WorldWideScience

Sample records for mumps

  1. Mumps and mumps vaccine: a global review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazka, A M; Robertson, S E; Kraigher, A

    1999-01-01

    Mumps is an acute infectious disease caused by a paramyxovirus. Although the disease is usually mild, up to 10% of patients can develop aseptic meningitis; a less common but more serious complication is encephalitis, which can result in death or disability. Permanent deafness, orchitis, and pancreatitis are other untoward effects of mumps. Based on data reported to WHO up to April 1998, mumps vaccine is routinely used by national immunization programmes in 82 countries/areas: 23 (92%) of 25 developed countries, 19 (86%) of 22 countries with economies in transition (mainly the Newly Independent States of the former Soviet Union), and 40 (24%) of 168 developing countries. Countries that have achieved high coverage have shown a rapid decline in mumps morbidity. Furthermore, in many of these countries, mumps-associated encephalitis and deafness have nearly vanished. This review considers the disease burden due to mumps; summarizes studies on the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of different strains of mumps vaccine; and highlights lessons learned about implementing mumps immunization in different countries. Countries already using mumps vaccine should monitor immunization coverage and establish routine mumps surveillance with investigation of outbreaks. Where mumps is targeted for elimination, countries need to add a second dose of mumps vaccine for children, keeping in mind that the disease may still occur in susceptible adults.

  2. Mumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... years of age who haven’t received the mumps vaccine, but you can catch it at any age. ... Health, Kids and TeensTags: childhood disease, infections, mumps, mumps vaccine, parotid glands, parotitis, swollen cheeks, viral infection October ...

  3. Mumps Meningoencephalitis, Toronto, 1963

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, D. M.; Bach, Ruth D.; Larke, R. P. B.; McNaughton, G. A.

    1964-01-01

    Between January and June 1963, 45 children were hospitalized with mumps meningoencephalitis. Of 39 patients with laboratory evidence of mumps infection, 24 had parotitis and 15 showed no salivary gland involvement. Cerebrospinal fluids from 18 of 40 patients yielded mumps virus by inoculation of rhesus monkey kidney cultures; 33 subjects, including 12 of the 18 virus excretors, showed rising or elevated levels of mumps antihemagglutinin during convalescence. Between May 1959 and June 1963, mumps virus was recovered from cerebrospinal fluids of 50 of 126 cases of mumps meningoencephalitis; virus isolation rates were highest during the peak incidence of mumps meningoencephalitis in winter and early spring. Mumps vaccine (inactivated) was administered to 34 parents with no history of mumps, shortly after their children developed mumps. Mumps occurred in three of 17 parents without prevaccination mumps antihemagglutinins, and in two others, but in none of 15 who had prevaccination antibodies. PMID:14120950

  4. Sounding rocket flight report, MUMP 9 and MUMP 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassl, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the launching of two-Marshall-University of Michigan Probes (MUMP 9 and MUMP 10), Nike-Tomahawk sounding rocket payloads, are summarized. The MUMP is similar to the thermosphere probe, an ejectable instrument package for studying the variability of the earth's atmospheric parameters. The MUMP 9 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, a molecular fluorescence densitometer, a mini-tilty filter, and a lunar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 143 to 297 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during January 1971. The MUMP 10 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, an electron temperature probe, a cryogenic densitometer, and a solar position sensor. These instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature and the charged particle density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 145 to 290 km over Wallops Island during the afternoon preceding the MUMP 9 launch.

  5. Mumps vaccine performance among university students during a mumps outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortese, Margaret M; Jordan, Hannah T; Curns, Aaron T; Quinlan, Patricia A; Ens, Kim A; Denning, Patricia M; Dayan, Gustavo H

    2008-04-15

    The largest reported mumps outbreak at a US college in 19 years occurred in 2006 at a Kansas university with a 2-dose measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination policy. We assessed vaccine performance and mumps risk factors, including the possibility of waning vaccine protection. Case students were compared with a cohort of the university's approximately 19,000 undergraduates. The secondary attack rate for clinical mumps was determined among roommates exposed to case students. Time from receipt of the second dose of MMR vaccine was compared between case students and roommates without mumps. Coverage with > or =2 dose of MMR vaccine was > or =95% among 140 undergraduate case students and 444 cohort students. The secondary attack rate for clinical mumps among roommates who had received 2 doses of vaccine ranged from 2.2% to 7.7%, depending on the case definition. Compared with roommates without mumps, case students were more likely (odds ratio, 2.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-4.82) to have received their second dose of MMR vaccine > or =10 years earlier. The odds of being a case student increased with each 1-year increase in time from receipt of the second dose of MMR vaccine (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-1.68) among case students and roommates aged 18-19 years but not among those aged > or =20 years. Students aged 18-19 years had a higher risk of mumps (risk ratio, 3.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.60-6.16), compared with students aged > or =22 years; women living in dormitories had increased risk of mumps (risk ratio, 1.95; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-3.76), compared with men not living in dormitories. High 2-dose MMR coverage protected many students from developing mumps but was not sufficient to prevent the mumps outbreak. Vaccine-induced protection may wane. Similar US settings where large numbers of young adults from wild-type naive cohorts live closely together may be at particular risk for mumps outbreaks.

  6. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  7. Sounding rocket flight report: MUMP 9 and MUMP 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassl, H. J.

    1971-01-01

    The results of the launching of two Marshall-University of Michigan Probes (MUMP 9 and MUMP 10), Nike-Tomahawk sounding rocket payloads, are summarized. The MUMP 9 paylaod included an omegatron mass analyzer, a molecular fluorescence densitometer, a mini-tilty filter, and a lunar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 143 to 297 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during January 1971. The MUMP 10 payload included an omegatron mass analyzer, an electron temperature probe (Spencer, Brace, and Carignan, 1962), a cryogenic densitometer, and a solar position sensor. This complement of instruments permitted the determination of the molecular nitrogen density and temperature and the charged particle density and temperature in the altitude range from approximately 145 to 290 km over Wallops Island, Virginia, during the afternoon preceding the MUMP 9 launch in January 1971. A general description of the payload kinematics, orientation analysis, and the technique for the reduction and analysis of the data is given.

  8. Effectiveness of one dose of mumps vaccine against clinically diagnosed mumps in Guangzhou, China, 2006-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanxi; Xu, Jianxiong; Cai, Yuanjun; He, Qing; Zhang, Chunhuan; Chen, Jian; Dong, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wensui; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ming

    2013-12-01

    Although mumps-containing vaccines were introduced in China in 1990s, mumps continues to be a public health concern due to the lack of decline in reported mumps cases. To assess the mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE) in Guangzhou, China, we performed a 1:1 matched case-control study. Among children in Guangzhou aged 8 mo to 12 y during 2006 to 2012, we matched one healthy child to each child with clinically diagnosed mumps. Cases with clinically diagnosed mumps were identified from surveillance sites system and healthy controls were randomly sampled from the Children's Expanded Programmed Immunization Administrative Computerized System in Guangzhou. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate VE. We analyzed the vaccination information for 1983 mumps case subjects and 1983 matched controls and found that the overall VE for 1 dose of mumps vaccine, irrespective of the manufacture, was 53.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.0-63.5%) to children aged 8 mo to 12 y. This post-marketing mumps VE study found that immunization with one dose of the mumps vaccine confers partial protection against mumps disease. Evaluation of the VE for the current mumps vaccines, introduction of a second dose of mumps vaccine, and assessment of modifications to childhood immunization schedules is essential.

  9. Effectiveness of one dose of mumps vaccine against clinically diagnosed mumps in Guangzhou, China, 2006–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanxi; Xu, Jianxiong; Cai, Yuanjun; He, Qing; Zhang, Chunhuan; Chen, Jian; Dong, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wensui; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Although mumps-containing vaccines were introduced in China in 1990s, mumps continues to be a public health concern due to the lack of decline in reported mumps cases. To assess the mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE) in Guangzhou, China, we performed a 1:1 matched case-control study. Among children in Guangzhou aged 8 mo to 12 y during 2006 to 2012, we matched one healthy child to each child with clinically diagnosed mumps. Cases with clinically diagnosed mumps were identified from surveillance sites system and healthy controls were randomly sampled from the Children’s Expanded Programmed Immunization Administrative Computerized System in Guangzhou. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate VE. We analyzed the vaccination information for 1983 mumps case subjects and 1983 matched controls and found that the overall VE for 1 dose of mumps vaccine, irrespective of the manufacture, was 53.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 41.0–63.5%) to children aged 8 mo to 12 y. This post-marketing mumps VE study found that immunization with one dose of the mumps vaccine confers partial protection against mumps disease. Evaluation of the VE for the current mumps vaccines, introduction of a second dose of mumps vaccine, and assessment of modifications to childhood immunization schedules is essential. PMID:23955378

  10. Evaluation of live attenuated S79 mumps vaccine effectiveness in mumps outbreaks: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuan-xi; Nie, Jun; Liang, Jian-hua; Wang, Ming

    2009-02-05

    Mumps virus infection is a potentially serious viral infection of childhood and early adulthood. In China, live attenuated S(79) mumps vaccine has been licensed for pediatric use since 1990. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of live attenuated S(79) mumps vaccine against clinical mumps in outbreaks. Cases were selected from mumps outbreaks in schools in Guangzhou between 2004 and 2005. Each case was matched by gender, age and classroom. Vaccination information was obtained from Children's EPI Administrative Computerized System. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated for 1 or 2 doses of S(79) vaccine with 95% confidence intervals (CI). One hundred and ninety-four cases and 194 controls were enrolled into the study. VE of the S(79) mumps vaccine for 1 dose versus 0 confer protection 80.4% (95% CI, 60.0%-90.4%) and VEs against mumps in outbreaks for 1 dose of mumps vaccine are similar among those children aged 4-9 years and aged over 10 years old. The live attenuated S(79) mumps vaccine can be effective in preventing clinical mumps outbreaks.

  11. Effectiveness of one dose of mumps vaccine against clinically diagnosed mumps in Guangzhou, China, 2006–2012

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Chuanxi; Xu, Jianxiong; Cai, Yuanjun; He, Qing; Zhang, Chunhuan; Chen, Jian; Dong, Zhiqiang; Hu, Wensui; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Although mumps-containing vaccines were introduced in China in 1990s, mumps continues to be a public health concern due to the lack of decline in reported mumps cases. To assess the mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE) in Guangzhou, China, we performed a 1:1 matched case-control study. Among children in Guangzhou aged 8 mo to 12 y during 2006 to 2012, we matched one healthy child to each child with clinically diagnosed mumps. Cases with clinically diagnosed mumps were identified from surveillance...

  12. Mumps in Poland in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska, Justyna; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination against mumps, introduced initially as recommended, from 2003 is mandatory in Poland and given as two dose scheme with MMR vaccine (mumps, measles, and rubella). Despite observed decline in mumps incidence for over a decade which is a result of conducted vaccinations, mumps is still a common childhood disease in Poland. To assess epidemiological situation of mumps in Poland in 2012, including vaccination coverage in Polish population, in comparison to previous years. The descriptive analysis was based on data retrieved from routine mandatory surveillance system and published in the annual bulletins "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2012" and "Vaccinations in Poland in 2012" (Czarkowski MP i in., Warszawa 2013, NIZP-PZH i GIS). Mumps cases were classified according to the criteria of surveillance case definition implemented in the European Union (Commission Decision of 28 April 2008 amending Decision 2002/253/EC). National Immunisation Programme for year 2012 was also used. In total, there were 2779 mumps cases registered in Poland in 2012. Incidence of mumps was 7.2 per 100 000 and it was higher by 7.5% in comparison with 2011 and lower by 19.4% in comparison to median for the years 2006-2010. The highest incidence rate was observed among children aged 5 years (71.8 per 100 000). Incidence in women (5.9) was lower than in men (8.6). In 2012, 25 people were hospitalized due to mumps. Vaccination coverage of children aged 3 years in Poland in 2012 was 97.9%. Systematic execution of mumps vaccination in accordance with the National Immunisation Programme resulted in a significant decrease in the number of registered cases. Due to the high vaccination coverage further decline in the number of cases is expected.

  13. Mumps in Poland in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyńska, Monika Roberta; Rogalska, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination against mumps from 2003 is mandatory in Poland and given as two dose scheme with MMR vaccine (mumps, measles, and rubella). Earlier this vaccination was only recommended. Despite observed decline in mumps incidence for over a decade which is a result of conducted vaccinations, mumps is still a common childhood disease. To assess epidemiological situation of mumps in Poland in 2013, including vaccination coverage in Polish population, in comparison to previous years. The descriptive analysis was based on data retrieved from routine mandatory surveillance system and published in the annual bulletins "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2013" and "Vaccinations in Poland in 2013" (Czarkowski MP i in., Warszawa 2013, NIZP-PZH i GIS). Mumps cases were classified according to the criteria of surveillance case definition implemented in the European Union (Commission Decision of 28 April 2008 amending Decision 2002/253/EC). National Immunisation Programme for year 2013 was also used. In total, there were 2 436 mumps cases registered in Poland in 2013. Incidence of mumps was 6.3 per 100,000 and it was lower by 12.5% in comparison with 2012 and lower by 18.2% in comparison with median for the years 2007-2010. The highest incidence rate was observed among children aged 5 years (54.0 per 100,000). Incidence in men (7.5) was higher than in women (5.2). In 2013, 38 people were hospitalized due to mumps. Vaccination coverage of children aged 3 years in Poland in 2013 was 97.5% and it was lower by 0.4% in comparison with year 2012. Systematic execution of mumps vaccination in accordance with the National Immunisation Programme resulted in a significant decrease in the number of registered cases. Due to the high vaccination coverage further decline in the number of cases is expected.

  14. MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumpsvax® Mumps Vaccine ... Biavax® II (as a combination product containing Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine) ... II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine)

  15. Mumps vaccine virus strains and aseptic meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Marie-Claude; Dutta, Anil; Weinberger, Clement; Plotkin, Stanley A

    2006-11-30

    Mumps immunization can easily be included in national schedules, particularly if combined with measles or measles and rubella vaccines, but debate continues concerning the relative safety of various licensed mumps vaccine strains. The opportunities for control of mumps are also being affected by differences in the cost of the vaccines prepared with different strains of mumps virus. The present report evaluates available data on the association of the Urabe and other strains of mumps vaccine with the occurrence of aseptic meningitis. We also review the comparative immunogenicity and efficacies of the most widely used mumps vaccines in controlled clinical trials and field evaluations, and briefly examine relative cost as it relates to the implementation of national immunization programs. We conclude that extensive experience with the most widely used mumps vaccine strains in many countries has shown that the risk-benefit ratio of live mumps vaccines is highly favourable for vaccination, despite the occasional occurence of aseptic meningitis.

  16. Pediatric mumps with laryngeal edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yujiro; Oi, Yasufumi; Matsuoka, Ryo; Daimon, Yumi; Ito, Asami; Kubota, Wataru; Konishi, Kyoko; Onguchi, Toshimi; Sato, Akihiro; Yamashita, Yukio; Ishihara, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Mumps virus infection primarily affects the salivary glands and may incur various complications. Laryngeal edema is such a rare complication that few adult cases have been reported. We report the first known pediatric patient with mumps with laryngeal edema. An 8-year-old boy developed dyspnea after a rapidly progressive swelling of his face and neck. Laryngoscopy revealed edematous changes in the supraglottic and subglottic regions, and computed tomography confirmed significant laryngeal edema in addition to swelling of the cervical soft tissue and the salivary glands. Laboratory findings revealed a high serum amylase level and confirmed the diagnosis of mumps. Intravenous steroid administration alleviated the dyspnea, although the patient required temporary tracheal intubation to maintain airway patency. He did not need tracheotomy and did not experience any other complications. Laryngeal edema must be regarded as a rare, potentially life-threatening complication of mumps. When mumps is diagnosed with significant swelling of the neck, an emergency airway should be established to prevent airway obstruction.

  17. Updated recommendations for isolation of persons with mumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-10

    Mumps, an acute vaccine-preventable viral illness transmitted by respiratory droplets and saliva, has an incubation period most commonly of 16-18 days. The classic clinical presentation of mumps is parotitis, which can be preceded by several days of nonspecific prodromal symptoms; however, mumps also can be asymptomatic, especially in young children. Mumps transmission can occur from persons with subclinical or clinical infections and during the prodromal or symptomatic phases of illness. In 2006, during a mumps resurgence in the United States, the latest national recommendations from CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) stipulated that persons with mumps be maintained in isolation with standard precautions and droplet precautions for 9 days after onset of parotitis. However, the existence of conflicting guidance (i.e., that the infectious period of mumps extended through the fourth day after parotitis onset) led to confusion regarding the appropriate length of isolation. In addition, during the 2006 resurgence, compliance with recommendations for isolation in university settings was substantially lower for 9 days (65%) compared with 4-5 days (86%). In 2007, after a review of the evidence supporting the 9-day isolation guidance by AAP and CDC, AAP changed its isolation guidance for health-care workers in ambulatory settings from 9 days to 5 days. In February 2008, after review of data on mumps in health-care settings, mumps viral load, and mumps virus isolation, the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) approved changes in its recommendations related to mumps in in-patient settings. As a result, CDC, AAP, and HICPAC all now recommend a 5-day period after onset of parotitis, both for isolation of persons with mumps in either community or health-care settings and for use of standard precautions and droplet precautions. This report summarizes the scientific basis for these changes in mumps isolation guidance.

  18. Mumps outbreak in Incheon, Korea, 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon Young Cho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Recently, we have noticed an increase in the number of patients with mumps in Incheon, Korea. The aim of this study is to estimate the regional trend in mumps incidence and to evaluate the factors related to the recent increase. Methods : We reviewed the medical records of 66 patients with mumps who had been admitted to Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital from July 1999 to June 2009. We compared the differences in records between “outbreak, 2009” and “nonoutbreak, 2000–2008.” Results : Of the 66 patients, 35 (53% were admitted in 2009, and 31 (47% were admitted between 2000 and 2008. Most of the patients admitted during the outbreak were over 15 years of age (80.0%, were born before 1993 (77.1%, and had received a single dose of mumps vaccine (62.9%. There were no significant differences in contact history, present address, clinical manifestations, and complications, except for orchitis, between the two groups. Conclusion : There was a sharp increase in the number of inpatients with mumps who were born before 1993 and who were over 15 years of age. We recommend that a booster vaccination be considered for adolescents and young adults born before 1993 who are susceptible to mumps infection due to their reduced opportunities for receiving two doses of mumps vaccine.

  19. Characteristics of a large mumps outbreak: Clinical severity, complications and association with vaccination status of mumps outbreak cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamir, C Stein; Schroeder, H; Shoob, H; Abramson, N; Zentner, G

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, large mumps outbreaks, involving mainly adolescents and young adults, have re-emerged in several countries. We investigated a large mumps outbreak, evaluated the association between mumps clinical severity (complications, hospitalization) and vaccination status (number of previous measles, mumps and rubella - MMR vaccine doses), and assessed vaccine effectiveness. The first mumps cases emerged in an ultra-orthodox boys' school in Jerusalem and were epidemiologically linked to the mumps outbreak in New York. Overall, 3130 mumps cases were notified in the Jerusalem district during September 2009-August 2011 (median age 13y, 64% males). Most cases were reported from community clinics. Patients with systemic symptoms and/or complications (419, 13.4%) were either hospitalized (n = 79) or treated in an emergency medical center (n = 340). The main complications included orchitis (3.8% males> age 12y) and meningoencephalitis (0.5%). The mumps virus genotype was G5. The distribution of previous MMR vaccine doses (n = 0,1,2) was: 24.8%, 28.3% and 46.9%, respectively. The number of previous vaccine doses was inversely associated with clinical severity. Adjusted values for MMR vaccine effectiveness against complications were estimated as 52.1% (95% CI -4 -78%) for one vaccine dose and 62.7% (95% CI 25.7-81.3%) for 2 doses. The outbreak was characterized by predominance of male students; the majority of whom had been previously vaccinated. The reported complication rate was relatively low. Vaccination status was associated with age and disease severity. The combination of limited mumps vaccine effectiveness and the specific school setting (dense learning and living conditions) probably contributed to the disease spread.

  20. Recent resurgence of mumps in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Gustavo H; Quinlisk, M Patricia; Parker, Amy A; Barskey, Albert E; Harris, Meghan L; Schwartz, Jennifer M Hill; Hunt, Kae; Finley, Carol G; Leschinsky, Dennis P; O'Keefe, Anne L; Clayton, Joshua; Kightlinger, Lon K; Dietle, Eden G; Berg, Jeffrey; Kenyon, Cynthia L; Goldstein, Susan T; Stokley, Shannon K; Redd, Susan B; Rota, Paul A; Rota, Jennifer; Bi, Daoling; Roush, Sandra W; Bridges, Carolyn B; Santibanez, Tammy A; Parashar, Umesh; Bellini, William J; Seward, Jane F

    2008-04-10

    The widespread use of a second dose of mumps vaccine among U.S. schoolchildren beginning in 1990 was followed by historically low reports of mumps cases. A 2010 elimination goal was established, but in 2006 the largest mumps outbreak in two decades occurred in the United States. We examined national data on mumps cases reported during 2006, detailed case data from the most highly affected states, and vaccination-coverage data from three nationwide surveys. A total of 6584 cases of mumps were reported in 2006, with 76% occurring between March and May. There were 85 hospitalizations, but no deaths were reported; 85% of patients lived in eight contiguous midwestern states. The national incidence of mumps was 2.2 per 100,000, with the highest incidence among persons 18 to 24 years of age (an incidence 3.7 times that of all other age groups combined). In a subgroup analysis, 83% of these patients reported current college attendance. Among patients in eight highly affected states with known vaccination status, 63% overall and 84% between the ages of 18 and 24 years had received two doses of mumps vaccine. For the 12 years preceding the outbreak, national coverage of one-dose mumps vaccination among preschoolers was 89% or more nationwide and 86% or more in highly affected states. In 2006, the national two-dose coverage among adolescents was 87%, the highest in U.S. history. Despite a high coverage rate with two doses of mumps-containing vaccine, a large mumps outbreak occurred, characterized by two-dose vaccine failure, particularly among midwestern college-age adults who probably received the second dose as schoolchildren. A more effective mumps vaccine or changes in vaccine policy may be needed to avert future outbreaks and achieve the elimination of mumps. Copyright 2008 Massachusetts Medical Society.

  1. Analysis of mumps vaccine failure by means of avidity testing for mumps virus-specific immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, M; Matsuzono, Y; Takekoshi, Y; Yamada, S; Itakura, O; Kubota, M; Kikuta, H; Togashi, T

    1998-11-01

    To characterize patients with mumps vaccine failure, avidity testing was performed with the Enzygnost Anti-Parotitis Virus/IgG kit using a single-dilution-6 M urea denaturation method. Five groups of patients were tested. Group 1 consisted of 29 patients with primary mumps infections; group 2 was 20 children and adults with a definite history of natural infection; group 3 was 7 patients with a recent mumps vaccination, 1 of whom developed parotid gland swelling and aseptic meningitis; group 4 was 14 patients with mumps vaccine failure; and group 5 was 6 patients with recurrent episodes of parotitis in addition to a history of vaccination. On the basis of the results of groups 1 and 2, an avidity of /=32% was determined to be high. Avidity maturation from low to high appears to occur around 180 days after the acute illness. The results of group 3 showed that the vaccine-induced immunoglobulin G (IgG) had very low avidity. Among the 14 patients in group 4, 12 patients, including 7 with a positive IgM response, were diagnosed as having secondary vaccine failures. The results of group 5 suggested the possibility that the avidity of the mumps vaccine-induced IgG remains low or borderline. These results showed that secondary mumps vaccine failure occurs not infrequently, even among school age children under condition in which the vaccine coverage is low (i.e., 33% in our study population), and therefore, vaccinees are prone to be exposed to wild-type viruses. Avidity testing should provide information useful for the analysis of mumps virus infections.

  2. A comparative study of the incidence of aseptic meningitis in symptomatic natural mumps patients and monovalent mumps vaccine recipients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Miyazaki, Chiaki; Ito, Yuhei; Kamada, Makoto; Kumagai, Takuji; Yuri, Kenji; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Miyata, Akiko; Ihara, Toshiaki; Ochiai, Hitoshi; Shimomura, Kunihisa; Suzuki, Eitaro; Torigoe, Sadayoshi; Igarashi, Masahiro; Kase, Tetsuo; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2007-03-30

    To compare the incidence of aseptic meningitis associated with symptomatic natural mumps infection and in mumps vaccine recipients, we conducted a prospective comparative study. Consecutive samples of 1051 children with mumps were enrolled by 10 pediatricians and 21,465 vaccine recipients by 143 pediatric primary care practitioners, from January 1, 2000 to January 1, 2003. Parents used a daily diary to record symptoms during the period of illness (15 days) or 30-day period following immunization. Mumps infection was confirmed by virus isolation and/or detection of mumps virus genome in salivary and CSF samples. The incidence of aseptic meningitis was 13/1051 (1.24%) in patients with symptomatic natural mumps infection and was estimated to be 0.7-1.1% of overall infection in considering asymptomatic infection, and 10/21,465 (0.05%) in vaccine recipients. Although aseptic meningitis is a clear side effect of the mumps vaccine, the incidence is considerably lower than among those with symptomatic natural infection. Our results provide an informative data for consideration to resume mumps vaccine as a part of routine immunization schedule for Japanese children.

  3. Case of mumps orchitis after vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Takayoshi; Mochida, Junichi; Takada, Shogo; Hori, Yutaro; Yamaguchi, Kenya; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of mumps orchitis after vaccination. A 35-year-old man visited the emergency unit of our hospital for fever and right testicular pain on 7 January 2012. Two weeks before the visit, he underwent vaccination for mumps. After 7 days of hospitalization, the patient recovered from fever and testicular pain. Scrotal magnetic resonance imaging suggested right orchitis, and an increased level of serum mumps immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G indicated an initial infection of mumps virus. The peak value of immunoglobulin G showed 106 enzyme immunoassay unit 5 weeks after vaccination, which was 10-fold higher than the ordinary rise of a vaccinated individual. This fact leads to two possibilities. One is this happened as an adverse event of vaccination, and the other is that he actually had a wild-type infection at the same time as vaccination. There are some reports regarding adverse events of mumps vaccine; however, they might include wild-type infection. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Mumps vaccine effectiveness in primary schools and households, the Netherlands, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Bianca E P; van Lier, Alies; van de Kassteele, Jan; Fanoy, Ewout B; Ruijs, Wilhelmina L M; Hulshof, Folkwin; Blauwhof, Annet; Schipper, Maarten; van Binnendijk, Rob; Boot, Hein J; de Melker, Hester E; Hahné, Susan J M

    2012-04-19

    To estimate the mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE) during a large genotype D mumps outbreak, we conducted a cross-sectional study in eight primary schools and associated households in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were used to collect information on the occurrence of mumps. Multivariate analyses were used to estimate VE. Among schoolchildren we estimated the VE against mumps. Among household contacts where the schoolchild was the index case we estimated the VE against mumps and against mumps infectiousness. In total 1175 children and 2281 household contacts participated in the study. The mumps attack rate among schoolchildren was 17%. The mumps VE in schoolchildren was 92% [95% confidence interval (CI) 83-96%] and 93% [85-97%] for one and two doses of the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine, respectively. The adjusted mumps VE among household contacts was 67% [65-95%] and 11% [-4 to 88%] against mumps and mumps infectiousness, respectively. Our study indicates that the mumps component of the MMR vaccine offered adequate protection against mumps among schoolchildren. The relatively low VE among household contacts is of concern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mumps vaccine failure investigation in Novosibirsk, Russia, 2002-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrasheuskaya, A V; Kulak, M V; Rubin, S; Ignatyev, G M

    2007-07-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the importance of vaccine failure (VF) in cases of mumps during 2002-2004 in the city of Novosibirsk, Western Siberia, Russia, and to genotype the responsible virus strain. Mumps virus-specific RT-PCR testing of saliva was performed for 18 cases of mumps. Sera were tested for IgM and IgG, IgG avidity, and the ability to neutralise a panel of mumps viruses, including the Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus. Of the 12 patients for whom vaccination status was positively determined, 11 showed serological evidence of primary VF. Sequence analysis of virus RNA amplified from saliva revealed a genotype C2 virus in 2002, a genotype H2 virus in 2003, and both genotypes in 2004. Although several vaccinated patients were positive for mumps virus IgG at the time of first sampling, only nominal levels of neutralising antibody were detected, and these were effective in neutralising the vaccine strain, but not genotype C and H mumps virus strains. These results suggest that the majority of cases of mumps in vaccinees are caused by primary VF, defined as either a lack of seroconversion or a lack of IgG maturity, as based on avidity testing. The results also support the hypothesis that sera of low neutralising antibody titre have a limited ability to neutralise heterologous mumps virus strains, suggesting that antigenic differences between circulating and mumps vaccine virus strains may play a role in cases of breakthrough infection. Consistent with previous reports, mumps virus genotypes C and H continue to circulate in Novosibirsk.

  6. Horizontal transmission of the Leningrad-3 live attenuated mumps vaccine virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrasheuskaya, A V; Neverov, A A; Rubin, S; Ignatyev, G M

    2006-03-06

    Here we describe symptomatic transmission of the Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus from healthy vaccinees to previously vaccinated contacts. Throat swab and serum samples were taken from six symptomatic mumps cases and from 13 family contacts. Assessment of serum IgG and IgM anti-mumps virus antibodies and IgG avidity testing was performed using commercial test kits. Sera neutralizing antibodies were measured by plaque reduction neutralization assay using the L-3 vaccine mumps virus as the target. All six of the symptomatic mumps cases and three contact subjects tested positive for mumps by RT-PCR. The genomic sequences tested (F, SH and HN genes) of all nine of these samples were identical to the L-3 mumps vaccine strain. All 13 contacts were asymptomatic; however clear serological evidence of mumps infection was found in some of them. The likely epidemiological source of the transmitted L-3 mumps virus was children who were recently vaccinated at the schools attended by the six symptomatic mumps patients described here. The L-3 mumps vaccine virus can be shed and transmitted horizontally, even to subjects previously vaccinated with the same virus.

  7. Frequency of lymphocytic meningitis associated with mumps before and after a mass campaign for mumps vaccination in children from Salvador, Northeast Brazil

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    Nascimento-Carvalho Cristiana M.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency of lymphocytic meningitis(LM concomitant with mumps, before and after the mumps mass immunization campaign in 1997. METHOD: Demographic, clinical and cerebrospinal fluid(CSF information was collected from the chart of all patients aged from 2 to 59 months, whose CSF exam was performed at the CSF Lab/FJS, between 1989 and 2001. LM was defined as pleocytosis composed by lymphomononuclear cells and negative exams for bacterial or mycologic infection. RESULTS: Of 1,519 patients, 894(58.9% had normal exams. LM was present in 301(19.8% patients, out of which 22(7.3% had concomitant mumps. The frequency of LM ranged from 15.8% in 1989 to 19.7% in 2001 and of LM with concomitant Mumps ranged from 10.5% in 1989 to 4.7% in 1995, when the last cases were registered. CONCLUSION: It is probable that the mumps vaccine campaign has influenced the absence of LM with concomitant Mumps, from 1996 to 2001.

  8. Presumed Cases of Mumps in Pregnancy: Clinical and Infection Control Implications

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    Svjetlana Lozo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a mumps outbreak in New York and New Jersey was reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Subsequently, the dissemination of the disease was rapid, and, from June 28th 2009 through January 29th 2010, a total of 1,521 cases of mumps were reported in New York and New Jersey. Seven presumed cases occurred in pregnant women cared for at our institution. Mumps diagnosis as per the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene was based on clinical manifestations, particularly parotitis. Prior immunizations with mumps vaccine and negative IgM were not adequate to rule out mumps infections. All of our seven patients had exposure to mumps in either their household or their community, and some of the them had symptoms of mumps. Due to the difficulties in interpreting serologies of these patients, their cases led to a presumed diagnosis of mumps. The diagnosis of mumps lead to the isolation of patients and health care personnel that were in contact with them. In this paper, we detail the presenting findings, diagnostic dilemmas and infection control challenges associated with presumed cases of mumps in pregnancy.

  9. Questionnaire survey on mumps vaccination for parents in Nara prefecture, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Taito; Nishikawa, Hiroki; Onaka, Masayuki; Ishihara, Mariko; Nishiyama, Atsuko; Yoshida, Sayaka

    2018-04-01

    Although the mumps vaccine has not been included in the national immunization program (NIP) in Japan, it has been shown that a two-dose routine vaccine program would be highly cost-effective. In this study, we carried outa questionnaire-based study to investigate how many Japanese parents want the mumps vaccine to be included in the NIP with proper information. The questionnaire was given to parents who visited the Pediatrics or neonatal intensive care unit of Nara Prefecture General Medical Center, Nara City, Japan, between 1 March 2017 and 31 August 2017. The questionnaire consisted of information about mumps and six questions, for example (i) do parents know that mumps can be prevented by vaccine; (ii) do they know that they need to pay for mumps vaccines; and (iii) do they hope that the government will resume routine mumps vaccination. In total, 1,224 parents answered the questionnaire. A total of 81% and 75.4% of parents knew that mumps can be prevented by vaccination and that mumps vaccine is not included in the NIP, respectively, before reading the information. After reading the information, 95.0% of parents thought that mumps vaccine should be included in the NIP. While 61.7% of parents answered that they would choose two-dose vaccination without governmental financial support, 92.1% of them would choose two-dose vaccination with governmental financial support (P mumps vaccine to be included in the NIP. Japan is able to start routine use of the mumps vaccine now. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  10. 21 CFR 866.3380 - Mumps virus serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3380 Mumps virus... serological tests to identify mumps viruses from tissue culture isolates derived from clinical specimens. The...

  11. Immune responses to mumps vaccine in adults who were vaccinated in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna-Wakim, Rima; Yasukawa, Linda L; Sung, Phillip; Arvin, Ann M; Gans, Hayley A

    2008-06-15

    In a mumps outbreak in the United States, many infected individuals were adults who had received 2 doses of mumps vaccine. The persistence of cellular immunity to mumps vaccine has not been defined. This was an observational, nonrandomized cohort study evaluating cell-mediated and humoral immunity to mumps in 10 vaccinated and 10 naturally immune adults. Mumps-specific T cell activation and interferon (IFN)-gamma production were measured using lymphoproliferative and flow cytometry assays, and mumps immunoglobulin (Ig) G was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. T cell immunity to mumps was high in both groups; 70% of vaccinated and 80% of naturally immune individuals had a positive (> or =3) stimulation index (SI) (P = 1.0). The mean percentages of mumps-specific CD4+ T cells that expressed CD69 and produced IFN-gamma were equivalent in the 2 groups: 0.06% and 0.12%, respectively (P = .11). The mean SIs in the groups were also equivalent, although IFN-gamma concentrations from cultures stimulated with mumps antigen were higher in naturally immune adults than in vaccinated adults (P < or = .01). All adults were positive for mumps IgG. T and B cell immunity to mumps was detected in adults at least 10 years after immunization. Except for IFN-gamma release, responses in vaccinated adults paralleled those observed in naturally immune individuals.

  12. Mumps outbreak in Israel's highly vaccinated society: are two doses enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, E; Grotto, I; Moerman, L; Warshavsky, B; Slater, P E; Lev, B

    2012-03-01

    Mumps outbreaks in recent years have given rise to questions about the effectiveness of the mumps vaccine. This study examined the epidemiological data from a recent mumps outbreak in Israel and from outbreaks in other countries with high vaccination coverage, and considered whether long-established vaccination policies designed to protect against mumps are in need of revision. Of over 5000 case patients in the Israeli outbreak, half of whom were in the Jerusalem health district, nearly 40% were aged ≥15 years and, of those whose vaccination status was known, 78% had been fully vaccinated for their age - features similar to those in recent mumps outbreaks in Europe and North America. The epidemiological and laboratory evidence suggests that many previously vaccinated adolescents and young adults are now susceptible to mumps because their vaccine-based immunity has waned. Booster vaccination programmes for those at high risk of infection during mumps outbreaks - particularly those in congregate living environments - merit priority consideration.

  13. [Comparative evaluation of neurovirulence of domestic and foreign live mumps vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, O A; Popov, V F; Bektimirov, T A; Grigor'eva, L V; Iunasova, T N; Kaplunova, O P; Sharova, O K

    2001-01-01

    Morphological and immunofluorescent study of changes in the central nervous system of monkeys with mumps was carried out in order to determine the criteria of neurovirulence of different mumps virus strains. Quantitative evaluation showed a lower residual neurovirulence of L-3 strain vs. Jeryl Lynn and Urabe Am9 strains. Use of new methodological approaches to evaluation of mumps vaccine strain neurovirulence will improve the safety control of live mumps vaccines.

  14. Vaccination of School Children With Live Mumps Virus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furesz, J.; Nagler, F. P.

    1970-01-01

    Live, attenuated mumps virus vaccine (Mumpsvax) was administered to 146 school children 6 to 9 years of age. One child developed clinical mumps nine days after vaccination; epidemiological and serological data strongly suggest that this child had become infected before vaccination. Apart from this single instance there were no apparent clinical reactions that could be ascribed to the administration of the vaccine. Sixty-three of the 146 children with no clinical history of mumps had an initial serum neutralizing antibody titre of less than 1:2. Specific antibodies to mumps virus were detected in 93.5% of the sera of the susceptible children 28 days after vaccination, and the geometric mean antibody titre of these sera was low (1:6). Of the 80 initially seropositive children 21 (26.2%) showed a significant antibody response to the vaccine and this was influenced by the pre-existing antibody level. These data have further demonstrated the safety and efficacy of the live mumps vaccine in children. PMID:5420994

  15. Cellular and humoral immunity after vaccination or natural mumps infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Kihei; Hagihara, Kimiko; Oishi, Tomohiro; Miyata, Ippei; Akaike, Hiroto; Ogita, Satoko; Ohno, Naoki; Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2017-08-01

    This study measured cell-mediated immunity (CMI) and serum antibody to clarify the basis of breakthrough after vaccination and reinfection after mumps. From a pool of 54 college students, 17 seronegative subjects and 14 subjects with intermediate level of antibodies against mumps were vaccinated with a monovalent mumps vaccine, and CMI was assessed using interferon-γ release assay. CMI positivity according to pre-existing antibody level, defined as titer  0.05), respectively. Vaccination or even natural mumps infection did not always induce both cellular and humoral immunity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Genetic characterization of L-Zagreb mumps vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Jelena; Gulija, Tanja Kosutic; Forcic, Dubravko; Baricevic, Marijana; Jug, Renata; Mesko-Prejac, Majda; Mazuran, Renata

    2005-04-01

    Eleven mumps vaccine strains, all containing live attenuated virus, have been used throughout the world. Although L-Zagreb mumps vaccine has been licensed since 1972, only its partial nucleotide sequence was previously determined (accession numbers , and ). Therefore, we sequenced the entire genome of L-Zagreb vaccine strain (Institute of Immunology Inc., Zagreb, Croatia). In order to investigate the genetic stability of the vaccine, sequences of both L-Zagreb master seed and currently produced vaccine batch were determined and no difference between them was observed. A phylogenetic analysis based on SH gene sequence has shown that L-Zagreb strain does not belong to any of established mumps genotypes and that it is most similar to old, laboratory preserved European strains (1950s-1970s). L-Zagreb nucleotide and deduced protein sequences were compared with other mumps virus sequences obtained from the GenBank. Emphasis was put on functionally important protein regions and known antigenic epitopes. The extensive comparisons of nucleotide and deduced protein sequences between L-Zagreb vaccine strain and other previously determined mumps virus sequences have shown that while the functional regions of HN, V, and L proteins are well conserved among various mumps strains, there can be a substantial amino acid difference in antigenic epitopes of all proteins and in functional regions of F protein. No molecular pattern was identified that can be used as a distinction marker between virulent and attenuated strains.

  17. Establishing a small animal model for evaluating protective immunity against mumps virus.

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    Adrian Pickar

    Full Text Available Although mumps vaccines have been used for several decades, protective immune correlates have not been defined. Recently, mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations. To better understand the causes of the outbreaks and to develop means to control outbreaks in mumps vaccine immunized populations, defining protective immune correlates will be critical. Unfortunately, no small animal model for assessing mumps immunity exists. In this study, we evaluated use of type I interferon (IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout mice (IFN-α/βR-/- for such a model. We found these mice to be susceptible to mumps virus administered intranasally and intracranially. Passive transfer of purified IgG from immunized mice protected naïve mice from mumps virus infection, confirming the role of antibody in protection and demonstrating the potential for this model to evaluate mumps immunity.

  18. Mumps prophylaxis in the light of a new test for antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, P P

    1978-01-01

    A radial haemolysis test was used to investigate immunity to mumps. Antibody was found in 92 (42%) out of 220 children aged up to 5 years, 124 (78%) out of 159 children aged 6--10 years, 192 (86%) out of 222 children aged 11 years, 138 (92%) out of 150 children aged 15 years, and 280 (95%) out of 296 women attending an antenatal clinic. A group of 307 cadets aged 16--18 years were also tested and interviewed: 133 (95%) out of 140 who said that they had had mumps and 108 (87%) out of 124 who said that they had not had mumps were found to have antibody. The results suggest that tests for immunity to mumps by radial haemolysis would permit more rational use of mumps-specific immunoglobulin and attenuated mumps vaccine. PMID:365288

  19. Immunogenicity of novel mumps vaccine candidates generated by genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Chen, Zhenhai; Phan, Shannon; Pickar, Adrian; He, Biao

    2014-03-01

    Mumps is a highly contagious human disease, characterized by lateral or bilateral nonsuppurative swelling of the parotid glands and neurological complications that can result in aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. A mumps vaccination program implemented since the 1960s reduced mumps incidence by more than 99% and kept the mumps case numbers as low as hundreds of cases per year in the United States before 2006. However, a large mumps outbreak occurred in vaccinated populations in 2006 and again in 2009 in the United States, raising concerns about the efficacy of the vaccination program. Previously, we have shown that clinical isolate-based recombinant mumps viruses lacking expression of either the V protein (rMuVΔV) or the SH protein (rMuVΔSH) are attenuated in a neurovirulence test using newborn rat brains (P. Xu et al., Virology 417:126-136, 2011, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2011.05.003; P. Xu et al., J. Virol. 86:1768-1776, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06019-11) and may be good candidates for vaccine development. In this study, we examined immunity induced by rMuVΔSH and rMuVΔV in mice. Furthermore, we generated recombinant mumps viruses lacking expression of both the V protein and the SH protein (rMuVΔSHΔV). Analysis of rMuVΔSHΔV indicated that it was stable in tissue culture cell lines. Importantly, rMuVΔSHΔV was immunogenic in mice, indicating that it is a promising candidate for mumps vaccine development.

  20. Dynamics of the serologic response in vaccinated and unvaccinated mumps cases during an epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaijk, Patricia; Gouma, Sigrid; Hulscher, Hinke I; Han, Wanda G; Kleijne, Deborah E; van Binnendijk, Rob S; van Els, Cécile A

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, several mumps outbreaks were reported in various countries despite high vaccination coverage. In most cases, young adults were affected who have acquired immunity against mumps solely by vaccination and not by previous wild-type mumps virus infection. To investigate mumps-specific antibody levels, functionality and dynamics during a mumps epidemic, blood samples were obtained longitudinally from 23 clinical mumps cases, with or without a prior history of vaccination, and from 20 healthy persons with no serological evidence of recent mumps virus infection. Blood samples from mumps cases were taken 1-2 months and 7-10 months after onset of disease. Both vaccinated and unvaccinated mumps cases had significantly higher geomean concentrations of mumps-specific IgG (resp. 13,617 RU/ml (95% CI of 9,574-19,367 RU/ml) vs. 1,552 (445-5412) RU/ml at 1-2 months; and 6,514 (5,247-8,088) RU/ml vs. 1,143 (480-2,725) RU/ml at 7-10 months) than healthy controls (169 (135-210) RU/ml) (p = 0.001). Patterns in virus-neutralizing (VN) antibody responses against the mumps vaccine virus were similar, vaccinated and unvaccinated mumps cases had significantly higher ND50 values at both time points of sampling (resp 4,695 (3,779-5,832) RU/ml vs. 1,533 (832-2,825) RU/ml at 1-2 months; 2,478 (1,968-3,122) RU/ml vs. 1,221 (1,029-1,449) RU/ml at 7-10 months) compared with (previously vaccinated) healthy controls (122 (196-76)) RU/ml) (p = 0.001) The unvaccinated mumps cases had significantly lower mumps-specific IgG and VN antibody concentrations at both sampling points compared with previously vaccinated cases, but their antibody concentrations did not differ significantly at the 2 time points. In contrast, the mumps-specific IgG and VN antibody concentrations of the previously vaccinated mumps cases were significantly higher within the first 2 months after onset of mumps and declined thereafter, characteristic for a secondary response. A moderate correlation was found

  1. Mumps vaccine effectiveness in primary schools and households, the Netherlands, 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, B.E.; van Lier, A.; van de Kassteele, J.; Fanoy, E.B.; Ruijs, W.L.M.; Hulshof, F.; Blauwhof, A.; Schipper, M.; van Binnendijk, R.; Boot, H.J.; de Melker, H.E.; Hahne, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE) during a large genotype D mumps outbreak, we conducted a cross-sectional study in eight primary schools and associated households in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were used to collect information on the occurrence of mumps. Multivariate analyses

  2. Cross-neutralization between three mumps viruses & mapping of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN epitopes

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    Sunil R Vaidya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The reports from the countries where mumps vaccine is given as routine immunization suggest differences in mumps virus neutralizing antibody titres when tested with vaccine and wild type viruses. Such reports are unavailable from countries like India where mumps vaccine is not included in routine immunization. We, therefore, undertook this study to understand the cross-neutralization activity of Indian mumps viruses. Methods: By using commercial mumps IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA and a rapid focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT, a panel of serum samples was tested. The panel consisted of 14 acute and 14 convalescent serum samples collected during a mumps outbreak and 18 archived serum samples. Two wild types (genotypes C and G and Leningrad-Zagreb vaccine strain (genotype N were used for the challenge experiments and FRNT titres were determined and further compared. The HN protein sequence of three mumps viruses was analyzed for the presence of key epitopes. Results: All serum samples effectively neutralized mumps virus wild types and a vaccine strain. However, significantly lower FRNT titres were noted to wild types than to vaccine strain (P<0.05. The comparison between EIA and FRNT results revealed 95.6 per cent agreement. No amino acid changes were seen in the epitopes in the Indian wild type strains. All potential N-linked glycosylation sites were observed in Indian strains. Interpretation & conclusions:Good cross-neutralization activity was observed for three mumps virus strains, however, higher level of FRNT titres was detected for mumps virus vaccine strain compared to Indian wild type isolates.

  3. Cross-neutralization between three mumps viruses & mapping of haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Dvivedi, Garima M; Jadhav, Santoshkumar M

    2016-01-01

    The reports from the countries where mumps vaccine is given as routine immunization suggest differences in mumps virus neutralizing antibody titres when tested with vaccine and wild type viruses. Such reports are unavailable from countries like India where mumps vaccine is not included in routine immunization. We, therefore, undertook this study to understand the cross-neutralization activity of Indian mumps viruses. By using commercial mumps IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a rapid focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT), a panel of serum samples was tested. The panel consisted of 14 acute and 14 convalescent serum samples collected during a mumps outbreak and 18 archived serum samples. Two wild types (genotypes C and G) and Leningrad-Zagreb vaccine strain (genotype N) were used for the challenge experiments and FRNT titres were determined and further compared. The HN protein sequence of three mumps viruses was analyzed for the presence of key epitopes. All serum samples effectively neutralized mumps virus wild types and a vaccine strain. However, significantly lower FRNT titres were noted to wild types than to vaccine strain (P<0.05). The comparison between EIA and FRNT results revealed 95.6 per cent agreement. No amino acid changes were seen in the epitopes in the Indian wild type strains. All potential N-linked glycosylation sites were observed in Indian strains. Good cross-neutralization activity was observed for three mumps virus strains, however, higher level of FRNT titres was detected for mumps virus vaccine strain compared to Indian wild type isolates.

  4. Pericardial Tamponade in an Adult Suffering from Acute Mumps Infection

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    Sascha Kahlfuss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a case of a 51-year-old man with acute pericardial tamponade requiring emergency pericardiocentesis after he suffered from sore throat, headache, malaise, and sweats for two weeks. Serological analyses revealed increased mumps IgM and IgG indicating an acute mumps infection whereas other bacterial and viral infections were excluded. In addition, MRI revealed atypical swelling of the left submandibular gland. Whereas mumps has become a rare entity in children due to comprehensive vaccination regimens in western civilizations, our case highlights mumps as an important differential diagnosis also in adults, where the virus can induce life-threatening complications such as pericardial tamponade.

  5. Technical Aspects of Interfacing MUMPS to an External SQL Relational Database Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmak, Peter M.; Walters, Richard F.; Penrod, Gail

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an interface connecting InterSystems MUMPS (M/VX) to an external relational DBMS, the SYBASE Database Management System. The interface enables MUMPS to operate in a relational environment and gives the MUMPS language full access to a complete set of SQL commands. MUMPS generates SQL statements as ASCII text and sends them to the RDBMS. The RDBMS executes the statements and returns ASCII results to MUMPS. The interface suggests that the language features of MUMPS make it an attractive tool for use in the relational database environment. The approach described in this paper separates MUMPS from the relational database. Positioning the relational database outside of MUMPS promotes data sharing and permits a number of different options to be used for working with the data. Other languages like C, FORTRAN, and COBOL can access the RDBMS database. Advanced tools provided by the relational database vendor can also be used. SYBASE is an advanced high-performance transaction-oriented relational database management system for the VAX/VMS and UNIX operating systems. SYBASE is designed using a distributed open-systems architecture, and is relatively easy to interface with MUMPS.

  6. [A case of orchitis following vaccination with freeze-dried live attenuated mumps vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Masayasu; Takizawa, Akitoshi; Furuta, Akira; Yanada, Shuichi; Iwamuro, Shinya; Tashiro, Kazuya

    2002-05-01

    In Japan, freeze-dried live attenuated mumps vaccine has been used optionally since 1981. The effectiveness of mumps vaccination has been established by worldwide research since 1971. On the other hand, because of it's live activity several untoward effects have been reported. Vaccination-related mumps orchitis is a rare adverse effect of mumps vaccine. Only 9 cases of vaccination-related mumps orchitis have been reported in Japan. We describe a case of orchitis following mumps vaccination in adolescence. A 16 years-old male has admitted because of acute orchitis with high fever and painful swelling of right testis. The patient had received vaccination with freeze-dried live attenuated mumps vaccine 16 days before admission. After admission, the bed-rest had completely relieved the symptoms on 6th hospital day. The impaired testis has maintained normal size and consistency 6 months after discharge.

  7. The risk of aseptic meningitis associated with the Leningrad-Zagreb mumps vaccine strain following mass vaccination with measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Claudio Marcos; Kmetzsch, Claudete Iris; Mohrdieck, Renate; Sperb, Alethea Fagundes; Prevots, D Rebecca

    2002-10-01

    Few data are available on the risk of aseptic meningitis following vaccination with the Leningrad-Zagreb (L-Z) strain of mumps vaccine. In 1997 the mumps vaccine was introduced into the state of Rio Grande do Sul in Brazil through mass vaccination with mumps-measles-rubella (MMR), targeting children aged 1-11 years. Five municipalities used exclusively MMR vaccine containing the L-Z strain of mumps. An outbreak of aseptic meningitis was observed shortly after the mass campaign. To estimate the risk of aseptic meningitis associated with this strain, we analysed vaccination and meningitis case surveillance data from the selected municipalities. A case of vaccine-associated aseptic meningitis was defined as one with a pleocytosis of 10-1,500 leukocytes/ml and occurring within 15-35 days after vaccine receipt. We estimated a risk of 2.9 cases per 10,000 doses of L-Z administered, equivalent to 1 case per 3,390 doses administered. The overall risk of aseptic meningitis following the campaign was increased 12.2-fold (95% CI: 6.0-24.7) compared with the same period in 1995-1996. Following the mass campaign, the incidence of mumps declined 93% during 1998-2000. Vaccination with the L-Z strain of mumps vaccine as part of a mass campaign was associated with a significantly increased risk of aseptic meningitis. Decisions about type of mumps vaccine and mumps vaccination strategies must consider vaccine safety issues in addition to other criteria.

  8. Is it Right Time to Introduce Mumps Vaccine in Indias Universal Immunization Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, S R; Hamde, V S

    2016-06-08

    Measles, mumps and rubella are vaccine preventable diseases. However, morbidity and mortality due to these diseases remain largely unnoticed in India. Measles has received much attention; mumps and rubella still need to garner attention. According to the World Health Organization, near-elimination of mumps could be achieved by maintaining high vaccine coverage using a two-dose strategy. However, Government of India has not yet decided on mumps vaccine. In this review, we have reviewed sero-prevalence studies, vaccine studies, outbreak investigations, virus isolation and virus genotyping studies on mumps. Overall, mumps seems to be a significant public health problem in India, but does not garner attention due to the absence of a surveillance and documentation system. Thus, inclusion of mumps antigen in the Universal immunization program would have added advantages, the economic burden imposed by the cost of the vaccine offset by a reduction in disease burden.

  9. Protective effect of vaccination against mumps complications, Czech Republic, 2007–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Orlíková

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Czech Republic, two-dose immunization against mumps achieves 98 % coverage. The routine reporting detects mumps cases, clinical complications, and hospital admissions in unvaccinated but also in vaccinated individuals. Using surveillance data of patients with mumps we assessed the effectiveness of mumps vaccination on mumps clinical complications and hospitalization need. We also investigated the effect of the time since immunization. Methods We analysed data on incident mumps cases reported to the Czech national surveillance system in 2007–2012. Using a logistic regression model with adjustment for age, sex, year of onset, and the administrative region, the association between vaccination and the most frequent mumps complications and hospitalization was evaluated. The adjusted odds ratios (ORa for mumps complications were compared between the vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups, reflecting the vaccine effectiveness (VEa computed as VEa = (1-ORa×100. We estimated the risk of mumps complications by the time from vaccination. Results From total of 9663 mumps analysed cases 5600 (58 % occurred in males. The mean age at the disease onset was 17.3, median 16 years. Ninety percent of the study patients had no complications, while 1.6 % developed meningitis, 0.2 % encephalitis, and 0.6 % pancreatitis. Mumps orchitis occurred in 659 (11.8 % male cases. In total, 1192 (12.3 % patients required hospitalization. Two doses of vaccine received by 81.8 % cases significantly reduced the risk of hospitalization: ORa 0.29 (95 % CI: 0.24, 0.35. Two doses showed statistically significant VEa 64 % (95 % CI: 46, 79 for meningitis, 93 % (95 % CI: 66, 98 for encephalitis in all cases, and 72 % (95 % CI: 64, 78 for orchitis in males. Vaccine effectiveness for orchitis declined from 81 to 74 % and 56 % in the most affected age groups 10–14, 15–19, and 20–24 years, respectively. Among 7850 two-dose recipients

  10. Antibody induced by immunization with the Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine strain effectively neutralizes a heterologous wild-type mumps virus associated with a large outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Steven A; Qi, Li; Audet, Susette A; Sullivan, Bradley; Carbone, Kathryn M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A; Sirota, Lev; Beeler, Judy

    2008-08-15

    Recent mumps outbreaks in older vaccinated populations were caused primarily by genotype G viruses, which are phylogenetically distinct from the genotype A vaccine strains used in the countries affected by the outbreaks. This finding suggests that genotype A vaccine strains could have reduced efficacy against heterologous mumps viruses. The remote history of vaccination also suggests that waning immunity could have contributed to susceptibility. To examine these issues, we obtained consecutive serum samples from children at different intervals after vaccination and assayed the ability of these samples to neutralize the genotype A Jeryl Lynn mumps virus vaccine strain and a genotype G wild-type virus obtained during the mumps outbreak that occurred in the United States in 2006. Although the geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers against the genotype G virus were approximately one-half the titers measured against the vaccine strain, and although titers to both viruses decreased with time after vaccination, antibody induced by immunization with the Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine strain effectively neutralized the outbreak-associated virus at all time points tested.

  11. Mumps Virus: Modification of the Identify-Isolate-Inform Tool for Frontline Healthcare Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L. Koenig

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mumps is a highly contagious viral infection that became rare in most industrialized countries following the introduction of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccine in 1967. The disease, however, has been re-emerging with several outbreaks over the past decade. Many clinicians have never seen a case of mumps. To assist frontline healthcare providers with detecting potential cases and initiating critical actions, investigators modified the “Identify-Isolate-Inform” tool for mumps infection. The tool is applicable to regions with rare incidences or local outbreaks, especially seen in college students, as well as globally in areas where vaccination is less common. Mumps begins with a prodrome of low-grade fever, myalgias and malaise/anorexia, followed by development of nonsuppurative parotitis, which is the pathognomonic finding associated with acute mumps infection. Orchitis and meningitis are the two most common serious complications, with hearing loss and infertility occurring rarely. Providers should consider mumps in patients with exposure to a known case or international travel to endemic regions who present with consistent signs and symptoms. If mumps is suspected, healthcare providers must immediately implement standard and droplet precautions and notify the local health department and hospital infection control personnel.

  12. Identification and development of a promising novel mumps vaccine candidate strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Ma, Shaohui; Liu, Longding; Zhao, Hongling; Wang, Lichun; Jiang, Li; Xie, Zhongping; Dong, Chenghong; Li, Qihan

    2010-12-01

    Mumps epidemics are usually caused by airborne transmission of mumps virus (MuV) and have high morbidity in non-immunized children. Epidemiological studies in many regions of China show that the genotype F viral strain is the most prevalent. However, the genotype A strain is currently used to prepare vaccines. Regional epidemiological MuV data suggest a significant application for the development of live attenuated mumps vaccines targeting specific genotypes. This article reports the isolation and culture of a genotype F MuV candidate strain that could be used to prepare a live attenuated mumps vaccine. This strain is shown to have good immunological efficacy and stability in neurovirulence evaluations. This work should facilitate the implementation of mumps vaccination in mainland China by targeting the most prevalent MuV genotype, genotype F. Copyright © 2010 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Mumps-containing vaccine effectiveness during outbreaks in two schools in Guangdong, China, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Qi-ru

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mumps-containing vaccine was licensed in the 1990s in China with a single dose administered routinely to children aged 18–24 months since 2008. However, an increase in reported mumps cases during the period 2009 to 2012 casts doubt on the effectiveness of a single-dose mumps vaccination. In March 2012, large numbers of mumps cases in a day-care centre and primary school in Guangdong Province were investigated to estimate the effectiveness of mumps-containing vaccine.Methods: A mumps case was defined as a case with acute onset of unilateral or bilateral swelling of the parotid gland or other salivary glands. Clinical data were collected among students and staff members in the two schools from 6 February to 3 June 2012. Vaccination history was obtained from immunization certificates. Vaccine effectiveness (VE was calculated among children in classes that had more than two mumps cases.Results: The cohort included 369 children from seven classes, four from the day-care centre and three from the primary school. Vaccination certificates available for 347 children showed immunization coverage of 82% (285/347. The overall attack rate was 14.6% (54/369; the VE for a single dose of mumps vaccine was 65% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 19%–85% when given within three years and 15% (95% CI: -2%–52% when given three to six years before the outbreak. For two doses of vaccine the VE was 53% (95% CI: -15–80%.Discussion: A single dose of mumps-containing vaccine was not effective to prevent these outbreaks among preschool and schoolchildren. A second dose of mumps-containing vaccine to four to five-year-old children should be considered in China.

  14. Comparative efficacy of Rubini, Jeryl-Lynn and Urabe mumps vaccine in an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Gary; Goh, Kee Tai; Ma, Stefan; Chew, Suok Kai

    2005-11-01

    The comparative efficacy of the three mumps vaccine strains (Jeryl-Lynn, Urabe and Rubini) was conducted in an Asian population from data arising from an epidemiological investigation of seven institutional outbreaks of mumps in Singapore. Demographic information (gender, age, ethnic group), clinical presentation and vaccination history (date and place of mumps vaccination, type of mumps vaccine received) of all children who attended the six childcare centres and one primary school where outbreaks of 20 or more cases of mumps occurred in 1999 were collected. The attack rate of the unvaccinated group and the attack rates of the vaccine groups (for each vaccine strain) were determined and the vaccine efficacy of the three vaccines calculated. The vaccine efficacy of the Jeryl-Lynn strain, Urabe strain and Rubini strain mumps vaccine were 80.7, 54.4 and -55.3%, respectively. Rubini strain mumps vaccine conferred no protection and has since been deregistered in Singapore.

  15. A case of mumps-related acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazama, Kyoko; Shiihara, Takashi; Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shunji; Dowa, Yuri; Watanabe, Mio

    2017-10-01

    Mumps is a common childhood viral disease characterized by fever and swelling of the parotid gland. The prognosis is generally good, although some complications, such as encephalitis (0.1%), exist. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion is the most common type of acute encephalopathy. However, this type of encephalopathy has not been reported in association with mumps infection. A previously healthy 3-year-old Japanese boy had a brief convulsion after fever for 3days, and then had conscious disturbance and parotitis. After several days, he had a second brief convulsion and was admitted. Increased serum amylase levels and presence of anti-mumps immunoglobulin M antibody confirmed mumps parotitis. The patient had another brief seizure later the day of admission. He did not have status or cluster seizures, although the biphasic nature of his seizures, conscious disturbance between the seizures, no pleocytosis in cerebrospinal fluid, and brain magnetic resonance images were consistent with acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion. In Japan, the mumps vaccine is not administered as a part of routine immunizations. It thus has low coverage (30-40%), and as a result, mumps infections are still common. However, this is the first case of mumps-related acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion. This case may be representative of only a minority of patients with mumps-associated central nervous system involvement. Nevertheless, this diagnostic possibility may be considered. In order to prevent mumps-related complications, routine mumps vaccination might be warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidemiologic and genetic characteristics of mumps viruses isolated in China from 1995 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Aili; Zhu, Zhen; Chen, Meng; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Wang, Yan; Ma, Yan; Wang, Changyin; Fang, Xueqiang; Li, Ping; Guan, Ronghui; Wang, Shuang; Zhou, Jianhui; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Hui; Ding, Zhengrong; Li, Liqun; Bo, Fang; Sun, Zhaodan; Zhang, Zhenying; Feng, Daxing; He, Jilan; Chen, Hui; Jin, Li; Rota, Paul A; Xu, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiologic and genetic characteristics of mumps viruses detected in China from 1995 to 2010 were analyzed in this study. Mumps remains endemic in China with a high overall incidence rate. The incidence of mumps in Western China was higher than that in other regions of the country. Each year, most of mumps cases occurred between April and July, but a small peak also occurred in November and December. Mumps cases primarily affected the under 15 year old age group. Virologic data demonstrated that genotype F was the predominant circulating genotype throughout China for at least 15 years and no other genotype was detected between 1995 and 2010. Analysis of sequence data from the small hydrophobic (SH) gene indicated that multiple transmission chains of genotype F were found in various provinces of China, with no apparent chronologic and geographic restriction. This is the first report describing the epidemiology of mumps and genetic characterization of mumps viruses at the national level in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Mumps vaccine associated orchitis: Evidence supporting a potential immune-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Vanessa; Wadsley, Jane; Jenner, Bernard; Buttery, Jim P

    2010-03-19

    We report 3 cases of orchitis following vaccination with mumps-measles-rubella (MMR) vaccine, two with an onset within 3 days following vaccination. Orchitis is a common complication of mumps infection, particularly in post-pubertal males, and is also recognized as a very rare complication of mumps vaccination. These cases, discussed together with a comprehensive review of the existing literature regarding post-vaccine orchitis, highlight uncertainty regarding the pathogenesis of post-vaccine orchitis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Emergent lineages of mumps virus suggest the need for a polyvalent vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan May

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mumps outbreaks among vaccinated patients have become increasingly common in recent years. While there are multiple conditions driving this re-emergence, convention has suggested that these outbreaks are associated with waning immunity rather than vaccine escape. Molecular evidence from both the ongoing American and Dutch outbreaks in conjunction with recent structural biology studies challenge this convention, and suggest that emergent lineages of mumps virus exhibit key differences in antigenic epitopes from the vaccine strain employed: Jeryl-Lynn 5. The American and Dutch 2016–2017 outbreak lineages were examined using computational biology through the lens of diversity in immunogenic epitopes. Findings are discussed and the laboratory evidence indicating neutralization of heterologous mumps strains by serum from vaccinated individuals is reviewed. Taken together, it is concluded that the number of heterologous epitopes occurring in mumps virus in conjunction with waning immunity is facilitating small outbreaks in vaccinated patients, and that consideration of a polyvalent mumps vaccine is warranted.

  19. MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC MMR (Measles, Mumps, & Rubella) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... Why get vaccinated? Measles, mumps, and rubella are viral diseases that can ... Before vaccines, these diseases were very common in ...

  20. Dynamics of the serologic response in vaccinated and unvaccinated mumps cases during an epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kaaijk (P.); S. Gouma (Sigrid); H.I. Hulscher (Hinke I.); W.G. Han (Wanda G.); D.E. Kleijne (Deborah E.); R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); C.A.C.M. van Els (Cécile)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn the last decade, several mumps outbreaks were reported in various countries despite high vaccination coverage. In most cases, young adults were affected who have acquired immunity against mumps solely by vaccination and not by previous wild-type mumps virus infection. To investigate

  1. Mumps vaccine effectiveness and risk factors for disease in households during an outbreak in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Kara A; Rosen, Jennifer B; Zucker, Jane R; Zimmerman, Christopher M

    2014-01-09

    Mumps outbreaks have been reported among vaccinated populations, and declining mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE) has been suggested as one possible cause. During a large mumps outbreak in New York City, we assessed: (1) VE of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) against mumps and (2) risk factors for acquiring mumps in households. Cases of mumps were investigated using standard methods. Additional information on disease and vaccination status of household contacts was collected. Case households completed follow-up phone interviews 78-198 days after initial investigation to ascertain additional cases. Mumps cases meeting the study case definition were included in the analysis. Risk factors for mumps were assessed, and VE was calculated using secondary household attack rates. Three hundred and eleven households with 2176 residents were included in the analysis. The median age of residents was 13 years (range <1-85), and 462 (21.2%) residents met the study mumps case definition. Among 7-17 year olds, 89.7% received one or more doses of MMR vaccine, with 76.7% receiving two doses. Young adults aged 10-14 years (OR=2.4, CI=1.3-4.7) and 15-19 years (OR=2.5, CI=1.3-5.0) were at highest risk of mumps. The overall 2-dose VE for secondary contacts aged five and older was 86.3% (CI 63.3-94.9). The two-dose effectiveness of MMR vaccine against mumps was 86.3%, consistent with other published mumps VE estimates. Many factors likely contributed to this outbreak. Suboptimal MMR coverage in the affected population combined with VE may not have conferred adequate immunity to prevent transmission and may have contributed to this outbreak. Achieving high MMR coverage remains the best available strategy for prevention of mumps outbreaks. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergent lineages of mumps virus suggest the need for a polyvalent vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Meghan; Rieder, Courtney A; Rowe, Rebecca J

    2018-01-01

    Mumps outbreaks among vaccinated patients have become increasingly common in recent years. While there are multiple conditions driving this re-emergence, convention has suggested that these outbreaks are associated with waning immunity rather than vaccine escape. Molecular evidence from both the ongoing American and Dutch outbreaks in conjunction with recent structural biology studies challenge this convention, and suggest that emergent lineages of mumps virus exhibit key differences in antigenic epitopes from the vaccine strain employed: Jeryl-Lynn 5. The American and Dutch 2016-2017 outbreak lineages were examined using computational biology through the lens of diversity in immunogenic epitopes. Findings are discussed and the laboratory evidence indicating neutralization of heterologous mumps strains by serum from vaccinated individuals is reviewed. Taken together, it is concluded that the number of heterologous epitopes occurring in mumps virus in conjunction with waning immunity is facilitating small outbreaks in vaccinated patients, and that consideration of a polyvalent mumps vaccine is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Human leukocyte antigen and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms associated with heterogeneous immune responses to mumps viral vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Dhiman, Neelam; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2008-05-01

    Mumps outbreaks continue to occur throughout the world, including in highly vaccinated populations. Vaccination against mumps has been successful; however, humoral and cellular immune responses to mumps vaccines vary significantly from person to person. We set out to assess whether HLA and cytokine gene polymorphisms are associated with variations in the immune response to mumps viral vaccine. To identify genetic factors that might contribute to variations in mumps vaccine-induced immune responses, we performed HLA genotyping in a group of 346 healthy schoolchildren (12-18 years of age) who previously received 2 doses of live mumps vaccine. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (minor allele frequency of >5%) in cytokine and cytokine receptor genes were genotyped for a subset of 118 children. Median values for mumps-specific antibody titers and lymphoproliferative stimulation indices were 729 IU/mL and 4.8, respectively. Girls demonstrated significantly higher mumps antibody titers than boys, indicating gender-linked genetic differences in humoral immune response. Significant associations were found between the HLA-DQB1*0303 alleles and lower mumps-specific antibody titers. An interesting finding was the association of several HLA class II alleles with mumps-specific lymphoproliferation. Alleles of the DRB1 (*0101, *0301, *0801, *1001, *1201, and *1302), DQA1 (*0101, *0105, *0401, and *0501), and DQB1 (*0201, *0402, and *0501) loci were associated with significant variations in lymphoproliferative immune responses to mumps vaccine. Additional associations were observed with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the interleukin-10RA, interleukin-12RB1, and interleukin-12RB2 cytokine receptor genes. Minor alleles for 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within interleukin-10RA and interleukin-12RB genes were associated with variations in humoral and cellular immune responses to mumps vaccination. These data suggest the important role of HLA and immunoregulatory cytokine receptor

  4. [Comparative evaluation of Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus neurovirulence in a neonatal rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignat'ev, G M; Otrashevskaia, E V; Rubin, S A

    2011-01-01

    The neurovirulence and replication potential of several mumps virus strains, including Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus (FSUE SIC "Microgen", Russia) and wild type strains isolated in the Novosibirsk Region (Russia), were assessed in rat tests. The mean neurovirulence scores of the Leningrad-3 virus (mumps vaccine strains (usually ranging from 0 to 5). In general, the relative ability of the viruses to replicate in the rat brain tracked with their neurovirulence scores. These results indicate a low neurovirulence potential of the Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine virus for humans.

  5. Scilab and MATLAB Interfaces to MUMPS (version 4.6 or greater)

    OpenAIRE

    Fèvre , Aurélia; Pralet , Stéphane; L'Excellent , Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    This document describes the Scilab and MATLAB interfaces to MUMPS version 4.6. We describe the differences and similarities between usual Fortran/C MUMPS interfaces and its Scilab/MATLAB interfaces, the calling sequences and functionalities. Examples of use and experimental results are also provided.

  6. Factors associated with mothers not vaccinating their children against mumps in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Y; Shida, N; Izumi, S; Ogasawara, M; Kakinuma, W; Tsujiuchi, T; Machida, K

    2016-08-01

    In Japan, mumps immunization is not mandatory, and the prevalence of mumps immunization among eligible children is only about 30%, raising concerns about increased risk of meningitis, encephalitis and deafness caused by mumps. In 2011, to understand why families are not voluntarily immunizing their children against mumps, we surveyed mothers who were university graduates to examine the factors and barriers influencing mumps vaccination in Japan. A cross sectional design. We sent questionnaires including questions on demographic data and vaccination status, barriers and factors for immunizations to university alumnae to recruit participants. Data were analysed by Student's t-test for continuous variables and by univariate and multivariate analysis to obtain the odds ratio and adjusted odds ratio. Two hundred and twenty-six mothers with children responded with an average (range) age of 44.7 years (SD = 5.02; 30-55 years). Adjusted odds ratios (aOR) from logistic regression analysis identified fear of harmful side-effects (aOR, 2.55; 95% CI, 1.10 to 5.89), the vaccination not being mandatory (aOR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.41 to 7.72), perceived non-efficacy (aOR, 6.21; 95% CI, 1.85 to 20.91) and being busy (aOR, 3.30; 95% CI, 1.21 to 9.01) were significantly and inversely associated with mumps vaccination. Recommendations from family doctors (aOR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.71), living abroad when their children would be vaccinated (aOR, 0.10; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.68) and the maternal age (aOR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.96) were significant and positively associated with vaccination. In the absence of mandatory vaccinations, a public education campaign about mumps, their potential consequences and the nature and value of vaccination could improve the prevalence of mumps vaccination among children and prevent the consequences of this disease. Copyright © 2016 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular Epidemiological Study of Mumps Epidemics of 2015 in Okinawa, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuba, Yumani; Kyan, Hisako; Arakaki, Eri; Takara, Taketoshi; Kato, Takashi; Okano, Sho; Oshiro, Yuko; Kudaka, Jun; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2017-05-24

    Although major mumps epidemics occurred every 4-5 years in Okinawa Prefecture in Japan, no laboratory diagnoses were conducted. A mumps epidemic started in Okinawa in October 2014, and we collected clinical samples from 31 patients in 4 areas (Hokubu, Nanbu, Miyako, and Yaeyama) from July to December 2015, for virus isolation and RT-PCR, whose positive ratios were 52% and 87%, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses showed that all isolates were classified into genotype G, and with one exception, consisted of 2 subgenotypes, Ge (55.6%) and Gw (40.7%), which have been prominent in Japan recently. One isolate was classified in another lineage, which was detected in Japan for the first time, and was similar to a Hong Kong isolate from 2014. Remarkably, the geographic distributions of the 2 major lineages were separated. The Ge viruses were isolated from the main island of Okinawa and the Yaeyama Islands, whereas the Gw isolates were mainly detected from the Miyako Islands. These results suggest that the Ge and Gw mumps viruses mainly caused the mumps epidemics of 2015 in Okinawa, and that they spread independently in separate regions. This is the first report describing the molecular epidemiology of mumps epidemics in Okinawa Prefecture.

  8. MMRV (measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age Second dose: 4 through 6 years of age A third dose of MMRV might be recommended in certain mumps outbreak situations. There are no known risks to getting ... 12 years of age might get 2 separate shots: MMR (measles, mumps ...

  9. Effectiveness of a vaccination program against mumps in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynash, Y; Nadraga, A; Dasho, M

    2008-12-01

    Medical records and incidence data were analyzed retrospectively to document the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of mumps in relation to vaccination status in the Lviv province of Ukraine over a 7.5-year period, beginning in 2000, when a second dose of mumps vaccine was introduced. Lviv, 1 of 27 provinces in western Ukraine, with a land area of 21,833 km(2), had a total population of about 2,555,834 in 2006. The initial success of the second dose introduction in 2000 in Ukraine was limited by a local outbreak of mumps in Lviv province in 2000-2002 due to a vaccine shortage; most cases were over the age of 7 years. The vaccine with the Leningrad-3 virus strain used before 2001 was then replaced by the triple vaccine "Priorix", with the RIT 4385 derivate of the Jeryl Lynn strain, Belgium. Orchitis and aseptic meningitis were associated with the Russian vaccine. Of the 10,894 reported cases, the most severe (367 cases, 3.4%) were hospitalized in the Lviv Hospital for Infectious Diseases. Admitted patients were predominantly male and over 14 years old. Of the 367 patients admitted to the Lviv Hospital for Infectious Diseases, 45.8% had been vaccinated (mostly by a first dose of Russian vaccine), 15.9% had not been vaccinated, and 38.1% had an unknown vaccination status. More mumps cases occurred in winter and spring than in summer and autumn. The clinical picture and complications (orchitis, pancreatitis, meningitis, and encephalitis) were typical of this disease. The vaccine shortage and an increase in the susceptible population among those who received the Russian vaccine contributed to the outbreak. The use of vaccine with a derivate of the Jeryl Lynn strain has resulted in a dramatic drop in mumps cases since 2002.

  10. A prolonged mumps outbreak among highly vaccinated Aboriginal people in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangor-Jones, Revle D; Dowse, Gary K; Giele, Carolien M; van Buynder, Paul G; Hodge, Meredith M; Whitty, Mary M

    2009-10-05

    To describe a prolonged outbreak of mumps in the Kimberley region of Western Australia in 2007-2008. Descriptive analysis of all mumps cases notified to the WA Notifiable Infectious Diseases Database for the period 1 July 2007 to 30 June 2008. Notified cases of mumps by patients' place of residence, age, Indigenous or non-Indigenous ethnicity, vaccination status and method of diagnosis. 84% (153/183) of mumps notifications in WA over the study period occurred in the Kimberley region or were directly linked to Kimberley cases. Median age of patients was 18 years (range, 2-63 years), and 54% of patients were aged less than 20 years. Almost all (92%) were Australian Aboriginal people; 67% (102/153) had received at least one dose of mumps vaccine, and 52% had received two doses. The highest notification rate (1816 cases per 100,000 population) was in the Aboriginal 15-19-years age group, and 92% of these patients had received at least one dose of mumps vaccine. Almost all outbreak cases (94%) were laboratory confirmed. Genotyping was performed on 20 mumps virus isolates: all were genotype J. A prolonged outbreak of mumps occurred in a well defined, highly vaccinated, predominantly young Aboriginal population in the remote Kimberley region of WA. This outbreak raises questions about the effectiveness and scheduling of the current vaccine (which is genotype A-derived), especially for Aboriginal people. Surveillance of circulating mumps virus genotypes and neutralisation studies will help in evaluating the protection provided by the current vaccine against genotypically different strains.

  11. Development of a simplified and convenient assay for cell-mediated immunity to the mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naruhito; Shima, Masayuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Okuno, Toshiomi

    2014-09-01

    Because methods for measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to the mumps virus are expensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding, the role of CMI in mumps virus infection remains unclear. To address this issue, we report here the development of a simplified method for measuring mumps virus-specific CMI that is suitable for use in diverse laboratory and clinical settings. A mumps vaccine was cultured with whole blood, and interferon (IFN)-γ released into the culture supernatant was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IFN-γ production in blood from vaccinated subjects markedly increased in response to the vaccine and decreased before the antibody titer decreased in some cases, suggesting that this assay may be used as a simple surrogate method for measuring CMI specific for the mumps virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An assessment of mumps vaccine effectiveness by dose during an outbreak in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Shelley L; Lim, Gillian H; Simpson, Mary Anne; Gagné, Louise; Gubbay, Jonathan; Kristjanson, Erik; Fung, Cecilia; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2011-06-14

    This investigation was done to assess vaccine effectiveness of one and two doses of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine during an outbreak of mumps in Ontario. The level of coverage required to reach herd immunity and interrupt community transmission of mumps was also estimated. Information on confirmed cases of mumps was retrieved from Ontario's integrated Public Health Information System. Cases that occurred between Sept. 1, 2009, and June 10, 2010, were included. Selected health units supplied coverage data from the Ontario Immunization Record Information System. Vaccine effectiveness by dose was calculated using the screening method. The basic reproductive number (R(0)) represents the average number of new infections per case in a fully susceptible population, and R(0) values of between 4 and 10 were considered for varying levels of vaccine effectiveness. A total of 134 confirmed cases of mumps were identified. Information on receipt of MMR vaccine was available for 114 (85.1%) cases, of whom 63 (55.3%) reported having received only one dose of vaccine; 32 (28.1%) reported having received two doses. Vaccine effectiveness of one dose of the MMR vaccine ranged from 49.2% to 81.6%, whereas vaccine effectiveness of two doses ranged from 66.3% to 88.0%. If we assume vaccine effectiveness of 85% for two doses of the vaccine, vaccine coverage of 88.2% and 98.0% would be needed to interrupt community transmission of mumps if the corresponding reproductive values were four and six. Our estimates of vaccine effectiveness of one and two doses of mumps-containing vaccine were consistent with the estimates that have been reported in other outbreaks. Outbreaks occurring in Ontario and elsewhere serve as a warning against complacency over vaccination programs.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of mumps meningoencephalitis with bilateral hippocampal lesions without preceding acute parotitis: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Ah Reum; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kang, Young Hye; Cho, Soon Gu; Choi, Seong Hye; Baek, Ji Hyeon [Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Meningitis is a common central nervous system (CNS) complication of the mumps, a viral infection, but encephalitis and meningoencephalitis are less common in mumps. We describe magnetic resonance imaging findings of acute mumps meningoencephalitis in a 32-year-old male who showed bilateral hippocampal lesions without preceding parotitis. Although it is rare, hippocampal involvement should be considered a CNS complication of mumps infection.

  14. Transmission of the L-Zagreb mumps vaccine virus, Croatia, 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaic, B; Gjenero-Margan, I; Aleraj, B; Ljubin-Sternak, S; Vilibic-Cavlek, T; Kilvain, S; Pavic, I; Stojanovic, D; Ilic, A

    2008-04-17

    We report on three cases of symptomatic transmission of the L-Zagreb mumps vaccine virus from three vaccinated children to five adult contacts. The five contact cases were parents of the vaccinated children and presented with parotitis and in one case also with aseptic meningitis. The etiology of the contacts' illness was determined by viral culture, genomic sequencing, serology and epidemiological linking. Two of the vaccinated children developed vaccine associated parotitis as an adverse event three weeks following immunization. Symptoms in contact cases developed five to seven weeks after the vaccination of the children. The five contact cases, as well as the three children with adverse events recovered completely. The children had been vaccinated with MMR vaccine produced by the Institute of Immunology Zagreb, each of them with a different lot. One of the possible explanations for these adverse events is that the very low levels of wild mumps virus circulation in the last decade, combined with waning immunity in those who received one dose of vaccine or suffered from mumps in childhood, resulted in susceptible young adults and that this unique epidemiological situation allows us to detect horizontal transmission of mumps vaccine virus.

  15. Economic evaluation of vaccination programme of mumps vaccine to the birth cohort in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Shu-ling; Kondo, Masahide; Okubo, Ichiro

    2014-07-16

    The most common preventative measure against mumps is vaccination with mumps vaccine. In most parts of the world, mumps vaccine is routinely delivered through live attenuated Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccine. In Japan, receiving mumps vaccine is voluntary and vaccine uptake rate is less than 30%. The introduction of mumps vaccine into routine vaccination schedule has become one of the current topics in health policy and has raised the need to evaluate efficient ways in protecting children from mumps-related diseases in Japan. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis with Markov model and calculated incremental cost effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of 11 different programmes; a single-dose programme at 12-16 months and 10 two-dose programmes with second dose uptakes at ages 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11. Our base-case analyse set the cost per shot at ¥6951 (US$72; 1US$=96.8). Results show that single-dose programme dominates status quo. On the other hand, ICERs of all 10 two-dose programmes are under ¥6,300,000 (US$65,082) per QALY from payer's perspective while it ranged from cost-saving to <¥7,000,000 (US$72,314) per QALY from societal perspective. By adopting WHO's classification that an intervention is cost-effective if ICER (in QALY) is between one and three times of GDP as a criterion, either of the vaccination programme is concluded as cost-effective from payer's or societal perspectives. Likewise, to uptake second dose at 3-5 years old is more favourable than an uptake at any other age because of lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  17. Seroprevalence of mumps in The Netherlands: dynamics over a decade with high vaccination coverage and recent outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaby Smits

    Full Text Available Here we present mumps virus specific antibody levels in a large cross-sectional population-based serosurveillance study performed in the Netherlands in 2006/2007 (n = 7900. Results were compared with a similar study (1995/1996 and discussed in the light of recent outbreaks. Mumps antibodies were tested using a fluorescent bead-based multiplex immunoassay. Overall seroprevalence was 90.9% with higher levels in the naturally infected cohorts compared with vaccinated cohorts. Mumps virus vaccinations at 14 months and 9 years resulted in an increased seroprevalence and antibody concentration. The second vaccination seemed to be important in acquiring stable mumps antibody levels in the long term. In conclusion, the Dutch population is well protected against mumps virus infection. However, we identified specific age- and population groups at increased risk of mumps infection. Indeed, in 2007/2008 an outbreak has occurred in the low vaccination coverage groups emphasizing the predictive value of serosurveillance studies.

  18. Immunogenicity and efficacy of Hoshino strain of mumps vaccine in Iran; two years study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avijgan, M; Hafizi, M; Moghni, M; Kheiri, S; Esteghamati, A; Sarikhani, S

    2011-06-01

    This report describes the immunogenicity and efficacy and long term immunity of Hoshino strain of Mumps (included in MMR Vaccine) in shahr-e-kord, Islamic Republic of Iran (I.R.Iran). A total of 338 Children aged 3-18 years were tested for Mumps IgG using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The proportion of susceptible, mumps IgG negative, children was 19.8% (67 subjects). Of the 67 susceptible children, 36 received the MMR vaccination and successfully completed the study. Blood was collected by venipuncture 3, 12, and 24 months after vaccination and serum samples were tested by ELISA for detection of Mumps IgM and IgG. The overall seroconversion rate was 86.1%, 77.7% and 75% at 3, 12, and 24 months after vaccination respectively.

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  20. Mumps vaccine effectiveness in highly immunized populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Angela; Torner, Núria; Castilla, Jesús; Batalla, Joan; Godoy, Pere; Guevara, Marcela; Carnicer, Dolors; Caylà, Joan; Rius, Cristina; Jansà, Josep Maria

    2010-04-30

    The aim of the study was to investigate effectiveness of mumps MMR component in communities with high MMR coverage. Outbreak-related cases of mumps born between 1995 and 2005 notified to Navarre and Catalonia public health services during the period 2005-2007 were studied. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) and their 95%CI were calculated using the screening method. Of 47 confirmed, 85.1% immunized with at least one dose (1MMR) and 44.9% with two (2MMR). Estimated VE was 85.4% (95%CI: 67.3-93.4) for 1MMR and 88.5% (95%CI: 78.1-93.9) for 2MMR. High 2MMR coverage, improved confirmation techniques and further VE studies with all confirmed cases are needed to prevent further outbreaks. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Seroprevalence of IgG Antibodies against Mumps in Bulgarian Children under 18 Years of Age

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    Milena Karcheva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of IgG antibodies against mumps in a representative stratified sample of children under 18 years of age in Pleven district, Bulgaria. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, sero-epidemiologic survey of 132 children aged under 18 years was conducted in Pleven district. They were distributed into two age groups: from 0 to 11 years old (n=80 and from 12 to 18 years old (n=52. An enzyme immunoassay (EIA was performed for indirect evidence of specific IgG antibodies in the serum. Results: The results showed that 41% of the investigated children were negative in terms of mumps IgG antibodies, 11% had borderline values and the remaining, approximately 48%, were positive. In the group of children aged 0 to 11 years who had received one dose of the mumps vaccine, 50% were negative for mumps IgG antibodies. In the second group of children aged 12 to 18 years who had received two vaccine doses, the percentage of participants negative for mumps IgG antibodies decreased significantly. Conclusion: Our observations emphasise the need to conduct expanded sero-epidemiological investigations of the populations most affected by mumps and to immunise susceptible individuals.

  2. An outbreak of mumps with genetic strain variation in a highly vaccinated student population in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willocks, L J; Guerendiain, D; Austin, H I; Morrison, K E; Cameron, R L; Templeton, K E; DE Lima, V R F; Ewing, R; Donovan, W; Pollock, K G J

    2017-11-01

    An outbreak of mumps within a student population in Scotland was investigated to assess the effect of previous vaccination on infection and clinical presentation, and any genotypic variation. Of the 341 cases, 79% were aged 18-24. Vaccination status was available for 278 cases of whom 84% had received at least one dose of mumps containing vaccine and 62% had received two. The complication rate was 5·3% (mainly orchitis), and 1·2% were admitted to hospital. Genetic sequencing of mumps virus isolated from cases across Scotland classified 97% of the samples as genotype G. Two distinct clusters of genotype G were identified, one circulating before the outbreak and the other thereafter, suggesting the virus that caused this outbreak was genetically different from the previously circulating virus. Whilst the poor vaccine effectiveness we found may be due to waning immunity over time, a contributing factor may be that the current mumps vaccine is less effective against some genotypes. Although the general benefits of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine should continue to be promoted, there may be value in reassessing the UK vaccination schedule and the current mumps component of the MMR vaccine.

  3. A spatial analysis of the spread of mumps: the importance of college students and their spring-break-associated travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgreen, P M; Bohnett, L C; Yang, M; Pentella, M A; Cavanaugh, J E

    2010-03-01

    To characterize the association between county-level risk factors and the incidence of mumps in the 2006 Iowa outbreak, we used generalized linear mixed models with the number of mumps cases per county as the dependent variable. To assess the impact of spring-break travel, we tested for differences in the proportions of mumps cases in three different age groups. In the final multivariable model, the proportion of Iowa's college students per county was positively associated (Pstudents in a county were spread among more campuses, this was associated with fewer mumps cases. Finally, we found the proportion of mumps cases in both older and younger persons increased after 1 April (P=0.0029), suggesting that spring-break college travel was associated with the spread of mumps to other age groups.

  4. NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Mumps to Rabies, animal - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  5. A case of mumps orchitis and pancreatitis in 25 years old man hospitalized in Clinic of infectious diseases - Varna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliznakova Dimitrichka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mumps is an acute infectious disease caused by mumps virus. The main pathologic feature is serofibrinous inflammation of the salivary glands, resulting in their swelling. In pre-puberty children the course of illness is usually benign, and approximately one third of the cases remain subclinical. Extrasalivary gland involvement, such as orchitis, meningitis, pancreatitis is possible. The inflammation of pancreas takes an auspicious course and lasting sequels, such as diabetes mellitus or pancreatic cancer, do not occur. Orchitis occurs in 15-40% of postpubertal males with mumps, and without treatment 30-50% of them develop testicular atrophy, which is associated with male infertility. The testicular atrophy after recovery from mumps orchitis is linked as a predisposing factor for testicular cancer. Objective: To present a case report of patient with multi-organ localization of mumps virus and to analyze the severity of the specific organ form of the disease. Case report: We present a case report of mumps, in combination with mumps orchitis and mumps pancreatitis in 25 years old man, hospitalized in the Clinic of infectious diseases - Varna. Diagnosis was established on the basis of clinical features of disease, epidemiological, biochemical and serological data, realized through the relevant laboratories in the St. Marina Hospital - Varna. Results: In the presented case, the disease started as a moderate form of mumps affecting both parotid glands, and 3 days after the onset of the symptoms, pancreatitis and orchitis occurred. Conclusion: multi-organ involvement in the clinical course of mumps, taking its with is usual manifestation of the disease. In spite of the multiple organ involvement in this case, the patient recovered without lasting sequels.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated mumps vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Li, Changgui; Chen, Yuguo; Liu, Longding; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Che, Yanchun; Deng, Wei; Li, Hong; Cui, Xiaoyu; Ma, Na; Ding, Dong; Xie, Zhongping; Cui, Pingfang; Ji, Qiuyan; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Qihan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mumps, a communicable, acute and previously well-controlled disease, has had recent and occasional resurgences in some areas. Methods: A randomized, double-blind, controlled and multistep phase I study of an F-genotype attenuated mumps vaccine produced in human diploid cells was conducted. A total of 300 subjects were enrolled and divided into 4 age groups: 16–60 years, 5–16 years, 2–5 years and 8–24 months. The groups were immunized with one injection per subject. Three different doses of the F-genotype attenuated mumps vaccine, A (3.5 ± 0.25 logCCID50), B (4.25 ± 0.25 logCCID50) and C (5.0 ± 0.25 logCCID50), as well as a placebo control and a positive control of a licensed A-genotype vaccine (S79 strain) were used. The safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine were compared with those of the controls. Results: The safety evaluation suggested that mild adverse reactions were observed in all groups. No serious adverse event (SAE) was reported throughout the trial. The immunogenicity test showed a similar seroconversion rate of the neutralizing and ELISA antibody in the 2- to 5-year-old and 8- to 24-month-old groups compared with the seroconversion rate in the positive control. The GMT of the neutralizing anti-F-genotype virus antibodies in the vaccine groups was slightly higher than that in the positive control group. Conclusions: The F-genotype attenuated mumps vaccine evaluated in this clinical trial was demonstrated to be safe and have effective immunogenicity vs. control. PMID:24614759

  7. STUDY ON SEROPREVALENCE OF MUMPS - SPECIFIC IgG ANTIBODIES IN A HEALTHY POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Karcheva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mumps is a vaccine preventable viral infection. Its typical clinical manifestations are characterized by pain and swelling of the salivary glands, fever, and fatigue. Often other organs are affected - testes in males after puberty (orchitis, ovaries in women (ooforitis, pancreas (pancreatitis, central nervous system (meningities. The use of specific immune prophylaxis led to a significant success in the fight against mumps, but there are still unresolved issues related to the immunological and epidemiological effectiveness of the vaccines. The disease continues to interest researchers today. The main issues being tackled are related to the conduct of virological, clinical and sero-epidemiological studies in different countries. Objectives of the study is to determine the frequency distribution of mumps-specific IgG antibodies in healthy populations in the region of Pleven, Bulgaria. Methods: a cross-sectional sero - epidemiological representative population - based survey in the area was made. Enzyme immunoassay method was used for an indirect proof of mumps - specific IgG serum antibodies. 410 people were examined at an average age of 25 (1 to 84. Of these, 250 (61 % were women and 160 (39 % - men. Results: Of all test results, the negative were 72 (19 %, the borderline were 12 (3 %, the positive were 182 (44 %, and highly positive were 144 (35 %. The vaccination status showed that 242 (69 % of all surveyed were immunized with a vaccine against mumps. According to the immunization schedule in Bulgaria, 132 (33 % people were immunized with monovaccine during the years - 1 intake, 80 (20 % with trivaccine - 1 intake, and 64 (16 % - 2 doses. Conclusion: We believe that despite the specific immunprophylaxis carried out against mumps decades on end, the necessary level of protection leading to its elimination has not yet been reached.

  8. Correlation of genetic variability with safety of mumps vaccine Urabe AM9 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amexis, G; Fineschi, N; Chumakov, K

    2001-08-15

    The Urabe AM9 strain of mumps vaccine live is known for its genetic instability and some vaccines derived from this strain were withdrawn from the market due to an excessive number of vaccine-associated parotitis and meningitis cases. To identify the molecular basis of this instability, we determined complete nucleotide sequences of several stocks of the Urabe strain used for vaccine production by different manufacturers and of two clinical isolates from cases of vaccine-associated meningitis. In contrast to previously published studies relating the Lys335 --> Glu mutation in the viral HN gene with neurovirulence of mumps virus, we could not confirm any association of this mutation with the safety of mumps vaccine. Each of the three vaccine stocks studied had its own characteristic profile of mutations that was identified by cDNA sequencing and quantitated by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage. Determination of the mutational profile of mumps vaccine lots could allow vaccine manufacturers to characterize seed viruses and monitor the consistency of vaccine production to prevent emergence of virulent revertants.

  9. Assessment of mumps-containing vaccine effectiveness during an outbreak: Importance to introduce the 2-dose schedule for China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Liu, Yan; Tang, Jihai; Jia, Haimei; Qin, Wei; Su, Ying; Wang, Huaqing; Hao, Lixin

    2018-01-29

    China has used 3 different mumps-containing vaccines (MuCV) since 1990: monovalent mumps vaccine, measles-mumps (MM) vaccine, and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, and one dose MuCV (using MMR at 18 months) has been included in the EPI since 2007. MuCV effectiveness has been of concern following large-scale mumps outbreaks. In 2015, an outbreak of mumps occurred in a primary school, which allow us assess vaccine effectiveness of different MuCVs. All children in the school were studied as a retrospective cohort. Vaccination histories and case information were obtained from vaccination records and clinic/hospital logs. Parental questionnaires were used to confirm students' illnesses and calculate attack rate (AR). VE was assessed using the formula, VE = (AR in unvaccinated students- AR in the vaccinated students) / (AR in unvaccinated students). VEs of different type of MuCV were compared. In total, 283 students were identified as clinical mumps among the 2370 students, and 1908 students were included for MuCV VE assessment. 213 (including 21 [8.9%] patients) were 2-dose MuCV recipients (AR: 9.9%), 1165 (including 123 [51.9%] patients) were 1-dose recipients (AR: 10.6%), and 530 (including 93 [39.2%] patients) were unvaccinated (AR: 17.5%). VE was 44% for 2 doses and 40% for one dose. For one-MuCV-dose students, estimated mumps VE was 63% for vaccinated within 3 years (between vaccination and this outbreak); 50% for vaccinated within 3 to 5 years; and 34% for vaccinated more than 5 years. Comparing VE by vaccine type and 5-year interval since vaccination, VE for MMR was 60%, which was consistently higher than VE for monovalent mumps vaccine (22%) and MM (2%). This outbreak was associated with low and declining 1-dose MuCV effectiveness. China's immunization program should evaluate the potential of a 2-dose MMR schedule to adequately control mumps.

  10. Investigation of mumps vaccine failures in Minsk, Belarus, 2001-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrasheuskaya, Alena V; Blatun, Elena M; Kulak, Michail V; Atrasheuskaya, Alina; Karpov, Igor A; Rubin, Steven; Ignatyev, George M

    2007-06-11

    The purpose of this study was to investigate mumps vaccine failures (VF) in a highly vaccinated population of Minsk, Belarus, and to investigate a possible role for virus strain-specific immunity. During our 3-year study period, 22 adults were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Minsk with a diagnosis of mumps. A genotype H1 mumps virus (MuV) strain was identified in all patients. Of 15 patients from whom the paired sera were collected, 9 were confirmed to have been previously vaccinated. Serological examinations indicated primary VF in seven of these cases and secondary VF in two. Despite almost all vaccinated patients possessing MuV specific IgG, few possessed neutralizing antibody to the vaccine strain and titers were nominal. Importantly, none of the sera were able to neutralize a genotype H MuV strain. Our results demonstrate the importance of assaying for neutralizing antibody and support the assertion that antigenic differences between wild type and vaccine MuV strains may play a role in cases of breakthrough infection in vaccinees.

  11. Mumps outbreak in a tribal population from the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilavat, Siddharth M; Vaidya, Sunil R; Hamde, Venkat S

    2017-12-01

    A cluster of parotitis cases (n = 13) were observed in a tribal population of Vansda village from the Union Territory of Dadra and Nagar Haveli, India between 20th and 22nd week of 2016. Primary information was received by the local Infectious Disease Surveillance Program team, and subsequently field investigations were carried out in the affected area. Active surveillance was conducted till twice the incubation period from onset of the last surveyed case. For the laboratory investigations, 19 serum samples were collected from 11-suspected cases and their close contacts (n = 8). All samples were transported within 12 h on icepacks to the main laboratory at Pune. Majority of the suspected mumps cases were children except four adults. Mumps infection was confirmed in 8 of 11 suspected cases with post-onset ranging from 28 to 43 days and none from the close contacts. Both mumps specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in nine cases (including one equivocal) and single contact (equivocal result). Overall, ten cases and eight contacts (including one equivocal) showed mumps specific IgG antibodies. Present investigation provides information about the characteristics of mumps outbreak in a tribal community that resides in the remote areas. In addition, introduction of mumps containing vaccine in the tribal population may have added advantages in the tribal health program. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mumps epidemiology in the mid-west of Ireland 2004-2008: increasing disease burden in the university/college setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whyte, D

    2009-01-01

    Mumps is a contagious vaccine-preventable viral disease that is experiencing a revival in students attending second and third level colleges. Large mumps outbreaks have been reported in several countries despite the presence of childhood immunisation programmes over many years, including measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. In 2008, 1,377 cases of mumps were notified in Ireland and 1,734 in the first three months of 2009 (provisional data). This paper reviews the recent epidemiology of mumps in the Mid-West region of Ireland and highlights preventive measures. A substantial proportion of cases were not laboratory-confirmed and it is important that doctors continue to notify suspected cases. In the Irish Mid-West, data from enhanced surveillance shows a high proportion of mumps in the age group 15-24 years. Complications were uncommon and rarely severe. Where data were available, over half of the cases did not recall having received two doses of MMR, but most recalled one dose. Parents should continue to ensure children receive both MMR vaccinations so that uptake is optimal for protection. Steps were taken to increase awareness of the disease in the school, college and university settings. Preventive measures implemented to limit mumps transmission in the school\\/college setting over recent years included vaccination of close contacts, isolation for five days and hand hygiene.

  13. [Drug clinics. Drug of the month. A new measles-rubella-mumps vaccine (Priorix)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senterre, J

    1999-02-01

    A novel measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (Priorix) has been marketed by SmithKline Beecham. It contains live attenuated virus with measles and mumps strains slightly different from those present in MMR VAX (Pasteur Merieux MSD). The indications and contraindications are similar for both vaccines. Immunogenicity is also equivalent as well as general reactogenicity. By contrast local symptoms were reported significantly less frequently after Priorix.

  14. Can mumps vaccine induce remission in recurrent respiratory papilloma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, Nigel R T

    2002-07-01

    To describe our experience using laser excision and locally injected mumps vaccine to induce remission in patients with recurrent respiratory papilloma (RRP). Tertiary care regional medical center. Initially, 11 children with RRP treated in a pilot study with laser excision at regular intervals for at least a year without adjuvant therapy; later, a series of 18 children and 20 adults with RRP, some of whom had used various adjuvant therapy with interval laser excision. Both patient groups continued their same interval laser excision with the same or similar laser, same clinical setting, and same surgeon. Locally injected mumps vaccine was then administered into the excision site after each laser removal of papilloma. Larynx and trachea were microphotographed with each treatment. Two consecutive disease-free intervals and a follow-up of at least 1 year were required criteria for remission. In the pilot study, remission was induced in 9 (82%) of 11 patients by 1 to 10 injections, with follow-up of 5 to 19 years. In the subsequent series, remission was induced in 29 (76%) of 38 patients by 4 to 26 injections, and follow-up was 2 to 5 years. Combined with serial laser excision, mumps vaccine positively influences induction of remission in children with RRP. The mechanisms of this effect are unclear, but the treatment is readily available, inexpensive, and has a low risk of adverse effects.

  15. Mumps increase in Flanders, Belgium, 2012-2013: results from temporary mandatory notification and a cohort study among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braeye, Toon; Linina, Indra; De Roy, Rikka; Hutse, Veronik; Wauters, Magali; Cox, Pia; Mak, Ruud

    2014-07-31

    In 2012, an increase in mumps notifications occurred in Belgium, affecting young vaccinated adults. At the end of 2012, a mumps outbreak occurred at the Catholic University of Leuven KU Leuven in Flanders. We investigated the outbreak to estimate incidence, mumps vaccine effectiveness and to detect potential risk factors for the disease. In June 2012, we set up mandatory notification in Flanders and we collected information on circulating genotypes from the National Reference Centre. We conducted a cohort study among KU Leuven students. We defined a case as self-reported parotitis, between September 2012 and March 2013. We distributed web-based questionnaires to a random sample of students. We calculated vaccine effectiveness by comparing the risks in students vaccinated twice with those vaccinated once. We estimated risk ratios (RR) to identify risk factors. From 16th June 2012 to 1st April 2013, 4061 mumps cases were notified to the regional public health office (30% were vaccinated once and 69% were vaccinated twice). All 16 samples collected at the KU Leuven were genotype G5. Of 717 participants of the cohort study, 38 (5%; 95%CI 4-8%) met the case-definition. All reported being vaccinated with at least one dose of mumps-containing vaccine. The incidence of mumps was 5% among those vaccinated twice and 16% among those vaccinated once (vaccine effectiveness of two doses compared to one: 68%, 95%CI -24% to 92%). The risk of mumps was lower among those vaccinated with two doses of mumps-containing vaccine ≤10 years before (RR: 0.33, 95%CI 0.10-1.02) and higher among students working in a bar (RR: 3.6, 95%CI 1.8-7.0). Incomplete protection by two doses of mumps-containing vaccine, possible waning immunity and intense social contacts may have contributed to the occurrence of this outbreak in Flanders. Efforts to maintain high vaccination coverage with two doses remain essential. However, the reasons for low vaccine effectiveness must be further explored and

  16. Trend of measles, mumps, and rubella incidence following the measles-rubella catch up vaccination in the Republic of Korea, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Young June; Eom, Hye-Eun; Cho, Sung-Il

    2017-09-01

    Following the introduction of measles-rubella (MR) catch-up vaccination in 2001 and two dose measles-mumps-rubella (MMR2) keep-up program in 2002, the incidence of measles, mumps, and rubella was not evaluated systematically. To describe the recent changes in epidemiology, a population-based incidence study from 2001 to 2015 using national notifiable disease surveillance data was conducted. Between 2001 and 2015, there was decrease in the incidence of measles and rubella, whereas a steady increase in mump incidence was noted. The age distribution of mumps cases has shifted to the older age group, whereas rubella became more frequent in younger age group. The incidence of mumps showed an increase in every birth cohorts, except for the decrease in incidence for catch-up vaccination cohort from 131 cases in 2007-2011 to 64 cases per 100 000 in 2012-2015. Continuing in monitoring of mumps and strengthening of the high two-dose MMR vaccination coverage should be taken place in Korea. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Easy and Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus by Live Fluorescent Visualization of Virus-Infected Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Mumps viruses show diverse cytopathic effects (CPEs of infected cells and viral plaque formation (no CPE or no plaque formation in some cases depending on the viral strain, highlighting the difficulty in mumps laboratory studies. In our previous study, a new sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac, was developed for visualization of sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac can easily and rapidly perform histochemical fluorescent visualization of influenza viruses and virus-infected cells without an antiviral antibody and cell fixation. In the present study, the potential utility of BTP3-Neu5Ac for rapid detection of mumps virus was demonstrated. BTP3-Neu5Ac could visualize dot-blotted mumps virus, virus-infected cells, and plaques (plaques should be called focuses due to staining of infected cells in this study, even if a CPE was not observed. Furthermore, virus cultivation was possible by direct pick-up from a fluorescent focus. In conventional methods, visible appearance of the CPE and focuses often requires more than 6 days after infection, but the new method with BTP3-Neu5Ac clearly visualized infected cells after 2 days and focuses after 4 days. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is a precise, easy, and rapid assay for confirmation and titration of mumps virus.

  18. The potential dysfunction of otolith organs in patients after mumps infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Juan; Yu, Jing; Wu, Yong-Zhen; Tian, Liang; Han, Zhao; Wang, Jing; Chi, Fang-Lu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between mumps and the extent of hearing impairment and otolith organ damage. A total of 27 patients with unilateral hearing impairment following mumps were enrolled. The degrees of hearing loss and otolith organ damage were confirmed by audiometric and vestibular evoked myogenic potential [VEMP] tests. All the results were compared and analyzed using Stata 13.0 software for Windows. The VEMP thresholds of the affected ears were significantly higher than those of the unaffected ears in both tests (cervical VEMP [cVEMP] test and ocular VEMP [oVEMP] test; p = 0.000 and 0.001, respectively). The mean cVEMP and oVEMP threshold values of the affected ears with hearing impairment for ≤10 years were significantly lower than those of affected ears with hearing impairment for >10 years [p = 0.009 and 0.004, respectively]. Deafness resulting from mumps is usually profound and permanent, which indicates severe damage to the cochlea due to the disease. The functions of otolith organs in the vestibular system are also impaired. Over time, the function of the otolith organs or their neural pathway may suffer secondary damage.

  19. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: mumps virus [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term mumps virus 名詞 一般 * * * * ムンプスウイル...ス ムンプスウイルス ムンプスーイルス Thesaurus2015 200906033436284499 C LS07 UNKNOWN_2 mumps virus

  20. [Comparative analysis on the complete genome sequence of mumps epidemic strain and mumps vaccine strain S79 isolated in Zhejiang province, China between year 2005 and 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Yan; Feng, Yan; Zhong, Shu-Ling; Lu, Yi-Yu; Zhuang, Fang-Cheng; Xu, Chang-Ping

    2012-03-01

    To compare the differences in the complete genome sequence between mumps epidemic strain and mumps vaccine strain S79 isolated in Zhejiang province. A total of 4 mumps epidemic strains, which were separated from Zhejiang province during 2005 to 2010, named as ZJ05-1, ZJ06-3, ZJ08-1 and ZJ10-1 were selected in the study. The complete genome sequences were amplified using RT-PCR. The genetic differences between vaccine strain S79 and other genotype strains were compared; while the genetic-distance was calculated and the evolution was analyzed. The biggest difference between the 4 epidemic strains and the vaccine strain S79 was found on the membrane associated protein gene; whose average nucleotide differential number was 42.5 +/- 3.0 and the average variant ratio was 13.6%; while the mean amino acid differential number was 12.8 +/- 1.5 and the average variant ratio was 22.4%. The smallest difference among the 4 epidemic strains and the vaccine strain was found in stromatin genes, whose average nucleotide differential number was 73.8 +/- 2.5 and the average variant ratio was 5.9%; while the mean amino acid differential number was 3.0 +/- 0.8 and the average variant ratio was 0.8%. The dn/ds value of the stromatin genes of the 4 epidemic strains reached the highest, as 0.6526; but without any positive pressure (dn/ds 0.05). There were mutations happened on the known antigen epitope, as 8th amino acid of membrane associated protein genes and on the 336th and 356th amino acid of hemagglutinin/neuraminidase proteins. Compared with the vaccine strain, the glycosylation sites of ZJ05-1, ZJ06-3, ZJ08-1 and ZJ10-1 increased 1, 1, 2 and 2 respectively. The complete amino acid sequence of all strains showed that there were 17 characteristic sites found on the genotype-F mumps strain. Within the complete genome, the genetic-distance between epidemic strains and vaccine strains in Zhejiang province (0.071) was significantly larger than the genetic-distance between strains in

  1. Measles and Mumps Tests: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to: Find out whether you have an active infection of measles or mumps. An active infection means you have symptoms of the illness. ... will be collected into a test tube or vial. You may feel a little sting when the ...

  2. [Mumps outbreak in the Plzeň Region in 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazdiora, P; Skálová, J; Kubátová, A; Ježová, I; Morávková, I; Podlesná, I; Průchová, J; Spáčilová, M; Švecová, M

    2015-10-01

    The mumps outbreak in the Plzeň Region in 2011 was analysed retrospectively using the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory data. Vaccine efficacy analysis was also conducted in various population groups. The routine procedure and standard form were used by the epidemiologists to collect data on the age, sex, place of residence, presence in collectivities, date of disease onset, type of complications and date of their onset, hospital admission, vaccination, and results of laboratory analyses. Based on the records of general practitioners for children and adolescents, data on the vaccination of children born in the previous three years have been provided to the epidemic control departments every year by 30 June since 1989. To estimate the vaccination coverage rate, the numbers of single-dose or two-dose recipients are related to the number of children registered in a given year. The first year of vaccine recipients were children born in 1986 who were aged 25 in 2011. The data collected on the population of the Plzeň Region were used for the primary analyses. To estimate the efficacy of the mumps vaccine, age and vaccine coverage cohort analysis was performed using the screening method. To analyse categories, the chi-square test with Yates correction was applied at a significance level of p = 0.05 % (EPIINFO version 6.04d). In 2011, 721 mumps cases were reported in the Plzeň Region (incidence: 126.1 cases per 100 000 population). The average patient age was 19.4 years, with a median of 18 years (age range 1-77 years). Four hundred and seventeen (57.8%) patients were males. Biological specimens from 375 (52.0%) patients were investigated serologically in the virology laboratory and mumps were laboratory confirmed in 316 (43.8%) of them - in 222 patients, one blood specimen was analysed. The most afflicted area was the Klatovy district with the incidence of 449.3/100 000 population. The most affected age group were 15-19 year-olds with the incidence of 1008

  3. A Mumps Outbreak in Vojvodina, Serbia, in 2012 Underlines the Need for Additional Vaccination Opportunities for Young Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Nedeljković

    Full Text Available In 2012, mumps was introduced from Bosnia and Herzegovina to Vojvodina, causing an outbreak with 335 reported cases. The present manuscript analyses the epidemiological and laboratory characteristics of this outbreak, identifies its main causes and suggests potential future preventive measures. Sera of 133 patients were tested for mumps-specific antibodies by ELISA and 15 nose/throat swabs were investigated for mumps virus RNA by RT-PCR. IgG antibodies were found in 127 patients (95.5%. Mumps infection was laboratory-confirmed in 53 patients, including 44 IgM and 9 PCR positive cases. All other 282 cases were classified as epidemiologically-confirmed. More than half of the patients (n = 181, 54% were 20-29 years old, followed by the 15-19 age bracket (n = 95, 28.4%. Twice as many males as females were affected (67% versus 33%. Disease complications were reported in 13 cases (3.9%, including 9 patients with orchitis and 4 with pancreatitis. According to medical records or anamnestic data, 190 patients (56.7% were immunized with two doses and 35 (10.4% with one dose of mumps-containing vaccine. The Serbian sequences corresponded to a minor genotype G variant detected during the 2011/2012 mumps outbreak in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Vaccine failures, the initial one-dose immunization policy and a vaccine shortage between 1999 and 2002 contributed to the outbreak. Additional vaccination opportunities should be offered to young adults during transition periods in their life trajectories.

  4. Meta-analysis of vaccine effectiveness of mumps-containing vaccine under different immunization strategies in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaqing; Hu, Yongmei; Zhang, Guomin; Zheng, Jingshan; Li, Li; An, Zhijie

    2014-08-20

    To evaluate vaccine effectiveness (VE) of mumps-containing vaccine (MuV) under different immunization strategies. We conducted Medline, Embase, China National Knowledge Internet (CNKI), and Wan Fang Database (WF) searches for Chinese and English language articles describing studies of mumps VE in a Chinese population. Evaluated articles were scored on quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Meta-analysis was conducted using random effects models. Sensitivity analysis, subgroup analysis and meta-regression were conducted to explore heterogeneity. A total of 32 studies in 19 papers were included; 14 were case-control studies, and 18 were cohort studies. Half of the studies were of high quality; 41% were of moderate quality. The overall VE for mumps containing vaccine (either one dose or two doses) was 85% (95% CI 76-90%) for cohort studies and 88% (95% CI 82-92%) for case-control studies. Using random effects meta-regression we found significant differences in some study covariates; for instance, VE varied by population (VE=88% in day care versus 69% in pupil, p=0.008) and emergency versus routine immunization (VE=80% for routine immunization versus 95% for emergency immunization, p=0.041). However, these results must be interpreted with caution due to the low number of studies in subgroups, with the permutation test giving non-significant results that indicated that the results may be due to chance. MuV provides good protection from mumps infection. Further studies of mumps VE with larger sample sizes enabling subgroup analyses will be needed to confirm our findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mumps vaccine virus genome is present in throat swabs obtained from uncomplicated healthy recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T; Nakayama, T

    2001-01-08

    Seven children were followed for up to 42 days post-vaccination with live mumps vaccine and 37 throat swabs were obtained serially. Viral genomic RNA was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in the phosphoprotein (P) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) regions. Virus isolation was also attempted. Genomic differentiation of detected mumps virus genome was performed by sequence analysis and/or restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). No adverse reaction was observed in these children. Although mumps virus was not isolated from any of the samples, viral RNA was detected in four samples from three vaccine recipients, 18, 18 and 26, and 7 days after vaccination, respectively. Detected viral RNA was identified as the vaccine strain. Our data suggests that vaccine virus inoculated replicates in the parotid glands but the incidence of virus transmission from recipients to other susceptible subjects should be low.

  6. Mumps Hoshino and Torii vaccine strains were distinguished from circulating wild strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Akihito; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    Aseptic meningitis and acute parotitis have been observed after mumps vaccination. Mumps outbreaks have been reported in Japan because of low vaccine coverage, and molecular differentiation is required to determine whether these cases are vaccine associated. RT-nested PCR was performed in the small hydrophobic gene region, and viruses were differentiated by restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. A total of 584 nucleotides were amplified. The PCR product of the Hoshino strain was cut into two fragments (313 and 271 nucleotides) by MfeI; that of the Torii strain was digested with EcoT22I, resulting in 332- and 252-nucleotide fragments. Both strains were genotype B and had an XbaI site, resulting in two fragments: 299 and 285 nucleotides. Current circulating wild types were cut only by XbaI or MfeI. However, the MfeI site of the wild types was different from that of the Hoshino strain, resulting in 451- and 133-nucleotide fragments. Using three restriction enzymes, two mumps vaccine strains were distinguished from wild types, and this separation was applied to the identification of vaccine-related adverse events.

  7. Mumps and the Vaccine (Shot) to Prevent It

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as measles and rubella. Prevents your child from getting a fever and swollen glands under the ears or jaw from mumps. Keeps your child from missing school or child care (and keeps you from missing work to care for your sick child). Is the MMR shot safe? Yes. The MMR shot is very safe, and it ...

  8. Search for the lepton-flavor violating decays $B^0_s \\rightarrow e^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\mp}$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Baesso, C.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Busetto, G.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carranza-Mejia, H.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chen, P.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G.A.; Craik, D.C.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P.N.Y.; Davis, A.; De Bonis, I.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dogaru, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garofoli, J.; Garosi, P.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S.T.; Harrison, J.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicheur, A.; Hicks, E.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Kenyon, I.R.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kochebina, O.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R.F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luisier, J.; Luo, H.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Maratas, J.; Marconi, U.; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurice, E.; Mazurov, A.; Mc Skelly, B.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M.J.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen, A.D.; Nguyen, T.D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B.K.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Patrick, G.N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, A.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Roberts, D.A.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Salzmann, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Sirendi, M.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V.K.; Sun, L.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tresch, M.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urner, D.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Van Dijk, M.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Voss, H.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Watson, N.K.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Wotton, S.A.; Wright, S.; Wu, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-01-01

    A search for the lepton-flavour violating decays $B^0_s \\rightarrow e^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\mp}$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$ is performed with a data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$, TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. The observed number of $B^0_s \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$ and $B^0 \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}$ candidates is consistent with background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions of both decays are determined to be $BR(B^0_s \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp} 107$ TeV/c$^2$ and $M_{\\rm LQ} (B^0 \\to e^{\\pm} \\mu^{\\mp}) > 126$ TeV/c$^2$ at 95% C.L., and are a factor of two higher than the previous bounds.

  9. Vaccine-preventable diseases in pediatric patients: a review of measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deborah A; Pade, Kathryn H

    2016-12-22

    Vaccine-preventable diseases such as measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella continue to plague children and adults worldwide. Although public health programs have helped decrease the prevalence and sequelae of these diseases, outbreaks still occur. To limit the spread of these diseases, emergency clinicians must be able to readily identify the characteristic presentations of the rashes associated with measles, rubella, and varicella, as well as the common presenting features associated with mumps. Diagnostic laboratory studies are not usually necessary, as a complete history and physical examination usually lead to an accurate diagnosis. Treatment for these vaccine-preventable diseases usually consists of supportive care, but, in some cases, severe complications and death may occur. This issue provides a review of the clinical features, differential diagnoses, potential complications, and treatment options for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  10. Mumps Outbreak among Highly Vaccinated Teenagers and Children in the Central Region of Portugal, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Eugénio; Ferreira, Muriel; Rodrigues, Fernanda; Palminha, Paula; Vinagre, Elsa; Pimentel, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Mumps vaccine was introduced in the National Immunization Program in Portugal in 1987, rapidly reaching a national coverage > 92%, with important reduction in the annual incidence of the disease. We report a mumps outbreak in the Central Region of Portugal, occurred in the winter 2012-13. Cases of salivary-gland swelling and other symptoms compatible with mumps were investigated. Geodemographics, clinical, laboratory and vaccination data were analyzed. Over six months, 148 outbreak-related cases were reported: 87.8% occurred in three of the 16 affected counties and 78.4% had a known epidemiological link. Median age was 14.5 years (2-62) and 70.3% were 11-20 years old; 61.5% were male. The mean duration of disease was seven days (2-20). The disease was generally mild; 80.4% had fever and in 55.4% there was unilateral involvement of the parotid gland. Seven cases had orchitis, one oophoritis and one had nephritis. Two cases were hospitalized. School transmission predominated and class attack rates were < 30%. Most of the cases occurred in vaccinated individuals (92%) of whom 86.8% had received 2 doses; 17.7% had received one dose of the vaccine containing the Rubini strain. Mumps virus genotype G was identified in 4 cases. This mumps outbreak among a highly vaccinated population, occurring mostly in teenagers at school, could be due to the partial effectiveness of the vaccine against the disease (particularly in the group vaccinated with Rubini strain), waning immunity overtime and genotype mismatch. This outbreak report shows the importance of discussion about the need of more booster dose of the actual vaccine or new vaccine including more genotypes to improve immunogenicity.

  11. Comparison of the effectiveness of two mumps vaccines during an outbreak in Switzerland in 1999 and 2000: A case-cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, Jean-Luc; Zwahlen, Marcel; Feuz, Mirjam; Matter, Hans C.

    2003-01-01

    In two recent nation-wide outbreaks of mumps in Switzerland two-thirds of young children with clinical mumps had a history of primary vaccination. On average, measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination coverage is 80%. Two types of vaccine are commonly used: Jeryl-Lynn and Rubini. The effectiveness of the latter has been questioned in several publications. The authors therefore compared Rubini to Jeryl-Lynn in a case-cohort study. The study included 111 young children with clinical mumps who had been reported to the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) by primary care physicians of the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network (SSSN) between January 1999 and May 2000. Sentinel physicians also sampled 661 children from the same birth cohort as the cases. While we found no evidence for the effectiveness of the Rubini strain, vaccination with the Jeryl-Lynn strain was 70% effective against clinical mumps. Furthermore, children vaccinated with the Rubini strain attended primary health care more frequently with clinical mumps than those who had received Jeryl-Lynn (odds ratio: 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3, 4.7). Restricting the analysis to laboratory confirmed cases increased the odds ratio to 18.4 (95% CI: 2.5, 811.2). Our study confirms the low effectiveness of the Rubini strain vaccine in the field. This vaccine should therefore be considered inappropriate for the control and elimination of mumps and its use should be discontinued. As other vaccines with comparable quality and safety standards and a substantially higher effectiveness are available the MMR vaccination program in Switzerland will not be compromised if the use of Rubini is no longer recommended

  12. [Contribution of the detection of IgA antibodies to the laboratory diagnosis of mumps in the population with a high vaccination coverage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberková, R; Smíšková, D; Havlíčková, M; Herrmannová, K; Lexová, P; Malý, M

    2015-03-01

    Serological diagnosis of epidemic mumps can be difficult in vaccinated persons, particularly due to the absence of specific IgM antibodies. The aim was to find whether adding the detection of IgA antibodies to the currently used routine serological diagnosis of mumps (detection of IgM and IgG antibodies in an acute serum sample) would make the serological diagnosis of mumps more effective in a population with a high vaccination coverage. At the same time, ELISA kits for the detection of early IgA and IgM antibodies against the mumps virus were compared and statistical analysis of the results was performed. Sixty-four acute sera from patients with laboratory confirmed diagnosis of mumps were included in the study. Clinical specimens were collected at the onset of clinical symptoms. To test the sera, the MASTAZYME ELISA Mumps IgA kit (MAST DIAGNOSTICA, Germany) with the MASTSORB sorbent (RF and IgG) and Enzygnost Anti-Parotitis-Virus/IgM kit (Siemens, Germany) were used. A panel of 121 acute sera with no epidemiological link to mumps virus served as specificity controls for the IgA assay. The epidemiological data were derived from the EPIDAT system. The level of agreement was assessed using the McNemara test and Cohen's coefficient kappa. The Stata 9.2 software (Stata Corp LP, College Station, USA) was used for statistical analysis. The detection of IgA and IgM antibodies against the mumps virus yielded concordant results in 50/64 acute sera, 32 positive and 18 negative, i.e. an agreement of 78.12 %. Of the remaining 14 samples, 13 were only IgA positive and one was only IgM positive. The controls showed non-specific IgA positivity in 5/121 samples which indicates a 96% specificity. The absence of specific IgM antibodies against mumps virus is relatively often seen in vaccinated indivi-duals; nevertheless, the test is routinely used in patients with suspected active infection. The test for IgA antibodies, which is not routinely performed, significantly increased the

  13. Achieving nanoscale horizontal separations in the standard 2 μm PolyMUMPS process

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2013-01-25

    This paper shares with the research community how to achieve, effectively and easily, lateral submicron separations in the standard 2 lm PolyMUMPS process without any fabrication intervention or post-processing, based on the oxide sidewall spacer technique. Thousands of nanoseparations were created and successfully tested by visual inspection and by a simple capacitance measurement. The lateral separations attained were less than 440 nm and reached as low as 280 nm. To corroborate the findings, measurements were performed on different capacitors fabricated in different fabrication runs with consistent results. This is the first time that submicron lateral distances are reported in PolyMUMPS using the oxide spacer technique.

  14. Safety and immunogenicity of a live attenuated mumps vaccine: a phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yan; Ma, Jingchen; Li, Changgui; Chen, Yuguo; Liu, Longding; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Li; Wang, Xuan-Yi; Che, Yanchun; Deng, Wei; Li, Hong; Cui, Xiaoyu; Ma, Na; Ding, Dong; Xie, Zhongping; Cui, Pingfang; Ji, Qiuyan; Wang, JingJing; Zhao, Yuliang; Wang, Junzhi; Li, Qihan

    2014-01-01

    Mumps, a communicable, acute and previously well-controlled disease, has had recent and occasional resurgences in some areas. A randomized, double-blind, controlled and multistep phase I study of an F-genotype attenuated mumps vaccine produced in human diploid cells was conducted. A total of 300 subjects were enrolled and divided into 4 age groups: 16-60 years, 5-16 years, 2-5 years and 8-24 months. The groups were immunized with one injection per subject. Three different doses of the F-genotype attenuated mumps vaccine, A (3.5 ± 0.25 logCCID50), B (4.25 ± 0.25 logCCID50) and C (5.0 ± 0.25 logCCID50), as well as a placebo control and a positive control of a licensed A-genotype vaccine (S79 strain) were used. The safety and immunogenicity of this vaccine were compared with those of the controls. The safety evaluation suggested that mild adverse reactions were observed in all groups. No serious adverse event (SAE) was reported throughout the trial. The immunogenicity test showed a similar seroconversion rate of the neutralizing and ELISA antibody in the 2- to 5-year-old and 8- to 24-month-old groups compared with the seroconversion rate in the positive control. The GMT of the neutralizing anti-F-genotype virus antibodies in the vaccine groups was slightly higher than that in the positive control group. The F-genotype attenuated mumps vaccine evaluated in this clinical trial was demonstrated to be safe and have effective immunogenicity vs. control.

  15. Neurovirulence safety testing of mumps vaccines--historical perspective and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S A; Afzal, M A

    2011-04-05

    Many live, attenuated viral vaccines are derived from wild type viruses with known neurovirulent properties. To assure the absence of residual neurotoxicity, pre-clinical neurovirulence safety testing of candidate vaccines is performed. For mumps virus, a highly neurotropic virus, neurovirulence safety testing is performed in monkeys. However, laboratory studies suggest an inability of this test to correctly discern among virus strains of varying neurovirulence potential in man, and, further, some vaccines found to be neuroattenuated in monkeys were later found to be neurovirulent in humans when administered in large numbers. Over the past decade, concerted efforts have been made to replace monkey-based neurovirulence safety testing with more informative, alternative methods. This review summarizes the current status of mumps vaccine neurovirulence safety testing and insights into models currently approved and those under development. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Development and biological properties of a new live attenuated mumps vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saika, Shizuko; Kidokoro, Minoru; Kubonoya, Hiroko; Ito, Kozo; Ohkawa, Tokitada; Aoki, Athuko; Nagata, Noriyo; Suzuki, Kazuyoshi

    2006-01-01

    To develop a new live attenuated mumps vaccine, a wild mumps Y7 strain isolated from a patient who developed mild parotitis was treated with nitrosoguanidine and ultraviolet, followed by selection of a temperature-sensitive clone. The selected clone, Y125, showed stable temperature-sensitivity in Vero cells. Intraspinal inoculation of marmosets with the Y125 produced only minimal histopathological changes, while intracerebral inoculation of neonatal rats revealed that the Y125 did not cause hydrocephalus. Both these effects of the Y125 were similar to those of the non-neurovirulent Jeryl Lynn strain. Furthermore, subcutaneous inoculation of the Y125 induced high levels of neutralizing antibodies in all Cercopithecus monkeys examined. Although the safety and immunogenicity should be confirmed in further field trials in humans, the present results indicate that the Y125 could be a promising vaccine candidate.

  17. Horizontal transmission of the Leningrad-Zagreb mumps vaccine strain: a report of six symptomatic cases of parotitis and one case of meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrasheuskaya, Alina; Kulak, Mikhail; Fisenko, Elena G; Karpov, Igor; Ignatyev, George; Atrasheuskaya, Alena

    2012-08-03

    Here we report horizontal symptomatic transmission of the Leningrad-Zagreb (L-Zagreb) mumps vaccine virus. Children who were the source of transmission had been vaccinated with the MMR vaccine (Serum Institute of India) contained L-Zagreb mumps virus. This is the first report of horizontal symptomatic transmission of this vaccine. The etiology of all seven contact cases was confirmed by epidemiological linking, serology and by F, SH, NP and HN mumps virus genes sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Shift within age-groups of mumps incidence, hospitalizations and severe complications in a highly vaccinated population. Spain, 1998-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Perea, Noemí; Masa-Calles, Josefa; Torres de Mier, María de Viarce; Fernández-García, Aurora; Echevarría, Juan E; De Ory, Fernando; Martínez de Aragón, María Victoria

    2017-08-03

    The mumps vaccine (Jeryl-Lynn-strain) was introduced in Spain in 1981, and a vaccination policy which included a second dose was added in 1995. From 1992-1999, a Rubini-strain based vaccine was administered in many regions but later withdrawn due to lack of effectiveness. Despite high levels of vaccination coverage, epidemics have continued to appear. We characterized the three epidemic waves of mumps between 1998 and 2014, identifying major changes in susceptible populations using Poisson regression. For the period 1998-2003 (P1), the most affected group was from 1 to 4years old (y) [Incidence Rate (IR)=71.7 cases/100,000 population]; in the periods 2004-2009 (P2) and 2010-2014 (P3) IR ratio (IRR) increased among 15-24y (P2=1.46; P3=2.68) and 25-34y (P2=2.17; P3=4.05). Hospitalization rate (HR), complication rate (CR) and neurological complication rate (NR) among hospitalized subjects decreased across the epidemics, except for 25-34y which increased: HR ratio (HRR) (P2=2.18; P3=2.16), CRR (P3=2.48), NRR (P3=2.41). In Spain mumps incidence increased, while an overall decrease of hospitalizations and severe complications occurred across the epidemics. Cohorts born during periods of low vaccination coverage and those vaccinated with Rubini-strain were the most affected populations, leading to a shift in mumps cases from children to adolescents and young adults; this also reveals the waning immunity provided by the mumps vaccine. Despite not preventing all mumps cases, the vaccine appears to prevent serious forms of the disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody responses to Hepatitis B and measles-mumps-rubella vaccines in children who received chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Santana Viana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate viral vaccine antibody levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia after chemotherapy and after vaccine booster doses. METHODS: Antibody levels against hepatitis B, rubella, measles and mumps vaccine antigens were evaluated in 33 children after completing chemotherapy (before and after vaccine booster doses and the results were compared to the data of 33 healthy children matched for gender, age and social class. RESULTS: After chemotherapy, 75.9%, 67.9%, 59.3% and 51.7% of the patients showed low antibody titers that would be unlikely to protect against exposure to measles, rubella, hepatitis B and mumps, respectively. After receiving a vaccine booster dose for these antigens the patients had high antibody levels consistent with potential protection against measles, mumps and hepatitis B, but not against rubella. CONCLUSION: Extra doses of measles-mumps-rubella plus hepatitis B vaccines are recommended in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients submitted to treatment after hematologic recovery. After this, viral vaccine antibody levels should be verified to define the individual's protective status.

  20. Safety of measles, mumps and rubella vaccination in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijstek, Marloes W; Pileggi, Gecilmara C S; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; Armbrust, Wineke; Hoppenreijs, Esther P A H; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; Kuis, Wietse; Wulffraat, Nico M

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination on disease activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: A retrospective observational multicentre cohort study was performed in 314 patients with JIA, born between 1989 and 1996. Disease

  1. Immune response to the mumps component of the MMR vaccine in the routine of immunisation services in the Brazilian National Immunisation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Matos dos Santos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A non-controlled longitudinal study was conducted to evaluate the combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella (MMR immunogenicity in 150 children vaccinated in the routine of three health units in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2008-2009, without other vaccines administered during the period from 30 days before to 30 days after vaccination. A previous study conducted in Brazil in 2007, in 1,769 children ranging from 12-15 months of age vaccinated against yellow fever and MMR simultaneously or at intervals of 30 days or more between doses, had shown low seroconversion for mumps regardless of the interval between administration of the two vaccines. The current study showed 89.5% (95% confidence interval: 83.3; 94.0 seroconversion rate for mumps. All children seroconverted for measles and rubella. After revaccination, high antibody titres and seroconversion rates were achieved against mumps. The results of this study and others suggest that two MMR doses confer optimal immunoresponses for all three antigens and the possible need for additional doses should be studied taking into account not only serological, but also epidemiological data, as there is no serological correlate of protection for mumps.

  2. Mumps virus encephalomyelitis in a 19-year old male patient with an undefined severe combined immunodeficiency post-haematopoietic bone marrow transplantation: a rare fatal complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre, Toby A; Pelosi, Emanuela; McQuaid, Stephen; Richardson, Deborah; Newman, Joan; Hill, Kate; Veys, Paul; Davies, Graham; Orchard, Kim H

    2013-06-01

    We describe a rare case of fatal mumps encephalomyelitis occurring in 19-year old male following matched unrelated donor peripheral blood haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The indication for HSCT was for an undefined form of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Molecular typing of the mumps viral RNA isolated from neural tissue indicated that the infection was acquired at the time of a mumps outbreak in England and Wales that occurred between 2004 and 2006. This case highlights the importance of considering mumps in the differential diagnosis of central nervous system infection in highly immunosuppressed patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Outbreak-related mumps vaccine effectiveness among a cohort of children and of young adults in Germany 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takla, Anja; Böhmer, Merle M; Klinc, Christina; Kurz, Norbert; Schaffer, Alice; Stich, Heribert; Stöcker, Petra; Wichmann, Ole; Koch, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Mumps outbreaks in populations with high 2-dose vaccination coverage and among young adults are increasingly reported. However, data on the duration of vaccine-induced protection conferred by mumps vaccines are scarce. As part of a supra-regional outbreak in Germany 2010/11, we conducted two retrospective cohort studies in a primary school and among adult ice hockey teams to determine mumps vaccine effectiveness (VE). Via questionnaires we collected information on demography, clinical manifestations, and reviewed vaccination cards. We estimated VE as 1-RR, RR being the rate ratio of disease among two-times or one-time mumps-vaccinated compared with unvaccinated persons. The response rate was 92.6% (100/108--children cohort) and 91.7% (44/48--adult cohort). Fourteen cases were identified in the children and 6 in the adult cohort. In the children cohort (mean age: 9 y), 2-dose VE was 91.9% (95% CI 81.0-96.5%). In the adult cohort (mean age: 26 y), no cases occurred among the 13 2-times vaccinated, while 1-dose VE was 50.0% (95% CI -9.4-87.1%). Average time since last vaccination showed no significant difference for cases and non-cases, but cases were younger at age of last mumps vaccination (children cohort: 2 vs. 3 y, P=0.04; adult cohort: 1 vs. 4 y, P=0.03). We did not observe signs of waning immunity in the children cohort. Due to the small sample size VE in the adult cohort should be interpreted with caution. Given the estimated VE, very high 2-dose vaccination coverage is required to prevent future outbreaks. Intervention efforts to increase coverage must especially target young adults who received<2 vaccinations during childhood.

  4. Evaluation of anti-measles and anti-mumps vaccination coverage in a cohort of youth in South-Centre of Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lo Magno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined a cohort of young people from South Centre Sicily, Italy, in order to evaluate anti-measles anti-mumps vaccination coverage. It is shown that, in proportion, an antibody protection against mumps is greater than an antibody protection against measles and also it causes acute episodes in some subjects vaccinated.

  5. Advancing MEMS Technology Usage through the MUMPS (Multi-User MEMS Processes) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, D. A.; Markus, K. W.; Dhuler, V.; Mahadevan, R.; Cowen, A.

    1995-01-01

    In order to help provide access to advanced micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and lower the barriers for both industry and academia, the Microelectronic Center of North Carolina (MCNC) and ARPA have developed a program which provides users with access to both MEMS processes and advanced electronic integration techniques. The four distinct aspects of this program, the multi-user MEMS processes (MUMP's), the consolidated micro-mechanical element library, smart MEMS, and the MEMS technology network are described in this paper. MUMP's is an ARPA-supported program created to provide inexpensive access to MEMS technology in a multi-user environment. It is both a proof-of-concept and educational tool that aids in the development of MEMS in the domestic community. MUMP's technologies currently include a 3-layer poly-silicon surface micromachining process and LIGA (lithography, electroforming, and injection molding) processes that provide reasonable design flexibility within set guidelines. The consolidated micromechanical element library (CaMEL) is a library of active and passive MEMS structures that can be downloaded by the MEMS community via the internet. Smart MEMS is the development of advanced electronics integration techniques for MEMS through the application of flip chip technology. The MEMS technology network (TechNet) is a menu of standard substrates and MEMS fabrication processes that can be purchased and combined to create unique process flows. TechNet provides the MEMS community greater flexibility and enhanced technology accessibility.

  6. Mutual interference on the immune response to yellow fever vaccine and a combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento Silva, Juliana Romualdo; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B; Siqueira, Marilda M; Freire, Marcos de Silva; Castro, Yvone P; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S; Yamamura, Anna Maya Y; Martins, Reinaldo M; Leal, Maria de Luz F

    2011-08-26

    A randomized trial was conducted to assess the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of yellow fever vaccines (YFV) given either simultaneously in separate injections, or 30 days or more after a combined measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Volunteers were also randomized to YFV produced from 17DD and WHO-17D-213 substrains. The study group comprised 1769 healthy 12-month-old children brought to health care centers in Brasilia for routine vaccination. The reactogenicity was of the type and frequency expected for the vaccines and no severe adverse event was associated to either vaccine. Seroconversion and seropositivity 30 days or more after vaccination against yellow fever was similar across groups defined by YFV substrain. Subjects injected YFV and MMR simultaneously had lower seroconversion rates--90% for rubella, 70% for yellow fever and 61% for mumps--compared with those vaccinated 30 days apart--97% for rubella, 87% for yellow fever and 71% for mumps. Seroconversion rates for measles were higher than 98% in both comparison groups. Geometric mean titers for rubella and for yellow fever were approximately three times higher among those who got the vaccines 30 days apart. For measles and mumps antibodies GMTs were similar across groups. MMR's interference in immune response of YFV and YFV's interference in immune response of rubella and mumps components of MMR had never been reported before but are consistent with previous observations from other live vaccines. These results may affect the recommendations regarding primary vaccination with yellow fever vaccine and MMR. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mumps orchitis in the post-vaccine era (1967-2009): a single-center series of 67 patients and review of clinical outcome and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Boronat, Mauro; Ojeda, Antonio; García-Delgado, Yaiza; Angel-Moreno, Alfonso; Carranza-Rodríguez, Cristina; Bellini, Raquel; Francès, Adela; Nóvoa, Francisco Javier; Pérez-Arellano, José-Luis

    2010-03-01

    Since the introduction of the mumps vaccine, the age of appearance of mumps infection has shifted from children to adolescents and young adults, groups with a higher incidence of disease complications and sequelae. During the years 2000-2001, the Gran Canaria Island was part of an epidemic of mumps. In that period, our institution attended 67 cases of serologically confirmed acute mumps orchitis, the most serious complication of mumps infection in young postpubertal males. We conducted a descriptive and prospective study of this cohort and extensively reviewed the literature from 1967 (the year the first mumps vaccine was introduced) to 2009. Fifty-six patients were admitted because of general impairment and were treated with alpha-interferon. Sixty-six patients presented parotitis previous to orchitis (interval from parotitis to orchitis, 4.9 d). Orchitis was unilateral in 89.5% and bilateral in 10.4% of cases. More than 98% of patients had orchitis-associated fever. Nine patients had clinical and biochemical data showing acute mumps meningitis, and 11 had subclinical pancreatitis. The mean duration of symptoms was 4.6 days (range, 1-9). During the acute phase, more than 41% of the evaluated testes had a volume >25 mL. Acute hormonal disturbances were highly prevalent. These included decreased levels of testosterone and inhibin B with low or normal levels of gonadotropins in 35% of subjects, and, to our knowledge not previously reported, an atypical hormonal pattern consisting of low levels of free testosterone and inhibin B, along with increased measures of luteinizing hormone but low or normal follicle-stimulating hormone levels (11% of cases). During the follow-up period (mean, 331 d) a high incidence of sperm disturbance was found.

  8. Molecular epidemiology of mumps virus in Japan and proposal of two new genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inou, Yoko; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Naoko; Uejima, Hajime; Yuri, Kenji; Kamada, Makoto; Kumagai, Takuji; Sakiyama, Hiroshi; Miyata, Akiko; Ochiai, Hitoshi; Ihara, Toshiaki; Okafuji, Teruo; Okafuji, Takao; Nagai, Takao; Suzuki, Eitaro; Shimomura, Kunihisa; Ito, Yuhei; Miyazaki, Chiaki

    2004-05-01

    We isolated 872 strains of mumps virus from naso-pharyngeal secretions in seven different districts of Japan from January 2000 to July 2001. Among them, 57 strains were geno-typed by nucleotide sequencing in part of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and small hydrophobic (SH) protein regions. Four different genotypes (B, G, K, and L) of mumps virus were co-circulating in Japan and the distribution of genotypes varied in geographically different districts. Two new clusters designated as genotypes K and L had more than 7% nucleotide variation in the SH gene. Among the 57 strains, 11 were classified as B, 35 as G, three as K, and eight as L, which was mainly isolated in Tokyo. We also examined 104 stains isolated in a clinic in Mie prefecture from 1993 to 2003. Genotype B was the indigenous strain and genotype K was introduced in 1994. Genotypes B and K co-circulated in the 1990s and were replaced by genotype G in 2000. There was no significant change in neutralizing test antibody titers against genotypes B, G, K, and L using seven post-vaccination sera with Hoshino strain (genotype B) and these four genotypes had a different antigenicity from genotype A. We should continue to watch on mumps virus molecular epidemiology. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Design and characterization of a fully differential MEMS accelerometer fabricated using MetalMUMPs technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Peng; Qu, Hongwei

    2013-05-02

    This paper presents a fully differential single-axis accelerometer fabricated using the MetalMUMPs process. The unique structural configuration and common-centriod wiring of the metal electrodes enables a fully differential sensing scheme with robust metal sensing structures. CoventorWare is used in structural and electrical design and simulation of the fully differential accelerometer. The MUMPs foundry fabrication process of the sensor allows for high yield, good process consistency and provides 20 μm structural thickness of the sensing element, which makes the capacitive sensing eligible. In device characterization, surface profile of the fabricated device is measured using a Veeco surface profilometer; and mean and gradient residual stress in the nickel structure are calculated as approximately 94.7 MPa and -5.27 MPa/μm, respectively. Dynamic characterization of the sensor is performed using a vibration shaker with a high-end commercial calibrating accelerometer as reference. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured as 0.52 mV/g prior to off-chip amplification. Temperature dependence of the sensing capacitance is also characterized. A -0.021fF/°C is observed. The findings in the presented work will provide useful information for design of sensors and actuators such as accelerometers, gyroscopes and electrothermal actuators that are to be fabricated using MetalMUMPs technology.

  10. Factors influencing preclinical in vivo evaluation of mumps vaccine strain immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halassy, B; Kurtović, T; Brgles, M; Lang Balija, M; Forčić, D

    2015-01-01

    Immunogenicity testing in animals is a necessary preclinical assay for demonstration of vaccine efficacy the results of which are often the basis for the decision whether to proceed or withdraw the further development of the novel vaccine candidate. However, in vivo assays are rarely, if at all, optimized and validated. Here we clearly demonstrate the importance of in vivo assay (mumps virus immunogenicity testing in guinea pigs) optimization for gaining reliable results and the suitability of Fractional factorial design of experiments (DoE) for such a purpose. By the use of DoE with resolution IV (2IV((4-1))) we clearly revealed that the parameters significantly increasing assay sensitivity were interval between animal immunizations followed by the body weight of experimental animals. The quantity (0 versus 2%) of the stabilizer (fetal bovine serum, FBS) in the sample was shown as non-influencing parameter in DoE setup. However, the separate experiment investigating only the FBS influence, and performed under other parameters optimally set, showed that FBS also influences the results of immunogenicity assay. Such finding indicated that (a) factors with strong influence on the measured outcome can hide the effects of parameters with modest/low influence and (b) the matrix of mumps virus samples to be compared for immunogenicity must be identical for reliable virus immunogenicity comparison. Finally the 3 mumps vaccine strains widely used for decades in the licensed vaccines were for the first time compared in an animal model, and results obtained were in line with their reported immunogenicity in human population supporting the predictive power of the optimized in vivo assay.

  11. Do HIV-positive adult immigrants need to be screened for measles-mumps-rubella and varicella zoster virus immunization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llenas-García, Jara; Rubio, Rafael; Hernando, Asunción; Arrazola, Pilar; Pulido, Federico

    2013-08-01

    A systematic screening for measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) in HIV-positive adult immigrants in Spain was evaluated, and factors associated with MMR and VZV vaccines' indication were studied. Every HIV-positive immigrant was tested for VZV and MMR-IgG. MMR vaccine was indicated to patients with lymphocytes CD4+ >200 cells/mm³ and a negative measles-IgG, a negative mumps-IgG and/or a negative rubella-IgG. VZV vaccine was indicated to every VZV-IgG negative patient with CD4+ >400 cells/mm³. In total, 289 patients were screened; seroprevalence was 95.2%, 92.2%, 70.3% and 89.3% for VZV, measles, mumps and rubella IgG, respectively. Having a negative VZV-IgG was statistically associated with coming from sub-Saharan Africa (prevalence ratio [PR]: 6.52; 95% CI: 1.71-24.84; p=0.006), while having secondary education was a protective factor (PR: 0.25; 95% CI: 0.07-0.97; p=0.045). Fourteen patients (4.8%) had indication of VZV vaccine; vaccination was feasible in 21.4% of them at first visit. Eighty-one patients (29.7%) had indication of MMR vaccine, most of them due to mumps-IgG negative (53.1%) or rubella-IgG negative (24.7%). Age Especial attention should be given to immigrant women of childbearing age.

  12. Mumps in a district primary school at the locality of Santa Fe, Bogota (Colombia 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oneida Castañeda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epidemic parotitis (“mumps” is a human viral infection which affects mainly the salivary glands; its peak incidence afflicts children 5 to 9-year. At epidemiologic week (EW 40/2010, the Centro Oriente II Level Hospital received a community report about a mumps outbreak in a District Primary School (DPS, eastwards of the locality of Santa Fe (Bogotá. The hospital’s epidemiology office sent a response team to investigate the situation and to guide prevention & control actions. Methods. The team made an outbreak descriptive study; field investigation included description time-place-person; case-definition as patient with active clinical condition of parotitis; Active Institutional Search (AIS and house visitations; study variables matched those of the official individual notification report. Data were registered and analyzed using Epi -Info 3.5.1® with frequency, central trend and association measurements. Results. 14 mumps cases were identified: 1 adult and 13(93% children; 5(35,7% were girls; median age was 11,9 year (range 7-40. Four cases (28,6% were confirmed by clinical signs, 10(71,4% by epidemiologic link; no one was hospitalized. 12 patients (86% had unknown vaccination status; 11 cases (78% produced neither the vaccination card nor any additional information. Index case occurred at EW30/2010 and the epidemic peak occurred at EW34/2010; attack rate was 8.1%. Conclusions. Epidemiology office confirmed mumps outbreak, delayed notification and impossibility to verify vaccination records. The response team recommended the DPS to strengthen biosafety measures; and advised local health institution to increase epidemiologic surveillance & control activities, adherence to national mumps protocol, school vaccination and to promote information, communication, education strategies on importance of vaccination and cards right use.

  13. Deep sequencing reveals persistence of cell-associated mumps vaccine virus in chronic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfopoulou, Sofia; Mee, Edward T; Connaughton, Sarah M; Brown, Julianne R; Gilmour, Kimberly; Chong, W K 'Kling'; Duprex, W Paul; Ferguson, Deborah; Hubank, Mike; Hutchinson, Ciaran; Kaliakatsos, Marios; McQuaid, Stephen; Paine, Simon; Plagnol, Vincent; Ruis, Christopher; Virasami, Alex; Zhan, Hong; Jacques, Thomas S; Schepelmann, Silke; Qasim, Waseem; Breuer, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Routine childhood vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella has virtually abolished virus-related morbidity and mortality. Notwithstanding this, we describe here devastating neurological complications associated with the detection of live-attenuated mumps virus Jeryl Lynn (MuV JL5 ) in the brain of a child who had undergone successful allogeneic transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). This is the first confirmed report of MuV JL5 associated with chronic encephalitis and highlights the need to exclude immunodeficient individuals from immunisation with live-attenuated vaccines. The diagnosis was only possible by deep sequencing of the brain biopsy. Sequence comparison of the vaccine batch to the MuV JL5 isolated from brain identified biased hypermutation, particularly in the matrix gene, similar to those found in measles from cases of SSPE. The findings provide unique insights into the pathogenesis of paramyxovirus brain infections.

  14. Design and Characterization of a Fully Differential MEMS Accelerometer Fabricated Using MetalMUMPs Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Qu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a fully differential single-axis accelerometer fabricated using the MetalMUMPs process. The unique structural configuration and common-centriod wiring of the metal electrodes enables a fully differential sensing scheme with robust metal sensing structures. CoventorWare is used in structural and electrical design and simulation of the fully differential accelerometer. The MUMPs foundry fabrication process of the sensor allows for high yield, good process consistency and provides 20 μm structural thickness of the sensing element, which makes the capacitive sensing eligible. In device characterization, surface profile of the fabricated device is measured using a Veeco surface profilometer; and mean and gradient residual stress in the nickel structure are calculated as approximately 94.7 MPa and −5.27 MPa/μm, respectively. Dynamic characterization of the sensor is performed using a vibration shaker with a high-end commercial calibrating accelerometer as reference. The sensitivity of the sensor is measured as 0.52 mV/g prior to off-chip amplification. Temperature dependence of the sensing capacitance is also characterized. A −0.021fF/°C is observed. The findings in the presented work will provide useful information for design of sensors and actuators such as accelerometers, gyroscopes and electrothermal actuators that are to be fabricated using MetalMUMPs technology.

  15. Effect of age on the incidence of aseptic meningitis following immunization with monovalent mumps vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muta, Hiromi; Nagai, Takao; Ito, Yuhei; Ihara, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2015-11-09

    The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of aseptic meningitis after mumps vaccination in younger children compared with older children. This prospective cohort study included a total of 21,465 children under 18 years of age who had received the first dose of three of the Japanese mumps monovalent vaccine. We compared the cumulative incidence of aseptic meningitis for 30 days after vaccination among the following age groups: ≤ 1, 2, 3-4, and ≥ 5 years old. We also investigated the cumulative incidence of salivary gland swelling, a fever (≥ 38°C) lasting at least 3 days during the 10 to 25 days following immunization, vomiting of 3 times or more, headache, and seizure. A total of 10 aseptic meningitis, 551 salivary gland swelling, 844 fevers, 669 vomiting, 757 headaches, and 29 seizure cases were identified. The cumulative incidence of aseptic meningitis increased with age (0.016%, 0.021%, 0.066%, and 0.096%, respectively). Statistical significance was observed between children ≥ 3 years old and those mumps vaccine that is currently available for use in Japan may be administered in children less than 3 years of age in order to complicate a less aseptic meningitis after immunization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [An outbreak of mumps in a high school: Estimation of vaccine effectiveness. Zaragoza 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compés-Dea, Cecilia; Guimbao-Bescós, Joaquín; Gaspar-Escayola, José Ignacio; Lázaro-Belanche, María Ángeles; Aznar-Brieba, Amaya

    2015-01-01

    Mumps outbreaks continue to occur, even after the consolidation of vaccination programs. An outbreak of mumps occurred in a high school in Zaragoza during December 2011. To describe the outbreak and estimate vaccine effectiveness. unilateral or bilateral swelling of the parotid or other salivary glands for three or more days without any other apparent cause. People attending the 'Parque Goya' High School or with transmission chain origin in the High School. From two days before the onset of symptoms of the first case to five days after the last case. Samples were collected for virus confirmation (IgM, urine culture and oropharyngeal exudate), and isolates were processed for genotyping. A retrospective cohort study was performed in two high school classrooms to estimate vaccine efficacy. Public health authorities conducted active surveillance, isolation of cases, and vaccination of susceptible contacts. There were 27 cases. Twenty-one (77.8%) were vaccinated with two doses of Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine. Twelve (44%) were confirmed microbiologically. G1 genotype was determined in six cases. According to the cohort study, vaccine efficacy for one dose was 34% (95%CI: -44 to 70), and was 67% (95%CI: 28 to 83) for two doses. Vaccine effectiveness was lower than expected. Early detection and isolation of cases have been instrumental in preventing new cases in schools. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of different continuous cell lines in the isolation of mumps virus by the shell vial method from clinical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, J; Ballesteros, F; Mari, M; Munar, M

    2001-01-01

    Aims—To compare prospectively the efficacy of the Vero, LLC-MK2, MDCK, Hep-2, and MRC-5 cell lines in the isolation of the mumps virus from clinical samples by means of the shell vial method. Methods—During an epidemic outbreak of parotiditis 48 clinical samples (saliva swabs and CSF) were studied. Two vials of the Vero, LLC-MK2, MDCK, MRC-5, and Hep-2 cell lines were inoculated with 0.2 ml of the samples by the shell vial assay. The vials were incubated at 36°C for two and five days. The vials were then fixed with acetone at -20°C for 10 minutes and stained by a monoclonal antibody against mumps virus by means of an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Results—The mumps virus was isolated from 36 samples. The Vero and LLC-MK2 cell lines showed a 100% isolation capacity, MDCK showed 77.7%, MRC-5 showed 44.4%, and Hep-2 showed 22.2%. The Vero and LLC-MK2 lines were significantly different to the other cell lines (p 5 infectious foci) were 94.4% for Vero, 97.2% for LLC-MK2, 5.5% for MDCK, 5.5% for Hep-2, and 0% for MRC-5. Conclusions—The Vero and LLC-MK2 cell lines are equally efficient at two and five days incubation for the isolation of the mumps virus from clinical samples, and the use of the shell vial method considerably shortens the time of aetiological diagnosis with higher specificity. Key Words: mumps virus • Vero cell line • LLC-MK2 cell line • MDCK cell line • Hep-2 cell line • MRC-5 cell line • isolation • shell vial PMID:11729211

  18. No demonstrable association between the Leningrad-Zagreb mumps vaccine strain and aseptic meningitis in a large clinical trial in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H J; Oun, S Aly; Bakr, S S Abou; Kapre, S V; Jadhav, S S; Dhere, R M; Bhardwaj, S

    2010-04-01

    To address the claim that the Leningrad-Zagreb (L-Z) mumps vaccine strain is causally associated with aseptic meningitis, a prospective, post-marketing safety study was conducted with a measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) (TRESIVAC(R); Serum Institute of India Ltd., Pune, India), which uses the L-Z strain as its mumps component in Egypt. In all, 453 119 children (65 423 children aged 16-24 months and 329 211 children aged 5-7 years) received MMR. The control groups which, as a result of local health regulations, were slightly younger than vaccinees, comprised 12 253 and 46 232 children, respectively. Using questionnaires, the parents recorded solicited local, systemic and neurological adverse events for up to 42 days post-vaccination. All data were analysed externally on an intention-to-treat basis by individuals not participating in the study. Local and/or systemic reactions were reported in a small percentage of participants, with pain, fever and parotitis being the most common signs among vaccinees in both age groups. No case of aseptic meningitis, encephalitis, anaphylaxis or convulsions was observed in any participant. Thus, in this series of more than 450 000 Egyptian children, the L-Z mumps vaccine strain in this vaccine did not cause aseptic meningitis. The vaccine is considerably cheaper than Western competitors and a valid alternative to other MMR vaccines.

  19. [Virus strain specific serum neutralizing antibodies in children and adolescents immunized with a Russian mumps vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Krasil'nikov, I V; Ignat'ev, G M

    2010-01-01

    Postvaccination immunity was studied in the children and teenagers without a history of clinical mumps infection, who had been immunized with the Leningrad-3 mumps vaccine. The level of specific lgG in ELISA and that and spectrum of their neutralizing activity against a vaccine strain and three heterologous mumps virus (MV) strains (genotypes A, C, and H) were measured. The investigation included 151 sera from the vaccinees aged 3 to 17 years, possessing the detectable specific IgG titers in ELISA and the detectable neutralizing titers against the vaccine strain. 97.4% of the vaccinees had neutralizing activity against 1-3 heterologous MV strains. A preponderance of neutralizing titers against heterologous MV strains by 1-log2 in some sera (6.5-32.5 depending on age) was most likely to suggest that the vaccinees' had been in contact with these virus strains in the past. In our investigation, a combination of positive IgG titers and neutralizing titers against the vaccine strain 2-log2 or higher provided the protection of the vaccinated children and teenagers against the symptomatic infection. There was a pronounced buster effect of the second immunization and a drop in the neutralizing activity of the sera from the vaccinated children and adolescents over time after the first and second immunization.

  20. Immunogenicity of mumps virus vaccine candidates matching circulating genotypes in the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengel, James; Phan, Shannon I; Pickar, Adrian; Xu, Pei; He, Biao

    2017-07-13

    Mumps virus (MuV) causes acute infection in humans with characteristic swelling of the parotid gland. While vaccination has greatly reduced the incidence of MuV infection, there have been multiple large outbreaks of mumps virus (MuV) in highly vaccinated populations. The most common vaccine strain, Jeryl Lynn, belongs to genotype A, which is no longer a circulating genotype. We have developed two vaccine candidates that match the circulating genotypes in the United States (genotype G) and China (genotype F). We found that there was a significant decrease in the ability of the Jeryl Lynn vaccine to produce neutralizing antibody responses to non-matched viruses, when compared to either of our vaccine candidates. Our data suggests that an updated vaccine may allow for better immunity against the circulating MuV genotypes G and F. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. 75 FR 48715 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... consciousness, --Permanent brain damage. Note: The first dose of MMRV vaccine has been associated with rash and... Vaccine Information Materials for Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella Vaccines AGENCY: Centers for... comment period. SUMMARY: Under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act (NCVIA) (42 U.S.C. 300aa-26), the...

  2. Mumps: a year of enhanced surveillance in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Angela; Oviedo, Manuel; Torner, Nuria; Carmona, Gloria; Costa, Josep; Caylà, Joan; Sala, M Rosa; Barrabeig, Irene; Camps, Neus; Minguell, Sofia; Alvarez, Josep; Godoy, Pere; Jansà, Josep M

    2009-05-26

    Mumps is a vaccine-preventable disease candidate for elimination. Positive predictive value (PPV) of clinical case definition was assessed. During 2007, 410 suspected cases were reported in Catalonia: 348 fulfilled clinical case definition and 159 were laboratory confirmed. Incidence rate was 4.8 per 100,000 for cases that fulfilled the clinical definition, and 2.2 for laboratory confirmed cases. Global PPV was 44.5%; 38.5% in or =15 years (p=0.04). Most laboratory confirmed cases (72.3%) received at least one MMR dose. With sustained high MMR coverage, laboratory confirmation is necessary to control the disease and assess vaccine failure.

  3. Increasing mumps incidence rates among children and adolescents in the Republic of Korea: age–period–cohort analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-June Choe

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: The increase in mumps seen in Korea may have been affected by the birth cohort exposed to the Rubini strain; however other factors may have contributed to the increase in non-exposed cohorts.

  4. Evaluation of the thermal stability of a novel strain of live-attenuated mumps vaccine (RS-12 strain) lyophilized in different stabilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Razieh Kamali; Taqavian, Mohammad; Sadigh, Zohreh-Azita; Shahkarami, Mohammad-Kazem; Esna-Ashari, Fatemeh; Hamkar, Rasool; Hosseini, Seyedeh-Marzieh; Hatami, Alireza

    2014-04-01

    The stability of live-attenuated viral vaccines is important for immunization efficacy. Here, the thermostabilities of lyophilized live-attenuated mumps vaccine formulations in two different stabilizers, a trehalose dihydrate-based stabilizer and a stabilizer containing sucrose, human serum albumin and sorbitol were investigated using accelerated stability tests at 4°C, 25°C and 37°C at time points between 4h (every 4h for the first 24h) and 1 week. Even under the harshest storage conditions of 37°C for 1 week, the 50% cell culture infective dose (CCID50) determined from titrations in Vero cells dropped by less than 10-fold using each stabilizer formulation and thus complied with the World Health Organization's requirements for the potency of live-attenuated mumps vaccines. However, as the half-life of the RS-12 strain mumps virus infectivity was lengthened substantially at elevated temperatures using the trehalose dihydrate (TD)-based stabilizer, this stabilizer is recommended for vaccine use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. THE RESULTS OF STUDY OF THE LEVELS OF SPECIFIC ANTIBODIES TO THE COMBINED INJECTION VACCINES AGAINST INFLUENZA, MEASLES, RUBELLA AND MUMPS AND DT IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC PHYSICAL ILLNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Haritе

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of antibodies to the separate and combined administration of the vaccine plus Grippol® Plus and vaccines against measles, mumps and/or rubella, diphtheria and tetanus (DT in children with chronic medical illnesses, including HIV and organic CNS. Revealed that at low reactogenicity and safety of the vaccine Grippol® Plus, concomitant vaccination does not affect the dynamics of the synthesis (seroprotection, seroconversion, diphtheria, mumps, and rubella antibodies, however, reduces the synthesis of measles antibodies. When combined administration of DT and mumps-measles vaccines + Grippol® Plus suppressed antibody response to a strain of influenza virus A/H3N2. 

  6. Measles, Mumps, and Rubella - Vaccine Use and Strategies for Elimination of Measles, Rubella, and Congenital Rubella Syndrome and Control of Mumps: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Vol. 47/No. RR-8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-05-22

    onset an average of 16-18 days after exposure. Parotitis may be preceded by fever, headache, malaise, myalgia, and anorexia . Only 30%-40% of mumps...six- " teen -year follow-up in the Hawaiian Islands. JAMA 1988;259:3133-6 98 Hillary IB, Griffith AH. Persistence of antibody 10 years after

  7. The effectiveness of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination in the prevention of pediatric hospitalizations for targeted and untargeted infections: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Saulle, Rosella; Unim, Brigid; Meggiolaro, Angela; Barbato, Angelo; Mannocci, Alice; Spadea, Antonietta

    2017-08-03

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine in reducing hospitalizations for infectious disease, targeted and not targeted, as well as from respiratory diseases in children in Rome. The cohort was recomposed through record linkage of 2 archives (vaccination register and hospital discharge records. The analysis included 11,004 children. 20.9% did not receive the MMR vaccination, 49% and 30.1% received one and 2 doses. There were no hospitalizations for rubella, 2 for mumps, and 12 for measles. The vaccine was highly protective against measles and mumps hospitalizations (HR = 0.10; 95% CI: 0.03.0.34). Regarding all infectious diseases there were 414 hospitalizations, and the vaccine was protective (HR = 0.29; 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.34). Concerning respiratory diseases, there were 809 admissions (7.4%), and the vaccine was highly protective (HR: 0.18; 95% CI: 0.07 to 0.48). MMR vaccination is effective for the primary prevention of target and not targeted infectious diseases and may also limit hospitalizations for respiratory diseases.

  8. Acetaminophen (Paracetamol) Use, Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination, and Autistic Disorder: The Results of a Parent Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Stephen T.; Klonoff-Cohen, Hillary S.; Wingard, Deborah L.; Akshoomoff, Natacha A.; Macera, Caroline A.; Ji, Ming

    2008-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether acetaminophen (paracetamol) use after the measles-mumps-rubella vaccination could be associated with autistic disorder. This case-control study used the results of an online parental survey conducted from 16 July 2005 to 30 January 2006, consisting of 83 children with autistic disorder and 80…

  9. [Specific humoral immunity after single immunization with mumps vaccine: data of a 3-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, A V; Bukin, E K; Krasil'nikov, I V; Ignat'ev, G M

    2011-01-01

    The level and spectrum of humoral specific immunity were studied in 60 volunteers immunized with Russian mumps vaccine. Specific IgG levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and neutralization test using the Leningrad-3 (L-3) mumps virus (MV) vaccine strain and 5 heterologous MV strains of various genotypes (A, B, C, D, and H). The maximum functional activity of antibodies was recorded at an average of 18 months postvaccination. Within 3 years after vaccination, starting at 6 months, specific IgG neutralized all 6 MV strains having varying activity in relation to the genotype. Neutralizing titers (NT) against the L-3 strain were 1.3-1.7-fold higher than those against heterologous MV strains throughout the follow-up. Despite a tendency towards lower specific IgG levels, within 3 years postvaccination, EIA IgG titers remained to be 2.5 -log, L-3 strain HT were -log, or more, and the titers against 5 heterologous MV strains were 2 -log2 or more in all the volunteers.

  10. Measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella seroprevalence in refugees in Germany in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Alexandra; Happle, Christine; Grote, Ulrike; Schleenvoigt, Benjamin Thomas; Hampel, Annika; Dopfer, Christian; Hansen, Gesine; Schmidt, Reinhold Ernst; Behrens, Georg M N

    2016-12-01

    The current extent of migration poses emerging socio-economic and humanitarian challenges. Little is known on vaccination rates in migrants entering Europe, and the implementation of guidelines for serological testing and vaccination of refugees are pending. We conducted seroprevalence analyses for measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (MMRV) in 678 refugees coming to Germany during the current crisis. The mean age of refugees was 28.8±11.4 years, and 76.1 % of subjects were male. Overall, IgG seronegativity was 7.4 % (95 % CI 5.5-9.6) for measles, 10.2 % (95 % CI 8.0-12.5) for mumps, 2.2 % (95 % CI 1.2-3.4) for rubella, and 3.3 % (95 % CI 1.9-4.9) for varicella. Seropositivity rates were age-dependent with considerably low values in children. For example, overall MMR immunity was 90.9 % (95 % CI 88.8-93.1), but only 73.1 % of minor aged refugees displayed complete seroprevalence against all three diseases, and only 68.9 % of children and adolescents were completely MMRV immune. Our initial data set suggests overall satisfactory MMRV immunity in adult migrants coming to Europe, but the observed low MMRV seroprevalences in refugee children support thorough and prompt vaccination of young migrants entering Europe. Taken together, our data set underlines the urgent need to implement and validate vaccination guidelines for refugee care in the current crisis.

  11. Structural characterization of Mumps virus fusion protein core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yueyong; Xu Yanhui; Lou Zhiyong; Zhu Jieqing; Hu Xuebo; Gao, George F.; Qiu Bingsheng; Rao Zihe; Tien, Po

    2006-01-01

    The fusion proteins of enveloped viruses mediating the fusion between the viral and cellular membranes comprise two discontinuous heptad repeat (HR) domains located at the ectodomain of the enveloped glycoproteins. The crystal structure of the fusion protein core of Mumps virus (MuV) was determined at 2.2 A resolution. The complex is a six-helix bundle in which three HR1 peptides form a central highly hydrophobic coiled-coil and three HR2 peptides pack against the hydrophobic grooves on the surface of central coiled-coil in an oblique antiparallel manner. Fusion core of MuV, like those of simian virus 5 and human respiratory syncytium virus, forms typical 3-4-4-4-3 spacing. The similar charecterization in HR1 regions, as well as the existence of O-X-O motif in extended regions of HR2 helix, suggests a basic rule for the formation of the fusion core of viral fusion proteins

  12. Genetic heterogeneity of L-Zagreb mumps virus vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosutic-Gulija, Tanja; Forcic, Dubravko; Santak, Maja; Ramljak, Ana; Mateljak-Lukacevic, Sanja; Mazuran, Renata

    2008-07-10

    The most often used mumps vaccine strains Jeryl Lynn (JL), RIT4385, Urabe-AM9, L-Zagreb and L-3 differ in immunogenicity and reactogenicity. Previous analyses showed that JL, Urabe-AM9 and L-3 are genetically heterogeneous. We identified the heterogeneity of L-Zagreb throughout the entire genome. Two major variants were defined: variant A being identical to the consensus sequence of viral seeds and vaccine(s) and variant B which differs from variant A in three nucleotide positions. The difference between viral variants in L-Zagreb strain is insufficient for distinct viral strains to be defined. We demonstrated that proportion of variants in L-Zagreb viral population depends on cell substrate used for viral replication in vitro and in vivo. L-Zagreb strain should be considered as a single strain composed of at least two variant viral genomes.

  13. Seroprevalence of measles, mumps and rubella among young adults, after 20 years of universal 2-dose MMR vaccination in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Hagai; Zarka, Salman; Ankol, Omer E; Rozhavski, Vladi; Davidovitch, Nadav; Aboudy, Yair; Balicer, Ran D

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based vaccination policy is important for the global and local efforts of achieving control over measles. In 2007, the first Israeli birth cohort to be twice vaccinated during childhood with Measles-Mumps-Rubella vaccine reached adulthood. In parallel, Israel experienced its largest measles outbreak since 1994. We aimed to assess the seroprevalence of measles IgG antibodies and concordance with rubella and mumps seroprevalence among young Israeli adults born 1988-9 in comparison to previous birth cohorts, in order to inform evidence based prevention policy. We conducted a seroprevalence study of IgG antibodies among 439 Israeli adults born in 1988-9, based on a representative sample of sera collected at age 18-19 upon recruitment to mandatory military service in 2007. In total, 85.7% were seropositive for measles as compared with 95.6% in the 1996 recruitment (P Israel and in other countries.

  14. In vitro and in vivo growth alter the population dynamic and properties of a Jeryl Lynn mumps vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Sarah M; Wheeler, Jun X; Vitková, Eva; Minor, Philip; Schepelmann, Silke

    2015-08-26

    Mumps vaccines are live attenuated viruses. They are known to vary in effectiveness, degree of attenuation and adverse event profile. However, the underlying reasons are poorly understood. We studied two closely related mumps vaccines which originate from the same attenuated Jeryl Lynn-5 strain but have different efficacies. Jeryl Lynn-Canine Kidney (JL-CK), produced on primary canine kidney cells, is less effective than RIT4385, which is produced on chicken embryo fibroblasts. JL-CK and RIT4385 could be distinguished by a number of in vitro and in vivo properties. JL-CK produced heterogeneous, generally smaller plaques than RIT4385, but gave 100-fold higher titres when grown in cells and showed a higher degree of hydrocephalus formation in neonatal rat brains. Sanger sequencing of JL-CK identified 14 regions of heterogeneity throughout the genome. Plaque purification of JL-CK demonstrated the presence of five different Jeryl Lynn-5 variants encompassing the 14 mutations. One JL-CK mutation was associated with a small plaque phenotype, the effects of the others in vitro or in vivo were less clear. Only 4% of the JL-CK population corresponded to the parental Jeryl Lynn-5 strain. Next generation sequencing of JL-CK and virus before and after growth in cell lines or neonatal rat brains showed that propagation in vitro or in vivo altered the population dramatically. Our findings indicate that growth of JL-CK in primary canine kidney cells resulted in the selection of a mixture of mumps virus variants that have different biological properties compared to the parent Jeryl Lynn-5 virus. We also report three previously unknown heterogenic regions within the N gene of the RIT4385 vaccine. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Genetic heterogeneity of L-Zagreb mumps virus vaccine strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateljak-Lukacevic Sanja

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most often used mumps vaccine strains Jeryl Lynn (JL, RIT4385, Urabe-AM9, L-Zagreb and L-3 differ in immunogenicity and reactogenicity. Previous analyses showed that JL, Urabe-AM9 and L-3 are genetically heterogeneous. Results We identified the heterogeneity of L-Zagreb throughout the entire genome. Two major variants were defined: variant A being identical to the consensus sequence of viral seeds and vaccine(s and variant B which differs from variant A in three nucleotide positions. The difference between viral variants in L-Zagreb strain is insufficient for distinct viral strains to be defined. We demonstrated that proportion of variants in L-Zagreb viral population depends on cell substrate used for viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion L-Zagreb strain should be considered as a single strain composed of at least two variant viral genomes.

  16. Genetic heterogeneity of L-Zagreb mumps virus vaccine strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosutic-Gulija, Tanja; Forcic, Dubravko; Šantak, Maja; Ramljak, Ana; Mateljak-Lukacevic, Sanja; Mazuran, Renata

    2008-01-01

    Background The most often used mumps vaccine strains Jeryl Lynn (JL), RIT4385, Urabe-AM9, L-Zagreb and L-3 differ in immunogenicity and reactogenicity. Previous analyses showed that JL, Urabe-AM9 and L-3 are genetically heterogeneous. Results We identified the heterogeneity of L-Zagreb throughout the entire genome. Two major variants were defined: variant A being identical to the consensus sequence of viral seeds and vaccine(s) and variant B which differs from variant A in three nucleotide positions. The difference between viral variants in L-Zagreb strain is insufficient for distinct viral strains to be defined. We demonstrated that proportion of variants in L-Zagreb viral population depends on cell substrate used for viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion L-Zagreb strain should be considered as a single strain composed of at least two variant viral genomes. PMID:18616793

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of central structure domains from mumps virus F protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yueyong; Xu, Yanhui; Zhu, Jieqing; Qiu, Bingsheng; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F.; Tien, Po

    2005-01-01

    Single crystals of the central structure domains from mumps virus F protein have been obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A diffraction data set has been collected to 2.2 Å resolution. Fusion of members of the Paramyxoviridae family involves two glycoproteins: the attachment protein and the fusion protein. Changes in the fusion-protein conformation were caused by binding of the attachment protein to the cellular receptor. In the membrane-fusion process, two highly conserved heptad-repeat (HR) regions, HR1 and HR2, are believed to form a stable six-helix coiled-coil bundle. However, no crystal structure has yet been determined for this state in the mumps virus (MuV, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family). In this study, a single-chain protein consisting of two HR regions connected by a flexible amino-acid linker (named 2-Helix) was expressed, purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. A complete X-ray data set was obtained in-house to 2.2 Å resolution from a single crystal. The crystal belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 161.2, b = 60.8, c = 40.1 Å, β = 98.4°. The crystal structure will help in understanding the molecular mechanism of Paramyxoviridae family membrane fusion

  18. Application of Oral Fluid Assays in Support of Mumps, Rubella and Varicella Control Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. C. Maple

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Detection of specific viral antibody or nucleic acid produced by infection or immunization, using oral fluid samples, offers increased potential for wider population uptake compared to blood sampling. This methodology is well established for the control of HIV and measles infections, but can also be applied to the control of other vaccine preventable infections, and this review describes the application of oral fluid assays in support of mumps, rubella and varicella national immunization programs. In England and Wales individuals with suspected mumps or rubella, based on clinical presentation, can have an oral fluid swab sample taken for case confirmation. Universal varicella immunization of children has led to a drastic reduction of chickenpox in those countries where it is used; however, in England and Wales such a policy has not been instigated. Consequently, in England and Wales most children have had chickenpox by age 10 years; however, small, but significant, numbers of adults remain susceptible. Targeted varicella zoster virus (VZV immunization of susceptible adolescents offers the potential to reduce the pool of susceptible adults and oral fluid determination of VZV immunity in adolescents is a potential means of identifying susceptible individuals in need of VZV vaccination. The main application of oral fluid testing is in those circumstances where blood sampling is deemed not necessary, or is undesirable, and when the documented sensitivity and specificity of the oral fluid assay methodology to be used is considered sufficient for the purpose intended.

  19. The two-dose measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) immunisation schedule: factors affecting maternal intention to vaccinate.

    OpenAIRE

    Pareek, M; Pattison, H M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the light of sub-optimal uptake of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination, we investigated the factors that influence the intentions of mothers to vaccinate. METHOD: A cross-sectional survey of 300 mothers in Birmingham with children approaching a routine MMR vaccination was conducted using a postal questionnaire to measure: intention to vaccinate, psychological variables, knowledge of the vaccine, and socioeconomic status. The vaccination status of the children was ...

  20. Biological characteristics of genetic variants of Urabe AM9 mumps vaccine virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K E; Dimock, K; Brown, E G

    2000-03-01

    The Urabe AM9 mumps vaccine is composed of a mixture of variants distinguishable by a difference at nucleotide (nt) 1081 of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene (Brown, E.G., Dimock, K., Wright, K.E., 1996. The Urabe AM9 mumps vaccine is a mixture of viruses differing at amino acid (aa) 335 of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase gene with one form associated with disease. J. Infect. Dis. 174, 619-622.). Further genetic and biological variation was detected in plaque purified viruses from the Urabe AM9 vaccine by examining the HN gene sequence, plaque morphology, cytopathic effects and growth in Vero cells, and temperature sensitivity (ts). Infection of Vero cells with plaque purified viruses with a G at nt 1081 of the HN gene produced large, clear plaques, caused significant CPE early after infection but yielded lower titres of virus than other purified viruses. None of these viruses were ts. In contrast, half of the plaque purified viruses with an A at nt 1081 were sensitive to a temperature of 39.5 degrees C. These viruses produced small plaques, caused significant CPE and grew to low titres. Two ts viruses possessed a unique aa substitution at aa 468 of HN. The remaining A(1081) viruses were not ts, produced large plaques but little CPE, and grew to titres 10-fold higher than the G(1081) viruses. Isolates of Urabe AM9 associated with post-vaccination illness were similar to these non-ts A(1081) viruses, but could be further sub-divided into two groups on the basis of a difference at aa 464 of HN. The post-vaccination isolates may represent insufficiently attenuated components of the vaccine, while the G(1081) and ts subset of A(1081) viruses may be more fully attenuated.

  1. Measles-mumps-rubella-varicella combination vaccine and the risk of febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nicola P; Fireman, Bruce; Yih, W Katherine; Lewis, Edwin; Kulldorff, Martin; Ray, Paula; Baxter, Roger; Hambidge, Simon; Nordin, James; Naleway, Allison; Belongia, Edward A; Lieu, Tracy; Baggs, James; Weintraub, Eric

    2010-07-01

    In February 2008, we alerted the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices to preliminary evidence of a twofold increased risk of febrile seizures after the combination measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine when compared with separate measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) and varicella vaccines. Now with data on twice as many vaccine recipients, our goal was to reexamine seizure risk after MMRV vaccine. Using 2000-2008 Vaccine Safety Datalink data, we assessed seizures and fever visits among children aged 12 to 23 months after MMRV and separate MMR + varicella vaccines. We compared seizure risk after MMRV vaccine to that after MMR + varicella vaccines by using Poisson regression as well as with supplementary regressions that incorporated chart-review results and self-controlled analyses. MMRV vaccine recipients (83,107) were compared with recipients of MMR + varicella vaccines (376,354). Seizure and fever significantly clustered 7 to 10 days after vaccination with all measles-containing vaccines but not after varicella vaccination alone. Seizure risk during days 7 to 10 was higher after MMRV than after MMR + varicella vaccination (relative risk: 1.98 [95% confidence interval: 1.43-2.73]). Supplementary analyses yielded similar results. The excess risk for febrile seizures 7 to 10 days after MMRV compared with separate MMR + varicella vaccination was 4.3 per 10,000 doses (95% confidence interval: 2.6-5.6). Among 12- to 23-month-olds who received their first dose of measles-containing vaccine, fever and seizure were elevated 7 to 10 days after vaccination. Vaccination with MMRV results in 1 additional febrile seizure for every 2300 doses given instead of separate MMR + varicella vaccines. Providers who recommend MMRV should communicate to parents that it increases the risk of fever and seizure over that already associated with measles-containing vaccines.

  2. A population-based study of measles, mumps and rubella vaccination and autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard; Hviid, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) is a cause of autism. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998. The cohort was selected on the basis of data from the Danish...... Civil Registration System, which assigns a unique identification number to every live-born infant and new resident in Denmark. MMR-vaccination status was obtained from the Danish National Board of Health. Information on the children’s autism status was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central...... the age at the time of vaccination, the time since vaccination, or the date of vaccination and the development of autistic disorder. Conclusions This study provides strong evidence against the hypothesis that MMR vaccination causes autism....

  3. A population-based study of measles, mumps and rubella vaccination and autism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard; Hviid, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that vaccination against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) is a cause of autism. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998. The cohort was selected on the basis of data from the Danish...... the age at the time of vaccination, the time since vaccination, or the date of vaccination and the development of autistic disorder. Conclusions This study provides strong evidence against the hypothesis that MMR vaccination causes autism....... Civil Registration System, which assigns a unique identification number to every live-born infant and new resident in Denmark. MMR-vaccination status was obtained from the Danish National Board of Health. Information on the children’s autism status was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central...

  4. THE INFLUENCE OF DOUBLE IMMUNIZATION ON MORBIDITY OF MEASLES, MUMPS AND RUBELLA IN THE NORTH-WEST REGION OF RUSSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Lyalina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The influence of double immunization on measles, mumps and rubella incidence in the North-West Federal District (North-West Russia has been analyzed. Due to the vaccination of the population morbidity of these infections in the region has decreased significantly. The necessity to improve the surveillance system due to changes in the manifestations of the epidemic process particularly connected with increasing of proportion of adults among patients has been proposed.

  5. Effect of jet injection on infectivity of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine in a bench model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Collins, Marcus; Saxon, Gene; Jarrahian, Courtney; Zehrung, Darin; Cappello, Chris; Dhere, Rajeev; Royals, Michael; Papania, Mark; Rota, Paul A

    2015-08-26

    Disposable-syringe jet injectors (DSJIs) with single-use, auto disable, needle-free syringes offer the opportunity to avoid hazards associated with injection using a needle and syringe. Clinical studies have evaluated DSJIs for vaccine delivery, but most studies have focused on inactivated, subunit, or DNA vaccines. Questions have been raised about possible damage to live attenuated viral vaccines by forces generated during the jet injection process. This study examines the effect of jet injection on the integrity of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR), measured by viral RNA content and infectivity. Three models of DSJIs were evaluated, each generating a different ejection force. Following jet injection, the RNA content for each of the vaccine components was measured using RT-qPCR immediately after injection and following passage in Vero cells. Jet injection was performed with and without pig skin as a simulation of human skin. There was little to no reduction of RNA content immediately following jet injection with any of the three DSJIs. Samples passaged in Vero cells showed no loss in infectivity of the measles vaccine following jet injection. Mumps vaccine consistently showed increased replication following jet injection. Rubella vaccine showed no loss after jet injection alone but some infectivity loss following injection through pig skin with two of the devices. Overall, these data demonstrated that forces exerted on a live attenuated MMR vaccine did not compromise vaccine infectivity. The bench model and protocol used in this study can be applied to evaluate the impact of jet injection on other live virus vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Smoking and older age associated with mumps in an outbreak in a group of highly-vaccinated individuals attending a youth club party, the Netherlands, 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ladbury, G.; Ostendorf, S.; Waegemaekers, T.; Binnendijk, R. van; Boot, H.; Hahne, S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a mumps outbreak in a highly-vaccinated population attending a party at a youth club. In a retrospective cohort study with 60 of approximately 100 participants responding, vaccination status was verified for 58/59 respondents, of whom 54 were vaccinated twice and four once. The attack

  7. Comparison of a neutralization enzyme immunoassay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for evaluation of immune status of children vaccinated for mumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, T; Jongerius, M C; van der Zwan, C W; Plantinga, A D; Kraaijeveld, C A; Berbers, G A

    1992-01-01

    A 50% neutralization enzyme immunoassay (N50-EIA) was compared with an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for determining mumps virus antibodies in three consecutive serum samples from 138 children vaccinated with a live mumps vaccine at the age (in years) of 1.5. By the N50-EIA, most (132 of 138) preserum samples did not show neutralizing activity. Eight to 12 weeks after vaccination, 17 of the children were still negative, but only 7 remained so after 2.5 years, resulting in a seroconversion rate of 125 of 132 (95%). Over the same period, the neutralization geometric mean titer rose from 3.6 to 9.9. By an indirect ELISA, 128 of 138 preserum samples were found negative. The early and late postvaccination sera of 8 children were ELISA negative, resulting in a seroconversion rate of 120 of 128 (94%). Only two children remained seronegative by both methods. Seven of the late postvaccination serum samples yielded noncorresponding results, reflecting 95% correlation between both methods. Due to cross-reactivity with parainfluenza viruses, the ELISA proved to be less specific, but on the other hand, it showed a greater sensitivity than the N50-EIA. PMID:1500523

  8. Combination of Vaccine-Strain Measles and Mumps Viruses Enhances Oncolytic Activity against Human Solid Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ho Anh; Zhang, LiFeng; Cuong, Bui Khac; Van Tong, Hoang; Cuong, Le Duy; Hang, Ngo Thu; Nhung, Hoang Thi My; Yamamoto, Naoki; Toan, Nguyen Linh

    2018-02-07

    Oncolytic measles and mumps viruses (MeV, MuV) have a potential for anti-cancer treatment. We examined the anti-tumor activity of MeV, MuV, and MeV-MuV combination (MM) against human solid malignancies (HSM). MeV, MuV, and MM targeted and significantly killed various cancer cell lines of HSM but not normal cells. MM demonstrated a greater anti-tumor effect and prolonged survival in a human prostate cancer xenograft tumor model compared to MeV and MuV. MeV, MuV, and MM significantly induced the expression of immunogenic cell death markers and enhanced spleen-infiltrating immune cells. In conclusion, MM combination significantly improves the treatment of human solid malignancies.

  9. Vacinas contra varicela e vacina quádrupla viral Varicella vaccines and measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Ferro Bricks

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Apresentar uma revisão atualizada sobre os estudos de eficácia, eventos adversos e esquema vacinal da vacina contra varicela e a nova apresentação combinada com a vacina contra sarampo, caxumba e rubéola. FONTES DOS DADOS: Revisão bibliográfica utilizando a base de dados MEDLINE e LILACS no período de 1999 a 2006. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: A vacina contra varicela tem uma eficácia entre 70 a 90% contra a infecção e 95 a 98% de proteção contra as formas graves. É uma vacina bem tolerada e pouco reatogênica. Após o seu licenciamento, foram comprovados apenas três casos de transmissão do vírus vacinal de pessoas previamente saudáveis para contatos domiciliares, que desenvolveram doença leve. Apesar das evidências de que a proteção conferida pela vacina pode diminuir com o passar dos anos, ainda não é possível afirmar que seja necessário, no momento, a aplicação de uma segunda dose, tendo em vista a exposição ao vírus selvagem. Após a vacinação universal, as chances de estímulo natural deverão diminuir, e muito provavelmente será necessário a aplicação de doses de reforço. Recentemente foi licenciada a vacina quádrupla viral, um produto combinado com a vacina contra sarampo, caxumba, rubéola e varicela com elevadas taxas de soroconversão. CONCLUSÃO:A vacina contra varicela é recomendada pela Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria (SBP para as crianças a partir de 1 ano de idade. Esperamos que, em breve, a vacina quádrupla viral esteja disponível no Brasil, pois o uso de vacinas combinadas possibilita uma maior cobertura vacinal.OBJECTIVES: To present an up-to-date review of studies investigating the efficacy, adverse events and vaccination regimens of the varicella vaccine and the new presentation combined with the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella. SOURCES OF DATA: Bibliographic review of the MEDLINE and LILACS databases covering the period 1999 to 2006 SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The varicella

  10. Immunogenicity and safety of a novel MMR vaccine (live, freeze-dried) containing the Edmonston-Zagreb measles strain, the Hoshino mumps strain, and the RA 27/3 rubella strain: Results of a randomized, comparative, active controlled phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ashwani; Mitra, Monjori; Joshi, Himanshu Arvind; Nayak, Uma Siddhartha; Siddaiah, Prashanth; Babu, T Ramesh; Mahapatro, Samarendra; Sanmukhani, Jayesh; Gupta, Gaurav; Mittal, Ravindra; Glueck, Reinhard

    2017-07-03

    This phase III clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of the single-dose and multi-dose formulations of a novel MMR vaccine (live, freeze-dried) developed by M/s Cadila Healthcare Limited, India (Cadila MMR vaccine), containing the Hoshino mumps strain, compared to that of an existing MMR vaccine (live, freeze-dried) developed by M/s Serum Institute of India Limited, India (Serum MMR vaccine). These two vaccines have similar measles and rubella strains, but different mumps strains (Hoshino in Cadila MMR vaccine, and L-Zagreb in Serum MMR vaccine). Three hundred and twenty-eight subjects of either sex, aged 15-18 months, were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive either the Cadila or Serum MMR vaccine. Immunogenicity assessments (IgG antibodies against measles, mumps, and rubella viruses) were done at baseline and 42 d after vaccination. Solicited (local and systemic) and unsolicited adverse events were recorded for up to 42 d following vaccination. The Cadila MMR vaccine was found to be non-inferior to the Serum MMR vaccine in terms of end-of-study proportion of subjects seropositive for anti-measles antibodies (100.0% in both groups), anti-mumps antibodies (94.5% vs. 94.0%), and anti-rubella antibodies (95.5% vs. 91.0%). Both vaccines were well tolerated by all study participants; the most common adverse event reported in both groups was fever, followed by rash. The results of this phase III clinical trial show that the novel Cadila MMR vaccine is non-inferior to the Serum MMR vaccine.

  11. Two-layer radio frequency MEMS fractal capacitors in PolyMUMPS for S-band applications

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-07-23

    In this Letter, the authors fabricate for the first time MEMS fractal capacitors possessing two layers and compare their performance characteristics with the conventional parallel-plate capacitor and previously reported state-of-the-art single-layer MEMS fractal capacitors. Explicitly, a capacitor with a woven structure and another with an interleaved configuration were fabricated in the standard PolyMUMPS surface micromachining process and tested at S-band frequencies. The self-resonant frequencies of the fabricated capacitors were close to 10GHz, which is better than that of the parallel-plate capacitor, which measured only 5.5GHz. Further, the presented capacitors provided a higher capacitance when compared with the state-of-the-art-reported MEMS fractal capacitors created using a single layer at the expense of a lower quality factor. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  12. Overview of measles and mumps vaccine: origin, present, and future of vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betáková, T; Svetlíková, D; Gocník, M

    2013-01-01

    Measles and mumps are common viral childhood diseases that can cause serious complications. Vaccination remains the most efficient way to control the spread of these viruses. The manufacturing capability for viral vaccines produced in embryonated hen eggs and conventional/classical cell substrates, such as chicken embryo fibroblast or primary dog kidney cell substrates, is no longer sufficient. This limitation can be overcome by utilizing other recognized cell substrates such as Madin Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK), Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO), Vero (monkey origin) cells, MRC-5 (human diploid) or as an alternative, introducing new cell substrates of human or avian origin. A very important factor in vaccine production is the safety and immunogenicity of the final vaccine, where the proper choice of cell substrate used for virus propagation is made. All substrates used in vaccine production must be fully characterized to avoid the contamination of hidden unknown pathogens which is difficult to achieve in primary cell substrates.

  13. Anticorpos para os vírus da rubéola, do sarampo e da caxumba em crianças de São Paulo, Brasil Rubella, measles and mumps serum antibodies in children of S. Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Piza de Souza Carvalho

    1976-12-01

    Full Text Available Foram dosados anticorpos inibidores da hemaglutinação para o vírus da rubéola, do sarampo e da caxumba, em amostras de soro de 166 crianças de elevado nível sócio-econômico, com idade de 6 a 12 anos, que freqüentavam, em 1969, uma escola primária na cidade de São Paulo, Brasil. A per-centagem de soros positivos foi de 49,3% para a rubéola, 88,2% para o sarampo e 79,4% para a caxumba. Através de interrogatório junto aos pais, observou-se significativa correspondência entre antecedentes clínicos positivos para sarampo e caxumba e presença de anticorpos circulantes (95,3% e 91,7%, respectivamente. Houve grande discordância quando os antecedentes clínicos ou vacinais para sarampo e caxumba eram negativos: 51,8% e 61,4% destas crianças possuíam anticorpos circulantes. Quanto à rubéola, não foi possível fazer-se tal correlação, pois a maioria das mães não sabia dar informações sobre esta doença, no passado.One hundred and sixty high socio-economic level, 6-12 year old children, attending a primary school, were tested in 1969 for rubella, measles and mumps HI antibodies. A 49.3% positivity for rubella antibodies, 88.2% for measles and 79.4% for mumps were found. A good correlation was observed between a positive history of clinical disease in the past and detectable serum antibodies for measles and mumps (95.3% and 91.7%, respectively. Quite on the contrary was observed when the history of measles and mumps disease or immunization in the past were negative, as 51.8% and 61.4% of these children, respectively, presented antibodies. As regards rubella, no correlation was obtained as the great majority of the parents was unable to give information on this disease in the past.

  14. INTRALESIONAL MEASLES, MUMPS AND RUBELLA (MMR VACCINE-AN EFFECTIVE THERAPEUTIC TOOL IN THE TREATMENT OF WART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Warts are common cutaneous viral infection. Various therapeutic modalities have been using in treatment of wart, but none of them are standardised. Immunotherapy is new current approach in the treatment of wart. AIMS: To know the efficacy and safety profile of Measles Mumps Rubella (MMR Vaccine in the treatment of wart. METHODS: MMR vaccine was injected into a largest single wart intralesionally and subsequent injections given every 2 weeks apart for about 3 to 5 times. Every month followup of patients was done to know the clearance of wart. RESULTS: Complete remission of warts seen in 70.4% of patients, partial remission seen in 22.2% and no response was seen in 7.4% of patients. No serious adverse side effects were seen in the current study. CONCLUSION: MMR vaccine can be considered as a safe, effective, inexpensive intralesional immunotherapeutic modality in the treatment of wart.

  15. Rapid response to a case of mumps: implications for preventing transmission at a medical research facility Respuesta rápida a un caso de paperas: implicaciones para la prevención del contagio en una instalación de investigación biomédica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Salmón-Mulanovich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To prevent transmission among the staff and potentially among the non-human primate (NHP colony at the U.S. Naval Medical Research Center Detachment in Peru, where an active case of mumps was discovered in a senior laboratory technician in Sep 03, 2007. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Subjects at the research facility were interviewed and potentially susceptible contacts were tested for mumps IgG. RESULTS: In total, 81 out of 106 staff members (76% had close contact with the case. Only 6/81 (7% had MMR, 33 (41% reported having had mumps, and 8 of 45 (18% of the potentially susceptible individuals did not have immunity (IgG > 20.0. All the susceptible, exposed individuals received MMR vaccine. There were no secondary cases and access to the NHP colony was restricted. DISCUSSION: Immediate and thorough investigation and occupational health response were imperative in preventing secondary cases of mumps among humans and NHP.OBJETIVO: Prevenir el contagio de parotiditis al personal y potencialmente a la colonia de primates no humanos (PNH, tras detectarse un caso en el personal técnico de laboratorio en el Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades de la Marina de los EUA (NMRCD. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El personal fue entrevistado y se hizo una prueba de IgG para parotiditis a los contactos potencialmente susceptibles. RESULTADOS: En total, 81 de 106 miembros del personal tuvo contacto cercano con el caso. Sólo 6/81 (7% tenían vacuna y 33 (41% reportaron haber tenido parotiditis, y 8 de 45 (18% de los susceptibles potenciales no tenían inmunidad (IgG > 20.0. Todos los susceptibles expuestos fueron vacunados y no hubo casos secundarios. Se restringió el acceso a la colonia de PNH. CONCLUSIÓN: La investigación inmediata y la respuesta de salud ocupacional fue imperativa para prevenir casos secundarios de parotiditis en el personal y los NHP.

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX) by intramuscular or subcutaneous routes at separate injection sites: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Yves; Habermehl, Pirmin; Thomas, Stéphane; Eymin, Cécile; Fiquet, Anne

    2009-04-14

    When this trial was initiated, the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine was licensed for subcutaneous administration in all European countries and for intramuscular administration in some countries, whereas varicella vaccine was licensed only for subcutaneous administration. This study evaluated the intramuscular administration of an MMR vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX) compared with the subcutaneous route. An open-label randomised trial was performed in France and Germany. Healthy children, aged 12 to 18 months, received single injections of M-M-RvaxPro and VARIVAX concomitantly at separate injection sites. Both vaccines were administered either intramuscularly (IM group, n = 374) or subcutaneously (SC group, n = 378). Immunogenicity was assessed before vaccination and 42 days after vaccination. Injection-site erythema, swelling and pain were recorded from days 0 to 4 after vaccination. Body temperature was monitored daily between 0 and 42 days after vaccination. Other adverse events were recorded up to 42 days after vaccination and serious adverse events until the second study visit. Antibody response rates at day 42 in the per-protocol set of children initially seronegative to measles, mumps, rubella or varicella were similar between the IM and SC groups for all four antigens. Response rates were 94 to 96% for measles, 98% for both mumps and rubella and 86 to 88% for varicella. For children initially seronegative to varicella, 99% achieved the seroconversion threshold (antibody concentrations of >or= 1.25 gpELISA units/ml). Erythema and swelling were the most frequently reported injection-site reactions for both vaccines. Most injection-site reactions were of mild intensity or small size (vaccines was comparable regardless of administration route. Integration of both administration routes in the current European indications for the two vaccines will now allow physicians in Europe to choose their preferred administration route

  17. The Measels-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination from a health political and economical point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habl, Claudia

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Measels, Mumps and Rubella (MMR are highly contagious infectious diseases which may lead to severe complications. These diseases are vaccine-preventable. The present Health Technology Assessment report (report on technological consequences, HTA report was commissioned by the German Institute of Medical Documentation and Information (DIMDI and addresses various aspects of the MMR vaccination, the key question being how the MMR immunisation coverage rate can be increased in Germany. Objectives: The objectives of this report were to describe the benefits of the MMR vaccination for Germany and to analyse how the desired MMR immunisation coverage of >95% can be achieved. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in 29 literature data bases. Particularly for epidemiological data and information on vaccination programs, this systematic search was supplemented by an extensive hand search, written and oral enquiries, as well as interviews with experts. A total of 200 texts were used to prepare this report. Results: At 92.5% (as of 2004 based on the whole of Germany, the current immunisation coverage for measles in children is above the weighted EC-15-average of 90.67%. Statements can only be made regarding the probability of illness for measles, as no data is available for mumps and rubella. With 2.8 infections (per 100,000 residents in 2006, Germany has not achieved the WHO target. Of cases submitted to the laboratory, only 32% were validated by diagnostic laboratory findings and 45% confirmed clinical-epidemiologically. There are only few economic analyses of vaccination programs in Germany. In international publications, mainly measels are validated economically. An analysis of the cost of measles for Germany shows potential cost savings. Unfortunately, no complete economic evaluation (cost-effectiveness, cost-benefit, or cost-utility analyses for MMR vaccination has been performed for Germany. Analyses conducted in the US

  18. Safety and Immunogenicity of Coadministering a Combined Meningococcal Serogroup C and Haemophilus influenzae Type b Conjugate Vaccine with 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccine at 12 Months of Age ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Elizabeth; Andrews, Nick; Waight, Pauline; Findlow, Helen; Ashton, Lindsey; England, Anna; Stanford, Elaine; Matheson, Mary; Southern, Joanna; Sheasby, Elizabeth; Goldblatt, David; Borrow, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The coadministration of the combined meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC)/Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine at 12 months of age was investigated to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this regimen compared with separate administration of the conjugate vaccines. Children were randomized to receive MCC/Hib vaccine alone followed 1 month later by PCV7 with MMR vaccine or to receive all thr...

  19. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro®) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX®) by intramuscular or subcutaneous routes at separate injection sites: a randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Stéphane; Habermehl Pirmin; Gillet Yves; Eymin Cécile; Fiquet Anne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background When this trial was initiated, the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine was licensed for subcutaneous administration in all European countries and for intramuscular administration in some countries, whereas varicella vaccine was licensed only for subcutaneous administration. This study evaluated the intramuscular administration of an MMR vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro®) and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX®) compared with the subcutaneous route. Methods An open-label random...

  20. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a measles, mumps and rubella vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro® and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX® by intramuscular or subcutaneous routes at separate injection sites: a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stéphane

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When this trial was initiated, the combined measles, mumps and rubella (MMR vaccine was licensed for subcutaneous administration in all European countries and for intramuscular administration in some countries, whereas varicella vaccine was licensed only for subcutaneous administration. This study evaluated the intramuscular administration of an MMR vaccine (M-M-RvaxPro® and a varicella vaccine (VARIVAX® compared with the subcutaneous route. Methods An open-label randomised trial was performed in France and Germany. Healthy children, aged 12 to18 months, received single injections of M-M-RvaxPro and VARIVAX concomitantly at separate injection sites. Both vaccines were administered either intramuscularly (IM group, n = 374 or subcutaneously (SC group, n = 378. Immunogenicity was assessed before vaccination and 42 days after vaccination. Injection-site erythema, swelling and pain were recorded from days 0 to 4 after vaccination. Body temperature was monitored daily between 0 and 42 days after vaccination. Other adverse events were recorded up to 42 days after vaccination and serious adverse events until the second study visit. Results Antibody response rates at day 42 in the per-protocol set of children initially seronegative to measles, mumps, rubella or varicella were similar between the IM and SC groups for all four antigens. Response rates were 94 to 96% for measles, 98% for both mumps and rubella and 86 to 88% for varicella. For children initially seronegative to varicella, 99% achieved the seroconversion threshold (antibody concentrations of ≥ 1.25 gpELISA units/ml. Erythema and swelling were the most frequently reported injection-site reactions for both vaccines. Most injection-site reactions were of mild intensity or small size (≤ 2.5 cm. There was a trend for lower rates of injection-site erythema and swelling in the IM group. The incidence and nature of systemic adverse events were comparable for the two routes

  1. A case-control study of autism and mumps-measles-rubella vaccination using the general practice research database: design and methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiangning

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An association between mumps-measles-rubella (MMR vaccination and the onset of symptoms typical of autism has recently been suggested. This has led to considerable concern about the safety of the vaccine. Methods A matched case-control study using data derived form the United Kingdom General Practice Research Database. Children with a possible diagnosis of autism will be identified from their electronic health records. All diagnoses will be validated by a detailed review of hospital letters and by using information derived from a parental questionnaire. Ten controls per case will be selected from the database. Conditional logistic regression will be used to assess the association between MMR vaccination and autism. In addition case series analyses will be undertaken to estimate the relative incidence of onset of autism in defined time intervals after vaccination. The study is funded by the United Kingdom Medical Research Council. Discussion Electronic health databases offer tremendous opportunities for evaluating the adverse effects of vaccines. However there is much scope for bias and confounding. The rigorous validation of all diagnoses and the collection of additional information by parental questionnaire in this study are essential to minimise the possibility of misleading results.

  2. Thermal Actuation Based 3-DoF Non-Resonant Microgyroscope Using MetalMUMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Masood ul Hassan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available High force, large displacement and low voltage consumption are a primary concern for microgyroscopes. The chevron-shaped thermal actuators are unique in terms of high force generation combined with the large displacements at a low operating voltage in comparison with traditional electrostatic actuators. A Nickel based 3-DoF micromachined gyroscope comprising 2-DoF drive mode and 1-DoF sense mode oscillator utilizing the chevron-shaped thermal actuators is presented here. Analytical derivations and finite element simulations are carried out to predict the performance of the proposed device using the thermo-physical properties of electroplated nickel. The device sensitivity is improved by utilizing the dynamical amplification of the oscillation in 2-DoF drive mode using an active-passive mass configuration. A comprehensive theoretical description, dynamics and mechanical design considerations of the proposed gyroscopes model are discussed in detail. Parametric optimization of gyroscope, its prototype modeling and fabrication using MetalMUMPs has also been investigated. Dynamic transient simulation results predicted that the sense mass of the proposed device achieved a drive displacement of 4.1µm when a sinusoidal voltage of 0.5V is applied at 1.77 kHz exhibiting a mechanical sensitivity of 1.7μm /o/s in vacuum. The wide bandwidth frequency response of the 2-DoF drive mode oscillator consists of two resonant peaks and a flat region of 2.11 kHz between the peaks defining the operational frequency region. The sense mode resonant frequency can lie anywhere within this region and therefore the amplitude of the response is insensitive to structural parameter variations, enhancing device robustness against such variations. The proposed device has a size of 2.2 x 2.6 mm2, almost one third in comparison with existing M-DoF vibratory gyroscope with an estimated power consumption of 0.26 Watts. These predicted results illustrate that the chevron

  3. Rubella: Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virus vaccine that was licensed in 1968. The mumps vaccine first became available in 1967, fol- lowed by ... vaccine. • people vaccinated before 1979 with either killed mumps vaccine or mumps vaccine of unknown type who are ...

  4. Prevalence of Inadequate Immunity to Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella in MLB and NBA Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Justin J; Toresdahl, Brett G; Ling, Daphne I; Boniquit, Nicole T; Callahan, Lisa R; Kinderknecht, James J

    2018-05-01

    Multiple outbreaks of vaccine-preventable viral diseases have occurred in professional sports in recent years. Currently, there is no established protocol for vaccination or immunity screening for professional athletes. There are significant differences in the prevalence of inadequate immunity dependent on age, sport, country of birth, and participation in collegiate sports. Cross-sectional cohort study. Level 4. A sample of Major League Baseball (MLB) and National Basketball Association (NBA) players were screened for serologic evidence of immunity to measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella prior to the 2015 and 2016 seasons. The results were designated as adequate (immune) or inadequate (equivocal or nonimmune) based on laboratory criteria. Comparison with an age-matched control group was performed using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). A total of 98 athletes (62 MLB, 36 NBA) were screened. The prevalence of inadequate immunity for any virus was 35.5% in MLB players and 33.3% in NBA players. There was a significantly greater risk of inadequate immunity to rubella (risk ratio, 6.38; P < 0.01) and varicella (risk ratio, 4.21; P < 0.01) in athletes compared with the age-matched NHANES population. Our analysis did not reveal differences in rates of immunity based on sport, country of birth (US born vs international), or participation in college athletics. There was a lower rate of inadequate immunity to varicella with increasing age (odds ratio, 0.72; P = 0.05). One-third of athletes studied had inadequate immunity to 1 of the 4 viruses tested. Younger players had a significantly greater risk of inadequate immunity to varicella. Birth outside the US and lack of participation in college athletics were not found to influence immunity rates. These results can inform the development of future screening programs to prevent outbreaks of viral infections in professional athletes.

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of coadministering a combined meningococcal serogroup C and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at 12 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Andrews, Nick; Waight, Pauline; Findlow, Helen; Ashton, Lindsey; England, Anna; Stanford, Elaine; Matheson, Mary; Southern, Joanna; Sheasby, Elizabeth; Goldblatt, David; Borrow, Ray

    2011-03-01

    The coadministration of the combined meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC)/Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine at 12 months of age was investigated to assess the safety and immunogenicity of this regimen compared with separate administration of the conjugate vaccines. Children were randomized to receive MCC/Hib vaccine alone followed 1 month later by PCV7 with MMR vaccine or to receive all three vaccines concomitantly. Immunogenicity endpoints were MCC serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) titers of ≥8, Hib-polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP) IgG antibody concentrations of ≥0.15 μg/ml, PCV serotype-specific IgG concentrations of ≥0.35 μg/ml, measles and mumps IgG concentrations of >120 arbitrary units (AU)/ml, and rubella IgG concentrations of ≥11 AU/ml. For safety assessment, the proportions of children with erythema, swelling, or tenderness at site of injection or fever or other systemic symptoms for 7 days after immunization were compared between regimens. No adverse consequences for either safety or immunogenicity were demonstrated when MCC/Hib vaccine was given concomitantly with PCV and MMR vaccine at 12 months of age or separately at 12 and 13 months of age. Any small differences in immunogenicity were largely in the direction of a higher response when all three vaccines were given concomitantly. For systemic symptoms, there was no evidence of an additive effect; rather, any differences between schedules showed benefit from the concomitant administration of all three vaccines, such as lower overall proportions with postvaccination fevers. The United Kingdom infant immunization schedule now recommends that these three vaccines may be offered at one visit at between 12 and 13 months of age.

  6. Lack of association between measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and autism in children: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Kiełtyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata

    2010-05-01

    The first objective of the study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination and autism in children. The second objective was to examine whether the risk of autism differs between use of MMR and the single measles vaccine. Case-control study. The 96 cases with childhood or atypical autism, aged 2 to 15, were included into the study group. Controls consisted of 192 children individually matched to cases by year of birth, sex, and general practitioners. Data on autism diagnosis and vaccination history were from physicians. Data on the other probable autism risk factors were collected from mothers. Logistic conditional regression was used to assess the risk of autism resulting from vaccination. Assessment was made for children vaccinated (1) Before diagnosis of autism, and (2) Before first symptoms of autism onset. Odds ratios were adjusted to mother's age, medication during pregnancy, gestation time, perinatal injury and Apgar score. For children vaccinated before diagnosis, autism risk was lower in children vaccinated with MMR than in the nonvaccinated (OR: 0.17, 95% CI: 0.06-0.52) as well as to vaccinated with single measles vaccine (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.22-0.91). The risk for vaccinated versus nonvaccinated (independent of vaccine type) was 0.28 (95% CI: 0.10-0.76). The risk connected with being vaccinated before onset of first symptoms was significantly lower only for MMR versus single vaccine (OR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.22-0.99). The study provides evidence against the association of autism with either MMR or a single measles vaccine.

  7. Intralesional tuberculin (PPD) versus measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine in treatment of multiple warts: a comparative clinical and immunological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Maha Adel; Salem, Samar Abdallah M; Fouad, Dina Adel; El-Fatah, Abeer Aly Abd

    2015-01-01

    Intralesional purified protein derivative (PPD) or mumps, measles, rubella (MMR) were not previously compared regarding their efficacy or mechanism of action in treatment of warts. We aimed to compare their efficacy in treatment of multiple warts and investigate their effect on serum interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-12. Thirty patients with multiple warts were included (10 treated with PPD, 10 with MMR, and 10 with normal saline (control)). Injection was done every 3 weeks until clearance or maximum of three treatments. Clinical response of target and distant warts was evaluated. Serum ILs-4 and -12 were assessed before and after treatment. A significantly higher rate of complete response was found in target and distant warts with PPD (60% each) and MMR (80%, 40%, respectively) compared with controls (0%), with no significant difference between both treatments. After treatment, the control group showed the lowest serum IL-12 and IL-4 levels compared with the MMR- and PPD-treated groups with statistically significant difference in between. MMR resulted in a significantly higher serum IL-12 than PPD. With PPD, IL-4 was increased with statistically significant change compared with pretreat-ment level. Intralesional PPD and MMR show comparable efficacy and safety in treatment of multiple warts. Serum ILs-4 and-12 increase following antigen injection. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. EVALUATION OF POTENCY OF MUMPS VACCINE USED IN IRAN: COMPARISON OF WHO AND NIBSC METHOD IN CELL CULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tavajohi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against mumps is included in world Health Organization (WHO program of global immunization. Safety and efficacy of vaccines must be confirmed by control units in charge of public health. In Iran, the secondary control on potency of vaccine has not been set up yet. We decided to overcome this problem by developing WHO and NIBSC methods in Food and Drug Control Lab. ‎Nine dilutions of vaccine from 10-1 to 10-5 in ‎0.5log10 steps were mixed with Vero cell suspension. In WHO method, the cell suspension was seeded in octaplicate (8 wells of each dilution in 24-well plate and incubated at 36°C for 10 days, during which the cells were checked for cytopathic changes everyday and positive wells were recorded. We used 5% serum and 1 × 105 cells for the assays. The test was repeated with six different vaccines produced in one batch. The mean potency was 10 4.475±0.134 CCID50/vial for each ten-dose vial. For NIBSC method the dilutions of vaccine were added to hexaplicate (6 well per dilution in 24-wells plate. After 3 hours, the medium was removed and overlay was added. Then the plates were incubated at 35°C for 10 days. After incubation period, the plaques were stained with methyl violet and counted. This assay was repeated three times and the mean of results was 5.93 log10 PFU/dose. ‎ Results indicate that the potency of the vaccine is in acceptable range in either method. WHO method is simple and less time consuming compared to NIBSC method.

  9. The immunogenicity and safety of a tetravalent measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccine when co-administered with conjugated meningococcal C vaccine to healthy children: A phase IIIb, randomized, multi-center study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, Paolo; Esposito, Susanna; Bona, Gianni; Cuccia, Mario; Desole, Maria Giuseppina; Ferrera, Giuseppe; Gabutti, Giovanni; Pellegrino, Angelo; Salvini, Filippo; Henry, Ouzama; Povey, Michael; Marchetti, Federico

    2016-08-05

    Multiple vaccination visits and administrations can be stressful for infants, parents and healthcare providers. Multivalent combination vaccines can deliver the required number of antigens in fewer injections and clinic visits, while vaccine co-administration can also reduce the number of visits. This non-inferiority study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of co-administering a combined measles-mumps-rubella-varicella (MMRV) vaccine with conjugated meningococcal C (MenC) vaccine in a large cohort of healthy Italian toddlers. Healthy subjects aged 13-15months were randomized (2:1:1) to receive single doses of either: co-administered MMRV+MenC at the same visit (MMRV+MenC group); or MMRV followed 42days later by MenC (MMRV group); or MenC followed 42days later by MMRV (MenC group). Blood samples were collected before and 43days after vaccination. Antibody titers against MMRV were measured using ELISA. Functional-anti-meningococcal-serogroup activity (rSBAMenC) was assessed using a serum bactericidal test. Solicited local and general reactions were recorded for up to 4 and 42days post-vaccination, respectively. Non-inferiority of MMRV+MenC to MMRV (post-dose-1 seroconversion rates) and MMRV+MenC to MenC (post-dose-1 seroprotection rates) was achieved if the lower limit (LL) of the 95% confidence interval (CI) for the group difference was ⩾-10% for each antigen. 716 subjects were enrolled in the study. At 42days post-vaccination, the MMRV seroconversion rates were 99.3% (measles), 94.5% (mumps), 100% (rubella) and 99.7% (varicella) in the MMRV+MenC group, and 99.4%, 93.2%, 100% and 100%, respectively, in the MMRV group. The seroprotection rates against rSBA-MenC were 98.3% in the MMRV+MenC group and 99.3% in the MenC group. Non-inferiority was reached for all the vaccine antigens. The safety profiles were as expected for these vaccines. The immune responses elicited by co-administered MMRV+MenC were non-inferior to those elicited by MMRV or MenC alone and

  10. Mumps meningoencephalitis: an epidemiological approach Meningoencefalite pelo vírus da caxumba: abordagem epidemiológica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Leboreiro-Fernandez

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse distribution of meningoencefalitis caused by mumps viras in children related to sex, age and seasonal influences. Thirty seven children were evaluated, ages ranging from 2 to 14 years. They were seen at Emergency Unit of Faculdade de Medicina do Triângulo Mineiro and at Hospital da Criança, in Uberaba-MG, Brazil, from March 1st 1991 to February 1st 1993 and they were hospitalized for about 5 days. Through a protocol findings were studied during hospitalization and clinical course stressing epidemiology, symptomatology, cerebrospinal fluid studies, electroencephalogram and cortical function analysis. Only epidemiological data were considered in the present study. Data analysis revealed male predominance, at a range from 5 to 9 years and great number of occurrences at the last quarter of the year.O presente trabalho tem por objetivo, estudar a distribuição quanto ao sexo, idade e sazonalidade, em crianças com meningencefalite pelo vírus da caxumba. Foram avaliadas 37 crianças, com idades variando de 2 a 14 anos, atendidas no Pronto-Socorro do Hospital Escola da FMTM e do Hospital da Criança, MG, no período de 1-março-1991 a 1-fevereiro-1993 e hospitalizadas por período médio de 5 dias. Através de protocolo pré-elaborado foram estudados os achados obtidos por ocasião da internação e evolução, enfatizando-se a epidemiologia, sintomatologia, líquido cefalorraqueano, eletrencefalograma e função cortical. São considerados apenas os dados epidemiológicos, no presente estudo. A análise das informações pertinentes revela predomínio no sexo masculino, na faixa etária dos 5 aos 9 anos e maior número de casos no último trimestre do ano, correspondente à estação da primavera.

  11. Prevalence of antibodies against measles, mumps, and rubella before and after vaccination of school-age children with three different triple combined viral vaccines, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 1996 Prevalencia de anticuerpos contra sarampión, paperas y rubéola en niños en edad escolar antes y después de la vacunación con tres vacunas triples antivirales combinadas diferentes, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil, 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaventura Antônio dos Santos

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the seroprevalence for measles, mumps, and rubella in school-age children (6-12 years old before and after the administration of three triple combined viral vaccines. METHODS: In two municipal schools of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, 692 blood samples were collected before vaccination and 636 samples 21 to 30 days after vaccination during 1996. IgG antibody seropositivity was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (measles and mumps with Enzygnost [Behring, Marburg, Germany]; rubella with Rubenostika [Organon Teknica, Boxtel, the Netherlands]. The vaccines compared were: A: E-Zagreb, L-Zagreb, and Wistar RA 27/3 (Tresivac; B: Moraten, J-Lynn, and Wistar RA 27/3 (M-M-R II; and C: Schwarz, Urabe AM-9, and Wistar RA 27/3 (Trimovax. RESULTS: Before vaccination, 79.2% [95% confidence interval (CI = 76.0%-82.2%] of the samples were positive for measles, 69.4% (95% CI = 65.8%-72.8% for mumps, and 55.4% (95% CI = 51.6%-59.2% for rubella. After vaccination with the A, B, and C vaccines, seropositivity was 100.0%, 99.5%, and 100.0%, respectively for measles; 99.5%, 94.5%, and 92.0% for mumps; and 92.6%, 91.3%, and 88.6% for rubella. CONCLUSIONS: About one-fifth (20.8% of the schoolchildren who could have been vaccinated against measles at age 9 months had levels of antibodies insufficient for protection. In the sample of schoolchildren without previous vaccination against mumps and rubella, high proportions of susceptible levels were found. All vaccines were immunogenic, but vaccine A yielded a seroconversion rate of 99.5% for the mumps component, which was significantly higher than the other two vaccines (P OBJETIVO: Se evaluó la seroprevalencia para sarampión, paperas y rubéola en niños en edad escolar (6-12 años antes y después de la administración de tres vacunas triples antivirales combinadas. MÉTODOS: Se colectaron 692 muestras de sangre antes de la vacunación y 636 muestras entre 21 y 30 días después de la

  12. An evaluation of the adverse reaction potential of three measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Boaventura Antônio dos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the incidence of adverse events following the administration of three commercially available measles-mumps-rubella (MMR combination vaccines. Methods. A randomized double-blind clinical trial was performed in 1996 that involved a total of 10 142 students 6-12 years of age in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, in Brazil. An MMR vaccine containing the Edmonston-Zagreb, Leningrad-Zagreb, and RA 27/3 strains ("vaccine A" was administered to 2 226 students (21.9% of the total; an MMR vaccine with the Moraten, Jeryl Lynn, and Wistar 27/3 strains ("vaccine B" was administered to 2 216 children (21.8%; and an MMR vaccine containing the Schwartz, Urabe AM-9, and Wistar 27/3 strains ("vaccine C" was given to 2 179 students (21.5%. A control group of 3 521 students (34.7% was not vaccinated. Both the vaccinated subjects and the control subjects were followed daily for 30 days to detect any clinical manifestations. Results. Adverse events were more frequent in the vaccinated children than in the control group (P < 0.01. In terms of causing parotitis, vaccine A had a relative risk (RR of 5.72 (95% confidence interval (CI = 3.11-10.54 when compared with vaccine B, and an RR of 2.33 (95% CI = 1.52-3.58 when compared with vaccine C. Vaccine A was also associated with an increased risk of lymphadenopathy when compared with vaccine B (RR = 3.11; 95% CI = 1.78-5.45 and with vaccine C (RR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.35-3.66. Vaccine C was associated with an increased risk of parotitis when compared with vaccine B (RR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.26-4.80. Three cases of aseptic meningitis were detected among the children in the study group, but only one case of vaccine-related aseptic meningitis was identified, among the children receiving vaccine A. Conclusions. The three MMR vaccines that we studied are associated with different risks of adverse events. We found vaccine A to cause more reactions than the two other vaccines, especially vaccine B. In addition

  13. Evidence of pestivirus RNA in human virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harasawa, R; Tomiyama, T

    1994-01-01

    We examined live virus vaccines against measles, mumps, and rubella for the presence of pestivirus RNA or of pestiviruses by reverse transcription PCR. Pestivirus RNA was detected in two measles-mumps-rubella combined vaccines and in two monovalent vaccines against mumps and rubella. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the PCR products indicated that a modified live vaccine strain used for immunization of cattle against bovine viral diarrhea is not responsible for the contamination of the vaccines. Images PMID:8077414

  14. Thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viruses Chickenpox, mumps, rubella, Epstein-Barr virus, or parvovirus can decrease your platelet count for a while. ... that can affect your platelets. You may need vaccines for mumps, measles, rubella, and chickenpox. You may ...

  15. Mumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... appear to offer sufficient protection during an outbreak. Since the recommendation for a second dose didn't begin until the late 1980s or early 1990s, many young adults may not have received their second dose ...

  16. FastStats: Measles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Women’s Health State and Territorial Data Reproductive Health Contraceptive Use Infertility Reproductive Health Notice Regarding FastStats Mobile ... measles, mumps, rubella: 91.9% (2015) Percent of adolescents aged 13-17 years vaccinated against measles, mumps, ...

  17. Orchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a catheter or medical instruments inserted into your penis. Viral orchitis Viral orchitis is usually caused by the mumps virus. About one-third of males who contract the mumps after puberty develop orchitis, usually four to seven days after ...

  18. Thermal MEMS actuator operation in aqueous media/seawater: Performance enhancement through atomic layer deposition post processing of PolyMUMPs devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnat, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.warnat@dal.ca; Forbrigger, Cameron; Hubbard, Ted [Mechanical Engineering, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2X4 (Canada); Bertuch, Adam; Sundaram, Ganesh [Ultratech Inc., Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A method to enhance thermal microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuators in aqueous media by using dielectric encapsulation layers is presented. Aqueous media reduces the available mechanical energy of the thermal actuator through an electrical short between actuator structures. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} laminates with various thicknesses were deposited on packaged PolyMUMPs devices to electrically separate the actuator from the aqueous media. Atomic layer deposition was used to form an encapsulation layer around released MEMS structures and the package. The enhancement was assessed by the increase of the elastic energy, which is proportional to the mechanical stiffness of the actuator and the displacement squared. The mechanical stiffness of the encapsulated actuators compared with the noncoated actuators was increased by factors ranging from 1.45 (for 45 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 20 nm TiO{sub 2}) to 1.87 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). Displacement measurements were made for all laminate combinations in filtered tap water and seawater by using FFT based displacement measurement technique with a repeatability of ∼10 nm. For all laminate structures, the elastic energy increased and enhanced the actuator performance: In seawater, the mechanical output energy increased by factors ranging from 5 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to 11 (for 90 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 40 nm TiO{sub 2}). The authors also measured the long-term actuator stability/reliability in seawater. Samples were stored for 29 days in seawater and tested for 17 days in seawater. Laminates with TiO{sub 2} layers allowed constant operation over the entire measurement period.

  19. Childhood Diseases - What Parents Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is covered in the vaccine. Similarly, the MMR vaccine protects against measles, mumps, and rubella, viral infections that cause serious symptoms. Measles and mumps often can lead to chronic conditions, such as deafness, brain damage, and reproductive problems. Rubella is also known as ...

  20. [Epidemic parotiditis, a reportable disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boverhoff, J C; Baart, J A

    2013-01-01

    Three consecutive patients with an acute swelling of one of the cheeks, were diagnosed with epidemic parotiditis. The first phase of the diagnostic procedure for an acute cheek swelling is to eliminate the possibility of odontogenic causes. When odontogenic problems have been excluded, non-dentition-related causes may be considered. An acute, progressive swelling in the preauricular area can often be attributed to an inflammation of the parotid gland, but epidemic parotiditis should also be considered. Epidemic parotiditis, or mumps, is caused by the mumps virus. Contamination occurs aerogenically. In the Netherlands, mumps vaccine is an ingredient of the governmental combined mump-measles-rubella inoculation programme. However, in recent years several small-scale parotiditis epidemics have broken out, predominantly among young, inoculated adults. Oropharyngeal mucus and blood samples are needed to diagnose the disease. Each case of the disease should be reported to the community healthcare service.

  1. Search for the lepton-flavour violating decay $D^0 \\to e^\\pm\\mu^\\mp$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-03-10

    A search for the lepton-flavour violating decay $D^0 \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$ is made with a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0$ fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of $7$ TeV and $8$ TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Candidate $D^0$ mesons are selected using the decay $D^{*+} \\to D^0 \\pi^+$ and the $D^0 \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$ branching fraction is measured using the decay mode $D^0 \\to K^- \\pi^+$ as a normalisation channel. No significant excess of $D^0 \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$ candidates over the expected background is seen, and a limit is set on the branching fraction, $\\mathcal{B}(D^0 \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp) < 1.3 \\times 10^{-8}$, at 90 % confidence level. This is an order of magnitude lower than the previous limit and it further constrains the parameter space in some leptoquark models and in supersymmetric models with R-parity violation.

  2. Evaluation of a Mobile Phone-Based Intervention to Increase Parents' Knowledge About the Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination and Their Psychological Empowerment: Mixed-Method Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Marta; Galimberti, Elisa; Fiordelli, Maddalena; Schulz, Peter Johannes

    2018-03-07

    There is mixed evidence on the effectiveness of vaccination-related interventions. A major limitation of most intervention studies is that they do not apply randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the method that, over the last 2 decades, has increasingly been considered as the only method to provide proof of the effectiveness of an intervention and, consequently, as the most important instrument in deciding whether to adopt an intervention or not. This study, however, holds that methods other than RCTs also can produce meaningful results. The aim of this study was to evaluate 2 mobile phone-based interventions aimed at increasing parents' knowledge of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination (through elements of gamification) and their psychological empowerment (through the use of narratives), respectively. The 2 interventions were part of an RCT. We conducted 2 studies with the RCT participants: a Web-based survey aimed at assessing their rating of the tool regarding a number of qualities such as usability and usefulness (N=140), and qualitative telephonic interviews to explore participants' experiences with the app (N=60). The results of the survey showed that participants receiving the knowledge intervention (alone or together with the empowerment intervention) liked the app significantly better compared with the group that only received the empowerment intervention (F 2,137 =15.335; Pbenefits of the vaccination at the same time. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number 30768813; http://www.isrctn.com/ ISRCTN30768813 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6xOQSJ3w8). ©Marta Fadda, Elisa Galimberti, Maddalena Fiordelli, Peter Johannes Schulz. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 07.03.2018.

  3. Quality of Care Provided by Physician’s Extenders in Air Force Primary Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    WITHOUT 214 ARRHYTHMIAS OR HEART BLOCK GASTROENTERITIS :634 HEART MURMUR [ 11 13. 15 MEASLES. MUMPS, CHICKEN POX 213. 215. 217 OTHER HEART DISEASES 01...mumps, chicken pox 8 11 7 16 Hepatitis or exposure to hepatitis 11 8 4 17 Infectious mononucleosis 1 15 2 *4 Gonorrhea (or exposure to gonorrhea) 17 28...Operation of the New Mexico Experimental Medical Care Review Organization," Medical Care 14 (Supplement 9), December 1976. Daniels, M., and S. A

  4. Attitudinal and demographic predictors of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR uptake during the UK catch-up campaign 2008-09: cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Continued suboptimal measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccine uptake has re-established measles epidemic risk, prompting a UK catch-up campaign in 2008-09 for children who missed MMR doses at scheduled age. Predictors of vaccine uptake during catch-ups are poorly understood, however evidence from routine schedule uptake suggests demographics and attitudes may be central. This work explored this hypothesis using a robust evidence-based measure. DESIGN: Cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire with objective behavioural outcome. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 365 UK parents, whose children were aged 5-18 years and had received <2 MMR doses before the 2008-09 UK catch-up started. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Parents' attitudes and demographics, parent-reported receipt of invitation to receive catch-up MMR dose(s, and catch-up MMR uptake according to child's medical record (receipt of MMR doses during year 1 of the catch-up. RESULTS: Perceived social desirability/benefit of MMR uptake (OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.09-2.87 and younger child age (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.68-0.89 were the only independent predictors of catch-up MMR uptake in the sample overall. Uptake predictors differed by whether the child had received 0 MMR doses or 1 MMR dose before the catch-up. Receipt of catch-up invitation predicted uptake only in the 0 dose group (OR = 3.45, 95% CI = 1.18-10.05, whilst perceived social desirability/benefit of MMR uptake predicted uptake only in the 1 dose group (OR = 9.61, 95% CI = 2.57-35.97. Attitudes and demographics explained only 28% of MMR uptake in the 0 dose group compared with 61% in the 1 dose group. CONCLUSIONS: Catch-up MMR invitations may effectively move children from 0 to 1 MMR doses (unimmunised to partially immunised, whilst attitudinal interventions highlighting social benefits of MMR may effectively move children from 1 to 2 MMR doses (partially to fully immunised. Older children may be

  5. Mandatory vaccinations in European countries, undocumented information, false news and the impact on vaccination uptake: the position of the Italian pediatric society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzola, Elena; Spina, Giulia; Russo, Rocco; Bozzola, Mauro; Corsello, Giovanni; Villani, Alberto

    2018-06-14

    High rates of vaccination coverage are important in preventing infectious diseases. Enforcing mandatory vaccinations is one of the strategies that some Countries adopted to protect the community when vaccination coverage is not satisfactory. In Italy, in 2017 vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliovirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, measles, mumps, rubella and varicella became compulsory in childhood. In order to contrast vaccination policies, anti-vaccination campaigns contribute to the spread of fake news. Among them, there is the false information that Italy is the only one country with mandatory vaccination policy. Aim of our study is confronting vaccination policies in children under 18 months against among different European countries for the following vaccines: diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliovirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, measles, mumps, rubella and varicella. Information on policies of mandatory or recommended vaccinations of the European Countries were gathered by ECDC and compared to the Italian one. European Countries recommend or contemplate compulsory vaccines. Among them, eleven Countries (35.4%) have mandatory vaccinations for at least one out of diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliovirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccine. Not only in Italy, vaccination against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, poliovirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, measles, mumps, rubella and varicella is mandatory in children under 18 months. Other European countries adopted compulsory policies in order to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and to protect the community.

  6. The combined measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines and the total number of vaccines are not associated with development of autism spectrum disorder: the first case-control study in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yota; Uchiyama, Tokio; Kurosawa, Michiko; Aleksic, Branko; Ozaki, Norio

    2012-06-13

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and general vaccinations, including measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, in Japanese subjects, a population with high genetic homogeneity. A case-control study was performed. Cases (n=189) were diagnosed with ASD, while controls (n=224) were volunteers from general schools, matched by sex and birth year to cases. Vaccination history and prenatal, perinatal, and neonatal factors from the Maternal and Child Health handbook, which was part of each subject's file, were examined. To determine the relationship between potential risk factors and ASD, crude odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated, and the differences in mean values of the quantitative variables between cases and controls were analyzed using an unpaired t-test. Moreover, MMR vaccination and the effect of the number of vaccine injections were investigated using a conditional multiple regression model. For MMR vaccination, the OR was 1.04 (95% CI, 0.65-1.68), and no significant differences were found for the other vaccines. For all of the prenatal, perinatal and neonatal factors, there were no significant differences between cases and controls. Furthermore, regarding the presence of ASD, MMR vaccination and the number of vaccine injections had ORs of 1.10 (95% CI, 0.64-1.90) and 1.10 (95% CI, 0.95-1.26), respectively, in the conditional multiple regression model; no significant differences were found. In this study, there were not any convincing evidences that MMR vaccination and increasing the number of vaccine injections were associated with an increased risk of ASD in a genetically homogeneous population. Therefore, these findings indicate that there is no basis for avoiding vaccination out of concern for ASD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of routine varicella vaccination using the measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccine in France: an economic analysis based on a dynamic transmission model for varicella and herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlewood, Kavi J; Ouwens, Mario J N M; Sauboin, Christophe; Tehard, Bertrand; Alain, Sophie; Denis, François

    2015-04-01

    Each year in France, varicella and zoster affect large numbers of children and adults, resulting in medical visits, hospitalizations for varicella- and zoster-related complications, and societal costs. Disease prevention by varicella vaccination is feasible, wherein a plausible option involves replacing the combined measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine with the combined MMR and varicella (MMRV) vaccine. This study aimed to: (1) assess the cost-effectiveness of adding routine varicella vaccination through MMRV, using different vaccination strategies in France; and (2) address key uncertainties, such as the economic consequences of breakthrough varicella cases, the waning of vaccine-conferred protection, vaccination coverage, and indirect costs. Based on the outputs of a dynamic transmission model that used data on epidemiology and costs from France, a cost-effectiveness model was built. A conservative approach was taken regarding the impact of varicella vaccination on zoster incidence by assuming the validity of the hypothesis of an age-specific boosting of immunity against varicella. The model determined that routine MMRV vaccination is expected to be a cost-effective option, considering a cost-effectiveness threshold of €20,000 per quality-adjusted life-year saved; routine vaccination was cost-saving from the societal perspective. Results were driven by a large decrease in varicella incidence despite a temporary initial increase in the number of zoster cases due to the assumption of exogenous boosting. In the scenario analyses, despite moderate changes in assumptions about incidence and costs, varicella vaccination remained a cost-effective option for France. Routine vaccination with MMRV was associated with high gains in quality-adjusted life-years, substantial reduction in the occurrences of varicella- and zoster-related complications, and few deaths due to varicella. Routine MMRV vaccination is also expected to provide reductions in costs related to

  8. Drug: D05089 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ttenuated mumps vaccine (TN) ... Antiviral ... DG01689 ... Live vaccine ... DG01687 ... Parenteral live vaccine Therapeutic category: 6313 ATC code: J07BE01 ... PubChem: 17398246 ...

  9. Viral arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... B Hepatitis C Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Human parvovirus Mumps Rubella Alphaviruses Cytomegalovirus It may also occur after immunization with the rubella vaccine, which is typically given to children. While many ...

  10. RF MEMS Fractal Capacitors With High Self-Resonant Frequencies

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Emira, Ahmed; Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    This letter demonstrates RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fractal capacitors possessing the highest reported self-resonant frequencies (SRFs) in PolyMUMPS to date. Explicitly, measurement results show SRFs beyond 20 GHz. Furthermore, quality

  11. Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances and Indicators of Immune Function in Children Aged 12 – 19 years: NHANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cheryl R.; McGovern, Kathleen J.; Pajak, Ashley M.; Maglione, Paul J.; Wolff, Mary S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are immunotoxic in laboratory studies. Humans studies of immune effects are inconsistent. Using the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) we examined PFAS serum concentration and indicators of prevalent immune function among 12 to 19 year old children. Methods In this cross-sectional study we examined PFAS serum concentration in relation to measles, mumps, and rubella antibody concentrations in NHANES 1999 – 2000 and 2003 – 2004 (n=1,191) and to allergic conditions and allergic sensitization in NHANES 2005 – 2006 (n=640). Results In adjusted, survey-weighted models, a doubling of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) concentration among seropositive children was associated with a 13.3% (95% CI −19.9, −6.2) decrease in rubella antibody concentration and a 5.9% decrease in mumps antibody concentration (95% CI −9.9, −1.6). We observed no adverse association between exposure and current allergic conditions, including asthma. Children with higher PFOS concentration were less likely to be sensitized to any allergen (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58, 0.95). Conclusion Increased exposure to several PFAS was associated with lower levels to mumps and rubella antibody concentrations, especially among seropositive individuals. These lower antibody concentrations may indicate a less robust response to vaccination or greater waning of vaccine-derived immunity over time. PMID:26492286

  12. Blood differential test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swelling and inflammation from bacteria or viruses) Infectious mononucleosis , or mono (viral infection that causes fever, sore ... involves the lungs) Viral infection (for example, infectious mononucleosis, mumps, measles) An increased percentage of eosinophils may ...

  13. Healthy Family 2009: Protecting Toddlers and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Protecting Toddlers and Teens Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... virus that causes a rash, cough, runny nose, eye irritation, and fever Mumps, a virus causing fever, ...

  14. Splenogonadal fusion: a forgotten cause of testicular swelling in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    swelling in children. Mohamad ... report describes a 25-month-old male child who presented with left .... conditions such as mumps, malaria, leukemia, trauma, and ... Splenogonadal fusion and testicular cancer: case report and review of.

  15. What Is a Vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases like whooping cough (pertussis), measles, mumps, and German measles (rubella) may be unfamiliar to you. In ... Paylines & Funding Paylines Paylines by Fiscal Year Financial Management Plan Budget Data Comparisons Background on Planning and ...

  16. Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Immunizations Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian/Pacific Islander ... 35 months reached the Healthy People goal for immunizations for hepatitis B, MMR (measles-mumps-rubella), polio ...

  17. Predicting global variation in infectious disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Moestrup; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard

    2016-01-01

    demographic and population data. Results: Birth rates were the best predictor for mumps and malaria CFR. For tuberculosis CFR death rates were the best predictor and for leptospirosis population density was a significant predictor. Conclusions and implications: CFR predictors differed among diseases according...... and leptospirosis and assessed these for association with a range of population characteristics, such as crude birth and death rates, median age of the population, mean body mass index, proportion living in urban areas and tuberculosis vaccine coverage. We then tested this predictive model on Danish his- torical...... have the opposite effect. Accordingly changes in CFR may occur in parallel with demographic transitions. Methodology: We explored the predictability of CFR using data obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) disease databases for four human diseases: mumps, malaria, tuberculosis...

  18. Dgroup: DG01687 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available uated mumps vaccine (JP17) ... D04866 ... Freeze-dried live attenuated measles vaccine (JP17) ... D06512 ... Freeze-...dried live attenuated rubella vaccine (JP17) ... D08804 ... Freeze-dried live attenuated measles

  19. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  20. Disease: H00396 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cations such as aseptic meningitis, pediatric deafness, and orchitis. Infectious disease ... Mumps virus [GN:T4...inflammation of parotid glands and fever. Mortality is rare, but it often accompanied by more serious compli

  1. Influence of population diversity on neurovirulence potential of plaque purified L-Zagreb variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic-Jelecki, Jelena; Forcic, Dubravko; Jagusic, Maja; Kosutic-Gulija, Tanja; Mazuran, Renata; Balija, Maja Lang; Isakov, Ofer; Shomron, Noam

    2016-04-29

    Despite continuing research efforts, determinants of mumps virus virulence are still largely unknown. One of consequences of this is difficulty in striking a balance between efficacy and safety of live attenuated mumps vaccines. Among mumps vaccine strains associated with occurrence of postvaccinal aseptic meningitis is L-Zagreb, developed by further attenuation of vaccine strain L-3. Starting from an archived L-Zagreb sample with suboptimal neuroattenuation score, we isolated different viral variants and compared their genetic and phenotypic properties, in investigation of neurovirulence markers. Six different L-Zagreb variants were isolated by plaque purification. Their neurovirulent status was determined by rat-based neurovirulence test; population structure was determined by deep sequencing. We isolated one well neuroattenuated viral variant, two marginally neuroattenuated, and three insufficiently neuroattenuated. No genetic markers of neurovirulence could be identified. None of variants had detectable amounts of defective interfering particles. Two characteristics set insufficiently neuroattenuated variants apart from less-neurovirulent ones: elevated variability level in regions 1293-3314, 5363-7773 and 9382-11657, and/or elevated number of mutations present in frequencies ≥ 1%. The most neurovirulent variants possessed both of these features. Distinctive heterogeneity profiles were obtained for insufficiently neuroattenuated L-Zagreb variants. No markers that would discriminate between marginally and well neuroattenuated variants were identified. The findings of this study may serve as a guideline during development of an improved L3/L-Zagreb vaccine strain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Facial nerve palsy: analysis of cases reported in children in a suburban hospital in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folayan, M O; Arobieke, R I; Eziyi, E; Oyetola, E O; Elusiyan, J

    2014-01-01

    The study describes the epidemiology, treatment, and treatment outcomes of the 10 cases of facial nerve palsy seen in children managed at the Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-Ife over a 10 year period. It also compares findings with report from developed countries. This was a retrospective cohort review of pediatric cases of facial nerve palsy encountered in all the clinics run by specialists in the above named hospital. A diagnosis of facial palsy was based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Information retrieved from the case note included sex, age, number of days with lesion prior to presentation in the clinic, diagnosis, treatment, treatment outcome, and referral clinic. Only 10 cases of facial nerve palsy were diagnosed in the institution during the study period. Prevalence of facial nerve palsy in this hospital was 0.01%. The lesion more commonly affected males and the right side of the face. All cases were associated with infections: Mainly mumps (70% of cases). Case management include the use of steroids and eye pads for cases that presented within 7 days; and steroids, eye pad, and physical therapy for cases that presented later. All cases of facial nerve palsy associated with mumps and malaria infection fully recovered. The two cases of facial nerve palsy associated with otitis media only partially recovered. Facial nerve palsy in pediatric patients is more commonly associated with mumps in the study environment. Successes are recorded with steroid therapy.

  3. 77 FR 5026 - Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... will include discussions on: meningococcal vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine, tetanus, diphtheria, and... appropriate dose, administration interval, age groups and contraindications applicable to the vaccines..., and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. A VFC vote is scheduled for meningococcal vaccines...

  4. Acute and Subacute Toxic Study of Aqueous Leaf Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    ... end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed and their organs (liver, heart and kidney) removed for macroscopic ... uses include treatment of swelling caused by mumps and ..... medicinal use of this plant in folk medicine. However ...

  5. MFR-vaccination og autisme - et populationsbaseret followupstudie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard; Hviid, Anders; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    Summary: Summary A population-based study of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination and autism. Ugeskr Læger 2002; 164: 5741-4. Introduction: It has been suggested that the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination causes autism. Material and methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all...... confidence interval, 0.65 to 1.07). There was no association between age at vaccination, time since vaccination or calendar period at time of vaccination and development of autistic disorder. Discussion: This study provides strong evidence against the hypothesis that MMR vaccination causes autism....... children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998. The cohort was established based on data from the Danish Civil Registration System. A unique person identifiable number given to all subjects enabled linkage with other national registries. MMR vaccination status was obtained from the Danish...

  6. Facial nerve palsy: Analysis of cases reported in children in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-02-28

    Feb 28, 2013 ... steroids and eye pads for cases that presented within 7 days; and steroids, eye pad, and physical ... Key words: Children, facial nerve, malaria, mumps, Nigeria, palsy .... until 200 white blood cells (WBC) have been seen and.

  7. MEMS variable capacitance devices utilizing the substrate: II. Zipping varactors

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; El-Masry, Ezz I.

    2010-01-01

    and tested. To the best of our knowledge, these zipping varactors exhibit the best reported characteristics in PolyMUMPS to date within their category in terms of tuning range, quality factor, required actuation voltage and total area consumed. © 2010 IOP

  8. Evaluation of MMR Vaccination and Autism Link

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective cohort study of autism in all children born in Denmark from January 1991 through December 1998 and those receiving measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR vaccination is reported from the Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Aarhus, Denmark.

  9. The Dangerous Decline in the United States Military’s Infectious Disease Vaccine Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-17

    of the 27th Special Operations Medical Group, Cannon Air Force Base, New Mexico . He has supported numerous combat operations including Operations...Japanese encephalitis.22 In addition, development of licensed vaccines for yellow fever, mumps, measles, varicella and oral polio was supervised

  10. Effect of vaccinations on seizure risk and disease course in Dravet syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, N.E.; van der Maas, N.A.T.; Sonsma, A.C.M.; Ippel, E.; Bondt, P.E.V.D.; Hagebeuk, E.; Jansen, F.E.; Geesink, H.H.; Braun, K.P.; de Louw, A.; Augustijn, P.B.; Neuteboom, R.F.; Schieving, J.H.; Stroink, H.; Vermeulen, R.J.; Nicolai, J.; Brouwer, O.F.; van Kempen, M.; de Kovel, C.G.F.; Kemmeren, J.M.; Koeleman, B.P.C.; Knoers, N.V.; Lindhout, D.; Gunning, W.B.; Brilstra, E.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of vaccination-associated seizure onset on disease course and estimate the risk of subsequent seizures after infant pertussis combination and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccinations in Dravet syndrome (DS). Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from hospital

  11. Radioimmunoassay for the detection of virus-specific IgA antibodies in saliva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, M.G.

    1982-01-01

    The use of a sensitive and versatile radioimmunoassay (RIA) for detection of mumps-specific IgA and measles-specific IgA in unconcentrated saliva samples is described. The samples were obtained either by expectoration or by swabbing of the oral cavity, with or without stimulation of secretion, and were inactivated and clarified before testing. Mumps-specific IgA antibodies were detected as early as one day after onset of illness and peaked at 1-2 weeks after onset. Measles-specific salivary IgA antibodies were detected in 15-month old children 2-3 weeks after immunization. These results suggest that the RIA technique may be useful for early diagnosis of viral infections and for confirmation of response to immunization without the need for a blood sample, as well as for the study of the secretory immune response in very young and older subjects. (Auth.)

  12. Immunologic effects of hydroxyurea in sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Howard M; Connolly, Margaret A; Kalpatthi, Ram; Ware, Russell E; Wang, Winfred C; Luchtman-Jones, Lori; Waclawiw, Myron; Goldsmith, Jonathan C; Swift, Andrea; Casella, James F

    2014-10-01

    Susceptibility to encapsulated bacteria is well known in sickle cell disease (SCD). Hydroxyurea use is common in adults and children with SCD, but little is known about hydroxyurea's effects on immune function in SCD. Because hydroxyurea inhibits ribonucleotide reductase, causing cell cycle arrest at the G1-S interface, we postulated that hydroxyurea might delay transition from naive to memory T cells, with inhibition of immunologic maturation and vaccine responses. T-cell subsets, naive and memory T cells, and antibody responses to pneumococcal and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccines were measured among participants in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of hydroxyurea in infants and young children with SCD (BABY HUG). Compared with placebo, hydroxyurea treatment resulted in significantly lower total lymphocyte, CD4, and memory T-cell counts; however, these numbers were still within the range of historical healthy controls. Antibody responses to pneumococcal vaccination were not affected, but a delay in achieving protective measles antibody levels occurred in the hydroxyurea group. Antibody levels to measles, mumps, and rubella showed no differences between groups at exit, indicating that effective immunization can be achieved despite hydroxyurea use. Hydroxyurea does not appear to have significant deleterious effects on the immune function of infants and children with SCD. Additional assessments of lymphocyte parameters of hydroxyurea-treated children may be warranted. No changes in current immunization schedules are recommended; however, for endemic disease or epidemics, adherence to accelerated immunization schedules for the measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine should be reinforced. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. 38 CFR 3.350 - Special monthly compensation ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mumps followed by orchitis in service is service connected. Since atrophy is usually perceptible within... eye reveals that perception of objects, hand movements, or counting fingers cannot be accomplished at 3 feet. Lesser extents of vision, particularly perception of objects, hand movements, or counting...

  14. The Dangerous Decline in the Department of Defense’s Vaccine Program for Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    mumps, measles, varicella , and oral polio.21 In the high­risk business of vaccine production, experience breeds proficiency and efficiency, curbing...has served as commander of the 27th Special Operations Medical Group, Cannon AFB, New Mexico . Colonel Hall has supported numerous combat operations

  15. [The active offering of measles, rubella and mumps vaccine in new mothers: the experience of health facilities in one of the Local Health Unit of Rome, Lazio, Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Viviana; Pettinicchio, Valentina; Lancia, Andreina; Vazzoler, Cristiana; De Luca, Francesca; Franco, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Rubella is a contagious disease that can be very serious, especially in unvaccinated pregnant women. The best way to be protected is getting vaccinated: MMR vaccine is very effective at protecting people against measles, mumps, and rubella, and preventing the complications caused by these diseases. According to PASSI 2012-2015 (the Italian behavioral risk factor surveillance system) in the territory of ex ASL Roma C only 56% of women between 18 and 49 years were immunized against rubella, thanks to vaccination (34%) or past infection detected by rubeotest (22%); 2% was susceptible and 42% of respondents did not know their immune status against rubella. The Italian National Plan for the Elimination of Measles and Congenital Rubella (PNEMoRc) 2010-15 had the aim to reduce the prevalence of rubella susceptibility in young women (<5%), to reduce the prevalence of congenital rubella and to increase MMR vaccination coverage. This plan suggested to promote actions to spread correct information about MMR vaccine in the general population and healthcare workers and to offer this vaccine to susceptible women during every appropriate contact with the Family planning clinics. In order to ensure and monitor these recommendations, a recovery procedure for MMR vaccine was activated in 2015 for women who contacted the health facilities for their first child vaccination. A form was developed in order to collect information about women's immune status against rubella and measles. According to this tool all women who stated they had never been vaccinated for rubella or MMR and/or did not remember vaccination and/or had never had a rubeotest were considered susceptible to rubella. Women susceptible to rubella were invited to undergo vaccination. Data collected during one year activity were recorded and analyzed with Epinfo 7.0 software. We collected 1801 correctly filled forms; 88.6% (1595) of women were evaluated immune to rubella and 11.4% susceptible. The prevalence of

  16. 76 FR 19778 - National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program: Statement of Reasons for Not Conducting Rule-Making...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... petition, in 2008, the Secretary contracted with the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to review the...-mumps rubella vaccines, and diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis vaccines. The IOM committee will author a... Secretary expects to receive the IOM consensus report in early summer. After receipt of the consensus report...

  17. A random cluster survey and a convenience sample give comparable estimates of immunity to vaccine preventable diseases in children of school age in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Heath; Riddell, Michaela A; Gidding, Heather F; Nolan, Terry; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2002-08-19

    We compared estimates of the age-specific population immunity to measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B and varicella zoster viruses in Victorian school children obtained by a national sero-survey, using a convenience sample of residual sera from diagnostic laboratories throughout Australia, with those from a three-stage random cluster survey. When grouped according to school age (primary or secondary school) there was no significant difference in the estimates of immunity to measles, mumps, hepatitis B or varicella. Compared with the convenience sample, the random cluster survey estimated higher immunity to rubella in samples from both primary (98.7% versus 93.6%, P = 0.002) and secondary school students (98.4% versus 93.2%, P = 0.03). Despite some limitations, this study suggests that the collection of a convenience sample of sera from diagnostic laboratories is an appropriate sampling strategy to provide population immunity data that will inform Australia's current and future immunisation policies. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Subclinical immune reactions to viral infections may correlate with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... 1. Department of Pediatrics, Bolu,Turkey. 2.Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Bolu,Turkey. 3.Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology,. Bolu,Turkey. 4. ... HSV-1, CMV, Measles, Mumps, Rubella and EBV were evaluated. Results: ..... MHC-Class I proteins are also produced ...

  19. TIPS FOR THE RADIOLOGIST Use of MR sialography and T2W fat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acute non-suppurative parotitis (as found in mumps), early Sjögren's syndrome, or suppurative parotitis as seen following duct obstruction. Sometimes there is strong insistence on retrograde contrast sialography; however, this may exacerbate the pre-existing inflammatory process.1. The imaging of a young patient expands ...

  20. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccine leaves a person unprotected and still at risk for getting a disease. Other vaccinations require a booster shot every few years to ... who get diseases like mumps may be at risk for side effects of the illness, such ... children). Vaccinations are about protecting you in the future, not ...

  1. Delayed Hypersensitivity to Tuberculin and Other Antigens in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delayed hypersensitivi:y is a valuable index of cellular immune function, provided that the incidence of positive readions in the population is known. One hundred and sixty-two hospital pat;ents were examined, using tuberculin. (PPD), streptokinase and antigens derived from Candida albicans and mumps. Whereas 75% of ...

  2. Compulsory and recommended vaccination in Italy: evaluation of coverage and non-compliance between 1998-2002 in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampi, Serena; Ricci, Rita; Ruffilli, Isa; Zanetti, Franca

    2005-04-21

    Since vaccinations are an effective prevention tool for maintaining the health of society, the monitoring of immunization coverage allows us to identify areas where disease outbreaks are likely to occur, and possibly assist us in predicting future outbreaks. The aim of this study is the investigation of the coverage achieved for compulsory (diphtheria, tetanus, polio, hepatitis B,) and recommended (pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, measles-mumps-rubella) vaccinations between 1998 and 2002 in the municipality of Bologna and the identification of the subjects not complying with compulsory and recommended vaccinations. The statistics regarding vaccinal coverage were elaborated from the data supplied by the Bologna vaccinal registration system (1998-2000) and the IPV4 program (2001-2002). To calculate the coverage for compulsory vaccinations and cases of non-compliance reference was made to the protocol drawn up by the Emilia Romagna Regional Administration. The reasons for non-compliance were divided into various categories In Bologna the levels of immunization for the four compulsory vaccinations are satisfactory: over 95% children completed the vaccinal cycle, receiving the booster for anti-polio foreseen in their 3rd year and for anti-diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis at 6 years. The frequency of subjects with total non-compliance (i.e. those who have not begun any compulsory vaccinations by the age of one year) is generally higher in Bologna than in the region, with a slight increase in 2002 (2.52% and 1.06% in the city and the region respectively). The frequency of the anti-measles vaccination is higher than that of mumps and rubella, which means that the single vaccine, as opposed to the combined MMR (measles-mumps-rubella) was still being used in the period in question. The most common reason for non compliance is objection of parents and is probably due to reduction of certain diseases or anxiety about the possible risks. In Bologna the frequency of children

  3. Compulsory and recommended vaccination in Italy: evaluation of coverage and non-compliance between 1998-2002 in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruffilli Isa

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since vaccinations are an effective prevention tool for maintaining the health of society, the monitoring of immunization coverage allows us to identify areas where disease outbreaks are likely to occur, and possibly assist us in predicting future outbreaks. The aim of this study is the investigation of the coverage achieved for compulsory (diphtheria, tetanus, polio, hepatitis B, and recommended (pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, measles-mumps-rubella vaccinations between 1998 and 2002 in the municipality of Bologna and the identification of the subjects not complying with compulsory and recommended vaccinations. Methods The statistics regarding vaccinal coverage were elaborated from the data supplied by the Bologna vaccinal registration system (1998–2000 and the IPV4 program (2001–2002. To calculate the coverage for compulsory vaccinations and cases of non-compliance reference was made to the protocol drawn up by the Emilia Romagna Regional Administration. The reasons for non-compliance were divided into various categories Results In Bologna the levels of immunization for the four compulsory vaccinations are satisfactory: over 95% children completed the vaccinal cycle, receiving the booster for anti-polio foreseen in their 3rd year and for anti-dyphteria, tetanus, pertussis at 6 years. The frequency of subjects with total non-compliance (i.e. those who have not begun any compulsory vaccinations by the age of one year is generally higher in Bologna than in the region, with a slight increase in 2002 (2.52% and 1.06% in the city and the region respectively. The frequency of the anti-measles vaccination is higher than that of mumps and rubella, which means that the single vaccine, as opposed to the combined MMR (measles-mumps-rubella was still being used in the period in question. The most common reason for non compliance is objection of parents and is probably due to reduction of certain diseases or anxiety about the

  4. Structural and Functional Studies on the Fusion and Attachment Envelope Glycoproteins of Nipah Virus and Hendra Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    including measles virus (MeV), mumps virus, Sendai virus (SeV), Newcastle disease virus (NDV), rinderpest virus, canine distemper virus (CDV), human...Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD. Hut 102, MT2, MT4, and CEM human T cell lines were provided by Chou-Zen Giam, USUHS, Bethesda, MD. The human osteosarcoma

  5. MEMS-Based Waste Vibrational Energy Harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    MEMS energy- harvesting device. Although PZT is used more prevalently due to its higher piezoelectric coefficient and dielectric constant, AlN has...7 1. Lead Zirconium Titanate ( PZT ) .........................................................7 2. Aluminum...Laboratory PiezoMUMPS Piezoelectric Multi-User MEMS Processes PZT Lead Zirconate Titanate SEM Scanning Electron Microscopy SiO2 Silicon

  6. Measles: Information for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as mumps and rubella. • Prevents your child from getting an uncomfortable rash and high fever from measles. • Keeps your child from missing school or childcare (and keeps you from missing work to care for your sick child). Is the MMR shot safe? Yes. The MMR shot is very safe, and it ...

  7. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 22, Number 1, February 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    bullet wound? a. Head or neck b. Rest of body (4) Other injury (e.g., sports injury, accidental fall , etc.)? If yes to any of the above, please... pregnancy loss and preterm labor.1,2 Mumps virus spreads easily from per- son to person through inhalation of air- borne saliva droplets or from

  8. LIVE ATTENUATED VACCINES FOR THE IMMUNOPROPHYLAXIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shamsutdinova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The review focuses on the history of the production of live antiviral vaccines and their use for the prevention of infectious diseases. It was noted that before the beginning of the 20th century, only three live vaccines were developed and put into practice — against smallpox, rabies, plague. The discovery of D. Enders, T.H. Weller and F.Ch. Robins of the ability of the polio virus, and then of a number of other viruses, to reproduce in vitro in cell cultures of various types, greatly expanded the studies on the production of attenuated strains of viruses for live vaccines. The historical stages of obtaining and introducing live vaccines for the prevention of smallpox, poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, and mumps are highlighted. Arguments in favor of the use of associated vaccine preparations for the prevention of viral infections are presented. Various variants of the strategy and tactics of using live vaccines, which are used for specific prevention of viral infections in different countries, are described. The review provides information on technological methods for obtaining antiviral vaccines. The publications testifying to the development of specific reactions in immunized vaccine strains of measles, mumps, poliomyelitis and rubella viruses, such as aseptic meningitis (vaccine strains of mumps virus, acute arthritis (vaccine rubella virus strains, temperature reactions, rash (vaccine strains of the virus Measles, vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis (VAPP vaccine vaccine poliovirus. It is particularly noted that the long experience of vaccine prevention both in Russia and abroad convincingly shows that the risk of developing post-vaccination complications is incommensurably lower than the risk of causing harm to health from the corresponding infections. It is concluded that despite introduction of new third and fourth generation vaccines into practice, live attenuated vaccines do not lose their significance and are used in vaccine

  9. Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions About Routine Childhood Vaccinations Among Jewish Ultra-Orthodox Mothers Residing in Communities with Low Vaccination Coverage in the Jerusalem District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein Zamir, Chen; Israeli, Avi

    2017-05-01

    Background and aims Childhood vaccinations are an important component of primary prevention. Maternal and Child Health (MCH) clinics in Israel provide routine vaccinations without charge. Several vaccine-preventable-diseases outbreaks (measles, mumps) emerged in Jerusalem in the past decade. We aimed to study attitudes and knowledge on vaccinations among mothers, in communities with low immunization coverage. Methods A qualitative study including focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Results Low immunization coverage was defined below the district's mean (age 2 years, 2013) for measles-mumps-rubella-varicella 1st dose (MMR1\\MMRV1) and diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis 4th dose (DTaP4), 96 and 89%, respectively. Five communities were included, all were Jewish ultra-orthodox. The mothers' (n = 87) median age was 30 years and median number of children 4. Most mothers (94%) rated vaccinations as the main activity in the MCH clinics with overall positive attitudes. Knowledge about vaccines and vaccination schedule was inadequate. Of vaccines scheduled at ages 0-2 years (n = 13), the mean number mentioned was 3.9 ± 2.8 (median 4, range 0-9). Vaccines mentioned more often were outbreak-related (measles, mumps, polio) and HBV (given to newborns). Concerns about vaccines were obvious, trust issues and religious beliefs were not. Vaccination delay was very common and timeliness was considered insignificant. Practical difficulties in adhering to the recommended schedule prevailed. The vaccinations visits were associated with pain and stress. Overall, there was a sense of self-responsibility accompanied by inability to influence others. Conclusion Investigating maternal knowledge and attitudes on childhood vaccinations provides insights that may assist in planning tailored intervention programs aimed to increase both vaccination coverage and timeliness.

  10. Updated data on effective and safe immunizations with live-attenuated vaccines for children after living donor liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinjoh, Masayoshi; Hoshino, Ken; Takahashi, Takao; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2015-01-29

    Although immunizations using live-attenuated vaccines are not recommended for children post-liver transplant due to their theoretical risks, they will inevitably encounter vaccine-preventable viral diseases upon returning to real-life situations. The window of opportunity for vaccination is usually limited prior to transplantation because these children often have unstable disease courses. Also, vaccine immunity does not always persist after transplantation. Beginning in 2002, subcutaneous immunizations with four individual live-attenuated vaccines (measles, rubella, varicella, and mumps) to pediatric patients following living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) were performed for those who fulfilled the clinical criteria, including humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Written informed consent was collected. We included the study on 70 immunizations for 18 cases that we reported in 2008 (Shinjoh et al., 2008). A total of 196 immunizations were administered to 48 pediatric post-LDLT recipients. Of these, 144 were first immunizations and 52 were repeated immunizations following LDLT. The seroconversion rates at the first dose for measles (AIK-C), rubella (TO-336), varicella (Oka), and mumps (Hoshino) were 100% (36/36), 100% (35/35), 70% (23/33), and 75% (24/32), respectively. Antibody levels did not fall over time in patients immunized with rubella vaccine. Three mild cases of breakthrough varicella were observed. Two cases with transient parotid gland swelling were observed after mumps immunization. Two admissions because of fever at 2-3 weeks after the measles vaccine were reported but the patients had no symptoms of measles. Immunizations using selected live-attenuated vaccines were safe and effective for post-LDLT children who were not severely immunosuppressed. However, with the exception of rubella, repeated immunization may be necessary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed Hypersensitivity in Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Kumar

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty two adult male patients of psoriasis and 100 normal Volunteers Were skin-tested ′ with DNC-B, mumps skin antigen, candidin coccidiodin, PPD, croton Oil and histamine hate Except for ′decreased mine phosphate sensitization seen: with DNCB, the response of psoriabics to, skin testing was comparable with the normals.

  12. Infectious diseases at the paediatric isolation units of Clairwood and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No cases of poliomyelitis, diphtheria or cholera have been seen since 1990. Typhoid fever, mumps, tetanus and pertussis have decreased, but remain at low endemic levels. Between 1994 and 1996, 1% of measles and 15.3% of varicella cases have been associated with illV-l infection; this has resulted in 56% of measles ...

  13. MEMS variable capacitance devices utilizing the substrate: II. Zipping varactors

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2010-03-22

    This paper, the second and last in this series, introduces PolyMUMPS zipping varactors that exploit the substrate and provide a high tuning range and a high quality factor. Building on the important findings of part I of this paper, the substrate was utilized effectively once again in the design and fabrication of zipping varactors to attain devices with very good performance. Two zipping varactors are proposed, analysed theoretically, simulated, fabricated and tested successfully. The tuning range, quality factor and actuation voltage of those varactors are 4.5, 16.4, 55 V and 4.2, 17, 55 V respectively. Finally, and based on one of the proposed zipping varactors, a very large capacitance value varactor array, with a tuning range of 5.3, was designed and tested. To the best of our knowledge, these zipping varactors exhibit the best reported characteristics in PolyMUMPS to date within their category in terms of tuning range, quality factor, required actuation voltage and total area consumed. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Written reminders increase vaccine coverage in Danish children - evaluation of a nationwide intervention using The Danish Vaccination Register, 2014 to 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suppli, Camilla Hiul; Rasmussen, Mette; Valentiner-Branth, Palle

    2017-01-01

    of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR2) and the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio vaccine DTaP-IPV4 among the 7-year-olds, with 5.0 percentage points (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-5.4) and 6.4 percentage points (95% CI: 6.0-6.9), respectively. Among the 2.5 and 7-year-olds, the proportion...

  15. Inflammatorisk tarmsygdom--spiller mikroorganismer en rolle?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sara Elsøe; Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Vainer, Ben

    2002-01-01

    This review focuses on the potential pathogenic role of microorganisms in relation to inflammatory bowel diseases, i.e. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Pathogenic microorganism such as Mycobacterium paratuberculosis, measles and mumps viruses, Epstein-Barr virus, and Listeria monocytogenes...... disease reflects an immune imbalance with loss of tolerance for normally harmless antigens in the mucosal microflora. Udgivelsesdato: 2002-Dec-9...

  16. Viruses and thyroiditis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hober Didier

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral infections are frequently cited as a major environmental factor involved in subacute thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid diseases This review examines the data related to the role of viruses in the development of thyroiditis. Our research has been focused on human data. We have reviewed virological data for each type of thyroiditis at different levels of evidence; epidemiological data, serological data or research on circulating viruses, direct evidence of thyroid tissue infection. Interpretation of epidemiological and serological data must be cautious as they don't prove that this pathogen is responsible for the disease. However, direct evidence of the presence of viruses or their components in the organ are available for retroviruses (HFV and mumps in subacute thyroiditis, for retroviruses (HTLV-1, HFV, HIV and SV40 in Graves's disease and for HTLV-1, enterovirus, rubella, mumps virus, HSV, EBV and parvovirus in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, it remains to determine whether they are responsible for thyroid diseases or whether they are just innocent bystanders. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between viruses and thyroid diseases, in order to develop new strategies for prevention and/or treatment.

  17. Viruses and thyroiditis: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desailloud, Rachel; Hober, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections are frequently cited as a major environmental factor involved in subacute thyroiditis and autoimmune thyroid diseases This review examines the data related to the role of viruses in the development of thyroiditis. Our research has been focused on human data. We have reviewed virological data for each type of thyroiditis at different levels of evidence; epidemiological data, serological data or research on circulating viruses, direct evidence of thyroid tissue infection. Interpretation of epidemiological and serological data must be cautious as they don't prove that this pathogen is responsible for the disease. However, direct evidence of the presence of viruses or their components in the organ are available for retroviruses (HFV) and mumps in subacute thyroiditis, for retroviruses (HTLV-1, HFV, HIV and SV40) in Graves's disease and for HTLV-1, enterovirus, rubella, mumps virus, HSV, EBV and parvovirus in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. However, it remains to determine whether they are responsible for thyroid diseases or whether they are just innocent bystanders. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between viruses and thyroid diseases, in order to develop new strategies for prevention and/or treatment. PMID:19138419

  18. A longitudinal analysis of the effect of nonmedical exemption law and vaccine uptake on vaccine-targeted disease rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y Tony; Debold, Vicky

    2014-02-01

    We assessed how nonmedical exemption (NME) laws and annual uptake of vaccines required for school or daycare entry affect annual incidence rates for 5 vaccine-targeted diseases: pertussis, measles, mumps, Haemophilus influenzae type B, and hepatitis B. We employed longitudinal mixed-effects models to examine 2001-2008 vaccine-targeted disease data obtained from the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System. Key explanatory variables were state-level vaccine-specific uptake rates from the National Immunization Survey and a state NME law restrictiveness level. NME law restrictiveness and vaccine uptake were not associated with disease incidence rate for hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type B, measles, or mumps. Pertussis incidence rate, however, was negatively associated with NME law restrictiveness (b = -0.20; P = .03) and diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus vaccine uptake (b = -0.01; P = .05). State NME laws and vaccine uptake rates did not appear to influence lower-incidence diseases but may influence reported disease rates for higher-incidence diseases. If all states increased their NME law restrictiveness by 1 level and diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus uptake by 1%, national annual pertussis cases could decrease by 1.14% (171 cases) and 0.04% (5 cases), respectively.

  19. A novel vertical comb-drive electrostatic actuator using a one layer process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hailu, Zewdu; He, Siyuan; Mrad, Ridha Ben

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and testing of a new residual stress gradient based vertical comb-drive actuator. Conventional vertical comb-drive actuators need two structural layers, i.e. one for the moving fingers and a second for the fixed fingers. A vertical comb-drive actuator based on a single structural layer micromachining process, using the residual stress gradient along the thickness of the nickel of the MetalMUMPs (Metal Multi-User MEMS process) fabrication process, is developed. The MetalMUMPs provides a 20 μm thick nickel film and is subject to residual stress gradients along its thickness. Two curve-up beams are devised to curve out of plane after release. The curve-up beams raise a plate with comb fingers above the substrate to form the moving fingers. The fixed comb fingers are connected to the substrate via anchors. When a voltage is applied across the moving and the fixed fingers, the moving fingers move down towards the fixed fingers. Experimental measurements on prototypes have verified the design principle. A vertical displacement of 4.81 µm at 150 V was measured. (paper)

  20. Optimising the introduction of multiple childhood vaccines in Japan: A model proposing the introduction sequence achieving the highest health gains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standaert, Baudouin; Schecroun, Nadia; Ethgen, Olivier; Topachevskyi, Oleksandr; Morioka, Yoriko; Van Vlaenderen, Ilse

    2017-12-01

    Many countries struggle with the prioritisation of introducing new vaccines because of budget limitations and lack of focus on public health goals. A model has been developed that defines how specific health goals can be optimised through immunisation within vaccination budget constraints. Japan, as a country example, could introduce 4 new pediatric vaccines targeting influenza, rotavirus, pneumococcal disease and mumps with known burden of disease, vaccine efficacies and maximum achievable coverages. Operating under budget constraints, the Portfolio-model for the Management of Vaccines (PMV) identifies the optimal vaccine ranking and combination for achieving the maximum QALY gain over a period of 10 calendar years in children optimal sequence of vaccine introduction (mumps [1st], followed by influenza [2nd], rotavirus [3rd], and pneumococcal [4th]). With exactly the same budget but without vaccine ranking, the total QALY gain can be 20% lower. The PMV model could be a helpful tool for decision makers in those environments with limited budget where vaccines have to be selected for trying to optimise specific health goals. Copyright © 2017 GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Case-control study of risk factors for spasmodic dysphonia: A comparison with other voice disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kristine; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M; Sauder, Cara; Houtz, Daniel R; Smith, Marshall E

    2012-05-01

    This epidemiology study examined risk factors uniquely associated with spasmodic dysphonia (SD). Case-control. A questionnaire was administered to 150 patients with SD (with and without coexisting vocal tremor) and 136 patients with other structural, neurological, and functional voice disorders (excluding SD and vocal tremor). Questions included personal and family medical histories, environmental exposures, trauma, illnesses, voice use habits, and the Short Form 36. Several factors were uniquely associated with SD (α = .05), including: 1) a personal history of cervical dystonia, sinus and throat illnesses, mumps, rubella, dust exposure, and frequent volunteer voice use, 2) a family history of voice disorders, 3) an immediate family history of vocal tremor and meningitis, and 4) an extended family history of head and neck tremor, ocular disease, and meningitis. Vocal tremor coexisted with SD in 29% of cases. Measles and mumps vaccines were protective for SD. SD is likely multifactorial and associated with several endogenous and exogenous factors. Certain viral exposures, voice use patterns, and familial neurological conditions may contribute to the onset of SD later in life. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus hemagglutinin protein G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, G.A.; Salmi, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    Guinea pig and rabbit antisera from animals immunized with purified measles virus hemagglutinin (G) protein were used to establish a solid-phase four-layer radioimmunoassay for quantitative measurement of the G protein. The sensitivity of the assay was 2 ng of purified G protein, and 200 μg of protein from uninfected Vero cells neither decreased the sensitivity nor reacted non-specifically in the assay. Radioimmunoassay standard dose-response curves were established and unknown values interpolated from these using the logit program of a desktop computer. Using this procedure, a measles virus growth curve in infected Vero cells was determined by measurement of G protein production. Under these same conditions, hemagglutination was not sensitive enough to detect early hemagglutinin production. Viral antigens in canine distemper virus, Newcastle disease virus, parainfluenza viruses 1-4, simian virus 5, and respiratory syncytial virus-infected cell lysates did not cross-react in the radioimmunoassay. A small degree of cross-reactivity was detected with mumps viral antigens, both with Vero cell-derived (wild-type strain) and egg-derived (Enders strain) purified virus preparations and with a cell lysate antigen prepared from wild-type mumps virus-infected Vero cells. (Auth.)

  3. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus hemagglutinin protein G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, G A; Salmi, A A [Turku Univ. (Finland)

    1982-08-01

    Guinea pig and rabbit antisera from animals immunized with purified measles virus hemagglutinin (G) protein were used to establish a solid-phase four-layer radioimmunoassay for quantitative measurement of the G protein. The sensitivity of the assay was 2 ng of purified G protein, and 200 ..mu..g of protein from uninfected Vero cells neither decreased the sensitivity nor reacted non-specifically in the assay. Radioimmunoassay standard dose-response curves were established and unknown values interpolated from these using the logit program of a desktop computer. Using this procedure, a measles virus growth curve in infected Vero cells was determined by measurement of G protein production. Under these same conditions, hemagglutination was not sensitive enough to detect early hemagglutinin production. Viral antigens in canine distemper virus, Newcastle disease virus, parainfluenza viruses 1-4, simian virus 5, and respiratory syncytial virus-infected cell lysates did not cross-react in the radioimmunoassay. A small degree of cross-reactivity was detected with mumps viral antigens, both with Vero cell-derived (wild-type strain) and egg-derived (Enders strain) purified virus preparations and with a cell lysate antigen prepared from wild-type mumps virus-infected Vero cells.

  4. Iterative methods for 3D implicit finite-difference migration using the complex Padé approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Carlos A N; Campos, Itamara S; Costa, Jessé C; Neto, Francisco A; Schleicher, Jörg; Novais, Amélia

    2013-01-01

    Conventional implementations of 3D finite-difference (FD) migration use splitting techniques to accelerate performance and save computational cost. However, such techniques are plagued with numerical anisotropy that jeopardises the correct positioning of dipping reflectors in the directions not used for the operator splitting. We implement 3D downward continuation FD migration without splitting using a complex Padé approximation. In this way, the numerical anisotropy is eliminated at the expense of a computationally more intensive solution of a large-band linear system. We compare the performance of the iterative stabilized biconjugate gradient (BICGSTAB) and that of the multifrontal massively parallel direct solver (MUMPS). It turns out that the use of the complex Padé approximation not only stabilizes the solution, but also acts as an effective preconditioner for the BICGSTAB algorithm, reducing the number of iterations as compared to the implementation using the real Padé expansion. As a consequence, the iterative BICGSTAB method is more efficient than the direct MUMPS method when solving a single term in the Padé expansion. The results of both algorithms, here evaluated by computing the migration impulse response in the SEG/EAGE salt model, are of comparable quality. (paper)

  5. United States Army Aeromedical Support to African Fliers, 1941 - 1949: The Tuskegee Flight Suregons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    infectious diseases: upper respiratory infections (URIs), measles, mumps, chicken pox and other contagious diseases, malaria and venereal diseases...as campaigns in Cuba, the Philippines, Mexico and Nicaragua. However, neither the Air Corps nor its Medical Corps officers had much experience in...with live chickens , rabbits, steers and beef cattle from natives. One physician commented that the locals would rather trade for coffee, tea or

  6. Air and Space Power Journal. Volume 25, Number 1, Spring 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    their careers at US military R&D centers supervised the development of licensed vaccines for yellow fever, mumps, measles, varicella , and oral...Special Operations Medical Group, Cannon AFB, New Mexico . Colonel Hall has supported numerous combat operations, including Iraqi Freedom, Endur- ing...C2F Expanded Missions Unit Newport, Rhode Island The Adaptive Optics Revolution: A History by Robert W. Duffner. University of New Mexico Press

  7. Bilateral painful parotid lumps and a lump in the groin: An uncommon presentation of common Kikuchi's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumeet Prakash Mirgh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD is an under-recognized disease most commonly presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy, fever, and cytopenias in young females. Bilateral parotid enlargement is usually caused by infections (e.g., mumps and autoimmune conditions (e.g., Sjogren syndrome. Parotid enlargement, inguinal lymphadenopathy, and pyrexia of unknown origin are uncommon presenting features of KFD and should be suspected in the appropriate setting.

  8. The Role of the Hendra Virus and Nipah Virus Attachment Glycoproteins in Receptor Binding and Antibody Neutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-31

    of important human (measles (MeV), mumps, human parainfluenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)) and animal ( canine distemper virus (CDV...occurrence of a natural canine infection (6; 7). Since the emergence of HeV there have been a total of 86 horse fatalities, 2 canine infections and 7...Infectious Diseases 6. Anonymous. 2011. HENDRA VIRUS, EQUINE - AUSTRALIA (21): (QUEENSLAND) CANINE . Pro-Med-mail, Archive No. 20110802.2324

  9. Submission Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    LGM) CF Conval. serum req, SF 557 Lymphogranuloma venereum 1 ml serum, Less than 1:8 (LGV) CF Red top tube, Conval. serum req, SF 557 Malaria Indirect...Vaccinia Herpes simplex S Vulvovaginitis Coxsackie Group B Vaginal swab Herpes simplex Lesion scraping Lymphogranuloma venereum Paired blood Central...simplex Paired sera Mumps Postmortem brain and cord Lvphocytic chorio- meningitis Lymphogranuloma venereum Psittacosis 134 TABLEV - ILLNESS VIRAL OR

  10. Varicella vaccination in Europe – taking the practical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadzot-Delvaux Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Varicella is a common viral disease affecting almost the entire birth cohort. Although usually self-limiting, some cases of varicella can be serious, with 2 to 6% of cases attending a general practice resulting in complications. The hospitalisation rate for varicella in Europe ranges from 1.3 to 4.5 per 100,000 population/year and up to 10.1% of hospitalised patients report permanent or possible permanent sequelae (for example, scarring or ataxia. However, in many countries the epidemiology of varicella remains largely unknown or incomplete. In countries where routine childhood vaccination against varicella has been implemented, it has had a positive effect on disease prevention and control. Furthermore, mathematical models indicate that this intervention strategy may provide economic benefits for the individual and society. Despite this evidence and recommendations for varicella vaccination by official bodies such as the World Health Organization, and scientific experts in the field, the majority of European countries (with the exception of Germany and Greece have delayed decisions on implementation of routine childhood varicella vaccination, choosing instead to vaccinate high-risk groups or not to vaccinate at all. In this paper, members of the Working Against Varicella in Europe group consider the practicalities of introducing routine childhood varicella vaccination in Europe, discussing the benefits and challenges of different vaccination options (vaccination vs. no vaccination, routine vaccination of infants vs. vaccination of susceptible adolescents or adults, two doses vs. one dose of varicella vaccine, monovalent varicella vaccines vs. tetravalent measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines, as well as the optimal interval between two doses of measles, mumps, rubella and varicella vaccines. Assessment of the epidemiology of varicella in Europe and evidence for the effectiveness of varicella vaccination provides support for

  11. Maxwell Paper Anthology. Award-Winning Papers AY 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    and instructor weapon system officer (WSO), training officer, and wing scheduler, 522d Fighter Squadron, Cannon AFB, New Mexico . At the 34th Bomb...surgeon, HQ USAFE. Ramstein AB, Germany. He has served as the commander of the 27th Special Operations Medical Group, Cannon AFB. New Mexico ...encephalitis.20 In addition, development of li- censed vaccines for yellow fever, mumps, measles, varicella , and oral polio was supervised by

  12. Air and Space Power Journal (ASPJ). Volume 25, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    gators who began their careers at US military R&D centers supervised the development of licensed vaccines for yellow fever, mumps, measles, varicella ...of the 27th Special Operations Medical Group, Cannon AFB, New Mexico . Colonel Hall has supported numerous combat operations, including Iraqi Freedom... Mexico Press (http://www.unmpress.com), 1312 Basehart Road SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106-4363, 2009, 485 pages, $44.00 (hardcover), ISBN 978-0

  13. Kandungan Saponin Buah, Daun dan Tangkai Daun Belimbing Wuluh (Averrhoa Bilimbi L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Fahrunnida, Fahrunnida

    2015-01-01

    In Indonesia, belimbing wuluh (Averrhoa bilimbi L.) has been used for traditional medicine, especially to heal stiff, mumps, rheumatism, ulcers, acne, tinea versicolor, high blood pressure, and dental pain and cough. This property is predicted comes from its secondary metabolites. Saponin is a compound group of secondary metabolites which is known to have antitussives and expectorants effect, antiinflammatory, antibacterial, and cytotoxic activity for cancer therapy. However, scientific infor...

  14. Compulsory and recommended vaccination in Italy: evaluation of coverage and non-compliance between 1998-2002 in Northern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Stampi, Serena; Ricci, Rita; Ruffilli, Isa; Zanetti, Franca

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Since vaccinations are an effective prevention tool for maintaining the health of society, the monitoring of immunization coverage allows us to identify areas where disease outbreaks are likely to occur, and possibly assist us in predicting future outbreaks. The aim of this study is the investigation of the coverage achieved for compulsory (diphtheria, tetanus, polio, hepatitis B,) and recommended (pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae, measles-mumps-rubella) vaccinations betw...

  15. Comparative dynamics, seasonality in transmission, and predictability of childhood infections in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, A. S.; Metcalf, C. J. E.; Grenfell, B. T.

    2018-01-01

    The seasonality and periodicity of infections, and the mechanisms underlying observed dynamics, can have implications for control efforts. This is particularly true for acute childhood infections. Among these, the dynamics of measles is the best understood and has been extensively studied, most notably in the UK prior to the start of vaccination. Less is known about the dynamics of other childhood diseases, particularly outside Europe and the US. In this paper, we leverage a unique dataset to examine the epidemiology of six childhood infections - measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, scarlet fever and pertussis - across 32 states in Mexico from 1985 to 2007. This dataset provides us with a spatiotemporal probe into the dynamics of six common childhood infections, and allows us to compare them in the same setting over the same time period. We examine three key epidemiological characteristics of these infections – the age profile of infections, spatiotemporal dynamics, and seasonality in transmission - and compare with predictions from existing theory and past findings. Our analysis reveals interesting epidemiological differences between the six pathogens, and variations across space. We find signatures of term time forcing (reduced transmission during the summer) for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, and scarlet fever; for pertussis, a lack of term time forcing could not be rejected. PMID:27873563

  16. A phase III, open-label, randomised multicentre study to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of a booster dose of two different reduced antigen diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-polio vaccines, when co-administered with measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in 3 and 4-year-old healthy children in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Robin; Kuriyakose, Sherine; Mesaros, Narcisa; Han, Htay Htay; Tomlinson, Richard; Faust, Saul N; Snape, Matthew D; Pollard, Andrew J; Finn, Adam

    2018-04-19

    To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of a reduced antigen diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-inactivated poliovirus (dTap-IPV B ) vaccine (Boostrix-IPV, GSK) as a pre-school booster in 3-4 year old children as compared to dTap-IPV R (Repevax, Sanofi Pasteur), when co-administered with mumps-measles-rubella vaccine (MMRV). This phase III, open label, randomised study was conducted in the UK between April 2011 and April 2012. Children due their pre-school dTap-IPV booster vaccination were randomised 2:1 to receive one of two different dTap-IPV vaccines (dTap-IPV B or dTap-IPV R ) with blood sample for immunogenicity assessment just prior and one month after vaccination. Immune responses to diphtheria, tetanus and polio antigens were compared between the study vaccines (inferential comparison). In the absence of an accepted pertussis correlate of protection, the immunogenicity of dTap-IPV B vaccine against pertussis was compared with historical pertussis efficacy data (inferential comparison). Safety and reactogenicity of both study vaccines were evaluated. 387 children were randomised and 385 vaccinated: 255 in the dTap-IPV B group and 130 in the dTap-IPV R group. Prior to vaccination, ≥76.8% of children had anti-diphtheria and ≥65.5% had anti-tetanus titres above the protection threshold; for pertussis, the pre-vaccination seropositivity rate ranged between 18.1 and 70.6%. Both vaccines were immunogenic with 99.2-100% of children achieving titres above the pre-specified seroprotection/seropositivity thresholds. One serious adverse event not considered as causally related to the study vaccination by the study investigator was reported in the dTap-IPV B group. Non-inferiority of dTap-IPV B to dTap-IPV R was demonstrated. Both vaccines had a clinically acceptable safety and reactogenicity profile when co-administered with MMRV to children 3-4 years old. NCT01245049 (ClinicalTrials.gov). Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  17. Compound Warfare: That Fatal Knot

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    this contact—the contact, incidentally, was a two-way street, with small pox , chicken pox , typhoid, measles, mumps, and other viral diseases killing...and Indian societies in Mexico and the Southwest quickly adopted the hardy and versatile animals into their local culture. By the end of the... Mexico and being admitted as the twenty-eighth state of the Union in 1845. Some of the great Indian heroes—Geronimo (born 1829) and Cochise (born ca

  18. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 12, Number 7, October 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    region 1) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, New Mexico , Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. The ACIP also recommended that...2724-9. 7. Struewing JP, Hyams KC, Tueller JE, Gray GC. The risk of measles, mumps, and varicella among young adults: a serosurvey of US Navy and... Varicella Sentinel reportable events for all beneficiaries1 at U.S. Army medical facilities, MSMR 33Vol. 12/No. 7 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005

  19. Vaccination Policies: Requirements and Exemptions for Entering School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Erik

    2017-12-01

    (1) According to the World Health Organization, immunization prevents between 2 million to 3 million deaths every year across the world. (2) When immunization rates are high, herd immunity develops and limits the spread of the disease, which helps protect those who cannot be vaccinated. (3) Vaccination rates for measles, mumps and rubella vary across the United States, ranging from 85.6 percent in Washington, D.C., to 99.4 percent in Mississippi.

  20. Learning From Iraq: A Final Report From the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    example, USAID planned on basic health services to be available to 25% of the entire population and 50% of mothers and children within 60 days of the...in the vaccination of millions of children against measles, mumps, and rubella. In addition, by 2011, the national infant-mortality rate had...the program, the United States Congress appeared to have a “laissez faire” attitude toward the expenditure of U.S. tax dollars in Iraq. The

  1. Structure and software tools of AIDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duisterhout, J S; Franken, B; Witte, F

    1987-01-01

    AIDA consists of a set of software tools to allow for fast development and easy-to-maintain Medical Information Systems. AIDA supports all aspects of such a system both during development and operation. It contains tools to build and maintain forms for interactive data entry and on-line input validation, a database management system including a data dictionary and a set of run-time routines for database access, and routines for querying the database and output formatting. Unlike an application generator, the user of AIDA may select parts of the tools to fulfill his needs and program other subsystems not developed with AIDA. The AIDA software uses as host language the ANSI-standard programming language MUMPS, an interpreted language embedded in an integrated database and programming environment. This greatly facilitates the portability of AIDA applications. The database facilities supported by AIDA are based on a relational data model. This data model is built on top of the MUMPS database, the so-called global structure. This relational model overcomes the restrictions of the global structure regarding string length. The global structure is especially powerful for sorting purposes. Using MUMPS as a host language allows the user an easy interface between user-defined data validation checks or other user-defined code and the AIDA tools. AIDA has been designed primarily for prototyping and for the construction of Medical Information Systems in a research environment which requires a flexible approach. The prototyping facility of AIDA operates terminal independent and is even to a great extent multi-lingual. Most of these features are table-driven; this allows on-line changes in the use of terminal type and language, but also causes overhead. AIDA has a set of optimizing tools by which it is possible to build a faster, but (of course) less flexible code from these table definitions. By separating the AIDA software in a source and a run-time version, one is able to write

  2. The Role of the WI-38 Cell Strain in Saving Lives and Reducing Morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Olshansky

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The modern success story of vaccinations involves a historical chain of events that transformed the discovery that vaccines worked, to administering them to the population. We estimate the number of lives saved and morbidity reduction associated with the discovery of the first human cell strain used for the production of licensed human virus vaccines, known as WI-38. The diseases studied include poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (chicken pox, herpes zoster, adenovirus, rabies and Hepatitis A. The number of preventable cases and deaths in the U.S. and across the globe was assessed by holding prevalence rates and disease-specific death rates constant from 1960–2015. Results indicate that the total number of cases of poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, adenovirus, rabies and hepatitis A averted or treated with WI-38 related vaccines was 198 million in the U.S. and 4.5 billion globally (720 million in Africa; 387 million in Latin America and the Caribbean; 2.7 billion in Asia; and 455 million in Europe. The total number of deaths averted from these same diseases was approximately 450,000 in the U.S., and 10.3 million globally (1.6 million in Africa; 886 thousand in Latin America and the Caribbean; 6.2 million in Asia; and 1.0 million in Europe.

  3. A systematic review on recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: clinical effect and duration of benefit of different treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Kiverniti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to compare different modalities used for the treatment of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP in adults and children in terms of their clinical effect and the duration of benefit. Systematic review of papers was written in the English language and published between 1977 and 2007. Outcomes are number of patients with a clinical response and length of time the response lasted for. We found 28 useful studies. There were 1,045 subjects, 416 children and 339 adults who underwent different treatments for RRP between 1976 and 2007. The methods used consisted of cidofovir, interferon, surgical excision, indole-3-carbinol, acyclovir, mumps vaccine, and photodynamic therapy. 62.5% of patients had a complete response on cidofovir (11 studies, 45.14% on interferon (8 studies, 33.33% on I3C (2 studies, 44.36% after surgery (5 studies, 77.55% after the mumps vaccine (1 study, 100% on acyclovir (1 study, and 9.09% after photodynamic therapy (1 study. The effect of different modalities lasted between 9 and 27 months. In conclusion, it is impossible to reach any reliable conclusions as to which method is the most durable and effective. There is a great need for randomised control multicentre trials on the treatment of RRP, so that reliable results can be produced.

  4. The Armed Forces Epidemiological Board: Its First Fifty Years, 1940-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    measles; (9 mumps; (g) diphtheria and tetanus toxoids; (I) enteric infections such as bacillary dysentery, Shigella, Sahnonella typhosa, Vibrio cholerae ...pestis that followed the kissing of the dead. Once he remarked that a patient in New Mexico did not die of plague but of "too many antibiotics." Another...interests shifted to hog cholera and the f’eld of virology. This interest continued for the next thirty-eight y’ears. A key obs,’.%ation (with Dr. Paul

  5. MMR vaccination of children with egg allergy is safe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dorthe Vestergård; Jørgensen, Inger Merete

    2013-01-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination is part of the Danish Childhood Vaccination Programme. It is known that children may react with anaphylaxis to MMR vaccines containing traces of egg protein. In Denmark, national clinical guidelines recommend that children with egg allergy be referred...... to vaccination at a paediatric ward despite changed recommendations in other countries. The purpose of this study was to determine whether children with egg allergy presented with anaphylactic/allergic reactions to MMR vaccination and to discuss whether Danish recommendations should be upheld....

  6. An XCT image database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Masaru; Minato, Kotaro; Koide, Harutoshi; Hirakawa, Akina; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Itoh, Harumi; Torizuka, Kanji; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Kuwahara, Michiyoshi.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, an expansion of X-ray CT (XCT) examination history database to XCT image database is discussed. The XCT examination history database has been constructed and used for daily examination and investigation in our hospital. This database consists of alpha-numeric information (locations, diagnosis and so on) of more than 15,000 cases, and for some of them, we add tree structured image data which has a flexibility for various types of image data. This database system is written by MUMPS database manipulation language. (author)

  7. [The examination of cerebro-spinal fluid in the viroses of the central nervous system (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonomi, U

    1977-01-01

    The general outlines for the isolation of viruses from the cerebro-spinal fluid are described. It is suggested to associate to the virus cultivation of the cerebrospinal fluid even the cultivation from other pathological materials as faringeal swabs and stools and the search for antibodies in the blood serum. Researches of viruses in cerebro-spinal fluid done by the Service of Microbiology of the Hospital of Verona have given in 55 cases examined during the year 1976 2 positive isolates; in both mumps virus has been isolated.

  8. Inactivation of viruses in bubbling processes utilized for personal bioaerosol monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agranovski, I E; Safatov, A S; Borodulin, A I; Pyankov, O V; Petrishchenko, V A; Sergeev, A N; Agafonov, A P; Ignatiev, G M; Sergeev, A A; Agranovski, V

    2004-12-01

    A new personal bioaerosol sampler has recently been developed and evaluated for sampling of viable airborne bacteria and fungi under controlled laboratory conditions and in the field. The operational principle of the device is based on the passage of air through porous medium immersed in liquid. This process leads to the formation of bubbles within the filter as the carrier gas passes through and thus provides effective mechanisms for aerosol removal. As demonstrated in previous studies, the culturability of sampled bacterium and fungi remained high for the entire 8-h sampling period. The present study is the first step of the evaluation of the new sampler for monitoring of viable airborne viruses. It focuses on the investigation of the inactivation rate of viruses in the bubbling process during 4 h of continuous operation. Four microbes were used in this study, influenza, measles, mumps, and vaccinia viruses. It was found that the use of distilled water as the collection fluid was associated with a relatively high decay rate. A significant improvement was achieved by utilizing virus maintenance fluid prepared by using Hank's solution with appropriate additives. The survival rates of the influenza, measles, and mumps viruses were increased by 1.4 log, 0.83 log, and 0.82 log, respectively, after the first hour of operation compared to bubbling through the sterile water. The same trend was observed throughout the entire 4-h experiment. There was no significant difference observed only for the robust vaccinia virus.

  9. Chickenpox in Poland in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska, Justyna; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    A number of chickenpox cases, occurring especially in children, indicates the rationale for the use of chickenpox vaccinations. In Poland since 2002, chickenpox vaccination is included in the National Immunisation Programme as recommended. To assess epidemiological situation of chickenpox in Poland in 2012 in comparison to previous years. The descriptive analysis was based on data retrieved from routine mandatory surveillance system and published in the annual bulletins "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2012" and "Vaccinations in Poland in 2012" (Czarkowski MP i in., Warszawa 2013, NIZP-PZH i GIS). National Immunisation Programme for year 2012 was also used. In 2012, 208 276 cases of chickenpox were registered in Poland. The highest number of cases was reported in Śląskie voivodeship, the lowest in Podlaskie voivodeship. Mumps incidence was 540.5 per 100 000 and was higher than in 2011 (448.7). The highest incidence was recorded in children aged 4 years (7 611.5 per 100 000). The chickenpox incidence among men (570.7) was higher than among women (512.2). The incidence among rural residents (553.9) was higher than among urban residents (531.8). Number of cases hospitalized due to mumps was 1 361. Number of people vaccinated against chickenpox was 56 213. In 2012, there was an increase in the incidence of smallpox in Poland. This trend is continuing since 2004, which can be partly explained by improved surveillance of the disease.

  10. ATLAS b-tagging efficiency measurements using a $t\\bar{t}$ sample in pp collisions at $\\sqrt s$=13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Changqiao; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The $b$-tagging efficiency of the MV2c10 discriminant for track-jets and calorimeter-jets containing $b$-hadrons is measured using 36.5~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions collected in 2015 and 2016 by ATLAS at $\\sqrt{s}$=13~TeV. The measurements are performed using a tag-and-probe method to select a control sample of jets enriched in $b$-jets, by keeping events with a final state consistent with the process $pp\\to t\\bar{t}\\to W^+bW^-\\bar{b} \\to e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp \

  11. RF MEMS Fractal Capacitors With High Self-Resonant Frequencies

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-07-23

    This letter demonstrates RF microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) fractal capacitors possessing the highest reported self-resonant frequencies (SRFs) in PolyMUMPS to date. Explicitly, measurement results show SRFs beyond 20 GHz. Furthermore, quality factors higher than 4 throughout a band of 1-15 GHz and reaching as high as 28 were achieved. Additional benefits that are readily attainable from implementing fractal capacitors in MEMS are discussed, including suppressing residual stress warping, eliminating the need for etching holes, and reducing parasitics. The latter benefits were acquired without any fabrication intervention. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. [Review of the 2016 Swiss immunization schedule and technology update for improving vaccine management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Alessandro

    2016-05-11

    The 2016 immunization schedule published by the Swiss Federal Office of Public Health includes three new clauses: reimbursement of the additional Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young males (11-26 years) as recommended by local canton programs, the end of franchise exemption for the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination, and the creation of a new system of indemnities and moral compensation in the event of personal injury resulting from vaccinations. This article presents the main features of the 2016 immunization schedule with details of the technology available to physicians to improve vaccine management.

  13. Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR) Vaccination: What Everyone Should Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... information, see State Vaccination Requirements . How Can Parents Pay For MMR Vaccine? Most health insurance plans cover ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file Zip Archive ...

  14. Anafilaxia associada à vacina contra sarampo, caxumba e rubéola Anafilaxia asociada a la vacuna contra sarampión, varicela y rubéola Anaphylaxis associated with the vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iolanda Maria Novadzki

    2010-04-01

    sensibilización por algún componente residual de la vacuna y posible reacción cruzada con el dextrano.A case-control study was carried out aiming to describe the cases and causes of anaphylaxis associated with the vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella. A total of 22 reported cases in children who showed mucocutaneous manifestations, during the Campanha Nacional de Vacinação (Brazilian Vaccination Campaign, conducted in the city of Curitiba, Southern Brazil, in 2004, were studied. In addition, 66 children, who were next to these cases and did not show a symptomatology after the vaccine was applied, were selected. Serum measurements of antibodies for vaccine antigens and total IgE, specific IgE antibody measurements for several allergens, and skin tests were performed. Vaccine response was adequate, specific IgE measurement and skin tests showed that potential allergens in vaccines and atopy were not associated with anaphylactic reactions. Skin tests with the vaccine and dextran were positive in the cases exclusively, suggesting sensitization to certain residual components of the vaccine and possible cross-reaction with dextran.

  15. Etiologic agents of central nervous system infections among febrile hospitalized patients in the country of Georgia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Akhvlediani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: There is a large spectrum of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens that cause central nervous system (CNS infections. As such, identification of the etiological agent requires multiple laboratory tests and accurate diagnosis requires clinical and epidemiological information. This hospital-based study aimed to determine the main causes of acute meningitis and encephalitis and enhance laboratory capacity for CNS infection diagnosis. METHODS: Children and adults patients clinically diagnosed with meningitis or encephalitis were enrolled at four reference health centers. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was collected for bacterial culture, and in-house and multiplex RT-PCR testing was conducted for herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2, mumps virus, enterovirus, varicella zoster virus (VZV, Streptococcus pneumoniae, HiB and Neisseria meningitidis. RESULTS: Out of 140 enrolled patients, the mean age was 23.9 years, and 58% were children. Bacterial or viral etiologies were determined in 51% of patients. Five Streptococcus pneumoniae cultures were isolated from CSF. Based on in-house PCR analysis, 25 patients were positive for S. pneumoniae, 6 for N. meningitidis, and 1 for H. influenzae. Viral multiplex PCR identified infections with enterovirus (n = 26, VZV (n = 4, and HSV-1 (n = 2. No patient was positive for mumps or HSV-2. CONCLUSIONS: Study findings indicate that S. pneumoniae and enteroviruses are the main etiologies in this patient cohort. The utility of molecular diagnostics for pathogen identification combined with the knowledge provided by the investigation may improve health outcomes of CNS infection cases in Georgia.

  16. Etiologic Agents of Central Nervous System Infections among Febrile Hospitalized Patients in the Country of Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhvlediani, Tamar; Bautista, Christian T.; Shakarishvili, Roman; Tsertsvadze, Tengiz; Imnadze, Paata; Tatishvili, Nana; Davitashvili, Tamar; Samkharadze, Tamar; Chlikadze, Rusudan; Dvali, Natia; Dzigua, Lela; Karchava, Mariam; Gatserelia, Lana; Macharashvili, Nino; Kvirkvelia, Nana; Habashy, Engy Emil; Farrell, Margaret; Rowlinson, Emily; Sejvar, James; Hepburn, Matthew; Pimentel, Guillermo; Dueger, Erica; House, Brent; Rivard, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is a large spectrum of viral, bacterial, fungal, and prion pathogens that cause central nervous system (CNS) infections. As such, identification of the etiological agent requires multiple laboratory tests and accurate diagnosis requires clinical and epidemiological information. This hospital-based study aimed to determine the main causes of acute meningitis and encephalitis and enhance laboratory capacity for CNS infection diagnosis. Methods Children and adults patients clinically diagnosed with meningitis or encephalitis were enrolled at four reference health centers. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected for bacterial culture, and in-house and multiplex RT-PCR testing was conducted for herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2, mumps virus, enterovirus, varicella zoster virus (VZV), Streptococcus pneumoniae, HiB and Neisseria meningitidis. Results Out of 140 enrolled patients, the mean age was 23.9 years, and 58% were children. Bacterial or viral etiologies were determined in 51% of patients. Five Streptococcus pneumoniae cultures were isolated from CSF. Based on in-house PCR analysis, 25 patients were positive for S. pneumoniae, 6 for N. meningitidis, and 1 for H. influenzae. Viral multiplex PCR identified infections with enterovirus (n = 26), VZV (n = 4), and HSV-1 (n = 2). No patient was positive for mumps or HSV-2. Conclusions Study findings indicate that S. pneumoniae and enteroviruses are the main etiologies in this patient cohort. The utility of molecular diagnostics for pathogen identification combined with the knowledge provided by the investigation may improve health outcomes of CNS infection cases in Georgia. PMID:25369023

  17. Vaccination policies among health professional schools: evidence of immunity and allowance of vaccination exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Samantha B; Libby, Tanya E; Lindley, Megan C; Ahmed, Faruque; Stevenson, John; Strikas, Raymond A

    2015-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize health professional schools by their vaccination policies for acceptable forms of evidence of immunity and exemptions permitted. METHODS Data were collected between September 2011 and April 2012 using an Internet-based survey e-mailed to selected types of accredited health professional programs. Schools were identified through accrediting associations for each type of health professional program. Analysis was limited to schools requiring ≥1 vaccine recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP): measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis B, varicella, pertussis, and influenza. Weighted bivariate frequencies were generated using SAS 9.3. RESULTS Of 2,775 schools surveyed, 75% (n=2,077) responded; of responding schools, 93% (1947) required ≥1 ACIP-recommended vaccination. The proportion of schools accepting ≥1 non-ACIP-recommended form of evidence of immunity varied by vaccine: 42% for pertussis, 37% for influenza, 30% for rubella, 22% for hepatitis B, 18% for varicella, and 9% for measles and mumps. Among schools with ≥1 vaccination requirement, medical exemptions were permitted for ≥1 vaccine by 75% of schools; 54% permitted religious exemptions; 35% permitted personal belief exemptions; 58% permitted any nonmedical exemption. CONCLUSIONS Many schools accept non-ACIP-recommended forms of evidence of immunity which could lead some students to believe they are protected from vaccine preventable diseases when they may be susceptible. Additional efforts are needed to better educate school officials about current ACIP recommendations for acceptable forms of evidence of immunity so school policies can be revised as needed.

  18. SEROLOGICAL RESPONSE TO VACCINES IN CHILDREN WITH DIABETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Anahita Sanaei; Alaei, Mohammad Reza; Musavi, Zahra; Faramarzi, Raheleh; Mansouri, Farhad; Nasimfar, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) are more susceptible to infections. Deficiency in some domains of immune system could be one of the main reasons, which increases the risk of infections. The aim of this study was to assess antibody responses to vaccines in a group of children with diabetes and in the controls. A cross-sectional study was performed among 90 children under 15 years of age with a history of type 1 DM, referred to endocrinology clinics of university hospitals; Mofid Children Hospital and Loghman Hospital. Also, we enrolled ninety healthy children as the control group. Antibody levels against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella and hepatitis B (HB) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among 90 patients with diabetes, 48% were male and 52% were female and in the control group 49% were male and 51% were female. Regarding IgG antibody levels against measles, there was not any significant difference between the two groups, but according to the applied kit, IgG levels against measles vaccine were positive in 62% of the diabetic and 84% of the controls. Also, there was a significant difference between the two groups in terms of IgG antibody level against rubella, but consistent with the applied kit, there was not any significant difference between the two the groups. Given the results of the study, no difference was found between patients with diabetes and controls who were vaccinated with pertussis, diphtheria, tetanus, mumps and HB vaccines. But there are some concerns about measles and rubella vaccinations that need further investigation.

  19. Estimating the effectiveness of early control measures through school absenteeism surveillance in observed outbreaks at rural schools in Hubei, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yunzhou; Yang, Mei; Jiang, Hongbo; Wang, Ying; Yang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhixia; Yan, Weirong; Diwan, Vinod K; Xu, Biao; Dong, Hengjin; Palm, Lars; Liu, Li; Nie, Shaofa

    2014-01-01

    School absenteeism is a common data source in syndromic surveillance, which allows for the detection of outbreaks at an early stage. Previous studies focused on its correlation with other data sources. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of control measures based on early warning signals from school absenteeism surveillance in rural Chinese schools. A school absenteeism surveillance system was established in all 17 primary schools in 3 adjacent towns in the Chinese region of Hubei. Three outbreaks (varicella, mumps, and influenza-like illness) were detected and controlled successfully from April 1, 2012, to January 15, 2014. An impulse susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered model was used to fit the epidemics of these three outbreaks. Moreover, it simulated the potential epidemics under interventions resulting from traditional surveillance signals. The effectiveness of the absenteeism-based control measures was evaluated by comparing the simulated datasets. The school absenteeism system generated 52 signals. Three outbreaks were verified through epidemiological investigation. Compared to traditional surveillance, the school absenteeism system generated simultaneous signals for the varicella outbreak, but 3 days in advance for the mumps outbreak and 2-4 days in advance for the influenza-like illness outbreak. The estimated excess protection rates of control measures based on early signals were 0.0%, 19.0-44.1%, and 29.0-37.0% for the three outbreaks, respectively. Although not all outbreak control measures can benefit from early signals through school absenteeism surveillance, the effectiveness of early signal-based interventions is obvious. School absenteeism surveillance plays an important role in reducing outbreak spread.

  20. The Role of Childhood Infections and Immunizations on Childhood Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Hari; Danysh, Heather E; Scheurer, Michael E; Okcu, M Fatih; Skapek, Stephen X; Hawkins, Douglas S; Spector, Logan G; Erhardt, Erik B; Grufferman, Seymour; Lupo, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a rare, highly malignant tumor arising from primitive mesenchymal cells that differentiate into skeletal muscle. Relatively little is known about RMS susceptibility. Based on growing evidence regarding the role of early immunologic challenges on RMS development, we evaluated the role of infections and immunizations on this clinically significant pediatric malignancy. RMS cases (n = 322) were enrolled from the third trial coordinated by the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group. Population-based controls (n = 322) were pair matched to cases on race, sex, and age. The following immunizations were assessed: diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus (DPT); measles, mumps, and rubella; and oral polio vaccine. We also evaluated if immunizations were complete versus incomplete. We examined selected infections including chickenpox, mumps, pneumonia, scarlet fever, rubella, rubeola, pertussis, mononucleosis, and lung infections. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for each exposure, adjusted for maternal education and total annual income. Incomplete immunization schedules (OR = 5.30, 95% CI: 2.47-11.33) and incomplete DPT immunization (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.06-2.29) were positively associated with childhood RMS. However, infections did not appear to be associated with childhood RMS. This is the largest study of RMS to date demonstrating a possible protective effect of immunizations against the development of childhood RMS. Further studies are needed to validate our findings. Our findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting a protective role of routine vaccinations in childhood cancer and specifically in childhood RMS. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Differential RF MEMS interwoven capacitor immune to residual stress warping

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-07-27

    A RF MEMS capacitor with an interwoven structure is designed, fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and tested in an effort to address fabrication challenges usually faced in MEMS processes. The interwoven structure was found to offer several advantages over the typical MEMS parallel-plate design including eliminating the warping caused by residual stress, eliminating the need for etching holes, suppressing stiction, reducing parasitics and providing differential capability. The quality factor of the proposed capacitor was higher than five throughout a 2–10 GHz range and the resonant frequency was in excess of 20 GHz.

  2. Differential RF MEMS interwoven capacitor immune to residual stress warping

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    A RF MEMS capacitor with an interwoven structure is designed, fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and tested in an effort to address fabrication challenges usually faced in MEMS processes. The interwoven structure was found to offer several advantages over the typical MEMS parallel-plate design including eliminating the warping caused by residual stress, eliminating the need for etching holes, suppressing stiction, reducing parasitics and providing differential capability. The quality factor of the proposed capacitor was higher than five throughout a 2–10 GHz range and the resonant frequency was in excess of 20 GHz.

  3. CHRONOVAC VOYAGEUR: A study of the immune response to yellow fever vaccine among infants previously immunized against measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Catherine; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Tondeur, Laura; Poirier, Béatrice; Seffer, Valérie; Desprès, Philippe; Consigny, Paul-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2017-10-27

    For administration of multiple live attenuated vaccines, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends either simultaneous immunization or period of at least 28days between vaccines, due to a possible reduction in the immune response to either vaccine. The main objective of this study was to compare the immune response to measles (alone or combined with mumps and rubella) and yellow fever vaccines among infants aged 6-24months living in a yellow fever non-endemic country who had receivedmeasles and yellow fever vaccines before travelling to a yellow fever endemic area. A retrospective, multicenter case-control study was carried out in 7 travel clinics in the Paris area from February 1st 2011 to march 31, 2015. Cases were defined as infants immunized with the yellow fever vaccine and with the measles vaccine, either alone or in combination with mumps and rubella vaccine, with a period of 1-27days between each immunization. For each case, two controls were matched based on sex and age: a first control group (control 1) was defined as infants having received the measles vaccine and the yellow fever vaccine simultaneously; a second control group (control 2) was defined as infants who had a period of more than 27days between receiving the measles vaccine and yellow fever vaccine. The primary endpoint of the study was the percentage of infants with protective immunity against yellow fever, measured by the titer of neutralizing antibodies in a venous blood sample. One hundred and thirty-one infants were included in the study (62 cases, 50 infants in control 1 and 19 infants in control 2). Of these, 127 (96%) were shown to have a protective titer of yellow fever antibodies. All 4 infants without a protective titer of yellow fever antibodies were part of control group 1. The measles vaccine, alone or combined with mumps and rubella vaccines, appears to have no influence on humoral immune response to the yellow fever vaccine when administered between 1 and 27

  4. MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Long-term seizures, coma, or lowered consciousness ‚ ‚Brain damage Other things that could happen after this vaccine: ‚ ‚People sometimes faint after medical procedures, including vaccination. ...

  5. Measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospital contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Signe; Benn, Christine Stabell; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    -confirmed RSV hospital contacts at age 14-23 months in all children born in Denmark 1997-2002 who had already received the vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (acellular), polio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) at the recommended ages of 3, 5, and 12 months. RESULTS: The study...

  6. LHCb: The search for $D^0\\rightarrow e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$

    CERN Multimedia

    Bird, T

    2013-01-01

    In 2011 and 2012 LHCb collected a total of $3\\,\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$-collisions, making LHCb the perfect place to look for rare charm decays. The lepton flavour violating decay $D^0\\rightarrow{}e^\\pm\\mu^\\mp$ is forbidden in the Standard Model and so it's detection would be a clear sign of new physics. In this poster an overview of the method used measure $\\mathcal{B}\\left(D^0\\rightarrow{}e^\\pm\\mu^\\mp\\right)$ with respect to $\\mathcal{B}\\left(D^0\\rightarrow{}\\pi^\\pm\\pi^\\mp\\right)$ is presented. It is estimated that this analysis will be able to set a limit on $\\mathcal{B}\\left(D^0\\rightarrow{}e^\\pm\\mu^\\mp\\right) < 10^{-8}$ at a $90\\%$ confidence level.

  7. Mumps Parotitis and Ovarian Cancer: Modern Significance of an Historic Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    ligation or a breast mastitis , found to protect against ovarian cancer, might do so by causing overexpression of the hypoglycosylated form of MUC1...negative plates were incubated overnight and washed three times with PBS before addition of 100 μl of 2.5% bovine serum albumin in PBS. Serially...a breast mastitis which have been shown to protect against ovarian cancer(10), might confer protection because of injury to the tissue causing

  8. Evaluation of a TaqMan Array Card for Detection of Central Nervous System Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyango, Clayton O; Loparev, Vladimir; Lidechi, Shirley; Bhullar, Vinod; Schmid, D Scott; Radford, Kay; Lo, Michael K; Rota, Paul; Johnson, Barbara W; Munoz, Jorge; Oneko, Martina; Burton, Deron; Black, Carolyn M; Neatherlin, John; Montgomery, Joel M; Fields, Barry

    2017-07-01

    Infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are often acute, with significant morbidity and mortality. Routine diagnosis of such infections is limited in developing countries and requires modern equipment in advanced laboratories that may be unavailable to a number of patients in sub-Saharan Africa. We developed a TaqMan array card (TAC) that detects multiple pathogens simultaneously from cerebrospinal fluid. The 21-pathogen CNS multiple-pathogen TAC (CNS-TAC) assay includes two parasites ( Balamuthia mandrillaris and Acanthamoeba ), six bacterial pathogens ( Streptococcus pneumonia e, Haemophilus influenzae , Neisseria meningitidis , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and Bartonella ), and 13 viruses (parechovirus, dengue virus, Nipah virus, varicella-zoster virus, mumps virus, measles virus, lyssavirus, herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, Epstein-Barr virus, enterovirus, cytomegalovirus, and chikungunya virus). The card also includes human RNase P as a nucleic acid extraction control and an internal manufacturer control, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase). This CNS-TAC assay can test up to eight samples for all 21 agents within 2.5 h following nucleic acid extraction. The assay was validated for linearity, limit of detection, sensitivity, and specificity by using either live viruses (dengue, mumps, and measles viruses) or nucleic acid material (Nipah and chikungunya viruses). Of 120 samples tested by individual real-time PCR, 35 were positive for eight different targets, whereas the CNS-TAC assay detected 37 positive samples across nine different targets. The CNS-TAC assays showed 85.6% sensitivity and 96.7% specificity. Therefore, the CNS-TAC assay may be useful for outbreak investigation and surveillance of suspected neurological disease. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Attitudes of Swiss Health Care Providers Toward Childhood Immunizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Marianne; Schaedelin, Sabine; Aebi, Christoph; Berger, Christoph; Crisinel, Pierre-Alex; Diana, Alessandro; Niederer-Loher, Anita; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Vaudaux, Bernard; Heininger, Ulrich

    2017-06-01

    INFOVAC is a network providing information about immunization issues to health professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the attitude of INFOVAC subscribers toward the current Swiss immunization schedule, potential modifications, and current and hypothetical immunization practices regarding their own children. In March 2015, a Web-based survey was sent to 4260 physicians and pharmacists subscribed to INFOVAC. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. The following information was obtained: (1) current immunization status of own children; (2) which immunizations would currently be accepted for a hypothetical own child and (3) attitudes toward potential modifications of the Swiss immunization schedule. Descriptive methods and multivariate models to correct for covariables were used for data analysis. Nine hundred and fifty-five valid questionnaires were received: 886/3704 (23.9%) from physicians and 69/556 (12.4%) from pharmacists. Current (>95%) and hypothetical (>99%) immunization rates were high for diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis and measles-mumps-rubella. Most pediatricians (61%) would support more vaccines for their children than currently recommended by the Swiss immunization advisory committee, whereas about 50% of other physicians and pharmacists would decline at least one of the recommended immunizations, most frequently varicella, pneumococcal or meningococcal C conjugate vaccines. Strong general support was expressed for the expansion of human papillomavirus immunization to males, acceleration of the measles-mumps-rubella schedule and a 2 + 1 instead of 3 + 1 diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, acellular-inactivated poliomyelitis vaccine (DTPa-IPV)/Haemophilus influenzae type b ± hepatitis B virus (HBV) schedule. Survey participants generally demonstrated a positive attitude toward immunization, with pediatricians being the most progressive subgroup with the largest percentage of participants (63.1%) neither declining nor postponing any

  10. Search for a heavy narrow resonance decaying to $e\\mu, e\\tau$, or $\\mu\\tau$ with the ATLAS detector in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borjanovic, Iris; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Bremer, Johan; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brown, Gareth; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Büscher, Volker; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Buran, Torleiv; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Busato, Emmanuel; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capriotti, Daniele; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Cascella, Michele; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo Martin; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalleri, Pietro; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Cheung, Sing-Leung; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiefari, Giovanni; Chikovani, Leila; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins, Neil; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Curtis, Chris; Cuthbert, Cameron; Cwetanski, Peter; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dameri, Mauro; Damiani, Daniel; Danielsson, Hans Olof; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; Davidek, Tomas; Davidson, Nadia; Davidson, Ruth; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Devetak, Erik; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Luise, Silvestro; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dinut, Florin; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobbs, Matt; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Dohmae, Takeshi; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doxiadis, Alexander; Doyle, Tony; Dressnandt, Nandor; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Dührssen, Michael; Duerdoth, Ian; Duflot, Laurent; Dufour, Marc-Andre; Duguid, Liam; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Duxfield, Robert; Dwuznik, Michal; Düren, Michael; Ebenstein, William; Ebke, Johannes; Eckweiler, Sebastian; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Epp, Brigitte; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Fabre, Caroline; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farley, Jason; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Gordon; Fisher, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleckner, Johanna; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fowler, Andrew; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Frank, Tal; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Gan, KK; Gao, Yongsheng; Gaponenko, Andrei; Garberson, Ford; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gerlach, Peter; Gershon, Avi; Geweniger, Christoph; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Adam; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Ginzburg, Jonatan; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goebel, Martin; Göpfert, Thomas; Goeringer, Christian; Gössling, Claus; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gosselink, Martijn; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenshaw, Timothy; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grybel, Kai; Guest, Daniel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haas, Stefan; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Hadley, David; Haefner, Petra; Hahn, Ferdinand; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Hartert, Jochen; Hartjes, Fred; Haruyama, Tomiyoshi; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayakawa, Takashi; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, Robert; Henke, Michael; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirsch, Florian; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holder, Martin; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Holy, Tomas; Holzbauer, Jenny; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Horner, Stephan; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibbotson, Michael; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Jantsch, Andreas; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Jež, Pavel; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansen, Marianne; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johnert, Sebastian; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Joram, Christian; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Jovin, Tatjana; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Juranek, Vojtech; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kabana, Sonja; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kalinovskaya, Lidia; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karagounis, Michael; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Mayuko; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Kekelidze, George; Keller, John; Kenyon, Mike; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerschen, Nicolas; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klemetti, Miika; Klier, Amit; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Klous, Sander; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluge, Thomas; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Koenig, Sebastian; Köpke, Lutz; Koetsveld, Folkert; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolachev, Guennady; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolesnikov, Vladimir; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kono, Takanori; Kononov, Anatoly; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Krejci, Frantisek; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Mark; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lancon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lepold, Florian; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Loureiro, Karina; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Luijckx, Guy; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lundberg, Björn; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lundquist, Johan; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Maeno, Tadashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Malecki, Piotr; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Manabe, Atsushi; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Alessandro; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massaro, Graziano; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazur, Michael; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Donald, Jeffrey; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Meguro, Tatsuma; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Meng, Zhaoxia; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Micu, Liliana; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Miller, Robert; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mönig, Klaus; Möser, Nicolas; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Moorhead, Gareth; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Morello, Gianfranco; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Müller, Thomas; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Niedercorn, Francois; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Henrik; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Osuna, Carlos; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Paleari, Chiara; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Park, Woochun; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perantoni, Marcelo; Perez, Kerstin; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Perrodo, Pascal; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petschull, Dennis; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phan, Anna; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Plotnikova, Elena; Poblaguev, Andrei; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Poll, James; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Pretzl, Klaus Peter; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purdham, John; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Raas, Marcel; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rahimi, Amir; Rahm, David; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Randrianarivony, Koloina; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Gabriel; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rosselet, Laurent; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Samset, Björn Hallvard; Sanchez, Arturo; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Saraiva, João; Sarangi, Tapas; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schäfer, Uli; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultes, Joachim; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellden, Bjoern; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherman, Daniel; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Ben Campbell; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snow, Steve; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiwoks, Ralf; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Strachota, Pavel; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strang, Michael; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Strong, John; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Soh, Dart-yin; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Suzuki, Yuta; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Sánchez, Javier; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tardif, Dominique; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tassi, Enrico; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teinturier, Marthe; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topfel, Cyril; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alesandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiakiris, Menelaos; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Turala, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Tzanakos, George; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Poel, Egge; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Vegni, Guido; Veillet, Jean-Jacques; Veloso, Filipe; Veness, Raymond; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinek, Elisabeth; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virchaux, Marc; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorwerk, Volker; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahlen, Helmut; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Weber, Michele; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Weydert, Carole; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Sebastian; Whitehead, Samuel Robert; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Michael Galante; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xie, Song; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Takayuki; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, Dantong; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Long; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Ning; Zhou, Yue; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhuravlov, Vadym; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zmouchko, Viatcheslav; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-06-10

    This letter presents the results of a search for a heavy particle decaying into an $e^\\pm \\mu^\\mp, e^\\pm\\tau^\\mp$, or $\\mu^\\pm\\tau^\\mp$ final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. The data were recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC during 2011 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.5/fb. No significant excess above the Standard Model expectation is observed, and exclusions at 95% confidence level are placed on the cross section time branching ratio for the production of an R-parity-violating supersymmetric tau sneutrino. These results considerably extend constraints from Tevatron experiments.

  11. SAFETY AND IMMUNOLOGIC EFFICACY OF COMBINED IMMUNIZATION IN CHILDREN AGED 6—7 YEARS WITH VACCINES FROM THE NATIONAL CALENDAR OF PROPHYLACTICS VACCINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Konovalov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the safety of the vaccination for prevention of influenza with Grippol® plus vaccine alongside with vaccination with combined preparations for the prevention of diphtheria and tetanus (Td and measles, rubella, mumps in children aged 6—7 years. We determined that combined immunization with the indicated vaccines proves good tolerability and low reactogenicity. Vaccine Grippol® Plus shows low reactogenicity , high immunologenicity and does not cause cross-suppression of antibodies in co-administration with other vaccines on vaccination calendar. Also concomitant vaccination with Grippol® plus and other vaccines does not inhibit the development of a specific immune response against influenza.

  12. Use of pre-travel vaccine-preventable disease serology as a screening tool to identify patients in need of pre-travel vaccination: a retrospective audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, David P; McGuinness, Sarah L; Cohen, Jonathan; Waring, Lynette J; Leder, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Vaccination is a safe and effective public health intervention that not only protects individual travellers from vaccine-preventable diseases (VPDs), but prevents them from becoming a source of disease in their destination and on their return. Obtaining an accurate vaccination history from travellers during a pre-travel review can be difficult; serology may be used to identify patients who are non-immune to specific diseases in order to guide vaccination requirements. Clinically relevant data about the usefulness of serology in this setting are lacking. We performed a retrospective audit of pre-travel VPD serology requested by practitioners of a busy community-based travel clinic. All serological results for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella zoster virus, hepatitis A and B requested over a 5-year period were extracted and analysed. Results were stratified by gender and year of birth and compared using Stata. Four thousand four hundred and fifty-one serological assays from 1445 individual were assessed. Overall, 47% of patients tested had at least one negative serological result. High rates of seropositivity for measles, mumps and rubella were seen in those born prior to 1966 but >10% of travellers born after 1966 lacked serological evidence of protection against these diseases. Hepatitis A and B serological results revealed broadly lower rates of immunity in our community likely reflecting the absence of these vaccines from historical vaccine protocols. Serology can be a useful tool in the identification of non-immune travellers to enable targeted vaccination prior to travel. We recommend that travel health clinicians assess patients' vaccination and infection histories, and strongly consider serology or vaccination where there is doubt about immunity. This will help protect the traveller and prevent importation of disease into destination or home communities. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  13. Economic analysis of measles elimination program in the Republic of Korea, 2001: a cost benefit analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Geun-Ryang; Choe, Young June; Go, Un Yeong; Kim, Yong-Ik; Lee, Jong-Koo

    2013-05-31

    In this study, we modeled the cost benefit analysis for three different measles vaccination strategies based upon three different measles-containing vaccines in Korea, 2001. We employed an economic analysis model using vaccination coverage data and population-based measles surveillance data, along with available estimates of the costs for the different strategies. In addition, we have included analysis on benefit of reduction of complication by mumps and rubella. We evaluated four different strategies: strategy 1, keep-up program with a second dose measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine at 4-6 years without catch-up campaign; strategy 2, additional catch-up campaign with measles (M) vaccine; strategy 3, catch-up campaign with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine; and strategy 4, catch-up campaign with MMR vaccine. The cost of vaccination included cost for vaccines, vaccination practices and other administrative expenses. The direct benefit of estimated using data from National Health Insurance Company, a government-operated system that reimburses all medical costs spent on designated illness in Korea. With the routine one-dose MMR vaccination program, we estimated a baseline of 178,560 measles cases over the 20 years; when the catch-up campaign with M, MR or MMR vaccines was conducted, we estimated the measles cases would decrease to 5936 cases. Among all strategies, the two-dose MMR keep-up program with MR catch-up campaign showed the highest benefit-cost ratio of 1.27 with a net benefit of 51.6 billion KRW. Across different vaccination strategies, our finding suggest that MR catch-up campaign in conjunction with two-dose MMR keep-up program was the most appropriate option in terms of economic costs and public health effects associated with measles elimination strategy in Korea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Teenagers’ understandings of and attitudes towards vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases: A qualitative study☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, S.; Patterson, C.; Smith, E.; Bedford, H.; Hunt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background To examine immunisation information needs of teenagers we explored understandings of vaccination and vaccine-preventable diseases, attitudes towards immunisation and experiences of immunisation. Diseases discussed included nine for which vaccines are currently offered in the UK (human papillomavirus, meningitis, tetanus, diphtheria, polio, whooping cough, measles, mumps and rubella), and two not currently included in the routine UK schedule (hepatitis B and chickenpox). Methods Twelve focus groups conducted between November 2010 and March 2011 with 59 teenagers (29 girls and 30 boys) living in various parts of Scotland. Results Teenagers exhibited limited knowledge and experience of the diseases, excluding chickenpox. Measles, mumps and rubella were perceived as severe forms of chickenpox-like illness, and rubella was not associated with foetal damage. Boys commonly believed that human papillomavirus only affects girls, and both genders exhibited confusion about its relationship with cancer. Participants considered two key factors when assessing the threat of diseases: their prevalence in the UK, and their potential to cause fatal or long-term harm. Meningitis was seen as a threat, but primarily to babies. Participants explained their limited knowledge as a result of mass immunisation making once-common diseases rare in the UK, and acknowledged immunisation's role in reducing disease prevalence. Conclusions While it is welcome that fewer teenagers have experienced vaccine-preventable diseases, this presents public health advocates with the challenge of communicating benefits of immunisation when advantages are less visible. The findings are timely in view of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's recommendation that a booster of meningitis C vaccine should be offered to teenagers; that teenagers did not perceive meningitis C as a significant threat should be a key concern of promotional information. While teenagers’ experiences of

  15. Serologic vaccination response after solid organ transplantation: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Eckerle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases after solid organ transplantation (SOT are one of the major complications in transplantation medicine. Vaccination-based prevention is desirable, but data on the response to active vaccination after SOT are conflicting. METHODS: In this systematic review, we identify the serologic response rate of SOT recipients to post-transplantation vaccination against tetanus, diphtheria, polio, hepatitis A and B, influenza, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitides, tick-borne encephalitis, rabies, varicella, mumps, measles, and rubella. RESULTS: Of the 2478 papers initially identified, 72 were included in the final review. The most important findings are that (1 most clinical trials conducted and published over more than 30 years have all been small and highly heterogeneous regarding trial design, patient cohorts selected, patient inclusion criteria, dosing and vaccination schemes, follow up periods and outcomes assessed, (2 the individual vaccines investigated have been studied predominately only in one group of SOT recipients, i.e. tetanus, diphtheria and polio in RTX recipients, hepatitis A exclusively in adult LTX recipients and mumps, measles and rubella in paediatric LTX recipients, (3 SOT recipients mount an immune response which is for most vaccines lower than in healthy controls. The degree to which this response is impaired varies with the type of vaccine, age and organ transplanted and (4 for some vaccines antibodies decline rapidly. CONCLUSION: Vaccine-based prevention of infectious diseases is far from satisfactory in SOT recipients. Despite the large number of vaccination studies preformed over the past decades, knowledge on vaccination response is still limited. Even though the protection, which can be achieved in SOT recipients through vaccination, appears encouraging on the basis of available data, current vaccination guidelines and recommendations for post-SOT recipients

  16. Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Generation of Optimal Elimination Trees for Multi-frontal Direct Solver Over H-refined Grids

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.

    2014-06-06

    In this paper we present a dynamic programming algorithm for finding optimal elimination trees for computational grids refined towards point or edge singularities. The elimination tree is utilized to guide the multi-frontal direct solver algorithm. Thus, the criterion for the optimization of the elimination tree is the computational cost associated with the multi-frontal solver algorithm executed over such tree. We illustrate the paper with several examples of optimal trees found for grids with point, isotropic edge and anisotropic edge mixed with point singularity. We show the comparison of the execution time of the multi-frontal solver algorithm with results of MUMPS solver with METIS library, implementing the nested dissection algorithm.

  17. Use of MR sialography and T2W fat-suppressed series in parotitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Pretorius

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Imaging can be helpful when investigating salivary gland pain and swelling. Typically in such cases, an ultrasound (US or conventional sialogram would be requested in seeking obstructed or dilated ducts, a ductal calculus or an abscess within the gland. Occasionally a CT scan is requested. MR is usually reserved for investigating clinically palpable masses in the glands. In acute non-obstructive parotitis, the differential diagnosis includes acute non-suppurative parotitis (as found in mumps, early Sjögren’s syndrome, or suppurative parotitis as seen following duct obstruction. Despite sometimes strong insistence on retrograde contrast sialography, this may exacerbate the pre-existing inflammatory process. The imaging of a young patient expands on these observations.

  18. Phylogenetic and epidemiological analysis of measles outbreaks in Denmark, 2013 to 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Fonager, Jannik; Knudsen, Lisbet Krause

    2015-01-01

    Despite the introduction of safe, effective vaccines decades ago and joint global public health efforts to eliminate measles, this vaccine-preventable disease continues to pose threats to children's health worldwide. During 2013 and 2014, measles virus was introduced into Denmark through several...... an outbreak. The majority of the cases were unvaccinated (n = 27) or recipients of one dose of measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine (n = 7). In addition, two fully vaccinated adult cases were reported in 2014. We demonstrate the transmission of measles virus in a population in which the two-dose MMR...... vaccination coverage rate was 80% and how even vaccinated individuals may be at risk of contracting measles once transmission has been established....

  19. MMRV (Measles, Mumps, Rubella, and Varicella) Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Deafness ‚ ‚ Long-term seizures, coma, lowered consciousness ‚ ‚ Brain damage Other things that could happen after this vaccine: ‚ ‚ People sometimes faint after medical procedures, including vaccination. ...

  20. Reversible splenial lesion on the corpus callosum in nonfulminant hepatitis A presenting as encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon Young Ko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reversible focal lesions on the splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC have been reported in patients with mild encephalitis/encephalopathy caused by various infectious agents, such as influenza, mumps, adenovirus, Varicella zoster, Escherichia coli, Legionella pneumophila, and Staphylococcus aureus. We report a case of a reversible SCC lesion causing reversible encephalopathy in nonfulminant hepatitis A. A 30-year-old healthy male with dysarthria and fever was admitted to our hospital. After admission his mental status became confused, and so we performed electroencephalography (EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain, which revealed an intensified signal on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI at the SCC. His mental status improved 5 days after admission, and the SCC lesion had completely disappeared 15 days after admission.

  1. A Global Perspective on Vaccine Safety and Public Health: The Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folb, Peter I.; Bernatowska, Ewa; Chen, Robert; Clemens, John; Dodoo, Alex N. O.; Ellenberg, Susan S.; Farrington, C. Patrick; John, T. Jacob; Lambert, Paul-Henri; MacDonald, Noni E.; Miller, Elizabeth; Salisbury, David; Schmitt, Heinz-J.; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Wimalaratne, Omala

    2004-01-01

    Established in 1999, the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety advises the World Health Organization (WHO) on vaccine-related safety issues and enables WHO to respond promptly, efficiently, and with scientific rigor to issues of vaccine safety with potential global importance. The committee also assesses the implications of vaccine safety for practice worldwide and for WHO policies. We describe the principles on which the committee was established, its modus operandi, and the scope of the work undertaken, both present and future. We highlight its recent recommendations on major issues, including the purported link between the measles–mumps–rubella vaccine and autism and the safety of the mumps, influenza, yellow fever, BCG, and smallpox vaccines as well as that of thiomersal-containing vaccines. PMID:15514229

  2. Gd enhanced MRI in sensorineural hearing loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Mika; Tono, Tetsuya; Toyama, Katsuhiro; Kano, Kiyo; Morimitsu, Tamotsu

    1996-01-01

    The enhanced MRI hearing findings of the inner ear in 124 patients with sensorineural hearing loss were evaluated. MR images were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of gadolinium (0.1 mmol/kg). In three out of seventy-nine patients with unilateral healing loss, cochlear and/or the vestibular enhancement was noted on the symptomatic side. The positive cases included those with Ramsay-Hunt syndrome, mumps and so-called sudden deafness. Forty-five patients with bilateral hearing loss showed no enhancement within the inner ear. Although positive gadolinium enhancement of the inner ear may detect inflammatory lesions due to a viral infection, its incidence in sensorineural hearing loss, including cases of sudden deafness. seems to be extremely rare. (author)

  3. Low voltage RF MEMS variable capacitor with linear C-V response

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-07-23

    An RF MEMS variable capacitor, fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and tuned electrostatically, possessing a linear capacitance-voltage response is reported. The measured quality factor of the device was 17 at 1GHz, while the tuning range was 1.2:1 and was achieved at an actuation DC voltage of 8V only. Further, the linear regression coefficient was 0.98. The variable capacitor was created such that it has both vertical and horizontal capacitances present. As the top suspended plate moves towards the bottom fixed plate, the vertical capacitance increases whereas the horizontal capacitance decreases simultaneously such that the sum of the two capacitances yields a linear capacitance-voltage relation. © 2012 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

  4. Teenagers' understandings of and attitudes towards vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, S; Patterson, C; Smith, E; Bedford, H; Hunt, K

    2013-05-24

    To examine immunisation information needs of teenagers we explored understandings of vaccination and vaccine-preventable diseases, attitudes towards immunisation and experiences of immunisation. Diseases discussed included nine for which vaccines are currently offered in the UK (human papillomavirus, meningitis, tetanus, diphtheria, polio, whooping cough, measles, mumps and rubella), and two not currently included in the routine UK schedule (hepatitis B and chickenpox). Twelve focus groups conducted between November 2010 and March 2011 with 59 teenagers (29 girls and 30 boys) living in various parts of Scotland. Teenagers exhibited limited knowledge and experience of the diseases, excluding chickenpox. Measles, mumps and rubella were perceived as severe forms of chickenpox-like illness, and rubella was not associated with foetal damage. Boys commonly believed that human papillomavirus only affects girls, and both genders exhibited confusion about its relationship with cancer. Participants considered two key factors when assessing the threat of diseases: their prevalence in the UK, and their potential to cause fatal or long-term harm. Meningitis was seen as a threat, but primarily to babies. Participants explained their limited knowledge as a result of mass immunisation making once-common diseases rare in the UK, and acknowledged immunisation's role in reducing disease prevalence. While it is welcome that fewer teenagers have experienced vaccine-preventable diseases, this presents public health advocates with the challenge of communicating benefits of immunisation when advantages are less visible. The findings are timely in view of the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation's recommendation that a booster of meningitis C vaccine should be offered to teenagers; that teenagers did not perceive meningitis C as a significant threat should be a key concern of promotional information. While teenagers' experiences of immunisation in school were not always positive

  5. 'Outbreak Gold Standard' selection to provide optimized threshold for infectious diseases early-alert based on China Infectious Disease Automated-alert and Response System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Jiang, Yong-Gen; Zhao, Gen-Ming; Guo, Xiao-Qin; Michael, Engelgau

    2017-12-01

    The China Infectious Disease Automated-alert and Response System (CIDARS) was successfully implemented and became operational nationwide in 2008. The CIDARS plays an important role in and has been integrated into the routine outbreak monitoring efforts of the Center for Disease Control (CDC) at all levels in China. In the CIDARS, thresholds are determined using the "Mean+2SD‟ in the early stage which have limitations. This study compared the performance of optimized thresholds defined using the "Mean +2SD‟ method to the performance of 5 novel algorithms to select optimal "Outbreak Gold Standard (OGS)‟ and corresponding thresholds for outbreak detection. Data for infectious disease were organized by calendar week and year. The "Mean+2SD‟, C1, C2, moving average (MA), seasonal model (SM), and cumulative sum (CUSUM) algorithms were applied. Outbreak signals for the predicted value (Px) were calculated using a percentile-based moving window. When the outbreak signals generated by an algorithm were in line with a Px generated outbreak signal for each week, this Px was then defined as the optimized threshold for that algorithm. In this study, six infectious diseases were selected and classified into TYPE A (chickenpox and mumps), TYPE B (influenza and rubella) and TYPE C [hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and scarlet fever]. Optimized thresholds for chickenpox (P 55 ), mumps (P 50 ), influenza (P 40 , P 55 , and P 75 ), rubella (P 45 and P 75 ), HFMD (P 65 and P 70 ), and scarlet fever (P 75 and P 80 ) were identified. The C1, C2, CUSUM, SM, and MA algorithms were appropriate for TYPE A. All 6 algorithms were appropriate for TYPE B. C1 and CUSUM algorithms were appropriate for TYPE C. It is critical to incorporate more flexible algorithms as OGS into the CIDRAS and to identify the proper OGS and corresponding recommended optimized threshold by different infectious disease types.

  6. The globalization of risk and risk perception: why we need a new model of risk communication for vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Heidi; Brocard Paterson, Pauline; Erondu, Ngozi

    2012-11-01

    Risk communication and vaccines is complex and the nature of risk perception is changing, with perceptions converging, evolving and having impacts well beyond specific geographic localities and points in time, especially when amplified through the Internet and other modes of global communication. This article examines the globalization of risk perceptions and their impacts, including the example of measles and the globalization of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine risk perceptions, and calls for a new, more holistic model of risk assessment, risk communication and risk mitigation, embedded in an ongoing process of risk management for vaccines and immunization programmes. It envisions risk communication as an ongoing process that includes trust-building strategies hand-in-hand with operational and policy strategies needed to mitigate and manage vaccine-related risks, as well as perceptions of risk.

  7. Mexico introduces pentavalent vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Combination vaccines have been introduced in Mexico. The national immunization program has incorporated the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines in 1998, and the pentavalent vaccine in 1999. The two categories of antigen composition in combination vaccines are: 1) multiple different antigenic types of a single pathogen, such as the 23 valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and 2) antigens from different pathogens causing different diseases, such as the DPT and MMR vaccines. Pentavalent vaccines are included in the second category. The vaccine protects against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and other diseases produced by Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib). Combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and Haemophilus influenza type b (DTP-HB/Hib) vaccine has been distributed to 87% of Mexican children under 1 year of age. Over 800,000 doses of pentavalent vaccine have been administered.

  8. Vaccine-Preventable Admissions to an Irish Paediatric Intensive Care

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doyle, Y

    2017-05-01

    In the Republic of Ireland, the schedule of state-funded immunisation for children is comprehensive and includes diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, pneumococcus, hepatitis B, meningococcus C, haemophilus B, polio, measles, rubella and mumps. Varicella and meningococcal B vaccines are commercially available but are not currently funded by the government. Each of the illnesses preventable by these vaccines can cause substantial morbidity, and rarely mortality, in infants and children. Our PICU continues to see serious illness due to avoidable infection. There were 39 admissions in a 4 year period, with 34 children surviving to discharge. Nine children were infected with pneumococcus, with 4 deaths. There was one case of pertussis, causing death. Most infections occurred in previously healthy children. These preventable conditions represent a significant burden on children, families, and on social and healthcare resources

  9. Modeling and fabrication of an RF MEMS variable capacitor with a fractal geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2013-08-16

    In this paper, we model, fabricate, and measure an electrostatically actuated MEMS variable capacitor that utilizes a fractal geometry and serpentine-like suspension arms. Explicitly, a variable capacitor that possesses a top suspended plate with a specific fractal geometry and also possesses a bottom fixed plate complementary in shape to the top plate has been fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process. An important benefit that was achieved from using the fractal geometry in designing the MEMS variable capacitor is increasing the tuning range of the variable capacitor beyond the typical ratio of 1.5. The modeling was carried out using the commercially available finite element software COMSOL to predict both the tuning range and pull-in voltage. Measurement results show that the tuning range is 2.5 at a maximum actuation voltage of 10V.

  10. CT scans in encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanishi, Masami; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Iida, Noriyuki; Hisanaga, Manabu; Kinugawa, Kazuhiko

    1980-01-01

    Generally, CT scans reveal a decrease in the volume of the ventricular system, sylvian fissures and cortical sulci in the acute stage of encephalitis, and softening of the cerebral lobes with dilatation of the lateral ventricles and subarachnoidian dilated spaces in the chronic stage. We encountered three cases of encephalitis: mumps (case 1), herpes simplex (case 2), and syphilis (case 3). In case 1, brain edema was seen in the acute stage and brain atrophy in the chronic stage. In case 2, necrosis of the temporal pole, which is pathognomonic in herpes simplex encephalitis, was recognized. And in case 3, multiple lesions whose CT appearance was enhanced by contrast materials were found scattered over the whole brain. These lesions were diagnosed as inflammatory granuloma by histological examination. (author)

  11. Spontaneous reports on drug-induced pancreatitis in Denmark from 1968 to 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, V; Sonne, J; Andersen, M

    2001-01-01

    valproate (two cases), clomipramine (one case) and azathioprine (one case). Definite relationship was stated for mesalazine (three cases), azathioprine (two cases) and simvastatin (one case) on the basis of re-challenge. A possible or probable causality was considered for a further 30 drugs including 5...... (measles" mumps/rubella) vaccination. CONCLUSION: Drug-induced pancreatitis is rarely reported. The incidence may be increasing and the course is often serious. This is the first report on definite simvastatin-induced pancreatitis. Further studies on the pancreotoxic potential of drugs are warranted.......OBJECTIVES: To present an update on drug-induced pancreatitis reported to the Danish Committee on Adverse Drug Reactions. DESIGN: Retrospective study of spontaneous case reports to the Danish reporting system on adverse drug reactions. METHODS: All cases of suspected drug-induced pancreatitis...

  12. Asthma and allergy in children with and without prior measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Osuna, Christa Elyse; Steuerwald, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    with asthma and allergic diseases at ages 5, 7 and 13 years in a birth cohort. METHODS: In the Faroe Islands, 640 children were followed from birth. Follow-up examinations at ages 5, 7 and 13 years included a physical examination and a maternal questionnaire about the child's health. At age 7, total and grass...

  13. Two-layer radio frequency MEMS fractal capacitors in PolyMUMPS for S-band applications

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter, the authors fabricate for the first time MEMS fractal capacitors possessing two layers and compare their performance characteristics with the conventional parallel-plate capacitor and previously reported state-of-the-art single

  14. An Electro-thermal MEMS Gripper with Large Tip Opening and Holding Force: Design and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay J. KHAZAAI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, fabrication, and characterization of a novel MEMS gripper that is driven electro-thermally by a new V-shape actuator (VSA and a set of modified Guckel U-shape actuators (mUSA. The modification of the angle between the hot and cold arms in the mUSA facilitates unidirectional in-plane displacement causing the opening of the gripper. This configuration distinguishes the MEMS gripper from others in its ability to generate larger tip displacement and greater holding force. The metallic structures allow for a low operating voltage and low overall power consumption. A tip opening of 173.4 μm has been measured at the operating voltage of 1 V with consuming power of 0.85 W. MetalMUMPs is employed to fabricate the device, in which electroplated nickel is used as the structural material.

  15. Myxoviruses do not induce non-specific alterations in membrane permeability early on in infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, K.A.; Micklem, K.J.; Bogomolova, N.N.; Boriskin, Y.S.; Pasternak, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The permeability characteristics of cells infected with myxoviruses have been studied by measuring the concentrative uptake of nutrients, the concentration of intracellular K + , and the maintenance of the Na + gradient across the plasma membrane. Cells either show no change at all (Sendai virus-infected BHK cells and measles virus-infected Vero cells) or they show a decreased ability to concentrate nutrients, while intracellular K + and the Na + gradient remain unchanged (Sendai and influenza virus-infected L-1210 cells, measles virus-infected lymphocytes and mumps virus-infected L-41 cells). In no case, therefore, was a change observed that resembles the non-specific increase in membrane permeability induced by haemolytic paramyxoviruses (35, 42) or the non-specific membrane leakiness postulated to take place in infected cells (8, 9). A preliminary account of some of these findings has been presented (39)

  16. Scalability of Direct Solver for Non-stationary Cahn-Hilliard Simulations with Linearized time Integration Scheme

    KAUST Repository

    Woźniak, M.

    2016-06-02

    We study the features of a new mixed integration scheme dedicated to solving the non-stationary variational problems. The scheme is composed of the FEM approximation with respect to the space variable coupled with a 3-leveled time integration scheme with a linearized right-hand side operator. It was applied in solving the Cahn-Hilliard parabolic equation with a nonlinear, fourth-order elliptic part. The second order of the approximation along the time variable was proven. Moreover, the good scalability of the software based on this scheme was confirmed during simulations. We verify the proposed time integration scheme by monitoring the Ginzburg-Landau free energy. The numerical simulations are performed by using a parallel multi-frontal direct solver executed over STAMPEDE Linux cluster. Its scalability was compared to the results of the three direct solvers, including MUMPS, SuperLU and PaSTiX.

  17. Reimmunization after bone marrow transplantation: Current recommendations and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Clarisse M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Autologous and allogeneic BMT recipients lose immune memory of exposition to infectious agents and vaccines accumulated throughout lifetime and therefore need to be revaccinated. Diphtheria toxoid, tetanus toxoid, pertussis vaccine (children < 7 years old, Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib conjugate, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide, inactivated influenza vaccine, inactivated polio vaccine and live-attenuated measles-mumps-rubella vaccine are the currently recommended vaccines to be included in a vaccination program after BMT. For most of them, the best time of vaccination, the number of vaccine doses and/or the duration of immunity after vaccination have not been established. Vaccination protocols vary greatly among BMT centers suggesting that the lack of sufficient data has not permitted the establishment of solid recommendations. The use of other vaccines and the perspectives for different vaccination protocols are discussed in this review.

  18. Adverse Events Following Immunization (AEFI in Children under 7- year of Age during 2014 in Hamedan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Khazaei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surveillance of adverse events following immunization (AEFI is essential to improve high standard of vaccine safety, and maintain public trust in immunization programs. This study aimed to determine the AEFI and their related factors in children. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study including all children under 7- year of age, in Hamadan Province, the West of Iran, in 2014. All of the AEFI related with Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG, Diphtheria, Pertussis, and Tetanus (DPT, Measles, Mumps, and Rubella (MMR vaccines were obtained from the documented record-based by Health Centers, in Hamadan province. Results: From a total of 239,204 doses administered, 284 AEFI were notified (11.8 per 10,000 doses. The proportion of AEFI was more frequently reported from Health Houses than Health Centers (60.2 vs. 37.0, P

  19. Association between perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and asthma and allergic disease in children as modified by MMR vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Jensen, Tina Kold

    2017-01-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are highly persistent chemicals that might be associated with asthma and allergy, but the associations remain unclear. Therefore, this study examined whether pre- and postnatal PFAS exposure was associated with childhood asthma and allergy. Measles, mumps......, and rubella (MMR) vaccination in early life may have a protective effect against asthma and allergy, and MMR vaccination is therefore taken into account when evaluating these associations. In a cohort of Faroese children whose mothers were recruited during pregnancy, serum concentrations of five PFASs...... with immunoglobulin E (IgE) (cord blood and at age 7 years) and asthma/allergic diseases (questionnaires at ages 5 and 13 years and skin prick test at age 13 years) was determined. A total of 559 children were included in the analyses. Interactions with MMR vaccination were evaluated. Among 22 MMR...

  20. [Lack of association between MMR vaccination and the incidence of autism in children: a case-control study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Kiełtyka, Agnieszka; Majewska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    The matched case-control study has been undertook to investigate whether measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine may be casually associated with autism in children. Cases were children to 14-year old with diagnosis of core autism or atypical autism. Controls were matched on age, sex and general practice. The 96 cases and 192 controls were included. The study provides strong evidence against association of autism with both MMR and a single measles individual vaccine. Additionally children vaccinated with MMR, regardless of age of vaccination (to 18th, 24th and 36th month of life), had risk equal half of that of single measles vaccinated (for vaccinated to 18th month OR=0.41 95%PU: 0.20-0.85). Our findings confirm that MMR vaccination is not associated with an increased risk of autism in children.

  1. In vitro evaluation of antiviral and virucidal activity of a high molecular weight hyaluronic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blasi Elisabetta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background hyaluronic acid (HA, a non-sulphated glycosaminoglycan, is present in synovial fluid, vitreous humour serum and many connective tissues. Pharmaceutical preparations of HA are used in clinical practice for wound healing, joint pain, kerato-conjunctivitis, asthma, mouth care, oesophageal-reflux, and gastritis. Moreover, it is used as a filler to counteract ageing and facial lipoatrophy. Our study aims at investigating the in vitro antiviral activity of a high molecular weight HA. Methods the MTT test was used to rule out the potential toxic effects of HA on the different cell lines used in the antiviral assays. The antiviral activity of HA against Coxsackievirus B5, Herpes Simplex Virus-1, Mumps Virus, Adenovirus-5, Influenza Virus A/H1N1, Human Herpesvirus-6, Porcine Parvovirus, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus was assessed by virus yield assays. Results the most effective inhibition was observed against Coxsackievirus B5, with 3Log reduction of the virus yield at 4 mg/ml, and a reduction of 3.5Log and 2Log, at 2 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml, respectively: the selectivity index was 16. Mumps virus was highly inhibited too showing a reduction of 1.7Log at 1 mg/ml and 1Log at 4 mg/ml and 2 mg/ml (selectivity index = 12. The selectivity index for Influenza Virus was 12 with the highest inhibition (1Log observed at 4 mg/ml. Herpes Simplex Virus-1 and Porcine Parvovirus were mildly inhibited, whereas no antiviral activity was observed with respect to Adenovirus-5, Human Herpesvirus-6, Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus. No HA virucidal activity was ever observed against any of the viruses tested. Kinetic experiments showed that both Coxsackievirus B5 and Herpes simplex virus-1 replication were consistently inhibited, not influenced by the time of HA addition, during the virus replication cycle. Conclusions the spectrum of the antiviral activity exhibited by HA against both RNA and DNA viruses, known to have

  2. How to select a proper early warning threshold to detect infectious disease outbreaks based on the China infectious disease automated alert and response system (CIDARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruiping; Jiang, Yonggen; Michael, Engelgau; Zhao, Genming

    2017-06-12

    China Centre for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) developed the China Infectious Disease Automated Alert and Response System (CIDARS) in 2005. The CIDARS was used to strengthen infectious disease surveillance and aid in the early warning of outbreak. The CIDARS has been integrated into the routine outbreak monitoring efforts of the CDC at all levels in China. Early warning threshold is crucial for outbreak detection in the CIDARS, but CDCs at all level are currently using thresholds recommended by the China CDC, and these recommended thresholds have recognized limitations. Our study therefore seeks to explore an operational method to select the proper early warning threshold according to the epidemic features of local infectious diseases. The data used in this study were extracted from the web-based Nationwide Notifiable Infectious Diseases Reporting Information System (NIDRIS), and data for infectious disease cases were organized by calendar week (1-52) and year (2009-2015) in Excel format; Px was calculated using a percentile-based moving window (moving window [5 week*5 year], x), where x represents one of 12 centiles (0.40, 0.45, 0.50….0.95). Outbreak signals for the 12 Px were calculated using the moving percentile method (MPM) based on data from the CIDARS. When the outbreak signals generated by the 'mean + 2SD' gold standard were in line with a Px generated outbreak signal for each week during the year of 2014, this Px was then defined as the proper threshold for the infectious disease. Finally, the performance of new selected thresholds for each infectious disease was evaluated by simulated outbreak signals based on 2015 data. Six infectious diseases were selected in this study (chickenpox, mumps, hand foot and mouth diseases (HFMD), scarlet fever, influenza and rubella). Proper thresholds for chickenpox (P75), mumps (P80), influenza (P75), rubella (P45), HFMD (P75), and scarlet fever (P80) were identified. The selected proper thresholds for these

  3. Can Machines Learn Respiratory Virus Epidemiology?: A Comparative Study of Likelihood-Free Methods for the Estimation of Epidemiological Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi L. Tessmer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To estimate and predict the transmission dynamics of respiratory viruses, the estimation of the basic reproduction number, R0, is essential. Recently, approximate Bayesian computation methods have been used as likelihood free methods to estimate epidemiological model parameters, particularly R0. In this paper, we explore various machine learning approaches, the multi-layer perceptron, convolutional neural network, and long-short term memory, to learn and estimate the parameters. Further, we compare the accuracy of the estimates and time requirements for machine learning and the approximate Bayesian computation methods on both simulated and real-world epidemiological data from outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1pdm09, mumps, and measles. We find that the machine learning approaches can be verified and tested faster than the approximate Bayesian computation method, but that the approximate Bayesian computation method is more robust across different datasets.

  4. MEMS variable capacitance devices utilizing the substrate: I. Novel devices with a customizable tuning range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshurafa, Amro M; El-Masry, Ezz I

    2010-01-01

    This paper, the first in a series of two, presents a paradigm shift in the design of MEMS parallel plate PolyMUMPS variable capacitance devices by proposing two structures that utilize the substrate and are able to provide predetermined, customizable, tuning ranges and/or ratios. The proposed structures can provide theoretical tuning ranges anywhere from 4.9 to 35 and from 3.4 to 26 respectively with a simple, yet effective, layout modification as opposed to the previously reported devices where the tuning range is fixed and cannot be varied. Theoretical analysis is carried out and verified with measurements of fabricated devices. The first proposed device possessed initially a tuning range of 4.4. Two variations of the structure having tuning ranges of 3 and 3.4, all at 1 GHz, were also successfully developed and tested. The second proposed variable capacitance device behaved as a switch.

  5. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis following Vaccination against Hepatitis B in a Child: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-liang Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which has been associated with several vaccines such as rabies, diphtheria-tetanus-polio, smallpox, measles, mumps, rubella, Japanese B encephalitis, pertussis, influenza, and the Hog vaccine. Here, we presented a case of 12-year-old child who suffered from ADEM three weeks after hepatitis B vaccination. He was admitted to our hospital with symptoms of weakness of limbs, high fever, and alteration of consciousness. Some abnormalities were also found in CSF. Treatment with high-dose corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin had significant effect, with marked improvement of the clinical symptoms and the results of CSF. The findings of MRI also detected some abnormal lesions located in both brain and spinal cord. The clinical features, the findings of CSF and MRI, and therapeutic effect may contribute to such diagnosis of ADEM.

  6. Infectious disease morbidity in the US region bordering Mexico, 1990-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, T J; Bryan, R T

    2000-11-01

    The United States and Mexico share an international boundary approximately 3000 km long. This border separates 2 nations with great differences in health status. The objective of this study was to assess morbidity due to infectious diseases in the US region bordering Mexico. The incidence between 1990 and 1998 of 22 nationally notifiable infectious diseases was compared between border and nonborder regions. Disease rates, reflected as rate ratios, were higher in the border region for botulism, brucellosis, diphtheria, hepatitis A, measles, mumps, rabies, rubella, salmonellosis, and shigellosis than in either of 2 nonborder comparison regions. These data indicate that incidence rates for a variety of infectious diseases of public health importance are significantly higher in the United States along the Mexican border than in nonborder regions. These results suggest that an inadequate public health infrastructure may contribute to excess morbidity due to infectious diseases in the border region.

  7. Age-dependent branching processes for surveillance of vaccine-preventable diseases with incubation period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marusia N Bojkova

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review the recent results of the authors in the area of infectious disease modelling by means of branching stochastic processes. This is a new approach involving age-dependent branching models, which turned out to be more appropriate and flexible for describing the spread of an infection in a given population, than discrete time ones. Concretely, Bellman-Harris and Sevast’yanov’s branching processes are investigated. It is justified that the proposed models are proper candidates as models of infectious diseases with incubation period like measles, mumps, avian flu, etc. It is worth to notice that in general the developed methodology is applicable to the diseases that follow the so-called SIR (susceptible- infected-removed scheme in terms of epidemiological models. Two policies of extra-vaccination level are proposed and compared on the ground of simulation examples.

  8. The role of message framing in promoting MMR vaccination: evidence of a loss-frame advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Purva; O'Connor, Daryl B; Lawton, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of message framing on intentions to obtain the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine for one's child and investigated whether Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and perceived outcome efficacy variables mediate and/or moderate message framing effects. One hundred and forty women read either a loss-framed or gain-framed message and then completed measures assessing their intentions to obtain the MMR vaccine for their child, and TPB and outcome efficacy variables. Exposure to the loss frame increased intentions to obtain the MMR vaccine and influenced perceptions of outcome efficacy. This suggests that outcome efficacy, but not other TPB variables may mediate framing effects within the context of MMR vaccination. Message frame, in addition to TPB variables, significantly predicted unique variance in behavioural intentions. These findings are discussed within the context of Prospect Theory, perceived risk and prevention/detection behaviours.

  9. Sensorineural hearing loss in hemorrhagic dengue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Natália Freire Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Discussion and conclusion: This is the first case report that brings together DHF and sudden hearing loss. In the development of this case no other cause to sudden hearing loss was found and the correlation between dengue and hearing loss was questioned. In the literature review was found that some viruses, as mumps virus, varicella-zoster virus and HSV-1 and HSV-2 are related to sudden hearing loss, all of them fit in the viral theory. Besides the viral theory of sudden hearing loss, there is the vascular theory that is the occlusion of the end artery that supplies the cochlea. DHF has a vascular commitment, and the hypothesis of a vascular cause could be elicited in this case. Many studies in this area are needed and this article has the objective of elicit the discussion about the subject. Could dengue be associated with sensorineural hearing loss?

  10. Public fear of vaccination: separating fact from fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanna, Ian; Slifka, Mark K

    2005-01-01

    During the last two centuries, the world has seen a substantial increase in the number and availability of vaccines for the prevention of infectious disease. Smallpox vaccine remains the most celebrated vaccine-related achievement in human history, but worldwide reductions in many other diseases including measles, mumps, rubella, polio, diphtheria, and whooping cough (Bordetella pertussis) also illustrate the power of vaccination in controlling outbreaks of contagious diseases. Ironically, as advances in vaccination successfully limit disease outbreaks, the impact that these infectious agents once had on society becomes marginalized. Public confidence in vaccination may erode because of real or perceived risks associated with immunization, and this in turn may lead to lower vaccination coverage and loss of herd immunity. Here, we will discuss some of the elements associated with public perceptions and fear of vaccination and place these into the context of how deadly several vaccine-preventable childhood diseases can be if vaccination coverage is insufficient.

  11. New Insights on the Morphology of Adult Mouse Penis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Esequiel; Weiss, Dana A.; Yang, Jennifer H.; Menshenina, Julia; Ferretti, Max; Cunha, Tristan J.; Barcellos, Dale; Chan, Lok Yun; Risbridger, Gail; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adult mouse penis represents the end point of masculine sex differentiation of the embryonic genital tubercle and contains bone, cartilage, the urethra, erectile bodies, several types of epithelium, and many individual cell types arrayed into specific anatomical structures. Using contemporary high-resolution imaging techniques, we sought to provide new insights to the current description of adult mouse penile morphology to enable understanding of penile abnormalities, including hypospadias. Examination of serial transverse and longitudinal sections, scanning electron microscopy, and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction provided a new appreciation of the individual structures in the adult mouse penis and their 3D interrelationships. In so doing, we discovered novel paired erectile bodies, the male urogenital mating protuberance (MUMP), and more accurately described the urethral meatus. These morphological observations were quantified by morphometric analysis and now provide accurate morphological end points of sex differentiation of mouse penis that will be the foundation of future studies to identify normal and abnormal penile development. PMID:21918128

  12. Using electronic mail to improve MMR uptake amongst third level students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, F

    2010-03-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of email in informing third level students about special MMR clinics being provided on campus during a mumps outbreak in the North West of Ireland. Email messages were sent directly to students, informing them of the clinics, inviting them to make a clinic appointment by email and providing details of walk-in clinics. At the clinics, all 177 attendees were asked to fill out a questionnaire and the response rate was 89% (n=158). Regarding the main sources of information about the vaccination clinics, email was selected by 117 (74%) students, word-of-mouth by 27 (17%), posters\\/leaflets by 8 (5%), and other sources by 6 (4%). Use of email as a source of information was rated as very good\\/excellent by 115 (73%), as good by 35 (22%) and poor\\/fair by 8 (5%). This study demonstrates that email is a useful and acceptable way of informing third level students about immunisation clinics in an outbreak situation.

  13. MUSIDH, multiple use of simulated demographic histories, a novel method to reduce computation time in microsimulation models of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E A J; De Vlas, S J; Richardus, J H; Habbema, J D F

    2008-09-01

    Microsimulation of infectious diseases requires simulation of many life histories of interacting individuals. In particular, relatively rare infections such as leprosy need to be studied in very large populations. Computation time increases disproportionally with the size of the simulated population. We present a novel method, MUSIDH, an acronym for multiple use of simulated demographic histories, to reduce computation time. Demographic history refers to the processes of birth, death and all other demographic events that should be unrelated to the natural course of an infection, thus non-fatal infections. MUSIDH attaches a fixed number of infection histories to each demographic history, and these infection histories interact as if being the infection history of separate individuals. With two examples, mumps and leprosy, we show that the method can give a factor 50 reduction in computation time at the cost of a small loss in precision. The largest reductions are obtained for rare infections with complex demographic histories.

  14. Measles epidemic in Switzerland and other parts of Europe

    CERN Multimedia

    TIS Commission

    2008-01-01

    There has been a measles epidemic in Switzerland since November 2006. By April 2008 the number of cases had reached almost 2500, with over 1300 since the beginning of the year alone. All cantons are affected but to varying degrees, the largest number of cases occurring in the north and east of the country. In all cases, the low vaccination coverage is responsible for the spread of this highly contagious disease. The contagious period starts 4 days before the rash appears and lasts until 4 days afterwards. In the event of infection, children must be kept away from school and measures must be taken to protect those who come into contact with them, which may include vaccination if the infection is less than 72 hours old. The Swiss and international health authorities recommend the following measures to prevent the spread of the disease: those who have already contracted the disease, received 2 doses of the vaccine (often in the form of the combined MMR - measles, mumps, rubella...

  15. DEFEAT OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM IN VIRAL INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sharipova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is devoted to studying of the submitted epidemiological, clinical, tool, laboratory data on pathology of cardiovascular system at various viral infections. The review is based on results of domestic and foreign researches. At viral infections damage of heart and his carrying-out system perhaps as during the sharp period of a disease, and the period of a convalescence or at the chronic course of virus process. The greatest cardiothrogenism is possessed by enteroviruses, which affect the myocardium in 5–15% of cases. Much attention is paid to herpesviruses, widespread, persistently persistent in the body, as one of the reasons for the development of dilated cardiomyopathy, coronary vasculitis, early atherosclerosis, cardiac rhythm disturbance. Other infections that may affect the cardiovascular system include influenza viruses, adenovirus, poliovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis, mumps, rubella, herpes simplex, varicella, arbovirus, respiratory-syntial virus, yellow fever virus et al. Complications from cardiovascular system can come to light at various age.

  16. Using electronic mail to improve MMR uptake amongst third level students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, F; Ryan, A; Schinaia, N; Breslin, A

    2010-03-01

    This study assessed the usefulness of email in informing third level students about special MMR clinics being provided on campus during a mumps outbreak in the North West of Ireland. Email messages were sent directly to students, informing them of the clinics, inviting them to make a clinic appointment by email and providing details of walk-in clinics. At the clinics, all 177 attendees were asked to fill out a questionnaire and the response rate was 89% (n=158). Regarding the main sources of information about the vaccination clinics, email was selected by 117 (74%) students, word-of-mouth by 27 (17%), posters/leaflets by 8 (5%), and other sources by 6 (4%). Use of email as a source of information was rated as very good/excellent by 115 (73%), as good by 35 (22%) and poor/fair by 8 (5%). This study demonstrates that email is a useful and acceptable way of informing third level students about immunisation clinics in an outbreak situation.

  17. Paramyxovirus membrane fusion: Lessons from the F and HN atomic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamb, Robert A.; Paterson, Reay G.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2006-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses enter cells by fusion of their lipid envelope with the target cell plasma membrane. Fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane allows entry of the viral genome into the cytoplasm. For paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion occurs at neutral pH, but the trigger mechanism that controls the viral entry machinery such that it occurs at the right time and in the right place remains to be elucidated. Two viral glycoproteins are key to the infection process-an attachment protein that varies among different paramyxoviruses and the fusion (F) protein, which is found in all paramyxoviruses. For many of the paramyxoviruses (parainfluenza viruses 1-5, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus and others), the attachment protein is the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) protein. In the last 5 years, atomic structures of paramyxovirus F and HN proteins have been reported. The knowledge gained from these structures towards understanding the mechanism of viral membrane fusion is described

  18. Relationship between parent held child records for immunisations, parental recall and health service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jessop, L

    2011-03-01

    Parent held child records (PHCR) were introduced in Ireland in 2008. This study investigated the relationship between the PHCR, parental recall and regional Health Service Executive (HSE) records for immunisation uptake. It used the Lifeways cohort study of 1070 singleton children to compare immunisation data from PHCR at one year, parental recall at five years and information from the HSE. When compared to HSE records, full recording of primary immunisations in the PHCR was reported for 695 of 749 (92.8%) children. Parental recall was correct for 520 of 538 (96.7%) children. Of the 307 completed PHCRs, 207 (75.9%) agreed with the HSE records. Agreement between the three sources for primary immunisations was 74-93% but was not statistically significant. Agreement was 91% (p < 0.001) for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccines between parental recall and HSE records. PHCRs underestimated and parental recall overestimated immunisation status when compared with HSE records.

  19. MEMS variable capacitance devices utilizing the substrate: I. Novel devices with a customizable tuning range

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2010-03-22

    This paper, the first in a series of two, presents a paradigm shift in the design of MEMS parallel plate PolyMUMPS variable capacitance devices by proposing two structures that utilize the substrate and are able to provide predetermined, customizable, tuning ranges and/or ratios. The proposed structures can provide theoretical tuning ranges anywhere from 4.9 to 35 and from 3.4 to 26 respectively with a simple, yet effective, layout modification as opposed to the previously reported devices where the tuning range is fixed and cannot be varied. Theoretical analysis is carried out and verified with measurements of fabricated devices. The first proposed device possessed initially a tuning range of 4.4. Two variations of the structure having tuning ranges of 3 and 3.4, all at 1 GHz, were also successfully developed and tested. The second proposed variable capacitance device behaved as a switch. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  20. Use of a radiation therapy treatment planning computer in a hospital health physics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addison, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    An onsite treatment planning computer has become state of the art in the care of radiation therapy patients, but in most installations the computer is used for therapy planning a diminutive amount of the day. At St. Mary's Hospital, arrangements have been negotiated for part time use of the treatment planning computer for health physics purposes. Computerized Medical Systems, Inc. (CMS) produces the Modulex radiotherapy planning system which is programmed in MUMPS, a user oriented language specially adapted for handling text string information. St. Mary's Hospital's CMS computer has currently been programmed to assist in data collection and write-up of diagnostic x-ray surveys, meter calibrations, and wipe/leak tests. The computer is setup to provide timely reminders of tests and surveys, and billing for consultation work. Programs are currently being developed for radionuclide inventories. Use of a therapy planning computer for health physics purposes can enhance the radiation safety program and provide additional grounds for the acquisition of such a computer system

  1. Notes from the Field: Measles Transmission in an International Airport at a Domestic Terminal Gate--April-May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Emily; Hickman, Cynthia; Engels, Kathryn; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2015-06-26

    On April 22, 2014, the Minnesota Department of Health notified CDC of a case of measles in a child aged 19 months who had documentation of receiving 1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine at age 12 months. The child's illness was clinically compatible with measles, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and immunoglobulin M serology at the Minnesota Department of Health Public Health Laboratory. The child was febrile and developed a rash on April 17 while on an international flight from India to the United States before taking a connecting flight from Chicago to Minneapolis. Persons with measles are infectious from 4 days before to 4 days after rash onset. Therefore, travelers were exposed on both the international and domestic flights. CDC's Division of Global Migration and Quarantine was contacted and provided information on potentially exposed persons to relevant health departments for follow-up. No documented transmission was reported as a result of the two flight exposures.

  2. INTERFERON BETA-1A TREATMENT IN HTLV-1-ASSOCIATED MYELOPATHY/TROPICAL SPASTIC PARAPARESIS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graça Maria de Castro Viana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Here a young patient (< 21 years of age with a history of infective dermatitis is described. The patient was diagnosed with myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis and treated with interferon beta-1a. The disease was clinically established as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, and laboratory tests confirmed the presence of antibodies to HTLV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Mumps, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, schistosomiasis, herpes virus 1 and 2, rubella, measles, varicella-zoster toxoplasmosis, hepatitis, HIV, and syphilis were excluded by serology. The patient was diagnosed with neurogenic bladder and presented with nocturia, urinary urgency, paresthesia of the lower left limb, a marked reduction of muscle strength in the lower limbs, and a slight reduction in upper limb strength. During the fourth week of treatment with interferon beta-1a, urinary urgency and paresthesia disappeared and clinical motor skills improved.

  3. Noise-induced hearing loss and associated factors among vector control workers in a Malaysian state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masilamani, Retneswari; Rasib, Abdul; Darus, Azlan; Ting, Anselm Su

    2014-11-01

    This study aims to determine the prevalence and associated factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among vector control workers in the state of Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia. This was an analytical cross-sectional study conducted on 181 vector control workers who were working in district health offices in a state in Malaysia. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire and audiometry. Prevalence of NIHL was 26% among this group of workers. NIHL was significantly associated with the age-group of 40 years and older, length of service of 10 or more years, current occupational noise exposure, listening to loud music, history of firearms use, and history of mumps/measles infection. Following logistic regression, age of more than 40 years and noise exposure in current occupation were associated with NIHL with an odds ratio of 3.45 (95% confidence interval = 1.68-7.07) and 6.87 (95% confidence interval = 1.54-30.69), respectively, among this group of vector control workers. © 2012 APJPH.

  4. Live vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella and the risk of hospital admissions for nontargeted infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Signe; Benn, Christine Stabell; Poulsen, Anja

    2014-01-01

    ). Nationwide Danish registers provided data on vaccinations and hospital admissions. The recommended vaccination schedule was inactivated vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, and Haemophilus influenzae type b (DTaP-IPV-Hib) administered at ages 3, 5, and 12 months and MMR at age 15 months...

  5. Study on the changes of serum HA and CG levels in several diseases besides liver disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiping, Lu; Yunbao, Ma; Xiaoyi, Zhang; Weihua, Lv [Changshu Hospital Attached to Medical College of Yangzhou Univ., Changshu No.2 People' s Hospital, Changshu (China)

    2005-12-15

    Objective: To study the changes of serum hyaluronic acid (HA) and cholyglycine (CG) in several diseases besides liver disorders. Methods: Serum HA and CG levels were measured with RIA in 78 patients with chronic liver diseases (with 70 controls), (84 patients with primary hepatic carcinoma ), 70 pediatric patients with various infections diseases (with 40 controls), 50 pediatric patients with recurrent respiratory infection (RRI, with 30 controls) and 428 pregnant women ( with 60 controls). In addition, RBC C{sub 3}b receptor ratio (RBCC{sub 3} bRR) and RBC immune-complex ratio (RBCICR) (both with yeast rosette method) as well as serum IgG,IgM,IgA,C{sub 3} levels (with immunoturbidity test) were examined in the 50 RRI pediatric patients, ALT levels were examined in the 70 pediatric patients with infectious diseases and SF examined in the 78 patients with chronic liver diseases. Results: The serum CG, HA and SF levels in the three groups of patients with chronic liver diseases ( CPH, CAH, Cirrhosis) were significantly higher than those in the controls (all P<0.01 ) with the exception of HA in CPH patients (P > 0.05). In patients with hepatic carcinoma, the CG and HA levels were positively correlated with the mortality at 4 months (P < 0.05). Among pregnant women, serum levels of HA and CG were significantly higher during the second and third trimesters (P<0.05-0.01) than those in the controls but not so during the first trimester. In the pediatric patients with infectious diseases, CG and HA levels were significantly higher in all these patients (P<0.01) with the only exception of HA in patients with mumps (P>0.05). For ALT, levels only increased in patients with hepatitis and typhoid fever with none in bacillary dysentery and mumps. In pediatric patients with RRI, RBCC{sub 3}bRR (%), CG, C{sub 3}, IgG levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05 ) with no significant differences in the case of RBCICR (%), HA, IgM and IgA levels (P>0

  6. Immunological efficacy of Vaccination against Measles in Children with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kaplina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The data of current vaccination process of cellular, humoral immunity and specific antibody formation in 41 children with Down syndrome at the age of 1 year to 6 years old is observed. To prevent easles used measles vaccine (n=12, divaccine -measles-mumps (n=21 and or Priorix vaccine (n=8. The comparison group consisted of 63 children without Down syndrome. The post-vaccination period in 97,6% of children with Down syndrome cases are asymptomatic, only 2,4% of children mentioned layering of intercurrent diseases. The immunological status in children with Down syndrome is characterized by a significant decrease in the  umber leucocytes, lymphocytes, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and absolute number of CD20+, but functional activity of the cells is preserved. By 30 days after immunization they have increased leucocytes, lymphocytes, CD 95+cells. The number of antibodies significantly increased (6,63±0,33 compared to 5,79±0,32 log2, р < 0,05.

  7. Fabrication of Quench Condensed Thin Films Using an Integrated MEMS Fab on a Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Richard; Reeves, Jeremy; Stark, Thomas; Barrett, Lawrence; Bishop, David

    Atomic calligraphy is a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based dynamic stencil nanolithography technique. Integrating MEMS devices into a bonded stacked array of three die provides a unique platform for conducting quench condensed thin film mesoscopic experiments. The atomic calligraphy Fab on a Chip process incorporates metal film sources, electrostatic comb driven stencil plate, mass sensor, temperature sensor, and target surface into one multi-die assembly. Three separate die are created using the PolyMUMPs process and are flip-chip bonded together. A die containing joule heated sources must be prepared with metal for evaporation prior to assembly. A backside etch of the middle/central die exposes the moveable stencil plate allowing the flux to pass through the stencil from the source die to the target die. The chip assembly is mounted in a cryogenic system at ultra-high vacuum for depositing extremely thin films down to single layers of atoms across targeted electrodes. Experiments such as the effect of thin film alloys or added impurities on their superconductivity can be measured in situ with this process.

  8. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Deffrasnes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections.

  9. Information is in the eye of the beholder: Seeking information on the MMR vaccine through an Internet search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Fernandez-Luque, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination campaigns are one of the most important and successful public health programs ever undertaken. People who want to learn about vaccines in order to make an informed decision on whether to vaccinate are faced with a wealth of information on the Internet, both for and against vaccinations. In this paper we develop an automated way to score Internet search queries and web pages as to the likelihood that a person making these queries or reading those pages would decide to vaccinate. We apply this method to data from a major Internet search engine, while people seek information about the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine. We show that our method is accurate, and use it to learn about the information acquisition process of people. Our results show that people who are pro-vaccination as well as people who are anti-vaccination seek similar information, but browsing this information has differing effect on their future browsing. These findings demonstrate the need for health authorities to tailor their information according to the current stance of users.

  10. Low-voltage puzzle-like fractal microelectromechanial system variable capacitor suppressing pull-in

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2012-10-01

    This Letter introduces an electrostatically actuated fractal MEMS variable capacitor that, by utilising the substrate, extends the tuning range (TR) beyond the theoretical limit of 1.5 as dictated by the pull-in phenomenon. The backbone concept behind the fractal varactor is to create a suspended movable plate possessing a specific fractal geometry, and to simultaneously create a bottom fixed plate complementary in shape to the top plate. Thus, when the top plate is actuated, it moves towards the bottom plate and fills the void present within the bottom plate without touching it akin to how puzzle pieces are assembled. Further, a reasonable horizontal separation is maintained between both the plates to avoid shorting. The electrostatic forces come from the capacitance formed between the top plate and bottom plate, and from the capacitance formed between the top plate and the doped substrate. The variable capacitor was fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and provided a TR of 4.1 at 6 V, and its resonant frequency was in excess of 40 GHz.

  11. Adventitious agents in viral vaccines: lessons learned from 4 case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricciani, John; Sheets, Rebecca; Griffiths, Elwyn; Knezevic, Ivana

    2014-09-01

    Since the earliest days of biological product manufacture, there have been a number of instances where laboratory studies provided evidence for the presence of adventitious agents in a marketed product. Lessons learned from such events can be used to strengthen regulatory preparedness for the future. We have therefore selected four instances where an adventitious agent, or a signal suggesting the presence of an agent, was found in a viral vaccine, and have developed a case study for each. The four cases are: a) SV40 in polio vaccines; b) bacteriophage in measles and polio vaccines; c) reverse transcriptase in measles and mumps vaccines; and d) porcine circovirus and porcine circovirus DNA sequences in rotavirus vaccines. The lessons learned from each event are discussed. Based in part on those experiences, certain scientific principles have been identified by WHO that should be considered in regulatory risk evaluation if an adventitious agent is found in a marketed vaccine in the future. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Routine Immunization of Adults in Canada: Review of the Epidemiology of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases and Current Recommendations for Primary Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Parkins

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is one of the greatest achievements in public health of the 20th century. However, the success of vaccine uptake and adherence to immunization guidelines seen in pediatric populations has not been observed among adult Canadians. As a result of the disparity in susceptibility to vaccine-preventable disease, there has been an increasing shift of vaccine-preventable childhood diseases into adult populations. Accordingly, morbidity and mortality due to vaccine-preventable illnesses now occur disproportionately in adults. All Canadians, irrespective of age, should have immunity to measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis and varicella. All adult Canadians with significant medical comorbidities or those older than 65 years of age should receive the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and yearly trivalent inactivate influenza vaccines. The present review summarizes the burden of illness of these vaccine-preventable diseases in the Canadian adult population and reviews the current immunization recommendations. Vaccination of all Canadians to these common agents remains a vital tool to decrease individual morbidity and mortality and reduce the overall burden of preventable disease in Canada.

  13. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortín, Juan; Martín-Benito, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes

  14. The RNA synthesis machinery of negative-stranded RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortín, Juan, E-mail: jortin@cnb.csic.es [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC) and CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (ISCIII), Madrid (Spain); Martín-Benito, Jaime, E-mail: jmartinb@cnb.csic.es [Department of Macromolecular Structures, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The group of Negative-Stranded RNA Viruses (NSVs) includes many human pathogens, like the influenza, measles, mumps, respiratory syncytial or Ebola viruses, which produce frequent epidemics of disease and occasional, high mortality outbreaks by transmission from animal reservoirs. The genome of NSVs consists of one to several single-stranded, negative-polarity RNA molecules that are always assembled into mega Dalton-sized complexes by association to many nucleoprotein monomers. These RNA-protein complexes or ribonucleoproteins function as templates for transcription and replication by action of the viral RNA polymerase and accessory proteins. Here we review our knowledge on these large RNA-synthesis machines, including the structure of their components, the interactions among them and their enzymatic activities, and we discuss models showing how they perform the virus transcription and replication programmes. - Highlights: • Overall organisation of NSV RNA synthesis machines. • Structure and function of the ribonucleoprotein components: Atomic structure of the RNA polymerase complex. • Commonalities and differences between segmented- and non-segmented NSVs. • Transcription versus replication programmes.

  15. Low-voltage puzzle-like fractal microelectromechanial system variable capacitor suppressing pull-in

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Ho, P.H.; Ouda, Mahmoud H.; Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa; Salama, Khaled N.

    2012-01-01

    This Letter introduces an electrostatically actuated fractal MEMS variable capacitor that, by utilising the substrate, extends the tuning range (TR) beyond the theoretical limit of 1.5 as dictated by the pull-in phenomenon. The backbone concept behind the fractal varactor is to create a suspended movable plate possessing a specific fractal geometry, and to simultaneously create a bottom fixed plate complementary in shape to the top plate. Thus, when the top plate is actuated, it moves towards the bottom plate and fills the void present within the bottom plate without touching it akin to how puzzle pieces are assembled. Further, a reasonable horizontal separation is maintained between both the plates to avoid shorting. The electrostatic forces come from the capacitance formed between the top plate and bottom plate, and from the capacitance formed between the top plate and the doped substrate. The variable capacitor was fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process and provided a TR of 4.1 at 6 V, and its resonant frequency was in excess of 40 GHz.

  16. Search for the Lepton Flavor Violating decays $ B^0_{(s)} \\to \\tau^\\pm \\mu^\\mp$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnau Romeu, Joan

    2018-01-01

    Lepton Flavor Violating (LFV) $B$ decays, such as $B^{0}_{(s)}\\rightarrow\\tau^{+}\\mu^{-}$, are forbidden in the Standard Model (SM) in the absence of non-zero neutrino masses, but can occur via one-loop diagrams if neutrino oscillations are included. This implies that the rate of these kind of processes is very suppressed, beyond the current and future experimental sensitivities. However, a wide variety of New Physics scenarios predict dramatically higher rates for these processes. The poster presents the search for the LFV decays $B^{0}_{(s)}\\rightarrow\\tau^{+}\\mu^{-}$ using 2011 and 2012 data of the LHCb experiment. The studied $\\tau$ decay mode is $\\tau\\rightarrow\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}\\pi^{+}\

  17. Seroprevalencia y conocimiento de vacunación en nuevos residentes Seroprevalence and vaccines knowledge among newcomers hospital residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Serrano Ramos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Valorar el conocimiento de los nuevos residentes sobre su calendario vacunal, su estado serológico frente enfermedades vacunoprevenibles y la validez de la historia clínico-laboral como indicador de protección frente éstas. Método: Mediante cuestionario específico obtenemos datos sobre el conocimiento del estado e historia vacunal, y mediante serología comprobamos el estado de protección actual de 130 nuevos residentes hospitalarios. Resultados: La edad media es de 26,7 años, siendo 62% mujeres. Son españoles 82%, de Centro y Sur América 17% y un 1% europeos. El 42% desconocen su calendario vacunal. Están protegidos frente varicela 93,1% y frente a sarampión 90.8%, pero frente parotiditis y rubéola sólo presentan anticuerpos positivos el 69.2% y 61.5% respectivamente. Refieren vacunación frente hepatitis B 81.5% y están protegidos 80,8%. Refieren vacunación de hepatitis A 35% y están protegidos 52.3%. 65% nunca se vacunó de gripe. Conclusiones: Se ha objetivado un gran desconocimiento sobre vacunaciones. La protección frente parotiditis y rubéola ha resultado escasa. La cobertura vacunal frente a VHB, VHA y gripe es baja contando con que se trata ya de personal de riesgo antes de realizar este estudio. La historia clínico laboral no es congruente con los resultados serológicos en muchos casos.Objective: To evaluate knowledge about vaccines, protection against vaccine-preventable diseases and labour medical history value. Methods: We obtained data on immunization status and serum antibodies against these diseases from 130 newcomers residents to our hospital that were enrolled from May to June 2008. Results: Their mean age was 26.7 years (62% women. They are Spanish 82%, from Centre and South America 17% and 1% European. 42% of subjects don't know their immunization schedule. 93.1% are immune against varicella and 90.8% against measles, but only 69,2% are immune against rubella and 61,5% against mumps. 81% have

  18. Successful administration of measles-rubella-mumps vaccine by graded challenge in a case with anaphylaxis after prior vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncel, Tuba; Sancakli, Ozlem; Ozdogru, Ece

    2017-04-01

    Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies during childhood along with cow's milk allergy. The measles-mumpsrubella (MMR) vaccine is included in the pediatric immunization schedule and contains egg protein. The currently accepted opinion is that the MMR vaccination should be done in a single dose under medical observation in patients with egg allergy. Although it is reported that the MMR vaccine is safe for that patients, there are some patients who developed anaphylaxis. Generally, the development of anaphylaxis after the previous vaccination is reported as a contraindication. We present a successful administration of MMR vaccine by gradually increased doses for a patient who developed anaphylaxis after the previous vaccination. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  19. Sexual behaviours and preconception health in Italian university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Poscia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Risky sexual behaviours have been recognized as a threat for sexual and reproductive health. AIM: This article shows the results of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" project ("Youth Health Information Desk" in relation to determining how a large sample of university students in Italy cope with preconception health, especially in the domains of sexual transmitted infections (STIs, fertility and vaccination preventable disease. METHODS: Twentythree questions of the "Sportello Salute Giovani" survey about sexual behaviour and reproductive health were analysed. Besides, results were stratified for sex, age class and socio-economic status. RESULTS: 19.7% of students have had first sexual intercourse before age 15. 21.8% of female students used emergency contraception. 66.4% of the 74.0% sexual active students reported using contraceptives, but about 32% of them used methods ineffective against STIs. A general low coverage for rubella, measles and mumps vaccination was revealed. 63.7% of men and 30.9% of woman never had urologic or gynaecological examinations. DISCUSSION: Overall, young adults in Italy are not still enough sensitized on fertility and preconception care. High schools and universities should increase awareness towards preservation of male and female fertility and preconception care.

  20. The application of structural nonlinearity in the development of linearly tunable MEMS capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavezipur, M; Khajepour, A; Hashemi, S M

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatically actuated parallel-plate tunable capacitors are the most desired MEMS capacitors because of their smaller sizes and higher Q-factors. However, these capacitors suffer from low tunability and exhibit high sensitivity near the pull-in voltage which counters the concept of tunability. In this paper, a novel design for parallel-plate tunable capacitors with high tunability and linear capacitance–voltage (C–V) response is developed. The design uses nonlinear structural rigidities to relieve intrinsic electrostatic nonlinearity in MEMS capacitors. Based on the force–displacement characteristic of an ideally linear capacitor, a real beam-like nonlinear spring model is developed. The variable stiffness coefficients of such springs improve the linearity of the C–V curve. Moreover, because the structural stiffness increases with deformations, the pull-in is delayed and higher tunability is achieved. Finite element simulations reveal that capacitors with air gaps larger than 4 µm and supporting beams thinner than 1 µm can generate highly linear C–V responses and tunabilities over 120%. Experimental results for capacitors fabricated by PolyMUMPs verify the effect of weak nonlinear geometric stiffness on improving the tunability for designs with a small air gap and relatively thick structural layers

  1. Randomized, double-blind, multicenter study of the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of 17DD and WHO 17D-213/77 yellow fever vaccines in children: implications for the Brazilian National Immunization Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-20

    Vaccines against yellow fever currently recommended by the World Health Organization contain either virus sub-strains 17D or 17DD. In adults, the 17DD vaccine demonstrated high seroconversion and similar performance to vaccines manufactured with the WHO 17D-213/77 seed-lot. In another study, 17DD vaccine showed lower seroconversion rates in children younger than 2 years. Data also suggested lower seroconversion with simultaneous application of measles vaccine. This finding in very young children is not consistent with data from studies with 17D vaccines. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind clinical trial was designed (1) to compare the immunogenicity and reactogenicity of two yellow fever vaccines: 17DD (licensed product) and 17D-213/77 (investigational product) in children aged 9-23 months; (2) to assess the effect of simultaneous administration of yellow fever and the measles-mumps-rubella vaccines; and (3) to investigate the interference of maternal antibodies in the response to yellow fever vaccination. The anticipated implications of the results are changes in vaccine sub-strains used in manufacturing YF vaccine used in several countries and changes in the yellow fever vaccination schedule recommendations in national immunization programs.

  2. Oral Polio Vaccination and Hospital Admissions With Non-Polio Infections in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Signe; Stensballe, Lone G; Krause, Tyra Grove

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Live vaccines may have nonspecific beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. This study examines whether children who had the live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) as the most recent vaccine had a different rate of admissions for infectious diseases than children with inactiv......Background.  Live vaccines may have nonspecific beneficial effects on morbidity and mortality. This study examines whether children who had the live-attenuated oral polio vaccine (OPV) as the most recent vaccine had a different rate of admissions for infectious diseases than children...... with inactivated diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine (DTaP-IPV-Hib) or live measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR) as their most recent vaccine. Methods.  A nationwide, register-based, retrospective cohort study of 137 403 Danish children born 1997-1999, who had received 3 doses...... of DTaP-IPV-Hib, were observed from 24 months (first OPV dose) to 36 months of age. Results.  Oral polio vaccine was associated with a lower rate of admissions with any type of non-polio infection compared with DTaP-IPV-Hib as most recent vaccine (adjusted incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.85; 95% confidence...

  3. A Micro-Test Structure for the Thermal Expansion Coefficient of Metal Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An innovative micro-test structure for detecting the thermal expansion coefficient (TEC of metal materials is presented in this work. Throughout this method, a whole temperature sensing moveable structures are supported by four groups of cascaded chevrons beams and packed together. Thermal expansion of the metal material causes the deflection of the cascaded chevrons, which leads to the capacitance variation. By detecting the capacitance value at different temperatures, the TEC value of the metal materials can be calculated. A finite element model has been established to verify the relationship between the TEC of the material and the displacement of the structure on horizontal and vertical directions, thus a function of temperature for different values of TEC can be deduced. In order to verify the analytical model, a suspended-capacitive micro-test structure has been fabricated by MetalMUMPs process and tested in a climate chamber. Test results show that in the temperature range from 30 °C to 80 °C, the TEC of the test material is 13.4 × 10−6 °C−1 with a maximum relative error of 0.8% compared with the given curve of relationship between displacement and temperature.

  4. Development of novel segmented-plate linearly tunable MEMS capacitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavezipur, M; Khajepour, A; Hashemi, S M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, novel MEMS capacitors with flexible moving electrodes and high linearity and tunability are presented. The moving plate is divided into small and rigid segments connected to one another by connecting beams at their end nodes. Under each node there is a rigid step which selectively limits the vertical displacement of the node. A lumped model is developed to analytically solve the governing equations of coupled structural-electrostatic physics with mechanical contact. Using the analytical solver, an optimization program finds the best set of step heights that provides the highest linearity. Analytical and finite element analyses of two capacitors with three-segmented- and six-segmented-plate confirm that the segmentation technique considerably improves the linearity while the tunability remains as high as that of a conventional parallel-plate capacitor. Moreover, since the new designs require customized fabrication processes, to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed technique for standard processes, a modified capacitor with flexible steps designed for PolyMUMPs is introduced. Dimensional optimization of the modified design results in a combination of high linearity and tunability. Constraining the displacement of the moving plate can be extended to more complex geometries to obtain smooth and highly linear responses

  5. MEMS earthworm: a thermally actuated peristaltic linear micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Craig; Ellerington, Neil; Hubbard, Ted; Kujath, Marek

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines the design, fabrication and testing of a bio-mimetic MEMS (micro-electro mechanical systems) earthworm motor with external actuators. The motor consists of a passive mobile shuttle with two flexible diamond-shaped segments; each segment is independently squeezed by a pair of stationary chevron-shaped thermal actuators. Applying a specific sequence of squeezes to the earthworm segments, the shuttle can be driven backward or forward. Unlike existing inchworm drives that use clamping and thrusting actuators, the earthworm actuators apply only clamping forces to the shuttle, and lateral thrust is produced by the shuttle's compliant geometry. The earthworm assembly is fabricated using the PolyMUMPs process with planar dimensions of 400 µm width by 800 µm length. The stationary actuators operate within the range of 4-9 V and provide a maximum shuttle range of motion of 350 µm (approximately half its size), a maximum shuttle speed of 17 mm s-1 at 10 kHz, and a maximum dc shuttle force of 80 µN. The shuttle speed was found to vary linearly with both input voltage and input frequency. The shuttle force was found to vary linearly with the actuator voltage.

  6. MEMS earthworm: a thermally actuated peristaltic linear micromotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Craig; Ellerington, Neil; Hubbard, Ted; Kujath, Marek

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the design, fabrication and testing of a bio-mimetic MEMS (micro-electro mechanical systems) earthworm motor with external actuators. The motor consists of a passive mobile shuttle with two flexible diamond-shaped segments; each segment is independently squeezed by a pair of stationary chevron-shaped thermal actuators. Applying a specific sequence of squeezes to the earthworm segments, the shuttle can be driven backward or forward. Unlike existing inchworm drives that use clamping and thrusting actuators, the earthworm actuators apply only clamping forces to the shuttle, and lateral thrust is produced by the shuttle's compliant geometry. The earthworm assembly is fabricated using the PolyMUMPs process with planar dimensions of 400 µm width by 800 µm length. The stationary actuators operate within the range of 4–9 V and provide a maximum shuttle range of motion of 350 µm (approximately half its size), a maximum shuttle speed of 17 mm s −1 at 10 kHz, and a maximum dc shuttle force of 80 µN. The shuttle speed was found to vary linearly with both input voltage and input frequency. The shuttle force was found to vary linearly with the actuator voltage.

  7. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZα-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  8. Autism Narratives in Media Coverage of the MMR Vaccine-Autism Controversy under a Crip Futurism Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Benjamin W

    2018-03-09

    While previous studies in health communication have examined online news media regarding autism, there is a lack of research that critically examines how such media representations may stigmatize autism and seeks to eliminate the condition, particularly in the context of the resurging measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine-autism controversy. To address this gap in the literature, this study analyzes 153 articles that engage the MMR vaccine-autism controversy from the top 10 online news sources in the U.S. from September 2015 through July 2017. It draws from Kafer's (2013) work in Feminist, Crip, Queer, using a lens of crip futurism to interpret three major narrative themes: a death and survival narrative that purports autism as a worst-case scenario, a societal problem narrative, and a preventative narrative that seeks to eliminate the condition. These themes suggest that online news media narratives about autism surrounding the autism-MMR controversy play into stereotypes about autism, including stigmatization and prioritization of preventive behaviors and cures over supporting the lived experiences of autistic individuals. Continued research on the impact of online media portrayals of autism specifically, and disability in health contexts generally, is called for.

  9. Outbreaks associated to large open air festivals, including music festivals, 1980 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho-Nevers, E; Gautret, P

    2013-03-14

    In the minds of many, large scale open air festivals have become associated with spring and summer, attracting many people, and in the case of music festivals, thousands of music fans. These festivals share the usual health risks associated with large mass gatherings, including transmission of communicable diseases and risk of outbreaks. Large scale open air festivals have however specific characteristics, including outdoor settings, on-site housing and food supply and the generally young age of the participants. Outbreaks at large scale open air festivals have been caused by Cryptosporium parvum, Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcus aureus, hepatitis A virus, influenza virus, measles virus, mumps virus and norovirus. Faecal-oral and respiratory transmissions of pathogens result from non-compliance with hygiene rules, inadequate sanitation and insufficient vaccination coverage. Sexual transmission of infectious diseases may also occur and is likely to be underestimated and underreported. Enhanced surveillance during and after festivals is essential. Preventive measures such as immunisations of participants and advice on-site and via social networks should be considered to reduce outbreaks at these large scale open air festivals.

  10. VALUE OF UNIVERSAL CHILDHOOD VARICELLA VACCINATION IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Ahčan

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1974 effective and safe vaccine against varicella was developed. Vaccination is recomended for universal childhood immunisation in some of west European countries and in the United States. The aim of the study was to perform economic analysis of universal childhood vaccination against varicella in Slovenia.Methods. We examined hypothetical birth cohort of 5800 persons followed from birth to their 30th birthday and calculated the cost-benefit ratio for varicella vaccination program. We assumed that one dose of vaccine would be given to 15-monthold children along with measles, mumps and rubella vaccination. It was also assumed that 95% of children would be vaccinated, that vaccine efficacy would be 90%, that vaccine induced immunity would be lifelong and that the program would have no effect on either the incidence rate or severity of herpes zoster. For both disease and vaccine we measured the direct medical cost and indirect cost.Results. Indirect cost represented major part compared to medical cost. The benefit to cost ratio was 0.89.Conclusions. Considering major assumptions in this analysis, there is no financial benefits from vaccinating all children against varicella in our country.

  11. Dismantling the Taboo against Vaccines in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio de Martino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinating pregnant women in order to protect them, the fetus, and the child has become universal in no way at all. Prejudice in health professionals add to fears of women and their families. Both these feelings are not supported by even the smallest scientific data. Harmlessness for the mother and the child has been observed for seasonal, pandemic, or quadrivalent influenza, mono, combined polysaccharide or conjugated meningococcal or pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid, acellular pertussis, human papillomavirus, cholera, hepatitis A, Japanese encephalitis, rabies, anthrax, smallpox, yellow fever, mumps, measles and rubella combined, typhoid fever, inactivated or attenuated polio vaccines, and Bacillus Calmétte Guerin vaccines. Instead, the beneficial effects of influenza vaccine for the mother and the child as well as of pertussis vaccine for the child have been demonstrated. Obstetrician-gynecologists, general practitioners, and midwives must incorporate vaccination into their standard clinical care. Strong communication strategies effective at reducing parental vaccine hesitancy and approval of regulatory agencies for use of vaccines during pregnancy are needed. It must be clear that the lack of pre-licensure studies in pregnant women and, consequently, the lack of a statement about the use of the vaccine in pregnant women does not preclude its use in pregnancy.

  12. Understanding and determining the etiology of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currenti, Salvatore A

    2010-03-01

    Worldwide, the rate of autism has been steadily rising. There are several environmental factors in concert with genetic susceptibilities that are contributing to this rise. Impaired methylation and mutations of mecp2 have been associated with autistic spectrum disorders, and related Rett syndrome. Genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 enzymes have also been linked to autism, specifically CYP27B1 that is essential for proper vitamin D metabolism. Vitamin D is important for neuronal growth and neurodevelopment, and defects in metabolism or deficiency have been implicated in autistic individuals. Other factors that have been considered include: maternally derived antibodies, maternal infection, heavy metal exposure, folic acid supplementation, epigenetics, measles, mumps, rubella vaccination, and even electromagnetic radiation. In each case, the consequences, whether direct or indirect, negatively affect the nervous system, neurodevelopment, and environmental responsive genes. The etiology of autism is a topic of controversial debate, while researchers strive to achieve a common objective. The goal is to identify the cause(s) of autism to understand the complex interplay between environment and gene regulation. There is optimism that specific causes and risk factors will be identified. The results of future investigations will facilitate enhanced screening, prevention, and therapy for "at risk" and autistic patients.

  13. Seroprevalence of rubella antibodies and determinants of susceptibility to rubella in a cohort of pregnant women in Canada, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Nicolas L; Rotondo, Jenny; Shapiro, Janna; Sherrard, Lindsey; Fraser, William D; Ward, Brian J

    2017-05-25

    Long term control of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome relies on high population-level immunity against rubella, particularly among women of childbearing age. In Canada, all pregnant women should be screened so that susceptible new mothers can be offered vaccination for rubella before discharge. This study was undertaken to estimate rubella susceptibility in a cohort of pregnant women in Canada and to identify associated socio-economic and demographic factors. Biobanked plasma samples were obtained from the Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) study, in which pregnant women were recruited between 2008 and 2011. Socio-demographic characteristics and obstetric histories were collected. Second trimester plasma samples (n=1,752) were tested for rubella-specific IgG using an in-house enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The percentage of women with IgG titers Canada (aOR 2.60, 95% CI 1.07-6.31). In conclusion, a large majority of pregnant women were found to be immune to rubella. Further research is needed to understand inequalities in vaccine uptake or access, and more effort is needed to promote catch-up measles-mumps-rubella vaccination among socioeconomically disadvantaged and immigrant women of childbearing age. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of parallel-plate-based MEMS tunable capacitors with linearized capacitance–voltage response and extended tuning range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shavezipur, M; Nieva, P; Khajepour, A; Hashemi, S M

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a design technique that can be used to linearize the capacitance–voltage (C–V) response and extend the tuning range of parallel-plate-based MEMS tunable capacitors beyond that of conventional designs. The proposed technique exploits the curvature of the capacitor's moving electrode which could be induced by either manipulating the stress gradients in the plate's material or using bi-layer structures. The change in curvature generates a nonlinear structural stiffness as the moving electrode undergoes out-of-plane deformation due to the actuation voltage. If the moving plate curvature is tailored such that the capacitance increment is proportional to the voltage increment, then a linear C–V response is obtained. The larger structural resistive force at higher bias voltage also delays the pull-in and increases the maximum tunability of the capacitor. Moreover, for capacitors containing an insulation layer between the two electrodes, the proposed technique completely eliminates the pull-in effect. The experimental data obtained from different capacitors fabricated using PolyMUMPs demonstrate the advantages of this design approach where highly linear C–V responses and tunabilities as high as 1050% were recorded. The design methodology introduced in this paper could be easily extended to for example, capacitive pressure and temperature sensors or infrared detectors to enhance their response characteristics.

  15. Direct solvers performance on h-adapted grids

    KAUST Repository

    Paszynski, Maciej; Pardo, David; Calo, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the performance of direct solvers when applied to a system of linear equations arising from an hh-adapted, C0C0 finite element space. Theoretical estimates are derived for typical hh-refinement patterns arising as a result of a point, edge, or face singularity as well as boundary layers. They are based on the elimination trees constructed specifically for the considered grids. Theoretical estimates are compared with experiments performed with MUMPS using the nested-dissection algorithm for construction of the elimination tree from METIS library. The numerical experiments provide the same performance for the cases where our trees are identical with those constructed by the nested-dissection algorithm, and worse performance for some cases where our trees are different. We also present numerical experiments for the cases with mixed singularities, where how to construct optimal elimination trees is unknown. In all analysed cases, the use of hh-adaptive grids significantly reduces the cost of the direct solver algorithm per unknown as compared to uniform grids. The theoretical estimates predict and the experimental data confirm that the computational complexity is linear for various refinement patterns. In most cases, the cost of the direct solver per unknown is lower when employing anisotropic refinements as opposed to isotropic ones.

  16. A multi-electrode and pre-deformed bilayer spring structure electrostatic attractive MEMS actuator with large stroke at low actuation voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Fangrong; Li, Zhi; Xiong, Xianming; Niu, Junhao; Peng, Zhiyong; Qian, Yixian; Yao, Jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-electrode and pre-deformed bilayer spring structure electrostatic attractive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) actuator; it has large stroke at relatively low actuation voltage. Generally, electrostatic-attractive-force-based actuators have small stroke due to the instability resulted from the electrostatic ‘pull-in’ phenomenon. However, in many applications, the electrostatic micro-actuator with large stroke at low voltage is more preferred. By introducing a multi-electrode and a pre-deformed bilayer spring structure, an electrostatic attractive MEMS actuator with large stroke at very low actuation voltage has been successfully demonstrated in this paper. The actuator contains a central plate with a size of 300 µm × 300 µm × 1.5 µm and it is supported by four L-shaped bilayer springs which are pre-deformed due to residual stresses. Each bilayer spring is simultaneously attracted by three adjacent fixed electrodes, and the factors affecting the electrostatic attractive force are analyzed by a finite element analysis method. The prototype of the actuator is fabricated by poly-multi-user-MEMS-process (PolyMUMP) and the static performance is tested using a white light interferometer. The measured stroke of the actuator reaches 2 µm at 13 V dc, and it shows a good agreement with the simulation. (paper)

  17. Congenital rubella syndrome and autism spectrum disorder prevented by rubella vaccination - United States, 2001-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Saad B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS is associated with several negative outcomes, including autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. The objective of this study was to estimate the numbers of CRS and ASD cases prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States from 2001 through 2010. Methods Prevention estimates were calculated through simple mathematical modeling, with values of model parameters determined from published literature. Model parameters included pre-vaccine era CRS incidence, vaccine era CRS incidence, the number of live births per year, and the percentage of CRS cases presenting with an ASD. Results Based on our estimates, 16,600 CRS cases (range: 8300-62,250 were prevented by rubella vaccination from 2001 through 2010 in the United States. An estimated 1228 ASD cases were prevented by rubella vaccination in the United States during this time period. Simulating a slight expansion in ASD diagnostic criteria in recent decades, we estimate that a minimum of 830 ASD cases and a maximum of 6225 ASD cases were prevented. Conclusions We estimate that rubella vaccination prevented substantial numbers of CRS and ASD cases in the United States from 2001 through 2010. These findings provide additional incentive to maintain high measles-mumps-rubella (MMR vaccination coverage.

  18. [Control, elimination and eradication of viral immuno preventable diseases in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Nereida; Maldonado, Mery

    2005-09-01

    Vaccination has demonstrated the capacity for the drastic decrease of the prevalence and incidence of several diseases of viral etiology and it has allowed their eradication. Among these human immuno preventable diseases are included poliomyelitis, measles, mumps, chicken pox, rubella, hepatitis A and B, influenza A and yellow fever. In residents, travelers to endemic areas and personal at risk, the vaccines to Japanese and equine encephalitis, rabies and adenovirus can be applied. Venezuela has not escaped from the positive impact in the epidemiology of these illnesses as a consequence of the organization and implementation of big national vaccination campaigns; however, and in spite of these efforts, important outbreaks of measles, yellow fever, chicken pox and hepatitis have occurred in the last few years. The tools to eliminate the majority of these viral diseases exist in Venezuela as well as in other countries, and are readily available, effective and relatively not expensive, but require on the whole of an effort of authorities and communities. The implementation of these strategies should have the support of the World Health Organization and the Panamerican Health Organization. This is a priority for the next few years if our aim is the eradication of these illnesses from Venezuela, the continent and the world.

  19. An Agent-Based Model of School Closing in Under-Vacccinated Communities During Measles Outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Wayne M; Carlson, Colin; Dougherty, Eric; Porco Francis, Travis C; Salter, Richard

    2016-04-01

    The winter 2014-15 measles outbreak in the US represents a significant crisis in the emergence of a functionally extirpated pathogen. Conclusively linking this outbreak to decreases in the measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccination rate (driven by anti-vaccine sentiment) is critical to motivating MMR vaccination. We used the NOVA modeling platform to build a stochastic, spatially-structured, individual-based SEIR model of outbreaks, under the assumption that R 0 ≈ 7 for measles. We show this implies that herd immunity requires vaccination coverage of greater than approximately 85%. We used a network structured version of our NOVA model that involved two communities, one at the relatively low coverage of 85% coverage and one at the higher coverage of 95%, both of which had 400-student schools embedded, as well as students occasionally visiting superspreading sites (e.g. high-density theme parks, cinemas, etc.). These two vaccination coverage levels are within the range of values occurring across California counties. Transmission rates at schools and superspreading sites were arbitrarily set to respectively 5 and 15 times background community rates. Simulations of our model demonstrate that a 'send unvaccinated students home' policy in low coverage counties is extremely effective at shutting down outbreaks of measles.

  20. Measles vaccination in children with neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kaplina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The data on the current vaccination process and specific antibody in 212 children with pathology of nervous systems in age from 1 year to 6 years old, vaccinated against measles. The comparison group consisted of 36 children without neurological disease. 86 children (40,6% were vaccinated measles – mumps vaccine, and 126 children (59,4% only measles vaccine. Post-vaccination period in 77,8% immunized against measles, was uneventful, layering intercurrent infections was noted in 22,2% of vaccine’s, and demonstrated the development of viral respiratory infections, bronchitis, otitis media and exacerbation of underlying disease. It is shown that the level of specific antibody to measles in children with pathology of nervous systems at 30 days after vaccination was 5,04±0,16 log 2, which did not differ from the comparison group (5,88±0,31 log 2. No significant differences in the level of antibody in a smooth and complicated course of vaccination period were found. Immunization of children with disorders of the nervous system of live vaccines is quite effective and leads to the formation of protective antibody titers in all vaccinated.

  1. Pleuritic Chest Pain: Sorting Through the Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reamy, Brian V; Williams, Pamela M; Odom, Michael Ryan

    2017-09-01

    Pleuritic chest pain is characterized by sudden and intense sharp, stabbing, or burning pain in the chest when inhaling and exhaling. Pulmonary embolism is the most common serious cause, found in 5% to 21% of patients who present to an emergency department with pleuritic chest pain. A validated clinical decision rule for pulmonary embolism should be employed to guide the use of additional tests such as d-dimer assays, ventilation-perfusion scans, or computed tomography angiography. Myocardial infarction, pericarditis, aortic dissection, pneumonia, and pneumothorax are other serious causes that should be ruled out using history and physical examination, electrocardiography, troponin assays, and chest radiography before another diagnosis is made. Validated clinical decision rules are available to help exclude coronary artery disease. Viruses are common causative agents of pleuritic chest pain. Coxsackieviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza, parainfluenza, mumps, adenovirus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus are likely pathogens. Treatment is guided by the underlying diagnosis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are appropriate for pain management in those with virally triggered or nonspecific pleuritic chest pain. In patients with persistent symptoms, persons who smoke, and those older than 50 years with pneumonia, it is important to document radiographic resolution with repeat chest radiography six weeks after initial treatment.

  2. Information, education, and health behaviors: Evidence from the MMR vaccine autism controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lenisa V

    2018-05-02

    In the wake of strong, although later refuted, claims of a link between autism and the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine, I examine whether fewer parents immunized or delayed vaccinations for their children and if there was a differential response by mother's education level. Using various controls and a differencing strategy that compares in MMR take-up with other vaccines, I find that the MMR-autism controversy led to a decline in the immediate years and that there were negative spillovers onto other vaccines. I also find evidence that more highly educated mothers responded more strongly to the controversy either by not immunizing their children altogether or, to a lesser degree, delaying vaccination. Moreover, the educational gap was greater in states where there was greater media attention devoted to the controversy. This is consistent with the health allocative efficiency hypothesis whereby part of the education gradient in health outcomes is due to more-educated individuals absorbing and responding to health information more quickly. However, unlike in the United Kingdom, where previous studies find that the gap was eliminated after the link was refuted, the evidence for the United States suggests that the educational gap persisted. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Factors That Influence Vaccination Decision-Making by Parents Who Visit an Anthroposophical Child Welfare Center: A Focus Group Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene A. Harmsen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, parents have become more disparaging towards childhood vaccination. One group that is critical about the National Immunization Program (NIP and participates less comprises parents with an anthroposophical worldview. Despite the fact that various studies have identified anthroposophists as critical parents with lower vaccination coverage, no research has been done to explore the beliefs underlying their childhood vaccination decision-making. We conducted a qualitative study using three focus groups ( of parents who visit an anthroposophical child welfare center. Our findings show that participants did not refuse all vaccinations within the Dutch NIP, but mostly refused the Mumps, Measles, and Rubella (MMR vaccination. Vaccination decisions are influenced by participants’ lifestyle, perception of health, beliefs about childhood diseases, perceptions about the risks of diseases, perceptions about vaccine effectiveness and vaccine components, and trust in institutions. Parents indicated that they felt a need for more information. Sufficient references should be provided to sources containing more information about childhood vaccination, especially about the effectiveness of vaccines and vaccine components and the risks, such as possible side effects and benefits of vaccination. This may satisfy parents’ information needs and enable them to make a sufficiently informed choice whether or not to vaccinate their child.

  4. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Insights from epidemiological game theory into gender-specific vaccination against rubella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eunha; Kochin, Beth; Galvani, Alison

    2009-10-01

    Rubella is a highly contagious childhood disease that causes relatively mild symptoms. However, rubella can result in severe congenital defects, known as congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), if transmitted from a mother to a fetus. Consequently, women have higher incentive to vaccinate against rubella than men do. Within the population vaccination reduces transmission but also increases the average age of infection and possibly the risk of CRS among unvaccinated females. To evaluate how the balance among these factors results in optimal coverage of vaccination, we developed a game theoretic age-structured epidemiological model of rubella transmission and vaccination. We found that high levels of vaccination for both genders are most effective in maximizing average utility across the population by decreasing the risk of CRS and reducing transmission of rubella. By contrast, the demands for vaccines driven by self-interest among males and females are 0% and 100% acceptance, respectively, if the cost of vaccination is relatively low. Our results suggest that the rubella vaccination by males that is likely to be achieved on voluntary basis without additional incentives would have been far lower than the population optimum, if rubella vaccine were offered separately instead of combined with measles and mumps vaccination as the MMR vaccine.

  6. Analysis of the Auckland 2014 measles outbreak indicates that adolescents and young adults could benefit from catch-up vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gary; Dias, Cassandra; Thornley, Simon; King, Ronald; Morrison, Anne; Matson, Angela; Hoskins, Richard

    2015-09-25

    To analyse the epidemiology, serology and vaccine effectiveness in a recent New Zealand measles outbreak that started in Auckland, from December, 2013 to June, 2014, to guide further preventive measures. Cases had a clinically compatible illness, which was either confirmed by PCR or serology, or were linked to a laboratory confirmed case. A total of 113 cases with 3,113 contacts were traced and managed in the Auckland region. Thirteen overseas acquired cases, produced a total of 98 locally acquired secondary cases, (plus two cases with unknown travel history). The majority of cases occurred in adolescents and young adults; 68/113 cases (60.1%) were aged 10 to 19 years. Among cases, 38.9% (44/113) were unimmunised, and 31.8% (36/113) had unknown immunisation status. A further 15.0% (17/113) of cases had received one or two doses of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine. Of the contacts who underwent serological testing for immunity (n=735), the lowest levels of serological immunity were observed in people aged 10 to 24 years. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated for the 15-24 year age cohort at 92% (95%CI; 82-97). Results suggest that an adolescent catch-up immunisation programme would prevent further outbreaks of imported measles.

  7. Direct solvers performance on h-adapted grids

    KAUST Repository

    Paszynski, Maciej

    2015-05-27

    We analyse the performance of direct solvers when applied to a system of linear equations arising from an hh-adapted, C0C0 finite element space. Theoretical estimates are derived for typical hh-refinement patterns arising as a result of a point, edge, or face singularity as well as boundary layers. They are based on the elimination trees constructed specifically for the considered grids. Theoretical estimates are compared with experiments performed with MUMPS using the nested-dissection algorithm for construction of the elimination tree from METIS library. The numerical experiments provide the same performance for the cases where our trees are identical with those constructed by the nested-dissection algorithm, and worse performance for some cases where our trees are different. We also present numerical experiments for the cases with mixed singularities, where how to construct optimal elimination trees is unknown. In all analysed cases, the use of hh-adaptive grids significantly reduces the cost of the direct solver algorithm per unknown as compared to uniform grids. The theoretical estimates predict and the experimental data confirm that the computational complexity is linear for various refinement patterns. In most cases, the cost of the direct solver per unknown is lower when employing anisotropic refinements as opposed to isotropic ones.

  8. Risk and protective factors for spasmodic dysphonia: a case-control investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kristine; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M; Kimber, Kamille; Sauder, Cara; Houtz, Daniel R; Doman, Darrin; Smith, Marshall E

    2011-01-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) is a chronic, incurable, and often disabling voice disorder of unknown pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to identify possible endogenous and exogenous risk and protective factors uniquely associated with SD. Prospective, exploratory, case-control investigation. One hundred fifty patients with SD and 150 medical controls (MCs) were interviewed regarding their personal and family histories, environmental exposures, illnesses, injuries, voice use patterns, and general health using a previously vetted and validated epidemiologic questionnaire. Odds ratios and multiple logistic regression analyses (α<0.15) identified several factors that significantly increased the likelihood of having SD. These factors included (1) a personal history of mumps, blepharospasm, tremor, intense occupational and avocational voice use, and a family history of voice disorders; (2) an immediate family history of meningitis, tremor, tics, cancer, and compulsive behaviors; and (3) an extended family history of tremor and cancer. SD is likely multifactorial in etiology, involving both genetic and environmental factors. Viral infections/exposures, along with intense voice use, may trigger the onset of SD in genetically predisposed individuals. Future studies should examine the interaction among genetic and environmental factors to determine the pathogenesis of SD. Copyright © 2011 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of the ${X^\\pm(5568)}$ state with semileptonic decays of the ${B_s^0}$ meson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2017-12-29

    We present a study of the $X^\\pm(5568)$ using semileptonic decays of the $B_s^0$ meson using the full Run II integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb$^{-1}$ in proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96\\,TeV collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We report evidence for a narrow structure, $X^\\pm(5568)$, in the decay sequence $X^\\pm(5568) \\to B_s^0 \\pi^\\pm$ where $B_s^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^\\mp D_s^\\pm \\, \\mathrm{X}$, $D_s^\\pm \\rightarrow \\phi \\pi^{\\pm}$ which is consistent with the previous measurement by the D0 collaboration in the hadronic decay mode, $X^\\pm(5568) \\to B^0_s \\pi^\\pm$ where $B^0_s \\to J/\\psi\\phi$. The mass and width of this state are measured using a combined fit of the hadronic and semileptonic data, yielding $m = 5566.9 ^{+3.2}_{-3.1} \\thinspace {\\rm (stat)} ^{+0.6}_{-1.2} {\\rm \\thinspace (syst)}$\\,MeV/$c^2$, $\\Gamma = 18.6 ^{+7.9}_{-6.1} {\\rm \\thinspace (stat)} ^{+3.5}_{-3.8} {\\rm \\thinspace (syst)} $\\,MeV/$c^2$ with a significance of 6.7$\\,\\sigma$.

  10. [Clozapine-induced parotitis: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouzien, C; Valiamé, A; Misdrahi, D

    2014-02-01

    Clozapine is the drug of choice for patients with an unsatisfactory response to routine antipsychotic treatment. Side effects such as sedation, weight gain, hypotension and hypersialorrhea are frequently reported whereas clozapine-induced parotitis is a less known complication. We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with a refractory schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. The failure to respond to at least two well-conducted antipsychotic trials with flupentixol and risperidone, led clinicians to prescribe clozapine, which was started three years earlier. Since its introduction, clozapine induced sialorrhea, which has been managed until now with anticholinergic medication. Recently, Mrs B. was hospitalized for a new relapse. Once treatment compliance checked (good level of plasmatic dosage), we decided to increase the dose of clozapine from 350 mg/d to 500 mg/d. Twenty days later, Mrs B. exhibited improvement of symptoms but complained of acute bilateral auricular pain and odynophagia. The bilateral and comparative clinical exam displayed a bilateral filling of the retromandibular depression, the painful swelling of the parotid gland, along with ptyalism and a slight inflammatory oedema of the Stenon duct orifice. Mrs B. was apyretic, with physiological constants within the limits of normal values. The biological analyses displayed a discrete inflammatory syndrome (mild hyperleucocytosis and anemia), a negative mumps IgM test and positive mumps IgG test, and a 1050 ng/mL clozapine blood level. Once viral parotitis was ruled out, the involvement of clozapine was evoked. Symptomatic medication was prescribed with per os analgesic (paracetamol) and antiseptic mouthwash (Éludril). Clozapine dosage was lowered to 400 mg/d. A week later, clinical examination confirmed improvement of the medical and psychiatric conditions. We report the case of a patient who developed a parotitis following clozapine dose adjustment. Clozapine induced parotitis was retained once the

  11. A Positive Control for Detection of Functional CD4 T Cells in PBMC: The CPI Pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Annemarie; Zhang, Ting; Li, Ruliang; Duechting, Andrea; Sundararaman, Srividya; Przybyla, Anna; Kuerten, Stefanie; Lehmann, Paul V

    2017-12-07

    Testing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) for immune monitoring purposes requires verification of their functionality. This is of particular concern when the PBMC have been shipped or stored for prolonged periods of time. While the CEF (Cytomegalo-, Epstein-Barr and Flu-virus) peptide pool has become the gold standard for testing CD8 cell functionality, a positive control for CD4 cells is so far lacking. The latter ideally consists of proteins so as to control for the functionality of the antigen processing and presentation compartments, as well. Aiming to generate a positive control for CD4 cells, we first selected 12 protein antigens from infectious/environmental organisms that are ubiquitous: Varicella, Influenza, Parainfluenza, Mumps, Cytomegalovirus, Streptococcus , Mycoplasma , Lactobacillus , Neisseria , Candida , Rubella, and Measles. Of these antigens, three were found to elicited interferon (IFN)-γ-producing CD4 cells in the majority of human test subjects: inactivated cytomegalo-, parainfluenza-, and influenza virions (CPI). While individually none of these three antigens triggered a recall response in all donors, the pool of the three (the 'CPI pool'), did. One hundred percent of 245 human donors tested were found to be CPI positive, including Caucasians, Asians, and African-Americans. Therefore, the CPI pool appears to be suitable to serve as universal positive control for verifying the functionality of CD4 and of antigen presenting cells.

  12. The Paramyxovirus Polymerase Complex as a Target for Next-Generation Anti-Paramyxovirus Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard K Plemper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paramyxovirus family includes major human and animal pathogens, including measles virus, mumps virus, and human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, as well as the emerging zoonotic Hendra and Nipah viruses. In the United States, RSV is the leading cause of infant hospitalizations due to viral infectious disease. Despite their clinical significance, effective drugs for the improved management of paramyxovirus disease are lacking. The development of novel anti-paramyxovirus therapeutics is therefore urgently needed. Paramyxoviruses contain RNA genomes of negative polarity, necessitating a virus-encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp complex for replication and transcription. Since an equivalent enzymatic activity is absent in host cells, the RdRp complex represents an attractive druggable target, although structure-guided drug development campaigns are hampered by the lack of high-resolution RdRp crystal structures. Here, we review the current structural and functional insight into the paramyxovirus polymerase complex in conjunction with an evaluation of the mechanism of activity and developmental status of available experimental RdRp inhibitors. Our assessment spotlights the importance of the RdRp complex as a premier target for therapeutic intervention and examines how high-resolution insight into the organization of the complex will pave the path towards the structure-guided design and optimization of much-needed next-generation paramyxovirus RdRp blockers.

  13. Global importation and population risk factors for measles in New Zealand: a case study for highly immunized populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, D T S; Marshall, J C; French, N P; Carpenter, T E; Roberts, M G; Kiedrzynski, T

    2017-07-01

    As endemic measles is eliminated through immunization, countries must determine the risk factors for the importation of measles into highly immunized populations to target control measures. Despite eliminating endemic measles, New Zealand suffers from outbreaks after introductions from abroad, enabling us to use it as a model for measles introduction risk. We used a generalized linear model to analyze risk factors for 1137 measles cases from 2007 to June 2014, provide estimates of national immunity levels, and model measles importation risk. People of European ethnicity made up the majority of measles cases. Age is a positive risk factor, particularly 0-2-year-olds and 5-17-year-old Europeans, along with increased wealth. Pacific islanders were also at greater risk, but due to 0-2-year-old cases. Despite recent high measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine immunization coverage, overall population immunity against measles remains ~90% and is lower in people born between 1982 and 2005. Greatest measles importation risk is during December, and countries predicted to be sources have historical connections and highest travel rates (Australia and UK), followed by Asian countries with high travel rates and higher measles incidences. Our results suggest measles importation due to travel is seeding measles outbreaks, and immunization levels are insufficient to continue to prevent outbreaks because of heterogeneous immunity in the population, leaving particular age groups at risk.

  14. Measles epidemic in Brazil in the post-elimination period: Coordinated response and containment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Daniele Rocha Queiroz; Franco, Aidée Ramirez; de Sá Roriz, Maria Lúcia Feitosa; Carneiro, Ana Karine Borges; de Oliveira Garcia, Márcio Henrique; de Souza, Fábia Lidiana; Duron Andino, Regina; de Góes Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona

    2017-03-23

    The measles virus circulation was halted in Brazil in 2001 and the country has a routine vaccination coverage against measles, mumps and rubella higher than 95%. In Ceará, the last confirmed case was in 1999. This article describes the strategies adopted and the effectiveness of surveillance and control measures implemented during a measles epidemic in the post-elimination period. The epidemic started in December 2013 and lasted 20 months, reaching 38 cities and 1,052 confirmed cases. The D8 genotype was identified. More than 50,000 samples were tested for measles and 86.4% of the confirmed cases had a laboratory diagnosis. The beginning of an campaign vaccination was delayed in part by the availability of vaccine. The classic control measures were not enough to control the epidemic. The creation of a committee of experts, the agreement signed between managers of the three spheres of government, the conducting of an institutional active search of suspected cases, vaccination door to door at alternative times, the use of micro planning, a broad advertising campaign at local media and technical operative support contributed to containing the epidemic. It is important to recognize the possibility of epidemics at this stage of post-elimination and prepare a sensitive surveillance system for timely response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Written reminders increase vaccine coverage in Danish children - evaluation of a nationwide intervention using The Danish Vaccination Register, 2014 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppli, Camilla Hiul; Rasmussen, Mette; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Mølbak, Kåre; Krause, Tyra Grove

    2017-04-27

    We evaluated a national intervention of sending written reminders to parents of children lacking childhood vaccinations, using the Danish Vaccination Register (DDV). The intervention cohort included the full birth cohort of 124,189 children born in Denmark who reached the age of 2 and 6.5 years from 15 May 2014 to 14 May 2015. The reference cohort comprised 124,427 children who reached the age of 2 and 6.5 years from 15 May 2013 to 14 May 2014. Vaccination coverage was higher in the intervention cohort at 2.5 and 7 years of age. The differences were most pronounced for the second dose of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine (MMR2) and the diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-polio vaccine DTaP-IPV4 among the 7-year-olds, with 5.0 percentage points (95% confidence interval (CI): 4.5-5.4) and 6.4 percentage points (95% CI: 6.0-6.9), respectively. Among the 2.5 and 7-year-olds, the proportion of vaccinations in the preceding 6 months was 46% and three times higher, respectively, in the intervention cohort than the reference cohort. This study indicates a marked effect of personalised written reminders, highest for the vaccines given later in the schedule in the older cohort. In addition, the reminders increased awareness about correct registration of vaccinations in DDV. This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  16. Measles outbreak in Greater Manchester, England, October 2012 to September 2013: epidemiology and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegorie, M; Shankar, K; Welfare, W S; Wilson, R W; Khiroya, C; Munslow, G; Fiefield, D; Bothra, V; McCann, R

    2014-12-11

    This paper describes the epidemiology and management of a prolonged outbreak of measles across the 2.7 million conurbation of Greater Manchester in the United Kingdom. Over a period of one year (from October 2012 to September 2013), over a thousand suspected measles cases (n = 1,073) were notified across Greater Manchester; of these, 395 (37%) were laboratory-confirmed, 91 (8%) were classed as probable, 312 (29%) were classed as possible and 275 (26%) excluded. Most confirmed and probable cases occurred in children within two age groups—infants (too young to be eligible for measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination according to the national immunisation programme) and children aged 10-19 years (low vaccine uptake in this cohort because of unfounded alleged links between the MMR vaccine and autism). During this one year period, there were a series of local outbreaks and many of these occurred within the secondary school setting. A series of public health measures were taken to control this prolonged outbreak: setting up incident management teams to control local outbreaks, a concerted immunisation catch-up campaign (initially local then national) to reduce the pool of children partially or totally unprotected against measles, and the exclusion of close contacts from nurseries and school settings for a period of 10 days following the last exposure to a case of measles.

  17. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer; Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B.; Dennis, John Ojur; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used

  18. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer, E-mail: umermian@gmail.com; Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Dennis, John Ojur [Department of Fundamental & Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid [Faculty of Electronics Engineering, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Khyber Pakhtunkhaw (Pakistan); Bazaz, Shafaat A. [Department of Computer Science, Center for Advance Studies in Engineering, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-22

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  19. Loss of antibodies and response to (re-)vaccination in children after treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, C M; Sanders, E A M; Rovers, M M; Wolfs, T F W; Bierings, M B

    2006-10-01

    Intensified chemotherapy regimens resulting in improved survival of children with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) lead to concerns about therapy-induced immune damage reflected by the loss of protection of previous immunizations and the efficacy of (re-)vaccination. The severity of secondary immunodeficiency, however, is not clear and knowledge is based on a limited number of studies. We performed a systematic review on literature concerning vaccination data of children with ALL published since 1980. Eight studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Regarding antibody titers after treatment, the number of children who had preserved the defined protection level for antibodies differed widely, ranging from 17 to 98% for diphtheria, 27 to 82% for Bordetella pertussis, 20 to 98% for tetanus, 62 to 100% for poliomyelitis, 35 to 100% for Haemophilus influenzae type B (HiB), 29 to 92% for mumps, 29 to 60% for measles and 72 to 92% for rubella. Most patients however responded to revaccination, demonstrating immunological recovery. Although the designs and results of the included studies varied widely, it can be concluded that cytostatic therapy for ALL in children results in a temporarily reduction of specific antibody levels. Memory is preserved but revaccination may be warranted. This is the first systematic review and the best possible current approximation of chemotherapy-induced immune damage in children after ALL treatment.

  20. Thirty years of vaccination in Vietnam: Impact and cost-effectiveness of the national Expanded Programme on Immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Dang, Thi Thanh Huyen; Friberg, Ingrid; Hoang, Van Minh; Pham Huy, Tuan Kiet; Walker, Neff; Nguyen, Van Cuong; Tran, Nhu Duong; Toda, Kohei; Hutubessy, Raymond; Fox, Kimberley; Nguyen, Tran Hien

    2015-05-07

    Countries like Vietnam transitioning to middle-income status increasingly bear the cost of both existing and new vaccines. However, the impact and cost-effectiveness of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) as a whole has never been assessed on a country level. Data on vaccine-preventable disease incidence and mortality from Vietnam's national surveillance was analysed to estimate the likely impact that vaccination in 1980-2010 may have had. Adjustment for under-reporting was made by examining trends in reported mumps incidence and in case-fatality risks for each disease. The same data were separately analysed using the Lives Saved Tool (LiST) to give an alternative estimate of impact. The financial cost of EPI in 1996-2010 was also estimated from the perspective of service provider. National surveillance data suggests that up to 5.7 million diseases cases and 26,000 deaths may have been prevented by EPI. Analysis using LiST suggests that even more deaths (370,000) may have been prevented by measles and pertussis vaccination alone. The cost-effectiveness of EPI is estimated to be around $1000-$27,000 per death prevented. Two separate approaches to assessing EPI impact in Vietnam give different quantitative results but a common conclusion: that EPI has made a substantial impact on mortality and represents good value for money. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. The Designing of Magnetic-Driven Micromirror for Portable FTIRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoxi Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a widely used instrument to analyze and test different materials including organic and inorganic. Most of current commercial Fourier transform infrared spectrometers are limited in miniaturization and scanning velocity by their macroscopic components. MEMS FTIR spectroscopy is one of the important applications of translational actuator-driven systems by using MEMS technology. The critical component in MEMS FTIRs is the large displacement translating micromirror and its actuator. The paper presents a large displacement and high-surface quality micromirror. The micromirror consists of a micromagnetic actuator and a micromirror plate. The mirror plate and the actuator are fabricated separately and bonded together afterwards, and its size is 3.6 × 3.6 mm2 high-surface quality square mirror plate and a 1cm2 moving part. The microactuator’s moving part is fabricated using MetalMUMPS, and its fixed part includes a ring permanent magnet and a solenoid to realize a large displacement. The mirror plate is fabricated using polished silicon coated with metal layer with high-surface prototypes that are fabricated and experimentally tested. A maximum stroke of 400 μm has been achieved in pull-in whereas only 140 μm stroke have been measured for a 4 to 5-volt DC-controlled displacement, and the resonance frequency is 10 Hz.

  2. National and state vaccination coverage among children aged 19-35 months--United States, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-02

    The National Immunization Survey (NIS) monitors vaccination coverage among children aged 19-35 months using a random-digit-dialed sample of telephone numbers of households to evaluate childhood immunization programs in the United States. This report describes the 2010 NIS coverage estimates for children born during January 2007-July 2009. Nationally, vaccination coverage increased in 2010 compared with 2009 for ≥ 1 dose of measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR), from 90.0% to 91.5%; ≥ 4 doses of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV), from 80.4% to 83.3%; the birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine (HepB), from 60.8% to 64.1%; ≥ 2 doses of hepatitis A vaccine (HepA), from 46.6% to 49.7%; rotavirus vaccine, from 43.9% to 59.2%; and the full series of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine, from 54.8% to 66.8%. Coverage for poliovirus vaccine (93.3%), MMR (91.5%), ≥ 3 doses HepB (91.8%), and varicella vaccine (90.4%) continued to be at or above the national health objective targets of 90% for these vaccines.* The percentage of children who had not received any vaccinations remained low (poverty status still exist. Maintaining high vaccination coverage levels is important to reduce the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases and prevent a resurgence of these diseases in the United States, particularly in undervaccinated populations.

  3. Use of rapid needs assessment as a tool to identify vaccination delays in Guatemala and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ardenne, Katie K; Darrow, Juliana; Furniss, Anna; Chavez, Catia; Hernandez, Herminio; Berman, Stephen; Asturias, Edwin J

    2016-03-29

    To explore the use of rapid needs assessment (RNA) surveys to determine the prevalence and factors contributing to delays in vaccination of children in two low middle-income countries (LMIC). Data from two RNA surveys performed as part of program improvement evaluations in Guatemala and Peru were used for this analysis. The primary endpoint was the timeliness of immunization with delay defined as administration of vaccines beyond 28 days from recommended age for DTwP-HepB-Hib (Penta) and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines, as well as past age-restrictions for rotavirus vaccine. Independent risk factors analyzed included child's gender, birth year, number of children in household, maternal age, maternal education, and food insecurity. Vaccine information was available from 811 children from 838 households surveyed. High rate of immunization delays was observed, with 75.6% of children in Guatemala and 57.8% of children in Peru being delayed for the third dose of Penta primary series. Factors associated with delayed vaccination in Guatemala included advanced maternal age and increased number of children in household. In Peru, significant associations were birth year before 2009, lower maternal education level, and increased number of children in household. RNA is a fast and effective method to identify timely vaccine coverage and derive a hypothesis of factors possibly associated with vaccination delay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Infectious Diseases and Tropical Cyclones in Southeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jietao Zheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Southeast China is frequently hit by tropical cyclones (TCs with significant economic and health burdens each year. However, there is a lack of understanding of what infectious diseases could be affected by tropical cyclones. This study aimed to examine the impacts of tropical cyclones on notifiable infectious diseases in southeast China. Disease data between 2005 and 2011 from four coastal provinces in southeast China, including Guangdong, Hainan, Zhejiang, and Fujian province, were collected. Numbers of cases of 14 infectious diseases were compared between risk periods and reference periods for each tropical cyclone. Risk ratios (RRs were calculated to estimate the risks. TCs were more likely to increase the risk of bacillary dysentery, paratyphoid fever, dengue fever and acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (ps < 0.05 than to decrease the risk, more likely to decrease the risk of measles, mumps, varicella and vivax malaria (ps < 0.05 than to increase the risk. In conclusion, TCs have mixed effects on the risk of infectious diseases. TCs are more likely to increase the risk of intestinal and contact transmitted infectious diseases than to decrease the risk, and more likely to decrease the risk of respiratory infectious diseases than to increase the risk. Findings of this study would assist in developing public health strategies and interventions for the reduction of the adverse health impacts from tropical cyclones.

  5. [Medical data in pathology--evaluation of a large collection. (530,000 diagnoses coded in SNOMED II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, R P

    1999-10-01

    The paper is describing the design and the performance of the computerized system, from its introduction in 1982 until the present day. The first device, using the MUMPS language on a mini-computer, followed by a VAX computer with terminals have been replaced in 1996 by an application program, using ORACLE, based on the client-server concept. The content and the particularities of the different data groups are discussed, concerning the functional components of the data bank: 'PATIENTS', 'SPECIMEN', 'SENDERS', 'REPORT' and 'DIAGNOSES'. By means of examples, we demonstrate the chronological evolution of the registration of persons, the distribution of the diagnoses according to the organ systems, the possibilities to combine various lesions and an algorithm to assure that a given lesion is registered only once per patient. In first place, the efficiency and the reliability of manual coding by a pathologist using the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED; 2nd edition [1979/1982]) is discussed. The data bank currently contains 530,000 diagnoses, distributed among on SNOMED's five main modules, obtained from 1500 autopsies, 140,000 surgical and 180,000 cytological specimens. Concluding the article, an analysis is made of desirable developments in the future with the aim of a better integration of the acquired information in routine work and an enhanced use of the medical content for epidemiological research or statistical analysis.

  6. Implication of health care personnel in measles transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torner, Núria; Solano, Ruben; Rius, Cristina; Domínguez, Angela; Surveillance Network of Catalonia, Spain, the Measles Elimination Program

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare personnel (HCP) play an important role in transmission of highly contagious diseases such as measles. Current immunization guidelines in Catalonia include Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) immunization for HCP born after 1967 without evidence of immunity. Despite high vaccination coverage (90%) a high burden of measles cases related to outbreaks have occurred. The aim of this study was to assess the implication of HCP in measles transmission related to healthcare setting. A review of surveillance case data from 2001 to 2013 gathered through the Measles Elimination Program in Catalonia was performed. Twenty six outbreaks involving 797 cases were reported, 52 (6.5%) were HCP aged 21–41 years, 72,5% (38) patient were care personnel (doctors and nurses) and 22,5% (14) other health care related personnel. Forty six 87%) were unvaccinated, 4(10%) had only one dose and 2 had two doses of MMR. In community outbreaks 30 clusters with HCP involved were observed, yet none were identified as index cases. Non-vaccinated HCPs against measles were all under 45 years of age. Vaccination is the only reliable protection against nosocomial spread of measles from HCPs. Assessing vaccination status of HCPs and implementing a 2 dose vaccination in those lacking evidence of immunity is needed in order to set to zero the risk of acquiring and spreading measles in healthcare (HC) settings. PMID:25483548

  7. Analgesic and Antiinflammatory Activities of the Aqueous Extract from Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour. Spreng. Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Jia Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour. Spreng. is a native Labiatae plant of Taiwan. The plants are commonly used in Chinese folk medicine for the treatment of cough, fever, sore throats, mumps, and mosquito bite. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and antiinflammatory properties of the aqueous extract from Plectranthus amboinicus (PA in vivo and in vitro. PA inhibited pain induced by acetic acid and formalin, and inflammation induced by carrageenan. The anti-inflammatory effect of PA was related to modulating antioxidant enzymes' activities in the liver and decreasing the Malondialdehyde (MDA level and the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2 in edema-paw tissue in mice. In vitro studies show that PA inhibited the proinflammatory mediators in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. PA blocked the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 subunit. Finally, the amount of carvacrol in the aqueous extract of PA was 1.88 mg/g extract. Our findings suggest that PA has analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. These effects were mediated by inhibiting the proinflammatory mediators through blocking NF-κB activation. Meanwhile, the effects observed in this study provide evidence for folkloric uses of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour. Spreng. in relieving pain and inflammation.

  8. Clinical application analysis of andrographolide total ester sulfonate injection, a traditional Chinese medicine licensed in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Huang, Pu; Chen, Zhe; Zheng, Si-Wei; Yu, Jin-Yang; Shi, Chen

    2017-04-01

    Andrographolide total ester sulfonate (ATES) injection is one of the products of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) currently used against viral infection in China. ATES injection was approved for manufacturing and marketing in January 2002. It is indicated for acute respiratory infections, tonsillitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, influenza, foot and mouth disease, bronchiolitis, herpangina, mumps, infectious mononucleosis and psychosis. However, its usage also carries risk. We investigated the use of ATES at the Wuhan Union Hospital from January 2014 to December 2014 and evaluated its real-world clinical application using the hospital centralized monitoring method. A total of 848 cases were enrolled in this study. In these cases, it was mainly used for postoperative anti-inflammation and treating upper respiratory infection, pneumonia and bronchitis. Among them, 39.86% were contraindicated. Irregular medication of adults and children accounted for 1.91% and 23.38%, respectively. Improper choice of solvent accounted for 3.18%. The choice of intravenous drip versus aerosol inhalation was reasonable. A case of adverse events (AEs) was observed in the monitoring period, and the incidence of adverse drug reaction (ADR) of ATES injection was 0.12%. ATES injection in our hospital is relatively safe with a low incidence of adverse reactions. The study assesses the clinical usage and adverse reactions of ATES injection, and provides suggestions for rational use in clinical practice.

  9. Immunity against measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, diphtheria, tetanus, polio, hepatitis A and hepatitis B among adult asylum seekers in the Netherlands, 2016.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freidl, Gudrun S; Tostmann, Alma; Curvers, Moud; Ruijs, Wilhelmina L M; Smits, Gaby; Schepp, Rutger; Duizer, Erwin; Boland, Greet; de Melker, Hester; van der Klis, Fiona R M; Hautvast, Jeannine L A; Veldhuijzen, Irene K

    2018-01-01

    Asylum seekers are a vulnerable population for contracting infectious diseases. Outbreaks occur among children and adults. In the Netherlands, asylum seeker children are offered vaccination according to the National Immunization Program. Little is known about protection against vaccine-preventable

  10. 'Just that little bit of doubt': Scottish parents', teenage girls' and health professionals' views of the MMR, H1N1 and HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catriona; Gray Brunton, Carol; Hogg, Rhona

    2014-02-01

    Parental decision making about childhood vaccinations is complex and the vaccination schedule ever-changing. Vaccination may be controversial even in countries with historically high vaccination rates such as Scotland. Health behaviour models have aided understanding of individual vaccine intentions for specific vaccines. These are limited in explaining actual behaviours and are divorced from the impact of socio-cultural contexts on vaccination decision making. To explore vaccination views in Scotland amongst parents, teenage girls and health professionals across three controversial vaccines: the Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR), the Human Papilloma virus (HPV) and the Influenza A (H1N1) vaccine. We used qualitative interviews and focus group discussions in a purposive sample of health professionals (n = 51), parents (n = 15) and teenage girls aged 12-15 years (n = 8) about their views of these vaccines. Discussions were analysed using thematic analysis. Two main themes are highlighted: 'vaccine risks revisited' in which we explored how the MMR legacy resurfaced and how worries about vaccine safety permeated the data. 'Vaccine responsibilities' indicated tensions regarding roles and responsibilities for vaccines. An overarching notion of 'just that little bit of doubt' referred to lingering doubts and uncertainties interwoven across the vaccines. Public health authorities should remain alert towards pervasive vaccine concerns. It is important for authorities to clarify vaccine roles and responsibilities in the face of new and existing vaccines and to acknowledge public concerns regarding vaccine safety.

  11. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF) vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were titered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose.

  12. A randomised double-blind clinical trial of two yellow fever vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77 in children nine-23 months old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This randomised, double-blind, multicentre study with children nine-23 months old evaluated the immunogenicity of yellow fever (YF vaccines prepared with substrains 17DD and 17D-213/77. YF antibodies were tittered before and 30 or more days after vaccination. Seropositivity and seroconversion were analysed according to the maternal serological status and the collaborating centre. A total of 1,966 children were randomised in the municipalities of the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais and São Paulo and blood samples were collected from 1,714 mothers. Seropositivity was observed in 78.6% of mothers and 8.9% of children before vaccination. After vaccination, seropositivity rates of 81.9% and 83.2%, seroconversion rates of 84.8% and 85.8% and rates of a four-fold increase over the pre-vaccination titre of 77.6% and 81.8% were observed in the 17D-213/77 and 17DD subgroups, respectively. There was no association with maternal immunity. Among children aged 12 months or older, the seroconversion rates of 69% were associated with concomitant vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella. The data were not conclusive regarding the interference of maternal immunity in the immune response to the YF vaccine, but they suggest interference from other vaccines. The failures in seroconversion after vaccination support the recommendation of a booster dose in children within 10 years of the first dose.

  13. Vaccine Adverse Events Reported during the First Ten Years (1998–2008 after Introduction in the State of Rondonia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica P. L. Cunha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite good safety records, vaccines given to young children can cause adverse events. We investigated the reported adverse events following immunization (AEFI of vaccines given to children of less than seven years of age during the first ten years (1998 to 2008 in the state of Rondonia, Brazil. We worked with the events related to BCG (Bacillus Calmett-Guérin, HB (hepatitis B, DTwP/Hib (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis+Hemophillus influenza b, DTP (diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis, MMR (mumps, measles, rubella, and YF (yellow fever vaccines because they were part of the recommended scheme. The number of doses of vaccines given was 3,231,567 with an average of AEFI of 57.2/year during the studied period. DTwP/Hib was responsible for 298 (57.8%, DTP 114 (22.9%, HB 31 (6%, MMR 28 (5.4%, BCG 24 (4.7%, and YF 20 (3.9% of the reported AEFI. The combination of the AEFI for DTwP/Hib vaccines showed the highest number of systemic (61.4% and local events (33.8%. Young children (≤1-year old were more susceptible to AEFI occurring in the 6 hours (54.2% following vaccine uptake. This study suggests significant differences in reactogenicity of vaccines and that despite limitations of the AEFI Brazilian registry system we cannot ignore underreporting and should use the system to expand our understanding of adverse events and effects.

  14. A missing dimension in measures of vaccination impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, M. Gabriela M.; Lipsitch, Marc; Wargo, Andrew R.; Kurath, Gael; Rebelo, Carlota; Medley, Graham F.; Coutinho, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Immunological protection, acquired from either natural infection or vaccination, varies among hosts, reflecting underlying biological variation and affecting population-level protection. Owing to the nature of resistance mechanisms, distributions of susceptibility and protection entangle with pathogen dose in a way that can be decoupled by adequately representing the dose dimension. Any infectious processes must depend in some fashion on dose, and empirical evidence exists for an effect of exposure dose on the probability of transmission to mumps-vaccinated hosts [1], the case-fatality ratio of measles [2], and the probability of infection and, given infection, of symptoms in cholera [3]. Extreme distributions of vaccine protection have been termed leaky (partially protects all hosts) and all-or-nothing (totally protects a proportion of hosts) [4]. These distributions can be distinguished in vaccine field trials from the time dependence of infections [5]. Frailty mixing models have also been proposed to estimate the distribution of protection from time to event data [6], [7], although the results are not comparable across regions unless there is explicit control for baseline transmission [8]. Distributions of host susceptibility and acquired protection can be estimated from dose-response data generated under controlled experimental conditions [9]–[11] and natural settings [12], [13]. These distributions can guide research on mechanisms of protection, as well as enable model validity across the entire range of transmission intensities. We argue for a shift to a dose-dimension paradigm in infectious disease science and community health.

  15. Disease spectrum and treatment patterns in a local male infertility clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, K L; Tsu, James H L; Tam, P C; Yiu, M K

    2015-02-01

    To review disease spectrum and treatment patterns in a local male infertility clinic. Case series. Male infertility clinic in a teaching hospital in Hong Kong. Patients who were seen as new cases in a local male infertility clinic between January 2008 and December 2012. Infertility assessment and counselling on treatment options. Disease spectrum and treatment patterns. A total of 387 new patients were assessed in the male infertility clinic. The mean age of the patients and their female partners was 37.2 and 32.1 years, respectively. The median duration of infertility was 3 years. Among the patients, 36.2% had azoospermia, 8.0% had congenital absence of vas deferens, and 48.3% of patients had other abnormalities in semen parameters. The commonest causes of male infertility were unknown (idiopathic), clinically significant varicoceles, congenital absence of vas deferens, mumps after puberty, and erectile or ejaculatory dysfunction. Overall, 66.1% of patients chose assisted reproductive treatment and 12.4% of patients preferred surgical correction of reversible male infertility conditions. Altogether 36.7% of patients required either surgical sperm retrieval or correction of male infertility conditions. The present study provided important local data on the disease spectrum and treatment patterns in a male infertility clinic. The incidences of azoospermia and congenital absence of vas deferens were much higher than those reported in the contemporary literature. A significant proportion of patients required either surgical sperm retrieval or correction of reversible male infertility conditions.

  16. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  17. Multi-disease analysis of maternal antibody decay using non-linear mixed models accounting for censoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeyvaerts, Nele; Leuridan, Elke; Faes, Christel; Van Damme, Pierre; Hens, Niel

    2015-09-10

    Biomedical studies often generate repeated measures of multiple outcomes on a set of subjects. It may be of interest to develop a biologically intuitive model for the joint evolution of these outcomes while assessing inter-subject heterogeneity. Even though it is common for biological processes to entail non-linear relationships, examples of multivariate non-linear mixed models (MNMMs) are still fairly rare. We contribute to this area by jointly analyzing the maternal antibody decay for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella, allowing for a different non-linear decay model for each infectious disease. We present a general modeling framework to analyze multivariate non-linear longitudinal profiles subject to censoring, by combining multivariate random effects, non-linear growth and Tobit regression. We explore the hypothesis of a common infant-specific mechanism underlying maternal immunity using a pairwise correlated random-effects approach and evaluating different correlation matrix structures. The implied marginal correlation between maternal antibody levels is estimated using simulations. The mean duration of passive immunity was less than 4 months for all diseases with substantial heterogeneity between infants. The maternal antibody levels against rubella and varicella were found to be positively correlated, while little to no correlation could be inferred for the other disease pairs. For some pairs, computational issues occurred with increasing correlation matrix complexity, which underlines the importance of further developing estimation methods for MNMMs. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Congenital rubella still a public health problem in Italy: analysis of national surveillance data from 2005 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambi, C; Filia, A; Rota, M C; Del Manso, M; Declich, S; Nacca, G; Rizzuto, E; Bella, A

    2015-04-23

    In accordance with the goal of the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, the Italian national measles and rubella elimination plan aims to reduce the incidence of congenital rubella cases to less than one case per 100,000 live births by the end of 2015. We report national surveillance data for congenital rubella and rubella in pregnancy from 2005 to 2013. A total of 75 congenital rubella infections were reported; the national annual mean incidence was 1.5/100,000 live births, including probable and confirmed cases according to European Union case definition. Two peaks occurred in 2008 and 2012 (5.0 and 3.6/100,000 respectively). Overall, 160 rubella infections in pregnancy were reported; 69/148 women were multiparous and 38/126 had had a rubella antibody test before pregnancy. Among reported cases, there were 62 infected newborns, 31 voluntary abortions, one stillbirth and one spontaneous abortion. A total of 24 newborns were unclassified and 14 women were lost to follow-up, so underestimation is likely. To improve follow-up of cases, systematic procedures for monitoring infected mothers and children were introduced in 2013. To prevent congenital rubella, antibody screening before pregnancy and vaccination of susceptible women, including post-partum and post-abortum vaccination, should be promoted. Population coverage of two doses of measles-mumps-rubella vaccination of ≥ 95% should be maintained and knowledge of health professionals improved.

  19. Silicon Micromachined Sensor for Broadband Vibration Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Adolfo; Edmans, Daniel; Cormeau, Chris; Seidler, Gernot; Deangelis, Dave; Maby, Edward

    1995-01-01

    The development of a family of silicon based integrated vibration sensors capable of sensing mechanical resonances over a broad range of frequencies with minimal signal processing requirements is presented. Two basic general embodiments of the concept were designed and fabricated. The first design was structured around an array of cantilever beams and fabricated using the ARPA sponsored multi-user MEMS processing system (MUMPS) process at the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina (MCNC). As part of the design process for this first sensor, a comprehensive finite elements analysis of the resonant modes and stress distribution was performed using PATRAN. The dependence of strain distribution and resonant frequency response as a function of Young's modulus in the Poly-Si structural material was studied. Analytical models were also studied. In-house experimental characterization using optical interferometry techniques were performed under controlled low pressure conditions. A second design, intended to operate in a non-resonant mode and capable of broadband frequency response, was proposed and developed around the concept of a cantilever beam integrated with a feedback control loop to produce a null mode vibration sensor. A proprietary process was used to integrat a metal-oxide semiconductor (MOS) sensing device, with actuators and a cantilever beam, as part of a compatible process. Both devices, once incorporated as part of multifunction data acquisition and telemetry systems will constitute a useful system for NASA launch vibration monitoring operations. Satellite and other space structures can benefit from the sensor for mechanical condition monitoring functions.

  20. The effect of sucrose as pain relief/comfort during immunisation of 15-month-old children in health care centres: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despriee, Åshild Wik; Langeland, Eva

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of 30% sucrose compared with a placebo (water) as pain relief and comfort during immunisation of 15-month-old children in health care centres. Children experience different levels of pain and distress during immunisation. Sweet solutions function as pain relief during immunisation for infants up to one year of age. However, there are few studies of older children. An experimental design in which the participants (15-month-old infants) were randomly assigned to an intervention group that received a 30% sugar solution or a control group that received a placebo (water). The study was performed at three health care centres in a large Norwegian municipality. The parents of all 15-month-old infants who were recommended for vaccination (for measles, mumps and rubella) between 5 September 2013 and 31 March 2014 were invited to have their infant participate. Duration of crying was the outcome measure. A total of 114 children were included (59 in the intervention group, 55 in the control group). The intervention group infants' crying was shorter (18 seconds mean) compared with the control group infants (33 seconds mean). The difference in crying duration between the groups was both statistically and clinically significant. This trial revealed that 30% sucrose orally has a calming and pain-relieving effect on 15-month-old infants during immunisation. Public health nurses should use a 30% sucrose solution for pain relief during immunisation of 15-month-old infants. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Population growth changes targets for immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuljapurkar, S; John, A M

    1995-01-01

    The faster the rate of population growth in developing countries, the less likely it is that current protocols for immunization against measles, rubella, and mumps will eradicate these childhood diseases. Standard protocols (timing, percentage of children to be immunized) do not take into account the rapid rates of population growth in developing countries (3.0% per year on average in sub-Saharan Africa and 2.0% in the rest of Africa, in Latin America, and in Asia, excluding China). Most public health planning models in this area were created based on static infant populations. The World Health Organization advises vaccinating at least 85% of children aged 6 to 9 months, a 3-month immunization window during which maternal antibodies are low (so the vaccination takes) and herd immunity is high (the probability that a child will encounter the disease is low because most children have been immunized). In practice, the immunization window in developing countries is 1 year or more. More susceptible children are present than assumed by the models. A larger number of susceptible babies are added each year during rapid population growth. As the age range for immunization widens, a higher percentage of children must be vaccinated to eradicate disease (chart). The proportion of each birth cohort that must be immunized rises as the population growth rate increases. At zero population growth, 94% must be vaccinated; at population growth rates greater than 3%, 98% must be vaccinated.

  2. Disc type thermal actuator with straight beams for angular motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, M. Arefin; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Ahmed, A.K. Waiz

    2013-01-01

    Motion of a micro thermal actuator largely depends on its structural topology. This paper presents designs for a novel rotary type micro thermal actuator. This actuator has unique arrangement of hot segments around the cold segment. Upon application of potential difference, hot segments expand against the cold segment of disc and make the cold disc rotate about its center. This rotary motion can be used for various optical applications like, switching, attenuation and diffraction. The actuator has been fabricated using poly MUMPS process technology. An analytical model was used for predicting steady state temperature profile along the actuator length and rotational behavior of the cold disc under different applied voltages. A finite element analysis (FEA) was carried out to predict the behavior of the actuator by defining an air volume around the structure and also between structure and substrate. Finally testing was done for predicting feasibility of the actuator. Comparison of the rotational behavior obtained from both analytical model and FEA with that of obtained from testing shows close agreement. -- Highlights: ► Electro-thermo-mechanical modeling and verification of rotary micro thermal actuator. ► Modeling with conduction, convection and radiation modes for the air gap below 3 micron. ► In micro level, shape factor and material resistivity were estimated and verified through I–V characteristics. ► Two different designs of different shape factors were designed, fabricated and tested. ► The devices were fabricated using surface micromachining technology and tested for verification

  3. Reporting of MMR evidence in professional publications: 1988–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, S; Hunt, K; Langan, M; Hamilton, V; Petticrew, M

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine how journals and magazines disseminate research evidence and guidance on best practice to health professionals by aligning commentaries on measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR) evidence in journals with key events in the MMR controversy. Design: Content analysis. Data sources: Comment articles in six commonly read UK publications. Main outcome measures: Number of comment pieces by publication, year and article type; trends in the focus, tone and inclusion of recommendations on MMR. Results: 860 articles met the inclusion criteria (BMJ n = 104, Community Practitioner n = 45, Health Visitor n = 24, Practice Nurse n = 61, Nursing Standard n = 61 and Pulse n = 565). Of these 860 comment pieces, 264 made some reference to evidence endorsing the safety of MMR. Around one in 10 were rated as negative (10.9%, n = 29) or neutral (11.3%, n = 30) in relation to MMR safety, and nearly a quarter (22.7%, n = 60) were rated as mixed. Following the publication of Wakefield et al’s 1998 paper there was a period of neutrality. In 2000, despite growing public concerns and widespread media coverage, fewer than 20 comment pieces were published. Less than a quarter of comment pieces (n = 196, 22.7%) included recommendations. Conclusion: While a period of neutrality may reflect a professional response to uncertainty by holding back until consensus emerges, it may also represent a missed opportunity to promote evidence-based practice. PMID:19414434

  4. Self-reported infections during international travel and notifiable infections among returning international travellers, Sweden, 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Dahl

    Full Text Available We studied food and water-borne diseases (FWDs, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs, vector-borne diseases (VBDs and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme among Swedish international travellers, in order to identify countries associated with a high number of infections. We used the national database for notifiable infections to estimate the number of FWDs (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, shigellosis, EHEC, Entamoeba histolytica, yersinosis, hepatitis A, paratyphoid fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis E, listeriosis, cholera, STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and acute hepatitis B, VBDs (dengue fever, malaria, West Nile fever, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria acquired abroad 2009-2013. We obtained number and duration of trips to each country from a database that monthly collects travel data from a randomly selected proportion of the Swedish population. We calculated number of infections per country 2009-2013 and incidence/million travel days for the five countries with the highest number of infections. Thailand had the highest number of FWDs (7,697, incidence 191/million travel days, STIs (1,388, incidence 34/million travel days and VBDs (358, incidence 9/million travel days. France had the highest number of cases of diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (8, 0.4/million travel days. Swedish travellers contracted most infections in Thailand. Special focus should be placed on giving advice to travellers to this destination.

  5. Expected immunizations and health protection for Hajj and Umrah 2018 -An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Gautret, Philippe; Memish, Ziad A

    2017-09-01

    The annual Hajj and Umrah are one of the largest recurring religious mass gatherings across the globe drawing pilgrims from more than 185 countries. The living circumstances and activities of the pilgrims may create an environment for the occurrence and spread of communicable diseases. Each year, the Health authority of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, in coordination with international health authorities, updates health requirements for pilgrims. The Hajj for 2017 took place from August 24 to September 5, 2017. Here, we review the expected obligations for immunizations for the 2018 Hajj and Umrah. The Hajj and Umrah vaccine requirements include mandatory vaccinations against yellow fever, quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide (every 3 years) or conjugated (every 5 years) vaccines and poliomyelitis vaccine. Influenza vaccine utilizing the 2016 (Southern Hemisphere vaccine to all pilgrims) was recommended but was not obligatory for pilgrims. Ciprofloxacin is required for individuals >12 years excluding pregnant women as chemoprophylaxis to be given at the port of entry for Pilgrims coming from the meningitis belt. With the ongoing outbreaks of measles in Europe, it is recommended that all pilgrims have an updated immunization against vaccine-preventable diseases (diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles and mumps). The mandatory vaccines remain the same with continued vigilance for the development of any new or emerging infectious diseases. Continuing surveillance for Zika virus, cholera and MERS-CoV are ongoing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rational use of rubella vaccine for prevention of congenital rubella syndrome in the Americas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan R. Hinman

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubella is a viral disease with minor morbidity and few complications unless it is contracted by a pregnant woman. Rubella infection during the first trimester of pregnancy often leads to fetal death or severe congenital defects (congenital rubella syndrome, CRS. Rubella remains endemic in many countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. It has been estimated that 20000 or more infants are perhaps born with CRS each year in Latin American and Caribbean countries. While the inclusion of rubella vaccination into routine childhood immunization will decrease rubella virus circulation among young children, it will not have immediate impact on the transmission of rubella among adults or the occurrence of CRS. A one-time mass campaign targeting both males and females 5 to 39 years of age with measles-mumps-rubella or measles-rubella vaccine followed by the use of measles-mumps-rubella vaccine in routine early childhood vaccination will prevent and control both rubella and CRS promptly. In April 1988, the Ministers of Health of the English-speaking Caribbean targeted rubella for elimination by the end of the year 2000 using the vaccination strategy outlined above. The rubella elimination experience of these countries will provide useful information for the eventual elimination of rubella virus from the Americas.La rubéola es una enfermedad vírica que produce poca morbilidad y pocas complicaciones, a no ser que la contraiga una mujer embarazada. La infección con rubéola durante el primer trimestre del embarazo a menudo termina en muerte fetal o en deformidades congénitas graves (síndrome de anomalías congénitas por rubéola, o SCR. La rubéola sigue siendo endémica en muchos países de América Latina y el Caribe. Se estima que quizá 20 000 niños o más nacen cada año con SCR en países latinoamericanos y caribeños. Si bien la adición de la vacuna contra la rubéola a los programas de inmunización infantil de rutina disminuirá la

  7. Universal varicella vaccine immunization in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Ohashi, Masahiro

    2016-04-07

    In 1974, Japanese scientists developed a live attenuated varicella vaccine based on the Oka strain. The efficacy of the vaccine for the prevention of varicella has been primarily demonstrated in studies conducted in the United States following the adoption of universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in 1996. Although the vaccine was developed by Japanese scientists, until recently, the vaccine has been administered on a voluntary basis in Japan resulting in a vaccine coverage rate of approximately 40%. Therefore, Japan initiated universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in November 2014. Given the transition from voluntary to universal immunization in Japan, it will also be important to monitor the epidemiology of varicella and herpes zoster. The efficacy and safety of co-administration of the varicella vaccine and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine have been demonstrated in many countries; however, there was no data from Japan. In order to adopt the practice of universal immunization using the Oka strain varicella vaccine in Japan, data demonstrating the efficacy and safety of co-administration of varicella vaccine and measles and rubella (MR) vaccine were required. Additionally, we needed to elucidate the appropriate time interval between the first and second administrations of the vaccine. It is also important to differentiate between wild type and Oka vaccine type strains in herpes zoster patient with past history of varicella vaccine. Thus, there are many factors to consider regarding the adoption of universal immunization in Japan to control varicella zoster virus (VZV) infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety and Immunogenicity of a Quadrivalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine and Commonly Administered Vaccines After Coadministration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Tregnaghi, Miguel; Keshavan, Pavitra; Ypma, Ellen; Han, Linda; Smolenov, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Given the broad age range across which the quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine MenACWY-CRM is used, coadministration with routine vaccines should be evaluated across age groups for possible immunologic interference and impact on vaccine reactogenicity and safety. We summarize data from a large population of infants, adolescents and international travelers from 10 phase 3 or 4 clinical studies to evaluate coadministration of MenACWY-CRM with commonly administered vaccines. Noninferiority analyses of immune responses were performed across studies and age groups for each vaccine. Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed. In infants, MenACWY-CRM coadministered with routine vaccines did not reduce immune responses to diphtheria, tetanus, poliovirus, hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae type b, pneumococcal conjugate, measles-mumps-rubella, varicella or pertussis antigens. Noninferiority criteria were not met for some pneumococcal conjugate serotypes at 7 months of age, but no consistent trends were observed. In adolescents, coadministration did not reduce immune responses to tetanus, diphtheria and human papilloma virus vaccine antigens. Noninferiority criteria for pertussis antigens were not uniformly met in infant and adolescent studies, although the clinical relevance is unclear. In adults, coadministration did not reduce immune responses to hepatitis A/B, typhoid fever, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and rabies antigens. Immune responses to MenACWY-CRM were not impacted by coadministration of commonly administered vaccines. Coadministration did not increase frequencies of postvaccination adverse events in any age group. With no clinically relevant vaccine interactions or impact on vaccine reactogenicity or safety, these results support the coadministration of MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines in all age groups.

  9. Vaccination and public trust: A model for the dissemination of vaccination behaviour with external intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorso, Claudio O.; Medus, Andrés; Balenzuela, Pablo

    2017-09-01

    Vaccination is widely recognized as the most effective way of immunization against many infectious diseases. However, unfounded claims about supposed side effects of some vaccines have contributed to spread concern and fear among people, thus inducing vaccination refusal. MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine coverage has undergone an important decrease in a large part of Europe and US as a consequence of erroneously alleged side effects, leading to recent measles outbreaks. There is evidence that clusterization of unvaccinated individuals may lead to epidemics way larger that the ones that might appear in the case that unvaccinated agents are distributed at random in the population. In this work we explore the emergence of those clusters as a consequence of the social interaction driven mainly by homophily, where vaccination behaviour is part of a process of cultural dissemination in the spirit of Axelrod's model. The ingredients of this calculation encompass: (i) interacting agents which are to decide if they vaccinate or not their children, (ii) their interaction with a small subset of stubborn agents who believe that the MMR vaccine is not safe and (iii) government sponsored propaganda trying to convince people of the benefits of vaccination. We find that these clusters, which emerge as a dynamical outcome of the model, are the responsible of the increasing probability of the occurrence of measles outbreaks, even in scenarios where the WHO (World Health Organization) recommendation of 95% vaccine coverage is fulfilled. However, we also illustrate that the mitigating effect of a public health campaign, could effectively reduce the impact and size of outbreaks.

  10. The V protein of Tioman virus is incapable of blocking type I interferon signaling in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Caignard

    Full Text Available The capacity of a virus to cross species barriers is determined by the development of bona fide interactions with cellular components of new hosts, and in particular its ability to block IFN-α/β antiviral signaling. Tioman virus (TioV, a close relative of mumps virus (MuV, has been isolated in giant fruit bats in Southeast Asia. Nipah and Hendra viruses, which are present in the same bat colonies, are highly pathogenic in human. Despite serological evidences of close contacts between TioV and human populations, whether TioV is associated to some human pathology remains undetermined. Here we show that in contrast to the V protein of MuV, the V protein of TioV (TioV-V hardly interacts with human STAT2, does not degrade STAT1, and cannot block IFN-α/β signaling in human cells. In contrast, TioV-V properly binds to human STAT3 and MDA5, and thus interferes with IL-6 signaling and IFN-β promoter induction in human cells. Because STAT2 binding was previously identified as a host restriction factor for some Paramyxoviridae, we established STAT2 sequence from giant fruit bats, and binding to TioV-V was tested. Surprisingly, TioV-V interaction with STAT2 from giant fruit bats is also extremely weak and barely detectable. Altogether, our observations question the capacity of TioV to appropriately control IFN-α/β signaling in both human and giant fruit bats that are considered as its natural host.

  11. Methods for addressing "innocent bystanders" when evaluating safety of concomitant vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shirley V; Abdurrob, Abdurrahman; Spoendlin, Julia; Lewis, Edwin; Newcomer, Sophia R; Fireman, Bruce; Daley, Matthew F; Glanz, Jason M; Duffy, Jonathan; Weintraub, Eric S; Kulldorff, Martin

    2018-04-01

    The need to develop methods for studying the safety of childhood immunization schedules has been recognized by the Institute of Medicine and Department of Health and Human Services. The recommended childhood immunization schedule includes multiple vaccines in a visit. A key concern is safety of concomitant (same day) versus separate day vaccination. This paper addresses a methodological challenge for observational studies using a self-controlled design to investigate the safety of concomitant vaccination. We propose a process for distinguishing which of several concomitantly administered vaccines is responsible for increased risk of an adverse event while adjusting for confounding due to relationships between effect modifying risk factors and concomitant vaccine combinations. We illustrate the approach by re-examining the known increase in risk of seizure 7 to 10 days after measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination and evaluating potential independent or modifying effects of other vaccines. Initial analyses suggested that DTaP had both an independent and potentiating effect on seizure. After accounting for the relationship between age at vaccination and vaccine combination, there was little evidence for increased risk of seizure with same day administration of DTaP and MMR; incidence rate ratio, 95% confidence interval 1.2 (0.9-1.6), P value = θ.226. We have shown that when using a self-controlled design to investigate safety of concomitant vaccination, it can be critically important to adjust for time-invariant effect modifying risk factors, such as age at time of vaccination, which are structurally related to vaccination patterns due to recommended immunization schedules. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Vaccinations and childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Eileen; Halliday, Sophia R; Campbell, Gemma R; Cardwell, Chris R; Patterson, Chris C

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between routine vaccinations and the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus by systematically reviewing the published literature and performing meta-analyses where possible. A comprehensive literature search was performed of MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify all studies that compared vaccination rates in children who subsequently developed type 1 diabetes mellitus and in control children. ORs and 95% CIs were obtained from published reports or derived from individual patient data and then combined using a random effects meta-analysis. In total, 23 studies investigating 16 vaccinations met the inclusion criteria. Eleven of these contributed to meta-analyses which included data from between 359 and 11,828 childhood diabetes cases. Overall, there was no evidence to suggest an association between any of the childhood vaccinations investigated and type 1 diabetes mellitus. The pooled ORs ranged from 0.58 (95% CI 0.24, 1.40) for the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination in five studies up to 1.04 (95% CI 0.94, 1.14) for the haemophilus influenza B (HiB) vaccination in 11 studies. Significant heterogeneity was present in most of the pooled analyses, but was markedly reduced when analyses were restricted to study reports with high methodology quality scores. Neither this restriction by quality nor the original authors' adjustments for potential confounding made a substantial difference to the pooled ORs. This study provides no evidence of an association between routine vaccinations and childhood type 1 diabetes.

  13. Prevention and assessment of infectious diseases among children and adult migrants arriving to the European Union/European Economic Association: a protocol for a suite of systematic reviews for public health and health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottie, Kevin; Mayhew, Alain D; Morton, Rachael L; Greenaway, Christina; Akl, Elie A; Rahman, Prinon; Zenner, Dominik; Pareek, Manish; Tugwell, Peter; Welch, Vivian; Meerpohl, Joerg; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Hui, Charles; Biggs, Beverley-Ann; Requena-Méndez, Ana; Agbata, Eric; Noori, Teymur; Schünemann, Holger J

    2017-09-11

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control is developing evidence-based guidance for voluntary screening, treatment and vaccine prevention of infectious diseases for newly arriving migrants to the European Union/European Economic Area. The objective of this systematic review protocol is to guide the identification, appraisal and synthesis of the best available evidence on prevention and assessment of the following priority infectious diseases: tuberculosis, HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, poliomyelitis (polio), Haemophilus influenza disease, strongyloidiasis and schistosomiasis. The search strategy will identify evidence from existing systematic reviews and then update the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness evidence using prospective trials, economic evaluations and/or recently published systematic reviews. Interdisciplinary teams have designed logic models to help define study inclusion and exclusion criteria, guiding the search strategy and identifying relevant outcomes. We will assess the certainty of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. There are no ethical or safety issues. We anticipate disseminating the findings through open-access publications, conference abstracts and presentations. We plan to publish technical syntheses as GRADEpro evidence summaries and the systematic reviews as part of a special edition open-access publication on refugee health. We are following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses for Protocols reporting guideline. This protocol is registered in PROSPERO: CRD42016045798. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Vaccinations in migrants and refugees: a challenge for European health systems. A systematic review of current scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mipatrini, Daniele; Stefanelli, Paola; Severoni, Santino; Rezza, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    The decline of immunization rates in countries of origin of migrants and refugees, along with risky conditions during the journey to Europe, may threaten migrants' health. We performed a systematic review of the scientific literature in order to assess the frequency of vaccine preventable diseases, and vaccination coverage among migrants and refugees in Europe. To this end, Medline and Cochrane databases were considered. After the screening and the selection process, 58 papers were included in the review. We focused on the following vaccine-preventable diseases: hepatitis B, measles, rubella, mumps, tetanus, poliomyelitis, pertussis, diphtheria, meningitis, and varicella. The results were presented as a qualitative synthesis. In summary, several studies highlighted that migrants and refugees have lower immunization rates compared to European-born individuals. Firstly, this is due to low vaccination coverage in the country of origin. Then, several problems may limit migrants' access to vaccination in Europe: (i) migrants are used to move around the continent, and many vaccines require multiple doses at regular times; (ii) information on the immunization status of migrants is often lacking; (iii) hosting countries face severe economic crises; (iv) migrants often refuse registration with medical authorities for fear of legal consequences and (v) the lack of coordination among public health authorities of neighboring countries may determine either duplications or lack of vaccine administration. Possible strategies to overcome these problems include tailoring immunization services on the specific needs of the target population, developing strong communication campaigns, developing vaccination registers, and promoting collaboration among public health authorities of European Countries.

  15. A point-of-care test for measles diagnosis: detection of measles-specific IgM antibodies and viral nucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrener, Lenesha; Slibinskas, Rimantas; Chua, Kaw Bing; Nigatu, Wondatir; Brown, Kevin E; Sasnauskas, Kestutis; Samuel, Dhanraj; Brown, David

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the performance of a newly developed point-of-care test (POCT) for the detection of measles-specific IgM antibodies in serum and oral fluid specimens and to assess if measles virus nucleic acid could be recovered from used POCT strips. The POCT was used to test 170 serum specimens collected through measles surveillance or vaccination programmes in Ethiopia, Malaysia and the Russian Federation: 69 were positive for measles immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, 74 were positive for rubella IgM antibodies and 7 were positive for both. Also tested were 282 oral fluid specimens from the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) surveillance programme of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. The Microimmune measles IgM capture enzyme immunoassay was the gold standard for comparison. A panel of 24 oral fluids was used to investigate if measles virus haemagglutinin (H) and nucleocapsid (N) genes could be amplified by polymerase chain reaction directly from used POCT strips. With serum POCT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 90.8% (69/76) and 93.6% (88/94), respectively; with oral fluids, sensitivity and specificity were 90.0% (63/70) and 96.2% (200/208), respectively. Both H and N genes were reliably detected in POCT strips and the N genes could be sequenced for genotyping. Measles virus genes could be recovered from POCT strips after storage for 5 weeks at 20-25 °C. The POCT has the sensitivity and specificity required of a field-based test for measles diagnosis. However, its role in global measles control programmes requires further evaluation.

  16. Immune Abnormalities in Fontan Protein-Losing Enteropathy: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdo, H Sonali; Stillwell, Terri L; Greenhawt, Matthew J; Stringer, Kathleen A; Yu, Sunkyung; Fifer, Carlen G; Russell, Mark W; Schumacher, Kurt R

    2015-08-01

    To comprehensively characterize the immunologic characteristics of patients with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) post-Fontan and compare them with patients without PLE post-Fontan. Patients with PLE post-Fontan and age-matched controls post-Fontan were prospectively studied with laboratory markers of immune function. Infectious history was obtained by interview and chart review. The groups' demographics, cardiac history, immune characteristics, and infection history were compared using appropriate 2-group statistics. A total of 16 patients enrolled (8 patients with PLE and 8 controls). All patients with PLE had lymphopenia compared with 25% of controls (P = .01). All patients with PLE had markedly depressed CD4 T cell counts (median 58 cells/μL) compared with controls (median 450 cells/μL, P = .0002); CD4% was also low in the PLE group (12.3%) and normal in control (36.9%, P = .004). Both groups had mildly depressed CD8 T cells and normal to slightly elevated natural killer and B-cell subsets. A majority of patients with PLE (62.5%) had negative titers to measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination, compared with no control Fontan with a negative titer (P = .03). Despite profoundly low CD4 counts, the frequency of infection was not different between groups with no reported opportunistic infections. Patients with Fontan-associated PLE have extensive quantitative immune abnormalities, particularly CD4 deficiency. These immune abnormalities are similar to those found in non-Fontan patients with PLE caused by intestinal lymphangiectasia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Considering economic analyses in the revision of the preventive vaccination law: a new direction for health policy-making in Japan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Manabu; Yongue, Julia; Ikeda, Shunya; Satoh, Toshihiko

    2014-10-01

    Evidence of a significant vaccine policy shift can be witnessed not only in the number of new vaccines available in Japan but also in the way that vaccine policy is being formulated. In 2010, policy makers decided for the first time ever to commission economic analyses as a reference in their consideration of subsidy allocation. This research offers a first hand account of the recent changes in vaccine policies by examining the decision-making process from the perspective of the researchers commissioned to perform the economic evaluations. In order to understand the vaccine policy-making process, a review was made of all the documents that were distributed and discussed during the government committee meetings from February 2010 when the revision of the Preventive Vaccination Law was initially proposed to May 2012 when the final recommendations were made. Economic evaluations were conducted for seven vaccines under consideration in the routine immunization program (Haemophilus influenzae type b or Hib, pneumococcal disease for children and adults, human papillomavirus, varicella, mumps, and hepatitis B). All were cost-effective options, except the Hib and hepatitis B vaccines. Nonetheless, all the vaccines were recommended equally for inclusion in the routine immunization program. While it is significant that policy-makers decided to commission economic assessments at all, various issues remain regarding the influence of external pressure, the choice of evaluation methods and the implications of using cost-effectiveness analyses on the future of Japanese health policy-making. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Varicella vaccination coverage of children under two years of age in Germany

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    Reuss Annicka M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since July 2004, routine varicella vaccination is recommended by the German Standing Vaccination Committee in Germany. Health Insurance Funds started to cover vaccination costs at different time points between 2004 and 2006 in the Federal States. Nationwide representative data on vaccination coverage against varicella of children under two years of age are not available. We aimed to determine varicella vaccination coverage in statutory health insured children under two years of age in twelve German Federal States using data from associations of statutory health insurance physicians (ASHIPs, in order to investigate the acceptance of the recommended routine varicella vaccination programme. Methods We analysed data on varicella vaccination from 13 of 17 ASHIPs of the years 2004 to 2007. The study population consisted of all statutory health insured children under two years of age born in 2004 (cohort 2004 or 2005 (cohort 2005 in one of the studied regions. Vaccination coverage was determined by the number of children vaccinated under 2 years of age within the study population. Results Varicella vaccination coverage of children under two years of age with either one dose of the monovalent varicella vaccine or two doses of the measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine increased from 34% (cohort 2004 to 51% (cohort 2005 in the studied regions (p Conclusions Our study shows increasing varicella vaccination coverage of young children, indicating a growing acceptance of the routine varicella vaccination programme by the parents and physicians. We recommend further monitoring of vaccination coverage using data from ASHIPs to investigate acceptance of the routine vaccination programmes over time.

  19. Cellphone-based hand-held microplate reader for point-of-care ELISA testing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Brandon; Cortazar, Bingen; Tseng, Derek; Ozkan, Haydar; Feng, Steve; Wei, Qingshan; Chan, Raymond Y.; Burbano, Jordi; Farooqui, Qamar; Lewinski, Michael; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2016-03-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in a microplate format has been a gold standard first-line clinical test for diagnosis of various diseases including infectious diseases. However, this technology requires a relatively large and expensive multi-well scanning spectrophotometer to read and quantify the signal from each well, hindering its implementation in resource-limited-settings. Here, we demonstrate a cost-effective and handheld smartphone-based colorimetric microplate reader for rapid digitization and quantification of immunoserology-related ELISA tests in a conventional 96-well plate format at the point of care (POC). This device consists of a bundle of 96 optical fibers to collect the transmitted light from each well of the microplate and direct all the transmission signals from the wells onto the camera of the mobile-phone. Captured images are then transmitted to a remote server through a custom-designed app, and both quantitative and qualitative diagnostic results are returned back to the user within ~1 minute per 96-well plate by using a machine learning algorithm. We tested this mobile-phone based micro-plate reader in a clinical microbiology lab using FDA-approved mumps IgG, measles IgG, and herpes simplex virus IgG (HSV-1 and HSV-2) ELISA tests on 1138 remnant patient samples (roughly 50% training and 50% testing), and achieved an overall accuracy of ~99% or higher for each ELISA test. This handheld and cost-effective platform could be immediately useful for large-scale vaccination monitoring in low-infrastructure settings, and also for other high-throughput disease screening applications at POC.

  20. [HLA genetic markers and auto-antibody profile in a Mapuche family with a case affected of type 1 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo, Sylvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Pérez, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (DM1) is caused by an autoimmune process that destroys beta cells of pancreas. Not all carriers of susceptible HLA genes and positive for autoantibodies develop the disease. Environmental factors play a role in triggering the autoimmune process. To analyze an exceptional case of DM1 in a Mapuche family in the context of genetic, immunological and environmental factors. A study of a family with an affected female child was carried out in a Mapuche community in Southern Chile (VIII region). This is an unique and sporadic DM1 case with Mapuche heritage. Nutritional and viral infections data were collected by interview and clinical records. A genetic analysis by PCR was done to detect class I and II HLA genes by reverse dot blot. The proband, her mother and sister had positive islet cell antibodies (ICA). Her father and brother were negative. All thefamily was positive for anti glutamic decarboxylase antibodies (GAD65). All subjects had HLA-DRB1 0407/0407 and HLA-DQB1 0302/0302 alleles. The index case and her father were homozygotes for the HLA-A1:A*68012/A*68012 allele. Mean breastfeeding lapse was 18 months in all children. No evidences for viral infections such as rubella, mumps or measles were found in this family. There was an altered profile of autoantibodies in the family of the index case. All genotypes were comparable with the European population where the diabetogenic combination DR4/DQB1*0302 is the most prevalent. No environmental factors could be incriminated as triggers of the disease.

  1. Randomised cluster trial to support informed parental decision-making for the MMR vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekker Hilary

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK public concern about the safety of the combined measles, mumps and rubella [MMR] vaccine continues to impact on MMR coverage. Whilst the sharp decline in uptake has begun to level out, first and second dose uptake rates remain short of that required for population immunity. Furthermore, international research consistently shows that some parents lack confidence in making a decision about MMR vaccination for their children. Together, this work suggests that effective interventions are required to support parents to make informed decisions about MMR. This trial assessed the impact of a parent-centred, multi-component intervention (balanced information, group discussion, coaching exercise on informed parental decision-making for MMR. Methods This was a two arm, cluster randomised trial. One hundred and forty two UK parents of children eligible for MMR vaccination were recruited from six primary healthcare centres and six childcare organisations. The intervention arm received an MMR information leaflet and participated in the intervention (parent meeting. The control arm received the leaflet only. The primary outcome was decisional conflict. Secondary outcomes were actual and intended MMR choice, knowledge, attitude, concern and necessity beliefs about MMR and anxiety. Results Decisional conflict decreased for both arms to a level where an 'effective' MMR decision could be made one-week (effect estimate = -0.54, p Conclusions Whilst both the leaflet and the parent meeting reduced parents' decisional conflict, the parent meeting appeared to enable parents to act upon their decision leading to vaccination uptake.

  2. Chickenpox in Poland in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyńska, Monika Roberta; Rogalska, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    A large number of chickenpox cases, occurring especially in children, indicates the rationale for the use of chickenpox vaccinations. In Poland since 2002, chickenpox vaccination is included in the National Immunisation Programme as recommended. To assess epidemiological situation of chickenpox in Poland in 2013 in comparison to previous years. The descriptive analysis was based on data retrieved from routine mandatory surveillance system and published in the annual bulletins "Infectious diseases and poisonings in Poland in 2013" and "Vaccinations in Poland in 2013" (Czarkowski MP i in., Warszawa 2014, NIZP-PZH i GIS). National Immunisation Programme for year 2013 was also used. In 2013, 178 501 cases of chickenpox were registered in Poland. The incidence was 463.6 and was lower than in 2012 (540.5). The highest number of cases was reported in mazowieckie voivodeship, the lowest in podlaskie voivodeship. The highest incidence was recorded in children aged 4 years (6 545.1 per 100,000). The chickenpox incidence among men (491.7) was higher by 12.4% comparing to women (437.3). The incidence among rural residents (497.2) was higher than among urban residents (441.7). Number of cases hospitalized due to mumps was 1 184. Number of people vaccinated against chickenpox was 57 168. In 2013, there was decrease in the incidence of chickenpox [corrected] in Poland with small fluctuations. Since 2002 the number of people vaccinated against chickenpox increased. The increase in the number of people vaccinated against chickenpox would help maintain the downward trend in subsequent years.

  3. Immunogenicity and safety of a CRM-conjugated meningococcal ACWY vaccine administered concomitantly with routine vaccines starting at 2 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Terry M; Nissen, Michael D; Naz, Aftab; Shepard, Julie; Bedell, Lisa; Hohenboken, Matthew; Odrljin, Tatjana; Dull, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Infants are at the highest risk for meningococcal disease and a broadly protective and safe vaccine is an unmet need in this youngest population. We evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of a 4-dose infant/toddler regimen of MenACWY-CRM given at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age concomitantly with pentavalent diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis-Hemophilus influenzae type b-inactivated poliovirus-combination vaccine (DTaP-IPV/Hib), hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), 7- or 13-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (PCV), and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine (MMR). Four doses of MenACWY-CRM induced hSBA titers ≥8 in 89%, 95%, 97%, and 96% of participants against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y, respectively. hSBA titers ≥8 were present in 76-98% of participants after the first 3 doses. A categorical linear analysis incorporating vaccine group and study center showed responses to routine vaccines administered with MenACWY-CRM were non-inferior to routine vaccines alone, except for seroresponse to the pertussis antigen fimbriae. The reactogenicity profile was not affected when MenACWY-CRM was administered concomitantly with routine vaccines. MenACWY-CRM administered with routine concomitant vaccinations in young infants was well tolerated and induced highly immunogenic responses against each of the serogroups without significant interference with the immune responses to routine infant vaccinations. Healthy 2 month old infants were randomized to receive MenACWY-CRM with routine vaccines (n = 258) or routine vaccines alone (n = 271). Immunogenicity was assessed by serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA). Medically attended adverse events (AEs), serious AEs (SAEs) and AEs leading to study withdrawal were collected throughout the study period.

  4. Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): a major subset of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra K

    2009-01-01

    Autism causes incapacitating neurologic problems in children that last a lifetime. The author of this article previously hypothesized that autism may be caused by autoimmunity to the brain, possibly triggered by a viral infection. This article is a summary of laboratory findings to date plus new data in support of an autoimmune pathogenesis for autism. Autoimmune markers were analyzed in the sera of autistic and normal children, but the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of some autistic children was also analyzed. Laboratory procedures included enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and protein immunoblotting assay. Autoimmunity was demonstrated by the presence of brain autoantibodies, abnormal viral serology, brain and viral antibodies in CSF, a positive correlation between brain autoantibodies and viral serology, elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and acute-phase reactants, and a positive response to immunotherapy. Many autistic children harbored brain myelin basic protein autoantibodies and elevated levels of antibodies to measles virus and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Measles might be etiologically linked to autism because measles and MMR antibodies (a viral marker) correlated positively to brain autoantibodies (an autoimmune marker)--salient features that characterize autoimmune pathology in autism. Autistic children also showed elevated levels of acute-phase reactants--a marker of systemic inflammation. The scientific evidence is quite credible for our autoimmune hypothesis, leading to the identification of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD) as a major subset of autism. AAD can be identified by immune tests to determine immune problems before administering immunotherapy. The author has advanced a speculative neuroautoimmune (NAI) model for autism, in which virus-induced autoimmunity is a key player. The latter should be targeted by immunotherapy to help children with autism.

  5. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents.All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells.We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  6. Varicella zoster virus related deaths and hospitalizations before the introduction of universal vaccination with the tetraviral vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra de Martino Mota

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To characterize varicella zoster virus-related deaths and hospitalizations in Brazil before universal vaccination with the tetravalent (measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella vaccine, attempting to collect baseline data on varicella morbidity and mortality in order to evaluate the impact of the varicella vaccination program. Methods: Varicella-associated mortality data were evaluated between 1996 and 2011 and varicella zoster virus-associated hospitalizations between 1998 and 2013. Data were gathered from the Informatics Department of the Unified Health System, considering the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, code B01. All age groups were assessed. Varicella-specific mortality rates were calculated and seasonality of varicella-zoster virus-associated hospitalizations was described. Results: There were 2334 varicella deaths between 1996 and 2011, 19.3% in infants aged less than 1 year and 36% in children from 1 to 4 years. In infants under 1 year, varicella mortality rates reached 3.2/100,000/year. In children aged 1–4 years, varicella mortality rates reach 1.64/100,000/year. Average annual mortality rates for varicella in Brazil are 0.88/100,000 in infants under 1 year and 0.40/100,000 in children aged 1–4 years. The total number of hospitalizations associated with varicella zoster virus was 62,246 from 2008 to 2013. Varicella-associated hospitalizations have a seasonal distribution in children, peaking in November. In the elderly, monthly averages of herpes zoster-associated hospitalizations present no significant seasonal variation. Conclusions: Varicella is associated, in the pre-vaccine period, to significant morbidity and mortality in Brazil. The universal vaccination program is expected to decrease the disease burden from varicella.

  7. [Towards a new vaccine economy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot, P; Martin, J F

    1994-01-01

    When Jonas Salk announced in the mid-50s the availability of a new vaccine against poliomyelitis, the world had the impression that it was now controlling infectious diseases. In fact, the success of this vaccine has been considerable and although some innovations lead to the launch of vaccines against flu, measles, rubella or mumps, the world vaccine market remained remarkably stable till the mid-80s. However, since 1984 (launch of the hepatitis B vaccine) there have been very substantial changes and further change is expected in the next ten years in the world market. Today, big companies are making a concentrated supply: Pasteur Mérieux with its subsidiary Connaught, SmithKline Beecham who acquired the Belgian company RIT, and Merck & Co. who is joining its forces with Pasteur Mérieux. Medium sized and small companies remain and reflect the situation of the past, but must work hard to secure their long term existence eventhough the world demand is going to double before the year 2000. Very substantial technological innovations explain to a large extent the development of the supply: progress in molecular biology, and particularly genetic engineering, lead to recombinant vaccines of which hepatitis B is the best example with worldwide sales in the range of $600 million a year. Similarly, conjugation technologies have allowed the development of new vaccines against meningitis, particularly Haemophilus influenzae type b. More recently, an efficacious vaccine against hepatitis A has been launched and many new products will be marketed in the next years against herpes, Lyme disease, and agents of other meningitis, etc.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Factors predictive of abnormal semen parameters in male partners of couples attending the infertility clinic of a tertiary hospital in south-western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Olusola Aduloju

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infertility is a common gynaecological problem and male factor contributes significantly in the aetiology of infertility. Semen analysis has remained a useful investigation in the search for male factor infertility. Aim: This study assessed the pattern of semen parameters and predictive factors associated with abnormal parameters in male partners of infertile couples attending a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Methods: A descriptive study of infertile couples presenting at the clinic between January 2012and December 2015 was done at Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti. Seminal fluid from the male partners were analysed in the laboratory using the WHO 2010 criteria for human semen characteristics. Data was analysed using SPSS 17 and logistic regression analysis was used to determine the predictive factors associated with abnormal semen parameters. Results: A total of 443 men participated in the study and 38.2% had abnormal sperm parameters. Oligozoospermia (34.8% and asthenozoospermia (26.9% are leading single factor abnormality found, astheno-oligozoospermia occurred in 14.2% and oligo-astheno-teratozoospermia in 3.6% of cases. The prevalence of azoospermia was 3.4%. Smoking habit, past infection with mumps and previous groin surgery significantly predicted abnormal semen parameters with p values of 0.025, 0.040 and 0.017 respectively. Positive cultures were recorded in 36.2% of cases and staph aureus was the commonest organism. Conclusion: Male factor abnormalities remain significant contributors to infertility and men should be encouraged through advocacy to participate in investigation of infertility to reduce the level of stigmatization and ostracizing of women with infertility especially in sub-Saharan Africa.

  9. Evolutionary game theory and social learning can determine how vaccine scares unfold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauch, Chris T; Bhattacharyya, Samit

    2012-01-01

    Immunization programs have often been impeded by vaccine scares, as evidenced by the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) autism vaccine scare in Britain. A "free rider" effect may be partly responsible: vaccine-generated herd immunity can reduce disease incidence to such low levels that real or imagined vaccine risks appear large in comparison, causing individuals to cease vaccinating. This implies a feedback loop between disease prevalence and strategic individual vaccinating behavior. Here, we analyze a model based on evolutionary game theory that captures this feedback in the context of vaccine scares, and that also includes social learning. Vaccine risk perception evolves over time according to an exogenously imposed curve. We test the model against vaccine coverage data and disease incidence data from two vaccine scares in England & Wales: the whole cell pertussis vaccine scare and the MMR vaccine scare. The model fits vaccine coverage data from both vaccine scares relatively well. Moreover, the model can explain the vaccine coverage data more parsimoniously than most competing models without social learning and/or feedback (hence, adding social learning and feedback to a vaccine scare model improves model fit with little or no parsimony penalty). Under some circumstances, the model can predict future vaccine coverage and disease incidence--up to 10 years in advance in the case of pertussis--including specific qualitative features of the dynamics, such as future incidence peaks and undulations in vaccine coverage due to the population's response to changing disease incidence. Vaccine scares could become more common as eradication goals are approached for more vaccine-preventable diseases. Such models could help us predict how vaccine scares might unfold and assist mitigation efforts.

  10. Challenges in conducting post-authorisation safety studies (PASS): A vaccine manufacturer's view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohet, Catherine; Rosillon, Dominique; Willame, Corinne; Haguinet, Francois; Marenne, Marie-Noëlle; Fontaine, Sandrine; Buyse, Hubert; Bauchau, Vincent; Baril, Laurence

    2017-05-25

    Post-authorisation safety studies (PASS) of vaccines assess or quantify the risk of adverse events following immunisation that were not identified or could not be estimated pre-licensure. The aim of this perspective paper is to describe the authors' experience in the design and conduct of twelve PASS that contributed to the evaluation of the benefit-risk of vaccines in real-world settings. We describe challenges and learnings from selected PASS of rotavirus, malaria, influenza, human papillomavirus and measles-mumps-rubella-varicella vaccines that assessed or identified potential or theoretical risks, which may lead to changes to risk management plans and/or to label updates. Study settings include the use of large healthcare databases and de novo data collection. PASS methodology is influenced by the background incidence of the outcome of interest, vaccine uptake, availability and quality of data sources, identification of the at-risk population and of suitable comparators, availability of validated case definitions, and the frequent need for case ascertainment in large databases. Challenges include the requirement for valid exposure and outcome data, identification of, and access to, adequate data sources, and mitigating limitations including bias and confounding. Assessing feasibility is becoming a key step to confirm that study objectives can be met in a timely manner. PASS provide critical information for regulators, public health agencies, vaccine manufacturers and ultimately, individuals. Collaborative approaches and synergistic efforts between vaccine manufacturers and key stakeholders, such as regulatory and public health agencies, are needed to facilitate access to data, and to drive optimal study design and implementation, with the aim of generating robust evidence. Copyright © 2017 GSK Biologicals SA. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnostic accuracy of two multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for the diagnosis of meningitis in children in a resource-limited setting.

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    Jermaine Khumalo

    Full Text Available Accurate etiological diagnosis of meningitis is important, but difficult in resource-limited settings due to prior administration of antibiotics and lack of viral diagnostics. We aimed to develop and validate 2 real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR assays for the detection of common causes of community-acquired bacterial and viral meningitis in South African children.We developed 2 multiplex RT- PCRs for detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, H. influenzae, enteroviruses, mumps virus and herpes simplex virus. We tested residual CSF samples from children presenting to a local paediatric hospital over a one-year period, whose CSF showed an abnormal cell count. Results were compared with routine diagnostic tests and the final discharge diagnosis. We calculated accuracy of the bacterial RT-PCR assay compared to CSF culture and using World Health Organisation definitions of laboratory-confirmed bacterial meningitis.From 292 samples, bacterial DNA was detected in 12 (4.1% and viral nucleic acids in 94 (32%. Compared to CSF culture, the sensitivity and specificity of the bacterial RT-PCR was 100% and 97.2% with complete agreement in organism identification. None of the cases positive by viral RT-PCR had a bacterial cause confirmed on CSF culture. Only 9/90 (10% of patients diagnosed clinically as bacterial meningitis or partially treated bacterial meningitis tested positive with the bacterial RT-PCR.In this population the use of 2 multiplex RT-PCRs targeting 6 common pathogens gave promising results. If introduced into routine diagnostic testing, these multiplex RT-PCR assays would supplement other diagnostic tests, and have the potential to limit unnecessary antibiotic therapy and hospitalisation.

  12. 3D streamers simulation in a pin to plane configuration using massively parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, J.-M.; Eichwald, O.; Ducasse, O.; Dessante, P.; Jacobs, C.; Renon, N.; Yousfi, M.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns the 3D simulation of corona discharge using high performance computing (HPC) managed with the message passing interface (MPI) library. In the field of finite volume methods applied on non-adaptive mesh grids and in the case of a specific 3D dynamic benchmark test devoted to streamer studies, the great efficiency of the iterative R&B SOR and BiCGSTAB methods versus the direct MUMPS method was clearly demonstrated in solving the Poisson equation using HPC resources. The optimization of the parallelization and the resulting scalability was undertaken as a function of the HPC architecture for a number of mesh cells ranging from 8 to 512 million and a number of cores ranging from 20 to 1600. The R&B SOR method remains at least about four times faster than the BiCGSTAB method and requires significantly less memory for all tested situations. The R&B SOR method was then implemented in a 3D MPI parallelized code that solves the classical first order model of an atmospheric pressure corona discharge in air. The 3D code capabilities were tested by following the development of one, two and four coplanar streamers generated by initial plasma spots for 6 ns. The preliminary results obtained allowed us to follow in detail the formation of the tree structure of a corona discharge and the effects of the mutual interactions between the streamers in terms of streamer velocity, trajectory and diameter. The computing time for 64 million of mesh cells distributed over 1000 cores using the MPI procedures is about 30 min ns-1, regardless of the number of streamers.

  13. Computational cost of isogeometric multi-frontal solvers on parallel distributed memory machines

    KAUST Repository

    Woźniak, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    This paper derives theoretical estimates of the computational cost for isogeometric multi-frontal direct solver executed on parallel distributed memory machines. We show theoretically that for the Cp-1 global continuity of the isogeometric solution, both the computational cost and the communication cost of a direct solver are of order O(log(N)p2) for the one dimensional (1D) case, O(Np2) for the two dimensional (2D) case, and O(N4/3p2) for the three dimensional (3D) case, where N is the number of degrees of freedom and p is the polynomial order of the B-spline basis functions. The theoretical estimates are verified by numerical experiments performed with three parallel multi-frontal direct solvers: MUMPS, PaStiX and SuperLU, available through PETIGA toolkit built on top of PETSc. Numerical results confirm these theoretical estimates both in terms of p and N. For a given problem size, the strong efficiency rapidly decreases as the number of processors increases, becoming about 20% for 256 processors for a 3D example with 1283 unknowns and linear B-splines with C0 global continuity, and 15% for a 3D example with 643 unknowns and quartic B-splines with C3 global continuity. At the same time, one cannot arbitrarily increase the problem size, since the memory required by higher order continuity spaces is large, quickly consuming all the available memory resources even in the parallel distributed memory version. Numerical results also suggest that the use of distributed parallel machines is highly beneficial when solving higher order continuity spaces, although the number of processors that one can efficiently employ is somehow limited.

  14. Safety of vaccines used for routine immunization of U.S. children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Margaret A; Das, Lopamudra; Raaen, Laura; Smith, Alexandria; Chari, Ramya; Newberry, Sydne; Shanman, Roberta; Perry, Tanja; Goetz, Matthew Bidwell; Gidengil, Courtney

    2014-08-01

    Concerns about vaccine safety have led some parents to decline recommended vaccination of their children, leading to the resurgence of diseases. Reassurance of vaccine safety remains critical for population health. This study systematically reviewed the literature on the safety of routine vaccines recommended for children in the United States. Data sources included PubMed, Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices statements, package inserts, existing reviews, manufacturer information packets, and the 2011 Institute of Medicine consensus report on vaccine safety. We augmented the Institute of Medicine report with more recent studies and increased the scope to include more vaccines. Only studies that used active surveillance and had a control mechanism were included. Formulations not used in the United States were excluded. Adverse events and patient and vaccine characteristics were abstracted. Adverse event collection and reporting was evaluated by using the McHarm scale. We were unable to pool results. Strength of evidence was rated as high, moderate, low, or insufficient. Of 20 478 titles identified, 67 were included. Strength of evidence was high for measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine and febrile seizures; the varicella vaccine was associated with complications in immunodeficient individuals. There is strong evidence that MMR vaccine is not associated with autism. There is moderate evidence that rotavirus vaccines are associated with intussusception. Limitations of the study include that the majority of studies did not investigate or identify risk factors for AEs; and the severity of AEs was inconsistently reported. We found evidence that some vaccines are associated with serious AEs; however, these events are extremely rare and must be weighed against the protective benefits that vaccines provide. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Association between perfluoroalkyl substance exposure and asthma and allergic disease in children as modified by MMR vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Jensen, Tina Kold; Osuna, Christa Elyse; Petersen, Maria Skaalum; Steuerwald, Ulrike; Nielsen, Flemming; Poulsen, Lars K; Weihe, Pál; Grandjean, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are highly persistent chemicals that might be associated with asthma and allergy, but the associations remain unclear. Therefore, this study examined whether pre- and postnatal PFAS exposure was associated with childhood asthma and allergy. Measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination in early life may have a protective effect against asthma and allergy, and MMR vaccination is therefore taken into account when evaluating these associations. In a cohort of Faroese children whose mothers were recruited during pregnancy, serum concentrations of five PFASs - Perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorodecanoic acid (PFDA) - were measured at three timepoints (maternal serum in pregnancy week 34-36 and child serum at ages 5 and 13 years) and their association with immunoglobulin E (IgE) (cord blood and at age 7 years) and asthma/allergic diseases (questionnaires at ages 5 and 13 years and skin prick test at age 13 years) was determined. A total of 559 children were included in the analyses. Interactions with MMR vaccination were evaluated. Among 22 MMR-unvaccinated children, higher levels of the five PFASs at age 5 years were associated with increased odds of asthma at ages 5 and 13. The associations were reversed among MMR-vaccinated children. Prenatal PFAS exposure was not associated with childhood asthma or allergic diseases regardless of MMR vaccination status. In conclusion, PFAS exposure at age 5 was associated with increased risk of asthma among a small subgroup of MMR-unvaccinated children but not among MMR-vaccinated children. While PFAS exposure may impact immune system functions, this study suggests that MMR vaccination might be a potential effect-modifier.

  16. Use of Fixed Effects Models to Analyze Self-Controlled Case Series Data in Vaccine Safety Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Stanley; Zeng, Chan; Newcomer, Sophia; Nelson, Jennifer; Glanz, Jason

    2012-04-19

    Conditional Poisson models have been used to analyze vaccine safety data from self-controlled case series (SCCS) design. In this paper, we derived the likelihood function of fixed effects models in analyzing SCCS data and showed that the likelihoods from fixed effects models and conditional Poisson models were proportional. Thus, the maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) of time-varying variables including vaccination effect from fixed effects model and conditional Poisson model were equal. We performed a simulation study to compare empirical type I errors, means and standard errors of vaccination effect coefficient, and empirical powers among conditional Poisson models, fixed effects models, and generalized estimating equations (GEE), which has been commonly used for analyzing longitudinal data. Simulation study showed that both fixed effect models and conditional Poisson models generated the same estimates and standard errors for time-varying variables while GEE approach produced different results for some data sets. We also analyzed SCCS data from a vaccine safety study examining the association between measles mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccination and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In analyzing MMR-ITP data, likelihood-based statistical tests were employed to test the impact of time-invariant variable on vaccination effect. In addition a complex semi-parametric model was fitted by simply treating unique event days as indicator variables in the fixed effects model. We conclude that theoretically fixed effects models provide identical MLEs as conditional Poisson models. Because fixed effect models are likelihood based, they have potentials to address methodological issues in vaccine safety studies such as how to identify optimal risk window and how to analyze SCCS data with misclassification of adverse events.

  17. Vaccination Confidence and Parental Refusal/Delay of Early Childhood Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa B Gilkey

    Full Text Available To support efforts to address parental hesitancy towards early childhood vaccination, we sought to validate the Vaccination Confidence Scale using data from a large, population-based sample of U.S. parents.We used weighted data from 9,354 parents who completed the 2011 National Immunization Survey. Parents reported on the immunization history of a 19- to 35-month-old child in their households. Healthcare providers then verified children's vaccination status for vaccines including measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR, varicella, and seasonal flu. We used separate multivariable logistic regression models to assess associations between parents' mean scores on the 8-item Vaccination Confidence Scale and vaccine refusal, vaccine delay, and vaccination status.A substantial minority of parents reported a history of vaccine refusal (15% or delay (27%. Vaccination confidence was negatively associated with refusal of any vaccine (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.63 as well as refusal of MMR, varicella, and flu vaccines specifically. Negative associations between vaccination confidence and measures of vaccine delay were more moderate, including delay of any vaccine (OR = 0.81, 95% CI, 0.76-0.86. Vaccination confidence was positively associated with having received vaccines, including MMR (OR = 1.53, 95% CI, 1.40-1.68, varicella (OR = 1.54, 95% CI, 1.42-1.66, and flu vaccines (OR = 1.32, 95% CI, 1.23-1.42.Vaccination confidence was consistently associated with early childhood vaccination behavior across multiple vaccine types. Our findings support expanding the application of the Vaccination Confidence Scale to measure vaccination beliefs among parents of young children.

  18. Safety of Combination of a Tetravalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Against Serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 With Other Vaccine Preparations: a Prospective Study of a Series of Cases Among Healthy Children and Children With Various Health Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal infection is an acute disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which proceeds with a diverse clinical aspect from nasopharyngitis to meningococcal meningitis and meningococcemia. Since 2014, a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine has been registered in Russia. This vaccine creates protection against serogroups A, C, W-135, Y and can be used from the age of nine months to 55 years. The actual issue is a vaccine tolerability, including when combined with other vaccine preparations.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the safety of a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y and W-135 when it is combined with other vaccine preparations.Methods. A prospective full-design study assessed the tolerability of immunization with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with a pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine, measles-mumps-rubella, viral hepatitis A, influenza, and chicken pox vaccines.Results. 97 children aged from 9 months to 18 years were vaccinated, 20 of them were healthy and 77 had medical issues (with allergic pathology, ENT diseases, cardiovascular and nervous system diseases, lung diseases as well as orphan diseases. Among vaccinated children, general reactions were observed in 3/97 (3.1% children, local reactions — in 5 (5.2%. The post-vaccination period passed asymptomatically and uneventfully in the prevailing majority of children vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (in 91, 93.8%.Conclusion. The immunization with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 is well tolerated, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with other vaccine preparations, in healthy children of different age groups and in patients with different health status.

  19. Critical dynamics in population vaccinating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pananos, A Demetri; Bury, Thomas M; Wang, Clara; Schonfeld, Justin; Mohanty, Sharada P; Nyhan, Brendan; Salathé, Marcel; Bauch, Chris T

    2017-12-26

    Vaccine refusal can lead to renewed outbreaks of previously eliminated diseases and even delay global eradication. Vaccinating decisions exemplify a complex, coupled system where vaccinating behavior and disease dynamics influence one another. Such systems often exhibit critical phenomena-special dynamics close to a tipping point leading to a new dynamical regime. For instance, critical slowing down (declining rate of recovery from small perturbations) may emerge as a tipping point is approached. Here, we collected and geocoded tweets about measles-mumps-rubella vaccine and classified their sentiment using machine-learning algorithms. We also extracted data on measles-related Google searches. We find critical slowing down in the data at the level of California and the United States in the years before and after the 2014-2015 Disneyland, California measles outbreak. Critical slowing down starts growing appreciably several years before the Disneyland outbreak as vaccine uptake declines and the population approaches the tipping point. However, due to the adaptive nature of coupled behavior-disease systems, the population responds to the outbreak by moving away from the tipping point, causing "critical speeding up" whereby resilience to perturbations increases. A mathematical model of measles transmission and vaccine sentiment predicts the same qualitative patterns in the neighborhood of a tipping point to greatly reduced vaccine uptake and large epidemics. These results support the hypothesis that population vaccinating behavior near the disease elimination threshold is a critical phenomenon. Developing new analytical tools to detect these patterns in digital social data might help us identify populations at heightened risk of widespread vaccine refusal. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  20. Evaluation of the Vestibular System and Etiology in Children with Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdane, Leman; İncesulu, Armağan; Özüdoğru, Erkan; Cingi, Cemal; Caklı, Hamdi; Gürbüz, Melek Kezban; Adapınar, Baki

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the vestibular system of children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL), investigate the etiological factors of USNHL and analyze whether a genetic predisposition exists. Thirty-three children aged less than 18 years with USNHL, who visited the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) department between January 2004 and December 2012, were included in this study. Cases with conductive hearing loss were excluded from the study. The patients were subjected to etiologic, genetic, and ophthalmologic evaluation; radiologic imaging; electronystagmography (ENG); and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) tests. The control group, which included 25 healthy children (13 males and 12 females), had undergone audiological assessment and were subjected to ENG and VEMP tests. All of the patients had severe-to-profound hearing loss. Mumps immunoglobulin G was positive in 22 (66.7%) of 33 patients. The 35delG mutation was not found in any of the patients. All of the patients underwent temporal computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Inner ear anomaly was present in 51.5% of the patients. Overall, 21 of 31 ENG patients had canal paresis in the affected ear. The VEMP response was absent on the affected side in three patients. The n23 latency average of the patient group was longer than that of the control group. Because USNHL causes irreversible problems in children, early diagnosis and auditory rehabilitation are very important. As USNHL is accompanied by inner ear anomaly, children with USNHL should undergo temporal bone CT and MRI. To evaluate the vestibular system, ENG and VEMP are non-invasive and diagnostic tests.

  1. Vaccinations in early life are not associated with development of islet autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes high-risk children: Results from prospective cohort data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerlein, Andreas; Strobl, Andreas N; Winkler, Christiane; Carpus, Michaela; Knopff, Annette; Donnachie, Ewan; Ankerst, Donna P; Ziegler, Anette-G

    2017-03-27

    Vaccinations in early childhood potentially stimulate the immune system and may thus be relevant for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). We determined the association of vaccination burden with T1D-associated islet autoimmunity in children with high familial risk followed prospectively from birth. A total of 20,570 certified vaccination records from 1918 children were correlated with time to onset of T1D-associated islet autoimmunity using Cox regression, considering multiple time periods up until age two years and vaccination types, and adjusting for HLA genotype, sex, delivery mode, season of birth, preterm delivery and maternal T1D status. Additionally, prospective claims data of 295,420 subjects were used to validate associations for the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination. Most vaccinations were not associated with a significantly increased hazard ratio (HR) for islet autoimmunity (e.g. HR [95% confidence interval]: 1.08 [0.96-1.21] per additional vaccination against measles, mumps and rubella at age 0-24months). TBE vaccinations within the first two years of life were nominally associated with a significantly increased autoimmunity risk (HR: 1.44 [1.06-1.96] per additional vaccination at age 0-24months), but this could not be confirmed with respect to outcome T1D in the validation cohort (HR: 1.02 [0.90-1.16]). We found no evidence that early vaccinations increase the risk of T1D-associated islet autoimmunity development. The potential association with early TBE vaccinations could not be confirmed in an independent cohort and appears to be a false positive finding. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Vaccinations among students in health care professions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lindeman, Katharina; Kugler, Joachim; Klewer, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Incomplete vaccinations among students in health care professions lead to an increased risk for infections. Until now, only few studies related to this issue do exist. Therefore vaccinations and awareness regarding the importance of vaccinations among students in health care professions should be investigated. All 433 students of a regional college for health care professionals were asked to complete a standardized and anonymous questionnaire. Altogether 301 nursing students and 131 students of the other health care professions participated. About 66.1 percent of nursing students and 50.4 percent of students of other health care professions rated vaccination as "absolutely necessary". Different percentages of completed vaccinations were reported for tetanus (79.1 percent versus 64.4 percent), hepatitis B (78.7 percent versus 77.5 percent) and hepatitis A (74.1 percent versus 68.5 percent). 6.3 percent versus 15.4 percent did not know if they were vaccinated against tetanus, hepatitis B (5.3 percent versus 7.7 percent) and hepatitis A (5.6 percent versus 9.2 percent). While approximately half of the students reported "primary vaccination and booster" against mumps (59.5 percent versus 53.5 percent), measles (58.8 percent versus 54.6 percent) and rubella (58.3 percent versus 55.4 percent), this was reported less for pertussis (43.8 percent versus 39.8 percent) and varicella (32.4 percent versus 25.2 percent). The results indicate inadequate vaccination status in the investigated students. In addition, a gap between the awareness of the importance of vaccinations and personal preventive behavior became obvious. Therefore, education of these future health professionals still requires issues related to vaccinations.

  3. An approach to computing discrete adjoints for MPI-parallelized models applied to Ice Sheet System Model 4.11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Larour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of sea-level rise projections, there is a strong need for hindcast validation of the evolution of polar ice sheets in a way that tightly matches observational records (from radar, gravity, and altimetry observations mainly. However, the computational requirements for making hindcast reconstructions possible are severe and rely mainly on the evaluation of the adjoint state of transient ice-flow models. Here, we look at the computation of adjoints in the context of the NASA/JPL/UCI Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM, written in C++ and designed for parallel execution with MPI. We present the adaptations required in the way the software is designed and written, but also generic adaptations in the tools facilitating the adjoint computations. We concentrate on the use of operator overloading coupled with the AdjoinableMPI library to achieve the adjoint computation of the ISSM. We present a comprehensive approach to (1 carry out type changing through the ISSM, hence facilitating operator overloading, (2 bind to external solvers such as MUMPS and GSL-LU, and (3 handle MPI-based parallelism to scale the capability. We demonstrate the success of the approach by computing sensitivities of hindcast metrics such as the misfit to observed records of surface altimetry on the northeastern Greenland Ice Stream, or the misfit to observed records of surface velocities on Upernavik Glacier, central West Greenland. We also provide metrics for the scalability of the approach, and the expected performance. This approach has the potential to enable a new generation of hindcast-validated projections that make full use of the wealth of datasets currently being collected, or already collected, in Greenland and Antarctica.

  4. Survival analysis for predictive factors of delay vaccination in Iranian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today, beside immunization coverage the age appropriate vaccination is another helpful index in public health. Evidences have shown that high immunization coverage rates do not necessarily imply age-appropriate vaccination status. The current study aimed to show the predictive factors of delayed vaccination by survival models. Methods: A historical cohort study conducted on 3610 children aged between 24 and 47 months who was living in the suburbs of five big cities of Iran. Time of delay in vaccination of first dose of mumps-measles-rubella (MMR was calculated from date of vaccination minus age appropriate time according to vaccine card. Kaplan-Maier and Log rank tests were used for comparison the median of delay time. For controlling of confounding variables, multivariate cox model was used and hazard ratio with 95% confidence interval (95% was reported. Results: The mean ± standard deviation and median interquartile range of delay time was 38.34 ± 73.1 and 16 (11-31 days in delayed group. The Log rank test showed that city of living, nationality, parents′ education, and birth order are related with prolonged delay time in MMR vaccination (P 0.05. Cox regression showed that city of living, mother education, and nationality are the most predictive factors of delay time duration in MMR vaccination. Conclusions: Delay time duration of vaccination increased by faring from capital to the east south. Moreover, concentration of foreign immigrants in big cities and low level of mother education are the most predictors of delayed vaccination. Educational intervention should focus on immigrants and mothers with low education level.

  5. [Surveillance Plan on Recent Outbreak of Measles and Rubella in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jané, Mireia; Torner, Nuria; Vidal, Ma José

    2015-01-01

    Measles and rubella are two immuno-preventive illnesses. In Catalonia, since 1988 all children are given two doses of measles and rubella vaccine with high levels of vaccination coverage. The measles elimination programme has been carried out since 1990 in Catalonia. This programme includes achieving and keeping high immunization levels among population with high vaccination coverage, intense epidemiological surveillance and an immediate response to the appearance of a case or outbreak. In 2014, the measles incidence rate was 1.9 cases/ 100,000 inhabitants. There w