more likely to be distributed in a pattern not distinguishable from a random model. Our findings cast doubt on the reliability of centromeric probes for aneuploidy screening. The analysis of chromosome position in sperm heads should be further investigated for the screening of infertile men.

  1. Centromeres cluster de novo at the beginning of meiosis in Brachypodium distachyon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoyu Wen

    Full Text Available In most eukaryotes that have been studied, the telomeres cluster into a bouquet early in meiosis, and in wheat and its relatives and in Arabidopsis the centromeres pair at the same time. In Arabidopsis, the telomeres do not cluster as a typical telomere bouquet on the nuclear membrane but are associated with the nucleolus both somatically and at the onset of meiosis. We therefore assessed whether Brachypodium distachyon, a monocot species related to cereals and whose genome is approximately twice the size of Arabidopsis thaliana, also exhibited an atypical telomere bouquet and centromere pairing. In order to investigate the occurrence of a bouquet and centromere pairing in B distachyon, we first had to establish protocols for studying meiosis in this species. This enabled us to visualize chromosome behaviour in meiocytes derived from young B distachyon spikelets in three-dimensions by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and accurately to stage meiosis based on chromatin morphology in relation to spikelet size and the timing of sample collection. Surprisingly, this study revealed that the centromeres clustered as a single site at the same time as the telomeres also formed a bouquet or single cluster.

  2. Molecular structures of centromeric heterochromatin and karyotypic evolution in the Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) (Crocodylidae, Crocodylia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoshi, Taiki; Nishida, Chizuko; Ota, Hidetoshi; Kumazawa, Yoshinori; Endo, Hideki; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2008-01-01

    Crocodilians have several unique karyotypic features, such as small diploid chromosome numbers (30-42) and the absence of dot-shaped microchromosomes. Of the extant crocodilian species, the Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) has no more than 2n = 30, comprising mostly bi-armed chromosomes with large centromeric heterochromatin blocks. To investigate the molecular structures of C-heterochromatin and genomic compartmentalization in the karyotype, characterized by the disappearance of tiny microchromosomes and reduced chromosome number, we performed molecular cloning of centromeric repetitive sequences and chromosome mapping of the 18S-28S rDNA and telomeric (TTAGGG)( n ) sequences. The centromeric heterochromatin was composed mainly of two repetitive sequence families whose characteristics were quite different. Two types of GC-rich CSI-HindIII family sequences, the 305 bp CSI-HindIII-S (G+C content, 61.3%) and 424 bp CSI-HindIII-M (63.1%), were localized to the intensely PI-stained centric regions of all chromosomes, except for chromosome 2 with PI-negative heterochromatin. The 94 bp CSI-DraI (G+C content, 48.9%) was tandem-arrayed satellite DNA and localized to chromosome 2 and four pairs of small-sized chromosomes. The chromosomal size-dependent genomic compartmentalization that is supposedly unique to the Archosauromorpha was probably lost in the crocodilian lineage with the disappearance of microchromosomes followed by the homogenization of centromeric repetitive sequences between chromosomes, except for chromosome 2.

  3. Characterization of centromeric histone H3 (CENH3 variants in cultivated and wild carrots (Daucus sp..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Dunemann

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9.

  4. Transgenerational propagation and quantitative maintenance of paternal centromeres depends on Cid/Cenp-A presence in Drosophila sperm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitika Raychaudhuri

    Full Text Available In Drosophila melanogaster, as in many animal and plant species, centromere identity is specified epigenetically. In proliferating cells, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant (CenH3, named Cid in Drosophila and Cenp-A in humans, is a crucial component of the epigenetic centromere mark. Hence, maintenance of the amount and chromosomal location of CenH3 during mitotic proliferation is important. Interestingly, CenH3 may have different roles during meiosis and the onset of embryogenesis. In gametes of Caenorhabditis elegans, and possibly in plants, centromere marking is independent of CenH3. Moreover, male gamete differentiation in animals often includes global nucleosome for protamine exchange that potentially could remove CenH3 nucleosomes. Here we demonstrate that the control of Cid loading during male meiosis is distinct from the regulation observed during the mitotic cycles of early embryogenesis. But Cid is present in mature sperm. After strong Cid depletion in sperm, paternal centromeres fail to integrate into the gonomeric spindle of the first mitosis, resulting in gynogenetic haploid embryos. Furthermore, after moderate depletion, paternal centromeres are unable to re-acquire normal Cid levels in the next generation. We conclude that Cid in sperm is an essential component of the epigenetic centromere mark on paternal chromosomes and it exerts quantitative control over centromeric Cid levels throughout development. Hence, the amount of Cid that is loaded during each cell cycle appears to be determined primarily by the preexisting centromeric Cid, with little flexibility for compensation of accidental losses.

  5. Esperanto for histones: CENP-A, not CenH3, is the centromeric histone H3 variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnshaw, W C; Allshire, R C; Black, B E; Bloom, K; Brinkley, B R; Brown, W; Cheeseman, I M; Choo, K H A; Copenhaver, G P; Deluca, J G; Desai, A; Diekmann, S; Erhardt, S; Fitzgerald-Hayes, M; Foltz, D; Fukagawa, T; Gassmann, R; Gerlich, D W; Glover, D M; Gorbsky, G J; Harrison, S C; Heun, P; Hirota, T; Jansen, L E T; Karpen, G; Kops, G J P L; Lampson, M A; Lens, S M; Losada, A; Luger, K; Maiato, H; Maddox, P S; Margolis, R L; Masumoto, H; McAinsh, A D; Mellone, B G; Meraldi, P; Musacchio, A; Oegema, K; O'Neill, R J; Salmon, E D; Scott, K C; Straight, A F; Stukenberg, P T; Sullivan, B A; Sullivan, K F; Sunkel, C E; Swedlow, J R; Walczak, C E; Warburton, P E; Westermann, S; Willard, H F; Wordeman, L; Yanagida, M; Yen, T J; Yoda, K; Cleveland, D W

    2013-04-01

    The first centromeric protein identified in any species was CENP-A, a divergent member of the histone H3 family that was recognised by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-spectrum disease. It has recently been suggested to rename this protein CenH3. Here, we argue that the original name should be maintained both because it is the basis of a long established nomenclature for centromere proteins and because it avoids confusion due to the presence of canonical histone H3 at centromeres.

  6. Transcriptional control of megakaryocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, A N

    2007-10-15

    Megakaryocytes are highly specialized cells that arise from a bipotent megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitor (MEP). This developmental leap requires coordinated activation of megakaryocyte-specific genes, radical changes in cell cycle properties, and active prevention of erythroid differentiation. These programs result from upregulation of megakaryocyte-selective transcription factors, downregulation of erythroid-selective transcription factors and ongoing mediation of common erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors. Unlike most developmental programs, no single lineage-unique family of master regulators exerts executive control over the megakaryocytic plan. Rather, an assemblage of non-unique factors and signals converge to determine lineage and differentiation. In human megakaryopoiesis, hereditary disorders of platelet production have confirmed contributions from three distinct transcription factor families. Murine models have extended this repertoire to include multiple additional factors. At a mechanistic level, the means by which these non-unique factors collaborate in the establishment of a perfectly unique cell type remains a central question.

  7. Thrombopoietin inhibits murine mast cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Ghinassi, Barbara; Lorenzini, Rodolfo; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Rana, Rosa Alba; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Partamian, Sandra; Migliaccio, Giovanni; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that Mpl, the thrombopoietin receptor, is expressed on murine mast cells and on their precursors and that targeted deletion of the Mpl gene increases mast cell differentiation in mice. Here we report that treatment of mice with thrombopoietin, or addition of this growth factor to bone marrow-derived mast cell cultures, severely hampers the generation of mature cells from their precursors by inducing apoptosis. Analysis of the expression profiling of mast cells obtained in the presence of thrombopoietin suggests that thrombopoietin induces apoptosis of mast cells by reducing expression of the transcription factor Mitf and its target anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2. PMID:18276801

  8. Absence of positive selection on CenH3 in Luzula suggests that holokinetic chromosomes may suppress centromere drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedek, František; Bureš, Petr

    2016-12-01

    The centromere drive theory explains diversity of eukaryotic centromeres as a consequence of the recurrent conflict between centromeric repeats and centromeric histone H3 (CenH3), in which selfish centromeres exploit meiotic asymmetry and CenH3 evolves adaptively to counterbalance deleterious consequences of driving centromeres. Accordingly, adaptively evolving CenH3 has so far been observed only in eukaryotes with asymmetric meiosis. However, if such evolution is a consequence of centromere drive, it should depend not only on meiotic asymmetry but also on monocentric or holokinetic chromosomal structure. Selective pressures acting on CenH3 have never been investigated in organisms with holokinetic meiosis despite the fact that holokinetic chromosomes have been hypothesized to suppress centromere drive. Therefore, the present study evaluates selective pressures acting on the CenH3 gene in holokinetic organisms for the first time, specifically in the representatives of the plant genus Luzula (Juncaceae), in which the kinetochore formation is not co-localized with any type of centromeric repeat. PCR, cloning and sequencing, and database searches were used to obtain coding CenH3 sequences from Luzula species. Codon substitution models were employed to infer selective regimes acting on CenH3 in Luzula KEY RESULTS: In addition to the two previously published CenH3 sequences from L. nivea, 16 new CenH3 sequences have been isolated from 12 Luzula species. Two CenH3 isoforms in Luzula that originated by a duplication event prior to the divergence of analysed species were found. No signs of positive selection acting on CenH3 in Luzula were detected. Instead, evidence was found that selection on CenH3 of Luzula might have been relaxed. The results indicate that holokinetism itself may suppress centromere drive and, therefore, holokinetic chromosomes might have evolved as a defence against centromere drive. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of

  9. Human artificial chromosomes with alpha satellite-based de novo centromeres show increased frequency of nondisjunction and anaphase lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, M Katharine; Mays, Robert W; Schwartz, Stuart; Willard, Huntington F

    2003-11-01

    Human artificial chromosomes have been used to model requirements for human chromosome segregation and to explore the nature of sequences competent for centromere function. Normal human centromeres require specialized chromatin that consists of alpha satellite DNA complexed with epigenetically modified histones and centromere-specific proteins. While several types of alpha satellite DNA have been used to assemble de novo centromeres in artificial chromosome assays, the extent to which they fully recapitulate normal centromere function has not been explored. Here, we have used two kinds of alpha satellite DNA, DXZ1 (from the X chromosome) and D17Z1 (from chromosome 17), to generate human artificial chromosomes. Although artificial chromosomes are mitotically stable over many months in culture, when we examined their segregation in individual cell divisions using an anaphase assay, artificial chromosomes exhibited more segregation errors than natural human chromosomes (P artificial chromosomes missegregate over a fivefold range, the data suggest that variable centromeric DNA content and/or epigenetic assembly can influence the mitotic behavior of artificial chromosomes.

  10. B chromosomes and Robertsonian fusions of Dichroplus pratensis (Acrididae): intraspecific support for the centromeric drive theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidau, C J; Martí, D A

    2004-01-01

    We tested the centromeric drive theory of karyotypic evolution in the grasshopper Dichroplus pratensis, which is simultaneously polymorphic for eight Robertsonian fusions and two classes of B chromosomes. A logistic regression analysis performed on 53 natural populations from Argentina revealed that B chromosomes are more probably found in populations with a higher proportion of acrocentric chromosomes, as the theory predicts. Furthermore, frequencies of B-carrying individuals are significantly negatively correlated with the mean frequency of different Robertsonian fusions per individual. No significant correlations between presence/absence or frequency of Bs, and latitude or altitude of the sampled populations, were found. We thus provide the first intraspecific evidence supporting the centromeric drive theory in relation to the establishment of B chromosomes in natural populations. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Autoantibodies directed to centromere protein F in a patient with BRCA1 gene mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Moghaddas, Fiona; Joshua, Fredrick; Taylor, Roberta; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Toh, Ban Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background Autoantibodies directed to centromere protein F were first reported in 1993 and their association with malignancy has been well documented. Case We present the case of a 48-year-old Caucasian female with a BRCA1 gene mutation associated with bilateral breast cancer. Antinuclear autoantibody immunofluorescence performed for workup of possible inflammatory arthropathy showed a high titre cell cycle related nuclear speckled pattern, with subsequent confirmation by addressable laser be...

  12. Perturbation of Incenp function impedes anaphase chromatid movements and chromosomal passenger protein flux at centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Leena J; Kukkonen, Anu M; Pouwels, Jeroen; Bolton, Margaret A; Jingle, Christopher D; Stukenberg, P Todd; Kallio, Marko J

    2009-02-01

    Incenp is an essential mitotic protein that, together with Aurora B, Survivin, and Borealin, forms the core of the chromosomal passenger protein complex (CPC). The CPC regulates various mitotic processes and functions to maintain genomic stability. The proper subcellular localization of the CPC and its full catalytic activity require the presence of each core subunit in the complex. We have investigated the mitotic tasks of the CPC using a function blocking antibody against Incenp microinjected into cells at different mitotic phases. This method allowed temporal analysis of CPC functions without perturbation of complex assembly or activity prior to injection. We have also studied the dynamic properties of Incenp and Aurora B using fusion protein photobleaching. We found that in early mitotic cells, Incenp and Aurora B exhibit dynamic turnover at centromeres, which is prevented by the anti-Incenp antibody. In these cells, the loss of centromeric CPC turnover is accompanied by forced mitotic exit without the execution of cytokinesis. Introduction of anti-Incenp antibody into early anaphase cells causes abnormalities in sister chromatid separation through defects in anaphase spindle functions. In summary, our data uncovers new mitotic roles for the CPC in anaphase and proposes that CPC turnover at centromeres modulates spindle assembly checkpoint signaling.

  13. ParABS Systems of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia: New Chromosome Centromeres Confer Partition Specificity†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubarry, Nelly; Pasta, Franck; Lane, David

    2006-01-01

    Most bacterial chromosomes carry an analogue of the parABS systems that govern plasmid partition, but their role in chromosome partition is ambiguous. parABS systems might be particularly important for orderly segregation of multipartite genomes, where their role may thus be easier to evaluate. We have characterized parABS systems in Burkholderia cenocepacia, whose genome comprises three chromosomes and one low-copy-number plasmid. A single parAB locus and a set of ParB-binding (parS) centromere sites are located near the origin of each replicon. ParA and ParB of the longest chromosome are phylogenetically similar to analogues in other multichromosome and monochromosome bacteria but are distinct from those of smaller chromosomes. The latter form subgroups that correspond to the taxa of their hosts, indicating evolution from plasmids. The parS sites on the smaller chromosomes and the plasmid are similar to the “universal” parS of the main chromosome but with a sequence specific to their replicon. In an Escherichia coli plasmid stabilization test, each parAB exhibits partition activity only with the parS of its own replicon. Hence, parABS function is based on the independent partition of individual chromosomes rather than on a single communal system or network of interacting systems. Stabilization by the smaller chromosome and plasmid systems was enhanced by mutation of parS sites and a promoter internal to their parAB operons, suggesting autoregulatory mechanisms. The small chromosome ParBs were found to silence transcription, a property relevant to autoregulation. PMID:16452432

  14. Separase Is Required for Homolog and Sister Disjunction during Drosophila melanogaster Male Meiosis, but Not for Biorientation of Sister Centromeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blattner, Ariane C; Chaurasia, Soumya; McKee, Bruce D; Lehner, Christian F

    2016-04-01

    Spatially controlled release of sister chromatid cohesion during progression through the meiotic divisions is of paramount importance for error-free chromosome segregation during meiosis. Cohesion is mediated by the cohesin protein complex and cleavage of one of its subunits by the endoprotease separase removes cohesin first from chromosome arms during exit from meiosis I and later from the pericentromeric region during exit from meiosis II. At the onset of the meiotic divisions, cohesin has also been proposed to be present within the centromeric region for the unification of sister centromeres into a single functional entity, allowing bipolar orientation of paired homologs within the meiosis I spindle. Separase-mediated removal of centromeric cohesin during exit from meiosis I might explain sister centromere individualization which is essential for subsequent biorientation of sister centromeres during meiosis II. To characterize a potential involvement of separase in sister centromere individualization before meiosis II, we have studied meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster males where homologs are not paired in the canonical manner. Meiosis does not include meiotic recombination and synaptonemal complex formation in these males. Instead, an alternative homolog conjunction system keeps homologous chromosomes in pairs. Using independent strategies for spermatocyte-specific depletion of separase complex subunits in combination with time-lapse imaging, we demonstrate that separase is required for the inactivation of this alternative conjunction at anaphase I onset. Mutations that abolish alternative homolog conjunction therefore result in random segregation of univalents during meiosis I also after separase depletion. Interestingly, these univalents become bioriented during meiosis II, suggesting that sister centromere individualization before meiosis II does not require separase.

  15. Identification and Preliminary Analysis of Several Centromere-associated Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clones from a Diploid Wheat Library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Although the centromeres of some plants have been investigated previously, our knowledge of the wheat centromere is still very limited. To understand the structure and function of the wheat centromere, we used two centromeric repeats (RCS1 and CCS1-5ab) to obtain some centromere-associated bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones in 32 RCS1-related BAC clones that had been screened out from a diploid wheat (Triticum boeoticum Boiss.; 2n=2x=14) BAC library. Southern hybridization results indicated that, of the 32 candidates,there were 28 RCS1-positive clones. Based on gel blot patterns, the frequency of RCS1 was approximately one copy every 69.4 kb in these 28 RCS1-positive BAC clones. More bands were detected when the same filter was probed with CCS1-5ab. Furthermore, the CCS1 bands covered all the bands detected by RCS1, which suggests that some CCS1 repeats were distributed together with RCS1. The frequency of CCS1 families was once every 35.8 kb, nearly twice that of RCS1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that the five BAC clones containing RCS1 and CCS1 sequences all detected signals at the centromeric regions in hexaploid wheat, but the signal intensities on the A-genome chromosomes were stronger than those on the B- and/or D-genome chromosomes. The FISH analysis among nine Triticeae cereals indicated that there were A-genomespecific (or rich) sequences dispersing on chromosome arms in the BAC clone TbBAC5. In addition, at the interphase cells, the centromeres of diploid species usually clustered at one pole and formed a ring-like allocation in the period before metaphase.

  16. Centromere replication timing determines different forms of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae checkpoint mutants during replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenyi; Bachant, Jeff; Collingwood, David; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2009-12-01

    Yeast replication checkpoint mutants lose viability following transient exposure to hydroxyurea, a replication-impeding drug. In an effort to understand the basis for this lethality, we discovered that different events are responsible for inviability in checkpoint-deficient cells harboring mutations in the mec1 and rad53 genes. By monitoring genomewide replication dynamics of cells exposed to hydroxyurea, we show that cells with a checkpoint deficient allele of RAD53, rad53K227A, fail to duplicate centromeres. Following removal of the drug, however, rad53K227A cells recover substantial DNA replication, including replication through centromeres. Despite this recovery, the rad53K227A mutant fails to achieve biorientation of sister centromeres during recovery from hydroxyurea, leading to secondary activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), aneuploidy, and lethal chromosome segregation errors. We demonstrate that cell lethality from this segregation defect could be partially remedied by reinforcing bipolar attachment. In contrast, cells with the mec1-1 sml1-1 mutations suffer from severely impaired replication resumption upon removal of hydroxyurea. mec1-1 sml1-1 cells can, however, duplicate at least some of their centromeres and achieve bipolar attachment, leading to abortive segregation and fragmentation of incompletely replicated chromosomes. Our results highlight the importance of replicating yeast centromeres early and reveal different mechanisms of cell death due to differences in replication fork progression.

  17. Regulation of Centromere Localization of the Drosophila Shugoshin MEI-S332 and Sister-Chromatid Cohesion in Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Cristina; Kashevsky, Helena; Pinto, Belinda; Clarke, Astrid; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2014-01-01

    The Shugoshin (Sgo) protein family helps to ensure proper chromosome segregation by protecting cohesion at the centromere by preventing cleavage of the cohesin complex. Some Sgo proteins also influence other aspects of kinetochore-microtubule attachments. Although many Sgo members require Aurora B kinase to localize to the centromere, factors controlling delocalization are poorly understood and diverse. Moreover, it is not clear how Sgo function is inactivated and whether this is distinct from delocalization. We investigated these questions in Drosophila melanogaster, an organism with superb chromosome cytology to monitor Sgo localization and quantitative assays to test its function in sister-chromatid segregation in meiosis. Previous research showed that in mitosis in cell culture, phosphorylation of the Drosophila Sgo, MEI-S332, by Aurora B promotes centromere localization, whereas Polo phosphorylation promotes delocalization. These studies also suggested that MEI-S332 can be inactivated independently of delocalization, a conclusion supported here by localization and function studies in meiosis. Phosphoresistant and phosphomimetic mutants for the Aurora B and Polo phosphorylation sites were examined for effects on MEI-S332 localization and chromosome segregation in meiosis. Strikingly, MEI-S332 with a phosphomimetic mutation in the Aurora B phosphorylation site prematurely dissociates from the centromeres in meiosis I. Despite the absence of MEI-S332 on meiosis II centromeres in male meiosis, sister chromatids segregate normally, demonstrating that detectable levels of this Sgo are not essential for chromosome congression, kinetochore biorientation, or spindle assembly. PMID:25081981

  18. Characterization of the genomic organization of the region bordering the centromere of chromosome V of Podospora anserina by direct sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silar, Philippe; Barreau, Christian; Debuchy, Robert; Kicka, Sébastien; Turcq, Béatrice; Sainsard-Chanet, Annie; Sellem, Carole H; Billault, Alain; Cattolico, Laurence; Duprat, Simone; Weissenbach, Jean

    2003-08-01

    A Podospora anserina BAC library of 4800 clones has been constructed in the vector pBHYG allowing direct selection in fungi. Screening of the BAC collection for centromeric sequences of chromosome V allowed the recovery of clones localized on either sides of the centromere, but no BAC clone was found to contain the centromere. Seven BAC clones containing 322,195 and 156,244bp from either sides of the centromeric region were sequenced and annotated. One 5S rRNA gene, 5 tRNA genes, and 163 putative coding sequences (CDS) were identified. Among these, only six CDS seem specific to P. anserina. The gene density in the centromeric region is approximately one gene every 2.8kb. Extrapolation of this gene density to the whole genome of P. anserina suggests that the genome contains about 11,000 genes. Synteny analyses between P. anserina and Neurospora crassa show that co-linearity extends at the most to a few genes, suggesting rapid genome rearrangements between these two species.

  19. Analysis of DNA restriction fragments greater than 5.7 Mb in size from the centromeric region of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arn, P H; Li, X; Smith, C; Hsu, M; Schwartz, D C; Jabs, E W

    1991-01-01

    Pulsed electrophoresis was used to study the organization of the human centromeric region. Genomic DNA was digested with rare-cutting enzymes. DNA fragments from 0.2 to greater than 5.7 Mb were separated by electrophoresis and hybridized with alphoid and simple DNA repeats. Rare-cutting enzymes (Mlu I, Nar I, Not I, Nru I, Sal I, Sfi I, Sst II) demonstrated fewer restriction sites at centromeric regions than elsewhere in the genome. The enzyme Not I had the fewest restriction sites at centromeric regions. As much as 70% of these sequences from the centromeric region are present in Not I DNA fragments greater than 5.7 and estimated to be as large as 10 Mb in size. Other repetitive sequences such as short interspersed repeated segments (SINEs), long interspersed repeated segments (LINEs), ribosomal DNA, and mini-satellite DNA that are not enriched at the centromeric region, are not enriched in Not I fragments of greater than 5.7 Mb in size.

  20. Temporal Regulation of fim Genes in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli during Infection of the Murine Urinary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Schwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC adhere to cells in the human urinary tract via type 1 pili that undergo phase variation where a 314-bp fimS DNA element flips between Phase-ON and Phase-OFF orientations through two site-specific recombinases, FimB and FimE. Three fim-lux operon transcriptional fusions were created and moved into the clinical UPEC isolate NU149 to determine their temporal regulation in UPEC growing in the urinary tract. Within murine urinary tracts, the UPEC strains demonstrated elevated transcription of fimA and fimB early in the infection, but lower transcription by the fifth day in murine kidneys. In contrast, fimE transcription was much lower than either fimA or fimB early, increased markedly at 24 h after inoculation, and then dropped five days after inoculation. Positioning of fimS was primarily in the Phase-ON position over the time span in UPEC infected bladders, whereas in UPEC infected murine kidneys the Phase-OFF orientation was favored by the fifth day after inoculation. Hemagglutination titers with guinea pig erythrocytes remained constant in UPEC growing in infected murine bladders but fell substantially in UPEC infected kidneys over time. Our results show temporal in vivo regulation of fim gene expression in different environmental niches when UPEC infects the murine urinary tract.

  1. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Alkan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  2. Characterization of the oncogenic function of centromere protein F in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Yongdong; Liu, Lulu; Zeng, Tingting; Zhu, Ying-Hui [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jiangchao [Vascular Biology Research Institute, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Leilei [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Li, Yan; Yuan, Yun-Fei [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Ma, Stephanie, E-mail: stefma@hku.hk [Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); Guan, Xin-Yuan, E-mail: xyguan@hkucc.hku.hk [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou (China); Department of Clinical Oncology, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China); State Key Laboratory for Liver Research, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Overexpression of CENPF is frequently detected in HCC. •Upregulation of CENPF serves as an independent prognosis factor in HCC patients. •CENPF functions as an oncogene in HCC by promoting cell G2/M transition. -- Abstract: Centromere protein F (CENPF) is an essential nuclear protein associated with the centromere-kinetochore complex and plays a critical role in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Up-regulation of CENPF expression has previously been detected in several solid tumors. In this study, we aim to study the expression and functional role of CENPF in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found CENPF was frequently overexpressed in HCC as compared with non-tumor tissue. Up-regulated CENPF expression in HCC was positively correlated with serum AFP, venous invasion, advanced differentiation stage and a shorter overall survival. Cox regression analysis found that overexpression of CENPF was an independent prognosis factor in HCC. Functional studies found that silencing CENPF could decrease the ability of the cells to proliferate, form colonies and induce tumor formation in nude mice. Silencing CENPF also resulted in the cell cycle arrest at G2/M checkpoint by down-regulating cell cycle proteins cdc2 and cyclin B1. Our data suggest that CENPF is frequently overexpressed in HCC and plays a critical role in driving HCC tumorigenesis.

  3. Organization and evolution of primate centromeric DNA from whole-genome shotgun sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Can; Ventura, Mario; Archidiacono, Nicoletta; Rocchi, Mariano; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Eichler, Evan E

    2007-09-01

    The major DNA constituent of primate centromeres is alpha satellite DNA. As much as 2%-5% of sequence generated as part of primate genome sequencing projects consists of this material, which is fragmented or not assembled as part of published genome sequences due to its highly repetitive nature. Here, we develop computational methods to rapidly recover and categorize alpha-satellite sequences from previously uncharacterized whole-genome shotgun sequence data. We present an algorithm to computationally predict potential higher-order array structure based on paired-end sequence data and then experimentally validate its organization and distribution by experimental analyses. Using whole-genome shotgun data from the human, chimpanzee, and macaque genomes, we examine the phylogenetic relationship of these sequences and provide further support for a model for their evolution and mutation over the last 25 million years. Our results confirm fundamental differences in the dispersal and evolution of centromeric satellites in the Old World monkey and ape lineages of evolution.

  4. Comparative cytogenetic analysis of chromosomal aberrations and premature centromere division in persons exposed to radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovicic, D.; Rakic, B.; Vukov, T.; Pajic, J.; Milacic, S.; Kovacevic, R.; Stevanovic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Bukvic, N.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine the presence of correlation between the frequency of premature centromere division (PCD) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in metaphases in persons professionally exposed to radionuclides. Biological dosimetry was performed by conventional cytogenetic technique. The presence of PCD was confirmed by Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The L1.84 probe (specific for centromeric region of chromosome 18) was used. The analysis included 50 subjects employed in the Clinical Center of Serbia (C) (the average age of 45.24 ± 1.18 and the average exposition time 17.96 ± 1.15) and 40 subjects in control group (K) (the average age of 44.40 ± 0.98 and the average years of employment 19.67 ± 0.98 years) which were not exposed to genotoxic agents in their workplaces. The results showed that frequencies of CA and PCD were statistically significantly higher in subjects exposed to radionuclides than in the control group (Mann-Whitney U test, P [sr

  5. B chromosomes are more frequent in mammals with acrocentric karyotypes: support for the theory of centromeric drive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palestis, Brian G; Burt, Austin; Jones, R Neil; Trivers, Robert

    2004-02-07

    The chromosomes of mammals tend to be either mostly acrocentric (having one long arm) or mostly bi-armed, with few species having intermediate karyotypes. The theory of centromeric drive suggests that this observation reflects a bias during female meiosis, favouring either more centromeres or fewer, and that the direction of this bias changes frequently over evolutionary time. B chromosomes are selfish genetic elements found in some individuals within some species. B chromosomes are often harmful, but persist because they drive (i.e. they are transmitted more frequently than expected). We predicted that species with mainly acrocentric chromosomes would be more likely to harbour B chromosomes than those with mainly bi-armed chromosomes, because female meiosis would favour more centromeres over fewer in species with one-armed chromosomes. Our results show that B chromosomes are indeed more common in species with acrocentric chromosomes, across all mammals, among rodents, among non-rodents and in a test of independent taxonomic contrasts. These results provide independent evidence supporting the theory of centromeric drive and also help to explain the distribution of selfish DNA across species. In addition, we demonstrate an association between the shape of the B chromosomes and the shape of the typical ('A') chromosomes.

  6. A cytogenetic study of hospital workers occupationally exposed to radionuclides in Serbia. Premature centromere division as novel biomarker of exposure?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajic, Jelena; Rakic, Boban [Serbian Institute of Occupational Health ' ' Dr Dragomir Karajovic' ' , Belgrade (Serbia). Biodosimetry Dept.; Jovicic, Dubravka [Univ. ' ' Singidunum' ' , Belgrade (Serbia). Genotoxicology Dept.; Milovanovic, Aleksandar [Serbian Institute of Occupational Health ' ' Dr Dragomir Karajovic' ' , Belgrade (Serbia). Biodosimetry Dept.; Belgrade Univ. (Serbia). Occupational Health Dept.

    2016-04-15

    The health risk of chronic exposure to radionuclides includes changes in the genome (e.g., chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) that increase chromosomal instability. There are also other phenomena, which seem to appear more frequently in metaphases of exposed persons (such as premature centromere division). The aim of this study was to discover whether or not there is correlation between incidence of named cytogenetic changes in persons occupationally exposed to radionuclides in comparison with unexposed control group, and if significant correlation is determined, can premature centromere division be consider as a biomarker of radiation exposure? The exposed group comprised 50 individuals occupationally exposed to radionuclides. The reference control group consisted of 40 unexposed individuals. Chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and premature centromere division were analyzed according to a standard International Atomic Energy Agency protocol. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 statistics.The means for analyzed cytogenetic changes were significantly higher in the exposed group. Positive correlation between them was found in exposed group. Premature centromere division parameter PCD5-10 was selected as particularly suitable for separating groups (exposed/unexposed). Identification of other phenomena related to radionuclide exposure, beside well known, may clarify recent problems in radiobiology concerning the biological response to low doses of ionizing radiation and its consequences.

  7. Single molecule localization imaging of telomeres and centromeres using fluorescence in situ hybridization and semiconductor quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Lu, Ju; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Ruohu; Cui, Yiping

    2018-07-13

    Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) is a powerful tool for imaging biological targets at the nanoscale. In this report, we present SMLM imaging of telomeres and centromeres using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The FISH probes were fabricated by decorating CdSSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with telomere or centromere complementary DNA strands. SMLM imaging experiments using commercially available peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes labeled with organic fluorophores were also conducted to demonstrate the advantages of using QDs FISH probes. Compared with the PNA probes, the QDs probes have the following merits. First, the fluorescence blinking of QDs can be realized in aqueous solution or PBS buffer without thiol, which is a key buffer component for organic fluorophores' blinking. Second, fluorescence blinking of the QDs probe needs only one excitation light (i.e. 405 nm). While fluorescence blinking of the organic fluorophores usually requires two illumination lights, that is, the activation light (i.e. 405 nm) and the imaging light. Third, the high quantum yield, multiple switching times and a good optical stability make the QDs more suitable for long-term imaging. The localization precision achieved in telomeres and centromeres imaging experiments is about 30 nm, which is far beyond the diffraction limit. SMLM has enabled new insights into telomeres or centromeres on the molecular level, and it is even possible to determine the length of telomere and become a potential technique for telomere-related investigation.

  8. A cytogenetic study of hospital workers occupationally exposed to radionuclides in Serbia. Premature centromere division as novel biomarker of exposure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajic, Jelena; Rakic, Boban; Jovicic, Dubravka; Milovanovic, Aleksandar; Belgrade Univ.

    2016-01-01

    The health risk of chronic exposure to radionuclides includes changes in the genome (e.g., chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei) that increase chromosomal instability. There are also other phenomena, which seem to appear more frequently in metaphases of exposed persons (such as premature centromere division). The aim of this study was to discover whether or not there is correlation between incidence of named cytogenetic changes in persons occupationally exposed to radionuclides in comparison with unexposed control group, and if significant correlation is determined, can premature centromere division be consider as a biomarker of radiation exposure? The exposed group comprised 50 individuals occupationally exposed to radionuclides. The reference control group consisted of 40 unexposed individuals. Chromosomal aberrations, micronuclei and premature centromere division were analyzed according to a standard International Atomic Energy Agency protocol. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 17.0 statistics.The means for analyzed cytogenetic changes were significantly higher in the exposed group. Positive correlation between them was found in exposed group. Premature centromere division parameter PCD5-10 was selected as particularly suitable for separating groups (exposed/unexposed). Identification of other phenomena related to radionuclide exposure, beside well known, may clarify recent problems in radiobiology concerning the biological response to low doses of ionizing radiation and its consequences.

  9. Genetic mapping of centromeres in the nine Citrus clementina chromosomes using half-tetrad analysis and recombination patterns in unreduced and haploid gametes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, Pablo; Cuenca, José; Hernández, María; Juárez, José; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2015-03-08

    Mapping centromere locations in plant species provides essential information for the analysis of genetic structures and population dynamics. The centromere's position affects the distribution of crossovers along a chromosome and the parental heterozygosity restitution by 2n gametes is a direct function of the genetic distance to the centromere. Sexual polyploidisation is relatively frequent in Citrus species and is widely used to develop new seedless triploid cultivars. The study's objectives were to (i) map the positions of the centromeres of the nine Citrus clementina chromosomes; (ii) analyse the crossover interference in unreduced gametes; and (iii) establish the pattern of genetic recombination in haploid clementine gametes along each chromosome and its relationship with the centromere location and distribution of genic sequences. Triploid progenies were derived from unreduced megagametophytes produced by second-division restitution. Centromere positions were mapped genetically for all linkage groups using half-tetrad analysis. Inference of the physical locations of centromeres revealed one acrocentric, four metacentric and four submetacentric chromosomes. Crossover interference was observed in unreduced gametes, with variation seen between chromosome arms. For haploid gametes, a strong decrease in the recombination rate occurred in centromeric and pericentromeric regions, which contained a low density of genic sequences. In chromosomes VIII and IX, these low recombination rates extended beyond the pericentromeric regions. The genomic region corresponding to a genetic distance recombination pattern along each chromosome. However, regions with low recombination rates extended beyond the pericentromeric regions of some chromosomes into areas richer in genic sequences. The persistence of strong linkage disequilibrium between large numbers of genes promotes the stability of epistatic interactions and multilocus-controlled traits over successive generations but

  10. The cohesion protein SOLO associates with SMC1 and is required for synapsis, recombination, homolog bias and cohesion and pairing of centromeres in Drosophila Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rihui; McKee, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Cohesion between sister chromatids is mediated by cohesin and is essential for proper meiotic segregation of both sister chromatids and homologs. solo encodes a Drosophila meiosis-specific cohesion protein with no apparent sequence homology to cohesins that is required in male meiosis for centromere cohesion, proper orientation of sister centromeres and centromere enrichment of the cohesin subunit SMC1. In this study, we show that solo is involved in multiple aspects of meiosis in female Drosophila. Null mutations in solo caused the following phenotypes: 1) high frequencies of homolog and sister chromatid nondisjunction (NDJ) and sharply reduced frequencies of homolog exchange; 2) reduced transmission of a ring-X chromosome, an indicator of elevated frequencies of sister chromatid exchange (SCE); 3) premature loss of centromere pairing and cohesion during prophase I, as indicated by elevated foci counts of the centromere protein CID; 4) instability of the lateral elements (LE)s and central regions of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), as indicated by fragmented and spotty staining of the chromosome core/LE component SMC1 and the transverse filament protein C(3)G, respectively, at all stages of pachytene. SOLO and SMC1 are both enriched on centromeres throughout prophase I, co-align along the lateral elements of SCs and reciprocally co-immunoprecipitate from ovarian protein extracts. Our studies demonstrate that SOLO is closely associated with meiotic cohesin and required both for enrichment of cohesin on centromeres and stable assembly of cohesin into chromosome cores. These events underlie and are required for stable cohesion of centromeres, synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and a recombination mechanism that suppresses SCE to preferentially generate homolog crossovers (homolog bias). We propose that SOLO is a subunit of a specialized meiotic cohesin complex that mediates both centromeric and axial arm cohesion and promotes homolog bias as a component of chromosome

  11. Analysis of Primary Structural Determinants That Distinguish the Centromere-Specific Function of Histone Variant Cse4p from Histone H3

    OpenAIRE

    Keith, Kevin C.; Baker, Richard E.; Chen, Yinhuai; Harris, Kendra; Stoler, Sam; Fitzgerald-Hayes, Molly

    1999-01-01

    Cse4p is a variant of histone H3 that has an essential role in chromosome segregation and centromere chromatin structure in budding yeast. Cse4p has a unique 135-amino-acid N terminus and a C-terminal histone-fold domain that is more than 60% identical to histone H3 and the mammalian centromere protein CENP-A. Cse4p and CENP-A have biochemical properties similar to H3 and probably replace H3 in centromere-specific nucleosomes in yeasts and mammals, respectively. In order to identify regions o...

  12. Mutations in CENPE define a novel kinetochore-centromeric mechanism for microcephalic primordial dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaa, Ghayda M; Vitre, Benjamin; Carpenter, Gillian; Abramowicz, Iga; Gleeson, Joseph G; Paciorkowski, Alex R; Cleveland, Don W; Dobyns, William B; O'Driscoll, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Defects in centrosome, centrosomal-associated and spindle-associated proteins are the most frequent cause of primary microcephaly (PM) and microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) syndromes in humans. Mitotic progression and segregation defects, microtubule spindle abnormalities and impaired DNA damage-induced G2-M cell cycle checkpoint proficiency have been documented in cell lines from these patients. This suggests that impaired mitotic entry, progression and exit strongly contribute to PM and MPD. Considering the vast protein networks involved in coordinating this cell cycle stage, the list of potential target genes that could underlie novel developmental disorders is large. One such complex network, with a direct microtubule-mediated physical connection to the centrosome, is the kinetochore. This centromeric-associated structure nucleates microtubule attachments onto mitotic chromosomes. Here, we described novel compound heterozygous variants in CENPE in two siblings who exhibit a profound MPD associated with developmental delay, simplified gyri and other isolated abnormalities. CENPE encodes centromere-associated protein E (CENP-E), a core kinetochore component functioning to mediate chromosome congression initially of misaligned chromosomes and in subsequent spindle microtubule capture during mitosis. Firstly, we present a comprehensive clinical description of these patients. Then, using patient cells we document abnormalities in spindle microtubule organization, mitotic progression and segregation, before modeling the cellular pathogenicity of these variants in an independent cell system. Our cellular analysis shows that a pathogenic defect in CENP-E, a kinetochore-core protein, largely phenocopies PCNT-mutated microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism-type II patient cells. PCNT encodes a centrosome-associated protein. These results highlight a common underlying pathomechanism. Our findings provide the first evidence for a kinetochore-based route to

  13. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Expression of Centromere Protein—A (CENPA) in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajput, Ashish B.; Hu, Nianping; Varma, Sonal; Chen, Chien-Hung; Ding, Keyue; Park, Paul C.; Chapman, Judy-Anne W.; SenGupta, Sandip K.; Madarnas, Yolanda; Elliott, Bruce E.; Feilotter, Harriet E.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormal cell division leading to the gain or loss of entire chromosomes and consequent genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer. Centromere protein –A (CENPA) is a centromere-specific histone-H3-like variant gene involved in regulating chromosome segregation during cell division. CENPA is one of the genes included in some of the commercially available RNA based prognostic assays for breast cancer (BCa)—the 70 gene signature MammaPrint ® and the five gene Molecular Grade Index (MGI SM ). Our aim was to assess the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CENPA in normal and malignant breast tissue. Clinically annotated triplicate core tissue microarrays of 63 invasive BCa and 20 normal breast samples were stained with a monoclonal antibody against CENPA and scored for percentage of visibly stained nuclei. Survival analyses with Kaplan–Meier (KM) estimate and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to assess the associations between CENPA expression and disease free survival (DFS). Average percentage of nuclei visibly stained with CENPA antibody was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in BCa than normal tissue. The 3-year DFS in tumors over-expressing CENPA (>50% stained nuclei) was 79% compared to 85% in low expression tumors (<50% stained nuclei). On multivariate analysis, IHC expression of CENPA showed weak association with DFS (HR > 60.07; p = 0.06) within our small cohort. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report evaluating the implications of increased IHC expression of CENPA in paraffin embedded breast tissue samples. Our finding that increased CENPA expression may be associated with shorter DFS in BCa supports its exploration as a potential prognostic biomarker

  14. Immunohistochemical Assessment of Expression of Centromere Protein—A (CENPA) in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, Ashish B. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Hu, Nianping [Cancer Research institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Varma, Sonal; Chen, Chien-Hung [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Ding, Keyue [NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Park, Paul C. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Chapman, Judy-Anne W. [NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); SenGupta, Sandip K. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Madarnas, Yolanda [Cancer Research institute, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Cancer Center of Southeastern Ontario, Kingston, ON K7L 2V7 (Canada); Elliott, Bruce E.; Feilotter, Harriet E., E-mail: feilotth@kgh.kari.net [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2011-12-06

    Abnormal cell division leading to the gain or loss of entire chromosomes and consequent genetic instability is a hallmark of cancer. Centromere protein –A (CENPA) is a centromere-specific histone-H3-like variant gene involved in regulating chromosome segregation during cell division. CENPA is one of the genes included in some of the commercially available RNA based prognostic assays for breast cancer (BCa)—the 70 gene signature MammaPrint{sup ®} and the five gene Molecular Grade Index (MGI{sup SM}). Our aim was to assess the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of CENPA in normal and malignant breast tissue. Clinically annotated triplicate core tissue microarrays of 63 invasive BCa and 20 normal breast samples were stained with a monoclonal antibody against CENPA and scored for percentage of visibly stained nuclei. Survival analyses with Kaplan–Meier (KM) estimate and Cox proportional hazards regression models were applied to assess the associations between CENPA expression and disease free survival (DFS). Average percentage of nuclei visibly stained with CENPA antibody was significantly higher (p = 0.02) in BCa than normal tissue. The 3-year DFS in tumors over-expressing CENPA (>50% stained nuclei) was 79% compared to 85% in low expression tumors (<50% stained nuclei). On multivariate analysis, IHC expression of CENPA showed weak association with DFS (HR > 60.07; p = 0.06) within our small cohort. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published report evaluating the implications of increased IHC expression of CENPA in paraffin embedded breast tissue samples. Our finding that increased CENPA expression may be associated with shorter DFS in BCa supports its exploration as a potential prognostic biomarker.

  15. The proximal first exon architecture of the murine ghrelin gene is highly similar to its human orthologue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seim Inge

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The murine ghrelin gene (Ghrl, originally sequenced from stomach tissue, contains five exons and a single transcription start site in a short, 19 bp first exon (exon 0. We recently isolated several novel first exons of the human ghrelin gene and found evidence of a complex transcriptional repertoire. In this report, we examined the 5' exons of the murine ghrelin orthologue in a range of tissues using 5' RACE. Findings 5' RACE revealed two transcription start sites (TSSs in exon 0 and four TSSs in intron 0, which correspond to 5' extensions of exon 1. Using quantitative, real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR, we demonstrated that extended exon 1 containing Ghrl transcripts are largely confined to the spleen, adrenal gland, stomach, and skin. Conclusion We demonstrate that multiple transcription start sites are present in exon 0 and an extended exon 1 of the murine ghrelin gene, similar to the proximal first exon organisation of its human orthologue. The identification of several transcription start sites in intron 0 of mouse ghrelin (resulting in an extension of exon 1 raises the possibility that developmental-, cell- and tissue-specific Ghrl mRNA species are created by employing alternative promoters and further studies of the murine ghrelin gene are warranted.

  16. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells

  17. Holocentromeres in Rhynchospora are associated with genome-wide centromere-specific repeat arrays interspersed among euchromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marques, A.; Ribeiro, T.; Neumann, Pavel; Macas, Jiří; Novák, Petr; Schubert, V.; Pellino, M.; Fuchs, J.; Ma, W.; Kuhlmann, M.; Brandt, R.; Vanzela, A.L.L.; Beseda, Tomáš; Šimková, Hana; Pedrosa-Harand, A.; Houben, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 44 (2015), s. 13633-13638 ISSN 0027-8424 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61389030 Keywords : Centromere * satellite DNA * holokinetic * chromosome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  18. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica M Hildebrand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-A(Cse4 is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-A(Cse4 for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-A(Cse4 misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-A(Cse4 in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-A(Cse4 is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.Z(Htz1 nucleosomes, but that H2A.Z(Htz1 is not required for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.Z(Htz1 from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-A(Cse4. Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-A(Cse4. The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-A(Cse4 mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation.

  19. Global effects of the CSR-1 RNA interference pathway on transcriptional landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Germano; Hoersch, Sebastian; O’Keeffe, Sean; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Grishok, Alla

    2014-01-01

    Argonaute proteins and their small RNA co-factors short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are known to inhibit gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the Argonaute CSR-1 binds thousands of endogenous siRNAs (endo-siRNAs) antisense to germline transcripts and associates with chromatin in a siRNA-dependent manner. However, its role in gene expression regulation remains controversial. Here, we used a genome-wide profiling of nascent RNA transcripts to demonstrate that the CSR-1 RNAi pathway promotes sense-oriented Pol II transcription. Moreover, a loss of CSR-1 function resulted in global increase in antisense transcription and ectopic transcription of silent chromatin domains, which led to reduced chromatin incorporation of centromere-specific histone H3. Based on these findings, we propose that the CSR-1 pathway has a role in maintaining the directionality of active transcription thereby propagating the distinction between transcriptionally active and silent genomic regions. PMID:24681887

  20. Essential loci in centromeric heterochromatin of Drosophila melanogaster. I: the right arm of chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Alistair B; Alm, Christina; Cealiac, Iulia; Sinclair, Don A; Honda, Barry M; Rossi, Fabrizio; Dimitri, Patrizio; Hilliker, Arthur J

    2010-06-01

    With the most recent releases of the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequences, much of the previously absent heterochromatic sequences have now been annotated. We undertook an extensive genetic analysis of existing lethal mutations, as well as molecular mapping and sequence analysis (using a candidate gene approach) to identify as many essential genes as possible in the centromeric heterochromatin on the right arm of the second chromosome (2Rh) of D. melanogaster. We also utilized available RNA interference lines to knock down the expression of genes in 2Rh as another approach to identifying essential genes. In total, we verified the existence of eight novel essential loci in 2Rh: CG17665, CG17683, CG17684, CG17883, CG40127, CG41265, CG42595, and Atf6. Two of these essential loci, CG41265 and CG42595, are synonymous with the previously characterized loci l(2)41Ab and unextended, respectively. The genetic and molecular analysis of the previously reported locus, l(2)41Ae, revealed that this is not a single locus, but rather it is a large region of 2Rh that extends from unextended (CG42595) to CG17665 and includes four of the novel loci uncovered here.

  1. Chromosome segregation regulation in human zygotes: altered mitotic histone phosphorylation dynamics underlying centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Werken, C; Avo Santos, M; Laven, J S E; Eleveld, C; Fauser, B C J M; Lens, S M A; Baart, E B

    2015-10-01

    Are the kinase feedback loops that regulate activation and centromeric targeting of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), functional during mitosis in human embryos? Investigation of the regulatory kinase pathways involved in centromeric CPC targeting revealed normal phosphorylation dynamics of histone H2A at T120 (H2ApT120) by Bub1 kinase and subsequent recruitment of Shugoshin, but phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 (H3pT3) by Haspin failed to show the expected centromeric enrichment on metaphase chromosomes in the zygote. Human cleavage stage embryos show high levels of chromosomal instability. What causes this high error rate is unknown, as mechanisms used to ensure proper chromosome segregation in mammalian embryos are poorly described. In this study, we investigated the pathways regulating CPC targeting to the inner centromere in human embryos. We characterized the distribution of the CPC in relation to activity of its two main centromeric targeting pathways: the Bub1-H2ApT120-Sgo-CPC and Haspin-H3pT3-CPC pathways. The study was conducted between May 2012 and March 2014 on human surplus embryos resulting from in vitro fertilization treatment and donated for research. In zygotes, nuclear envelope breakdown was monitored by time-lapse imaging to allow timed incubations with specific inhibitors to arrest at prometaphase and metaphase, and to interfere with Haspin and Aurora B/C kinase activity. Functionality of the targeting pathways was assessed through characterization of histone phosphorylation dynamics by immunofluorescent analysis, combined with gene expression by RT-qPCR and immunofluorescent localization of key pathway proteins. Immunofluorescent analysis of the CPC subunit Inner Centromere Protein revealed the pool of stably bound CPC proteins was not strictly confined to the inner centromere of prometaphase chromosomes in human zygotes, as observed in later stages of preimplantation development and somatic cells. Investigation of the

  2. Different patterns of evolution in the centromeric and telomeric regions of group A and B haplotypes of the human killer cell Ig-like receptor locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul-Woo Pyo

    Full Text Available The fast evolving human KIR gene family encodes variable lymphocyte receptors specific for polymorphic HLA class I determinants. Nucleotide sequences for 24 representative human KIR haplotypes were determined. With three previously defined haplotypes, this gave a set of 12 group A and 15 group B haplotypes for assessment of KIR variation. The seven gene-content haplotypes are all combinations of four centromeric and two telomeric motifs. 2DL5, 2DS5 and 2DS3 can be present in centromeric and telomeric locations. With one exception, haplotypes having identical gene content differed in their combinations of KIR alleles. Sequence diversity varied between haplotype groups and between centromeric and telomeric halves of the KIR locus. The most variable A haplotype genes are in the telomeric half, whereas the most variable genes characterizing B haplotypes are in the centromeric half. Of the highly polymorphic genes, only the 3DL3 framework gene exhibits a similar diversity when carried by A and B haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates, point to the centromeric gene-content motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes having emerged ~6 million years ago, contemporaneously with the separation of human and chimpanzee ancestors. In contrast, the telomeric motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes emerged more recently, ~1.7 million years ago, before the emergence of Homo sapiens. Thus the centromeric and telomeric motifs that typify A and B haplotypes have likely been present throughout human evolution. The results suggest the common ancestor of A and B haplotypes combined a B-like centromeric region with an A-like telomeric region.

  3. Discovery of a Regulatory Motif for Human Satellite DNA Transcription in Response to BATF2 Overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xuejia; Huang, Wenqiu; Zhang, Chenguang; Niu, Jing; Ding, Wei

    2016-03-01

    One of the basic leucine zipper transcription factors, BATF2, has been found to suppress cancer growth and migration. However, little is known about the genes downstream of BATF2. HeLa cells were stably transfected with BATF2, then chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing was employed to identify the DNA motifs responsive to BATF2. Comprehensive bioinformatics analyses indicated that the most significant motif discovered as TTCCATT[CT]GATTCCATTC[AG]AT was primarily distributed among the chromosome centromere regions and mostly within human type II satellite DNA. Such motifs were able to prime the transcription of type II satellite DNA in a directional and asymmetrical manner. Consistently, satellite II transcription was up-regulated in BATF2-overexpressing cells. The present study provides insight into understanding the role of BATF2 in tumours and the importance of satellite DNA in the maintenance of genomic stability. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Activation of the polyomavirus enhancer by a murine activator protein 1 (AP1) homolog and two contiguous proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, M E; Piette, J; Yaniv, M; Tang, W J; Folk, W R

    1988-01-01

    The polyomavirus enhancer is composed of multiple DNA sequence elements serving as binding sites for proteins present in mouse nuclear extracts that activate transcription and DNA replication. We have identified three such proteins and their binding sites and correlate them with enhancer function. Mutation of nucleotide (nt) 5140 in the enhancer alters the binding site (TGACTAA, nt 5139-5145) for polyomavirus enhancer A binding protein 1 (PEA1), a murine homolog of the human transcription fac...

  5. Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) expression in human and murine atherosclerotic lesions - Activin induces carp in smooth muscle cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waard, Vivian; van Achterberg, Tanja A. E.; Beauchamp, Nicholas J.; Pannekoek, Hans; de Vries, Carlie J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective-Cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP) is a transcription factor-related protein that has been studied most extensively in the heart. In the present study, we investigated the expression and the potential function of CARP in human and murine atherosclerosis. Methods and Results-CARP

  6. Imported rickettsioses : think of murine typhus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, FGH; Gansevoort, RT; Kreeftenberg, HG

    Murine typhus is a disease still prevalent in many parts of the world. Because the incidence in the US and Europe has declined rapidly, physicians in these continents have become unfamiliar with the clinical picture. Murine typhus is associated with significant morbidity and fatalities do occur,

  7. Puerarin Facilitates T-Tubule Development of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ES-CM is one of the promising cell sources for repopulation of damaged myocardium. However, ES-CMs present immature structure, which impairs their integration with host tissue and functional regeneration. This study used murine ES-CMs as an in vitro model of cardiomyogenesis to elucidate the effect of puerarin, the main compound found in the traditional Chinese medicine the herb Radix puerariae, on t-tubule development of murine ES-CMs. Methods: Electron microscope was employed to examine the ultrastructure. The investigation of transverse-tubules (t-tubules was performed by Di-8-ANEPPS staining. Quantitative real-time PCR was utilized to study the transcript level of genes related to t-tubule development. Results: We found that long-term application of puerarin throughout cardiac differentiation improved myofibril array and sarcomeres formation, and significantly facilitated t-tubules development of ES-CMs. The transcript levels of caveolin-3, amphiphysin-2 and junctophinlin-2, which are crucial for the formation and development of t-tubules, were significantly upregulated by puerarin treatment. Furthermore, puerarin repressed the expression of miR-22, which targets to caveolin-3. Conclusion: Our data showed that puerarin facilitates t-tubule development of murine ES-CMs. This might be related to the repression of miR-22 by puerarin and upregulation of Cav3, Bin1 and JP2 transcripts.

  8. Differential gene expression in the murine gastric fundus lacking interstitial cells of Cajal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Sean M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The muscle layers of murine gastric fundus have no interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the myenteric plexus and only possess intramuscular interstitial cells and this tissue does not generate electric slow waves. The absence of intramuscular interstitial cells in W/WV mutants provides a unique opportunity to study the molecular changes that are associated with the loss of these intercalating cells. Method The gene expression profile of the gastric fundus of wild type and W/WV mice was assayed by murine microarray analysis displaying a total of 8734 elements. Queried genes from the microarray analysis were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results Twenty-one genes were differentially expressed in wild type and W/WV mice. Eleven transcripts had 2.0–2.5 fold higher mRNA expression in W/WV gastric fundus when compared to wild type tissues. Ten transcripts had 2.1–3.9 fold lower expression in W/WV mutants in comparison with wild type animals. None of these genes have ever been implicated in any bowel motility function. Conclusions These data provides evidence that several important genes have significantly changed in the murine fundus of W/WV mutants that lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal and have reduced enteric motor neurotransmission.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii chromodomain protein 1 binds to heterochromatin and colocalises with centromeres and telomeres at the nuclear periphery.

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    Mathieu Gissot

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for some of the most deadly parasitic diseases afflicting humans, including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular parasites exhibit a complex life cycle and a coordinated cell cycle-dependant expression program. Their cell division is a coordinated multistep process. How this complex mechanism is organised remains poorly understood. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this study, we provide evidence for a link between heterochromatin, cell division and the compartmentalisation of the nucleus in Toxoplasma gondii. We characterised a T. gondii chromodomain containing protein (named TgChromo1 that specifically binds to heterochromatin. Using ChIP-on-chip on a genome-wide scale, we report TgChromo1 enrichment at the peri-centromeric chromatin. In addition, we demonstrate that TgChromo1 is cell-cycle regulated and co-localised with markers of the centrocone. Through the loci-specific FISH technique for T. gondii, we confirmed that TgChromo1 occupies the same nuclear localisation as the peri-centromeric sequences. CONCLUSION: We propose that TgChromo1 may play a role in the sequestration of chromosomes at the nuclear periphery and in the process of T. gondii cell division.

  10. MHF1-2/CENP-S-X performs distinct roles in centromere metabolism and genetic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Sonali; Osman, Fekret; Feeney, Laura; Lorenz, Alexander; Bryer, Claire; Whitby, Matthew C

    2013-09-11

    The histone-fold proteins Mhf1/CENP-S and Mhf2/CENP-X perform two important functions in vertebrate cells. First, they are components of the constitutive centromere-associated network, aiding kinetochore assembly and function. Second, they work with the FANCM DNA translocase to promote DNA repair. However, it has been unclear whether there is crosstalk between these roles. We show that Mhf1 and Mhf2 in fission yeast, as in vertebrates, serve a dual function, aiding DNA repair/recombination and localizing to centromeres to promote chromosome segregation. Importantly, these functions are distinct, with the former being dependent on their interaction with the FANCM orthologue Fml1 and the latter not. Together with Fml1, they play a second role in aiding chromosome segregation by processing sister chromatid junctions. However, a failure of this activity does not manifest dramatically increased levels of chromosome missegregation due to the Mus81-Eme1 endonuclease, which acts as a failsafe to resolve DNA junctions before the end of mitosis.

  11. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein coding...... regions, the map of transcripts is very complex due to small transcripts from the flanking ends of the transcription unit, the use of multiple start and stop sites for the main transcript, production of multiple functional RNA molecules from the same primary transcript, and RNA molecules made...... by independent transcription from within the unit. In genomic regions separating those that encode proteins or highly abundant RNA molecules with known function, transcripts are generally of low abundance and short-lived. In most of these cases, it is unclear to what extent a function is related to transcription...

  12. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

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    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  13. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

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    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  14. Endogenous pararetrovirus sequences associated with 24 nt small RNAs at the centromeres of Fritillaria imperialis L. (Liliaceae), a species with a giant genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becher, H.; Ma, L.; Kelly, L.J.; Kovařík, Aleš; Leitch, I. J.; Leitch, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 5 (2014), s. 823-833 ISSN 0960-7412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-10057S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : pararetrovirus * Fritillaria imperialis * centromere Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.972, year: 2014

  15. On-line sorting of human chromosomes by centromeric index, and identification of sorted populations by GTG-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, G. A.; Rens, W.; Manders, E.; van Oven, C.; Barendsen, G. W.; Aten, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Using slit-scan flow cytometry, the shape of human metaphase chromosomes, as expressed in their centromeric index (CI), and the DNA content of the chromosomes have been used as parameters in bivariate flow karyotyping. The resolution of the DNA vs CI flow karyogram of the larger chromosomes up to

  16. Lack of independent prognostic and predictive value of centromere 17 copy number changes in breast cancer patients with known HER2 and TOP2A status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Vang; Ejlertsen, Bent; Møller, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    hybridization (FISH) with centromere 17 (CEN-17) and TOP2A was performed on 120 normal breast specimens. The diploid CEN-17 copy number was reduced from the expected two signals in whole nuclei to an average of 1.68 signals per nucleus in cut sections of normal breast. Ploidy levels determined in normal breast...

  17. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1999-01-01

    Co-encapsidation of retroviral RNAs into virus particles allows for the generation of recombinant proviruses through events of template switching during reverse transcription. By use of a forced recombination system based on recombinational rescue of replication- defective primer binding site-imp....... We note that recombination-based rescue of primer binding site knock-out retroviral vectors may constitute a sensitive assay to register putative genetic interactions involving endogenous retroviral RNAs present in cells of various species.......-impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region...... harbouring the supposed RNA dimer-forming cis -elements and (ii) that copackaged retroviral RNAs can recombine despite pronounced sequence dissimilarity at the cross-over site(s) and within parts of the genome involved in RNA dimerization, encapsidation and strand transferring during reverse transcription...

  18. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  19. Transcription profiling suggests that mitochondrial topoisomerase IB acts as a topological barrier and regulator of mitochondrial DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Zhang, Hongliang; Khiati, Salim; Wu, Xiaolin; Pommier, Yves

    2017-12-08

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cell viability because it encodes subunits of the respiratory chain complexes. Mitochondrial topoisomerase IB (TOP1MT) facilitates mtDNA replication by removing DNA topological tensions produced during mtDNA transcription, but it appears to be dispensable. To test whether cells lacking TOP1MT have aberrant mtDNA transcription, we performed mitochondrial transcriptome profiling. To that end, we designed and implemented a customized tiling array, which enabled genome-wide, strand-specific, and simultaneous detection of all mitochondrial transcripts. Our technique revealed that Top1mt KO mouse cells process the mitochondrial transcripts normally but that protein-coding mitochondrial transcripts are elevated. Moreover, we found discrete long noncoding RNAs produced by H-strand transcription and encompassing the noncoding regulatory region of mtDNA in human and murine cells and tissues. Of note, these noncoding RNAs were strongly up-regulated in the absence of TOP1MT. In contrast, 7S DNA, produced by mtDNA replication, was reduced in the Top1mt KO cells. We propose that the long noncoding RNA species in the D-loop region are generated by the extension of H-strand transcripts beyond their canonical stop site and that TOP1MT acts as a topological barrier and regulator for mtDNA transcription and D-loop formation.

  20. GPBAR1/TGR5 mediates bile acid-induced cytokine expression in murine Kupffer cells.

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    Guiyu Lou

    Full Text Available GPBAR1/TGR5 is a novel plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled bile acid (BA receptor. BAs are known to induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver with unknown mechanism. Here we show that without other external stimuli, TGR5 activation alone induced the expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 or murine Kupffer cells. The TGR5-mediated increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was suppressed by JNK inhibition. Moreover, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse liver by 1% cholic acid (CA diet was blunted in JNK-/- mice. TGR5 activation by its ligands enhanced the phosphorylation levels, DNA-binding and trans-activities of c-Jun and ATF2 transcription factors. Finally, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells by TGR5 activation correlated with the suppression of Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1 expression in murine hepatocytes. These results suggest that TGR5 mediates the BA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in murine Kupffer cells through JNK-dependent pathway. This novel role of TGR5 may correlate to the suppression of Cyp7a1 expression in hepatocytes and contribute to the delicate BA feedback regulation.

  1. Two structurally distinct inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase 3 induced centromere positive micronuclei in human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Masayuki; Tanaka, Kenji; Takeiri, Akira; Harada, Asako; Kubo, Chiyomi; Sone, Sachiko; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Tachibana, Yukako; Okazaki, Makoto

    2008-08-25

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is an attractive novel pharmacological target. Inhibition of GSK3 is recently regarded as one of the viable approaches to therapy for Alzheimer's disease, cancer, diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, and bipolar mood disorder. Here, we have investigated the aneugenic potential of two potent and highly specific inhibitors of GSK3 by using an in vitro micronucleus test with human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells. One inhibitor was a newly synthesized maleimide derivative and the other was a previously known aminopyrimidine derivative. Both compounds elicited statistically significant and concentration-dependent increases in micronucleated cells. One hundred micronuclei (MN) of each were analyzed using centromeric DNA staining with fluorescence in situ hybridization. Both the two structurally distinct compounds induced centromere-positive micronuclei (CMN). Calculated from the frequency of MN cells and the percentage of CMN, CMN cell incidence after treatment with the maleimide compound at 1.2 microM, 2.4 microM, and 4.8 microM was 11.6, 27.7, and 56.3 per 1000 cells, respectively; the negative control was 4.5. CMN cell incidence after the treatment with the aminopyrimidine compound at 1.8 microM, 3.6 microM, and 5.4 microM was 6.7, 9.8 and 17.2 per 1000 cells, respectively. Both compounds exhibited concentration-dependent increase in the number of mitotic cells. The frequency of CMN cells correlated well with mitotic cell incidence after treatment with either compound. Furthermore, both inhibitors induced abnormal mitotic cells with asymmetric mitotic spindles and lagging anaphase chromosomes. These results lend further support to the hypothesis that the inhibition of GSK3 activity affects microtubule function and exhibits an aneugenic mode of action.

  2. Transcriptional regulation by competing transcription factor modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Hermsen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks lie at the heart of cellular computation. In these networks, intracellular and extracellular signals are integrated by transcription factors, which control the expression of transcription units by binding to cis-regulatory regions on the DNA. The designs of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cis-regulatory regions are usually highly complex. They frequently consist of both repetitive and overlapping transcription factor binding sites. To unravel the design principles of these promoter architectures, we have designed in silico prokaryotic transcriptional logic gates with predefined input-output relations using an evolutionary algorithm. The resulting cis-regulatory designs are often composed of modules that consist of tandem arrays of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind cooperatively. Moreover, these modules often overlap with each other, leading to competition between them. Our analysis thus identifies a new signal integration motif that is based upon the interplay between intramodular cooperativity and intermodular competition. We show that this signal integration mechanism drastically enhances the capacity of cis-regulatory domains to integrate signals. Our results provide a possible explanation for the complexity of promoter architectures and could be used for the rational design of synthetic gene circuits.

  3. Novel ZBTB24 Mutation Associated with Immunodeficiency, Centromere Instability, and Facial Anomalies Type-2 Syndrome Identified in a Patient with Very Early Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Máire A; Dawany, Noor; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Devoto, Marcella; Kelsen, Judith R

    2017-12-01

    Very early onset inflammatory bowel disease, diagnosed in children ≤5 years old, can be the initial presentation of some primary immunodeficiencies. In this study, we describe a 17-month-old boy with recurrent infections, growth failure, facial anomalies, and inflammatory bowel disease. Immune evaluation, whole-exome sequencing, karyotyping, and methylation array were performed to evaluate the child's constellation of symptoms and examination findings. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the child was homozygous for a novel variant in ZBTB24, the gene associated with immunodeficiency, centromere instability, and facial anomalies type-2 syndrome. This describes the first case of inflammatory bowel disease associated with immunodeficiency, centromere instability, and facial anomalies type-2 syndrome in a child with a novel disease-causing mutation in ZBTB24 found on whole-exome sequencing.

  4. WRKY transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  5. RNA-Interference Components Are Dispensable for Transcriptional Silencing of the Drosophila Bithorax-Complex

    KAUST Repository

    Cernilogar, Filippo M.

    2013-06-13

    Background:Beyond their role in post-transcriptional gene silencing, Dicer and Argonaute, two components of the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, were shown to be involved in epigenetic regulation of centromeric heterochromatin and transcriptional gene silencing. In particular, RNAi mechanisms appear to play a role in repeat induced silencing and some aspects of Polycomb-mediated gene silencing. However, the functional interplay of RNAi mechanisms and Polycomb group (PcG) pathways at endogenous loci remains to be elucidated.Principal Findings:Here we show that the endogenous Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway is dispensable for the PcG mediated silencing of the homeotic Bithorax Complex (BX-C). Although Dicer-2 depletion triggers mild transcriptional activation at Polycomb Response Elements (PREs), this does not induce transcriptional changes at PcG-repressed genes. Moreover, Dicer-2 is not needed to maintain global levels of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 and does not affect PRE-mediated higher order chromatin structures within the BX-C. Finally bioinformatic analysis, comparing published data sets of PcG targets with Argonaute-2-bound small RNAs reveals no enrichment of these small RNAs at promoter regions associated with PcG proteins.Conclusions:We conclude that the Dicer-2/Argonaute-2 RNAi pathway, despite its role in pairing sensitive gene silencing of transgenes, does not have a role in PcG dependent silencing of major homeotic gene cluster loci in Drosophila. © 2013 Cernilogar et al.

  6. Condensin HEAT subunits required for DNA repair, kinetochore/centromere function and ploidy maintenance in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingya Xu

    Full Text Available Condensin, a central player in eukaryotic chromosomal dynamics, contains five evolutionarily-conserved subunits. Two SMC (structural maintenance of chromosomes subunits contain ATPase, hinge, and coiled-coil domains. One non-SMC subunit is similar to bacterial kleisin, and two other non-SMC subunits contain HEAT (similar to armadillo repeats. Here we report isolation and characterization of 21 fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants for three non-SMC subunits, created using error-prone mutagenesis that resulted in single-amino acid substitutions. Beside condensation, segregation, and DNA repair defects, similar to those observed in previously isolated SMC and cnd2 mutants, novel phenotypes were observed for mutants of HEAT-repeats containing Cnd1 and Cnd3 subunits. cnd3-L269P is hypersensitive to the microtubule poison, thiabendazole, revealing defects in kinetochore/centromere and spindle assembly checkpoints. Three cnd1 and three cnd3 mutants increased cell size and doubled DNA content, thereby eliminating the haploid state. Five of these mutations reside in helix B of HEAT repeats. Two non-SMC condensin subunits, Cnd1 and Cnd3, are thus implicated in ploidy maintenance.

  7. Pathogenesis of Candida albicans infections in the alternative chorio-allantoic membrane chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse D Jacobsen

    Full Text Available Alternative models of microbial infections are increasingly used to screen virulence determinants of pathogens. In this study, we investigated the pathogenesis of Candida albicans and C. glabrata infections in chicken embryos infected via the chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM and analyzed the virulence of deletion mutants. The developing immune system of the host significantly influenced susceptibility: With increasing age, embryos became more resistant and mounted a more balanced immune response, characterized by lower induction of proinflammatory cytokines and increased transcription of regulatory cytokines, suggesting that immunopathology contributes to pathogenesis. While many aspects of the chicken embryo response resembled murine infections, we also observed significant differences: In contrast to systemic infections in mice, IL-10 had a beneficial effect in chicken embryos. IL-22 and IL-17A were only upregulated after the peak mortality in the chicken embryo model occurred; thus, the role of the Th17 response in this model remains unclear. Abscess formation occurs frequently in murine models, whereas the avian response was dominated by granuloma formation. Pathogenicity of the majority of 15 tested C. albicans deletion strains was comparable to the virulence in mouse models and reduced virulence was associated with significantly lower transcription of proinflammatory cytokines. However, fungal burden did not correlate with virulence and for few mutants like bcr1Δ and tec1Δ different outcomes in survival compared to murine infections were observed. C. albicans strains locked in the yeast stage disseminated significantly more often from the CAM into the embryo, supporting the hypothesis that the yeast morphology is responsible for dissemination in systemic infections. These data suggest that the pathogenesis of C. albicans infections in the chicken embryo model resembles systemic murine infections but also differs in some aspects. Despite

  8. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in the US

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-21

    Dr. Lucas Blanton discusses the Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston Texas in 2013.  Created: 4/21/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2015.

  9. Angiogenesis gene expression in murine endothelial cells during post-pneumonectomy lung growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konerding Moritz A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although blood vessel growth occurs readily in the systemic bronchial circulation, angiogenesis in the pulmonary circulation is rare. Compensatory lung growth after pneumonectomy is an experimental model with presumed alveolar capillary angiogenesis. To investigate the genes participating in murine neoalveolarization, we studied the expression of angiogenesis genes in lung endothelial cells. After left pneumonectomy, the remaining right lung was examined on days 3, 6, 14 and 21days after surgery and compared to both no surgery and sham thoracotomy controls. The lungs were enzymatically digested and CD31+ endothelial cells were isolated using flow cytometry cell sorting. The transcriptional profile of the CD31+ endothelial cells was assessed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR arrays. Focusing on 84 angiogenesis-associated genes, we identified 22 genes with greater than 4-fold regulation and significantly enhanced transcription (p

  10. Ribosomopathy-like properties of murine and human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheta Kulkarni

    Full Text Available Ribosomopathies comprise a heterogeneous group of hematologic and developmental disorders, often characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal and other developmental abnormalities and cancer predisposition. They are associated with mutations and/or haplo-insufficiencies of ribosomal proteins (RPs and inefficient ribosomal RNA (rRNA processing. The resulting ribosomal stress induces the canonical p19ARF/Mdm2/p53 tumor suppressor pathway leading to proliferative arrest and/or apoptosis. It has been proposed that this pathway is then inactivated during subsequent neoplastic evolution. We show here that two murine models of hepatoblastoma (HB and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC unexpectedly possess features that mimic the ribosomopathies. These include loss of the normal stoichiometry of RP transcripts and proteins and the accumulation of unprocessed rRNA precursors. Silencing of p19ARF, cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, binding to and inactivation of Mdm2 by free RPs, and up-regulation of the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 may further cooperate to drive tumor growth and survival. Consistent with this notion, re-instatement of constitutive p19ARF expression in the HB model completely suppressed tumorigenesis. In >2000 cases of human HCC, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer, RP transcript deregulation was a frequent finding. In HCC and breast cancer, the severity of this dysregulation was associated with inferior survival. In HCC, the presence of RP gene mutations, some of which were identical to those previously reported in ribosomopathies, were similarly negatively correlated with long-term survival. Taken together, our results indicate that many if not all cancers possess ribosomopathy-like features that may affect their biological behaviors.

  11. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in lytic infection of murine gammaherpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68. In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs. Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68.

  12. Detection and Automated Scoring of Dicentric Chromosomes in Nonstimulated Lymphocyte Prematurely Condensed Chromosomes After Telomere and Centromere Staining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M' kacher, Radhia [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); El Maalouf, Elie [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Terzoudi, Georgia [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ricoul, Michelle [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Heidingsfelder, Leonhard [MetaSystems, Altlussheim (Germany); Karachristou, Ionna [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Laplagne, Eric [Pole Concept, Paris (France); Hempel, William M. [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Colicchio, Bruno; Dieterlen, Alain [Laboratoire Modélisation Intelligence Processus Systèmes (MIPS)–Groupe TIIM3D, Université de Haute-Alsace, Mulhouse (France); Pantelias, Gabriel [Laboratory of Radiobiology & Biodosimetry, National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Sabatier, Laure, E-mail: laure.sabatier@cea.fr [Laboratoire de Radiobiologie et Oncologie, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To combine telomere and centromere (TC) staining of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) fusions to identify dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes, making possible the realization of a dose–response curve and automation of the process. Methods and Materials: Blood samples from healthy donors were exposed to {sup 60}Co irradiation at varying doses up to 8 Gy, followed by a repair period of 8 hours. Premature chromosome condensation fusions were carried out, and TC staining using peptide nucleic acid probes was performed. Chromosomal aberration (CA) scoring was carried out manually and automatically using PCC-TCScore software, developed in our laboratory. Results: We successfully optimized the hybridization conditions and image capture parameters, to increase the sensitivity and effectiveness of CA scoring. Dicentrics, centric rings, and acentric chromosomes were rapidly and accurately detected, leading to a linear-quadratic dose–response curve by manual scoring at up to 8 Gy. Using PCC-TCScore software for automatic scoring, we were able to detect 95% of dicentrics and centric rings. Conclusion: The introduction of TC staining to the PCC fusion technique has made possible the rapid scoring of unstable CAs, including dicentrics, with a level of accuracy and ease not previously possible. This new approach can be used for biological dosimetry in radiation emergency medicine, where the rapid and accurate detection of dicentrics is a high priority using automated scoring. Because there is no culture time, this new approach can also be used for the follow-up of patients treated by genotoxic therapy, creating the possibility to perform the estimation of induced chromosomal aberrations immediately after the blood draw.

  13. Cumulus-specific genes are transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer in a mouse model*

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Guo-qing; Heng, Boon-chin; Ng, Soon-chye

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated whether four cumulus-specific genes: follicular stimulating hormone receptor (FSHr), hyaluronan synthase 2 (Has2), prostaglandin synthase 2 (Ptgs2) and steroidogenic acute regulator protein (Star), were correctly reprogrammed to be transcriptionally silent following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in a murine model. Cumulus cells of C57×CBA F1 female mouse were injected into enucleated oocytes, followed by activation in 10 µmol/L strontium chloride for 5 h and sub...

  14. The Cell Cycle Timing of Centromeric Chromatin Assembly in Drosophila Meiosis Is Distinct from Mitosis Yet Requires CAL1 and CENP-C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgescu, Walter; Tang, Jonathan; Costes, Sylvain V.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2012-01-01

    CENP-A (CID in flies) is the histone H3 variant essential for centromere specification, kinetochore formation, and chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent studies have elucidated major cell cycle mechanisms and factors critical for CENP-A incorporation in mitosis, predominantly in cultured cells. However, we do not understand the roles, regulation, and cell cycle timing of CENP-A assembly in somatic tissues in multicellular organisms and in meiosis, the specialized cell division cycle that gives rise to haploid gametes. Here we investigate the timing and requirements for CID assembly in mitotic tissues and male and female meiosis in Drosophila melanogaster, using fixed and live imaging combined with genetic approaches. We find that CID assembly initiates at late telophase and continues during G1 phase in somatic tissues in the organism, later than the metaphase assembly observed in cultured cells. Furthermore, CID assembly occurs at two distinct cell cycle phases during male meiosis: prophase of meiosis I and after exit from meiosis II, in spermatids. CID assembly in prophase I is also conserved in female meiosis. Interestingly, we observe a novel decrease in CID levels after the end of meiosis I and before meiosis II, which correlates temporally with changes in kinetochore organization and orientation. We also demonstrate that CID is retained on mature sperm despite the gross chromatin remodeling that occurs during protamine exchange. Finally, we show that the centromere proteins CAL1 and CENP-C are both required for CID assembly in meiosis and normal progression through spermatogenesis. We conclude that the cell cycle timing of CID assembly in meiosis is different from mitosis and that the efficient propagation of CID through meiotic divisions and on sperm is likely to be important for centromere specification in the developing zygote. PMID:23300382

  15. Generation of an approximately 2.4 Mb human X centromere-based minichromosome by targeted telomere-associated chromosome fragmentation in DT40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, W; Critcher, R; Lee, C; Farr, C J

    1999-05-01

    A linear mammalian artificial chromosome (MAC) will require at least three types of functional element: a centromere, two telomeres and origins of replication. As yet, our understanding of these elements, as well as many other aspects of structure and organization which may be critical for a fully functional mammalian chromosome, remains poor. As a way of defining these various requirements, minichromosome reagents are being developed and analysed. Approaches for minichromosome generation fall into two broad categories: de novo assembly from candidate DNA sequences, or the fragmentation of an existing chromosome to reduce it to a minimal size. Here we describe the generation of a human minichromosome using the latter, top-down, approach. A human X chromosome, present in a DT40-human microcell hybrid, has been manipulated using homologous recombination and the targeted seeding of a de novo telomere. This strategy has generated a linear approximately 2.4 Mb human X centromere-based minichromosome capped by two artificially seeded telomeres: one immediately flanking the centromeric alpha-satellite DNA and the other targeted to the zinc finger gene ZXDA in Xp11.21. The chromosome retains an alpha-satellite domain of approximately 1. 8 Mb, a small array of gamma-satellite repeat ( approximately 40 kb) and approximately 400 kb of Xp proximal DNA sequence. The mitotic stability of this minichromosome has been examined, both in DT40 and following transfer into hamster and human cell lines. In all three backgrounds, the minichromosome is retained efficiently, but in the human and hamster microcell hybrids its copy number is poorly regulated. This approach of engineering well-defined chromosome reagents will allow key questions in MAC development (such as whether a lower size limit exists) to be addressed. In addition, the 2.4 Mb minichromosome described here has potential to be developed as a vector for gene delivery.

  16. Plant-Derived Transcription Factors for Orthologous Regulation of Gene Expression in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Gita; Balazadeh, Salma; Machens, Fabian; Kamranfar, Iman; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2017-09-15

    Control of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is central in many synthetic biology projects for which a tailored expression of one or multiple genes is often needed. As TFs from evolutionary distant organisms are unlikely to affect gene expression in a host of choice, they represent excellent candidates for establishing orthogonal control systems. To establish orthogonal regulators for use in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), we chose TFs from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We established a library of 106 different combinations of chromosomally integrated TFs, activation domains (yeast GAL4 AD, herpes simplex virus VP64, and plant EDLL) and synthetic promoters harboring cognate cis-regulatory motifs driving a yEGFP reporter. Transcriptional output of the different driver/reporter combinations varied over a wide spectrum, with EDLL being a considerably stronger transcription activation domain in yeast than the GAL4 activation domain, in particular when fused to Arabidopsis NAC TFs. Notably, the strength of several NAC-EDLL fusions exceeded that of the strong yeast TDH3 promoter by 6- to 10-fold. We furthermore show that plant TFs can be used to build regulatory systems encoded by centromeric or episomal plasmids. Our library of TF-DNA binding site combinations offers an excellent tool for diverse synthetic biology applications in yeast.

  17. [Expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 during murine mandibular first molar development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Chen, Zhi; Song, Guang-tai; Fan, Ming-wen; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zhi-feng

    2003-11-01

    To observe the expression of homeobox gene Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 during murine mandibular first molar development. The murine heads or mandibles on embryonic days 11-18 (E11-18) and postnatal day 1-3 (P1-3) were removed, fixed and embedded, 5 micro m serial sections were cut in the coronal plane. Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 RNA probes were synthesized by in vitro transcription and labeled with digoxigenin. Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 mRNA expression was observed after in situ hybridization. During molar development Msx-1 transcripts appeared only in mesenchymal cells, not in epithelial cells. Msx-2 and Dlx-2 both expressed in the epithelial and mesenchymal cells. At the initiation stage of the molar development Msx-2 and Dlx-2 had similar expression. At the bud stage (E13-14) Msx-2 mRNA signaling was intensive in the enamel organ and slight in the dental mesenchyme; Dlx-2 signaling was stronger in the dental papilla. At cap stage (E15-16) Msx-2 showed prominent mRNA signaling in enamel knot and Dlx-2 was maximal in the dental papilla. At the late bell stage (P2-3) Msx-2 transcripts were observed in odontoblasts but not labeled in ameloblasts, and Dlx-2 transcripts appeared in ameloblasts but no labeling was seen in odontoblasts. Msx-1, Msx-2 and Dlx-2 are expressed in various patterns during murine mandibular first molar development, suggesting they possibly play a role in the interaction between the epithelium and mesenchyme during the molar development.

  18. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  19. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  20. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Y Choi

    Full Text Available Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30 showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3 were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5 in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs

  1. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ... Show The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophage

  2. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  3. Transcriptional profiling reveals gland-specific differential expression in the three major salivary glands of the adult mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Oei, Maria S; Ovitt, Catherine E; Sincan, Murat; Melvin, James E

    2018-04-01

    RNA-Seq was used to better understand the molecular nature of the biological differences among the three major exocrine salivary glands in mammals. Transcriptional profiling found that the adult murine parotid, submandibular, and sublingual salivary glands express greater than 14,300 protein-coding genes, and nearly 2,000 of these genes were differentially expressed. Principle component analysis of the differentially expressed genes revealed three distinct clusters according to gland type. The three salivary gland transcriptomes were dominated by a relatively few number of highly expressed genes (6.3%) that accounted for more than 90% of transcriptional output. Of the 912 transcription factors expressed in the major salivary glands, greater than 90% of them were detected in all three glands, while expression for ~2% of them was enriched in an individual gland. Expression of these unique transcription factors correlated with sublingual and parotid specific subsets of both highly expressed and differentially expressed genes. Gene ontology analyses revealed that the highly expressed genes common to all glands were associated with global functions, while many of the genes expressed in a single gland play a major role in the function of that gland. In summary, transcriptional profiling of the three murine major salivary glands identified a limited number of highly expressed genes, differentially expressed genes, and unique transcription factors that represent the transcriptional signatures underlying gland-specific biological properties.

  4. Basal transcription machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-29

    Mar 29, 2007 ... The holoenzyme of prokaryotic RNA polymerase consists of the core enzyme, made of two , , ' and subunits, which lacks promoter selectivity and a sigma () subunit which enables the core enzyme to initiate transcription in a promoter dependent fashion. A stress sigma factor s, in prokaryotes ...

  5. Machine Dictation and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Evelyn; And Others

    This instructional package contains both an instructor's manual and a student's manual for a course in machine dictation and transcription. The instructor's manual contains an overview with tips on teaching the course, letters for dictation, and a key to the letters. The student's manual contains an overview of the course and of the skills needed…

  6. Transcriptional Regulation in Haematopoiesis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Felicia K B

    with the capacity to both self-renew and differentiate. This thesis is built upon two studies, which investigate two different aspects of the haematopoietic system; heterogeneity within the HSC compartment (presented in manuscript I), and the interplay between transcription factors controlling granulocyte/ monocyte...

  7. Crystallographic analysis of murine constitutive androstane receptor ligand-binding domain complexed with 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, Jeremy; Shan, Li; Fan, Ming; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Forman, Barry M.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2004-01-01

    The purification and structure determination of the murine constitutive androstane receptor bound to its inverse agonist/antagonist androstenol is described. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In contrast to classical nuclear receptors, which possess small-molecule ligand-inducible activity, CAR exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity in the apparent absence of ligand. CAR is among the most important transcription factors; it coordinately regulates the expression of microsomal cytochrome P450 genes and other drug-metabolizing enzymes. The murine CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) was coexpressed with the steroid receptor coactivator protein (SRC-1) receptor-interacting domain (RID) in Escherichia coli. The mCAR LBD subunit was purified away from SRC-1 by affinity, anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, crystallized with androstenol and the structure of the complex determined by molecular replacement

  8. Identification and characterization of a silencer regulatory element in the 3'-flanking region of the murine CD46 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, M; Tsujimura, A; Begum, N A; Matsumoto, M; Wabiko, H; Toyoshima, K; Seya, T

    2000-01-01

    The murine membrane cofactor protein (CD46) gene is expressed exclusively in testis, in contrast to human CD46, which is expressed ubiquitously. To elucidate the mechanism of differential CD46 gene expression among species, we cloned entire murine CD46 genomic DNA and possible regulatory regions were placed in the flanking region of the luciferase reporter gene. The reporter gene assay revealed a silencing activity not in the promoter, but in the 3'-flanking region of the gene and the silencer-like element was identified within a 0.2-kb region between 0.6 and 0.8 kb downstream of the stop codon. This silencer-like element was highly similar to that of the pig MHC class-I gene. The introduction of a mutation into this putative silencer element of murine CD46 resulted in an abrogation of the silencing effect. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay indicated the presence of the binding molecule(s) for this silencer sequence in murine cell lines and tissues. A size difference of the protein-silencer-element complex was observed depending upon the solubilizers used for preparation of the nuclear extracts. A mutated silencer sequence failed to interact with the binding molecules. The level of the binding factor was lower in the testicular germ cells compared with other organs. Thus the silencer element and its binding factor may play a role in transcriptional regulation of murine CD46 gene expression. These results imply that the effects of the CD46 silencer element encompass the innate immune and reproductive systems, and in mice may determine the testicular germ-cell-dominant expression of CD46. PMID:11023821

  9. Human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes express a distinct RNA profile compared to human control and murine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulzewsky, Frank; Arora, Sonali; de Witte, Lot; Ulas, Thomas; Markovic, Darko; Schultze, Joachim L; Holland, Eric C; Synowitz, Michael; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-08-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive brain tumor in adults. It is strongly infiltrated by microglia and peripheral monocytes that support tumor growth. In the present study we used RNA sequencing to compare the expression profile of CD11b(+) human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes (hGAMs) to CD11b(+) microglia isolated from non-tumor samples. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis showed a clear separation of the two sample groups and we identified 334 significantly regulated genes in hGAMs. In comparison to human control microglia hGAMs upregulated genes associated with mitotic cell cycle, cell migration, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix organization. We validated the expression of several genes associated with extracellular matrix organization in samples of human control microglia, hGAMs, and the hGAMs-depleted fraction via qPCR. The comparison to murine GAMs (mGAMs) showed that both cell populations share a significant fraction of upregulated transcripts compared with their respective controls. These genes were mostly related to mitotic cell cycle. However, in contrast to murine cells, human GAMs did not upregulate genes associated to immune activation. Comparison of human and murine GAMs expression data to several data sets of in vitro-activated human macrophages and murine microglia showed that, in contrast to mGAMs, hGAMs share a smaller overlap to these data sets in general and in particular to cells activated by proinflammatory stimulation with LPS + INFγ or TNFα. Our findings provide new insights into the biology of human glioblastoma-associated microglia/monocytes and give detailed information about the validity of murine experimental models. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2016;64:1416-1436. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Identification of distal silencing elements in the murine interferon-A11 gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffet, P; Lopez, S; Navarro, S; Bandu, M T; Coulombel, C; Vignal, M; Doly, J; Vodjdani, G

    1996-08-01

    The murine interferon-A11 (Mu IFN-A11) gene is a member of the IFN-A multigenic family. In mouse L929 cells, the weak response of the gene's promoter to viral induction is due to a combination of both a point mutation in the virus responsive element (VRE) and the presence of negatively regulating sequences surrounding the VRE. In the distal part of the promoter, the negatively acting E1E2 sequence was delimited. This sequence displays an inhibitory effect in either orientation or position on the inducibility of a virus-responsive heterologous promoter. It selectively represses VRE-dependent transcription but is not able to reduce the transcriptional activity of a VRE-lacking promoter. In a transient transfection assay, an E1E2-containing DNA competitor was able to derepress the native Mu IFN-A11 promoter. Specific nuclear factors bind to this sequence; thus the binding of trans-regulators participates in the repression of the Mu IFN-A11 gene. The E1E2 sequence contains an IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. Recombinant IRF2 binds this sequence and anti-IRF2 antibodies supershift a major complex formed with nuclear extracts. The protein composing the complex is 50 kDa in size, indicating the presence of IRF2 or antigenically related proteins in the complex. The Mu IFN-A11 gene is the first example within the murine IFN-A family, in which a distal promoter element has been identified that can negatively modulate the transcriptional response to viral induction.

  11. Increased Cerebral Tff1 Expression in Two Murine Models of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva B Znalesniak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF1 is a typical secretory product of the gastric mucosa and a very low level of expression occurs in nearly all regions of the murine brain. TFF1 possesses a lectin activity and binding to a plethora of transmembrane glycoproteins could explain the diverse biological effects of TFF1 (e.g., anti-apoptotic effect. It was the aim to test whether TFF expression is changed during neuroinflammation. Methods: Expression profiling was performed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses in two murine models of neuroinflammation, i.e. Toxoplasma gondii-induced encephalitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the latter being the most common animal model of multiple sclerosis. Tff1 expression was also localized using RNA in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results: We report for the first time on a significant transcriptional induction in cerebral Tff1 expression in both T. gondii-induced encephalitis and EAE. In contrast, Tff2 and Tff3 expression were not altered. Tff1 transcripts were predominantly localized in the internal granular layer of the cerebellum indicating neuronal expression. Furthermore, also glial cells are expected to express Tff1. Characterization of both experimental models by expression profiling (e.g., inflammasome sensors, inflammatory cytokines, microglial marker Iba1, ependymin related protein 1 revealed differences concerning the expression of the inflammasome sensor Nlrp1 and interleukin 17a. Conclusion: The up-regulated expression of Tff1 is probably the result of a complex inflammatory process as its expression is induced by tumor necrosis factor α as well as interleukins 1β and 17. However on the transcript level, Tff1KO mice did not show any significant signs of an altered immune response after infection with T. gondii in comparison with the wild type animals.

  12. Dicentric chromosome aberration analysis using giemsa and centromere specific fluorescence in-situ hybridization for biological dosimetry: An inter- and intra-laboratory comparison in Indian laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhavani, M.; Tamizh Selvan, G.; Kaur, Harpreet; Adhikari, J.S.; Vijayalakshmi, J.; Venkatachalam, P.; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate efficient handling of large samples, an attempt towards networking of laboratories in India for biological dosimetry was carried out. Human peripheral blood samples were exposed to 60 Co γ-radiation for ten different doses (0–5 Gy) at a dose rate of 0.7 and 2 Gy/min. The chromosomal aberrations (CA) were scored in Giemsa-stained and fluorescence in-situ hybridization with centromere-specific probes. No significant difference (p>0.05) was observed in the CA yield for given doses except 4 and 5 Gy, between the laboratories, among the scorers and also staining methods adapted suggest the reliability and validates the inter-lab comparisons exercise for triage applications. - Highlights: • This is the first report from India on Networking for Biological Dosimetry preparedness using dicentric chromosomal (DC) aberration assay. • There is no significant difference in the in vitro dose response curve (Slope, Intercept, Curvature) constructed among the two labs. • No significant variation in the scoring of DC aberrations between the scorers irrespective of labs. • The DC results obtained by the labs from the Giemsa stained metaphase preparations were confirmed with centromere specific-FISH for further reliability and validity

  13. In vivo regulation of gene transcription by alpha- and gamma-Tocopherol in murine T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of the 8 different analogues (alpha-, beta-, gamma-, delta-tocopherols and tocotrienols) designated as vitamin E, alpha-tocopherol (a-T) has been mostly studied, together with gamma-tocopherol (g-T) which is abundant in the US diet. We compared the effect of dietary supplementation with adequate or ...

  14. The immediate and late effects of thyroid hormone (triiodothyronine) on murine coagulation gene transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salloum-Asfar, Salam; Boelen, Anita; Reitsma, Pieter H.; van Vlijmen, Bart J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid dysfunction is associated with changes in coagulation. The aim of our study was to gain more insight into the role of thyroid hormone in coagulation control. C57Black/6J mice received a low-iodine diet and drinking water supplemented with perchlorate to suppress endogenous triiodothyronine

  15. Isolation of Blastomyces dermatitidis yeast from lung tissue during murine infection for in vivo transcriptional profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Marty, Amber J.; Wüthrich, Marcel; Carmen, John C.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Klein, Bruce S.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Gauthier, Gregory M.

    2013-01-01

    B. dermatitidis belongs to a group of thermally dimorphic fungi that grow as sporulating mold in the soil and convert to pathogenic yeast in the lung following inhalation of spores. Knowledge about the molecular events important for fungal adaptation and survival in the host remains limited. The development of high-throughput analytic tools such as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) has potential to provide novel insight on fungal pathogenesis especially if applied in vivo during infection. However, in...

  16. Azithromycin prophylaxis and treatment of murine toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Hammouda, Ehab; Tawfik, Abdulkader; Al-Omar, Othman M; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the azithromycin effects alone and in combination with other agents in the prophylaxis and treatment of murine toxoplasmosis. A total of 280 BALB/c mice were included, and 2 x 103 Toxoplasma organisms of the RH strain Toxoplasma gondii strain ATCC50174 were given intraperitoneally to each mouse. In experiment one, 40 animals were given azithromycin 200 milligram/kilogram/daily for 3 days starting the day of inoculation, 40 mice were control. In experiment 2, the treatment was started 48 hours after inoculation and given daily for 3 days: one group received azithromycin 200 milligram/kilogram/day, the second group received pyrimethamine 25 milligram/kilogram/day, and the sulfadiazine 100 milligram/kilogram/day. The third group was control. In experiment 3, 7 groups of animals received one of the following (1) none, (2) azithromycin 200 milligram/kilogram/day, (3) pyrimethamine 25 milligram/kilogram/day and sulfadiazine 100 milligram/kilogram/day, (4) azithromycin and sulfadiazine, (5) azithromycin and pyrimethamine, (6) azithromycin with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine, (7) sulfadiazine alone. Treatment was initiated 72 hours after inoculation for 3 days. The study was conducted at the Animal Care Facility of King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Animals that received azithromycin simultaneously with inoculation survived, and all control animals died. All animals died in groups receiving single drug therapy. Animals treated with azithromycin and sulfadiazine showed a survival rate of 40%, sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine 40%, or azithromycin with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine 95% (p<0.0001). Azithromycin alone was found to be effective in the prophylaxis of murine toxoplasmosis. Combination therapy was effective in the treatment of murine toxoplasmosis.

  17. Efficacy of posaconazole in murine experimental sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2012-05-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology.

  18. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  19. Characterization of E2F8, a novel E2F-like cell-cycle regulated repressor of E2F-activated transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jesper; Cloos, Paul; Toftegaard, Ulla

    2005-01-01

    The E2F family of transcription factors are downstream effectors of the retinoblastoma protein, pRB, pathway and are essential for the timely regulation of genes necessary for cell-cycle progression. Here we describe the characterization of human and murine E2F8, a new member of the E2F family...

  20. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  1. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    The myriad of cells in the human body are all made from the same blueprint: the human genome. At the heart of this diversity lies the concept of gene regulation, the process in which it is decided which genes are used where and when. Genes do not function as on/off buttons, but more like a volume...... mostly near the start of the gene known as the promoter. This region contains patterns scattered in the DNA that the TFs can recognize and bind to. Such binding can prompt the assembly of the pre-initiation complex which ultimately leads to transcription of the gene. In order to achieve the regulation...... on what characterizes a hippocampus promoter. Pairing CAGE with TF binding site prediction we identi¿ed a likely key regulator of hippocampus. Finally, we developed a method for CAGE exploration. While the DeepCAGE library characterized a full 1.4 million transcription initiation events it did not capture...

  2. Regulation of Murine Natural Killer Cell Commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Huntington

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available NK cells can derive from the same precursors as B and T cells, however to achieve lineage specificity, several transcription factors need to be activated or annulled. While a few important transcription factors have identified for NK genesis the mechanisms of how this is achieved is far from resolved. Adding to the complexity of this, NK cells are found and potentially develop in diverse locations in vivo and it remains to be addressed if a common NK cell precursor seeds diverse niches and how transcription factors may differentially regulate NK cell commitment in distinct microenvironments. Here we will summarise some recent findings in NK cell commitment and discuss how a NK cell transcriptional network might be organised, while addressing some misconceptions and anomalies along the way.

  3. Enhancers Are Major Targets for Murine Leukemia Virus Vector Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ravin, Suk See; Su, Ling; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Macpherson, Janet L.; Poidinger, Michael; Symonds, Geoff; Pond, Susan M.; Ferris, Andrea L.; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviral vectors have been used in successful gene therapies. However, in some patients, insertional mutagenesis led to leukemia or myelodysplasia. Both the strong promoter/enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors and the vector-specific integration site preferences played an important role in these adverse clinical events. MLV integration is known to prefer regions in or near transcription start sites (TSS). Recently, BET family proteins were shown to be the major cellular proteins responsible for targeting MLV integration. Although MLV integration sites are significantly enriched at TSS, only a small fraction of the MLV integration sites (integration map of more than one million integration sites from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a clinically relevant MLV-based vector. The integration sites form ∼60,000 tight clusters. These clusters comprise ∼1.9% of the genome. The vast majority (87%) of the integration sites are located within histone H3K4me1 islands, a hallmark of enhancers. The majority of these clusters also have H3K27ac histone modifications, which mark active enhancers. The enhancers of some oncogenes, including LMO2, are highly preferred targets for integration without in vivo selection. IMPORTANCE We show that active enhancer regions are the major targets for MLV integration; this means that MLV preferentially integrates in regions that are favorable for viral gene expression in a variety of cell types. The results provide insights for MLV integration target site selection and also explain the high risk of insertional mutagenesis that is associated with gene therapy trials using MLV vectors. PMID:24501411

  4. Transcriptional networks controlling adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, R; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    " of the transcription factor networks operating at specific time points during adipogenesis. Using such global "snapshots," we have demonstrated that dramatic remodeling of the chromatin template occurs within the first few hours following adipogenic stimulation and that many of the early transcription factors bind...... in a cooperative fashion to transcription factor hotspots. Such hotspots are likely to represent key chromatin nodes, where many adipogenic signaling pathways converge to drive the adipogenic transcriptional reprogramming....

  5. V-cbl, an oncogene from a dual-recombinant murine retrovirus that induces early B-lineage lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, W.Y.; Klinken, S.P.; Hartley, J.W.; Morse, H.C. III; Ruscetti, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    Cas NS-1 is an acutely transforming murine retrovirus that induces pre-B and pro-B cell lymphomas. Molecular cloning showed it was generated from the ecotropic Cas-Br-M virus by sequential recombinations with endogenous retroviral sequences and a cellular oncogene. The oncogene sequence shows no homology with known oncogenes but some similarity to the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4. A 100-kDa gag-cbl fusion protein, with no detectable kinase activity, is responsible for the cellular transformation. The cellular homologue of v-cbl, present in mouse and human DNA, is expressed in a range of hemopoietic lineages

  6. [Virulence of Sporothrix globosa in murine models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Pérez Gaete, Salomón; Rodríguez Badilla, Valentina; Vieille Oyarzo, Peggy; Opazo Sanchez, Héctor

    The sporothricosis disease is an infection caused by species included in Sporothrix schenkii complex. Verify the virulence of a strain of S. globosa using two different concentrations of inoculum by intraperitoneally and subcutaneously, into a mouse model. Nonrandomized pilot study, in murine inoculated with a strain of S. globosa (CBS 14.076M) by intraperitoneally and subcutaneously with inoculum concentrations of 0.5 and 4 McFarland. For this purpose 18 rodents CF-1 (ISP, Santiago, Chile) were used. The studied strain did not induce illness or injury on animals, they all survived and neither the tissue culture nor the histopathological analysis showed fungal growth or suggestive infection by organ abnormalities. The S. globosa strain did not present any virulence enough to cause disease at 0.5 and 4.0 McFarland concentration inoculum when inoculated in both intraperitoneally and subcutaneously, in murine models. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Potent and reversible lentiviral vector restriction in murine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geis, Franziska K; Galla, Melanie; Hoffmann, Dirk; Kuehle, Johannes; Zychlinski, Daniela; Maetzig, Tobias; Schott, Juliane W; Schwarzer, Adrian; Goffinet, Christine; Goff, Stephen P; Schambach, Axel

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral vectors are derived from wild-type retroviruses, can be used to study retrovirus-host interactions and are effective tools in gene and cell therapy. However, numerous cell types are resistant or less permissive to retrovirus infection due to the presence of active defense mechanisms, or the absence of important cellular host co-factors. In contrast to multipotent stem cells, pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. Much remains to be elucidated in the field of anti-viral immunity in stem cells, especially in PSC. In this study, we report that transduction with HIV-1-based, lentiviral vectors (LV) is impaired in murine PSC. Analyses of early retroviral events in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) revealed that the restriction is independent of envelope choice and does not affect reverse transcription, but perturbs nuclear entry and proviral integration. Proteasomal inhibition by MG132 could not circumvent the restriction. However, prevention of cyclophilin A (CypA) binding to the HIV-1 capsid via use of either a CypA inhibitor (cyclosporine A) or CypA-independent capsid mutants improved transduction. In addition, application of higher vector doses also increased transduction. Our data revealed a CypA mediated restriction in iPSC, which was acquired during reprogramming, associated with pluripotency and relieved upon subsequent differentiation. We showed that murine PSC and iPSC are less susceptible to LV. The block observed in iPSC was CypA-dependent and resulted in reduced nuclear entry of viral DNA and proviral integration. Our study helps to improve transduction of murine pluripotent cells with HIV-1-based vectors and contributes to our understanding of retrovirus-host interactions in PSC.

  8. SMC Progressively Aligns Chromosomal Arms in Caulobacter crescentus but Is Antagonized by Convergent Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngat T. Tran

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC complex plays an important role in chromosome organization and segregation in most living organisms. In Caulobacter crescentus, SMC is required to align the left and the right arms of the chromosome that run in parallel down the long axis of the cell. However, the mechanism of SMC-mediated alignment of chromosomal arms remains elusive. Here, using genome-wide methods and microscopy of single cells, we show that Caulobacter SMC is recruited to the centromeric parS site and that SMC-mediated arm alignment depends on the chromosome-partitioning protein ParB. We provide evidence that SMC likely tethers the parS-proximal regions of the chromosomal arms together, promoting arm alignment. Furthermore, we show that highly transcribed genes near parS that are oriented against SMC translocation disrupt arm alignment, suggesting that head-on transcription interferes with SMC translocation. Our results demonstrate a tight interdependence of bacterial chromosome organization and global patterns of transcription.

  9. Clearance of 131I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody from patients' blood by intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.S.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hird, V.; Davies, K.A.; Walport, M.; Ritter, M.A.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Five patients treated with intraperitoneal 131I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody for ovarian cancer also received i.v. exogenous polyclonal human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. The pharmacokinetics of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in these patients were compared with those of 28 other patients receiving i.p.-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody for the first time without exogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin, and who had no preexisting endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Patients receiving i.v. human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody demonstrated a rapid clearance of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody from their circulation. The (mean) maximum 131I blood content was 11.4% of the injected activity in patients receiving human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody compared to 23.3% in patients not given human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody decreased the radiation dose to bone marrow (from 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in the vascular compartment) 4-fold. Following the injection of human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody, 131I-monoclonal/human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody immune complexes were rapidly transported to the liver. Antibody dehalogenation in the liver was rapid, with 87% of the injected 131I excreted in 5 days. Despite the efficient hepatic uptake of immune complexes, dehalogenation of monoclonal antibody was so rapid that the radiation dose to liver parenchyma from circulating 131I was decreased 4-fold rather than increased. All patients developed endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody 2 to 3 weeks after treatment

  10. Immunomodulatory Effects of Deokgu Thermomineral Water Balneotherapy on Oxazolone-Induced Atopic Dermatitis Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sae Mi; Lee, Kyung Ho; Han, Hyung Jin; Yu, Dong Soo; Woo, So Youn; Yun, Seong Taek; Hamm, Se-Yeong; Kim, Hong Jig; Kim, Jin-Wou

    2016-04-01

    Although the therapeutic mechanism of balneotherapy for atopic dermatitis has not been clarified, many atopic patients who visit thermomineral springs have shown clinical improvements. This study was aimed to evaluate the immunomodulatory effect of thermomineral water balneotherapy on the atopic dermatitis murine model. The oxazolone-induced atopic dermatitis murine model was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of balneotherapy with Deokgu thermomineral water compared with distilled water. Histologic evaluation and confocal microscopic imaging were performed to analyze the lesional expression of cluster-of-differentiation (CD)4 and forkhead box p3 (Foxp3). Lesional mRNA expression of interleukin (IL) 33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), and Foxp3 was evaluated by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the distilled water bath group, confocal microscopic evaluation of CD4 and Foxp3 merged images showed increased expression of regulatory T cells in the thermomineral balneotherapy group. The lesional mRNA level of IL-33 showed a reduced trend in the thermomineral balneotherapy group, whereas the level of mRNA of Foxp3 was increased. TSLP showed a decreased trend in both distilled water and thermomineral water bath groups. There was a trend of reduced expression in lesional IL-33 mRNA but increased cell count of CD4(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in thermomineral balneotherapy compared with distilled water bath. Therefore, thermomineral balneotherapy can be an effective and safe adjuvant therapeutic option for atopic dermatitis.

  11. Exploring cellular memory molecules marking competent and active transcriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu De-Pei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development in higher eukaryotes involves programmed gene expression. Cell type-specific gene expression is established during this process and is inherited in succeeding cell cycles. Higher eukaryotes have evolved elegant mechanisms by which committed gene-expression states are transmitted through numerous cell divisions. Previous studies have shown that both DNase I-sensitive sites and the basal transcription factor TFIID remain on silenced mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that certain trans-factors might act as bookmarks, maintaining the information and transmitting it to the next generation. Results We used the mouse globin gene clusters as a model system to examine the retention of active information on M-phase chromosomes and its contribution to the persistence of transcriptional competence of these gene clusters in murine erythroleukemia cells. In cells arrested in mitosis, the erythroid-specific activator NF-E2p45 remained associated with its binding sites on the globin gene loci, while the other major erythroid factor, GATA-1, was removed from chromosome. Moreover, despite mitotic chromatin condensation, the distant regulatory regions and promoters of transcriptionally competent globin gene loci are marked by a preserved histone code consisting in active histone modifications such as H3 acetylation, H3-K4 dimethylation and K79 dimethylation. Further analysis showed that other active genes are also locally marked by the preserved active histone code throughout mitotic inactivation of transcription. Conclusion Our results imply that certain kinds of specific protein factors and active histone modifications function as cellular memory markers for both competent and active genes during mitosis, and serve as a reactivated core for the resumption of transcription when the cells exit mitosis.

  12. H4 histamine receptors mediate cell cycle arrest in growth factor-induced murine and human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-France Petit-Bertron

    Full Text Available The most recently characterized H4 histamine receptor (H4R is expressed preferentially in the bone marrow, raising the question of its role during hematopoiesis. Here we show that both murine and human progenitor cell populations express this receptor subtype on transcriptional and protein levels and respond to its agonists by reduced growth factor-induced cell cycle progression that leads to decreased myeloid, erythroid and lymphoid colony formation. H4R activation prevents the induction of cell cycle genes through a cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway that is not associated with apoptosis. It is mediated specifically through H4R signaling since gene silencing or treatment with selective antagonists restores normal cell cycle progression. The arrest of growth factor-induced G1/S transition protects murine and human progenitor cells from the toxicity of the cell cycle-dependent anticancer drug Ara-C in vitro and reduces aplasia in a murine model of chemotherapy. This first evidence for functional H4R expression in hematopoietic progenitors opens new therapeutic perspectives for alleviating hematotoxic side effects of antineoplastic drugs.

  13. Anatomy and Histology of the Human and Murine Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael

    2018-05-01

    The human and murine prostate glands have similar functional roles in the generation of seminal fluid to assist in reproduction. There are significant differences in the anatomy and histology of murine and human prostate and knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the murine prostate is essential to interpreting changes in genetically engineered mouse models. In this review, the normal anatomy and histology of both human and mouse prostate will be described. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Murine leukemia viruses: objects and organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) are among the simplest retroviruses. Prototypical gammaretroviruses encode only the three polyproteins that will be used in the assembly of progeny virus particles. These are the Gag polyprotein, which is the structural protein of a retrovirus particle, the Pol protein, comprising the three retroviral enzymes-protease, which catalyzes the maturation of the particle, reverse transcriptase, which copies the viral RNA into DNA upon infection of a new host cell, and integrase, which inserts the DNA into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell, and the Env polyprotein, which induces the fusion of the viral membrane with that of the new host cell, initiating infection. In general, a productive MLV infection has no obvious effect upon host cells. Although gammaretroviral structure and replication follow the same broad outlines as those of other retroviruses, we point out a number of significant differences between different retroviral genera.

  15. Proliferative capacity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, S.; Botnick, L.E.; Hannon, E.C.; Vigneulle, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a decrease in self-renewal capacity with serial transfer of murine hematopoietic stem cells. Production of differentiated cell progeny is maintained longer than stem cell self-renewal. In normal animals the capacity for self-renewal is not decreased with increasing donor age. The stem cell compartment in normal animals, both young and old, appears to be proliferatively quiescent. After apparent recovery from the alkylating agent busulfan, the probability of stem cell self-renewal is decreased, there is a permanent defect in the capacity of the bone marrow for serial transplantation, and the stem cells are proliferatively active. These findings support a model of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as a continuum of cells with decreasing capacities for self-renewal, increasing likelihood for differentiation, and increasing proliferative activity. Cells progress in the continuum in one direction and such progression is not reversible

  16. Transcript structure and domain display: a customizable transcript visualization tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenneth A; Ma, Kaiwang; Homayouni, Arielle; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-07-01

    Transcript Structure and Domain Display (TSDD) is a publicly available, web-based program that provides publication quality images of transcript structures and domains. TSDD is capable of producing transcript structures from GFF/GFF3 and BED files. Alternatively, the GFF files of several model organisms have been pre-loaded so that users only needs to enter the locus IDs of the transcripts to be displayed. Visualization of transcripts provides many benefits to researchers, ranging from evolutionary analysis of DNA-binding domains to predictive function modeling. TSDD is freely available for non-commercial users at http://shenlab.sols.unlv.edu/shenlab/software/TSD/transcript_display.html : jeffery.shen@unlv.nevada.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Murine model of long term obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A.; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of 3 murine models of obstructive jaundice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Results 70% (7/10) of tCL mice died by Day 7, whereas majority 67% (10/15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. 19% (3/16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond Day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 days after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by Day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension as well as severe fibrosis by Day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. Conclusion The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice but long term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. PMID:27916350

  18. Formation and maturation of the murine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Xiang, Lin; Rosen, Vicki

    2017-08-01

    Meniscal injuries are commonplace, but current surgical repair procedures do not prevent degenerative joint changes that occur after meniscal injury and often lead to osteoarthritis. Successful tissue regeneration in adults often recapitulates events that occur during embryogenesis, suggesting that understanding the regulatory pathways controlling these early processes may provide clues for developing strategies for tissue repair. While the mouse is now widely used to study joint diseases, detailed knowledge of the basic biology of murine meniscus is not readily available. Here, we examine meniscal morphogenesis in mice from embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) to 6 months of age using histology, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. We find that the meniscus is a morphologically distinct structure at E16 when it begins to regionalize. At birth, the meniscus has a distinguishable inner, avascular, round chondrocyte cell region, an outer, vascularized, fibroblast cell region, and a surface superficial zone. Maturation begins at 2 weeks of age when the meniscus expresses type I collagen, type II collagen, type X collagen, and MMP-13 in specific patterns. By 4 weeks of age, small areas of ossification are detected in the anterior meniscal horn, a common feature seen in rodents. Maturation appears complete at 8 weeks of age, when the meniscus resembles the adult structure complete with ossifying tissue that contains bone marrow like areas. Our results provide, the first systematic study of mouse meniscal development and will be a valuable tool for analyzing murine models of knee joint formation and disease. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1683-1689, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pathway aberrations of murine melanoma cells observed in Paired-End diTag transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Edison

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is the major cause of skin cancer deaths and melanoma incidence doubles every 10 to 20 years. However, little is known about melanoma pathway aberrations. Here we applied the robust Gene Identification Signature Paired End diTag (GIS-PET approach to investigate the melanoma transcriptome and characterize the global pathway aberrations. Methods GIS-PET technology directly links 5' mRNA signatures with their corresponding 3' signatures to generate, and then concatenate, PETs for efficient sequencing. We annotated PETs to pathways of KEGG database and compared the murine B16F1 melanoma transcriptome with three non-melanoma murine transcriptomes (Melan-a2 melanocytes, E14 embryonic stem cells, and E17.5 embryo. Gene expression levels as represented by PET counts were compared across melanoma and melanocyte libraries to identify the most significantly altered pathways and investigate the expression levels of crucial cancer genes. Results Melanin biosynthesis genes were solely expressed in the cells of melanocytic origin, indicating the feasibility of using the PET approach for transcriptome comparison. The most significantly altered pathways were metabolic pathways, including upregulated pathways: purine metabolism, aminophosphonate metabolism, tyrosine metabolism, selenoamino acid metabolism, galactose utilization, nitrobenzene degradation, and bisphenol A degradation; and downregulated pathways: oxidative phosphorylation, ATPase synthesis, TCA cycle, pyruvate metabolism, and glutathione metabolism. The downregulated pathways concurrently indicated a slowdown of mitochondrial activities. Mitochondrial permeability was also significantly altered, as indicated by transcriptional activation of ATP/ADP, citrate/malate, Mg++, fatty acid and amino acid transporters, and transcriptional repression of zinc and metal ion transporters. Upregulation of cell cycle progression, MAPK, and PI3K/Akt pathways were more limited to certain

  20. Murine homeobox-containing gene, Msx-1: analysis of genomic organization, promoter structure, and potential autoregulatory cis-acting elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuoka, M; Takahashi, T; Guron, C; Raghow, R

    1994-05-01

    Detailed molecular organization of the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the murine homeodomain-containing gene, Msx-1, is reported. The protein-encoding portion of the gene is contained in two exons, 590 and 1214 bp in length, separated by a 2107-bp intron; the homeodomain is located in the second exon. The two-exon organization of the murine Msx-1 gene resembles a number of other homeodomain-containing genes. The 5'-(GTAAGT) and 3'-(CCCTAG) splicing junctions and the mRNA polyadenylation signal (UAUAA) of the murine Msx-1 gene are also characteristic of other vertebrate genes. By nuclease protection and primer extension assays, the start of transcription of the Msx-1 gene was located 256 bp upstream of the first AUG. Computer analysis of the promoter proximal 1280-bp sequence revealed a number of potentially important cis-regulatory sequences; these include the recognition elements for Ap-1, Ap-2, Ap-3, Sp-1, a possible binding site for RAR:RXR, and a number of TCF-1 consensus motifs. Importantly, a perfect reverse complement of (C/G)TTAATTG, which was recently shown to be an optimal binding sequence for the homeodomain of Msx-1 protein (K.M. Catron, N. Iler, and C. Abate (1993) Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2354-2365), was also located in the murine Msx-1 promoter. Binding of bacterially expressed Msx-1 homeodomain polypeptide to Msx-1-specific oligonucleotide was experimentally demonstrated, raising a distinct possibility of autoregulation of this developmentally regulated gene.

  1. HIV-1 Myristoylated Nef Treatment of Murine Microglial Cells Activates Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase, NO2 Production and Neurotoxic Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Mangino

    Full Text Available The potential role of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 accessory protein Nef in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS is still poorly understood. Nef is a molecular adapter that influences several cellular signal transduction events and membrane trafficking. In human macrophages, Nef expression induces the production of extracellular factors (e.g. pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines and the recruitment of T cells, thus favoring their infection and its own transfer to uninfected cells via exosomes, cellular protrusions or cell-to-cell contacts. Murine cells are normally not permissive for HIV-1 but, in transgenic mice, Nef is a major disease determinant. Both in human and murine macrophages, myristoylated Nef (myr+Nef treatment has been shown to activate NF-κB, MAP kinases and interferon responsive factor 3 (IRF-3, thereby inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducers and activator of transcription (STAT-1, STAT-2 and STAT-3 through the production of proinflammatory factors.We report that treatment of BV-2 murine microglial cells with myr+Nef leads to STAT-1, -2 and -3 tyrosine phosphorylation and upregulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS with production of nitric oxide. We provide evidence that extracellular Nef regulates iNOS expression through NF-κB activation and, at least in part, interferon-β (IFNβ release that acts in concert with Nef. All of these effects require both myristoylation and a highly conserved acidic cluster in the viral protein. Finally, we report that Nef induces the release of neurotoxic factors in the supernatants of microglial cells.These results suggest a potential role of extracellular Nef in promoting neuronal injury in the murine model. They also indicate a possible interplay between Nef and host factors in the pathogenesis of neuroAIDS through the production of reactive nitrogen species in microglial cells.

  2. Newly Identified TLR9 Stimulant, M6-395 Is a Potent Polyclonal Activator for Murine B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Hee; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2012-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been extensively studied in recent years. However, functions of these molecules in murine B cell biology are largely unknown. A TLR4 stimulant, LPS is well known as a powerful polyclonal activator for murine B cells. In this study, we explored the effect of a murine TLR9 stimulant, M6-395 (a synthetic CpG ODNs) on B cell proliferation and Ig production. First, M6-395 was much more potent than LPS in augmenting B cell proliferation. As for Ig expression, M6-395 facilitated the expression of both TGF-β1-induced germ line transcript α (GLTα) and IL-4-induced GLTγ1 as levels as those by LPS and Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 agonist) : a certain Ig GLT expression is regarded as an indicative of the corresponding isotype switching recombination. However, IgA and IgG1 secretion patterns were quite different--these Ig isotype secretions by M6-395 were much less than those by LPS and Pam3CSK4. Moreover, the increase of IgA and IgG1 production by LPS and Pam3CSK4 was virtually abrogated by M6-395. The same was true for the secretion of IgG3. We found that this unexpected phenomena provoked by M6-395 is attributed, at least in part, to its excessive mitogenic nature. Taken together, these results suggest that M6-395 can act as a murine polyclonal activator but its strong mitogenic activity is unfavorable to Ig isotype switching.

  3. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  4. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  5. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  6. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... regions with function-related, short sequence motifs and molecular recognition features with structural propensities. This review focuses on molecular aspects of TFs, which represent paradigms of ID-related features. Through specific examples, we review how the ID-associated flexibility of TFs enables....... It is furthermore emphasized how classic biochemical concepts like allostery, conformational selection, induced fit, and feedback regulation are undergoing a revival with the appreciation of ID. The review also describes the most recent advances based on computational simulations of ID-based interaction mechanisms...

  7. Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) is not a transcriptional regulator of cardiac electrical remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Sine V; Tuomainen, Tomi; Borup, Rehannah

    2016-01-01

    The heart-failure relevant Potassium Channel Interacting Protein 2 (KChIP2) augments CaV1.2 and KV4.3. KChIP3 represses CaV1.2 transcription in cardiomyocytes via interaction with regulatory DNA elements. Hence, we tested nuclear presence of KChIP2 and if KChIP2 translocates into the nucleus...... intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. Neither increasing nor decreasing intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations caused translocation of KChIP2. Microarray analysis did not identify relief of transcriptional repression in murine KChIP2(-/-) heart samples. We conclude that although there is a baseline presence of KCh...

  8. Vitrification by Ultra-fast Cooling at a Low Concentration of Cryoprotectants in a Quartz Microcapillary: A Study Using Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoming; Park, Eric Y.H.; Fowler, Alex; Yarmush, Martin L.; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Conventional cryopreservation protocols for slow-freezing or vitrification involve cell injury due to ice formation/cell dehydration or toxicity of high cryoprotectant (CPA) concentrations, respectively. In this study, we developed a novel cryopreservation technique to achieve ultra-fast cooling rates using a quartz microcapillary (QMC). The QMC enabled vitrification of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells using an intracellular cryoprotectant concentration in the range used for slowing freezing (1–2 M). The cryoprotectants used included 2 M 1,2-propanediol (PROH, cell membrane permeable) and 0.5 M extracellular trehalose (cell membrane impermeable). More than 70% of the murine ES cells post-vitrification attached with respect to non-frozen control cells, and the proliferation rates of the two groups were similar. Preservation of undifferentiated properties of the pluripotent murine ES cells post vitrification cryopreservation was verified using three different types of assays: the expression of transcription factor Oct-4, the presentation of the membrane surface glycoprotein SSEA-1, and the elevated expression of the intracellular enzyme alkaline phosphatase. These results indicate that vitrification at a low concentration (2 M) of intracellular cryoprotectants is a viable and effective approach for the cryopreservation of murine embryonic stem cells. PMID:18462712

  9. ZFP521 regulates murine hematopoietic stem cell function and facilitates MLL-AF9 leukemogenesis in mouse and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Brian S; Rybak, Adrian P; Beerman, Isabel; Heesters, Balthasar; Mercier, Francois E; Scadden, David T; Bryder, David; Baron, Roland; Rossi, Derrick J

    2017-08-03

    The concept that tumor-initiating cells can co-opt the self-renewal program of endogenous stem cells as a means of enforcing their unlimited proliferative potential is widely accepted, yet identification of specific factors that regulate self-renewal of normal and cancer stem cells remains limited. Using a comparative transcriptomic approach, we identify ZNF521 / Zfp521 as a conserved hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-enriched transcription factor in human and murine hematopoiesis whose function in HSC biology remains elusive. Competitive serial transplantation assays using Zfp521 -deficient mice revealed that ZFP521 regulates HSC self-renewal and differentiation. In contrast, ectopic expression of ZFP521 in HSCs led to a robust maintenance of progenitor activity in vitro. Transcriptional analysis of human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples revealed that ZNF521 is highly and specifically upregulated in AMLs with MLL translocations. Using an MLL-AF9 murine leukemia model and serial transplantation studies, we show that ZFP521 is not required for leukemogenesis, although its absence leads to a significant delay in leukemia onset. Furthermore, knockdown of ZNF521 reduced proliferation in human leukemia cell lines possessing MLL-AF9 translocations. Taken together, these results identify ZNF521/ZFP521 as a critical regulator of HSC function, which facilitates MLL-AF9-mediated leukemic disease in mice.

  10. Tick-Borne Transmission of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Hajnická

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are a large group of DNA viruses infecting mainly vertebrates. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 is often used as a model in studies of the pathogenesis of clinically important human gammaherpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. This rodent virus appears to be geographically widespread; however, its natural transmission cycle is unknown. Following detection of MHV68 in field-collected ticks, including isolation of the virus from tick salivary glands and ovaries, we investigated whether MHV68 is a tick-borne virus. Uninfected Ixodes ricinus ticks were shown to acquire the virus by feeding on experimentally infected laboratory mice. The virus survived tick molting, and the molted ticks transmitted the virus to uninfected laboratory mice on which they subsequently fed. MHV68 was isolated from the tick salivary glands, consistent with transmission via tick saliva. The virus survived in ticks without loss of infectivity for at least 120 days, and subsequently was transmitted vertically from one tick generation to the next, surviving more than 500 days. Furthermore, the F1 generation (derived from F0 infected females transmitted MHV68 to uninfected mice on which they fed, with MHV68 M3 gene transcripts detected in blood, lung, and spleen tissue of mice on which F1 nymphs and F1 adults engorged. These experimental data fulfill the transmission criteria that define an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus, the largest biological group of viruses. Currently, African swine fever virus (ASFV is the only DNA virus recognized as an arbovirus. Like ASFV, MHV68 showed evidence of pathogenesis in ticks. Previous studies have reported MHV68 in free-living ticks and in mammals commonly infested with I. ricinus, and neutralizing antibodies to MHV68 have been detected in large mammals (e.g., deer including humans. Further studies are needed to determine if these reports are the result of tick-borne transmission

  11. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  12. Glycosaminoglycan interactions in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gillet

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs commonly participate in herpesvirus entry. They are thought to provide a reversible attachment to cells that promotes subsequent receptor binding. Murine gamma-herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68 infection of fibroblasts and epithelial cells is highly GAG-dependent. This is a function of the viral gp150, in that gp150-deficient mutants are much less GAG-dependent than wild-type. Here we show that the major MHV-68 GAG-binding protein is not gp150 but gp70, a product of ORF4. Surprisingly, ORF4-deficient MHV-68 showed normal cell binding and was more sensitive than wild-type to inhibition by soluble heparin rather than less. Thus, the most obvious viral GAG interaction made little direct contribution to infection. Indeed, a large fraction of the virion gp70 had its GAG-binding domain removed by post-translational cleavage. ORF4 may therefore act mainly to absorb soluble GAGs and prevent them from engaging gp150 prematurely. In contrast to gp70, gp150 bound poorly to GAGs, implying that it provides little in the way of adhesion. We hypothesize that it acts instead as a GAG-sensitive switch that selectively activates MHV-68 entry at cell surfaces.

  13. Autokinase activity of alpha-crystallin inhibits its specific interaction with the DOTIS element in the murine gamma D/E/F-crystallin promoter in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowski, D; Graw, J

    1997-10-01

    In a previous report we demonstrated the in vitro interaction of alpha-crystallin with an element downstream of the transcriptional initiation site (DOTIS) of the murine gamma E-crystallin promoter (Pietrowski et al., 1994, Gene 144, 171-178). The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of phosphorylation on this particular interaction. We could demonstrate that the autophosphorylation of alpha-crystallin leads to a complete loss of interaction with the DOTIS element, however, PKA-dependent phosphorylation of alpha-crystallin is without effect on the interaction. It is hypothesized that the autophosphorylation of alpha-crystallin might be involved in regulatory mechanisms of the murine gamma D/E/F-crystallin gene expression.

  14. A segment of the apospory-specific genomic region is highly microsyntenic not only between the apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass, but also with a rice chromosome 11 centromeric-proximal genomic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A; Morishige, Daryl T; Moore, L David; Mullet, John E; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory.

  15. A Segment of the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region Is Highly Microsyntenic Not Only between the Apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and Buffelgrass, But Also with a Rice Chromosome 11 Centromeric-Proximal Genomic Region1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Moore, L. David; Mullet, John E.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory. PMID:16415213

  16. Transcriptional Regulation of Hhex in Hematopoiesis and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ontogeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portero Migueles, Rosa; Shaw, Louise; Rodrigues, Neil P

    2017-01-01

    in endothelium of the dorsal aorta (DA) and in clusters of putative HSCs as they are specified during murine development. We exploited this observation, using the Hhex locus to define cis regulatory elements, enhancers and interacting transcription factors that are both necessary and sufficient to support gene...... for the Hhex ECR region during hematoendothelial development, we deleted the ECR element from the endogenous locus in the context of a targeted Hhex-RedStar reporter allele. Results indicate a specific requirement for the ECR in blood-associated Hhex expression during development and further demonstrate...

  17. The transcriptional landscape of hematopoietic stem cell ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney-Freeman, Shannon; Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Lacadie, Scott A.; Huang, Hsuan-Ting; Curran, Matthew; Loewer, Sabine; Naveiras, Olaia; Kathrein, Katie L.; Konantz, Martina; Langdon, Erin M.; Lengerke, Claudia; Zon, Leonard I.; Collins, James J.; Daley, George Q.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny has revealed mechanisms of blood differentiation and leukemogenesis, but a similar analysis of HSC development is lacking. Here, we acquired the transcriptomes of developing HSC purified from >2500 murine embryos and adult mice. We found that embryonic hematopoietic elements clustered into three distinct transcriptional states characteristic of the definitive yolk sac, HSCs undergoing specification, and definitive HSCs. We applied a network biology-based analysis to reconstruct the gene regulatory networks of sequential stages of HSC development and functionally validated candidate transcriptional regulators of HSC ontogeny by morpholino-mediated knock-down in zebrafish embryos. Moreover, we found that HSCs from in vitro differentiated embryonic stem cells closely resemble definitive HSC, yet lack a Notch-signaling signature, likely accounting for their defective lymphopoiesis. Our analysis and web resource (http://hsc.hms.harvard.edu) will enhance efforts to identify regulators of HSC ontogeny and facilitate the engineering of hematopoietic specification. PMID:23122293

  18. Dual analysis of the murine cytomegalovirus and host cell transcriptomes reveal new aspects of the virus-host cell interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanda Juranic Lisnic

    Full Text Available Major gaps in our knowledge of pathogen genes and how these gene products interact with host gene products to cause disease represent a major obstacle to progress in vaccine and antiviral drug development for the herpesviruses. To begin to bridge these gaps, we conducted a dual analysis of Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV and host cell transcriptomes during lytic infection. We analyzed the MCMV transcriptome during lytic infection using both classical cDNA cloning and sequencing of viral transcripts and next generation sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq. We also investigated the host transcriptome using RNA-Seq combined with differential gene expression analysis, biological pathway analysis, and gene ontology analysis. We identify numerous novel spliced and unspliced transcripts of MCMV. Unexpectedly, the most abundantly transcribed viral genes are of unknown function. We found that the most abundant viral transcript, recently identified as a noncoding RNA regulating cellular microRNAs, also codes for a novel protein. To our knowledge, this is the first viral transcript that functions both as a noncoding RNA and an mRNA. We also report that lytic infection elicits a profound cellular response in fibroblasts. Highly upregulated and induced host genes included those involved in inflammation and immunity, but also many unexpected transcription factors and host genes related to development and differentiation. Many top downregulated and repressed genes are associated with functions whose roles in infection are obscure, including host long intergenic noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs or small nucleolar RNAs. Correspondingly, many differentially expressed genes cluster in biological pathways that may shed new light on cytomegalovirus pathogenesis. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular warfare at the virus-host interface and suggest new areas of research to advance the understanding and treatment of cytomegalovirus

  19. Tissue- and agonist-specific regulation of human and murine plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 promoters in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, M; Painter, C A; Gleaves, L A; Schoenhard, J A; Atkinson, J B; Brown, N J; Vaughan, D E

    2003-11-01

    Numerous studies have described regulatory factors and sequences that control transcriptional responses in vitro. However, there is a paucity of information on the qualitative and quantitative regulation of heterologous promoters using transgenic strategies. In order to investigate the physiological regulation of human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (hPAI-1) expression in vivo compared to murine PAI-1 (mPAI-1) and to test the physiological relevance of regulatory mechanisms described in vitro, we generated transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) driven by the proximal -2.9 kb of the hPAI-1 promoter. Transgenic animals were treated with Ang II, TGF-beta1 and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to compare the relative activation of the human and murine PAI-1 promoters. Ang II increased EGFP expression most effectively in brain, kidney and spleen, while mPAI-1 expression was quantitatively enhanced most prominently in heart and spleen. TGF-beta1 failed to induce activation of the hPAI-1 promoter but potently stimulated mPAI-1 in kidney and spleen. LPS administration triggered robust expression of mPAI-1 in liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen and lung, while EGFP was induced only modestly in heart and kidney. These results indicate that the transcriptional response of the endogenous mPAI-1 promoter varies widely in terms of location and magnitude of response to specific stimuli. Moreover, the physiological regulation of PAI-1 expression likely involves a complex interaction of transcription factors and DNA sequences that are not adequately replicated by in vitro functional studies focused on the proximal -2.9 kb promoter.

  20. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Shinsuke, E-mail: yuasa@a8.keio.jp [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tabata, Hidenori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kazunori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi [Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function and Dynamics, Advanced Technology Development Group, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  1. Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine typhus is a widely distributed flea-borne infection caused by Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms of murine typhus are nonspecific and mimic a variety of other infectious diseases. We herein report a case of murine typhus in an area where the broad use of DDT in the mid-20th century has now made it a rare disease. The patient described presented with headache, fever, and a faint macular rash. Initial laboratory studies revealed a slight transaminase elevation. Further questioning revealed exposure to opossums, prompting the consideration of murine typhus as a diagnosis. Although typhus group antibodies were not present during the patient’s acute illness, empiric therapy with doxycycline was initiated, and the patient defervesced. One month after convalescence, the patient returned to clinic with serum that contained typhus group antibodies with an IgG titer of 1 : 1024. Murine typhus is an important consideration during the workup of a patient with a nonspecific febrile illness. Exposure to reservoir hosts and the flea vector place humans at risk for this disease. Clinician recognition of this entity is required for diagnosis and effective therapy.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeCYS3 encoding cystathionine γ-lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraishi, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Tsuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    In studying the regulation of GSH11, the structural gene of the high-affinity glutathione transporter (GSH-P1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cis-acting cysteine responsive element, CCGCCACAC (CCG motif), was detected. Like GSH-P1, the cystathionine γ-lyase encoded by CYS3 is induced by sulfur starvation and repressed by addition of cysteine to the growth medium. We detected a CCG motif (−311 to −303) and a CGC motif (CGCCACAC; −193 to −186), which is one base shorter than the CCG motif, in the 5′-upstream region of CYS3. One copy of the centromere determining element 1, CDE1 (TCACGTGA; −217 to −210), being responsible for regulation of the sulfate assimilation pathway genes, was also detected. We tested the roles of these three elements in the regulation of CYS3. Using a lacZ-reporter assay system, we found that the CCG/CGC motif is required for activation of CYS3, as well as for its repression by cysteine. In contrast, the CDE1 motif was responsible for only activation of CYS3. We also found that two transcription factors, Met4 and VDE, are responsible for activation of CYS3 through the CCG/CGC and CDE1 motifs. These observations suggest a dual regulation of CYS3 by factors that interact with the CDE1 motif and the CCG/CGC motifs. PMID:18317767

  3. The mechanical fingerprint of murine excisional wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensalfini, Marco; Haertel, Eric; Hopf, Raoul; Wietecha, Mateusz; Werner, Sabine; Mazza, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    A multiscale mechanics approach to the characterization of murine excisional wounds subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Local strain analysis at a physiological level of tension uncovers the presence of two distinct regions within the wound: i) a very compliant peripheral cushion and ii) a core area undergoing modest deformation. Microstructural visualizations of stretched wound specimens show negligible engagement of the collagen located in the center of a 7-day old wound; fibers remain coiled despite the applied tension, confirming the existence of a mechanically isolated wound core. The compliant cushion located at the wound periphery appears to protect the newly-formed tissue from excessive deformation during the phase of new tissue formation. The early remodeling phase (day 14) is characterized by a restored mechanical connection between far field and wound center. The latter remains less deformable, a characteristic possibly required for cell activities during tissue remodeling. The distribution of fibrillary collagens at these two time points corresponds well to the identified heterogeneity of mechanical properties of the wound region. This novel approach provides new insight into the mechanical properties of wounded skin and will be applicable to the analysis of compound-treated wounds or wounds in genetically modified tissue. Biophysical characterization of healing wounds is crucial to assess the recovery of the skin barrier function and the associated mechanobiological processes. For the first time, we performed highly resolved local deformation analysis to identify mechanical characteristics of the wound and its periphery. Our results reveal the presence of a compliant cushion surrounding a stiffer wound core; we refer to this heterogeneous mechanical behavior as "mechanical fingerprint" of the wound. The mechanical response is shown to progress towards that of the intact skin as healing takes place. Histology and multiphoton microscopy

  4. The maternal nucleolus plays a key role in centromere satellite maintenance during the oocyte to embryo transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulka, Helena; Langerova, Alena

    2014-04-01

    The oocyte (maternal) nucleolus is essential for early embryonic development and embryos originating from enucleolated oocytes arrest at the 2-cell stage. The reason for this is unclear. Surprisingly, RNA polymerase I activity in nucleolus-less mouse embryos, as manifested by pre-rRNA synthesis, and pre-rRNA processing are not affected, indicating an unusual role of the nucleolus. We report here that the maternal nucleolus is indispensable for the regulation of major and minor satellite repeats soon after fertilisation. During the first embryonic cell cycle, absence of the nucleolus causes a significant reduction in major and minor satellite DNA by 12% and 18%, respectively. The expression of satellite transcripts is also affected, being reduced by more than half. Moreover, extensive chromosome bridging of the major and minor satellite sequences was observed during the first mitosis. Finally, we show that the absence of the maternal nucleolus alters S-phase dynamics and causes abnormal deposition of the H3.3 histone chaperone DAXX in pronuclei of nucleolus-less zygotes.

  5. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation and postirradiation incubation on heterogeneous nuclear RNA size in murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, R.; Sauerbier, W.

    1978-01-01

    We have analyzed the decrease in synthesis of individual size classes of heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) in ultraviolet (uv)-irradiated Merwin plasmacytoma (MPC-11) cells at various times of postirradiation incubation. HnRNA from nonirradiated control cells is distributed over a wide range from approximately 60S to 5S, with 42S RNA carrying more label than any other size class. HnRNA from uv-irradiated cells shows a dose-dependent shift in size distribution toward lower molecular weight. The size distribution of hnRNA synthesized after prolonged times of postirradiation incubation is restored toward normal, i.e., synthesis of long RNA molecules increases relative to the synthesis of short ones. Analysis of the total number of hnRNA chains synthesized during a 20-min [ 3 H]uridine pulse shows a considerable eduction in their number with increasing uv dose. Murine cell lines are excision-repair-deficient but capable of post replication repair inhibited by caffeine. HnRNA transcripts of cells incubated in its presence were studied. The caffeine, which has no effect on hnRNA size in control cells, inhibits to a considerable extent the restoration of full-length transcripts during postirradiation incubation. The lack of excision repair in MPC-11 was confirmed by the analysis of pyrimidine dimers in trichloracetic acid-insoluble and soluble fractions within 8 h of postirradiation incubation. The size of parental and daughter strand DNA in uv-irradiated cells was correlated with RNA transcript size. The parental DNA in these experiments does not change its size as a consequence of uv exposure and postirradiation incubation. In contrast, daughter DNA strands are short in uv-irradiated cells and they increase in size during postirradiation incubation to reach the size of parental strands after 8 h

  6. DHA suppresses Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2014-04-14

    Several reports have indicated that dietary intake of DHA is associated with lower prevalence of periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DHA on the production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. LPS was isolated from lyophilised P. intermedia ATCC 25,611 cells using the standard hot-phenol-water protocol. Culture supernatants were collected and assayed for NO, IL-1β and IL-6. Real-time PCR analysis was carried out to detect the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), IL-1β, IL-6 and haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA. Immunoblot analysis was carried out to quantify the expression of iNOS and HO-1 protein and concentrations of signalling proteins. DNA-binding activities of NF-κB subunits were determined using an ELISA-based assay kit. DHA significantly attenuated the production of NO, IL-1β and IL-6 at both gene transcription and translation levels in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. DHA induced the expression of HO-1 in cells treated with P. intermedia LPS. Selective inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin IX significantly mitigated the inhibitory effects of DHA on LPS-induced NO production. DHA significantly attenuated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase induced by LPS. In addition, DHA suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-κB by regulating the nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit and inhibited the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Further in vivo studies are needed to better evaluate the potential of DHA in humans as a therapeutic agent to treat periodontal disease.

  7. The Role of Tumor Protein 53 Mutations in Common Human Cancers and Targeting the Murine Double Minute 2–P53 Interaction for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayebeh Hamzehloie

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The gene TP53 (also known as protein 53 or tumor protein 53, encoding transcription factor P53, is mutated or deleted in half of human cancers, demonstrating the crucial role of P53 in tumor suppression. There are reports of nearly 250 independent germ line TP53 mutations in over 100 publications. The P53 protein has the structure of a transcription factor and, is made up of several domains. The main function of P53 is to organize cell defense against cancerous transformation. P53 is a potent transcription factor that is activated in response to diverse stresses, leading to the induction of cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The P53 tumor suppressor is negatively regulated in cells by the murine double minute 2 (MDM2 protein. Murine double minute 2 favors its nuclear export, and stimulates its degradation. Inhibitors of the P53-MDM2 interaction might be attractive new anticancer agents that could be used to activate wild-type P53 in tumors. Down regulation of MDM2 using an small interfering RNA (siRNA approach has recently provided evidence for a new role of MDM2 in the P53 response, by modulating the inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinase 2 (cdk2 by P21/WAF1 (also known as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 or CDK-interacting protein 1.

  8. The RSF1 histone-remodelling factor facilitates DNA double-strand break repair by recruiting centromeric and Fanconi Anaemia proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pessina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ATM is a central regulator of the cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. Here we identify a biochemical interaction between ATM and RSF1 and we characterise the role of RSF1 in this response. The ATM-RSF1 interaction is dependent upon both DSBs and ATM kinase activity. Together with SNF2H/SMARCA5, RSF1 forms the RSF chromatin-remodelling complex. Although RSF1 is specific to the RSF complex, SNF2H/SMARCA5 is a catalytic subunit of several other chromatin-remodelling complexes. Although not required for checkpoint signalling, RSF1 is required for efficient repair of DSBs via both end-joining and homology-directed repair. Specifically, the ATM-dependent recruitment to sites of DSBs of the histone fold proteins CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, previously identified at centromeres, is RSF1-dependent. In turn these proteins recruit and regulate the mono-ubiquitination of the Fanconi Anaemia proteins FANCD2 and FANCI. We propose that by depositing CENPS/MHF1 and CENPX/MHF2, the RSF complex either directly or indirectly contributes to the reorganisation of chromatin around DSBs that is required for efficient DNA repair.

  9. Centromere Protein (CENP)-W Interacts with Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) U and May Contribute to Kinetochore-Microtubule Attachment in Mitotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Younghwa; Kim, Raehyung; Lee, Soojin

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies have shown that heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U), a component of the hnRNP complex, contributes to stabilize the kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis. CENP-W was identified as an inner centromere component that plays crucial roles in the formation of a functional kinetochore complex. Results We report that hnRNP U interacts with CENP-W, and the interaction between hnRNP U and CENP-W mutually increased each other’s protein stability by inhibiting the proteasome-mediated degradation. Further, their co-localization was observed chiefly in the nuclear matrix region and at the microtubule-kinetochore interface during interphase and mitosis, respectively. Both microtubule-stabilizing and microtubule-destabilizing agents significantly decreased the protein stability of CENP-W. Furthermore, loss of microtubules and defects in microtubule organization were observed in CENP-W-depleted cells. Conclusion Our data imply that CENP-W plays an important role in the attachment and interaction between microtubules and kinetochore during mitosis. PMID:26881882

  10. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  11. Disrupting SUMOylation enhances transcriptional function and ameliorates polyglutamine androgen receptor–mediated disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jason P.; Reddy, Satya L.; Yu, Zhigang; Giorgetti, Elisa; Montie, Heather L.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Higgins, Jake; McEachin, Richard C.; Robins, Diane M.; Merry, Diane E.; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR) causes neuromuscular degeneration in individuals with spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). PolyQ AR has diminished transcriptional function and exhibits ligand-dependent proteotoxicity, features that have both been implicated in SBMA; however, the extent to which altered AR transcriptional function contributes to pathogenesis remains controversial. Here, we sought to dissociate effects of diminished AR function from polyQ-mediated proteotoxicity by enhancing the transcriptional activity of polyQ AR. To accomplish this, we bypassed the inhibitory effect of AR SUMOylation (where SUMO indicates small ubiquitin-like modifier) by mutating conserved lysines in the polyQ AR that are sites of SUMOylation. We determined that replacement of these residues by arginine enhances polyQ AR activity as a hormone-dependent transcriptional regulator. In a murine model, disruption of polyQ AR SUMOylation rescued exercise endurance and type I muscle fiber atrophy; it also prolonged survival. These changes occurred without overt alterations in polyQ AR expression or aggregation, revealing the favorable trophic support exerted by the ligand-activated receptor. Our findings demonstrate beneficial effects of enhancing the transcriptional function of the ligand-activated polyQ AR and indicate that the SUMOylation pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in SBMA. PMID:25607844

  12. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Kellar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer.

  13. Murine Models of Gastric Corpus PreneoplasiaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P. Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma evolves in a field of pre-existing metaplasia. Over the past 20 years, a number of murine models have been developed to address aspects of the physiology and pathophysiology of metaplasia induction. Although none of these models has achieved true recapitulation of the induction of adenocarcinoma, they have led to important insights into the factors that influence the induction and progression of metaplasia. Here, we review the pathologic definitions relevant to alterations in gastric corpus lineages and classification of metaplasia by specific lineage markers. In addition, we review present murine models of the induction and progression of spasmolytic polypeptide (TFF2–expressing metaplasia, the predominant metaplastic lineage observed in murine models. These models provide a basis for the development of a broader understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of metaplasia in the stomach. Keywords: SPEM, Intestinal Metaplasia, Gastric Cancer, TFF2, Chief Cell, Hyperplasia

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  15. Contribution of delayed rectifier potassium currents to the electrical activity of murine colonic smooth muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, S D; Ward, S M; Dick, G M; Epperson, A; Bonner, H P; Sanders, K M; Horowitz, B; Kenyon, J L

    1999-01-01

    We used intracellular microelectrodes to record the membrane potential (Vm) of intact murine colonic smooth muscle. Electrical activity consisted of spike complexes separated by quiescent periods (Vm≈−60 mV). The spike complexes consisted of about a dozen action potentials of approximately 30 mV amplitude. Tetraethylammonium (TEA, 1–10 mM) had little effect on the quiescent periods but increased the amplitude of the action potential spikes. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP, ⋧ 5 mM) caused continuous spiking.Voltage clamp of isolated myocytes identified delayed rectifier K+ currents that activated rapidly (time to half-maximum current, 11.5 ms at 0 mV) and inactivated in two phases (τf = 96 ms, τs = 1.5 s at 0 mV). The half-activation voltage of the permeability was −27 mV, with significant activation at −50 mV.TEA (10 mM) reduced the outward current at potentials positive to 0 mV. 4-AP (5 mM) reduced the early current but increased outward current at later times (100–500 ms) consistent with block of resting channels relieved by depolarization. 4-AP inhibited outward current at potentials negative to −20 mV, potentials where TEA had no effect.Qualitative PCR amplification of mRNA identified transcripts encoding delayed rectifier K+ channel subunits Kv1.6, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, Kv4.3 and the Kvβ1.1 subunit in murine colon myocytes. mRNA encoding Kv 1.4 was not detected.We find that TEA-sensitive delayed rectifier currents are important determinants of action potential amplitude but not rhythmicity. Delayed rectifier currents sensitive to 4-AP are important determinants of rhythmicity but not action potential amplitude. PMID:10050014

  16. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  17. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  18. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  19. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  20. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26, multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlAm*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlAm* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

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    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B is a key molecule in modulating low-degree inflammatory conditions such as diabetes. The role of PTP1B in other chronic inflammations, however, remains unknown. Here, we report that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS-induced murine experimental colitis via expanding CD11b(+Gr-1(+ myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs. Employing DSS-induced murine experimental colitis as inflammatory animal model, we found that, compared with wild-type littermates, PTP1B-null mice demonstrated greater resistance to DSS-induced colitis, as reflected by slower weight-loss, greater survival rates and decreased PMN and macrophage infiltration into the colon. The evidence collectively also demonstrated that the resistance of PTP1B-null mice to DSS-induced colitis is based on the expansion of MDSCs. First, PTP1B-null mice exhibited a greater frequency of MDSCs in the bone marrow (BM, peripheral blood and spleen when compared with wild-type littermates. Second, PTP1B levels in BM leukocytes were significantly decreased after cells were induced into MDSCs by IL-6 and GM-CSF, and the MDSC induction occurred more rapidly in PTP1B-null mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting PTP1B as a negative regulator of MDSCs. Third, the adoptive transfer of MDSCs into mice with DSS-colitis significantly attenuated colitis, which accompanies with a decreased serum IL-17 level. Finally, PTP1B deficiency increased the frequency of MDSCs from BM cells likely through enhancing the activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 and Janus kinase 2 (JAK2. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidences that PTP1B deficiency ameliorates murine experimental colitis via expanding MDSCs.

  2. A novel SALL4/OCT4 transcriptional feedback network for pluripotency of embryonic stem cells.

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    Jianchang Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SALL4 is a member of the SALL gene family that encodes a group of putative developmental transcription factors. Murine Sall4 plays a critical role in maintaining embryonic stem cell (ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. We have shown that Sall4 activates Oct4 and is a master regulator in murine ES cells. Other SALL gene members, especially Sall1 and Sall3 are expressed in both murine and human ES cells, and deletions of these two genes in mice lead to perinatal death due to developmental defects. To date, little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling the regulation of expressions of SALL4 or other SALL gene family members. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report describes a novel SALL4/OCT4 regulator feedback loop in ES cells in balancing the proper expression dosage of SALL4 and OCT4 for the maintenance of ESC stem cell properties. While we have observed that a positive feedback relationship is present between SALL4 and OCT4, the strong self-repression of SALL4 seems to be the "break" for this loop. In addition, we have shown that SALL4 can repress the promoters of other SALL family members, such as SALL1 and SALL3, which competes with the activation of these two genes by OCT4. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings, when taken together, indicate that SALL4 is a master regulator that controls its own expression and the expression of OCT4. SALL4 and OCT4 work antagonistically to balance the expressions of other SALL gene family members. This novel SALL4/OCT4 transcription regulation feedback loop should provide more insight into the mechanism of governing the "stemness" of ES cells.

  3. The combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppresses airway inflammation in a murine model for chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Seil; Vos, Arjan P; Morgan, Mary E; Garssen, Johan; Georgiou, Niki A; Boon, Louis; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the use of interventions that target the intestinal microbiota as a treatment approach for asthma. This study is aimed at exploring the therapeutic effects of long-term treatment with a combination of Bifidobacterium breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides on airway inflammation and remodeling. A murine ovalbumin-induced chronic asthma model was used. Pulmonary airway inflammation; mRNA expression of pattern recognition receptors, Th-specific cytokines and transcription factors in lung tissue; expression of Foxp3 in blood Th cells; in vitro T cell activation; mast cell degranulation; and airway remodeling were examined. The combination of B. breve with non-digestible oligosaccharides suppressed pulmonary airway inflammation; reduced T cell activation and mast cell degranulation; modulated expression of pattern recognition receptors, cytokines and transcription factors; and reduced airway remodeling. The treatment induced regulatory T cell responses, as shown by increased Il10 and Foxp3 transcription in lung tissue, and augmented Foxp3 protein expression in blood CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. This specific combination of beneficial bacteria with non-digestible oligosaccharides has strong anti-inflammatory properties, possibly via the induction of a regulatory T cell response, resulting in reduced airway remodeling and, therefore, may be beneficial in the treatment of chronic inflammation in allergic asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms underlying enhanced in vitro adipocyte differentiation by the brominated flame retardant BDE-47

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamstra, Jorke H; Hruba, Eva; Blumberg, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) may play a role in the development of obesity. EDCs such as the flame retardant 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) have been shown to enhance adipocyte differentiation in the murine 3T3-L1 model. The mech......Recent studies suggest that exposure to endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) may play a role in the development of obesity. EDCs such as the flame retardant 2,2',4,4'-tetrabrominated diphenyl ether (BDE-47) have been shown to enhance adipocyte differentiation in the murine 3T3-L1 model....... The mechanisms by which EDCs direct preadipocytes to form adipocytes are poorly understood. Here, we examined transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms underlying the induction of in vitro adipocyte differentiation by BDE-47. Quantitative high content microscopy revealed concentration-dependent enhanced...

  5. MAML1 enhances the transcriptional activity of Runx2 and plays a role in bone development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Watanabe

    Full Text Available Mastermind-like 1 (MAML1 is a transcriptional co-activator in the Notch signaling pathway. Recently, however, several reports revealed novel and unique roles for MAML1 that are independent of the Notch signaling pathway. We found that MAML1 enhances the transcriptional activity of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2, a transcription factor essential for osteoblastic differentiation and chondrocyte proliferation and maturation. MAML1 significantly enhanced the Runx2-mediated transcription of the p6OSE2-Luc reporter, in which luciferase expression was controlled by six copies of the osteoblast specific element 2 (OSE2 from the Runx2-regulated osteocalcin gene promoter. Interestingly, a deletion mutant of MAML1 lacking the N-terminal Notch-binding domain also enhanced Runx2-mediated transcription. Moreover, inhibition of Notch signaling did not affect the action of MAML1 on Runx2, suggesting that the activation of Runx2 by MAML1 may be caused in a Notch-independent manner. Overexpression of MAML1 transiently enhanced the Runx2-mediated expression of alkaline phosphatase, an early marker of osteoblast differentiation, in the murine pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C3H10T1/2. MAML1(-/- embryos at embryonic day 16.5 (E16.5 had shorter bone lengths than wild-type embryos. The area of primary spongiosa of the femoral diaphysis was narrowed. At E14.5, extended zone of collagen type II alpha 1 (Col2a1 and Sox9 expression, markers of chondrocyte differentiation, and decreased zone of collagen type X alpha 1 (Col10a1 expression, a marker of hypertrophic chondrocyte, were observed. These observations suggest that chondrocyte maturation was impaired in MAML1(-/- mice. MAML1 enhances the transcriptional activity of Runx2 and plays a role in bone development.

  6. Physiological and Pathological Transcriptional Activation of Endogenous Retroelements Assessed by RNA-Sequencing of B Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Attig

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to evolutionarily-accrued sequence mutation or deletion, endogenous retroelements (EREs in eukaryotic genomes are subject to epigenetic silencing, preventing or reducing their transcription, particularly in the germplasm. Nevertheless, transcriptional activation of EREs, including endogenous retroviruses (ERVs and long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs, is observed in somatic cells, variably upon cellular differentiation and frequently upon cellular transformation. ERE transcription is modulated during physiological and pathological immune cell activation, as well as in immune cell cancers. However, our understanding of the potential consequences of such modulation remains incomplete, partly due to the relative scarcity of information regarding genome-wide ERE transcriptional patterns in immune cells. Here, we describe a methodology that allows probing RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq data for genome-wide expression of EREs in murine and human cells. Our analysis of B cells reveals that their transcriptional response during immune activation is dominated by induction of gene transcription, and that EREs respond to a much lesser extent. The transcriptional activity of the majority of EREs is either unaffected or reduced by B cell activation both in mice and humans, albeit LINEs appear considerably more responsive in the latter host. Nevertheless, a small number of highly distinct ERVs are strongly and consistently induced during B cell activation. Importantly, this pattern contrasts starkly with B cell transformation, which exhibits widespread induction of EREs, including ERVs that minimally overlap with those responsive to immune stimulation. The distinctive patterns of ERE induction suggest different underlying mechanisms and will help separate physiological from pathological expression.

  7. Transgene stability for three replication competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, M.; Carrasco, M.L.; Jespersen, T.

    2004-01-01

    cassette consisting of an internal ribosome entry site followed by the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding sequence inserted in different configurations into murine leukemia virus genomes. In two of the constructs, the insert was located in the upstream part of the U3 region while in the third...

  8. Murine alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. I. Radioligand binding studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, M.; Reese, J.; Cotecchia, S.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Alpha1-adrenoceptors were identified in murine tissues by [3H]prazosin saturation binding studies, with a rank order of cerebral cortex > cerebellum > liver > lung > kidney > heart > spleen, with the spleen not exhibiting detectable expression. Competition binding studies were performed with

  9. Reversal of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Murine Schistosomiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NO Al-Harbi, SA Bahashwan, MS Aboonq, MA Ramadan, AA Bahashwan. Abstract. Purpose: To evaluate the safety, pharmacological effect and mechanism of action of an antifibrotic compound, safironil (SAF)/praziquantel (PZQ) combination on reversal of liver fibrogenesis in chronic murine Schistosomiasis mansoni.

  10. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting angiogenesis is an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. The vascular endothelialcadherin (VE-cad) regulated angiogenesis is a potential target for anti-angiogenesis. Here, we develop a fusion vaccine plasmid DNA pSec-MBD2-VE-cad from VE-cad and murine beta defensin2 (MBD2) to induce immunity for ...

  11. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Qiang Man

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis.

  12. Turnover of T cells in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge of C57BL/6 mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 induces proliferation of T lymphocytes early after infection, as evidenced by incorporation of the DNA precursor bromodeoxyuridine. Using pulse-chase analysis, splenic and peripheral blood activated T lymphocytes were found...

  13. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL -1 and 0.6-0.7 ng mL -1 , respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Alpha-crystallins are involved in specific interactions with the murine gamma D/E/F-crystallin-encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowski, D; Durante, M J; Liebstein, A; Schmitt-John, T; Werner, T; Graw, J

    1994-07-08

    The promoter of the murine gamma E-crystallin (gamma E-Cry) encoding gene (gamma E-cry) was analyzed for specific interactions with lenticular proteins in a gel-retardation assay. A 21-bp fragment immediately downstream of the transcription initiation site (DOTIS) is demonstrated to be responsible for specific interactions with lens extracts. The DOTIS-binding protein(s) accept only the sense DNA strand as target; anti-sense or double-stranded DNA do not interact with these proteins. The DOTIS sequence element is highly conserved among the murine gamma D-, gamma E- and gamma F-cry and is present at comparable positions in the orthologous rat genes. Only a weak or even no protein-binding activity is observed if a few particular bases are changed, as in the rat gamma A-, gamma C- and gamma E-cry elements. DOTIS-binding proteins were found in commercially available bovine alpha-Cry preparations. The essential participation of alpha-Cry in the DNA-binding protein complex was confirmed using alpha-Cry-specific monoclonal antibody. The results reported here point to a novel function of alpha-Cry besides the structural properties in the lens.

  15. Murine bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for interleukin-12 gene delivery into Ewing sarcoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoping; Guan, Hui; Cao, Ying; Kleinerman, Eugenie S

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of interleukin 12 (IL-12) gene therapy in Ewing sarcoma and whether murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) could serve as vehicles for IL-12 gene delivery. MSCs were isolated from murine bone marrow cells. Cells were phenotyped using flow cytometry. Cultured MSCs differentiated into osteocytes and adipocytes using the appropriate media. Freshly isolated MSCs were transfected with adenoviral vectors containing either the beta-galactosidase (Ad:beta-gal) or the IL-12 (Ad:IL-12) gene. Expression of IL-12 was confirmed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Mice with TC71 Ewing sarcoma tumors were then treated intravenously with MSCs transfected with Ad:beta-gal or Ad:IL-12. Tumors were measured and analyzed by immunohistochemical analysis for expression of IL-12 protein. Expression of both p35 and p40 IL-12 subunits was demonstrated in MSCs transfected in vitro with Ad:IL-12. IL-12 expression was seen in tumors from mice treated with MSCs transfected with Ad:IL-12. Tumor growth was also significantly inhibited compared with that in mice treated with MSCs transfected with Ad:beta-gal. MSCs can be transfected with the IL-12 gene. These transfected cells localize to tumors after intravenous injection and induce local IL-12 protein production and the regression of established tumors. Copyright (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  16. Antibodies to SS-A/Ro-52kD and centromere in autoimmune liver disease: a clue to diagnosis and prognosis of primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Muratori, L; Pappas, G; Cassani, F; Worthington, J; Ferri, S; Quarneti, C; Cipriano, V; de Molo, C; Lenzi, M; Chapman, R W; Bianchi, F B

    2007-09-15

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) may be associated with various rheumatological disorders. To investigate the frequency and significance of 'rheumatological' antinuclear antibodies in the field of autoimmune chronic liver disease, with special regard to PBC. We studied 105 patients with PBC, 162 autoimmune liver disease controls (type 1 and 2 autoimmune hepatitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis), 30 systemic lupus erythematosus and 50 blood donors. Sera were tested for the presence of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA) by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, enzyme-linked and immunoblot (IB) assay, and for the presence of anti-centromere antibodies (ACA) by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells and IB. The overall prevalence of IB-detected anti-ENA in PBC (30%) was higher than in type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (2.5%, P < 0.0001), type 2 autoimmune hepatitis (0%, P < 0.0001) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (11.5%, P = 0.006) and lower than in systemic lupus erythematosus (53%, P = 0.03). The most frequent anti-ENA reactivity in PBC was anti-SSA/Ro-52kD (28%). ACA were detected by IB in 21% PBC patients and never in the other subjects (P < 0.0001). Anti-SS-A/Ro/52kD positive PBC patients had at the time of diagnosis a more advanced histological stage (P = 0.01) and higher serum levels of bilirubin (P = 0.01) and IgM (P = 0.03) compared with negative ones. In the autoimmune liver disease setting, anti-SS-A/Ro-52kD and ACA have a high specificity for PBC and can thus be of diagnostic relevance in anti-mitochondrial antibodies negative cases. If confirmed in further studies with adequate follow-up, anti-SS-A/Ro-52kD antibodies might identify PBC patients with a more advanced and active disease.

  17. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu-Ching [Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan (China); Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong [Department of Biochemistry, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Lai, Kuang-Chi [Department of Surgery, China Medical University Beigang Hospital, Yunlin 651, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min [Department of Pathology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan (China); Ho, Tin-Yun [School of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Hsiang, Chien-Yun, E-mail: cyhsiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Chung, Jing-Gung, E-mail: jgchung@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan (China); Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  18. Early induction of cytokines/cytokine receptors and Cox2, and activation of NF-κB in 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced murine oral cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu-Ching; Ho, Heng-Chien; Lee, Miau-Rong; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Yeh, Chung-Min; Lin, Yueh-Min; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the genes induced early in murine oral carcinogenesis. Murine tongue tumors induced by the carcinogen, 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO), and paired non-tumor tissues were subjected to microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering of upregulated genes in the tumor tissues revealed an association of induced genes with inflammation. Cytokines/cytokine receptors induced early were subsequently identified, clearly indicating their involvement in oral carcinogenesis. Hierarchical clustering also showed that cytokine-mediated inflammation was possibly linked with Mapk6. Cox2 exhibited the greatest extent (9–18 fold) of induction in the microarray data, and its early induction was observed in a 2 h painting experiment by RT-PCR. MetaCore analysis showed that overexpressed Cox2 may interact with p53 and transcriptionally inhibit expression of several downstream genes. A painting experiment in transgenic mice also demonstrated that NF-κB activates early independently of Cox2 induction. MetaCore analysis revealed the most striking metabolic alterations in tumor tissues, especially in lipid metabolism resulting from the reduction of Pparα and Rxrg. Reduced expression of Mapk12 was noted, and MetaCore analysis established its relationship with decreased efficiency of Pparα phosphorylation. In conclusion, in addition to cytokines/cytokine receptors, the early induction of Cox2 and NF-κB activation is involved in murine oral carcinogenesis.

  19. Germ line transmission of a yeast artificial chromosome spanning the murine [alpha][sub 1](I) collagen locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, W.M.; Dausman, J.; Beard, C.; Jaenisch, R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Johnson, C.; Lawrence, J.B. (Univ. of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester (United States))

    1993-03-26

    Molecular complementation of mutant phenotypes by transgenic technology is a potentially important tool for gene identification. A technology was developed to allow the transfer of a physically intact yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) into the germ line of the mouse. A purified 150-kilobase YAC encompassing the murine gene Col1a1 was efficiently introduced into embryonic stem (ES) cells via lipofection. Chimeric founder mice were derived from two transfected ES cell clones. These chimeras transmitted the full length transgene through the germ line, generating two transgenic mouse strains. Transgene expression was visualized as nascent transcripts in interphase nuclei and quantitated by ribonuclease protection analysis. Both assays indicated that the transgene was expressed at levels comparable to the endogenous collagen gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq of murine Bapx1 and Sox9 proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumantra Chatterjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work pertains to GEO submission GSE36672, in vivo and in vitro genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 proteins. We have previously shown that data from a genome wide binding assay combined with transcriptional profiling is an insightful means to divulge the mechanisms directing cell type specification and the generation of tissues and subsequent organs [1]. Our earlier work identified the role of the DNA-binding homeodomain containing protein Bapx1/Nkx3.2 in midgestation murine embryos. Microarray analysis of EGFP-tagged cells (both wildtype and null was integrated using ChIP-Seq analysis of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 DNA-binding proteins in living tissue.

  1. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  2. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  3. Single Amino Acid Insertion in Loop 4 Confers Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Receptor Function upon Murine Pit1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorf, Mikkel D.; Pedersen, Finn Skou; O'Hara, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    Pit1 is the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related human protein Pit2 is a receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV). The A-MuLV-related isolate 10A1 can utilize both Pit1 and Pit2 as receptors. A stretch...

  4. Expression of the Wilms' tumor gene WT1 in the murine urogenital system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, J; Schalling, M; Buckler, A J; Rogers, A; Haber, D A; Housman, D

    1991-08-01

    The Wilms' tumor gene WT1 is a recessive oncogene that encodes a putative transcription factor implicated in nephrogenesis during kidney development. In this report we analyze expression of WT1 in the murine urogenital system. WT1 is expressed in non-germ-cell components of the testis and ovaries in both young and adult mice. In situ mRNA hybridization studies demonstrate that WT1 is expressed in the granulosa and epithelial cells of ovaries, the Sertoli cells of the testis, and in the uterine wall. In addition to the 3.1-kb WT1 transcript detected by Northern blotting of RNA from kidney, uterus, and gonads, there is an approximately 2.5-kb WT1-related mRNA species in testis. The levels of WT1 mRNA in the gonads are among the highest observed, surpassing amounts detected in the embryonic kidney. During development, these levels are differentially regulated, depending on the sexual differentiation of the gonad. Expression of WT1 mRNA in the female reproductive system does not fluctuate significantly from days 4 to 40 postpartum. In contrast, WT1 mRNA levels in the tesis increase steadily after birth, reaching their highest expression levels at day 8 postpartum and decreasing slightly as the animal matures. Expression of WT1 in the gonads is detectable as early as 12.5 days postcoitum (p.c.). As an initial step toward exploring the tissue-specific expression of WT1, DNA elements upstream of WT1 were cloned and sequenced. Three putative transcription initiation sites, utilized in testis, ovaries, and uterus, were mapped by S1 nuclease protection assays. The sequences surrounding these sites have a high G + C content, and typical upstream CCAAT and TATAA boxes are not present. These studies allowed us to identify the translation initiation site for WT1 protein synthesis. We have also used an epitope-tagging protocol to demonstrate that WT1 is a nuclear protein, consistent with its role as a transcription factor. Our results demonstrate regulation of WT1 expression

  5. CRISPR/Cas9 Editing of Murine Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Engineering Inflammation-Resistant Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunger, Jonathan M; Zutshi, Ananya; Willard, Vincent P; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-05-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1) are found in elevated levels in diseased or injured tissues and promote rapid tissue degradation while preventing stem cell differentiation. This study was undertaken to engineer inflammation-resistant murine induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) through deletion of the IL-1 signaling pathway and to demonstrate the utility of these cells for engineering replacements for diseased or damaged tissues. Targeted deletion of the IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) gene in murine iPSCs was achieved using the RNA-guided, site-specific clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 genome engineering system. Clonal cell populations with homozygous and heterozygous deletions were isolated, and loss of receptor expression and cytokine signaling was confirmed by flow cytometry and transcriptional reporter assays, respectively. Cartilage was engineered from edited iPSCs and tested for its ability to resist IL-1-mediated degradation in gene expression, histologic, and biomechanical assays after a 3-day treatment with 1 ng/ml of IL-1α. Three of 41 clones isolated possessed the IL-1RI +/- genotype. Four clones possessed the IL-1RI -/- genotype, and flow cytometry confirmed loss of IL-1RI on the surface of these cells, which led to an absence of NF-κB transcription activation after IL-1α treatment. Cartilage engineered from homozygous null clones was resistant to cytokine-mediated tissue degradation. In contrast, cartilage derived from wild-type and heterozygous clones exhibited significant degradative responses, highlighting the need for complete IL-1 blockade. This work demonstrates proof-of-concept of the ability to engineer custom-designed stem cells that are immune to proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-1) as a potential cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  6. Elastin receptor (S-gal) occupancy by elastin peptides modulates T-cell response during murine emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Pierre, Alexandre; Sellami, Mehdi; Audonnet, Sandra; Lemaire, Flora; Le Naour, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema are associated with increased elastin peptides (EP) production because of excessive breakdown of lung connective tissue. We recently reported that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema. EP effects are largely mediated through a receptor complex that includes the elastin-binding protein spliced-galactosidase (S-gal). In previous studies, we established a correlation between cytokine production and S-gal protein expression in EP-treated immune cells. In this study, we investigated the S-gal-dependent EP effects on T-helper (Th) and T-cytotoxic (Tc) responses during murine EP-triggered pulmonary inflammation. C57BL/6J mice were endotracheally instilled with the valine-glycine-valine-alanine-proline-glycine (VGVAPG) elastin peptide, and, 21 days after treatment, local and systemic T-lymphocyte phenotypes were analyzed at cytokine and transcription factor expression levels by multicolor flow cytometry. Exposure of mice to the VGVAPG peptide resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of the CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing the cytokines IFN-γ or IL-17a and the transcription factors T-box expressed in T cells or retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt) without effects on IL-4 and Gata-binding protein 3 to DNA sequence [A/T]GATA[A/G] expression. These effects were maximized when each T-cell subpopulation was challenged ex vivo with EP, and they were inhibited in vivo when an analogous peptide antagonizing the EP/S-gal interactions was instilled together with the VGVAPG peptide. This study demonstrates that, during murine emphysema, EP-S-gal interactions contribute to a Th-1 and Th-17 proinflammatory T-cell response combined with a Tc-1 response. Our study also highlights the S-gal receptor as a putative pharmacological target to modulate such an immune response. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Analysis of Transcription Factors Key for Mouse Pancreatic Development Establishes NKX2-2 and MNX1 Mutations as Causes of Neonatal Diabetes in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Sarah E.; De Franco, Elisa; Lango Allen, Hana; Zerah, Michele; Abdul-Rasoul, Majedah M.; Edge, Julie A.; Stewart, Helen; Alamiri, Elham; Hussain, Khalid; Wallis, Sam; de Vries, Liat; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Houghton, Jayne A.L.; Edghill, Emma L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Understanding transcriptional regulation of pancreatic development is required to advance current efforts in developing beta cell replacement therapies for patients with diabetes. Current knowledge of key transcriptional regulators has predominantly come from mouse studies, with rare, naturally occurring mutations establishing their relevance in man. This study used a combination of homozygosity analysis and Sanger sequencing in 37 consanguineous patients with permanent neonatal diabetes to search for homozygous mutations in 29 transcription factor genes important for murine pancreatic development. We identified homozygous mutations in 7 different genes in 11 unrelated patients and show that NKX2-2 and MNX1 are etiological genes for neonatal diabetes, thus confirming their key role in development of the human pancreas. The similar phenotype of the patients with recessive mutations and mice with inactivation of a transcription factor gene support there being common steps critical for pancreatic development and validate the use of rodent models for beta cell development. PMID:24411943

  8. Noninfectious virus-like particles produced by Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retrovirus packaging cells deficient in viral envelope become infectious in the presence of lipofection reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S; Murai, F; Miyanohara, A; Friedmann, T

    1997-09-30

    Retrovirus packaging cell lines expressing the Moloney murine leukemia virus gag and pol genes but lacking virus envelope genes produce virus-like particles constitutively, whether or not they express a transcript from an integrated retroviral provirus. In the absence of a proviral transcript, the assembled particles contain processed gag and reverse transcriptase, and particles made by cells expressing an integrated lacZ provirus also contain viral RNA. The virus-like particles from both cell types are enveloped and are secreted/budded into the extracellular space but are noninfectious. Their physicochemical properties are similar to those of mature retroviral particles. The noninfectious gag pol RNA particles can readily be made infectious by the addition of lipofection reagents to produce preparations with titers of up to 10(5) colony-forming units per ml.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of hepatic lipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Viscarra, Jose; Kim, Sun-Joong; Sul, Hei Sook

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acid and fat synthesis in the liver is a highly regulated metabolic pathway that is important for very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) production and thus energy distribution to other tissues. Having common features at their promoter regions, lipogenic genes are coordinately regulated at the transcriptional level. Transcription factors, such as upstream stimulatory factors (USFs), sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1C (SREBP1C), liver X receptors (LXRs) and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) have crucial roles in this process. Recently, insights have been gained into the signalling pathways that regulate these transcription factors. After feeding, high blood glucose and insulin levels activate lipogenic genes through several pathways, including the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) and AKT-mTOR pathways. These pathways control the post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators, such as phosphorylation, acetylation or ubiquitylation, that affect their function, stability and/or localization. Dysregulation of lipogenesis can contribute to hepatosteatosis, which is associated with obesity and insulin resistance.

  10. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of

  11. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  12. Transcription is required to establish maternal imprinting at the Prader-Willi syndrome and Angelman syndrome locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Y Smith

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS [MIM 17620] and Angelman syndrome (AS [MIM 105830] locus is controlled by a bipartite imprinting center (IC consisting of the PWS-IC and the AS-IC. The most widely accepted model of IC function proposes that the PWS-IC activates gene expression from the paternal allele, while the AS-IC acts to epigenetically inactivate the PWS-IC on the maternal allele, thus silencing the paternally expressed genes. Gene order and imprinting patterns at the PWS/AS locus are well conserved from human to mouse; however, a murine AS-IC has yet to be identified. We investigated a potential regulatory role for transcription from the Snrpn alternative upstream exons in silencing the maternal allele using a murine transgene containing Snrpn and three upstream exons. This transgene displayed appropriate imprinted expression and epigenetic marks, demonstrating the presence of a functional AS-IC. Transcription of the upstream exons from the endogenous locus correlates with imprint establishment in oocytes, and this upstream exon expression pattern was conserved on the transgene. A transgene bearing targeted deletions of each of the three upstream exons exhibited loss of imprinting upon maternal transmission. These results support a model in which transcription from the Snrpn upstream exons directs the maternal imprint at the PWS-IC.

  13. Mammalian transcriptional hotspots are enriched for tissue specific enhancers near cell type specific highly expressed genes and are predicted to act as transcriptional activator hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anagha

    2014-12-30

    Transcriptional hotspots are defined as genomic regions bound by multiple factors. They have been identified recently as cell type specific enhancers regulating developmentally essential genes in many species such as worm, fly and humans. The in-depth analysis of hotspots across multiple cell types in same species still remains to be explored and can bring new biological insights. We therefore collected 108 transcription-related factor (TF) ChIP sequencing data sets in ten murine cell types and classified the peaks in each cell type in three groups according to binding occupancy as singletons (low-occupancy), combinatorials (mid-occupancy) and hotspots (high-occupancy). The peaks in the three groups clustered largely according to the occupancy, suggesting priming of genomic loci for mid occupancy irrespective of cell type. We then characterized hotspots for diverse structural functional properties. The genes neighbouring hotspots had a small overlap with hotspot genes in other cell types and were highly enriched for cell type specific function. Hotspots were enriched for sequence motifs of key TFs in that cell type and more than 90% of hotspots were occupied by pioneering factors. Though we did not find any sequence signature in the three groups, the H3K4me1 binding profile had bimodal peaks at hotspots, distinguishing hotspots from mono-modal H3K4me1 singletons. In ES cells, differentially expressed genes after perturbation of activators were enriched for hotspot genes suggesting hotspots primarily act as transcriptional activator hubs. Finally, we proposed that ES hotspots might be under control of SetDB1 and not DNMT for silencing. Transcriptional hotspots are enriched for tissue specific enhancers near cell type specific highly expressed genes. In ES cells, they are predicted to act as transcriptional activator hubs and might be under SetDB1 control for silencing.

  14. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynertson, Kurt A. [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Charlson, Mary E. [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu [Center for Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells.

  15. Microarray Gene Expression Analysis of Murine Tumor Heterogeneity Defined by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick G. Costouros

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of studying angiogenesis are limited in their ability to serially evaluate in vivo function throughout a target tissue. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and pharmacokinetic modeling provide a useful method for evaluating tissue vasculature based on contrast accumulation and washout. While it is often assumed that areas of high contrast enhancement and washout comprise areas of increased angiogenesis and tumor activity, the actual molecular pathways that are active in such areas are poorly understood. Using DCE-MRI in a murine subcutaneous tumor model, we were able to perform pharmacokinetic functional analysis of a tumor, coregistration of MRI images with histological cross-sections, immunohistochemistry, laser capture microdissection, and genetic profiling of tumor heterogeneity based on pharmacokinetic parameters. Using imaging as a template for biologic investigation, we have not found evidence of increased expression of proangiogenic modulators at the transcriptional level in either distinct pharmacokinetic region. Furthermore, these regions show no difference on histology and CD31 immunohistochemistry. However, the expression of ribosomal proteins was greatly increased in high enhancement and washout regions, implying increased protein translation and consequent increased cellular activity. Together, these findings point to the potential importance of posttranscriptional regulation in angiogenesis and the need for the development of angiogenesis-specific contrast agents to evaluate in vivo angiogenesis at a molecular level.

  16. Central Nervous System Demyelination and Remyelination is Independent from Systemic Cholesterol Level in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Sun, Wenhui; Brogden, Graham; Sun, Yanyong; Kammeyer, Patricia; Kalkuhl, Arno; Colbatzky, Florian; Deschl, Ulrich; Naim, Hassan Y; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    High dietary fat and/or cholesterol intake is a risk factor for multiple diseases and has been debated for multiple sclerosis. However, cholesterol biosynthesis is a key pathway during myelination and disturbances are described in demyelinating diseases. To address the possible interaction of dyslipidemia and demyelination, cholesterol biosynthesis gene expression, composition of the body's major lipid repositories and Paigen diet-induced, systemic hypercholesterolemia were examined in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) using histology, immunohistochemistry, serum clinical chemistry, microarrays and high-performance thin layer chromatography. TME-virus (TMEV)-infected mice showed progressive loss of motor performance and demyelinating leukomyelitis. Gene expression associated with cholesterol biosynthesis was overall down-regulated in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. Spinal cord levels of galactocerebroside and sphingomyelin were reduced on day 196 post TMEV infection. Paigen diet induced serum hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipidosis. However, high dietary fat and cholesterol intake led to no significant differences in clinical course, inflammatory response, astrocytosis, and the amount of demyelination and remyelination in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. The results suggest that down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis is a transcriptional marker for demyelination, quantitative loss of myelin-specific lipids, but not cholesterol occurs late in chronic demyelination, and serum hypercholesterolemia exhibited no significant effect on TMEV infection. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  17. Induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation by medicinal plant extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynertson, Kurt A; Charlson, Mary E; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates that diets high in fruits and vegetables provide a measure of cancer chemoprevention due to phytochemical constituents. Natural products are a rich source of cancer chemotherapy drugs, and primarily target rapidly cycling tumor cells. Increasing evidence indicates that many cancers contain small populations of resistant, stem-like cells that have the capacity to regenerate tumors following chemotherapy and radiation, and have been linked to the initiation of metastases. Our goal is to discover natural product-based clinical or dietary interventions that selectively target cancer stem cells, inducing differentiation. We adapted an alkaline phosphatase (AP) stain to assay plant extracts for the capacity to induce differentiation in embryonic stem (ES) cells. AP is a characteristic marker of undifferentiated ES cells, and this represents a novel approach to screening medicinal plant extracts. Following a survey of approximately 100 fractions obtained from 12 species of ethnomedically utilized plants, we found fractions from 3 species that induced differentiation, decreasing AP and transcript levels of pluripotency markers (Nanog, Oct-4, Rex-1). These fractions affected proliferation of murine ES, and human embryonal, prostate, and breast carcinoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Several phytochemical constituents were isolated; the antioxidant phytochemicals ellagic acid and gallic acid were shown to affect viability of cultured breast carcinoma cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Palmitoylation regulates 17β-estradiol-induced estrogen receptor-α degradation and transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Pesiri, Valeria; Leclercq, Guy; Marino, Maria; Acconcia, Filippo

    2012-05-01

    The estrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a transcription factor that regulates gene expression through the binding to its cognate hormone 17β-estradiol (E2). ERα transcriptional activity is regulated by E2-evoked 26S proteasome-mediated ERα degradation and ERα serine (S) residue 118 phosphorylation. Furthermore, ERα mediates fast cell responses to E2 through the activation of signaling cascades such as the MAPK/ERK and phosphoinositide-3-kinase/v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 1 pathways. These E2 rapid effects require a population of the ERα located at the cell plasma membrane through palmitoylation, a dynamic enzymatic modification mediated by palmitoyl-acyl-transferases. However, whether membrane-initiated and transcriptional ERα activities integrate in a unique picture or represent parallel pathways still remains to be firmly clarified. Hence, we evaluated here the impact of ERα palmitoylation on E2-induced ERα degradation and S118 phosphorylation. The lack of palmitoylation renders ERα more susceptible to E2-dependent degradation, blocks ERα S118 phosphorylation and prevents E2-induced ERα estrogen-responsive element-containing promoter occupancy. Consequently, ERα transcriptional activity is prevented and the receptor addressed to the nuclear matrix subnuclear compartment. These data uncover a circuitry in which receptor palmitoylation links E2-dependent ERα degradation, S118 phosphorylation, and transcriptional activity in a unique molecular mechanism. We propose that rapid E2-dependent signaling could be considered as a prerequisite for ERα transcriptional activity and suggest an integrated model of ERα intracellular signaling where E2-dependent early extranuclear effects control late receptor-dependent nuclear actions.

  19. Utility of in vivo transcription profiling for identifying Pseudomonas aeruginosa genes needed for gastrointestinal colonization and dissemination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koh, Andrew Y; Mikkelsen, Per J; Smith, Roger S

    2010-01-01

    these mutants and WT P. aeruginosa PA14. To evaluate T3SS factors, we tested GI colonization and neutropenia-induced dissemination of both deletional (PAO1 and PAK) and insertional (PA14) mutants in four genes in the P. aeruginosa T3SS, exoS or exoU, exoT, and popB. There were no significant differences in GI......, increased transcription of genes during in vivo murine GI colonization is not predictive of an essential role for the gene product in either colonization or overall survival following induction of neutropenia....

  20. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  1. Alternative staffing services. Contract transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, C

    1992-03-01

    Contract medical transcription services can be of great assistance in meeting the demands for transcription, without jeopardizing patient, physician, or institutional confidentiality. You simply must require the contract service to provide at least the same degree of protection and preservation of confidentiality that you should require inhouse. To achieve this you must make these requirements explicit, comprehensive, comprehensible, believable, and enforceable. Discuss the requirements with prospective contractors. Review them at least annually with existing contractors and when contracts are due for renewal. Be sure to specify the consequence of breaching confidentiality, and if there are breaches, enforce the terms of the contract. Consult your institution's legal counsel both in developing the contract and in enforcing its provisions. Take into consideration your department's and institution's policies, AHIMA's statement on confidentiality, as well as local, state, and federal laws. Above all, never lose sight of the patient. Ultimately, it is not patient information that you are obligated to protect. It is the patient.

  2. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe JmjC-protein, Msc1, prevents H2A.Z localization in centromeric and subtelomeric chromatin domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Buchanan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes are repetitively packaged into chromatin by nucleosomes, however they are regulated by the differences between nucleosomes, which establish various chromatin states. Local chromatin cues direct the inheritance and propagation of chromatin status via self-reinforcing epigenetic mechanisms. Replication-independent histone exchange could potentially perturb chromatin status if histone exchange chaperones, such as Swr1C, loaded histone variants into wrong sites. Here we show that in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, like Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Swr1C is required for loading H2A.Z into specific sites, including the promoters of lowly expressed genes. However S. pombe Swr1C has an extra subunit, Msc1, which is a JumonjiC-domain protein of the Lid/Jarid1 family. Deletion of Msc1 did not disrupt the S. pombe Swr1C or its ability to bind and load H2A.Z into euchromatin, however H2A.Z was ectopically found in the inner centromere and in subtelomeric chromatin. Normally this subtelomeric region not only lacks H2A.Z but also shows uniformly lower levels of H3K4me2, H4K5, and K12 acetylation than euchromatin and disproportionately contains the most lowly expressed genes during vegetative growth, including many meiotic-specific genes. Genes within and adjacent to subtelomeric chromatin become overexpressed in the absence of either Msc1, Swr1, or paradoxically H2A.Z itself. We also show that H2A.Z is N-terminally acetylated before, and lysine acetylated after, loading into chromatin and that it physically associates with the Nap1 histone chaperone. However, we find a negative correlation between the genomic distributions of H2A.Z and Nap1/Hrp1/Hrp3, suggesting that the Nap1 chaperones remove H2A.Z from chromatin. These data describe H2A.Z action in S. pombe and identify a new mode of chromatin surveillance and maintenance based on negative regulation of histone variant misincorporation.

  3. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Jessica; Hwang, Grace; Jacob, Justin; Sapp, Nicklas; Bedigian, Rick; Oka, Kazuhiro; Overbeek, Paul; Murray, Steve; Jordan, Philip W

    2014-07-01

    Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3) proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG) protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β), two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8) and one STAG protein (STAG3) that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC). From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8) is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis-specific cohesin

  4. Meiosis-specific cohesin component, Stag3 is essential for maintaining centromere chromatid cohesion, and required for DNA repair and synapsis between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hopkins

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cohesins are important for chromosome structure and chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Cohesins are composed of two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC1-SMC3 proteins that form a V-shaped heterodimer structure, which is bridged by a α-kleisin protein and a stromal antigen (STAG protein. Previous studies in mouse have shown that there is one SMC1 protein (SMC1β, two α-kleisins (RAD21L and REC8 and one STAG protein (STAG3 that are meiosis-specific. During meiosis, homologous chromosomes must recombine with one another in the context of a tripartite structure known as the synaptonemal complex (SC. From interaction studies, it has been shown that there are at least four meiosis-specific forms of cohesin, which together with the mitotic cohesin complex, are lateral components of the SC. STAG3 is the only meiosis-specific subunit that is represented within all four meiosis-specific cohesin complexes. In Stag3 mutant germ cells, the protein level of other meiosis-specific cohesin subunits (SMC1β, RAD21L and REC8 is reduced, and their localization to chromosome axes is disrupted. In contrast, the mitotic cohesin complex remains intact and localizes robustly to the meiotic chromosome axes. The instability of meiosis-specific cohesins observed in Stag3 mutants results in aberrant DNA repair processes, and disruption of synapsis between homologous chromosomes. Furthermore, mutation of Stag3 results in perturbation of pericentromeric heterochromatin clustering, and disruption of centromere cohesion between sister chromatids during meiotic prophase. These defects result in early prophase I arrest and apoptosis in both male and female germ cells. The meiotic defects observed in Stag3 mutants are more severe when compared to single mutants for Smc1β, Rec8 and Rad21l, however they are not as severe as the Rec8, Rad21l double mutants. Taken together, our study demonstrates that STAG3 is required for the stability of all meiosis

  5. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    model (PTO) is used to describe data from an assortment of methods (e.g. RIP-Chip, CLIP-Chip, miRNA profiling, ribosome profiling) that globally address the functionality of mRNA. Several examples of post-transcriptional operons have been documented in the literature and demonstrate the usefulness...... of the model in identifying new participants in cellular pathways as well as in deepening our understanding of cellular responses....

  6. Three-dimensional alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Nishimura, Akinobu; Satonaka, Haruhiko; Shintani, Ken; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Kasai, Yuichi; Masuda, Koichi; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2009-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the bone and often forms pulmonary metastases, which are the most important prognostic factor. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the progression and metastasis of human OS, a culture system mimicking the microenvironment of the tumor in vivo is needed. We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma. Two different metastatic clones, the parental Dunn and its derivative line LM8, which has a higher metastatic potential to the lungs, were encapsulated in alginate beads to develop the 3D culture system. The beads containing murine OS cells were also transplanted into mice to determine their metastatic potential in vivo. In this culture system, murine OS cells encapsulated in alginate beads were able to grow in a 3D structure with cells detaching from the alginate environment. The number of detaching cells was higher in the LM8 cell line than the Dunn cell line. In the in vivo alginate bead transplantation model, the rate of pulmonary metastasis was higher with LM8 cells compared with that of Dunn cells. The cell characteristics and kinetics in this culture system closely reflect the original malignant potential of the cells in vivo.

  7. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21 WAF1/CIP1

  8. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}. Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 {sup WAF1/CIP1}. Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}.

  9. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G. [Univ. of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  10. Mutual interdependence of splicing and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzyżek, Grzegorz; Świeżewski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    Transcription and splicing are intrinsically linked, as splicing needs a pre-mRNA substrate to commence. The more nuanced view is that the rate of transcription contributes to splicing regulation. On the other hand there is accumulating evidence that splicing has an active role in controlling transcription elongation by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAP II). We briefly review those mechanisms and propose a unifying model where splicing controls transcription elongation to provide an optimal timing for successive rounds of splicing.

  11. A novel fluid resuscitation strategy modulates pulmonary transcription factor activation in a murine model of hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd W. Costantini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Combining the hemodynamic and immune benefits of hypertonic saline with the anti-inflammatory effects of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor pentoxifylline (HSPTX as a hemorrhagic shock resuscitation strategy reduces lung injury when compared with the effects of Ringer's lactate (RL. We hypothesized that HSPTX exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with nuclear factor kappa B/cAMP response element-binding protein (NF-κB-CREB competition for the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP in lung tissue, thus affecting pro-inflammatory mediator production. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 60 minutes of hemorrhagic shock to reach a mean arterial blood pressure of 35 mmHg followed by resuscitation with either RL or HSPTX (7.5% HS + 25 mg/kg PTX. After four hours, lung samples were collected. NF-κB activation was assessed by measuring the levels of phosphorylated cytoplasmic inhibitor of kappa B (I-κB and nuclear NF-κB p65 by western blot. NF-κB and CREB DNA-binding activity were measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Competition between NF-κB and CREB for the coactivator CBP was determined by immunoprecipitation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8 levels in the lung were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: RL resuscitation produced significantly higher levels of lung IL-8 levels, I-κB phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation, and NF-κB DNA binding compared with HSPTX. NF-κB-CBP-binding activity was similar in both groups, whereas CREB-CBP-binding activity was significantly increased with HSPTX. CREB-DNA binding-activity increased to a greater level with HSPTX compared with RL. DISCUSSION: HSPTX decreases lung inflammation following hemorrhagic shock compared with conventional resuscitation using RL through attenuation of NF-κB signaling and increased CREB-DNA binding activity. HSPTX may have therapeutic potential in the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury observed after severe hemorrhagic shock.

  12. Interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Transcription-coupled DNA supercoiling has been shown to be an important regulator of transcription that is broadly present in the cell. Here we review experimental work which shows that RNA polymerase is a powerful torsional motor that can alter DNA topology and structure, and DNA supercoiling in turn directly affects transcription elongation.

  13. The Role of the MHV Receptor and Related Glycoproteins in Murine Hepatitis Virus Infection of Murine Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-13

    vaccinia virus-T7 RNA polymerase s y stem for e xpression of target genes . Mol . Cell . BioI . 7 : 2538-2544 . Gagneten , S ., Gout , 0 ., Dubois-Dalcq...glycoprotein. These results showed f or the first time that two murine CEA- related genes can be co-expressed in some cell lines from inbred mice...49 Southern Hybridization ................ . ............ 50 Subcloning of PCR Products and Gene Cloning ........ 51 Growth

  14. MicroRNA-gene expression network in murine liver during Schistosoma japonicum infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Schistosomiasis japonica remains a significant public health problem in China and Southeast Asian countries. The most typical and serious outcome of the chronic oriental schistosomiasis is the progressive granuloma and fibrosis in the host liver, which has been a major medical challenge. However, the molecular mechanism underling the hepatic pathogenesis is still not clear. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using microarrays, we quantified the temporal gene expression profiles in the liver of Schistosoma japonicum-infected BALB/c mice at 15, 30, and 45 day post infection (dpi with that from uninfected mice as controls. Gene expression alternation associated with liver damage was observed in the initial phase of infection (dpi 15, which became more magnificent with the onset of egg-laying. Up-regulated genes were dominantly associated with inflammatory infiltration, whereas down-regulated genes primarily led to the hepatic functional disorders. Simultaneously, microRNA profiles from the same samples were decoded by Solexa sequencing. More than 130 miRNAs were differentially expressed in murine liver during S. japonicum infection. MiRNAs significantly dysregulated in the mid-phase of infection (dpi 30, such as mmu-miR-146b and mmu-miR-155, may relate to the regulation of hepatic inflammatory responses, whereas miRNAs exhibiting a peak expression in the late phase of infection (dpi 45, such as mmu-miR-223, mmu-miR-146a/b, mmu-miR-155, mmu-miR-34c, mmu-miR-199, and mmu-miR-134, may represent a molecular signature of the development of schistosomal hepatopathy. Further, a dynamic miRNA-gene co-expression network in the progression of infection was constructed. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This study presents a global view of dynamic expression of both mRNA and miRNA transcripts in murine liver during S. japonicum infection, and highlights that miRNAs may play a variety of regulatory roles in balancing the immune responses during the

  15. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício C. Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate. HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2 genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  16. A Tandem Repeat in Decay Accelerating Factor 1 Is Associated with Severity of Murine Mercury-Induced Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Cauvi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Decay accelerating factor (DAF, a complement-regulatory protein, protects cells from bystander complement-mediated lysis and negatively regulates T cells. Reduced expression of DAF occurs in several systemic autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, and DAF deficiency exacerbates disease in several autoimmune models, including murine mercury-induced autoimmunity (mHgIA. Daf1, located within Hmr1, a chromosome 1 locus associated in DBA/2 mice with resistance to mHgIA, could be a candidate. Here we show that reduced Daf1 transcription in lupus-prone mice was not associated with a reduction in the Daf1 transcription factor SP1. Studies of NZB mice congenic for the mHgIA-resistant DBA/2 Hmr1 locus suggested that Daf1 expression was controlled by the host genome and not the Hmr1 locus. A unique pentanucleotide repeat variant in the second intron of Daf1 in DBA/2 mice was identified and shown in F2 intercrosses to be associated with less severe disease; however, analysis of Hmr1 congenics indicated that this most likely reflected the presence of autoimmunity-predisposing genetic variants within the Hmr1 locus or that Daf1 expression is mediated by the tandem repeat in epistasis with other genetic variants present in autoimmune-prone mice. These studies argue that the effect of DAF on autoimmunity is complex and may require multiple genetic elements.

  17. The potential role of ribosomal protein S5 on cell cycle arrest and initiation of murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matragkou, Christina N; Papachristou, Eleni T; Tezias, Sotirios S; Tsiftsoglou, Asterios S; Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Vizirianakis, Ioannis S

    2008-07-01

    Evidence now exists to indicate that some ribosomal proteins besides being structural components of the ribosomal subunits are involved in the regulation of cell differentiation and apoptosis. As we have shown earlier, initiation of erythroid differentiation of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells is associated with transcriptional inactivation of genes encoding ribosomal RNAs and ribosomal proteins S5 (RPS5) and L35a. In this study, we extended these observations and investigated whether transfection of MEL cells with RPS5 cDNA affects the onset of initiation of erythroid maturation and their entrance in cell cycle arrest. Stably transfected MEL cloned cells (MEL-C14 and MEL-C56) were established and assessed for their capacity to produce RPS5 RNA transcript and its translated product. The impact of RPS5 cDNA transfection on the RPS5 gene expression patterns and the accumulation of RPS5 protein in inducible transfected MEL cells were correlated with their ability to: (a) initiate differentiation, (b) enter cell cycle arrest at G(1)/G(0) phase, and (c) modulate the level of cyclin-dependent kinases CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6. The data presented indicate that deregulation of RPS5 gene expression (constitutive expression) affects RPS5 protein level and delays both the onset of initiation of erythroid maturation and entrance in cell cycle arrest in inducer-treated MEL cells. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Directing traffic on DNA-How transcription factors relieve or induce transcriptional interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Nan; Palmer, Adam C; Dodd, Ian B; Shearwin, Keith E

    2017-03-15

    Transcriptional interference (TI) is increasingly recognized as a widespread mechanism of gene control, particularly given the pervasive nature of transcription, both sense and antisense, across all kingdoms of life. Here, we discuss how transcription factor binding kinetics strongly influence the ability of a transcription factor to relieve or induce TI.

  19. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism....... The biosynthetic machinery of GLS is governed by interplay of six MYB and three bHLH transcription factors. MYB28, MYB29 and MYB76 regulate methionine-derived GLS, and MYB51, MYB34 and MYB122 regulate tryptophan-derived GLS. The three bHLH transcription factors MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 physically interact with all six...

  20. Repression of Meiotic Genes by Antisense Transcription and by Fkh2 Transcription Factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Khan, Sohail R.; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription ...

  1. Regulation of an H-ras-related transcript by parathyroid hormone in rat osteosarcoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D. K.; Weaver, W. R.; Clohisy, J. C.; Brakenhoff, K. D.; Kahn, A. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1992-01-01

    The rat osteosarcoma cell line UMR 106-01 is a commonly used model system for the study of osteoblast function. However, it also expresses a phenotype characteristic of transformed cells. To test whether the latter could be accounted for by aberrant oncogene expression, we probed Northern blots of UMR and other osteoblastic cells with a panel of oncogene probes. These blots, when probed with a cDNA specific for v-H-ras, revealed a 7.0-kilobase (kb) H-ras-related transcript (designated HRRT) in UMR 106-01 cells that was not expressed in other osteoblastic cells. Osteoblast-enriched calvarial cells expressed the typical 1.1-kb H-ras mRNA, which was absent in UMR cells. Additionally, Western blots of lysates of UMR cells documented the presence of three proteins immunologically related to H-rasp21. To determine whether HRRT represented a recombinant retrovirus product, Northern blots were probed with a cDNA specific for the highly conserved gag-pol region of Moloney murine leukemia virus. These blots showed parallel cross-reactivity with an apparently identical transcript of 7.0 kb. The 7.0-kb transcripts detected by both v-H-ras and gag-pol probes declined to the same extent after treatment with concentrations of PTH known to inhibit proliferation of these cells. PTH regulated the abundance of HRRT in a time- and dose-dependent manner, with greatest repression of the transcript after 8 h of treatment with 10(-8) M PTH. The decrease in HRRT could not be completely accounted for by changes in transcriptional activity, as determined by nuclear run-on assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Bifidobacterium breve and Lactobacillus rhamnosus treatment is as effective as budesonide at reducing inflammation in a murine model for chronic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Seil; Morgan, Mary E; Chen, Si; Vos, Arjan P; Garssen, Johan; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Boon, Louis; Georgiou, Niki A; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Folkerts, Gert

    2014-04-16

    Asthma is estimated to affect as many as 300 million people worldwide and its incidence and prevalence are rapidly increasing throughout the world, especially in children and within developing countries. Recently, there has been a growing interest in the use of potentially beneficial bacteria for allergic diseases. This study is aimed at exploring the therapeutic effects of long-term treatment with two different beneficial bacterial strains (Bifidobacterium breve M-16 V and Lactobacillus rhamnosus NutRes1) and a glucocorticoid (budesonide), as a reference treatment, on inflammatory response in a murine model for chronic allergic asthma. To mimic the chronic disease in asthmatic patients, we used the murine ovalbumin-induced asthma model combined with prolonged allergen exposure. Airway function; pulmonary airway inflammation; airway remodelling, mRNA expression of pattern recognition receptors, Th-specific cytokines and transcription factors in lung tissue; mast cell degranulation; in vitro T cell activation; and expression of Foxp3 in blood Th cells were examined. Lactobacillus rhamnosus reduced lung resistance to a similar extent as budesonide treatment in chronically asthmatic mice. Pulmonary airway inflammation, mast cell degranulation, T cell activation and airway remodelling were suppressed by all treatments. Beneficial bacteria and budesonide differentially modulated the expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs), nod-like receptors (NLRs), cytokines and T cell transcription factors. Bifidobacterium breve induced regulatory T cell responses in the airways by increasing Il10 and Foxp3 transcription in lung tissue as well as systemic by augmenting the mean fluorescence intensity of Foxp3 in blood CD4+ T cells. These findings show that Bifidobacterium breve M-16 V and Lactobacillus rhamnosus NutRes1 have strong anti-inflammatory properties that are comparable to budesonide and therefore may be beneficial in the treatment of chronic asthma.

  3. Derepression of the Iroquois Homeodomain Transcription Factor Gene IRX3 Confers Differentiation Block in Acute Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D.D. Somerville

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Iroquois homeodomain transcription factor gene IRX3 is expressed in the developing nervous system, limb buds, and heart, and transcript levels specify obesity risk in humans. We now report a functional role for IRX3 in human acute leukemia. Although transcript levels are very low in normal human bone marrow cells, high IRX3 expression is found in ∼30% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, ∼50% with T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and ∼20% with B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia, frequently in association with high-level HOXA gene expression. Expression of IRX3 alone was sufficient to immortalize hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs in myeloid culture and induce lymphoid leukemias in vivo. IRX3 knockdown induced terminal differentiation of AML cells. Combined IRX3 and Hoxa9 expression in murine HSPCs impeded normal T-progenitor differentiation in lymphoid culture and substantially enhanced the morphologic and phenotypic differentiation block of AML in myeloid leukemia transplantation experiments through suppression of a terminal myelomonocytic program. Likewise, in cases of primary human AML, high IRX3 expression is strongly associated with reduced myelomonocytic differentiation. Thus, tissue-inappropriate derepression of IRX3 contributes significantly to the block in differentiation, which is the pathognomonic feature of human acute leukemias.

  4. Transcriptional activation of melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein by PPARγ in adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Yoon-Jin [Department of Biology, Research Institute for Basic Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Si Young [R and D Center, Amore Pacific Corporation, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae Ryong, E-mail: trlee@amorepacific.com [R and D Center, Amore Pacific Corporation, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-729 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Hoon, E-mail: shkim@khu.ac.kr [Department of Biology, Research Institute for Basic Science, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-27

    Highlights: •MRAP enhanced HSL expression. •ACTH-mediated MRAP reduced glycerol release. •PPARγ induced MRAP expression. •PPARγ bound to the MRAP promoter. -- Abstract: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in rodents decreases lipid accumulation and body weight. Melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R) and MC2R accessory protein (MRAP) are specific receptors for ACTH in adipocytes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways such as adipogenesis and β-oxidation of fatty acids. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of MRAP expression during differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Stimulation with ACTH affected lipolysis in murine mature adipocytes via MRAP. Putative peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) was identified in the MRAP promoter region. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we observed binding of PPARγ to the MRAP promoter. The mutagenesis experiments showed that the −1209/−1198 region of the MRAP promoter could function as a PPRE site. These results suggest that PPARγ is required for transcriptional activation of the MRAP gene during adipogenesis, which contributes to understanding of the molecular mechanism of lipolysis in adipocytes.

  5. Transcriptional activation of melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein by PPARγ in adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Soo; Kim, Yoon-Jin; Cho, Si Young; Lee, Tae Ryong; Kim, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •MRAP enhanced HSL expression. •ACTH-mediated MRAP reduced glycerol release. •PPARγ induced MRAP expression. •PPARγ bound to the MRAP promoter. -- Abstract: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in rodents decreases lipid accumulation and body weight. Melanocortin receptor 2 (MC2R) and MC2R accessory protein (MRAP) are specific receptors for ACTH in adipocytes. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of metabolic pathways such as adipogenesis and β-oxidation of fatty acids. In this study we investigated the transcriptional regulation of MRAP expression during differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells. Stimulation with ACTH affected lipolysis in murine mature adipocytes via MRAP. Putative peroxisome proliferator response element (PPRE) was identified in the MRAP promoter region. In chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we observed binding of PPARγ to the MRAP promoter. The mutagenesis experiments showed that the −1209/−1198 region of the MRAP promoter could function as a PPRE site. These results suggest that PPARγ is required for transcriptional activation of the MRAP gene during adipogenesis, which contributes to understanding of the molecular mechanism of lipolysis in adipocytes

  6. The Homeodomain Transcription Factor Cdx1 Does Not Behave as an Oncogene in Normal Mouse Intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann S. Crissey

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Caudal-related homeobox genes Cdx1 and Cdx2 are intestine-specific transcription factors that regulate differentiation of intestinal cell types. Previously, we have shown Cdx1 to be antiproliferative and to promote cell differentiation. However, other studies have suggested that Cdx1 may be an oncogene. To test for oncogenic behavior, we used the murine villin promoter to ectopically express Cdx1 in the small intestinal villi and colonic surface epithelium. No changes in intestinal architecture, cell differentiation, or lineage selection were observed with expression of the transgene. Classic oncogenes enhance proliferation and induce tumors when ectopically expressed. However, the Cdx1 transgene neither altered intestinal proliferation nor induced spontaneous intestinal tumors. In a murine model for colitis-associated cancer, the Cdx1 transgene decreased, rather than increased, the number of adenomas that developed. In the polyps, the expression of the endogenous and the transgenic Cdx1 proteins was largely absent, whereas endogenous Villin expression was retained. This suggests that transgene silencing was specific and not due to a general Villin inactivation. In conclusion, neither the ectopic expression of Cdx1 was associated with changes in intestinal cell proliferation or differentiation nor was there increased intestinal cancer susceptibility. Our results therefore suggest that Cdx1 is not an oncogene in normal intestinal epithelium.

  7. UV-induced transcription from the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat and UV-induced secretion of an extracellular factor that induces HIV-1 transcription in nonirradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, B.; Kraemer, M.R.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Ponta, H.; Herrlich, P.

    1989-01-01

    UV irradiation, but not visible sunlight, induces the transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Chimeric constructs carrying all or parts of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat linked to an indicator gene were transfected into HeLa cells or murine and human T-cell lines, and their response to irradiation was tested. The cis-acting element conferring UV responsiveness is identical to the sequence binding transcription factor NF kappa B. UV irradiation enhances NF kappa B binding activity as assayed by gel retardation experiments. Interestingly, the requirement for UV irradiation can be replaced by cocultivation of transfected cells with UV-irradiated nontransfected (HIV-1-negative) cells. A UV-induced extracellular protein factor is detected in the culture medium conditioned by UV-treated cells. The factor is produced upon UV irradiation by several murine and human cell lines, including HeLa, Molt-4, and Jurkat, and acts on several cells. These data suggest that the UV response of keratinocytes in human skin can be magnified and spread to deeper layers that are more shielded, including the Langerhans cells, and that this indirect UV response may contribute to the activation of HIV-1 in humans

  8. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Evaluation of Fusarium spp. pathogenicity in plant and murine models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Reyes, Consuelo M; Alvarado-Fernández, Angela M; Ceballos-Rojas, Ana M; González-Carmona, Lady C; Linares-Linares, Melva Y; Castañeda-Salazar, Rubiela; Pulido-Villamarín, Adriana; Góngora-Medina, Manuel E; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús A; Rodríguez-Bocanegra, María X

    The genus Fusarium is widely recognized for its phytopathogenic capacity. However, it has been reported as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Thus, it can be considered a microorganism of interest in pathogenicity studies on different hosts. Therefore, this work evaluated the pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. isolates from different origins in plants and animals (murine hosts). Twelve isolates of Fusarium spp. from plants, animal superficial mycoses, and human superficial and systemic mycoses were inoculated in tomato, passion fruit and carnation plants, and in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed BALB/c mice. Pathogenicity tests in plants did not show all the symptoms associated with vascular wilt in the three plant models; however, colonization and necrosis of the vascular bundles, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates, showed the infective potential of Fusarium spp. in different plant species. Moreover, the pathogenicity tests in the murine model revealed behavioral changes. It was noteworthy that only five isolates (different origin and species) caused mortality. Additionally, it was observed that all isolates infected and colonized different organs, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates or host immune status. In contrast, the superficial inoculation test showed no evidence of epidermal injury or colonization. The observed results in plant and murine models suggest the pathogenic potential of Fusarium spp. isolates in different types of hosts. However, further studies on pathogenicity are needed to confirm the multihost capacity of this genus. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Corn silk induced cyclooxygenase-2 in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung A; Shin, Hyun-Hee; Choi, Sang Kyu; Choi, Hye-Seon

    2005-10-01

    Stimulation of murine macrophages with corn silk induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 with secretion of PGE2. Expression of COX-2 was inhibited by pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), and increased DNA binding by nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), indicating that COX-2 induction proceeds also via the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. A specific inhibitor of COX-2 decreased the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) stimulated by corn silk. PGE2 elevated the expression level of iNOS, probably via EP2 and EP4 receptors on the surface of the macrophages.

  12. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  13. Murine nephrotoxic nephritis as a model of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, M. K.E.; Kvist, P. H.; Jensen, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Using the nonaccelerated murine nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) as a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could provide an easily inducible model that enables a rapid test of treatments. Originally, the NTN model was developed as an acute model of glomerulonephritis, but in this study we evaluate...... progressive mesangial expansion and significant renal fibrosis within three weeks suggesting CKD development. CD1 and C57BL/6 females showed a similar disease progression, but female mice seemed more susceptible to NTS compared to male mice. The presence of albuminuria, GFR decline, mesangial expansion...

  14. Biological markers as predictors of radiosensitivity in syngeneic murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sei Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo; Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether a relationship exists between tumor control dose 50 (TCD 50 ) or tumor growth delay (TGD) and radiation induced apoptosis (RIA) in syngeneic murine tumors. Also we investigated the biological markers that can predict radiosensitivity in murine tumor system through analysis of relationship between TCD 50 , TGD, RIA and constitutive expression levels of the genetic products regulating RIA. Syngeneic murine tumors such as ovarian adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma, hepatocarcinoma were used in this study. C3H/HeJ mice were bred and maintained in our specific pathogen free mouse colony and were 8 ∼ 12 weeks old when used for the experiments. The tumors, growing in the right hind legs of mice, were analyzed for TCD 50 , TGD, and RIA at 8 mm in diameter. The tumors were also analyzed for the constitutive expression levels of p53, p21 WAF1/CIP1 , BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-x L , Bcl-x S , and p34. Correlation analysis was performed whether the level of RIA were correlated with TCD 50 or TGD, and the constitutive expression levels of genetic products regulating RIA were correlated with TCD 50 , TGD, RIA. The level of RIA showed a significant positive correlation (R = 0.922, ρ = 0.026) with TGD, and showed a trend to correlation (R = -0.848), marginally significant correlation with TCD 50 (ρ = 0.070). It indicates that tumors that respond to radiation with high percentage of apoptosis were more radiosensitive. The constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 and p34 showed a significant correlation either with TCD 50 (R = 0.893, ρ = 0.041 and R = 0.904, ρ = 0.035) or with TGD (R = -0.922, ρ 0.026 and R = -0.890, ρ = 0.043). The tumors with high constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 or p34 were less radiosensitive than those with low expression. Radiosensitivity may be predicted with the level of RIA in murine tumors. The constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 or p34 can be used as biological

  15. Anticonvulsive evaluation of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole kindling model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Charlotte; Boddum, Kim; von Schoubye, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    . Evaluation of THIP as a potential anticonvulsant has given contradictory results in different animal models and for this reason, we reevaluated the anticonvulsive properties of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. As loss of δ-GABAA R in the dentate gyrus has been associated...... the observed upregulation of δ-GABAA Rs. Even in the demonstrated presence of functional δ-GABAA Rs, THIP (0.5-4 mg/kg) showed no anticonvulsive effect in the PTZ kindling model using a comprehensive in vivo evaluation of the anticonvulsive properties....

  16. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  17. Murine cell glycolipids customization by modular expression of glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Buschbeck, Marcus; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Functional analysis of glycolipids has been hampered by their complex nature and combinatorial expression in cells and tissues. We report an efficient and easy method to generate cells with specific glycolipids. In our proof of principle experiments we have demonstrated the customized expression of two relevant glycosphingolipids on murine fibroblasts, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3), a marker for stem cells, and Forssman glycolipid, a xenoantigen. Sets of genes encoding glycosyltansferases were transduced by viral infection followed by multi-color cell sorting based on coupled expression of fluorescent proteins.

  18. Studies on murine plasmocytoma treatment with mistletoe lectin I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, F.; Storch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Mistletoe lectin I was tested in vivo and in vitro for its cytotoxic activity against murine plasmacytoma cells P3/X63-Ag8. As a result of this treatment, 30 to 60% of the BALB/c mice developed complete tumor regressions. 83% of the mice treated with mistletoe lectin I were resistant to viable tumor cell challenge after 100 days. The cytotoxic activity in vitro tested by 3 H-thymidine incorporation into P3/X63-Ag8 cells was very high. The rate was markedly reduced at concentrations up to 0.07 ng/ml. (author)

  19. Adrenaline influences the release of interleukin-6 from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J D; Hansen, E W; Frederiksen, C

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of adrenaline and interleukin-1beta on interleukin-6 secretion from cultured murine neurohypophyseal cells. Cells were cultured from neurohypophyses of 3- to 5-week-old mice and experiments were performed after 13 days in culture. Interleukin-6 was measured...... in 24-h samples using a sandwich fluoroimmunoassay. Unstimulated cells released 19+/-3 fmol interleukin-6/neurohypophysis/24 h (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 42). Adrenaline and interleukin-1beta increased the release of interleukin-6 from the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation with adrenaline...

  20. Biological markers as predictors of radiosensitivity in syngeneic murine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sei Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We investigated whether a relationship exists between tumor control dose 50 (TCD{sub 50}) or tumor growth delay (TGD) and radiation induced apoptosis (RIA) in syngeneic murine tumors. Also we investigated the biological markers that can predict radiosensitivity in murine tumor system through analysis of relationship between TCD{sub 50}, TGD, RIA and constitutive expression levels of the genetic products regulating RIA. Syngeneic murine tumors such as ovarian adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma, hepatocarcinoma were used in this study. C3H/HeJ mice were bred and maintained in our specific pathogen free mouse colony and were 8 {approx} 12 weeks old when used for the experiments. The tumors, growing in the right hind legs of mice, were analyzed for TCD{sub 50}, TGD, and RIA at 8 mm in diameter. The tumors were also analyzed for the constitutive expression levels of p53, p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}, BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-x{sub L}, Bcl-x{sub S}, and p34. Correlation analysis was performed whether the level of RIA were correlated with TCD{sub 50} or TGD, and the constitutive expression levels of genetic products regulating RIA were correlated with TCD{sub 50}, TGD, RIA. The level of RIA showed a significant positive correlation (R = 0.922, {rho} = 0.026) with TGD, and showed a trend to correlation (R = -0.848), marginally significant correlation with TCD{sub 50} ({rho} = 0.070). It indicates that tumors that respond to radiation with high percentage of apoptosis were more radiosensitive. The constitutive expression levels of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} and p34 showed a significant correlation either with TCD{sub 50} (R = 0.893, {rho} = 0.041 and R = 0.904, {rho} = 0.035) or with TGD (R = -0.922, {rho} 0.026 and R = -0.890, {rho} = 0.043). The tumors with high constitutive expression levels of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} or p34 were less radiosensitive than those with low expression. Radiosensitivity may be predicted with the level of RIA in murine tumors. The

  1. Effect of quercetin on the production of nitric oxide in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Prevotella intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yun-Jung; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived bioactive molecule that is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. In the current study, we investigated the effect of the flavonoid quercetin on the production of NO in murine macrophages activated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen related to inflammatory periodontal disease, and tried to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. LPS was isolated from P. intermedia ATCC 25611 cells by the standard hot phenol-water method. The concentration of NO in cell culture supernatants was determined by measuring the accumulation of nitrite. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) protein expression, phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38, inhibitory κB (IκB)-α degradation, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) phosphorylation were analyzed via immunoblotting. Quercetin significantly attenuated iNOS-derived NO production in RAW246.7 cells activated by P. intermedia LPS. In addition, quercetin induced HO-1 protein expression in cells activated with P. intermedia LPS. Tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP), a competitive inhibitor of HO-1, abolished the inhibitory effect of quercetin on LPS-induced NO production. Quercetin did not affect the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 induced by P. intermedia LPS. The degradation of IκB-α induced by P. intermedia LPS was inhibited when the cells were treated with quercetin. Quercetin also inhibited LPS-induced STAT1 signaling. Quercetin significantly inhibits iNOS-derived NO production in murine macrophages activated by P. intermedia LPS via anti-inflammatory HO-1 induction and inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB and STAT1 signaling pathways. Our study suggests that quercetin may contribute to the modulation of host-destructive responses mediated by NO and appears to have potential as a novel therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory periodontal disease.

  2. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of the capacity to produce IL-3 in murine AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenschwander, A U; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukaemia virus represent a model of murine AIDS (MAIDS). In this study we have analysed the capacity of CD4+ T cells from infected mice to produce IL-3 following stimulation with ConA for 24-72 h. In contrast to the position with IL-2, the production...

  4. Murine typhus in two travelers returning from Bali, Indonesia: an underdiagnosed disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Nozomi; Imoto, Kazuya; Ando, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Ohji, Goh; Kato, Yasuyuki; Sakata, Akiko; Hosokawa, Naoto; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Two Japanese travelers from Bali were diagnosed with murine typhus in Japan during the same period. Although one had only mild illness, the other experienced liver and kidney dysfunction. Murine typhus may be missed not only in endemic areas around the world, but also in travelers, especially those returning from marine resorts in these areas. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  5. DNA methylation of specific CpG sites in the promoter region regulates the transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimrat Mamrut

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a peptide hormone, well known for its role in labor and suckling, and most recently for its involvement in mammalian social behavior. All central and peripheral actions of oxytocin are mediated through the oxytocin receptor, which is the product of a single gene. Transcription of the oxytocin receptor is subject to regulation by gonadal steroid hormones, and is profoundly elevated in the uterus and mammary glands during parturition. DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism that regulates gene transcription, and has been linked to reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor in individuals with autism. Here, we hypothesized that transcription of the mouse oxytocin receptor is regulated by DNA methylation of specific sites in its promoter, in a tissue-specific manner. Hypothalamus-derived GT1-7, and mammary-derived 4T1 murine cell lines displayed negative correlations between oxytocin receptor transcription and methylation of the gene promoter, and demethylation caused a significant enhancement of oxytocin receptor transcription in 4T1 cells. Using a reporter gene assay, we showed that methylation of specific sites in the gene promoter, including an estrogen response element, significantly inhibits transcription. Furthermore, methylation of the oxytocin receptor promoter was found to be differentially correlated with oxytocin receptor expression in mammary glands and the uterus of virgin and post-partum mice, suggesting that it plays a distinct role in oxytocin receptor transcription among tissues and under different physiological conditions. Together, these results support the hypothesis that the expression of the mouse oxytocin receptor gene is epigenetically regulated by DNA methylation of its promoter.

  6. Antileukemic effect of zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier in WEHI-3B cell-induced murine leukemia model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman HS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Heshu Sulaiman Rahman,1–3 Abdullah Rasedee,1,2 Chee Wun How,2 Nazariah Allaudin Zeenathul,1,2 Max Stanley Chartrand,4 Swee Keong Yeap,2 Ahmad Bustamam Abdul,2,5 Sheau Wei Tan,2 Hemn Hassan Othman,1,3 Zahra Ajdari,6 Farideh Namvar,7 Palanisamy Arulselvan,2 Sharida Fakurazi,2,5 Parvaneh Mehrbod,2 Nasibeh Daneshvar,2 Hasina Begum2 1Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 2Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 3Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Sulaimany, Sulaimany City, Northern Iraq; 4DigiCare Behavioral Research, Casa Grande, AZ, USA; 5Faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 6Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia; 7Institute of Tropical Forestry and Forest Products (INTROP, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: Cancer nanotherapy is progressing rapidly with the introduction of many innovative drug delivery systems to replace conventional therapy. Although the antitumor activity of zerumbone (ZER has been reported, there has been no information available on the effect of ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC (ZER-NLC on murine leukemia cells. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of ZER-NLC on murine leukemia induced with WEHI-3B cells were investigated. The results from 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, Hoechst 33342, Annexin V, cell cycle, and caspase activity assays showed that the growth of leukemia cells in vitro was inhibited by ZER-NLC. In addition, outcomes of histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analyses revealed that the number of leukemia cells in the spleen of BALB/c leukemia mice significantly decreased after 4 weeks of oral treatment with various doses of ZER-NLC. Western blotting and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays confirmed the antileukemia effects

  7. Anti-inflammatory Potential of Petiveria alliacea on Activated RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rosa Martha Perez; Hoyo-Vadillo, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Defense and protection to multiple harmful stimuli are the inflammation, when is self-amplified and uncontrolled is the basis of the pathogenesis of a wide variety of inflammatory illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate if Petiveria alliacea could attenuate inflammation in a murine model of RAW264 macrophages the involved model and its involved mechanism. The ethanol extract from P. alliacea was precipitated with water and supernatant was used for this study (PW). The anti-inflammatory effects of PW were investigated through evaluating of the production of several cytokines, chemokines, and expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Also was determined the ability to decrease the oxidative stress in RAW264.7 cells with carboxy-2',7'-dichloro-dihydro-fluorescein diacetate. PW significantly suppress the secretion of prostaglandin E 2 , leukotriene C 4 , interleukin (IL)-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon gamma nitric oxide (NO), inducible NO synthase, IL-1 β, IL-4, in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PW also markedly inhibited the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. PW produced significant anti-inflammatory activity through inhibiting the production of inflammatory mediators through the NF-κB inactivation in the LPS-stimulated RAW24.7 cells. PW exerts significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, and this effect can be attributed in part, to the presence of dibenzyl disulfide, dibenzyl trisulfide pinitol, coumarin, myricetin, glutamyl-S-benzyl cysteine, and petiveriins A and B. Treatment with ethanol extract from Petiveria alliacea which was previously precipitated with water and supernatant (PE) was tested in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PE suppressed the level of oxidative stress and the induction of proinflammatory mediators, as PGE2, LTC4, IL-1 ß, IL-6, IL-10, IFN- NO, iNOS, IL-1 ß, IL-4, in RAW264.7 macrophages through NF-B inactivation. These findings

  8. Endogenous retroviruses mobilized during friend murine leukemia virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Stefano; Rosenke, Kyle; Hansen, Ethan; Hendrick, Duncan; Malik, Frank; Evans, Leonard H

    2016-12-01

    We have demonstrated in a mouse model that infection with a retrovirus can lead not only to the generation of recombinants between exogenous and endogenous gammaretrovirus, but also to the mobilization of endogenous proviruses by pseudotyping entire polytropic proviral transcripts and facilitating their infectious spread to new cells. However, the frequency of this occurrence, the kinetics, and the identity of mobilized endogenous proviruses was unclear. Here we find that these mobilized transcripts are detected after only one day of infection. They predominate over recombinant polytropic viruses early in infection, persist throughout the course of disease and are comprised of multiple different polytropic proviruses. Other endogenous retroviral elements such as intracisternal A particles (IAPs) were not detected. The integration of the endogenous transcripts into new cells could result in loss of transcriptional control and elevated expression which may facilitate pathogenesis, perhaps by contributing to the generation of polytropic recombinant viruses. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Promoter proximal polyadenylation sites reduce transcription activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pia Kjølhede; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression relies on the functional communication between mRNA processing and transcription. We previously described the negative impact of a point-mutated splice donor (SD) site on transcription. Here we demonstrate that this mutation activates an upstream cryptic polyadenylation (CpA) site......, which in turn causes reduced transcription. Functional depletion of U1 snRNP in the context of the wild-type SD triggers the same CpA event accompanied by decreased RNA levels. Thus, in accordance with recent findings, U1 snRNP can shield premature pA sites. The negative impact of unshielded pA sites...... on transcription requires promoter proximity, as demonstrated using artificial constructs and supported by a genome-wide data set. Importantly, transcription down-regulation can be recapitulated in a gene context devoid of splice sites by placing a functional bona fide pA site/transcription terminator within ∼500...

  10. Transcription and recombination: when RNA meets DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-08-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription-replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  11. Specificity and robustness in transcription control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anirvan M; Djordjevic, Marko; Shraiman, Boris I

    2002-02-19

    Recognition by transcription factors of the regulatory DNA elements upstream of genes is the fundamental step in controlling gene expression. How does the necessity to provide stability with respect to mutation constrain the organization of transcription control networks? We examine the mutation load of a transcription factor interacting with a set of n regulatory response elements as a function of the factor/DNA binding specificity and conclude on theoretical grounds that the optimal specificity decreases with n. The predicted correlation between variability of binding sites (for a given transcription factor) and their number is supported by the genomic data for Escherichia coli. The analysis of E. coli genomic data was carried out using an algorithm suggested by the biophysical model of transcription factor/DNA binding. Complete results of the search for candidate transcription factor binding sites are available at http://www.physics.rockefeller.edu/~boris/public/search_ecoli.

  12. Evaluating virulence of waterborne and clinical Aeromonas isolates using gene expression and mortality in neonatal mice followed by assessing cell culture’s ability to predict virulence based on transcriptional response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, S L; Rodgers, M R; Lye, D J; Stelma, G N; McKinstry, Craig A.; Malard, Joel M.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2007-10-01

    Aims: To assess the virulence of Aeromonas spp. using two models, a neonatal mouse assay and a mouse intestinal cell culture. Methods and Results: After artificial infection with a variety of Aeromonas spp., mRNA extracts from the two models were processed and hydridized to murine microarrays to determine host gene response. Definition of virulence was determined based on host mRNA production in murine neonatal intestinal tissue and mortality of infected animals. Infections of mouse intestinal cell cultures were then performed to determine whether this simpler model system’s mRNA responses correlated to neonatal results and therefore be predictive of virulence of Aeromonas spp. Virulent aeromonads up-regulated transcripts in both models including multiple host defense gene products (chemokines, regulation of transcription and apoptosis and cell signalling). Avirulent species exhibited little or no host response in neonates. Mortality results correlated well with both bacterial dose and average fold change of up-regulated transcripts in the neonatal mice. Conclusions: Cell culture results were less discriminating but showed promise as potentially being able to be predictive of virulence. Jun oncogene up-regulation in murine cell culture is potentially predictive of Aeromonas virulence. Significance and Impact of the Study: Having the ability to determine virulence of waterborne pathogens quickly would potentially assist public health officials to rapidly assess exposure risks.

  13. Efficacy of Astaxanthin for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis in a Murine Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yoshihisa

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease associated with various factors, including immunological abnormalities and exposure to allergens. Astaxanthin (AST is a xanthophyll carotenoid that has recently been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory effects and to regulate the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Thus, we investigated whether AST could improve the dermatitis and pruritus in a murine model of AD using NC/Nga mice. In addition to a behavioral evaluation, the effects of AST on the AD were determined by the clinical skin severity score, serum IgE level, histological analyses of skin, and by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting analyses for the expression of inflammation-related factors. AST (100 mg/kg or vehicle (olive oil was orally administered once day and three times a week for 26 days. When compared with vehicle-treated group, the administration of AST significantly reduced the clinical skin severity score. In addition, the spontaneous scratching in AD model mice was reduced by AST administration. Moreover, the serum IgE level was markedly decreased by the oral administration of AST compared to that in vehicle-treated mice. The number of eosinophils, total and degranulated mast cells all significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. The mRNA and protein levels of eotaxin, MIF, IL-4, IL-5 and L-histidine decarboxylase were significantly decreased in the skin of AST-treated mice compared with vehicle-treated mice. These results suggest that AST improves the dermatitis and pruritus in AD via the regulation of the inflammatory effects and the expression of inflammatory cytokines.

  14. Neuroprotective effect of bilberry extract in a murine model of photo-stressed retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideto Osada

    Full Text Available Excessive exposure to light promotes degenerative and blinding retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, the underlying mechanisms of photo-induced retinal degeneration are not fully understood, and a generalizable preventive intervention has not been proposed. Bilberry extract is an antioxidant-rich supplement that ameliorates ocular symptoms. However, its effects on photo-stressed retinas have not been clarified. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of bilberry extract against photo-stress in murine retinas. Light-induced visual function impairment recorded by scotopic and phototopic electroretinograms showing respective rod and cone photoreceptor function was attenuated by oral administration of bilberry extract through a stomach tube in Balb/c mice (750 mg/kg body weight. Bilberry extract also suppressed photo-induced apoptosis in the photoreceptor cell layer and shortening of the outer segments of rod and cone photoreceptors. Levels of photo-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress markers, as measured by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, were reduced by bilberry extract treatment. Reduction of ROS by N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a well-known antioxidant also suppressed ER stress. Immunohistochemical analysis of activating transcription factor 4 expression showed the presence of ER stress in the retina, and at least in part, in Müller glial cells. The photo-induced disruption of tight junctions in the retinal pigment epithelium was also attenuated by bilberry extract, repressing an oxidative stress marker, although ER stress markers were not repressed. Our results suggest that bilberry extract attenuates photo-induced apoptosis and visual dysfunction most likely, and at least in part, through ROS reduction, and subsequent ER stress attenuation in the retina. This study can help understand the mechanisms of photo

  15. Differentiation of murine embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells to renal lineage in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morizane, Ryuji [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Monkawa, Toshiaki, E-mail: monkawa@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoh, Hiroshi [Department of Internal Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-12-25

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells which have the unlimited proliferative capacity and extensive differentiation potency can be an attractive source for kidney regeneration therapies. Recent breakthroughs in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have provided with another potential source for the artificially-generated kidney. The purpose of this study is to know how to differentiate mouse ES and iPS cells into renal lineage. We used iPS cells from mouse fibroblasts by transfection of four transcription factors, namely Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc and Klf4. Real-time PCR showed that renal lineage markers were expressed in both ES and iPS cells after the induction of differentiation. It also showed that a tubular specific marker, KSP progressively increased to day 18, although the differentiation of iPS cells was slower than ES cells. The results indicated that renal lineage cells can be differentiated from both murine ES and iPS cells. Several inducing factors were tested whether they influenced on cell differentiation. In ES cells, both of GDNF and BMP7 enhanced the differentiation to metanephric mesenchyme, and Activin enhanced the differentiation of ES cells to tubular cells. Activin also enhanced the differentiation of iPS cells to tubular cells, although the enhancement was lower than in ES cells. ES and iPS cells have a potential to differentiate to renal lineage cells, and they will be an attractive resource of kidney regeneration therapy. This differentiation is enhanced by Activin in both ES and iPS cells.

  16. Expression pattern of the thrombopoietin receptor (Mpl) in the murine central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Anna; Wuerfel, Jens; Zhang, Juan; Hoffmann, Olaf; Ballmaier, Matthias; Dame, Christof

    2010-07-28

    Thrombopoietin (Thpo) and its receptor (Mpl), which regulate megakaryopoiesis, are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), where Thpo is thought to exert pro-apoptotic effects on newly generated neurons. Mpl expression has been analysed in brain tissue on transcript level and in cultured primary rat neurons and astrocytes on protein level. Herein, we analysed Mpl expression in the developing and adult murine CNS by immunohistochemistry and investigated the brain of mice with homozygous Mpl deficiency (Mpl-/-) by MRI. Mpl was not detectable at developmental stages E12 to E15 in any resident cells of the CNS. From E18 onwards, robust Mpl expression was found in various brain areas, including cerebral cortex, olfactory bulb, thalamus, hypothalamus, medulla, pons, and the grey matter of spinal cord. However, major developmental changes became obvious: In the subventricular zone of the cerebral cortex Mpl expression occurred only during late gestation, while in the hippocampus Mpl expression was detectable for first time at stage P4. In the white matter of the cerebellum Mpl expression was restricted to the perinatal period. In the adult cerebellum, Mpl expression switched to Purkinje cell. The majority of other Mpl-positive cells were NeuN-positive neurons. None of the cells could be double-labelled with astrocyte marker GFAP. Mpl-/- mice showed no gross abnormalities of the brain. Our data locate Mpl expression to neurons at different subdivisions of the spinal cord, rhombencephalon, midbrain and prosencephalon. Besides neuronal cells Mpl protein is also expressed in Purkinje cells of the adult cerebellum.

  17. Bifidobacterium breve attenuates murine dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases regulatory T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Overbeek, Saskia; van de Kant, Hendrik J G; Garssen, Johan; Folkerts, Gert; Vos, Paul; Morgan, Mary E; Kraneveld, Aletta D

    2014-01-01

    While some probiotics have shown beneficial effects on preventing or treating colitis development, others have shown no effects. In this study, we have assessed the immunomodulating effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus) and Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve) on T cell polarization in vitro, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and in vivo, using murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis model. With respect to the latter, the mRNA expression of T cell subset-associated transcription factors and cytokines in the colon was measured and the T helper type (Th) 17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets were determined in the Peyer's patches. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve incubations in vitro reduced Th17 and increased Th2 cell subsets in human PBMCs. In addition, B. breve incubation was also able to reduce Th1 and increase Treg cell subsets in contrast to L. rhamnosus. In vivo intervention with B. breve, but not L. rhamnosus, significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In DSS-treated C57BL/6 mice, intervention with B. breve increased the expression of mRNA encoding for Th2- and Treg-associated cytokines in the distal colon. In addition, intervention with B. breve led to increases of Treg and decreases of Th17 cell subsets in Peyer's patches of DSS-treated mice. B. breve modulates T cell polarization towards Th2 and Treg cell-associated responses in vitro and in vivo. In vivo B. breve intervention ameliorates DSS-induced colitis symptoms and this protective effect may mediated by its effects on the T-cell composition.

  18. Micro-RNAs in regenerating lungs: an integrative systems biology analysis of murine influenza pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai Sen; Choi, Hyungwon; Jiang, Xiaoou; Yin, Lu; Seet, Ju Ee; Patzel, Volker; Engelward, Bevin P; Chow, Vincent T

    2014-07-11

    Tissue regeneration in the lungs is gaining increasing interest as a potential influenza management strategy. In this study, we explored the role of microRNAs, short non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional regulation, during pulmonary regeneration after influenza infection. We profiled miRNA and mRNA expression levels following lung injury and tissue regeneration using a murine influenza pneumonia model. BALB/c mice were infected with a sub-lethal dose of influenza A/PR/8(H1N1) virus, and their lungs were harvested at 7 and 15 days post-infection to evaluate the expression of ~300 miRNAs along with ~36,000 genes using microarrays. A global network was constructed between differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential target genes with particular focus on the pulmonary repair and regeneration processes to elucidate the regulatory role of miRNAs in the lung repair pathways. The miRNA arrays revealed a global down-regulation of miRNAs. TargetScan analyses also revealed specific miRNAs highly involved in targeting relevant gene functions in repair such as miR-290 and miR-505 at 7 dpi; and let-7, miR-21 and miR-30 at 15 dpi. The significantly differentially regulated miRNAs are implicated in the activation or suppression of cellular proliferation and stem cell maintenance, which are required during the repair of the damaged lungs. These findings provide opportunities in the development of novel repair strategies in influenza-induced pulmonary injury.

  19. Bifidobacterium breve attenuates murine dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and increases regulatory T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    Full Text Available While some probiotics have shown beneficial effects on preventing or treating colitis development, others have shown no effects. In this study, we have assessed the immunomodulating effects of two probiotic strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus (L. rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium breve (B. breve on T cell polarization in vitro, using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, and in vivo, using murine dextran sodium sulfate (DSS colitis model. With respect to the latter, the mRNA expression of T cell subset-associated transcription factors and cytokines in the colon was measured and the T helper type (Th 17 and regulatory T cell (Treg subsets were determined in the Peyer's patches. Both L. rhamnosus and B. breve incubations in vitro reduced Th17 and increased Th2 cell subsets in human PBMCs. In addition, B. breve incubation was also able to reduce Th1 and increase Treg cell subsets in contrast to L. rhamnosus. In vivo intervention with B. breve, but not L. rhamnosus, significantly attenuated the severity of DSS-induced colitis. In DSS-treated C57BL/6 mice, intervention with B. breve increased the expression of mRNA encoding for Th2- and Treg-associated cytokines in the distal colon. In addition, intervention with B. breve led to increases of Treg and decreases of Th17 cell subsets in Peyer's patches of DSS-treated mice. B. breve modulates T cell polarization towards Th2 and Treg cell-associated responses in vitro and in vivo. In vivo B. breve intervention ameliorates DSS-induced colitis symptoms and this protective effect may mediated by its effects on the T-cell composition.

  20. Interleukin-17A and Neutrophils in a Murine Model of Bird-Related Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ishizuka

    Full Text Available Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP is an immune mediated lung disease induced by the repeated inhalation of a wide variety of antigens. Bird-related hypersensitivity pneumonitis (BRHP is one of the most common forms of HP in human and results from the inhalation of avian antigens. The findings of a recent clinical analysis suggest that in addition to Th1 factors, the levels of interleukin(IL-17 and IL-17-associated transcripts are increased in the setting of HP, and that both IL-17A and neutrophils are crucial for the development of pulmonary inflammation in murine models of HP. Our objectives were to investigate the roles of IL-17A and neutrophils in granuloma-forming inflammation in an acute HP model. We developed a mouse model of acute BRHP using pigeon dropping extract. We evaluated the process of granuloma formation and the roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in a model. We found that the neutralization of IL-17A by the antibody attenuated granuloma formation and the recruitment of neutrophils, and also decreased the expression level of chemokine(C-X-C motif ligand 5 (CXCL5 in the acute HP model. We confirmed that most of the neutrophils in the acute HP model exhibited immunoreactivity to the anti-IL-17 antibody. We have identified the central roles of both IL-17A and neutrophils in the pathogenesis of granuloma formation in acute HP. We have also assumed that neutrophils are an important source of IL-17A in an acute HP model, and that the IL-17A-CXCL5 pathway may be responsible for the recruitment of neutrophils.

  1. Biotin deficiency up-regulates TNF-alpha production in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu; Endo, Yasuo; Muramoto, Koji; Sugawara, Shunji

    2008-04-01

    Biotin, a water-soluble vitamin of the B complex, functions as a cofactor of carboxylases that catalyze an indispensable cellular metabolism. Although significant decreases in serum biotin levels have been reported in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, the biological roles of biotin in inflammatory responses are unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of biotin deficiency on TNF-alpha production. Mice were fed a basal diet or a biotin-deficient diet for 8 weeks. Serum biotin levels were significantly lower in biotin-deficient mice than biotin-sufficient mice. After i.v. administration of LPS, serum TNF-alpha levels were significantly higher in biotin-deficient mice than biotin-sufficient mice. A murine macrophage-like cell line, J774.1, was cultured in a biotin-sufficient or -deficient medium for 4 weeks. Cell proliferation and biotinylation of intracellular proteins were decreased significantly in biotin-deficient cells compared with biotin-sufficient cells. Significantly higher production and mRNA expression of TNF-alpha were detected in biotin-deficient J774.1 cells than biotin-sufficient cells in response to LPS and even without LPS stimulation. Intracellular TNF-alpha expression was inhibited by actinomycin D, indicating that biotin deficiency up-regulates TNF-alpha production at the transcriptional level. However, the expression levels of TNF receptors, CD14, and TLR4/myeloid differentiation protein 2 complex were similar between biotin-sufficient and -deficient cells. No differences were detected in the activities of the NF-kappaB family or AP-1. The TNF-alpha induction by biotin deficiency was down-regulated by biotin supplementation in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that biotin deficiency may up-regulate TNF-alpha production or that biotin excess down-regulates TNF-alpha production, suggesting that biotin status may influence inflammatory diseases.

  2. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  3. β-Arrestin2 mediates progression of murine primary myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Lindsay Am; Wisler, James W; Kim, Jihee; Theriot, Barbara; Huang, LiYin; Price, Trevor; Yang, Haeyoon; Chen, Minyong; Chen, Wei; Sipkins, Dorothy; Fedoriw, Yuri; Walker, Julia Kl; Premont, Richard T; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2017-12-21

    Primary myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm associated with significant morbidity and mortality, for which effective therapies are lacking. β-Arrestins are multifunctional adaptor proteins involved in developmental signaling pathways. One isoform, β-arrestin2 (βarr2), has been implicated in initiation and progression of chronic myeloid leukemia, another myeloproliferative neoplasm closely related to primary myelofibrosis. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between βarr2 and primary myelofibrosis. In a murine model of MPLW515L-mutant primary myelofibrosis, mice transplanted with donor βarr2-knockout (βarr2-/-) hematopoietic stem cells infected with MPL-mutant retrovirus did not develop myelofibrosis, whereas controls uniformly succumbed to disease. Although transplanted βarr2-/- cells homed properly to marrow, they did not repopulate long-term due to increased apoptosis and decreased self-renewal of βarr2-/- cells. In order to assess the effect of acute loss of βarr2 in established primary myelofibrosis in vivo, we utilized a tamoxifen-induced Cre-conditional βarr2-knockout mouse. Mice that received Cre (+) donor cells and developed myelofibrosis had significantly improved survival compared with controls. These data indicate that lack of antiapoptotic βarr2 mediates marrow failure of murine hematopoietic stem cells overexpressing MPLW515L. They also indicate that βarr2 is necessary for progression of primary myelofibrosis, suggesting that it may serve as a novel therapeutic target in this disease.

  4. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  5. Targeted destruction of murine macrophage cells with bioconjugated gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pissuwan, Dakrong [University of Technology Sydney, Institute for Nanoscale Technology (Australia); Valenzuela, Stella M. [University of Technology Sydney, Department of Medical and Molecular Biosciences (Australia)], E-mail: stella.valenzuela@uts.edu.au; Killingsworth, Murray C. [Sydney South West Pathology Service (Australia)], E-mail: murray.killingsworth@swsahs.nsw.gov.au; Xu, Xiaoda; Cortie, Michael B. [University of Technology Sydney, Institute for Nanoscale Technology (Australia)], E-mail: michael.cortie@uts.edu.au

    2007-12-15

    Gold nanorods manifest a readily tunable longitudinal plasmon resonance with light and consequently have potential for use in photothermal therapeutics. Recent work by others has shown how gold nanoshells and rods can be used to target cancer cells, which can then be destroyed using relatively high power laser radiation ({approx}1x10{sup 5} to 1x10{sup 10} W/m{sup 2}). Here we extend this concept to demonstrate how gold nanorods can be modified to bind to target macrophage cells, and show that high intensity laser radiation is not necessary, with even 5x10{sup 2} W/m{sup 2} being sufficient, provided that a total fluence of {approx}30 J/cm{sup 2} is delivered. We used the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and the monoclonal antibody CD11b, raised against murine macrophages, as our model system and a 5 mW solid state diode laser as our energy source. Exposure of the cells labeled with gold nanorods to a laser fluence of 30 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in 81% cell death compared to only 0.9% in the control, non-labeled cells.

  6. Targeted destruction of murine macrophage cells with bioconjugated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissuwan, Dakrong; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Killingsworth, Murray C.; Xu, Xiaoda; Cortie, Michael B.

    2007-12-01

    Gold nanorods manifest a readily tunable longitudinal plasmon resonance with light and consequently have potential for use in photothermal therapeutics. Recent work by others has shown how gold nanoshells and rods can be used to target cancer cells, which can then be destroyed using relatively high power laser radiation (˜1×105 to 1×1010 W/m2). Here we extend this concept to demonstrate how gold nanorods can be modified to bind to target macrophage cells, and show that high intensity laser radiation is not necessary, with even 5×102 W/m2 being sufficient, provided that a total fluence of ˜30 J/cm2 is delivered. We used the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and the monoclonal antibody CD11b, raised against murine macrophages, as our model system and a 5 mW solid state diode laser as our energy source. Exposure of the cells labeled with gold nanorods to a laser fluence of 30 J/cm2 resulted in 81% cell death compared to only 0.9% in the control, non-labeled cells.

  7. Targeted destruction of murine macrophage cells with bioconjugated gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissuwan, Dakrong; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Killingsworth, Murray C.; Xu, Xiaoda; Cortie, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanorods manifest a readily tunable longitudinal plasmon resonance with light and consequently have potential for use in photothermal therapeutics. Recent work by others has shown how gold nanoshells and rods can be used to target cancer cells, which can then be destroyed using relatively high power laser radiation (∼1x10 5 to 1x10 10 W/m 2 ). Here we extend this concept to demonstrate how gold nanorods can be modified to bind to target macrophage cells, and show that high intensity laser radiation is not necessary, with even 5x10 2 W/m 2 being sufficient, provided that a total fluence of ∼30 J/cm 2 is delivered. We used the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and the monoclonal antibody CD11b, raised against murine macrophages, as our model system and a 5 mW solid state diode laser as our energy source. Exposure of the cells labeled with gold nanorods to a laser fluence of 30 J/cm 2 resulted in 81% cell death compared to only 0.9% in the control, non-labeled cells

  8. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways by murine polyomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, Katie; Nicholas, Catherine; Garcea, Robert L., E-mail: Robert.Garcea@Colorado.edu

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear replication of DNA viruses activates DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways, which are thought to detect and inhibit viral replication. However, many DNA viruses also depend on these pathways in order to optimally replicate their genomes. We investigated the relationship between murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) and components of DDR signaling pathways including CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, ATR, and DNAPK. We found that recruitment and retention of DDR proteins at viral replication centers was independent of H2AX, as well as the viral small and middle T-antigens. Additionally, infectious virus production required ATR kinase activity, but was independent of CHK1, CHK2, or DNAPK signaling. ATR inhibition did not reduce the total amount of viral DNA accumulated, but affected the amount of virus produced, indicating a defect in virus assembly. These results suggest that MuPyV may utilize a subset of DDR proteins or non-canonical DDR signaling pathways in order to efficiently replicate and assemble. -- Highlights: •Murine polyomavirus activates and recruits DNA damage repair (DDR) proteins to replication centers. •Large T-antigen mediates recruitment of DDR proteins to viral replication centers. •Inhibition or knockout of CHK1, CHK2, DNA-PK or H2AX do not affect viral titers. •Inhibition of ATR activity reduces viral titers, but not viral DNA accumulation.

  9. Application of murine monoclonal antibodies to the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyl, J.; Coates, A.R.M.; Krambovitis, E.

    1982-01-01

    The immune response during infectious diseases leads to a rise in antibody titre to the various different antigenic determinants of the causative organism. The response is further complicated by the fact that it is relatively unusual for one individual to respond to all antigenic components of an organism. Demonstration of the specific immune response of an infected host by serological tests is often hampered by the broad cross-reactivity between several bacterial antigens. The authors report on a serodiagnostic application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAB), specific for a human pathogen, M. tuberculosis by a technique which is applicable in principle to the serodiagnosis of many other infectious diseases. The serum diagnostic test is based on the competitive inhibition by human sera of the binding of 125 I-labelled murine monoclonal antibodies to M. tuberculosis-coated polyvinyl plates. Five monoclonal antibodies binding to distinct antigenic determinants of the organism were used as structural probes which conferred their stringent combining site specificities to the polyclonal mixture of antibodies from patients' sera. When compared with healthy controls, increased titres of inhibitory antibodies were found in about 70% of patients with active tuberculosis. The diagnostic value of the individual monoclonal antibodies as well as the benefit from the use of multiple specificity probes has been qualified

  10. Murine models of osteosarcoma: A piece of the translational puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Mannu K; Castillo-Tandazo, Wilson; Mutsaers, Anthony J; Martin, Thomas John; Walkley, Carl R

    2018-06-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common cancer of bone in children and young adults. Despite extensive research efforts, there has been no significant improvement in patient outcome for many years. An improved understanding of the biology of this cancer and how genes frequently mutated contribute to OS may help improve outcomes for patients. While our knowledge of the mutational burden of OS is approaching saturation, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to OS initiation and maintenance is less clear. Murine models of OS have now been demonstrated to be highly valid recapitulations of human OS. These models were originally based on the frequent disruption of p53 and Rb in familial OS syndromes, which are also common mutations in sporadic OS. They have been applied to significantly improve our understanding about the functions of recurrently mutated genes in disease. The murine models can be used as a platform for preclinical testing and identifying new therapeutic targets, in addition to testing the role of additional mutations in vivo. Most recently these models have begun to be used for discovery based approaches and screens, which hold significant promise in furthering our understanding of the genetic and therapeutic sensitivities of OS. In this review, we discuss the mouse models of OS that have been reported in the last 3-5 years and newly identified pathways from these studies. Finally, we discuss the preclinical utilization of the mouse models of OS for identifying and validating actionable targets to improve patient outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  12. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yigang; Tang Yamei; Liu Jun; Sun Ying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy. Methods: A total of 40 rats were subjected to local γ-irradiation to the brain with the dosage of 7 Gy/d for 6 consecutive days. The amount of food intake, hairs and skin of irradiated field, body weight, general activities, CNS symptoms and signs were examined and recorded after irradiation. On day 3, 7, 14 and 30, the brain tissue was removed to observe histopathologic changes. Results: During the first two days after irradiation, the irradiated rats were agitated, and the amount of food intake decreased from day 2 onwards. No serious skin reaction to irradiation was observed. Survived rats had normal activities without any abnormal nervous signs. Histopathologic changes showed slight neuronal degeneration, smaller cell body, red-colored cytoplasm, disappearance of Nissl body, vacuolation, typical cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear divergence. On the 14th and 30th days, hypochromatism, loose and reticular necrotic foci were found in some samples. Conclusion: The murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy is useful and practical in radiobiological studies

  14. [Nuclear matrix organization of the chromocenters in cultured murine fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval', E V; Poliakov, V Iu

    2010-01-01

    In the current work, the structural organization of nuclear matrix of pericentromeric heterochromatin blocks (chromocenters) inside cultured murine fibroblasts was investigated. After 2 M NaCl extraction without DNase I treatment, chromocenters were extremely swelled, and it was impossible to detect them using conventional electron microscopy. Using immunogolding with anti-topoisomerase IIalpha antibody, we demonstrated that residual chromocenters were subdivided into numerous discrete aggregates. After 2 M NaCl extraction with DNase I treatment, the residual chromocenters appeared as a dense meshwork of thin fibers, and using this feature, the residual chromocenters were easily distinguished from the rest of nuclear matrix. After extraction with dextran sulfate and heparin, the chromocenters were decondensed, and chromatin complexes having rosette organization (central core from which numerous DNA fibers radiated) were seen. Probably, the appearance of these rosettes was a consequence of incomplete chromatin extraction. Thus, the nuclear matrix of pericentromeric chromosome regions in cultured murine fibroblasts differs morphologically from the rest of nuclear matrix.

  15. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Molecular characterization of murine models of squamous carcinomas of preclinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornachea Gomez, O.; Berdugo Zamora, A.

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis is a stratified epithelium affected by numerous pathologies, including cancer, being the tumors originated in this tissue more than half of the epithelial tumors diagnosed every year. Animal models are an essential tool for cancer research, as they provide information to understand how a homologous gene may cause or contribute to the disease in humans. The p53 CE and Rb CE; p53 CE murine models develop undifferentiated epidermal tumors with high metastatic potential that show a strong transcriptional similarity to many human tumors with poor prognosis. Numerous studies have associated the p53 tumor suppressor with deregulation of microRNAs involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis processes. Furthermore, tumors in p53 EC models show an early repression of p63 whose predominant isoform in keratinocytes of the basal layer is Np63. Our results indicate that miR21 helps to provide metastatic capacity to p53-deficient mouse skin tumors. The increased expression of miR21 correlates with active signaling pathways that can be inhibited pharmacologically. Moreover, miR21 expression is elevated in human metastatic lung tumors with poor prognosis. Besides, we also show that ?Np63? expression in p53-deficient cells partially reduces the metastatic behavior, most probably through the modulation microRNAs and transcription factors involved in the EMT process. These facts point to p53-deficient epidermal animal models as excellent candidates for preclinical analysis of human metastatic tumors characterized by TP53 alterations. Finally we developed a model in which the three members of the retinoblastoma family are ablated in the basal cells of stratified epithelia in a tamoxifen inducible manner: Rb1F/F ; Rbl2F/F;Rbl1-/-;K14CreErT2 (TKO). Previously our laboratory had shown that, in the absence of pRb, malignant conversion occurred when p53 is lost. At high doses of tamoxifen these animals show early lethality. When we adjust the dose

  17. The raccoon polyomavirus genome and tumor antigen transcription are stable and abundant in neuroglial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostoff, Terza; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Church, Molly E; Woolard, Kevin D; Pesavento, Patricia A

    2014-11-01

    Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) is associated with 100% of neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons. Other tumor-associated polyomaviruses (PyVs), including simian virus 40 (SV40), murine PyV, and Merkel cell PyV, are found integrated in the host genome in neoplastic cells, where they constitutively express splice variants of the tumor antigen (TAg) gene. We have previously reported that RacPyV exists only as an episome (nonintegrated) in neuroglial tumors. Here, we have investigated TAg transcription in primary tumor tissue by transcriptome analysis, and we identified the alternatively spliced TAg transcripts for RacPyV. We also determined that TAg was highly transcribed relative to host cellular genes. We further colocalized TAg DNA and mRNA by in situ hybridization and found that the majority of tumor cells showed positive staining. Lastly, we examined the stability of the viral genome and TAg transcription by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in cultured tumor cells in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model. When tumor cells were cultured in vitro, TAg transcription increased nearly 2 log-fold over that of parental tumor tissue by passage 17. Both episomal viral genome and TAg transcription were faithfully maintained in culture and in tumors arising from xenotransplantation of cultured cells in mice. This study represents a minimal criterion for RacPyV's association with neuroglial tumors and a novel mechanism of stability for a polyomavirus in cancer. The natural cycle of polyomaviruses in mammals is to persist in the host without causing disease, but they can cause cancer in humans or in other animals. Because this is an unpredictable and rare event, the oncogenic potential of polyomavirus is primarily evaluated in laboratory animal models. Recently, raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) was identified in neuroglial tumors of free-ranging raccoons. Viral copy number was consistently high in these tumors but was low or undetectable in nontumor tissue or in

  18. Compensatory Motor Neuron Response to Chromatolysis in the Murine hSOD1G93A Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riancho, Javier; Ruiz-Soto, Maria; Villagrá, Nuria T.; Berciano, Jose; Berciano, Maria T.; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated neuronal self-defense mechanisms in a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the transgenic hSOD1G93A, during both the asymptomatic and symptomatic stages. This is an experimental model of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with severe chromatolysis. As a compensatory response to translation inhibition, chromatolytic neurons tended to reorganize the protein synthesis machinery at the perinuclear region, preferentially at nuclear infolding domains enriched in nuclear pores. This organization could facilitate nucleo-cytoplasmic traffic of RNAs and proteins at translation sites. By electron microscopy analysis, we observed that the active euchromatin pattern and the reticulated nucleolar configuration of control motor neurons were preserved in ALS chromatolytic neurons. Moreover the 5′-fluorouridine (5′-FU) transcription assay, at the ultrastructural level, revealed high incorporation of the RNA precursor 5′-FU into nascent RNA. Immunogold particles of 5′-FU incorporation were distributed throughout the euchromatin and on the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus in both control and ALS motor neurons. The high rate of rRNA transcription in ALS motor neurons could maintain ribosome biogenesis under conditions of severe dysfunction of proteostasis. Collectively, the perinuclear reorganization of protein synthesis machinery, the predominant euchromatin architecture, and the active nucleolar transcription could represent compensatory mechanisms in ALS motor neurons in response to the disturbance of ER proteostasis. In this scenario, epigenetic activation of chromatin and nucleolar transcription could have important therapeutic implications for neuroprotection in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. Although histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently used as therapeutic agents, we raise the untapped potential of the nucleolar transcription of ribosomal genes as an exciting new target for the therapy of some neurodegenerative

  19. Transcriptional repression of BODENLOS by HD-ZIP transcription factor HB5 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smet, De I.; Lau, S.; Ehrismann, J.S.; Axiotis, I.; Kolb, M.; Kientz, M.; Weijers, D.; Jürgens, G.

    2013-01-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, the phytohormone auxin is an important patterning agent during embryogenesis and post-embryonic development, exerting effects through transcriptional regulation. The main determinants of the transcriptional auxin response machinery are AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF)

  20. Global and stage specific patterns of Krüppel-associated-box zinc finger protein gene expression in murine early embryonic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Corsinotti

    Full Text Available Highly coordinated transcription networks orchestrate the self-renewal of pluripotent stem cell and the earliest steps of mammalian development. KRAB-containing zinc finger proteins represent the largest group of transcription factors encoded by the genomes of higher vertebrates including mice and humans. Together with their putatively universal cofactor KAP1, they have been implicated in events as diverse as the silencing of endogenous retroelements, the maintenance of imprinting and the pluripotent self-renewal of embryonic stem cells, although the genomic targets and specific functions of individual members of this gene family remain largely undefined. Here, we first generated a list of Ensembl-annotated KRAB-containing genes encoding the mouse and human genomes. We then defined the transcription levels of these genes in murine early embryonic cells. We found that the majority of KRAB-ZFP genes are expressed in mouse pluripotent stem cells and other early progenitors. However, we also identified distinctively cell- or stage-specific patterns of expression, some of which are pluripotency-restricted. Finally, we determined that individual KRAB-ZFP genes exhibit highly distinctive modes of expression, even when grouped in genomic clusters, and that these cannot be correlated with the presence of prototypic repressive or activating chromatin marks. These results pave the way to delineating the role of specific KRAB-ZFPs in early embryogenesis.

  1. Trans-10, cis 12-Conjugated Linoleic Acid-Induced Milk Fat Depression Is Associated with Inhibition of PPARγ Signaling and Inflammation in Murine Mammary Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K. G. Kadegowda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous trans-10, cis-12-CLA (CLA reduces lipid synthesis in murine adipose and mammary (MG tissues. However, genomewide alterations in MG and liver (LIV associated with dietary CLA during lactation remain unknown. We fed mice (n=5/diet control or control + trans-10, cis-12-CLA (37 mg/day between d 6 and d 10 postpartum. The 35,302 annotated murine exonic evidence-based oligo (MEEBO microarray and quantitative RT-PCR were used for transcript profiling. Milk fat concentration was 44% lower on d 10 versus d 6 due to CLA. The CLA diet resulted in differential expression of 1,496 genes. Bioinformatics analyses underscored that a major effect of CLA on MG encompassed alterations in cellular signaling pathways and phospholipid species biosynthesis. Dietary CLA induced genes related to ER stress (Xbp1, apoptosis (Bcl2, and inflammation (Orm1, Saa2, and Cp. It also induced marked inhibition of PPARγ signaling, including downregulation of Pparg and Srebf1 and several lipogenic target genes (Scd, Fasn, and Gpam. In LIV, CLA induced hepatic steatosis probably through perturbations in the mitochondrial functions and induction of ER stress. Overall, results from this study underscored the role of PPARγ signaling on mammary lipogenic target regulation. The proinflammatory effect due to CLA could be related to inhibition of PPARγ signaling.

  2. Extra virgin olive oil polyphenolic extracts downregulate inflammatory responses in LPS-activated murine peritoneal macrophages suppressing NFκB and MAPK signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdeno, A; Sánchez-Hidalgo, M; Aparicio-Soto, M; Sánchez-Fidalgo, S; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, C

    2014-06-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) is obtained from the fruit of the olive tree Olea europaea L. Phenolic compounds present in EVOO have recognized anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the activity of the total phenolic fraction extracted from EVOO and the action mechanisms involved are not well defined. The present study was designed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the polyphenolic extract (PE) from EVOO on LPS-stimulated peritoneal murine macrophages. Nitric oxide (NO) production was analyzed by the Griess method and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescence analysis. Moreover, changes in the protein expression of the pro-inflammatory enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), as well as the role of nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NFκB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways, were analyzed by Western blot. PE from EVOO reduced LPS-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses through decreasing NO and ROS generation. In addition, PE induced a significant down-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and mPGES-1 protein expressions, reduced MAPK phosphorylation and prevented the nuclear NFκB translocation. This study establishes that PE from EVOO possesses anti-inflammatory activities on LPS-stimulated murine macrophages.

  3. Genetic deletion of the bacterial sensor NOD2 improves murine Crohn’s disease-like ileitis independent of functional dysbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corridoni, D.; Rodriguez-Palacios, A.; Di Stefano, G.; Di Martino, L.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Chang, E. B.; Arseneau, K. O.; Pizarro, T. T.; Cominelli, F.

    2016-11-16

    Although genetic polymorphisms in NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2) have been associated with the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD), little is known regarding the role of wild-type (WT) NOD2 in the gut. To date, most murine studies addressing the role of WT Nod2 have been conducted using healthy (ileitis/colitis-free) mouse strains. Here, we evaluated the effects of Nod2 deletion in a murine model of spontaneous ileitis, i.e., the SAMP1Yit/Fc (SAMP) strain, which closely resembles CD. Remarkably, Nod2 deletion improved both chronic cobblestone ileitis (by 50% assessed, as the % of abnormal mucosa at 24 wks of age), as well as acute dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis. Mechanistically, Th2 cytokine production and Th2-transcription factor activation (i.e., STAT6 phosphorylation) were reduced. Microbiologically, the effects of Nod2 deletion appeared independent of fecal microbiota composition and function, assessed by 16S rRNA and metatranscriptomics. Our findings indicate that pharmacological blockade of NOD2 signaling in humans could improve health in Th2-driven chronic intestinal inflammation.

  4. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transcription of human cytomegalovirus UL/b′ region has been studied extensively for some genes. In this study, transcripts of the UL140 and UL141, two of the UL/b′ genes, were identified in late RNAs of three HCMV isolates using Northern blot hybridization, cDNA library screening and RACE-PCR. At least three ...

  5. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-21

    Jan 21, 2013 ... Transcription of human cytomegalovirus UL/b′ region has been studied extensively for some genes. In this study, transcripts of the UL140 and UL141, two of the UL/b′ genes, were identified in late RNAs of three HCMV isolates using Northern blot hybridization, cDNA library screening and RACE-PCR.

  6. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes.......Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  7. Regulation of transcription in hyperthermophilic archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to insight in the mechanisms by which transcription in hyperthermophilic archaea is regulated. To accomplish this, we have aimed (I) to identify transcriptional regulatory proteins from hyperthermophilic archaea, (II) to characterize these

  8. 45 CFR 99.27 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Official transcript. 99.27 Section 99.27 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE FOR HEARINGS FOR THE CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Hearing Procedures § 99.27 Official transcript. The Department will...

  9. RNA polymerase II collision interrupts convergent transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hobson, David J; Wei, Wu; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2012-01-01

    Antisense noncoding transcripts, genes-within-genes, and convergent gene pairs are prevalent among eukaryotes. The existence of such transcription units raises the question of what happens when RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) molecules collide head-to-head. Here we use a combination of biochemical...

  10. Transcription regulation by the Mediator complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutourina, Julie

    2018-04-01

    Alterations in the regulation of gene expression are frequently associated with developmental diseases or cancer. Transcription activation is a key phenomenon in the regulation of gene expression. In all eukaryotes, mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription (Mediator), a large complex with modular organization, is generally required for transcription by RNA polymerase II, and it regulates various steps of this process. The main function of Mediator is to transduce signals from the transcription activators bound to enhancer regions to the transcription machinery, which is assembled at promoters as the preinitiation complex (PIC) to control transcription initiation. Recent functional studies of Mediator with the use of structural biology approaches and functional genomics have revealed new insights into Mediator activity and its regulation during transcription initiation, including how Mediator is recruited to transcription regulatory regions and how it interacts and cooperates with PIC components to assist in PIC assembly. Novel roles of Mediator in the control of gene expression have also been revealed by showing its connection to the nuclear pore and linking Mediator to the regulation of gene positioning in the nuclear space. Clear links between Mediator subunits and disease have also encouraged studies to explore targeting of this complex as a potential therapeutic approach in cancer and fungal infections.

  11. Rediscovering peritoneal macrophages in a murine endometriosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Li, Dong; An, Min; Li, Qiuju; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Guoyun

    2017-01-01

    What are the features of peritoneal macrophage subgroups and T helper cells in the development of murine endometriosis? During the development of endometriosis in a murine model, large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs) and small peritoneal macrophages (SPMs) are polarized into M1 and M2 cells, respectively, and the proportions of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and T regulatory (T reg ) cells are increased. Numerous studies investigating the etiology and pathogenesis of endometriosis have focused on the polarization states of peritoneal macrophages in endometriosis models and patients, but the results are inconclusive. Further studies indicate that peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs, although their roles in endometriosis are unknown. This study involves a prospective and randomized experiment. Fifty C57BL/6 female mice were randomly allocated to five control and five experimental groups (n = 5/group) according to the presence or absence of transplantation. The transplant periods are 0.25, 3, 14, 28 and 42 days. C57BL/6 mice were utilized to establish an endometriosis model by i.p. injection of allogeneic endometrial segments. Dynamic changes of peritoneal macrophage subsets and polarization profiles were evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). Macrophage morphology and density were assessed by cell counting under a microscope. Dynamic changes of Th1, Th2, Th17 and T reg cells were estimated by FCM. Peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs. The proportion of SPMs increased immediately after peritoneal injection of endometrial tissues, whereas LPMs showed an opposite trend. Peritoneal macrophages differentiated into both M1 and M2 macrophages. The bidirectional polarization of macrophages was caused by the inverse trends of polarization of LPMs and SPMs. Consistently, the proportions of Th1, Th17 and T reg cells were all increased in mice with endometriosis. N/A. In this study, detection was only performed in a

  12. Nanoliposomal artemisinin for the treatment of murine visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Want MY

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Muzamil Y Want,1 Mohammad Islammudin,1 Garima Chouhan,1 Hani A Ozbak,2 Hassan A Hemeg,2 Asoke P Chattopadhyay,3 Farhat Afrin2 1Parasite Immunology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Chemistry, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, India Abstract: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a fatal, vector-borne disease caused by the intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. Most of the therapeutics for VL are toxic, expensive, or ineffective. Sesquiterpenes are a new class of drugs with proven antimicrobial and antiviral activities. Artemisinin is a sesquiterpene lactone with potent antileishmanial activity, but with limited access to infected cells, being a highly lipophilic molecule. Association of artemisinin with liposome is a desirable strategy to circumvent the problem of poor accessibility, thereby improving its efficacy, as demonstrated in a murine model of experimental VL. Nanoliposomal artemisinin (NLA was prepared by thin-film hydration method and optimized using Box–Behnken design with a mean particle diameter of 83±16 nm, polydispersity index of 0.2±0.03, zeta potential of -27.4±5.7 mV, and drug loading of 33.2%±2.1%. Morphological study of these nanoliposomes by microscopy showed a smooth and spherical surface. The mechanism of release of artemisinin from the liposomes followed the Higuchi model in vitro. NLA was free from concomitant signs of toxicity, both ex vivo in murine macrophages and in vivo in healthy BALB/c mice. NLA significantly denigrated the intracellular infection of Leishmania donovani amastigotes and the number of infected macrophages ex vivo with an IC50 of 6.0±1.4 µg/mL and 5.1±0.9 µg/mL, respectively. Following treatment in a murine model of VL, NLA demonstrated superior efficacy compared to artemisinin with a

  13. Small finger protein of avian and murine retroviruses has nucleic acid annealing activity and positions the replication primer tRNA onto genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, A C; Sarih, L; Gabus, C; Litvak, S; Keith, G; Darlix, J L

    1988-06-01

    Retrovirus virions carry a diploid genome associated with a large number of small viral finger protein molecules which are required for encapsidation. Our present results show that finger protein p12 of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and p10 of murine leukaemia virus (MuLV) positions replication primer tRNA on the replication initiation site (PBS) at the 5' end of the RNA genome. An RSV mutant with a Val-Pro insertion in the finger motif of p12 is able to partially encapsidate genomic RNA but is not infectious because mutated p12 is incapable of positioning the replication primer, tRNATrp. Since all known replication competent retroviruses, and the plant virus CaMV, code for finger proteins analogous to RSV p12 or MuLV p10, the initial stage of reverse transcription in avian, mammalian and human retroviruses and in CaMV is probably controlled in an analogous way.

  14. The murine Cd48 gene: allelic polymorphism in the IgV-like region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, J G; Freeman, G J; Reiser, H

    1998-12-01

    The murine CD48 molecule is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which regulates the activation of T lymphocytes. prior cloning experiments using mRNA from two different mouse strains had yielded discrepant sequences within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48. To resolve this issue, we have directly sequenced genomic DNA of 10 laboratory strains and two inbred strains of wild origin. The results of our analysis reveal an allelic polymorphism within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48.

  15. ERP, a new member of the ets transcription factor/oncoprotein family: cloning, characterization, and differential expression during B-lymphocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M; Oettgen, P; Akbarali, Y; Dendorfer, U; Libermann, T A

    1994-05-01

    The ets gene family encodes a group of proteins which function as transcription factors under physiological conditions and, if aberrantly expressed, can cause cellular transformation. We have recently identified two regulatory elements in the murine immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) enhancer, pi and microB, which exhibit striking similarity to binding sites for ets-related proteins. To identify ets-related transcriptional regulators expressed in pre-B lymphocytes that may interact with either the pi or the microB site, we have used a PCR approach with degenerate oligonucleotides encoding conserved sequences in all members of the ets family. We have cloned the gene for a new ets-related transcription factor, ERP (ets-related protein), from the murine pre-B cell line BASC 6C2 and from mouse lung tissue. The ERP protein contains a region of high homology with the ETS DNA-binding domain common to all members of the ets transcription factor/oncoprotein family. Three additional smaller regions show homology to the ELK-1 and SAP-1 genes, a subgroup of the ets gene family that interacts with the serum response factor. Full-length ERP expresses only negligible DNA-binding activity by itself. Removal of the carboxy terminus enables ERP to interact with a variety of ets-binding sites including the E74 site, the IgH enhancer pi site, and the lck promoter ets site, suggesting a carboxy-terminal negative regulatory domain. At least three ERP-related transcripts are expressed in a variety of tissues. However, within the B-cell lineage, ERP is highly expressed primarily at early stages of B-lymphocyte development, and expression declines drastically upon B-cell maturation, correlating with the enhancer activity of the IgH pi site. These data suggest that ERP might play a role in B-cell development and in IgH gene regulation.

  16. Preparation of Murine Submandibular Salivary Gland for Upright Intravital Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficht, Xenia; Thelen, Flavian; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V

    2018-05-07

    The submandibular salivary gland (SMG) is one of the three major salivary glands, and is of interest for many different fields of biological research, including cell biology, oncology, dentistry, and immunology. The SMG is an exocrine gland comprised of secretory epithelial cells, myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, nerves, and extracellular matrix. Dynamic cellular processes in the rat and mouse SMG have previously been imaged, mostly using inverted multi-photon microscope systems. Here, we describe a straightforward protocol for the surgical preparation and stabilization of the murine SMG in anesthetized mice for in vivo imaging with upright multi-photon microscope systems. We present representative intravital image sets of endogenous and adoptively transferred fluorescent cells, including the labeling of blood vessels or salivary ducts and second harmonic generation to visualize fibrillar collagen. In sum, our protocol allows for surgical preparation of mouse salivary glands in upright microscopy systems, which are commonly used for intravital imaging in the field of immunology.

  17. Corn silk induces nitric oxide synthase in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung A; Choi, Sang Kyu; Choi, Hye Seon

    2004-12-31

    Corn silk has been purified as an anticoagulant previously and the active component is a polysaccharide with a molecular mass of 135 kDa. It activates murine macrophages to induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and generate substantial amounts of NO in time and dose-dependent manners. It was detectable first at 15 h after stimulation by corn silk, peaked at 24 h, and undetectable by 48 h. Induction of NOS is inhibited by pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and genistein, an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and tyrosine kinase, respectively, indicating that iNOS stimulated by corn silk is associated with tyrosine kinase and NF-kappaB signaling pathways. IkappaB-alpha degradation was detectible at 10 min, and the level was restored at 120 min after treatment of corn silk. Corn silk induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB by phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha.

  18. Flow cytometric quantification of radiation responses of murine peritoneal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokita, N.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods have been developed to distinguish subpopulations of murine peritoneal cells, and these were applied to the measurement of early changes in peritoneal cells after irradiation. The ratio of the two major subpopulations in the peritoneal fluid, lymphocytes and macrophages, was measured rapidly by means of cell volume distribution analysis as well as by hypotonic propidium iodide (PI) staining. After irradiation, dose and time dependent changes were noted in the cell volume distributions: a rapid loss of peritoneal lymphocytes, and an increase in the mean cell volume of macrophages. The hypotonic PI staining characteristics of the peritoneal cells showed two or three distinctive G 1 peaks. The ratio of the areas of these peaks was also found to be dependent of the radiation dose and the time after irradiation. These results demonstrate that these two parameters may be used to monitor changes induced by irradiation (biological dosimetry), and to sort different peritoneal subpopulations

  19. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  20. The kin17 Protein in Murine Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise C. Ramos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available kin17 has been described as a protein involved in the processes of DNA replication initiation, DNA recombination, and DNA repair. kin17 has been studied as a potential molecular marker of breast cancer. This work reports the detection and localization of this protein in the murine melanoma cell line B16F10-Nex2 and in two derived subclones with different metastatic potential, B16-8HR and B16-10CR. Nuclear and chromatin-associated protein fractions were analyzed, and kin17 was detected in all fractions, with an elevated concentration observed in the chromatin-associated fraction of the clone with low metastatic potential, suggesting that the kin17 expression level could be a marker of melanoma.

  1. Macropinocytosis is the Entry Mechanism of Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    of infection. Understanding how pathogens and toxins exploit or divert endocytosis pathways has advanced our understanding of membrane trafficking pathways, which benefits development of new therapeutical schemes and methods of drug delivery. We show here that Murine Leukemia Virus (A-MLV) pseudotyped......, or NIH-3T3 cells knocked-down for caveolin expression, was unaffected. Conversely, A-MLV infection of NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells was sensitive to amiloride analogues and actin-depolymerizing drugs that interfere with macropinocytosis. Further manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton through conditional...... with the amphotropic (expands the host range to many mammalian cells) envelope protein gains entry into host cells by macropinocytosis. Macropinosomes form as large, fluid-filled vacuoles (up to 10 μm) following collapse of cell surface protrusions and membrane scission. We use drugs or introduction of mutant proteins...

  2. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-01-01

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells

  3. First transplantation of isolated murine follicles in alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Julie; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; Luyckx, Valérie; Donnez, Jacques; Amorim, Christiani A

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to develop an artificial ovary allowing survival and growth of isolated follicles and ovarian cells, to restore fertility in women diagnosed with pathologies at high risk of ovarian involvement. For this, alginate beads containing isolated preantral follicles and ovarian cells were autografted to immunocompetent mice. One week after grafting, the beads were invaded by proliferating murine cells (12.1%) and capillaries. The recovery rate of follicles per graft ranged from 0% to 35.5%. Of the analyzed follicles, 77% were Ki67-positive and 81%, TUNEL-negative. Three antral follicles were also identified, evidencing their ability to grow in the matrix. Our results suggest that an artificial ovary is now conceivable, opening new perspectives to restore fertility in women.

  4. Combined genome-wide expression profiling and targeted RNA interference in primary mouse macrophages reveals perturbation of transcriptional networks associated with interferon signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craigon Marie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferons (IFNs are potent antiviral cytokines capable of reprogramming the macrophage phenotype through the induction of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs. Here we have used targeted RNA interference to suppress the expression of a number of key genes associated with IFN signalling in murine macrophages prior to stimulation with interferon-gamma. Genome-wide changes in transcript abundance caused by siRNA activity were measured using exon-level microarrays in the presence or absence of IFNγ. Results Transfection of murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs with a non-targeting (control siRNA and 11 sequence-specific siRNAs was performed using a cationic lipid transfection reagent (Lipofectamine2000 prior to stimulation with IFNγ. Total RNA was harvested from cells and gene expression measured on Affymetrix GeneChip Mouse Exon 1.0 ST Arrays. Network-based analysis of these data revealed six siRNAs to cause a marked shift in the macrophage transcriptome in the presence or absence IFNγ. These six siRNAs targeted the Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2 transcripts. The perturbation of the transcriptome by the six siRNAs was highly similar in each case and affected the expression of over 600 downstream transcripts. Regulated transcripts were clustered based on co-expression into five major groups corresponding to transcriptional networks associated with the type I and II IFN response, cell cycle regulation, and NF-KB signalling. In addition we have observed a significant non-specific immune stimulation of cells transfected with siRNA using Lipofectamine2000, suggesting use of this reagent in BMDMs, even at low concentrations, is enough to induce a type I IFN response. Conclusion Our results provide evidence that the type I IFN response in murine BMDMs is dependent on Ifnb1, Irf3, Irf5, Stat1, Stat2 and Nfkb2, and that siRNAs targeted to these genes results in perturbation of key transcriptional networks associated

  5. The interferon-induced antiviral protein PML (TRIM19) promotes the restriction and transcriptional silencing of lentiviruses in a context-specific, isoform-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masroori, Nasser; Merindol, Natacha; Berthoux, Lionel

    2016-03-22

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein, a type I interferon (IFN-I)-induced gene product and a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family, modulates the transcriptional activity of viruses belonging to various families. Whether PML has an impact on the replication of HIV-1 has not been fully addressed, but recent studies point to its possible involvement in the restriction of HIV-1 in human cells and in the maintenance of transcriptional latency in human cell lines in which HIV-1 is constitutively repressed. We investigated further the restriction of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac, by PML in murine cells and in a lymphocytic human cell line. In particular, we studied the relevance of PML to IFN-I-mediated inhibition and the role of individual human isoforms. We demonstrate that both human PML (hPML) and murine PML (mPML) inhibit the early post-entry stages of the replication of HIV-1 and a related lentivirus, SIVmac. In addition, HIV-1 was transcriptionally silenced by mPML and by hPML isoforms I, II, IV and VI in MEFs. This PML-mediated transcriptional repression was attenuated in presence of the histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA. In contrast, depletion of PML had no effect on HIV-1 gene expression in a human T cell line. PML was found to contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 by IFN-I. Specifically, IFN-α and IFN-β treatments of MEFs enhanced the PML-dependent inhibition of HIV-1 early replication stages. We show that PML can inhibit HIV-1 and other lentiviruses as part of the IFN-I-mediated response. The restriction takes place at two distinct steps, i.e. reverse transcription and transcription, and in an isoform-specific, cellular context-specific fashion. Our results support a model in which PML activates innate immune antilentiviral effectors. These data are relevant to the development of latency reversal-inducing pharmacological agents, since PML was previously proposed as a pharmacological target for such inhibitors. This study also has

  6. Murine model of long-term obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of three murine models of obstructive jaundice. C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Overall, 70% (7 of 10) of tCL mice died by day 7, whereas majority 67% (10 of 15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. A total of 19% (3 of 16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 d after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension and severe fibrosis by day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice, but long-term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene expression in IFN-g-activated murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critical for natural immunity and play a central role in specific acquired immunity. The IFN-gamma activation of macrophages derived from A/J or BALB/c mice yielded two different patterns of antiviral state in murine hepatitis virus 3 infection, which were related to a down-regulation of the main virus receptor. Using cDNA hybridization to evaluate mRNA accumulation in the cells, we were able to identify several genes that are differently up- or down-regulated by IFN-gamma in A/J (267 and 266 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated or BALB/c (297 and 58 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated mouse macrophages. Macrophages from mice with different genetic backgrounds behave differently at the molecular level and comparison of the patterns of non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated A/J or BALB/c mouse macrophages revealed, for instance, an up-regulation and a down-regulation of genes coding for biological functions such as enzymatic reactions, nucleic acid synthesis and transport, protein synthesis, transport and metabolism, cytoskeleton arrangement and extracellular matrix, phagocytosis, resistance and susceptibility to infection and tumors, inflammation, and cell differentiation or activation. The present data are reported in order to facilitate future correlation of proteomic/transcriptomic findings as well as of results obtained from a classical approach for the understanding of biological phenomena. The possible implication of the role of some of the gene products relevant to macrophage biology can now be further scrutinized. In this respect, a down-regulation of the main murine hepatitis virus 3 receptor gene was detected only in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages of resistant mice.

  8. Noninfectious virus-like particles produced by Moloney murine leukemia virus-based retrovirus packaging cells deficient in viral envelope become infectious in the presence of lipofection reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjai; Murai, Fukashi; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Friedmann, Theodore

    1997-01-01

    Retrovirus packaging cell lines expressing the Moloney murine leukemia virus gag and pol genes but lacking virus envelope genes produce virus-like particles constitutively, whether or not they express a transcript from an integrated retroviral provirus. In the absence of a proviral transcript, the assembled particles contain processed gag and reverse transcriptase, and particles made by cells expressing an integrated lacZ provirus also contain viral RNA. The virus-like particles from both cell types are enveloped and are secreted/budded into the extracellular space but are noninfectious. Their physicochemical properties are similar to those of mature retroviral particles. The noninfectious gag pol RNA particles can readily be made infectious by the addition of lipofection reagents to produce preparations with titers of up to 105 colony-forming units per ml. PMID:9380714

  9. Oviductal extracellular vesicles (oviductosomes, OVS) are conserved in humans: murine OVS play a pivotal role in sperm capacitation and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathala, Pradeepthi; Fereshteh, Zeinab; Li, Kun; Al-Dossary, Amal A; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2018-03-01

    significantly elevated in the oviductal luminal fluid (OLF) (P = 0.02) and in OVS (P = 0.03) of Pmca4-/-, compared to WT. Further, while PMCA1 levels did not fluctuate in OLF during the cycle in WT, they were significantly (P = 0.02) higher in proestrus/estrus than at metestrus/diestrus in Pmca4-/-. The elevated levels of PMCA1 in proestrus/estrus, which mimics PMCA4 in WT, is OLF/OVS-specific, and is not seen in oviductal tissues, uterosomes or epididymal luminal fluid of Pmca4-/-. However, qRT-PCR revealed significantly elevated levels of Pmca1 transcript in Pmca4-/- oviductal tissues, compared to WT. PMCA1 could be transferred from OVS to sperm and the levels were significantly higher for capacitated vs uncapacitated sperm, as assessed by flow cytometry (P = 0.001) after 3 h co-incubation, quantitative western blot (P fertility-modulating cargo components are conserved in humans, it suggests that murine OVS role in regulating the expression of proteins required for capacitation and fertility is also conserved. Secondly, OVS may explain some of the differences in in vivo and in vitro fertilization for mouse mutants, as seen in mice lacking the gene for FER which is the enzyme required for sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Our observation that murine OVS carry and can modulate sperm protein tyrosine phosphorylation by delivering them to sperm provides an explanation for the in vivo fertility of Fer mutants, not seen in vitro. Finally, our findings have implications for infertility treatment and exosome therapeutics. The work was supported by National Institute of Health (RO3HD073523 and 5P20RR015588) grants to P.A.M.-D. There are no conflicts of interests.

  10. Colon cancer associated transcripts in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yincong; Xie, Haibiao; Gao, Qunjun; Zhan, Hengji; Xiao, Huizhong; Zou, Yifan; Zhang, Fuyou; Liu, Yuchen; Li, Jianfa

    2017-10-01

    Long non-coding RNAs serve as important regulators in complicated cellular activities, including cell differentiation, proliferation and death. Dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs occurs in the formation and progression of cancers. The family of colon cancer associated transcripts, long non-coding RNAs colon cancer associated transcript-1 and colon cancer associated transcript-2 are known as oncogenes involved in various cancers. Colon cancer associated transcript-1 is a novel lncRNA located in 8q24.2, and colon cancer associated transcript-2 maps to the 8q24.21 region encompassing rs6983267. Colon cancer associated transcripts have close associations with clinical characteristics, such as lymph node metastasis, high TNM stage and short overall survival. Knockdown of them can reverse the malignant phenotypes of cancer cells, including proliferation, migration, invasion and apoptosis. Moreover, they can increase the expression level of c-MYC and oncogenic microRNAs via activating a series of complex mechanisms. In brief, the family of colon cancer associated transcripts may serve as potential biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products and World Trade Center particulate induced lung function loss: A case-cohort study and murine model of acute particulate exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraher, Erin J; Kwon, Sophia; Haider, Syed H; Crowley, George; Lee, Audrey; Ebrahim, Minah; Zhang, Liqun; Chen, Lung-Chi; Gordon, Terry; Liu, Mengling; Prezant, David J; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Nolan, Anna

    2017-01-01

    World Trade Center-particulate matter(WTC-PM) exposure and metabolic-risk are associated with WTC-Lung Injury(WTC-LI). The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) is most highly expressed in the lung, mediates metabolic risk, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the AGER-locus predict forced expiratory volume(FEV). Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that RAGE is a biomarker of WTC-LI in the FDNY-cohort and that loss of RAGE in a murine model would protect against acute PM-induced lung disease. We know from previous work that early intense exposure at the time of the WTC collapse was most predictive of WTC-LI therefore we utilized a murine model of intense acute PM-exposure to determine if loss of RAGE is protective and to identify signaling/cytokine intermediates. This study builds on a continuing effort to identify serum biomarkers that predict the development of WTC-LI. A case-cohort design was used to analyze a focused cohort of male never-smokers with normal pre-9/11 lung function. Odds of developing WTC-LI increased by 1.2, 1.8 and 1.0 in firefighters with soluble RAGE (sRAGE)≥97pg/mL, CRP≥2.4mg/L, and MMP-9≤397ng/mL, respectively, assessed in a multivariate logistic regression model (ROCAUC of 0.72). Wild type(WT) and RAGE-deficient(Ager-/-) mice were exposed to PM or PBS-control by oropharyngeal aspiration. Lung function, airway hyperreactivity, bronchoalveolar lavage, histology, transcription factors and plasma/BAL cytokines were quantified. WT-PM mice had decreased FEV and compliance, and increased airway resistance and methacholine reactivity after 24-hours. Decreased IFN-γ and increased LPA were observed in WT-PM mice; similar findings have been reported for firefighters who eventually develop WTC-LI. In the murine model, lack of RAGE was protective from loss of lung function and airway hyperreactivity and was associated with modulation of MAP kinases. We conclude that in a multivariate adjusted model increased sRAGE is

  12. Receptor for advanced glycation end-products and World Trade Center particulate induced lung function loss: A case-cohort study and murine model of acute particulate exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin J Caraher

    Full Text Available World Trade Center-particulate matter(WTC-PM exposure and metabolic-risk are associated with WTC-Lung Injury(WTC-LI. The receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE is most highly expressed in the lung, mediates metabolic risk, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the AGER-locus predict forced expiratory volume(FEV. Our objectives were to test the hypotheses that RAGE is a biomarker of WTC-LI in the FDNY-cohort and that loss of RAGE in a murine model would protect against acute PM-induced lung disease. We know from previous work that early intense exposure at the time of the WTC collapse was most predictive of WTC-LI therefore we utilized a murine model of intense acute PM-exposure to determine if loss of RAGE is protective and to identify signaling/cytokine intermediates. This study builds on a continuing effort to identify serum biomarkers that predict the development of WTC-LI. A case-cohort design was used to analyze a focused cohort of male never-smokers with normal pre-9/11 lung function. Odds of developing WTC-LI increased by 1.2, 1.8 and 1.0 in firefighters with soluble RAGE (sRAGE≥97pg/mL, CRP≥2.4mg/L, and MMP-9≤397ng/mL, respectively, assessed in a multivariate logistic regression model (ROCAUC of 0.72. Wild type(WT and RAGE-deficient(Ager-/- mice were exposed to PM or PBS-control by oropharyngeal aspiration. Lung function, airway hyperreactivity, bronchoalveolar lavage, histology, transcription factors and plasma/BAL cytokines were quantified. WT-PM mice had decreased FEV and compliance, and increased airway resistance and methacholine reactivity after 24-hours. Decreased IFN-γ and increased LPA were observed in WT-PM mice; similar findings have been reported for firefighters who eventually develop WTC-LI. In the murine model, lack of RAGE was protective from loss of lung function and airway hyperreactivity and was associated with modulation of MAP kinases. We conclude that in a multivariate adjusted model increased s

  13. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaya S Rangaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4. Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  14. Novel lncRNAs in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    KAUST Repository

    Ballarino, Monica; Cazzella, Valentina; D'Andrea, Daniel; Grassi, Luigi; Bisceglie, Lavinia; Cipriano, Andrea; Santini, Tiziana; Pinnarò , Chiara; Morlando, Mariangela; Tramontano, Anna; Bozzoni, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  15. Novel lncRNAs in myogenesis: a miR-31 overlapping transcript controls myoblast differentiation.

    KAUST Repository

    Ballarino, Monica

    2014-12-15

    Transcriptome analysis allowed the identification of new long noncoding RNAs differentially expressed during murine myoblast differentiation. These transcripts were classified on the basis of their expression under proliferating versus differentiated conditions, muscle-restricted activation, and subcellular localization. Several species displayed preferential expression in dystrophic (mdx) versus wild-type muscles, indicating their possible link with regenerative processes. One of the identified transcripts, lnc-31, even if originating from the same nuclear precursor of miR-31, is produced by a pathway mutually exclusive. We show that lnc-31 and its human homologue hsa-lnc-31 are expressed in proliferating myoblasts, where they counteract differentiation. In line with this, both species are more abundant in mdx muscles and in human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) myoblasts, than in their normal counterparts. Altogether, these data suggest a crucial role for lnc-31 in controlling the differentiation commitment of precursor myoblasts and indicate that its function is maintained in evolution despite the poor sequence conservation with the human counterpart.

  16. Transcription factor TLX1 controls retinoic acid signaling to ensure spleen development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenti, Elisa; Farinello, Diego; Penkov, Dmitry; Castagnaro, Laura; Lavorgna, Giovanni; Wuputra, Kenly; Tjaden, Naomi E. Butler; Bernassola, Francesca; Caridi, Nicoletta; Wagner, Michael; Kozinc, Katja; Niederreither, Karen; Blasi, Francesco; Pasini, Diego; Trainor, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie spleen development and congenital asplenia, a condition linked to increased risk of overwhelming infections, remain largely unknown. The transcription factor TLX1 controls cell fate specification and organ expansion during spleen development, and Tlx1 deletion causes asplenia in mice. Deregulation of TLX1 expression has recently been proposed in the pathogenesis of congenital asplenia in patients carrying mutations of the gene-encoding transcription factor SF-1. Herein, we have shown that TLX1-dependent regulation of retinoic acid (RA) metabolism is critical for spleen organogenesis. In a murine model, loss of Tlx1 during formation of the splenic anlage increased RA signaling by regulating several genes involved in RA metabolism. Uncontrolled RA activity resulted in premature differentiation of mesenchymal cells and reduced vasculogenesis of the splenic primordium. Pharmacological inhibition of RA signaling in Tlx1-deficient animals partially rescued the spleen defect. Finally, spleen growth was impaired in mice lacking either cytochrome P450 26B1 (Cyp26b1), which results in excess RA, or retinol dehydrogenase 10 (Rdh10), which results in RA deficiency. Together, these findings establish TLX1 as a critical regulator of RA metabolism and provide mechanistic insights into the molecular determinants of human congenital asplenia. PMID:27214556

  17. All-trans retinoic acid directs urothelial specification of murine embryonic stem cells via GATA4/6 signaling mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Mauney

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The urinary bladder and associated tract are lined by the urothelium, a transitional epithelium that acts as a specialized permeability barrier that protects the underlying tissue from urine via expression of a highly specific group of proteins known as the uroplakins (UP. To date, our understanding of the developmental processes responsible for urothelial differentiation has been hampered due to the lack of suitable models. In this study, we describe a novel in vitro cell culture system for derivation of urothelial cells from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs following cultivation on collagen matrices in the presence all trans retinoic acid (RA. Upon stimulation with micromolar concentrations of RA, ESCs significantly downregulated the pluripotency factor OCT-4 but markedly upregulated UP1A, UP1B, UP2, UP3A, and UP3B mRNA levels in comparison to naïve ESCs and spontaneously differentiating controls. Pan-UP protein expression was associated with both p63- and cytokeratin 20-positive cells in discrete aggregating populations of ESCs following 9 and 14 days of RA stimulation. Analysis of endodermal transcription factors such as GATA4 and GATA6 revealed significant upregulation and nuclear enrichment in RA-treated UP2-GFP+ populations. GATA4-/- and GATA6-/- transgenic ESC lines revealed substantial attenuation of RA-mediated UP expression in comparison to wild type controls. In addition, EMSA analysis revealed that RA treatment induced formation of transcriptional complexes containing GATA4/6 on both UP1B and UP2 promoter fragments containing putative GATA factor binding sites. Collectively, these data suggest that RA mediates ESC specification toward a urothelial lineage via GATA4/6-dependent processes.

  18. Transcriptional mapping of rabies virus in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flamand, A.; Delagneau, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    Synthesis of the proteins of rabies virus was studied in hamster cell infected with uv-irradiated virus. The uv target size of genes L, N, M 1 , and M 2 was measured during primary transcription. Except for N, the target size of the remaining genes was considerably larger than that of their physical sizes. The data fit the hypothesis that four genes occupy a single transcriptional unit and that transcription of rabies virus proceeds in the order N, M 1 , M 2 , and L

  19. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by “opening” or “closing” chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but also are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts. PMID:22223048

  20. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo

    2005-01-01

    level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has......NAC proteins constitute one of the largest families of plant-specific transcription factors, and the family is present in a wide range of land plants. Here, we summarize the biological and molecular functions of the NAC family, paying particular attention to the intricate regulation of NAC protein...

  1. Large-scale identification of microRNA targets in murine Dgcr8-deficient embryonic stem cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P A Davis

    Full Text Available Small RNAs such as microRNAs play important roles in embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. A broad range of microRNAs is expressed in embryonic stem cells while only a fraction of their targets have been identified. We have performed large-scale identification of embryonic stem cell microRNA targets using a murine embryonic stem cell line deficient in the expression of Dgcr8. These cells are heavily depleted for microRNAs, allowing us to reintroduce specific microRNA duplexes and identify refined target sets. We used deep sequencing of small RNAs, mRNA expression profiling and bioinformatics analysis of microRNA seed matches in 3' UTRs to identify target transcripts. Consequently, we have identified a network of microRNAs that converge on the regulation of several important cellular pathways. Additionally, our experiments have revealed a novel candidate for Dgcr8-independent microRNA genesis and highlighted the challenges currently facing miRNA annotation.

  2. Reprogramming of murine macrophages through TLR2 confers viral resistance via TRAF3-mediated, enhanced interferon production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Perkins

    Full Text Available The cell surface/endosomal Toll-like Receptors (TLRs are instrumental in initiating immune responses to both bacteria and viruses. With the exception of TLR2, all TLRs and cytosolic RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs with known virus-derived ligands induce type I interferons (IFNs in macrophages or dendritic cells. Herein, we report that prior ligation of TLR2, an event previously shown to induce "homo" or "hetero" tolerance, strongly "primes" macrophages for increased Type I IFN production in response to subsequent TLR/RLR signaling. This occurs by increasing activation of the transcription factor, IFN Regulatory Factor-3 (IRF-3 that, in turn, leads to enhanced induction of IFN-β, while expression of other pro-inflammatory genes are suppressed (tolerized. In vitro or in vivo "priming" of murine macrophages with TLR2 ligands increase virus-mediated IFN induction and resistance to infection. This priming effect of TLR2 is mediated by the selective upregulation of the K63 ubiquitin ligase, TRAF3. Thus, we provide a mechanistic explanation for the observed antiviral actions of MyD88-dependent TLR2 and further define the role of TRAF3 in viral innate immunity.

  3. Low-Dose Gene Therapy for Murine PKU Using Episomal Naked DNA Vectors Expressing PAH from Its Endogenous Liver Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiu Man Grisch-Chan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Limited duration of transgene expression, insertional mutagenesis, and size limitations for transgene cassettes pose challenges and risk factors for many gene therapy vectors. Here, we report on physiological expression of liver phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH by delivery of naked DNA/minicircle (MC-based vectors for correction of homozygous enu2 mice, a model of human phenylketonuria (PKU. Because MC vectors lack a defined size limit, we constructed a MC vector expressing a codon-optimized murine Pah cDNA that includes a truncated intron and is under the transcriptional control of a 3.6-kb native Pah promoter/enhancer sequence. This vector, delivered via hydrodynamic injection, yielded therapeutic liver PAH activity and sustained correction of blood phenylalanine comparable to viral or synthetic liver promoters. Therapeutic efficacy was seen with vector copy numbers of 95% loss of vector genomes and PAH activity in liver, demonstrating that MC vectors had not integrated into the liver genome. In conclusion, MC vectors, which do not have a defined size-limitation, offer a favorable safety profile for hepatic gene therapy due to their non-integration in combination with native promoters.

  4. A method for the isolation and characterization of functional murine monoclonal antibodies by single B cell cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, Sara; Oliver, Brian G; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Sack, Brandon; Bergl, Emilee; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody technologies have enabled dramatic advances in immunology, the study of infectious disease, and modern medicine over the past 40years. However, many monoclonal antibody discovery procedures are labor- and time-intensive, low efficiency, and expensive. Here we describe an optimized mAb discovery platform for the rapid and efficient isolation, cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies in murine systems. In this platform, antigen-binding splenic B cells from immunized mice are isolated by FACS and cocultured with CD40L positive cells to induce proliferation and mAb production. After 12days of coculture, cell culture supernatants are screened for antigen, and IgG positivity and RNA is isolated for reverse-transcription. Positive-well cDNA is then amplified by PCR and the resulting amplicons can be cloned into ligation-independent expression vectors, which are then used directly to transfect HEK293 cells for recombinant antibody production. After 4days of growth, conditioned medium can be screened using biolayer interferometry for antigen binding and affinity measurements. Using this method, we were able to isolate six unique, functional monoclonal antibodies against an antigen of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Importantly, this method incorporates several important advances that circumvent the need for single-cell PCR, restriction cloning, and large scale protein production, and can be applied to a wide array of protein antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In situ TLR2 and TLR4 expression in a murine model of mycetoma caused by Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán-Chiu, Blanca Edith; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Pérez-Torres, Armando; Méndez-Tovar, Luis Javier; López-Martínez, Rubén

    2011-04-01

    Actinomycetoma caused by Nocardia brasiliensis is a common disease in tropical regions. This ailment is characterized by a localized chronic inflammation that mainly affects the lower limbs. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, inducing the production of proinflammatory mediators. The role of TLRs in the immune response against N. brasiliensis is unknown. The aim of this work was to locate and quantify in a murine model the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in the infection site using reverse transcription-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The results showed that TLR2 expression increased in the infected tissue, whereas TLR4 expression decreased. The presence of TLR2 and TLR4 was demonstrated in different cell populations throughout the chronic infectious process. In the early stages of this process, TLR2 was expressed in neutrophils and macrophages in direct contact with the inoculum, whereas TLR4 was observed in mast cells. In the advanced stages of the infection, TLR2 was expressed in foam cells and fibroblasts and was likely associated with bacterial containment, while TLR4 was downregulated, probably resulting in an imbalance between the host immune response and the bacterial load that favoured chronic disease. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Radiation Induced Apoptosis of Murine Bone Marrow Cells Is Independent of Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Z Oben

    Full Text Available An understanding of how each individual 5q chromosome critical deleted region (CDR gene contributes to malignant transformation would foster the development of much needed targeted therapies for the treatment of therapy related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs. Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1 is a key transcriptional regulator of myeloid differentiation located within the 5q chromosome CDR that has been shown to regulate HSC (hematopoietic stem cell quiescence as well as the master regulator of apoptosis-p53. Since resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant transformation, we investigated the role of EGR1 in apoptosis of bone marrow cells; a cell population from which myeloid malignancies arise. We evaluated radiation induced apoptosis of Egr1+/+ and Egr1-/- bone marrow cells in vitro and in vivo. EGR1 is not required for radiation induced apoptosis of murine bone marrow cells. Neither p53 mRNA (messenger RNA nor protein expression is regulated by EGR1 in these cells. Radiation induced apoptosis of bone marrow cells by double strand DNA breaks induced p53 activation. These results suggest EGR1 dependent signaling mechanisms do not contribute to aberrant apoptosis of malignant cells in myeloid malignancies.

  7. Endochondral Growth Defect and Deployment of Transient Chondrocyte Behaviors Underlie Osteoarthritis Onset in a Natural Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, K. A.; Madi, K.; Mirczuk, S. M.; Parker, S.; Burleigh, A.; Poulet, B.; Hopkinson, M.; Bodey, A. J.; Fowkes, R. C.; Farquharson, C.; Lee, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore whether aberrant transient chondrocyte behaviors occur in the joints of STR/Ort mice (which spontaneously develop osteoarthritis [OA]) and whether they are attributable to an endochondral growth defect. Methods Knee joints from STR/Ort mice with advanced OA and age‐matched CBA (control) mice were examined by Affymetrix microarray profiling, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis, and immunohistochemical labeling of endochondral markers, including sclerostin and MEPE. The endochondral phenotype of STR/Ort mice was analyzed by histologic examination, micro–computed tomography, and ex vivo organ culture. A novel protocol for quantifying bony bridges across the murine epiphysis (growth plate fusion) using synchrotron x‐ray computed microtomography was developed and applied. Results Meta‐analysis of transcription profiles showed significant elevation in functions linked with endochondral ossification in STR/Ort mice (compared to CBA mice; P mice. Our novel synchrotron radiation microtomography method showed increased numbers (P mice compared to age‐matched CBA mice. Conclusion Taken together, our data support the notion of an inherent endochondral defect that is linked to growth dynamics and subject to regulation by the MEPE/sclerostin axis and may represent an underlying mechanism of pathologic ossification in OA. PMID:26605758

  8. C/EBPβ LIP and c-Jun synergize to regulate expression of the murine progesterone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizhong; Do, Han Ngoc; Aupperlee, Mark D; Durairaj, Srinivasan; Flynn, Emily E; Miksicek, Richard J; Haslam, Sandra Z; Schwartz, Richard C

    2018-06-02

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is required for murine mammary ductal morphogenesis and alveologenesis. Progesterone is critical for proliferation and alveologenesis in adult mammary glands, and there is a similar requirement for progesterone receptor isoform B (PRB) in alveologenesis. We examined C/EBPβ regulation of PR expression. All three C/EBPβ isoforms, including typically inhibitory LIP, transactivated the PR promoter. LIP, particularly, strongly synergized with c-Jun to drive PR transcription. Endogenous C/EBPβ and c-Jun stimulated a PR promoter-reporter and these two factors showed promoter occupancy on the endogenous PR gene. Additionally, LIP overexpression elevated endogenous PR protein expression. In pregnancy, both PRB and the relative abundance of LIP among C/EBPβ isoforms increase. Consistent with a role in PRB expression, in vivo C/EBPβ and PR isoform A expression showed mutually exclusive localization in mammary epithelium, while C/EBPβ and PRB largely co-localized. We suggest a critical role for C/EBPβ, particularly LIP, in PRB expression. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  10. Responses of the Murine Myeloid Colony-Forming Cell to Ansamycin Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoszewicz, Julius S.; Carter, William A.

    1974-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of murine myeloid colony-forming cells to the antiproliferative activities of three ansamycin antibiotics was determined. These cells were found to be 10- to 40-fold more susceptible than the corresponding human ones. PMID:4151701

  11. Diagnosing hypoxia in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis from reflectance multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinton, Sophie; Naylor, Amy J.; Claridge, Ela

    2017-07-01

    Spectra computed from multispectral images of murine models of Rheumatoid Arthritis show a characteristic decrease in reflectance within the 600-800nm region which is indicative of the reduction in blood oxygenation and is consistent with hypoxia.

  12. Acute Febrile Illness and Complications Due to Murine Typhus, Texas, USA1,2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Zeeshan; Kallumadanda, Sunand; Wang, Feng; Hemmige, Vagish; Musher, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Murine typhus occurs relatively commonly in southern Texas, as well as in California. We reviewed records of 90 adults and children in whom murine typhus was diagnosed during a 3-year period in 2 hospitals in southern Texas, USA. Most patients lacked notable comorbidities; all were immunocompetent. Initial signs and symptoms included fever (99%), malaise (82%), headache (77%), fatigue (70%), myalgias (68%), and rash (39%). Complications, often severe, in 28% of patients included bronchiolitis, pneumonia, meningitis, septic shock, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, myositis, and rhabdomyolysis; the last 3 are previously unreported in murine typhus. Low serum albumin and elevated procalcitonin, consistent with bacterial sepsis, were observed in >70% of cases. Rash was more common in children; thrombocytopenia, hyponatremia, elevated hepatic transaminases, and complications were more frequent in adults. Murine typhus should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in cases of acute febrile illness in southern and even in more northern US states.

  13. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  14. Radiobiological studies on target cell populations in murine bone marrow transplantation recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Ronald Peter

    1994-01-01

    The experiments presented in this thesis were designed to investigate the role of total body irradiation (TBI) in conditioning murine recipients of syngeneic and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). ... Zie: Summary

  15. Repression of meiotic genes by antisense transcription and by Fkh2 transcription factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Rosebrock, Adam P; Khan, Sohail R; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription represses sense transcription of meiotic genes in vegetative cells. Although the mechanism(s) of antisense mediated transcription repression need to be further explored, our data indicates that RNAi machinery is not required for repression. Previously, we and others used non-strand specific methods to study splicing regulation of meiotic genes and concluded that 28 mid-meiotic genes are spliced only in meiosis. We now demonstrate that the "unspliced" signal in vegetative cells comes from the antisense RNA, not from unspliced sense RNA, and we argue against the idea that splicing regulates these mid-meiotic genes. Most of these mid-meiotic genes are induced in mid-meiosis by the forkhead transcription factor Mei4. Interestingly, deletion of a different forkhead transcription factor, Fkh2, allows low levels of sense expression of some mid-meiotic genes in vegetative cells. We propose that vegetative expression of mid-meiotic genes is repressed at least two independent ways: antisense transcription and Fkh2 repression.

  16. Repression of Meiotic Genes by Antisense Transcription and by Fkh2 Transcription Factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Khan, Sohail R.; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription represses sense transcription of meiotic genes in vegetative cells. Although the mechanism(s) of antisense mediated transcription repression need to be further explored, our data indicates that RNAi machinery is not required for repression. Previously, we and others used non-strand specific methods to study splicing regulation of meiotic genes and concluded that 28 mid-meiotic genes are spliced only in meiosis. We now demonstrate that the “unspliced” signal in vegetative cells comes from the antisense RNA, not from unspliced sense RNA, and we argue against the idea that splicing regulates these mid-meiotic genes. Most of these mid-meiotic genes are induced in mid-meiosis by the forkhead transcription factor Mei4. Interestingly, deletion of a different forkhead transcription factor, Fkh2, allows low levels of sense expression of some mid-meiotic genes in vegetative cells. We propose that vegetative expression of mid-meiotic genes is repressed at least two independent ways: antisense transcription and Fkh2 repression. PMID:22238674

  17. Repression of meiotic genes by antisense transcription and by Fkh2 transcription factor in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available In S. pombe, about 5% of genes are meiosis-specific and accumulate little or no mRNA during vegetative growth. Here we use Affymetrix tiling arrays to characterize transcripts in vegetative and meiotic cells. In vegetative cells, many meiotic genes, especially those induced in mid-meiosis, have abundant antisense transcripts. Disruption of the antisense transcription of three of these mid-meiotic genes allowed vegetative sense transcription. These results suggest that antisense transcription represses sense transcription of meiotic genes in vegetative cells. Although the mechanism(s of antisense mediated transcription repression need to be further explored, our data indicates that RNAi machinery is not required for repression. Previously, we and others used non-strand specific methods to study splicing regulation of meiotic genes and concluded that 28 mid-meiotic genes are spliced only in meiosis. We now demonstrate that the "unspliced" signal in vegetative cells comes from the antisense RNA, not from unspliced sense RNA, and we argue against the idea that splicing regulates these mid-meiotic genes. Most of these mid-meiotic genes are induced in mid-meiosis by the forkhead transcription factor Mei4. Interestingly, deletion of a different forkhead transcription factor, Fkh2, allows low levels of sense expression of some mid-meiotic genes in vegetative cells. We propose that vegetative expression of mid-meiotic genes is repressed at least two independent ways: antisense transcription and Fkh2 repression.

  18. In silico and wet lab approaches to study transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hestand, Matthew Scott

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression is a complicated process with multiple types of regulation, including binding of proteins termed transcription factors. This thesis looks at transcription factors and transcription factor binding site discovery through computational predictions and wet lab work to better elucidate

  19. Acute lethal toxicity following passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Savoy, A C; Lupan, D M; Manalo, P B; Roberts, J S; Schlageter, A M; Weinhold, L C; Kozel, T R

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans alters the course of murine cryptococcosis. During studies of passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis, we noted the occurrence of an acute, lethal toxicity. Toxicity was characterized by scratching, lethargy, respiratory distress, collapse, and death within 20 to 60 min after injection of antibody. The toxic effect was observed only in mice with ...

  20. Puerarin Suppresses the Self-Renewal of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells by Inhibition of REST-MiR-21 Regulatory Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mengmeng; Yuan, Yin; Cui, Yurong; Hong, Xian; Luo, Hongyan; Hu, Xinwu; Tang, Ming; Hescheler, Jurgen; Xi, Jiaoya

    2015-01-01

    Puerarin shows a wide range of biological activities, including affecting the cardiac differentiation from murine embryonic stem (mES) cells. However, little is known about its effect and mechanism of action on the self-renewal of mES cells. This study aimed to determine the effect of puerarin on the self-renewal and pluripotency of mES cells and its underlying mechanisms. RT-PCR and real-time PCR were used to detect the transcripts of core transcription factors, specific markers for multiple lineages, REST and microRNA-21 (miR-21). Colony-forming assay was performed to estimate the self-renewal capacity of mES cells. Western blotting and wortmannin were employed to explore the role of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the inhibitory action of puerarin on REST transcript. Transfected mES cells with antagomir21 were used to confirm the role of miR-21 in the action of puerarin on cell self-renewal. Puerarin significantly decreased the percentage of the self-renewal colonies, and suppressed the transcripts of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, c-Myc and REST. Besides, PECAM, NCAM and miR-21 were up-regulated both under the self-renewal conditions and at day 4 of differentiation. The PI3K inhibitor wortmannin successfully reversed the mRNA expression changes of REST, Nanog and Sox2. Transfection of antagomir21 efficiently reversed the effects of puerarin on mES cells self-renewal. Inhibition of REST-miR-21 regulatory pathway may be the key mechanism of puerarin-induced suppression of mES cells self-renewal.

  1. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase-mediated signal transduction and interleukin 2 (IL-2) expression in the murine T-cell line, EL4.IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, R; Herring, A; Koh, W S; Lee, M; Kaminski, N E

    1996-05-31

    Cannabinoid receptors negatively regulate adenylate cyclase through a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP-binding protein. In the present studies, signaling via the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway was investigated in the murine thymoma-derived T-cell line, EL4.IL-2. Northern analysis of EL4.IL-2 cells identified the presence of 4-kilobase CB2 but not CB1 receptor-subtype mRNA transcripts. Southern analysis of genomic DNA digests for the CB2 receptor demonstrated identical banding patterns for EL4.IL-2 cells and mouse-derived DNA, both of which were dissimilar to DNA isolated from rat. Treatment of EL4.IL-2 cells with either cannabinol or Delta9-THC disrupted the adenylate cyclase signaling cascade by inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation which consequently led to a decrease in protein kinase A activity and the binding of transcription factors to a CRE consensus sequence. Likewise, an inhibition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) protein secretion, which correlated to decreased IL-2 gene transcription, was induced by both cannabinol and Delta9-THC. Further, cannabinoid treatment also decreased PMA/ionomycin-induced nuclear factor binding to the AP-1 proximal site of the IL-2 promoter. Conversely, forskolin enhanced PMA/ionomycin-induced AP-1 binding. These findings suggest that inhibition of signal transduction via the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway induces T-cell dysfunction which leads to a diminution in IL-2 gene transcription.

  2. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  3. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico; Romero-Barrios, Natali; Jé gu, Teddy; Benhamed, Moussa; Crespi, Martin

    2015-01-01

    splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates

  4. Salmonella Typhimurium transcription profiles in space flight

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Salmonella transcription profiles were obtained from samples flown on space shuttle mission STS-115 and compared to profiles from Salmonella grown under identical...

  5. Transcript for Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/medicalwordstranscript.html Transcript for Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial To use the sharing features on ... get to what those mean in a minute. Word Roots Word Roots. Let's begin with body parts. ...

  6. Behavior of a cloned murine interferon alpha/beta receptor expressed in homospecific or heterospecific background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzé, G; Lutfalla, G; Bandu, M T; Proudhon, D; Mogensen, K E

    1992-05-15

    A murine interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor was cloned from the IFN-sensitive L1210 cell line on the basis of its homology with the human receptor. A combination of methods that includes the screening of random-primed and oligo(dT)-primed cDNA libraries and polymerase chain reactions with a single-side specificity was used. At the amino acid level, the murine IFN-alpha/beta shows 46% identity with its human counterpart. Both human WISH cells presenting a low sensitivity to mouse IFN and a murine L1210 mutant subline that does not express the receptor have been stably transfected with the murine IFN-alpha/beta receptor. Whereas transfected human cells became sensitive to a limited number of mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes, the transfected murine L1210 mutant was found to be fully complemented and became sensitive to all mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes tested, including those that were not active on transfected human cells. These results strongly suggest that the receptor described here is implicated in the mediation of the activities of all murine IFN-alpha/beta subtypes.

  7. A unified architecture of transcriptional regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Danko, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is precisely controlled in time and space through the integration of signals that act at gene promoters and gene-distal enhancers. Classically, promoters and enhancers are considered separate classes of regulatory elements, often distinguished by histone modifications. However...... and enhancers are considered a single class of functional element, with a unified architecture for transcription initiation. The context of interacting regulatory elements and the surrounding sequences determine local transcriptional output as well as the enhancer and promoter activities of individual elements....

  8. Transcriptional Waves in the Yeast Cell Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Anna; Rosebrock, Adam; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Pyne, Saumyadipta; Chen, Haiying; Skiena, Steve; Futcher, Bruce; Leatherwood, Janet

    2005-01-01

    Many genes are regulated as an innate part of the eukaryotic cell cycle, and a complex transcriptional network helps enable the cyclic behavior of dividing cells. This transcriptional network has been studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) and elsewhere. To provide more perspective on these regulatory mechanisms, we have used microarrays to measure gene expression through the cell cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (fission yeast). The 750 genes with the most significant oscillat...

  9. Linking Core Promoter Classes to Circadian Transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål O Westermark

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in transcription are generated by rhythmic abundances and DNA binding activities of transcription factors. Propagation of rhythms to transcriptional initiation involves the core promoter, its chromatin state, and the basal transcription machinery. Here, I characterize core promoters and chromatin states of genes transcribed in a circadian manner in mouse liver and in Drosophila. It is shown that the core promoter is a critical determinant of circadian mRNA expression in both species. A distinct core promoter class, strong circadian promoters (SCPs, is identified in mouse liver but not Drosophila. SCPs are defined by specific core promoter features, and are shown to drive circadian transcriptional activities with both high averages and high amplitudes. Data analysis and mathematical modeling further provided evidence for rhythmic regulation of both polymerase II recruitment and pause release at SCPs. The analysis provides a comprehensive and systematic view of core promoters and their link to circadian mRNA expression in mouse and Drosophila, and thus reveals a crucial role for the core promoter in regulated, dynamic transcription.

  10. TAF(II)250: a transcription toolbox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassarman, D A; Sauer, F

    2001-08-01

    Activation of RNA-polymerase-II-dependent transcription involves conversion of signals provided by gene-specific activator proteins into the synthesis of messenger RNA. This conversion requires dynamic structural changes in chromatin and assembly of general transcription factors (GTFs) and RNA polymerase II at core promoter sequence elements surrounding the transcription start site of genes. One hallmark of transcriptional activation is the interaction of DNA-bound activators with coactivators such as the TATA-box binding protein (TBP)-associated factors (TAF(II)s) within the GTF TFIID. TAF(II)250 possesses a variety of activities that are likely to contribute to the initial steps of RNA polymerase II transcription. TAF(II)250 is a scaffold for assembly of other TAF(II)s and TBP into TFIID, TAF(II)250 binds activators to recruit TFIID to particular promoters, TAF(II)250 regulates binding of TBP to DNA, TAF(II)250 binds core promoter initiator elements, TAF(II)250 binds acetylated lysine residues in core histones, and TAF(II)250 possesses protein kinase, ubiquitin-activating/conjugating and acetylase activities that modify histones and GTFs. We speculate that these activities achieve two goals--(1) they aid in positioning and stabilizing TFIID at particular promoters, and (2) they alter chromatin structure at the promoter to allow assembly of GTFs--and we propose a model for how TAF(II)250 converts activation signals into active transcription.

  11. A biophysical model for transcription factories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canals-Hamann, Ana Z; Neves, Ricardo Pires das; Reittie, Joyce E; Iñiguez, Carlos; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Buckle, Veronica J; Iborra, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factories are nuclear domains where gene transcription takes place although the molecular basis for their formation and maintenance are unknown. In this study, we explored how the properties of chromatin as a polymer may contribute to the structure of transcription factories. We found that transcriptional active chromatin contains modifications like histone H4 acetylated at Lysine 16 (H4K16ac). Single fibre analysis showed that this modification spans the entire body of the gene. Furthermore, H4K16ac genes cluster in regions up to 500 Kb alternating active and inactive chromatin. The introduction of H4K16ac in chromatin induces stiffness in the chromatin fibre. The result of this change in flexibility is that chromatin could behave like a multi-block copolymer with repetitions of stiff-flexible (active-inactive chromatin) components. Copolymers with such structure self-organize through spontaneous phase separation into microdomains. Consistent with such model H4K16ac chromatin form foci that associates with nascent transcripts. We propose that transcription factories are the result of the spontaneous concentration of H4K16ac chromatin that are in proximity, mainly in cis

  12. Intrinsic terminators in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Tiago Ebert; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2015-04-08

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, an important pathogen of swine, exhibits a low guanine and cytosine (GC) content genome. M. hyopneumoniae genome is organised in long transcriptional units and promoter sequences have been mapped upstream of all transcription units. These analysis provided insights into the gene organisation and transcription initiation at the genome scale. However, the presence of transcriptional terminator sequences in the M. hyopneumoniae genome is poorly understood. In silico analyses demonstrated the presence of putative terminators in 82% of the 33 monocistronic units (mCs) and in 74% of the 116 polycistronic units (pCs) considering different classes of terminators. The functional activity of 23 intrinsic terminators was confirmed by RT-PCR and qPCR. Analysis of all terminators found by three software algorithms, combined with experimental results, allowed us to propose a pattern of RNA hairpin formation during the termination process and to predict the location of terminators in the M. hyopneumoniae genome sequence. The stem-loop structures of intrinsic terminators of mycoplasma diverge from the pattern of terminators found in other bacteria due the low content of guanine and cytosine. In M. hyopneumoniae, transcription can end after a transcriptional unit and before its terminator sequence and can also continue past the terminator sequence with RNA polymerases gradually releasing the RNA.

  13. MADS-box gene evolution - structure and transcription patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Bo; Pedersen, Louise Buchholt; Skipper, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs......Mads-box genes, ABC model, Evolution, Phylogeny, Transcription patterns, Gene structure, Conserved motifs...

  14. Temporal and spatial transcriptional fingerprints by antipsychotic or propsychotic drugs in mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Sakuma

    Full Text Available Various types of antipsychotics have been developed for the treatment of schizophrenia since the accidental discovery of the antipsychotic activity of chlorpromazine. Although all clinically effective antipsychotic agents have common properties to interact with the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R activation, their precise mechanisms of action remain elusive. Antipsychotics are well known to induce transcriptional changes of immediate early genes (IEGs, raising the possibility that gene expressions play an essential role to improve psychiatric symptoms. Here, we report that while different classes of antipsychotics have complex pharmacological profiles against D2R, they share common transcriptome fingerprint (TFP profile of IEGs in the murine brain in vivo by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR. Our data showed that various types of antipsychotics with a profound interaction of D2R including haloperidol (antagonist, olanzapine (antagonist, and aripiprazole (partial agonist all share common spatial TFPs closely homologous to those of D2R antagonist sulpiride, and elicited greater transcriptional responses in the striatum than in the nucleus accumbens. Meanwhile, D2R agonist quinpirole and propsychotic NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP exhibited the contrasting TFP profiles. Clozapine and propsychotic drug methamphetamine (MAP displayed peculiar TFPs that reflect their unique pharmacological property. Our results suggest that transcriptional responses are conserved across various types of antipsychotics clinically effective in positive symptoms of schizophrenia and also show that temporal and spatial TFPs may reflect the pharmacological features of the drugs. Thus, we propose that a TFP approach is beneficial to evaluate novel drug candidates for antipsychotic development.

  15. Preclinical evaluation of transcriptional targeting strategy for human hepatocellular carcinoma in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Kian Chuan; Huynh, Hung; Chung, Alexander Yaw Fui; Ooi, London Lucien Peng Jin; Lim, Kiat Hon; Hui, Kam Man; Lam, Paula Yeng Po

    2013-08-01

    Gene regulation of many key cell-cycle players in S-, G(2) phase, and mitosis results from transcriptional repression in their respective promoter regions during the G(0) and G(1) phases of cell cycle. Within these promoter regions are phylogenetically conserved sequences known as the cell-cycle-dependent element (CDE) and cell-cycle genes homology regions (CHR) sites. Thus, we hypothesize that transcriptional regulation of cell-cycle regulation via the CDE/CHR region together with liver-specific apolipoprotein E (apoE)-hAAT promoter could bring about a selective transgene expression in proliferating human hepatocellular carcinoma. We show that the newly generated vector AH-6CC-L2C could mediate hepatocyte-targeted luciferase gene expression in tumor cells and freshly isolated short-term hepatocellular carcinoma cultures from patient biopsy. In contrast, normal murine and human hepatocytes infected with AH-6CC-L2C expressed minimal or low luciferase activities. In the presence of prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), AH-6CC-L2C effectively suppressed the growth of orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived xenograft mouse model via the expression of yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD) that converts 5-FC to anticancer metabolite 5-fluoruracil. More importantly, we show that combination treatment of AH-6CC-L2C with an EZH2 inhibitor, DZNep, that targets EpCAM-positive hepatocellular carcinoma, can bring about a greater therapeutic efficacy compared with a single treatment of virus or inhibitor. Our study showed that targeting proliferating human hepatocellular carcinoma cells through the transcriptional control of therapeutic gene could represent a feasible approach against hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Mechanical stress activates Smad pathway through PKCδ to enhance interleukin-11 gene transcription in osteoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Kido

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mechanical stress rapidly induces ΔFosB expression in osteoblasts, which binds to interleukin (IL-11 gene promoter to enhance IL-11 expression, and IL-11 enhances osteoblast differentiation. Because bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs also stimulate IL-11 expression in osteoblasts, there is a possibility that BMP-Smad signaling is involved in the enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by mechanical stress. The present study was undertaken to clarify whether mechanical stress affects BMP-Smad signaling, and if so, to elucidate the role of Smad signaling in mechanical stress-induced enhancement of IL-11 gene transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mechanical loading by fluid shear stress (FSS induced phosphorylation of BMP-specific receptor-regulated Smads (BR-Smads, Smad1/5, in murine primary osteoblasts (mPOBs. FSS rapidly phosphorylated Y311 of protein kinase C (PKCδ, and phosphorylated PKCδ interacted with BR-Smads to phosphorylate BR-Smads. Transfection of PKCδ siRNA or Y311F mutant PKCδ abrogated BR-Smads phosphorylation and suppressed IL-11 gene transcription enhanced by FSS. Activated BR-Smads bound to the Smad-binding element (SBE of IL-11 gene promoter and formed complex with ΔFosB/JunD heterodimer via binding to the C-terminal region of JunD. Site-directed mutagenesis in the SBE and the AP-1 site revealed that both SBE and AP-1 sites were required for full activation of IL-11 gene promoter by FSS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that PKCδ-BR-Smads pathway plays an important role in the intracellular signaling in response to mechanical stress, and that a cross-talk between PKCδ-BR-Smads and ΔFosB/JunD pathways synergistically stimulates IL-11 gene transcription in response to mechanical stress.

  17. Handling stress may confound murine gut microbiota studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary R. Allen-Blevins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accumulating evidence indicates interactions between human milk composition, particularly sugars (human milk oligosaccharides or HMO, the gut microbiota of human infants, and behavioral effects. Some HMO secreted in human milk are unable to be endogenously digested by the human infant but are able to be metabolized by certain species of gut microbiota, including Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis, a species sensitive to host stress (Bailey & Coe, 2004. Exposure to gut bacteria like B. infantisduring critical neurodevelopment windows in early life appears to have behavioral consequences; however, environmental, physical, and social stress during this period can also have behavioral and microbial consequences. While rodent models are a useful method for determining causal relationships between HMO, gut microbiota, and behavior, murine studies of gut microbiota usually employ oral gavage, a technique stressful to the mouse. Our aim was to develop a less-invasive technique for HMO administration to remove the potential confound of gavage stress. Under the hypothesis that stress affects gut microbiota, particularly B. infantis, we predicted the pups receiving a prebiotic solution in a less-invasive manner would have the highest amount of Bifidobacteria in their gut. Methods This study was designed to test two methods, active and passive, of solution administration to mice and the effects on their gut microbiome. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice housed in a specific-pathogen free facility received increasing doses of fructooligosaccharide (FOS solution or deionized, distilled water. Gastrointestinal (GI tracts were collected from five dams, six sires, and 41 pups over four time points. Seven fecal pellets from unhandled pups and two pellets from unhandled dams were also collected. Qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was used to quantify and compare the amount of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Bacteroidetes, and

  18. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  19. Dynamic analysis of stochastic transcription cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire V Harper

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In individual mammalian cells the expression of some genes such as prolactin is highly variable over time and has been suggested to occur in stochastic pulses. To investigate the origins of this behavior and to understand its functional relevance, we quantitatively analyzed this variability using new mathematical tools that allowed us to reconstruct dynamic transcription rates of different reporter genes controlled by identical promoters in the same living cell. Quantitative microscopic analysis of two reporter genes, firefly luciferase and destabilized EGFP, was used to analyze the dynamics of prolactin promoter-directed gene expression in living individual clonal and primary pituitary cells over periods of up to 25 h. We quantified the time-dependence and cyclicity of the transcription pulses and estimated the length and variation of active and inactive transcription phases. We showed an average cycle period of approximately 11 h and demonstrated that while the measured time distribution of active phases agreed with commonly accepted models of transcription, the inactive phases were differently distributed and showed strong memory, with a refractory period of transcriptional inactivation close to 3 h. Cycles in transcription occurred at two distinct prolactin-promoter controlled reporter genes in the same individual clonal or primary cells. However, the timing of the cycles was independent and out-of-phase. For the first time, we have analyzed transcription dynamics from two equivalent loci in real-time in single cells. In unstimulated conditions, cells showed independent transcription dynamics at each locus. A key result from these analyses was the evidence for a minimum refractory period in the inactive-phase of transcription. The response to acute signals and the result of manipulation of histone acetylation was consistent with the hypothesis that this refractory period corresponded to a phase of chromatin remodeling which significantly

  20. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  1. Aspirin-triggered lipoxin A4 and lipoxin A4 up-regulate transcriptional corepressor NAB1 in human neutrophils.

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    Qiu, F H; Devchand, P R; Wada, K; Serhan, C N

    2001-12-01

    Aspirin-triggered 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (ATL) is an endogenous lipid mediator that mimics the actions of native lipoxin A4, a putative "stop signal" involved in regulating resolution of inflammation. A metabolically more stable analog of ATL, 15-epi-16-(para-fluoro)-phenoxy-lipoxin A4 analog (ATLa), inhibits neutrophil recruitment in vitro and in vivo and displays potent anti-inflammatory actions. ATLa binds with high affinity to the lipoxin A4 receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor on the surface of leukocytes. In this study, we used freshly isolated human neutrophils to examine ATLa's potential for initiating rapid nuclear responses. Using differential display reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, we identified a subset of genes that was selectively up-regulated upon short exposure of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to ATLa but not to the chemoattractant leukotriene B4 or vehicle alone. We further investigated ATLa regulation of one of the genes, NAB1, a transcriptional corepressor identified previously as a glucocorticoid-responsive gene in hamster smooth muscle cells. Treatment of human neutrophils with pertussis toxin blocked ATLa up-regulation of NAB1. In addition, ATLa stimulated NAB1 gene expression in murine lung vascular smooth muscle in vivo. These findings provide evidence for rapid transcriptional induction of a cassette of genes via an ATLa-stimulated G protein-coupled receptor pathway that is potentially protective and overlaps with the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid regulatory circuit.

  2. Cloning and characterization of the mouse Mcoln1 gene reveals an alternatively spliced transcript not seen in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stahl Stefanie

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder characterized by severe neurologic and ophthalmologic abnormalities. Recently the MLIV gene, MCOLN1, has been identified as a new member of the transient receptor potential (TRP cation channel superfamily. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the mouse homologue, Mcoln1, and report a novel splice variant that is not seen in humans. Results The human and mouse genes display a high degree of synteny. Mcoln1 shows 91% amino acid and 86% nucleotide identity to MCOLN1. Also, Mcoln1 maps to chromosome 8 and contains an open reading frame of 580 amino acids, with a transcript length of approximately 2 kb encoded by 14 exons, similar to its human counterpart. The transcript that results from murine specific alternative splicing encodes a 611 amino acid protein that differs at the c-terminus. Conclusions Mcoln1 is highly similar to MCOLN1, especially in the transmembrane domains and ion pore region. Also, the late endosomal/lysosomal targeting signal is conserved, supporting the hypothesis that the protein is localized to these vesicle membranes. To date, there are very few reports describing species-specific splice variants. While identification of Mcoln1 is crucial to the development of mouse models for MLIV, the fact that there are two transcripts in mice suggests an additional or alternate function of the gene that may complicate phenotypic assessment.

  3. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  4. Hyperammonemia in cirrhosis induces transcriptional regulation of myostatin by an NF-κB–mediated mechanism

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    Qiu, Jia; Thapaliya, Samjhana; Runkana, Ashok; Yang, Yu; Tsien, Cynthia; Mohan, Maradumane L.; Narayanan, Arvind; Eghtesad, Bijan; Mozdziak, Paul E.; McDonald, Christine; Stark, George R.; Welle, Stephen; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V.; Dasarathy, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, is nearly universal in cirrhosis and adversely affects patient outcome. The underlying cross-talk between the liver and skeletal muscle mediating sarcopenia is not well understood. Hyperammonemia is a consistent abnormality in cirrhosis due to impaired hepatic detoxification to urea. We observed elevated levels of ammonia in both plasma samples and skeletal muscle biopsies from cirrhotic patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, skeletal muscle from cirrhotics had increased expression of myostatin, a known inhibitor of skeletal muscle accretion and growth. In vivo studies in mice showed that hyperammonemia reduced muscle mass and strength and increased myostatin expression in wild-type compared with postdevelopmental myostatin knockout mice. We postulated that hyperammonemia is an underlying link between hepatic dysfunction in cirrhosis and skeletal muscle loss. Therefore, murine C2C12 myotubes were treated with ammonium acetate resulting in intracellular concentrations similar to those in cirrhotic muscle. In this system, we demonstrate that hyperammonemia stimulated myostatin expression in a NF-κB–dependent manner. This finding was also observed in primary murine muscle cell cultures. Hyperammonemia triggered activation of IκB kinase, NF-κB nuclear translocation, binding of the NF-κB p65 subunit to specific sites within the myostatin promoter, and stimulation of myostatin gene transcription. Pharmacologic inhibition or gene silencing of NF-κB abolished myostatin up-regulation under conditions of hyperammonemia. Our work provides unique insights into hyperammonemia-induced myostatin expression and suggests a mechanism by which sarcopenia develops in cirrhotic patients. PMID:24145431

  5. Dek overexpression in murine epithelia increases overt esophageal squamous cell carcinoma incidence

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    Cimperman, Katherine A.; Haas, Sarah R.; Guasch, Geraldine; Waclaw, Ronald R.; Komurov, Kakajan; Lane, Adam; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal cancer occurs as either squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) or adenocarcinoma. ESCCs comprise almost 90% of cases worldwide, and recur with a less than 15% five-year survival rate despite available treatments. The identification of new ESCC drivers and therapeutic targets is critical for improving outcomes. Here we report that expression of the human DEK oncogene is strongly upregulated in esophageal SCC based on data in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). DEK is a chromatin-associated protein with important roles in several nuclear processes including gene transcription, epigenetics, and DNA repair. Our previous data have utilized a murine knockout model to demonstrate that Dek expression is required for oral and esophageal SCC growth. Also, DEK overexpression in human keratinocytes, the cell of origin for SCC, was sufficient to cause hyperplasia in 3D organotypic raft cultures that mimic human skin, thus linking high DEK expression in keratinocytes to oncogenic phenotypes. However, the role of DEK over-expression in ESCC development remains unknown in human cells or genetic mouse models. To define the consequences of Dek overexpression in vivo, we generated and validated a tetracycline responsive Dek transgenic mouse model referred to as Bi-L-Dek. Dek