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Sample records for multiple-dose antibiotic prophylaxis

  1. Ceftriaxone (single dose) versus cefoxitin (multiple doses): success and failure of antibiotic prophylaxis in 1052 cesarean sections.

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    von Mandach, U; Huch, R; Malinverni, R; Huch, A

    1993-01-01

    The efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cesarean section with a single dose of ceftriaxone, a long-acting cephalosporin not widely used for prophylaxis, was tested. Ceftriaxone as a single dose of 1 g i.v. versus three doses of cefoxitin 1 g i.v. respectively were used in a prospective, randomized, controlled study consisting of 1052 patients undergoing cesarean section. Postoperative infection rate as measured by fever, endometritis and wound infection was 6.5% with ceftriaxone and 6.4% with cefoxitin. Urinary tract infections were significantly more frequent in the cefoxitin than in the ceftriaxone group (17.8% vs. 9.7%, p < 0.001). Enterococci and Escherichia coli accounted for urinary tract infections 1.86-, respectively, 4.3-fold more frequently with cefoxitin than with ceftriaxone. The time of hospitalization in patients with urinary tract infections was significantly lower with ceftriaxone than with cefoxitin (11 vs. 12 days, p < 0.05). The tolerance in both groups was equally satisfactory. A single dose of ceftriaxone, which is simple, reliable (compliance), well tolerated, inexpensive (fewer urinary tract infections and therefore fewer treatment costs than with cefoxitin) and safe (no overgrowth of pathogens) in our opinion is the antibiotic regimen of choice for prophylaxis in cesarean section in the described circumstances.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

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    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics.

  3. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON ESTOMATOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Responsable de la cátedra de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Víctor; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Varas Hilario, Roberto; Catedrático de Farmacología de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Guerra Sanguinetti, Jaime; Cirujano Dentista de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; López Bellido, Roger; Bachiller de la Facultad de Odontología UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Juan; Interno de la Facultad de OdontoIogia UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis consists in the use of an antimicrobial drug in a preventive way, that must be active against microorganisms that in high frequency causes posterior infections of our surgical wounds and maintain effective tissue concentrations along the surgery procedure and the posterior time when appears the bacteremia. To reach a successful treatment is necessary to have the knowledge of the resident bactemial flora and the pathogenous flora that infects our surgical wounds...

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis for abdominal hysterectomy.

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    Mele, G; Loizzi, P; Greco, P; Gargano, G; Varcaccio Garofalo, G; Belsanti, A

    1988-01-01

    Three different regimens of antibiotic treatment have been employed in order to evaluate their efficacy as a profilaxis for abdominal hysterectomy. Two short term administrations (Cephtriaxone and Cephamandole plus Tobramycine) and a conventional full dose treatment (Cephazoline) have been compared over a group of homogeneous patients. No significant differences, except a reduction in postoperative time spent in hospital, have been found among the groups. A reduction in urinary tract infection has also been reported with a single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis.

  5. Single-dose versus multiple-dose ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole prophylaxis in transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Zhoobin Heidari Bateni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate and compare the infectious and non-infectious complications of single-dose versus multiple-dose antibiotic therapy for trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS-guided biopsy of the prostate. Patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized study that was designed to investigate the effects of single-dose versus multiple-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis regimen mainly on asymptomatic bacteriuria, urinary tract infection (UTI without fever, fever and urinary septicemia. The single-dose group received one ciprofloxacin 500 mg tablet and two metronidazole 250 mg tablets at 2 hours before the biopsy, while the multiple-doses group received those every 12 hours from 3 days before the biopsy. One-hundred and sixty patients were evaluated in two groups and bacteriuria in urinalysis was encountered in 12 patients (15% in the single-dose group and four patients (5% in the multiple-dose group, with a significant difference (P=0.035. UTI without fever occurred in six patients (7.5% in the single-dose group and one patient (1.25% in the multiple-dose group, with no significant difference (borderline P=0.053. After biopsy, three patients (3.75% returned with fever due to UTI and bacteremia in the single-dose group and none in the multiple-dose group, but with no significant difference (P=0.08. Regarding non-infectious complications, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Using prophylactic antibiotics for prostate biopsy in multiple doses, and at least 3 days before the procedure significantly reduces the rate of bacteriuria compared with a single-dose regimen.

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

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    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  7. [Antibiotic prophylaxis with cephalosporins in heart surgery].

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    Reichart, B; Klinner, W; Adam, D

    1981-08-13

    60 minutes after i.v. injection tissue levels of 7 different cephalosporins were obtained using biological assay. The following concentrations were measured: cephalothn 1.4 micrograms/g; cepharin 4.7 micrograms/g; cephacetrile 11.2 micrograms/g; cephradine 15.4 micrograms/g; cefazedone 26.9 micrograms/g; cefamandole 40.3 micrograms/g, and finally cefoxitin 43 micrograms/g. The high tissue levels of cefamandole and cefoxitin are especially remarkable as i.v. doses of both antibiotics had been 50 mg/kg body weight ( doses of all other cephalosporins 100 mg/kg body weight). Except cephalothin, all cephalosporins tested were suitable for antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery.

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis in third molar surgery: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Controversy exists about the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing complications after lower third molar surgery. For evidence-based recommendation, a review was performed on clinical trials reporting the use of antibiotic prophylaxis compared with no treatment or placebo with "

  9. Prescribing antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E.M. Oomens; C.R.A. Verlinden; Y. Goey; T. Forouzanfar

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery to prevent infections. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis was performed to make evidence-based recommendations. A search of Embase, Ovid Medline, a

  10. Use of topical antibiotics as prophylaxis in clean dermatologic procedures.

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    Levender, Michelle M; Davis, Scott A; Kwatra, Shawn G; Williford, Phillip M; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-03-01

    Topical antibiotics are not indicated for routine postoperative care in clean dermatologic procedures, but may be widely used. We sought to describe topical antibiotic use in clean dermatologic surgical procedures in the United States. The 1993 to 2007 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database was queried for visits in which clean dermatologic surgery was performed. We analyzed provider specialty, use of topical antibiotics, and associated diagnoses. Use of topical antibiotic over time was analyzed by linear regression. An estimated 212 million clean dermatologic procedures were performed between 1993 and 2007; topical antibiotics were reported in approximately 10.6 million (5.0%) procedures. Dermatologists were responsible for 63.3% of dermatologic surgery procedures and reported use of topical antibiotic prophylaxis in 8.0 million (6.0%). Dermatologists were more likely to use topical antibiotic prophylaxis than nondermatologists (6.0% vs 3.5%). Use of topical antibiotic prophylaxis decreased over time. Data were limited to outpatient procedures. The assumption was made that when topical antibiotics were documented at procedure visits they were being used as prophylaxis. Topical antibiotics continue to be used as prophylaxis in clean dermatologic procedures, despite being ineffective for this purpose and posing a risk to patients. Although topical antibiotic use is decreasing, prophylactic use should be eliminated. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the appropriate perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in Italy.

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    Francesco Napolitano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The appropriate use of antibiotics prophylaxis in the prevention and reduction in the incidence of surgical site infection is widespread. This study evaluates the appropriateness of the prescription of antibiotics prophylaxis prior to surgery amongst hospitalized patients in the geographic area of Avellino, Caserta, and Naples (Italy and the factors associated with a poor adherence. METHODS: A sample of 382 patients admitted to 23 surgical wards and undergoing surgery in five hospitals were randomly selected. RESULTS: Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was appropriate in 18.1% of cases. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with hypoalbuminemia, with a clinical infection, with a wound clean were more likely to receive an appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis. Compared with patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA score ≥4, those with a score of 2 were correlated with a 64% reduction in the odds of having an appropriate prophylaxis. The appropriateness of the timing of prophylactic antibiotic administration was observed in 53.4% of the procedures. Multivariate logistic regression model showed that such appropriateness was more frequent in older patients, in those admitted in general surgery wards, in those not having been underwent an endoscopic surgery, in those with a higher length of surgery, and in patients with ASA score 1 when a score ≥4 was chosen as the reference category. The most common antibiotics used inappropriately were ceftazidime, sultamicillin, levofloxacin, and teicoplanin. CONCLUSIONS: Educational interventions are needed to improve perioperative appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis.

  12. Adherence to guidelines for surgical antibiotic prophylaxis: a review

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    Marise Gouvêa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTCONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES: The appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in the perioperative period may reduce the rate of infection in the surgical site. The purpose of this review was to evaluate adherence to guidelines for surgical antibiotic prophylaxis.METHODS:The present systematic review was performed according to the Cochrane Collaboration methodology. The databases selected for this review were: Medline (via PubMed, Scopus and Portal (BVS with selection of articles published in the 2004-2014 period from the Lilacs and Cochrane databases.RESULTS:The search recovered 859 articles at the databases, with a total of 18 studies selected for synthesis. The outcomes of interest analyzed in the articles were as follows: appropriate indication of antibiotic prophylaxis (ranging from 70.3% to 95%, inappropriate indication (ranging from 2.3% to 100%, administration of antibiotic at the correct time (ranging from 12.73% to 100%, correct antibiotic choice (ranging from 22% to 95%, adequate discontinuation of antibiotic (ranging from 5.8% to 91.4%, and adequate antibiotic prophylaxis (ranging from 0.3% to 84.5%.CONCLUSIONS:Significant variations were observed in all the outcomes assessed, and all the studies indicated a need for greater adherence to guidelines for surgical antibiotic prophylaxis.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dentoalveolar surgery: is it indicated?

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    Lawler, B; Sambrook, P J; Goss, A N

    2005-12-01

    Usually dentists in Australia give patients oral antibiotics after dentoalveolar surgery as a prophylaxis against wound infection. When this practice is compared to the principle of antibiotic prophylaxis in major surgery it is found to be at variance in a number of ways. In major surgery, the risk of infection should be high, and the consequences of infection severe or catastrophic, before antibiotic prophylaxis is ordered. If it is provided then a high dose of an appropriate spectrum antibiotic must be present in the blood prior to the first incision. Other factors which need to be considered are the degree of tissue trauma, the extent of host compromise, other medical comorbidities and length of hospitalization. Standardized protocols of administration have been determined and evaluated for most major surgical procedures. Dentoalveolar surgery is undoubtedly a skilled and technically challenging procedure. However, in contrast to major surgical procedures, it has a less than five per cent infection rate and rarely has severe adverse consequences. Dentoalveolar surgery should be of short duration with minimal tissue damage and performed in the dental chair under local anaesthesia. Controlled studies for both mandibular third molar surgery and placement of dental implants show little or no evidence of benefit from antibiotic prophylaxis and there is an adverse risk from the antibiotic. This review concludes that there is no case for antibiotic prophylaxis for most dentoalveolar surgery in fit patients. In the few cases where it can be considered, a single high preoperative dose should be given.

  14. Reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma: Literature review

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    Afshin Yadegari Naeeni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Despite advances in trauma management, treatment of the consequent infections has remained a major challenge. Antibiotic prophylaxis has been widely applied to reduce such infections. Although bacteria are present in most body parts, severe infections after treatment are less frequent in the head and neck of healthy individuals. The aim of the present study was to review the reasonable application of antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma. Materials and Methods: In this review article, PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched for studies on antibiotic prophylaxis in maxillofacial trauma published during 2000-2014. Conclusion: Antibiotics were not prescribed for tears and small clean wounds in the face and mouth. However, prophylaxis was applied for extensive mouth injuries which involved the facial skin. In case of maxillofacial fractures, 24-hour administration of antibiotics sufficed for compound fractures of the mandible and other parts of the face. Antibiotics were not required in other types of fractures. Prophylaxis should be applied over short pre- or post-operative periods based on the severity and complexity of maxillofacial fractures and their relations with intra- and extraoral environments. Apparently, more detailed studies are warranted to further clarify the subject.

  15. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis Necessary in Patients Undergoing Ureterolithotripsy?

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    Ali Pasha Meysamie

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral Ureterolithotripsy (TUL is a frequently used procedure in urology departments. Many urologists perform TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis; however the use of chemoprophylaxis before TUL remains a controversial issue in urology. Thisstudy was carried out to assess the safety of omitting antibiotic prophylaxis prior to TUL. In a prospective randomized clinical trial from January 2005 to December 2007, 114 patients with ureteral stones were enrolled; Fifty seven had preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis administered before TUL and fifty seven patients underwent TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis. The rate of postoperative infectious complications (fever, positive blood culture, significant bactriuria, the length of hospital stay and overall stone free rate were compared between the two groups. There was no statistically significant difference between two groups in the operation time, length of hospital stay, postoperative bacteriuria, positive urine culture, postoperative fever and overall success rate of TUL. It appears that the incidence of infectious complications does not increase in patients undergoing TUL without antibiotic prophylaxis if they have negative pre-operative urine culture and antiseptic technique have been performed thorough the procedure.

  16. Postoperative comparison of the results from use of antibiotic prophylaxis for one and five days among patients undergoing lumbar arthrodesis

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    Charbel Jacob Júnior

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To compare the postoperative results from use of antibiotic prophylaxis for one and five days among patients undergoing lumbar arthrodesis at up to three levels. METHODS: Forty-three patients who all underwent lumbar arthrodesis due to degenerative disc disease at one, two or three levels were evaluated. They were divided randomly into two groups: one received antibiotic prophylaxis with cefalotin (1 g and the other received the same antibiotic for five days. After the surgical intervention, the patients were evaluated at the time of hospital discharge, at the first return to the clinic (two weeks later and 90 days after the date of the surgery with the surgical wound, with clinical examination of the surgical wound and laboratory tests on both groups. RESULTS: It was observed that among the patients in the group with one day of antibiotic prophylaxis, 28.6% presented complications in the surgical wound, while in the group with five days, 27.9% presented complications. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that a single dose of antibiotic prophylaxis is as effective as a regimen of multiple doses in lumbar arthrodesis surgery at up to three levels. Thus, the costs and risks of subjecting patients to hospitalization under a prolonged drug regimen are unjustifiable.

  17. Prospective evaluation of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis before cystoscopy

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    Kamil Cam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to prospectively compare single-dose intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis vs. no prophylaxis before minor cystoscopic procedures, including punch biopsy and transurethral resection (TUR of small bladder tumors. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients with a mean age of 47.3 years old (range: 19-84 years old with initial negative urine cultures were recruited. All patients underwent a diagnostic cystoscopy. Patients were then randomized into 2 groups: o0 ne group that did not receive antibiotics (100 patients and the other group that received antibiotic treatment (100 patients with a single intravenous dose of cefoperazone. All patients had urine analysis and urine cultures on the second day after the operation. Additionally, clinical parameters including fever and dysuria were recorded. In 15% of the patients, incidental additional interventions such as punch biopsy or TUR of a small bladder tumor that were similarly distributed in both groups were performed. Results: In 1 patient from the antibiotic group and 2 patients from the no prophylaxis group, the urine cultures after cystoscopy were positive. No statistically significant difference was observed between these groups based on the microbiological and clinical parameters. Conclusion: The current study provides evidence that no antibiotic prophylaxis is required before diagnostic cystoscopy in patients without bacteriuria. But, the absolute risk of infection was small, suggesting that a much larger study is required.

  18. Choice of intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis for colorectal surgery does matter.

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    Deierhoi, Rhiannon J; Dawes, Lillian G; Vick, Catherine; Itani, Kamal M F; Hawn, Mary T

    2013-11-01

    The Surgical Care Improvement Program endorses mandatory compliance with approved intravenous prophylactic antibiotics; however, oral antibiotics are optional. We hypothesized that surgical site infection (SSI) rates may vary depending on the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis. A retrospective cohort study of elective colorectal procedures using Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) and SSI outcomes data was linked to the Office of Informatics and Analytics (OIA) and Pharmacy Benefits Management (PBM) antibiotic data from 2005 to 2009. Surgical site infection rates by type of IV antibiotic agent alone (IV) or in combination with oral antibiotic (IV + OA) were determined. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the association between type of antibiotic prophylaxis and SSI for the entire cohort and stratified by use of oral antibiotics. After 5,750 elective colorectal procedures, 709 SSIs (12.3%) developed within 30 days. Oral antibiotic + IV (n = 2,426) had a lower SSI rate than IV alone (n = 3,324) (6.3% vs 16.7%, p < 0.0001). There was a significant difference in the SSI rate based on type of preoperative IV antibiotic given (p ≤ 0.0001). Generalized estimating equations adjusting for significant covariates of age, body mass index, procedure work relative value units, and operation duration demonstrated an independent protective effect of oral antibiotics (odds ratio [OR] 0.37, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.46), as well as increased rates of SSI associated with ampicillin/sulbactam (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.37 to 3.56) and second generation cephalosporins (cefoxitin, OR 2.50, 95% CI 1.83 to 3.42; cefotetan, OR 2.70, 95% CI 1.72 to 4.22) when compared with first generation cephalosporin/metronidazole. The choice of IV antibiotic was related to the SSI rate; however, oral antibiotics were associated with reduced SSI rate for every antibiotic class. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis increases nasal carriage of antibiotic-resistant staphylococci.

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    McMurray, Claire L; Hardy, Katherine J; Verlander, Neville Q; Hawkey, Peter M

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococci are a significant cause of hospital-acquired infection. Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is an important risk factor for infection in surgical patients and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) are a major cause of prosthetic joint infections. The impact that antibiotic surgical prophylaxis has on the nasal carriage of staphylococci has not been studied. Daily nasal swabs were taken from 63 patients who received antibiotic surgical prophylaxis and 16 patients who received no antibiotics. Total aerobic bacterial count, S. aureus and CNS were enumerated by culture from nasal swabs. Representative isolates were typed by staphylococcal interspersed repeat units (SIRU) typing and PFGE, and MICs to nine antibiotics were determined. After antibiotic administration, there was a reduction in S. aureus counts (median - 2.3 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1)) in 64.0 % of S. aureus carriers, compared with only a 0.89 log(10)c.f.u. ml(- 1) reduction in 75.0 % of S. aureus carriers who did not receive antibiotics. A greater increase in the nasal carriage rate of meticillin-resistant CNS was observed after antibiotic surgical prophylaxis compared with hospitalization alone, with increases of 16.4 and 4.6 %, respectively. Antibiotic-resistant S. epidermidis carriage rate increased by 16.6 % after antibiotic administration compared with 7.5 % with hospitalization alone. Antibiotic surgical prophylaxis impacts the nasal carriage of both S. aureus and CNS.

  20. Indications of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental practice- review.

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    Ramu, C; Padmanabhan, T V

    2012-09-01

    Antibiotics are frequently used in dental practice. Clinical and bacteriological epidemiological factors determine the indications of antibiotics in dentistry. Antibiotics are used in addition to appropriate treatment to aid the host defences in the elimination of remaining bacteria. It is indicated when there is evidence of clinical sign involvement and spread of infection. Antibiotics are prescribed in dental practice for treating odontoge nic infections, non-odontogenic infections, as prophylaxis against focal and local infection. Special care needs to be addressed to patients with organ transplants, poorly controlled diabetes and pregnancy. Antibiotics should be used only as an adjunct to dental treatment and never alone as the first line of care. The present paper reviews the indications of antibiotics in dental practice.

  1. Indications of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental practice–Review

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    C Ramu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are frequently used in dental practice. Clinical and bacteriological epidemiological factors determine the indications of antibiotics in dentistry. Antibiotics are used in addition to appropriate treatment to aid the host defences in the elimination of remaining bacteria. It is indicated when there is evidence of clinical sign involvement and spread of infection. Antibiotics are prescribed in dental practice for treating odontoge nic infections, non-odontogenic infections, as prophylaxis against focal and local infection. Special care needs to be addressed to patients with organ transplants, poorly controlled diabetes and pregnancy. Antibiotics should be used only as an adjunct to dental treatment and never alone as the first line of care. The present paper reviews the indications of antibiotics in dental practice.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transurethral urological surgeries: Systematic review.

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    Alsaywid, Basim S; Smith, Grahame H H

    2013-04-01

    The use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection and bacteremia (sepsis) following endoscopic urologic procedures is a controversial topic. Evidence in the literature revealed that urological instrumentation is associated with increased incidence of urinary tract infection and bacteremia. The aim of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing the risk of urinary tract infection in patients who had transurethral urological surgeries. We have selected all RCTs of adult population who underwent all different types of transurethral urological surgery, including cystoscopy, transurethral resection of prostate and transurethral resection of bladder tumor, and received prophylactic antibiotics or placebo/no treatment. At first, more than 3000 references were identified and reviewed; of which 42 studies with a total of 7496 patients were included in the final analysis. All those trials were analyzing antibiotic prophylaxis versus placebo/no treatment, and they were significantly favoring antibiotic use in reducing all outcomes, including bacteriuria (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.46, P urinary tract infections and its sequels following transurethral urological surgeries in patients with preoperative sterile urine.

  3. Antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae: what impact on the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in colorectal surgery?

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    Kirby, A; Santoni, N

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis, introduced in the 1940s, brought in an era of relatively safe colorectal surgery. This was achieved in part due to the prevention of surgical site infections (SSIs) caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Since then, Enterobacteriaceae have become increasingly resistant to the antibiotics commonly used for prophylaxis. The impact of being colonized preoperatively with resistant Enterobacteriaceae on the efficacy of colorectal SSI prophylaxis, if any, is unknown. It is also difficult to predict the likely impact of resistance as the exposure‒response relationships have not been determined for antibiotic surgical prophylaxis. Neither is it known which test for resistance to use; the importance of the concentration of Enterobacteriaceae in the colon, the ability of different species of Enterobacteriaceae to cause SSIs, and the comparative ability of minimum inhibitory concentration or presence of a resistance mechanism in predicting SSI risk have yet to be established. Clinical research is urgently needed to answer these questions.

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis in infective endocarditis: Use or abuse?

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    Nisha Thakur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The American Heart Association (AHA recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis for infective endocarditis (IE are controversial. According to the new guidelines released by the AHA now, the only patients to receive antibiotics will be those at highest risk, i.e. those with a prosthetic heart valve, a history of endocarditis, certain forms of congenital heart disease or valvulopathy after heart transplantation, and only before certain dental procedures. Unfortunately, these guidelines are still based largely on expert opinion, with very little hard evidence to show that antibiotic therapy actually prevents IE. The Hypothesis: The reported incidence of bacteremia during dental intervention ranges from 10% to 100% and, with daily brushing and flossing, from 20% to 68%. Because bacteremia also occurs during brushing and flossing of teeth, why give prophylaxis just for dental procedures? Moreover, the risks of causing adverse or anaphylactic reactions from antibiotics as well as contributing to the nationwide antibiotic resistance problem are issues not to be taken lightly. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The hypothesis discusses the AHA recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis for IE, indicating some inherent limitations associated with it, and stresses upon the fact that these recommendation should also be updated, if not completely changed, to cope up with the advancements in the proper treatment plan.

  5. [Surgical site infections: antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery].

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    Asensio, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are very common, and represent more than 20% of all hospital-acquired infections. SSIs are associated with a higher mortality, as well as to an extended hospital stay and costs, depending on the surgical procedure and type of SSI. Advances in control practices for these infections include improvement in operating room ventilation, sterilization methods, barriers, and surgical techniques, as well as in surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis. For the latter, the antimicrobial agent should: be active against the most common pathogens, be administered in an appropriate dosage and in a time frame to ensure serum and tissue concentrations over the period of potential contamination, be safe, and be administered over the shortest effective time period to minimize adverse events, development of resistances, and cost. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transurethral urological surgeries: Systematic review

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    Basim S Alsaywid

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infection and bacteremia (sepsis following endoscopic urologic procedures is a controversial topic. Evidence in the literature revealed that urological instrumentation is associated with increased incidence of urinary tract infection and bacteremia. The aim of this review is to evaluate the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing the risk of urinary tract infection in patients who had transurethral urological surgeries. We have selected all RCTs of adult population who underwent all different types of transurethral urological surgery, including cystoscopy, transurethral resection of prostate and transurethral resection of bladder tumor, and received prophylactic antibiotics or placebo/no treatment. At first, more than 3000 references were identified and reviewed; of which 42 studies with a total of 7496 patients were included in the final analysis. All those trials were analyzing antibiotic prophylaxis versus placebo/no treatment, and they were significantly favoring antibiotic use in reducing all outcomes, including bacteriuria (RR 0.36, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.46, P < 0.0001 with moderate heterogeneity detected (I 2 48%, symptomatic UTI (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.51, P < 0.0001 with no significant heterogeneity was detected (I 2 = 17%, bacteremia (RR 0.43, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.82, P < 0.0001 with no noted heterogeneity (I 2 = 0%, and fever ≥38.5 Celsius (RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.73, P = 0.003; also, there was no noted heterogeneity (I 2 = 0%. However, using antibiotic prophylaxis did not reduce the incidence of low grade temperature (RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.61 to 1.11, P = 0.20 or in moderate grade temperature (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.48, P = 0.89. Antibiotic prophylaxis appears to be an effective intervention in preventing urinary tract infections and its sequels following transurethral urological surgeries in patients with preoperative sterile urine.

  7. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part I: abdominal surgery

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    Sergio Luis González López

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  8. [Optimization of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Minor Gynecologic Operations].

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    Selikhova, M S; Vdovin, S V; Mikhailovskaya, M V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the efficacy of various variants of antibiotic prophylaxis of infectious complications in female patients after histeroscopy. 109 patients were examined. The patients were hospitalized for planned historoscopy. 55 of them were treated prophylactically to prevent infectious complications with a broad spectrum antibiotic administered intravenously 30 min prior to the operation. A course antimicrobial therapy during the postoperative period was applied to 54 females. The results of the trial showed that single administration of an antimicrobial provided high level prevention of infectious complications, whereas the use of course antimicrobial therapy during the postoperative period was of no advantage by the efficacy.

  9. Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Periprosthetic Joint Infection (PJI: literature Review and World Consensus (Part Seven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Parvizi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context There is a need to find if patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or autoimmune disease require different perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis. There is also a need to determine if antibiotic prophylaxis should be different for primary cases, revision cases, hip arthroplasty and knee arthroplasty. The best antibiotic prophylaxis to choose in patients with colonization by carbapenem resistant enterobacteriaceae or multi-drug resistant (MDR-Acinetobacter spp needs to be determined. Evidence Acquisition Delegates in workgroup 3 of the consensus meeting on PJI reviewed English literature for relevant articles. 30 of 221 articles were relevant to the 4 following questions regarding perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent PJI. Results There is no need to use different antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or autoimmune disease than routine antibiotic prophylaxis. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis should be the same for primary and uninfected revision arthroplasty. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis should be the same for hips and knees arthroplasties. There is insufficient data to recommend expanded antibiotic prophylaxis in patients known to be colonized or recently infected with multi-drug resistant pathogens. Conclusions Based on evidences in the literature and consensus of expert delegates from consensus meeting recommendations for type of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or autoimmune disease, primary and uninfected revision arthroplasty, hip or knee arthroplasties and patients known to be colonized or recently infected with multi-drug resistant pathogens were provided.

  10. Antibiotic prophylaxis in children with relapsing urinary tract infections: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, P; Pizzini, C; Fanos, V

    2000-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are observed in 30-50% of children after the first UTI. Of these, approximately 90% occur within 3 months of the initial episode. The basic aim of antibiotic prophylaxis in children with malformative uropathy and/or recurrent UTIs, is to reduce the frequency of UTIs. The bacteria most frequently responsible for UTI are gram-negative organisms, with Escherichia coli accounting for 80% of urinary tract pathogens. In children with recurrent UTIs and in those treated with antibiotic prophylaxis there is a greater incidence of UTI due to Proteus spp., Klebsiella spp. and Enterobacter spp., whereas Pseudomonas spp., Serratia spp. and Candida spp. are more frequent in children with urogenital abnormalities and/or undergoing invasive instrumental investigations. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of UTI, the main ones being circumcision, periurethral flora, micturition disorders, bowel disorders, local factors and hygienic measures. Several factors facilitate UTI relapse: malformative uropathies, particularly of the obstructive type; vesico-ureteric reflux (VUR); previous repeated episodes of cystitis and/or pyelonephritis (3 or more episodes a year), even in the absence of urinary tract abnormalities; a frequently catheterized neurogenic bladder; kidney transplant. The precise mechanism of action of low-dose antibiotics is not yet fully known. The characteristics of the ideal prophylactic agent are presented in this review, as well as indications, dosages, side effects, clinical data of all molecules. While inappropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis encourages the emergence of microbial resistance, its proper use may be of great value in clinical practice, by reducing the frequency and clinical expression of UTIs and, in some cases such as VUR, significantly helping to resolve the underlying pathology.

  11. Vesicoureteral reflux and antibiotic prophylaxis: why cohorts and methodologies matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Saul P.; Cheng, Earl; DeFoor, William; Kropp, Bradley; Rushton, H. Gil; Skoog, Steve; Carpenter, Myra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Published cohorts of children with vesicoureteral reflux placed on antibiotic prophylaxis differ in baseline characteristics and methodology. These data have been combined in meta-analyses to derive treatment recommendations. We analyzed these cohorts in an attempt to understand the disparate outcomes reported. Materials and Methods Eighteen studies were identified from 1987 to 2013. These either retrospectively or prospectively evaluated children with VUR who were on long-term antibiotic prophylaxis. The presenting demographic data, criteria and methods of evaluation were tabulated. Outcomes were compared—specifically recurrent urinary infection and renal scarring. Results Significant differences in baseline characteristics and methodology were identified: gender, circumcision status, grade of reflux, evaluation of bowel and bladder dysfunction (BBD), methodology of urine collection, definition of urinary infection (UTI), measurement of compliance, means of identifying renal scarring. Cohorts with larger numbers of uncircumcised boys had more breakthrough UTI’s. Both infection and renal scarring rates were higher in series with higher grades of reflux. Bagged urine specimens were allowed in 6 series, rendering the data suspect. Children with BBD were excluded from 3 cohorts; only in 1 was BBD correlated with outcome. Compliance was monitored in only 6 studies. Conclusions Sub-populations as well as methodologies vary significantly in published series of children with VUR on anti-biotic prophylaxis. It is inappropriate to combine outcome data from these series in a meta-analysis, since this serves to blur distinctions between these sub-populations. Broad recommendations or guidelines based upon meta-analyses should be viewed with caution. PMID:22910235

  12. Antibiotic prophylaxis: is it needed for dialysis access procedures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Loay; Asif, Arif

    2009-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis has been employed to reduce the risk of infection. Many reports have documented the role of prophylactic antibiotics on the subsequent development of infection in patients undergoing surgical as well as a variety of percutaneous interventions including cardiac, vascular, biliary, genitourinary, and drainage of fluid collections. While prophylactic antibiotics can be critically important for certain procedures, their use can be associated with allergic reactions (including anaphylaxis), development of bacterial resistance, and increased costs of medical care. In this analysis, we report the incidence of clinical infection following minimally invasive interventions for dialysis access procedures. Hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients undergoing consecutive percutaneous interventions (n = 3162) for HD and PD access were included in this study. Procedure-related clinical infection was defined as the presence of fever/chills, tenderness, erythema, swelling within 72 hours postprocedure. The procedures included percutaneous balloon angioplasty (arterial and venous) [n = 2078 (AVF = 1310; AVG = 768)], venography for vascular mapping (n = 110), endovascular stent insertion (n = 26), intravascular coil placement (n = 31), thrombectomy for an arteriovenous fistula (n = 106), thrombectomy for an arteriovenous graft (n = 110), tunneled hemodialysis catheter (TDC) insertion and exchange (n = 283), TDC removal (n = 160), and insertion of accidentally extruded TDC through the same exit site (n = 9). There were 260 peritoneal dialysis catheter insertions and 15 repositioning procedures. Only patients undergoing TDC insertion for accidentally extruded catheter and PD catheter placement received antibiotic prophylaxis within 1-2 hours before the procedure. Extruded TDC received 1 g of cefazolin while PD catheter insertion had 1 g of intravenous vancomycin. Povidone iodine was used for skin antisepsis in all cases. One patient (0

  13. CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridge, C.A.; Carter, M.R.; Ryan, R.; Hegarty, C.; Malone, D.E. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Browne, L.P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Schaffer, K. [St Vincent' s University Hospital, Department of Microbiology, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2011-02-15

    To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson's score method. American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC. (orig.)

  14. CT colonography and transient bacteraemia: implications for antibiotic prophylaxis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridge, C A

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CT colonography (CTC). METHODS: Blood cultures were obtained at 5, 10 and 15 min after CTC from 100 consecutive consenting patients. Blood samples were cultured in both aerobic and anaerobic media and positive blood culture samples were analysed by a microbiologist. RESULTS: Blood culture samples were positive for growth in sixteen patients. All positive blood culture samples were confirmed skin contaminants. There were no cases of significant bacteraemia. The estimated significant bacteraemia rate as a result of CTC is 0-3.7%, based on 95% confidence intervals around extreme results using Wilson\\'s score method. CONCLUSIONS: American Heart Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines advise that antibiotic prophylaxis before lower gastrointestinal endoscopy is not indicated in patients with at risk cardiac lesions (ARCL) as the risk of a transient bacteraemia leading to infective endocarditis is low. These data show that the prevalence of transient bacteraemia after CTC is also low. It follows that patients with ARCL do not require antibiotic prophylaxis before CTC.

  15. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerepoot, Mariëlle; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in postmenopausal women, vaginal, but not oral, estrogens have been shown to restore the vagina lactobacilli flora, reduce vaginal colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, and reduce the number of UTIs compared to placebo. Different lactobacilli strains show different results in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Intravaginal suppositories with Lactobacillus crispatus in premenopausal women and oral capsules with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 in postmenopausal women are promising. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) cannot be recommended for the prevention of UTIs. Cranberries are thought to contain proanthocyanidins that can inhibit adherence of P-fimbriated E. coli to the uroepithelial cell receptors. Cranberry products decreased UTI recurrences about 30%–40% in premenopausal women with recurrent UTIs, but are less effective than low-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis. However, the optimal dose of cranberry product has still to be determined. Initially OM-89, a vaccine with 18 heat-killed E. coli extracts, seemed promising, but this was not confirmed in a recently randomized trial. PMID:27092529

  16. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariëlle Beerepoot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs. Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in postmenopausal women, vaginal, but not oral, estrogens have been shown to restore the vagina lactobacilli flora, reduce vaginal colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, and reduce the number of UTIs compared to placebo. Different lactobacilli strains show different results in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Intravaginal suppositories with Lactobacillus crispatus in premenopausal women and oral capsules with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 in postmenopausal women are promising. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C cannot be recommended for the prevention of UTIs. Cranberries are thought to contain proanthocyanidins that can inhibit adherence of P-fimbriated E. coli to the uroepithelial cell receptors. Cranberry products decreased UTI recurrences about 30%–40% in premenopausal women with recurrent UTIs, but are less effective than low-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis. However, the optimal dose of cranberry product has still to be determined. Initially OM-89, a vaccine with 18 heat-killed E. coli extracts, seemed promising, but this was not confirmed in a recently randomized trial.

  17. Non-Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerepoot, Mariëlle; Geerlings, Suzanne

    2016-04-16

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance has stimulated interest in non-antibiotic prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Well-known steps in the pathogenesis of UTIs are urogenital colonization and adherence of uropathogens to uroepithelial cell receptors. To prevent colonization in postmenopausal women, vaginal, but not oral, estrogens have been shown to restore the vagina lactobacilli flora, reduce vaginal colonization with Enterobacteriaceae, and reduce the number of UTIs compared to placebo. Different lactobacilli strains show different results in the prevention of recurrent UTIs. Intravaginal suppositories with Lactobacillus crispatus in premenopausal women and oral capsules with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 in postmenopausal women are promising. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) cannot be recommended for the prevention of UTIs. Cranberries are thought to contain proanthocyanidins that can inhibit adherence of P-fimbriated E. coli to the uroepithelial cell receptors. Cranberry products decreased UTI recurrences about 30%-40% in premenopausal women with recurrent UTIs, but are less effective than low-dose antimicrobial prophylaxis. However, the optimal dose of cranberry product has still to be determined. Initially OM-89, a vaccine with 18 heat-killed E. coli extracts, seemed promising, but this was not confirmed in a recently randomized trial.

  18. Antibiotic prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis for preventing infection after cesarean section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, Fiona M; Gyte, Gillian ML

    2014-01-01

    Background The single most important risk factor for postpartum maternal infection is cesarean section. Routine prophylaxis with antibiotics may reduce this risk and should be assessed in terms of benefits and harms. Objectives To assess the effects of prophylactic antibiotics compared with no prophylactic antibiotics on infectious complications in women undergoing cesarean section. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (May 2009). Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing the effects of prophylactic antibiotics versus no treatment in women undergoing cesarean section. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. Main results We identified 86 studies involving over 13,000 women. Prophylactic antibiotics in women undergoing cesarean section substantially reduced the incidence of febrile morbidity (average risk ratio (RR) 0.45; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39 to 0.51, 50 studies, 8141 women), wound infection (average RR 0.39; 95% CI 0.32 to 0.48, 77 studies, 11,961 women), endometritis (RR 0.38; 95% CI 0.34 to 0.42, 79 studies, 12,142 women) and serious maternal infectious complications (RR 0.31; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.48, 31 studies, 5047 women). No conclusions can be made about other maternal adverse effects from these studies (RR 2.43; 95% CI 1.00 to 5.90, 13 studies, 2131 women). None of the 86 studies reported infant adverse outcomes and in particular there was no assessment of infant oral thrush. There was no systematic collection of data on bacterial drug resistance. The findings were similar whether the cesarean section was elective or non elective, and whether the antibiotic was given before or after umbilical cord clamping. Overall, the methodological quality of the trials was unclear and in only a few studies was it obvious that potential other sources of bias had been

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis adequacy in knee arthroplasty and surgical wound infection: Prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Moral-Luque, J A; Checa-García, A; López-Hualda, Á; Villar-Del-Campo, M C; Martínez-Martín, J; Moreno-Coronas, F J; Montejo-Sancho, J; Rodríguez-Caravaca, G

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical wound infection. This study evaluated adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for knee arthroplasty and its effect on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study. We assessed the degree of adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis, the causes of non-adequacy, and the effect of non-adequacy on surgical site infection. Incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of a year. To assess the effect of prophylaxis non-adequacy on surgical site infection we used the relative risk adjusted with the aid of a logistic regression model. The study covered a total of 1749 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients and administered in 99.8% of cases, with an overall protocol adequacy of 77.6%. The principal cause of non-compliance was the duration of prescription of the antibiotics (46.5%). Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 1.43%. No relationship was found between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical infection (RR=1.15; 95% CI: .31-2.99) (P>.05). Surveillance and infection control programs enable risk factors of infection and improvement measures to be assessed. Monitoring infection rates enables us to reduce their incidence. Adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis was high but could be improved. We did not find a relationship between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis during cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugino; Cimino; Wactawski-Wende

    1998-07-01

    Objective: To compare single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis (cefotetan 1 g vs cefoxitin 2 g) in various subpopulations based upon risk factors for postsurgical infection following cesarean section.Methods: Patients undergoing cesarean section from April 1993 through March 1994 were included in a retrospective analysis if either of the above antibiotics were administered, surgery was non-emergent, gestational age was less than 32 weeks, absence of fever or prior antibiotics therapy within 72 hours, and no history of organ transplantation or HIV. Cases classified as high risk for infection: IDDM, obesity, autoimmune disease, sickle cell disease, or corticosteroid use. Cases classified as high risk for endometritis (any 2 factors): labor >12 hours, >4 vaginal examinations, ruptured membranes >9 hours, and internal fetal monitor. Cases were separated into 4 groups: elective vs non-elective, low vs high surgical risk. A chi(2) analysis was used to test for differences in infection rates between groups (P cesarean sections, 385 met criteria for inclusion. Non-elective cases accounted for 77% of cases. Postsurgical infection rate was greater in non-elective cases, 7.4%, vs elective cases, 3.0% (P =.056) as was the rate of endometritis (3.2% vs 1.2%, P =.185). No differences were noted based on antibiotic regimen. Postsurgical infection rate was greater for 28 cases at high risk for both surgical infection and endometritis (17.9%) when compared to all 357 other cases (4.5%), P =.003. No difference was noted for endometritis. Of the 28 cases 28.6% of patients treated with cefoxitin and 7.1% of cases treated with cefotetan developed postsurgical infection (P =.13).Conclusion: Overall cefoxitin and cefotetan provided equivalent clinical outcome. A small subset of patients with multiple risk factors for infection may benefit from cefotetan.

  1. Health Technology Assessment Fireside: Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Dental Treatment in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Brondani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper discusses the controversies surrounding the antibiotic prophylaxis preceding dental interventions within the following research question: how effective is dental antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing comorbidity and complications in those at risk? Methods. A synthesis of the available literature regarding antibiotic prophylaxis in dentistry was conducted under the lenses of Kazanjian’s framework for health technology assessment with a focus on economic concerns, population impact, social context, population at risk, and the effectiveness of the evidence to support its use. Results. The papers reviewed show that we have been using antibiotic prophylaxis without a clear and full understanding of its benefits. Although the first guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis was introduced in 1990, it has been revised on several occasions, from 1991 to 2011. Evidence-based clinical guidelines are yet to be seen. Conclusions. Any perceived potential benefit from administering antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures must be weighed against the known risks of lethal toxicity, allergy, and development, selection, and transmission of microbial resistance. The implications of guideline changes and lack of evidence for the full use of antibiotic prophylaxis for the teaching of dentistry have to be further discussed.

  2. Prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy in management protocols of patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Bejarano, Elena-Beatriz; Serrera-Figallo, María-Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Corrales, Aida; Romero-Ruiz, Manuel-María; Castillo-de-Oyagüe, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) linked to bisphosphonate treatment has specific characteristics that render its therapeutic management challenging for clinicians. Poor response to standard treatment makes it essential to take special precautions when treating this type of disease; therefore, antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy have been proposed as effective and helpful tools in these situations. Objectives This article seeks to assess published evidence in order to evaluate the different protocols used for antibiotic prophylaxis and/or antibiotic therapy in the general context of patients treated with bisphosphonates. Material and Methods A literature review of the last 10 years was carried out in PubMed using the following keywords: “antibiotic prophylaxis and osteonecrosis,” “bisphosphonates AND osteonecrosis AND dental management,” “bisphosphonate AND osteonecrosis AND antibiotic prophylaxis AND oral surgery.” A total of 188 articles were obtained, of which 18 were ultimately selected. Results and Discussion In patients treated with oral and intravenous bisphosphonates without chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, antibiotic prophylaxis prior to oral surgery is an important tool to avoid osteonecrosis and promote healing of the affected area. If the patient previously exhibited chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis after tooth extraction, antibiotic prophylaxis is indicated to prevent recurrent osteonecrosis and promote healing of the extraction site. If chemotherapy-associated osteonecrosis is already present, antibiotic therapy is a vital part of conservative management to reduce the symptomatology of MRONJ and keep it from worsening. Finally, a lack of clinical data and randomized controlled trials makes it difficult to choose the most appropriate protocol for the various clinical situations studied. Key words:Bisphosphonates, antibiotic prophylaxis, maxillary osteonecrosis, antibiotic treatment. PMID

  3. Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Urinary Tract Infections in Children With Spina Bifida on Intermittent Catheterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, Bas; Uiterwaal, Cuno; Kimpen, Jan; van Gool, Jan; de Jong, Tom; Winkler-Seinstra, Pauline; Houterman, Saskia; Verpoorten, Carla; van Steenwijk, Catharine de Jong-de Vos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Antibiotic prophylaxis (low dose chemoprophylaxis) has been prescribed since the introduction of clean intermittent catheterization in children with spina bifida. We hypothesized that stopping low dose chemoprophylaxis does not increase the number of urinary tract infections in these patien

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis for haematogenous bacterial arthritis in patients with joint disease: a cost effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Krijnen (Pieta); C.J. Kaandorp; E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); D. van Schaardenburg (Dirkjan); H.J. Moens; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the cost effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis for haematogenous bacterial arthritis in patients with joint disease. METHODS: In a decision analysis, data from a prospective study on bacterial arthritis in 4907 patients with joint dise

  5. Review of MRSA screening and antibiotics prophylaxis in orthopaedic trauma patients; The risk of surgical site infection with inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis in patients colonized with MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, H J; Ponniah, N; Long, S; Rath, N; Kent, M

    2017-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether orthopaedic trauma patients receive appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis keeping in view the results of their MRSA screening. The secondary aim was to analyse the risk of developing MRSA surgical site infection with and without appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis in those colonized with MRSA. We reviewed 400 consecutive orthopaedic trauma patient episodes. Preoperative MRSA screening results, operative procedures, prophylactic antibiotics and postoperative course were explored. In addition to these consecutive patients, the hospital MRSA database over the previous 5 years identified 27 MRSA colonized acute trauma patients requiring surgery. Of the 400 consecutive patient episodes, 395(98.7%) had MRSA screening performed on admission. However, in 236 (59.0%) cases, the results were not available before the surgery. Seven patient episodes (1.8%) had positive MRSA colonization. Analysis of 27 MRSA colonized patients revealed that 20(74%) patients did not have the screening results available before the surgery. Only 5(18.5%) received Teicoplanin and 22(81.4%) received cefuroxime for antibiotic prophylaxis before their surgery. Of those receiving cefuroxime, five (22.73%) patients developed postoperative MRSA surgical site infection (SSI) but none of those (0%) receiving Teicoplanin had MRSA SSI. The absolute risk reduction for SSI with Teicoplanin as antibiotic prophylaxis was 22.73% (CI=5.22%-40.24%) and NNT (Number Needed to Treat) was 5 (CI=2.5-19.2) CONCLUSION: Lack of available screening results before the surgery may lead to inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis increasing the risk of MRSA surgical site infection. Glycopeptide (e.g.Teicoplanin) prophylaxis should be considered when there is history of MRSA colonization or MRSA screening results are not available before the surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Burns injury in children: Is antibiotic prophylaxis recommended?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Chahed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wound infection is the most frequent complication in burn patients. There is a lack of guidelines on the use of systemic antibiotics in children to prevent this complication. Patients and Methods: A prospective study is carried out on 80 patients to evaluate the role of antibiotic prophylaxis in the control of infections. Results: The mean age was 34 months (9 months to 8 years. There was a male predominance with sex ratio of 1.66. The mean burn surface size burn was 26.5% with total burn surface area ranging from 5% to 33%, respectively. According to American Burn Association 37% (30/80 were severe burns with second and third degree burns >10% of the total surface body area in children aged <10 years old. Scalds represented 76.2% (61/80 of the burns. Burns by hot oil were 11 cases (13.7%, while 8 cases (10% were flame burns. The random distribution of the groups was as follow: Group A (amoxicilline + clavulanic acid = 25 cases, Group B (oxacilline = 20 cases and Group C (no antibiotics = 35 cases. Total infection rate was 20% (16/80, distributed as follow: 8 cases (50% in Group C, 5 cases (31.2% in Group A and 3 cases in Group B (18.7%. Infection rate in each individual group was: 22.9% (8 cases/35 in Group C, 20% (5 cases/25 in Group A and 15% (3 cases/20 in Group B (P = 0.7. They were distributed as follow: Septicaemia 12 cases/16 (75%, wound infection 4 cases/16 (25%. Bacteria isolated were with a decreasing order: Staphylococcus aureus (36.3%, Pseudomonas (27.2%, Escherichia coli (18.1%, Klebsiella (9% and Enterobacteria (9%. There is a tendency to a delayed cicatrisation (P = 0.07 in case of hot oil burns (65.18 ± 120 days than by flame (54.33 ± 19.8 days than by hot water (29.55 ± 26.2 days. Otherwise no toxic shock syndrome was recorded in this study. Conclusion: It is concluded that adequate and careful nursing of burn wounds seems to be sufficient to prevent complications and to obtain cicatrisation. Antibiotics are

  7. Meta-analysis: antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding - an updated Cochrane review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavez-Tapia, N C; Barrientos-Gutierrez, T; Tellez-Avila, F

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention.......Antibiotic prophylaxis seems to decrease the incidence of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is considered standard of care. However, there is no updated information regarding the effects of this intervention....

  8. Risk factors for antibiotic prophylaxis failure in patients with liver cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Xiaolou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the risk factors for antibiotic prophylaxis failure in patients with liver cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. MethodsEighty-two patients with liver cirrhosis and upper gastrointestinal bleeding who were admitted to our hospital from January 2011 to June 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received third-generation cephalosporins as the antibiotic prophylaxis for 7 days. The therapeutic effect of prophylaxis within two weeks was analyzed, and the clinical features were compared between prophylaxis response group and non-response group. The t-test or Mann-Whitney U test was applied for comparison of continuous data between groups, the chi-square test was applied for comparison of categorical data between groups, and the logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the risk factors for antibiotic prophylaxis failure. ResultsA total of 38 patients (46.4% developed secondary infection. There were significant differences in prothrombin time, proportion of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU, duration of ICU stay, proportion of patients who received deep venipuncture, Child-Pugh classification, and Child-Pugh score between the prophylaxis response group and non-response group (P<0.05. Child-Pugh classification (OR=2.455, 95%CI: 1.01-5.97, P=0.048 and admission to the ICU (OR=4.12, 95%CI: 1.32-12.83, P=0.015 were the independent risk factors for antibiotic prophylaxis failure. ConclusionAntibiotic prophylaxis with third-generation cephalosporins has a high failure rate, and admission to the ICU and a high Child-Pugh classification are the independent risk factors for antibiotic prophylaxis failure.

  9. Variation in Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Outpatient Pediatric Urological Procedures at United States Children's Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Katherine H; Bell, Teresa; Cain, Mark; Carroll, Aaron; Benneyworth, Brian D

    2017-03-01

    Guidelines recommend surgical antibiotic prophylaxis for clean-contaminated procedures but none for clean procedures. The purpose of this study was to describe variations in surgical antibiotic prophylaxis for outpatient urological procedures at United States children's hospitals. Using the PHIS (Pediatric Health Information System®) database we performed a retrospective cohort study of patients younger than 18 years who underwent clean and/or clean-contaminated outpatient urological procedures from 2012 to 2014. We excluded those with concurrent nonurological procedures or an abscess/infected wound. We compared perioperative antibiotic charges for clean vs clean-contaminated procedures using a multilevel logistic regression model with a random effect for hospital. We also examined whether hospitals that were guideline compliant for clean procedures, defined as no surgical antibiotic prophylaxis, were also compliant for clean-contaminated procedures using the Pearson correlation coefficient. We examined hospital level variation in antibiotic rates using the coefficient of variation. A total of 131,256 patients with a median age of 34 months at 39 hospitals met study inclusion criteria. Patients undergoing clean procedures were 14% less likely to receive guideline compliant surgical antibiotic prophylaxis than patients undergoing clean-contaminated procedures (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.84-0.88, p variation was seen for hospital level compliance with surgical antibiotic prophylaxis for clean-contaminated procedures (range 9.8% to 97.8%, coefficient of variation 0.36) than for clean procedures (range 35.0% to 98.2%, coefficient of variation 0.20). Hospitals that used surgical antibiotic prophylaxis appropriately for clean-contaminated procedures were likely to use surgical antibiotic prophylaxis inappropriately for clean procedures. More variation was seen in hospital level guideline compliance for clean-contaminated procedures. Copyright © 2017 American Urological

  10. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2011-04-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  11. The role of topical antibiotics used as prophylaxis in surgical site infection prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McHugh, S M

    2012-02-01

    Compared with systemic antibiotic therapy, the topical or local delivery of an antibiotic has many potential advantages. However, local antibiotics at the surgical site have received very limited approval in any of the surgical prophylaxis consensus guidelines that we are aware of. A review of the literature was carried out through searches of peer-reviewed publications in PubMed in the English language over a 30 year period between January 1980 and May 2010. Both retrospective and prospective studies were included, as well as meta-analyses. With regard to defining \\'topical\\' or \\'local\\' antibiotic application, the application of an antibiotic solution to the surgical site intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively was included. A number of surgical procedures have been shown to significantly benefit from perioperative topical prophylaxis, e.g. joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. The selective use of topical antibiotics as surgical prophylaxis is justified for specific procedures, such as joint arthroplasty, cataract surgery and, possibly, breast augmentation. In selective cases, such as obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery, topical surgical prophylaxis is also proven to be beneficial. Apart from these specific indications, the evidence for use of topical antibiotics in surgery is lacking in conclusive randomized controlled trials.

  12. [Preoperative preparation, antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical wound infection in breast surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil; de las Casas-Cámara, Gonzalo; Pita-López, María José; Robustillo-Rodela, Ana; Díaz-Agero, Cristina; Monge-Jodrá, Vicente; Fereres, José

    2011-01-01

    The impact of surgical wound infection on public health justifies its surveillance and prevention. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of surgical wound infection in breast procedures and assess its protocol of antibiotic prophylaxis and preoperative preparation. Observational multicentre prospective cohort study of incidence of surgical wound infection. Incidence was evaluated, stratified by National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) risk index and we calculated the standardized incidence ratio (SIR). The SIR was compared with Spanish rates and U.S. rates. The compliance and performance of the antibiotic prophylaxis and preoperative preparation protocol were assessed and their influence in the incidence of infection with the relative risk. Ten hospitals from the Comunidad de Madrid were included, providing 592 procedures. The cumulative incidence of surgical wound infection was 3.89% (95% CI: 2.3-5.5). The SIR was 1.82 on the Spanish rate and 2.16 on the American. Antibiotic prophylaxis was applied in 97.81% of cases, when indicated. The overall performance of antibiotic prophylaxis was 75%, and 53% for preoperative preparation. No association was found between infection and performance of prophylaxis or preoperative preparation (P>.05). Our incidence is within those seen in the literature although it is somewhat higher than the national surveillance programs. The performance of prophylaxis antibiotic must be improved, as well as the recording of preoperative preparation data. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis for infective endocarditis: ethical care in the era of revised guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, David S

    Beginning in 1955, the American Heart Association recommended antibiotic prophylaxis among patients with certain structural heart diseases to decrease the likelihood of infective endocarditis (IE) following dental procedures. Over the ensuing 52 years, the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines were revised to address gastrointestinal and genitourinary procedures and to modify the assessment of relative risks and specific regimens for prophylaxis. Throughout the various revisions, prophylaxis was recommended for individuals who were at increased risk of developing IE based on best evidence and consensus opinion, albeit in the absence of randomized controlled trials. In 2007, the AHA published a revised guideline statement dramatically restricting its recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis against IE. In 2008, these views were incorporated in an ACC/AHA guideline update on the management of patients with heart valve disease. The revisions represent a dramatic shift in terms of the patients for whom antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended and the procedures for which it is recommended. What is striking about the new guidelines is that the change in recommendations was based not on new data, but on a change in philosophy despite the lack of new data. To some degree, the arguments for and against antibiotic prophylaxis become those of philosophy, ethics, and the role of evidence-based medicine. This manuscript attempts to briefly examine those arguments and discuss why the revised guidelines may fail to respect the ethical principles of beneficence and patient autonomy.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated prior to dental procedures for prevention of periprosthetic joint infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rademacher, Willem M H; Walenkamp, Geert H I M; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Hendriks, Johannes G E; Goedendorp, Theo A; Rozema, Frederik R

    2017-10-01

    Background and purpose - To minimize the risk of hematogenous periprosthetic joint infection (HPJI), international and Dutch guidelines recommended antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental procedures. Unclear definitions and contradictory recommendations in these guidelines have led to unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions. To formulate new guidelines, a joint committee of the Dutch Orthopaedic and Dental Societies conducted a systematic literature review to answer the following question: can antibiotic prophylaxis be recommended for patients (with joint prostheses) undergoing dental procedures in order to prevent dental HPJI? Methods - The Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), reviews, and observational studies up to July 2015. Studies were included if they involved patients with joint implants undergoing dental procedures, and either considered HPJI as an outcome measure or described a correlation between HPJI and prophylactic antibiotics. A guideline was formulated using the GRADE method and AGREE II guidelines. Results - 9 studies were included in this systematic review. All were rated "very low quality of evidence". Additional literature was therefore consulted to address clinical questions that provide further insight into pathophysiology and risk factors. The 9 studies did not provide evidence that use of antibiotic prophylaxis reduces the incidence of dental HPJI, and the additional literature supported the conclusion that antibiotic prophylaxis should be discouraged in dental procedures. Interpretation - Prophylactic antibiotics in order to prevent dental HPJI should not be prescribed to patients with a normal or an impaired immune system function. Patients are recommended to maintain good oral hygiene and visit the dentist regularly.

  15. Survey of Intraocular Antibiotics Prophylaxis Practice after Open Globe Injury in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingsheng Lou

    Full Text Available To elucidate the Chinese practice of intraocular antibiotics administration for prophylaxis after open globe injury.A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed online by scanning a Quickmark (QR code with smartphones at the 20th Chinese National Conference of Ocular Trauma in November 2014.A total of 153 (30.6% of all participators at the conference responded. Of the respondents, 20.9% were routinely administered with prophylactic intraocular injection of antibiotics at the conclusion of the primary eye repair, and 56.9% were used only in cases with high risk of endophthalmitis development. The intraocular route of delivery was mainly included with intracameral injection (47.9% and intravitreal injection (42.0%. Cephalosporins (53.8% and vancomycin (42.0% were the main choices of antibiotic agents, followed by fluoroquinolones (24.3%, and aminoglycosides (13.4%. Only 21.9% preferred a combination of two or more two drugs routinely. In addition, significantly more respondents from the referral eye hospital (92.7% replied using intraocular antibiotics injection for prophylaxis compared to those respondents from the primary hospital (69.4% (p = 0.001, Fisher's exact test.Intraocular antibiotics injection for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis is widely used in China. However, the choice of antibiotic agents and the intraocular route of delivery vary. A well-designed clinical trial is needed to establish a standardized protocol of intraocular antibiotics administration for post-traumatic endophthalmitis prophylaxis.

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy-a new strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antsupova, Valeria; Nørgaard, Nis; Bisbjerg, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluoroquinolones are extensively used as prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate (TRUBP). Emerging fluoroquinolone resistance and selection of multiresistant organisms warrant new prophylactic strategies. Pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid have...... pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was used (5.9%). CONCLUSIONS: The combination of pivmecillinam and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid is an attractive prophylaxis for TRUBP from a clinical, bacteriological and ecological point of view as compared with ciprofloxacin....

  17. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  18. Infections and urolithiasis: current clinical evidence in prophylaxis and antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Giampaolo; Paparella, Stefano; Trinchieri, Alberto; Prezioso, Domenico; Rocco, Francesco; Naber, Kurt G

    2008-03-01

    Urinary tract infections and urosepsis are complications which can precede or follow a kidney stone treatment. Often the stones themselves are the source of infection, whether they are infection stones or not. Systemic infections are difficult to foresee, and neither a pre-operative negative urine culture nor an antibiotic prophylaxis avoid infectious complications for certain. The primary predictive risk factors of urosepsis are: patient conditions, urinary tract infection or a history of recurrent infections, characteristics of the stone, and anatomy of the urinary tract. Infection stones are still a matter of debate, concerning both the aetiology of the disease and its treatment. Positive cultures are not only found with struvite stones, but also with apatite and calcium oxalate stones. Currently, a long-term antibiotic therapy is advised in patients affected by infection stones. Antibiotic therapy should prevent not only septic complications but also recurrence or re-growth of stones after treatment. Different antibiotic modalities are recommended, sometimes together with urease inhibitors. Mid-stream urine culture is the easiest available pre-treatment parameter notwithstanding its poor predictive value. In case of suspected or proven urinary infection, an appropriate antibiotic therapy should always be administered prior to surgical procedure. There is, however, controversy regarding the antibiotic use, its role, expediency, and duration of prophylaxis in relation to the various surgical procedures, and the way infectious complications are considered and classified. When antibiotic prophylaxis is considered, its duration should be clearly established prior to surgery; duration may vary depending on the type of surgery or the type of antibiotic. Furthermore, prophylaxis should be administered only for a limited amount of time. In infection stones, in immuno-compromised patients or in patients with anatomical anomalies or diabetes, the risk of post

  19. Role of phytotherapy associated with antibiotic prophylaxis in female patients with recurrent urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuela Frumenzio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a phytotherapic which includes Solidago, Orthosiphon and Birch extract (Cistimev® in association with antibiotic prophylaxis in female patients affected by recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIr. Materials and methods: Patients affected by UTIr older than 18 years started a 3-months antibiotic prophylaxis (Prulifloxacin 600 mg, 1 cps/week or Phosphomicyn 1 cachet/week according to antibiogram after urine culture. The patients were divided in 2 groups: Group A: antibiotic prophylaxis plus phytotherapy (1 cps/die for 3 months and Group B: antibiotic prophylaxis alone. Results: 164 consecutive patients were studied: 107 were included in group A (mean age 59 ± 17.3 years and 57 (mean age 61 ± 15.7 in group B. During the treatment period the relapse frequencies between the two groups were not significantly different (p = 0.854: 12/107 (11.21% patients interrupted the treatment for UTIr in group A and 6/57 (10.52% in group B. In the long term follow-up the relapse UTI risk was significant different in the two groups with a relapse risk 2.5 greater in group B than in group A (p < 0.0001. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that in female patients affected by recurrent UTI, the association between antibiotic prophylaxis and of a phytotherapic which includes Solidago, Orthosiphon and Birch extract reduced the number of UTI in the 12 months following the end of prophylaxis and obtained a longer relapsing time, greatly improving the quality of life of the patients.

  20. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in dermatologic and soft tissue surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, T; Napp, M; Maier, S

    2014-01-01

    In Germany, over half a million operations are done in dermatologic surgery in a hospital setting every year, as well as a less well quantified number of procedures in private offices. In spite of this large number, specific guidelines concerning the use of perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery are sparse. In contrast to procedures in general, visceral or gynecological surgery, general guidelines on perioperative antibiotics issued by the Paul-Ehrlich Institutes and the AWMF do not specifically consider dermatologic operations. Several surveys indicate that familiarity with current recommendations on perioperative antibiotics is suboptimal and resulted in a considerable overuse of perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery. Given the increasing antimicrobial resistance among important pathogens and the inherent risks of antibiotic administration, the decision for the use of prophylactic antibiotics should be based on the individual risk profile of the patient and of the surgical procedure. In the following, we will critically discuss the evidence for perioperative antibiotics in dermatologic surgery.

  1. Evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis administration at the orthopedic surgery clinic of tertiary hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksum Radji

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing surgical site infections, at orthopedic surgery unit in tertiary hospital, Dr. Mintohardjo Navy Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study conducted retrospectively on the orthopedic unit of the Dr. Mintohardjo Navy Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia between January to December 2012. Assessment of appropriateness of antibiotic prophylaxis was carried out based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines and The National Guidelines of Antibiotic Usage in Indonesia. Results: A total of 163 samples consisted of men (73% and women (27% with an age range less than 12 years (9.8%, 12-25 years (23.3%, 26-65 years (58.9% and over 65 years (8.0%. The most commonly antibiotic prophylaxis used in this study was ceftriaxone (87.8%, followed by gentamycin (3.7%, cefotaxime (3.7%, cefoporaxone (1.2%, siprofloksasin (1.2%, fosfomycin (0.6%, meropenem (0.6%, and vancomycin (0.6%. Of the 163 patients 8 (4.9% patients developed a surgical site infection of all orthopedic surgical patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis. The pathogens isolated from surgical site infection were Escherichia coli (23.08%, coliform (18.62%, Staphylococcus aureus (18.00%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.15%, and Alkaligenes sp. (9.31%. Conclusions: The Compliance of antibiotics prophylaxis administration at orthopedic surgery unit in Dr. Mintohardjo Naval Hospital has not been in accordance with the guidelines of the national or international standards. Therefore it is necessary to do some improvements to ensure better compliance with standard guidelines.

  2. Evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis administration at the orthopedic surgery clinic of tertiary hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radji, Maksum; Aini, Fithrotul; Fauziyah, Siti

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing surgical site infections, at orthopedic surgery unit in tertiary hospital, Dr. Mintohardjo Navy Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This study was a cross-sectional study conducted retrospectively on the orthopedic unit of the Dr. Mintohardjo Navy Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia between January to December 2012. Assessment of appropriateness of antibiotic prophylaxis was carried out based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines and The National Guidelines of Antibiotic Usage in Indonesia. Results A total of 163 samples consisted of men (73%) and women (27%) with an age range less than 12 years (9.8%), 12-25 years (23.3%), 26-65 years (58.9%) and over 65 years (8.0%). The most commonly antibiotic prophylaxis used in this study was ceftriaxone (87.8%), followed by gentamycin (3.7%), cefotaxime (3.7%), cefoporaxone (1.2%), siprofloksasin (1.2%), fosfomycin (0.6%), meropenem (0.6%), and vancomycin (0.6%). Of the 163 patients 8 (4.9%) patients developed a surgical site infection of all orthopedic surgical patients who received antibiotic prophylaxis. The pathogens isolated from surgical site infection were Escherichia coli (23.08%), coliform (18.62%), Staphylococcus aureus (18.00%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12.15%), and Alkaligenes sp. (9.31%). Conclusions The Compliance of antibiotics prophylaxis administration at orthopedic surgery unit in Dr. Mintohardjo Naval Hospital has not been in accordance with the guidelines of the national or international standards. Therefore it is necessary to do some improvements to ensure better compliance with standard guidelines.

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment after prosthetic joint replacement: exploring the orthopaedic surgeon's opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare M. McNally, MPhil(Dent

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: Australian orthopaedic surgeons continue to recommend antibiotic prophylaxis for dental treatment. The recording of PJI in relation to dental procedures into clinical registries would enable the development of consistent guidelines between professional groups responsible for the care of this patient group.

  4. Effect of optimized antibiotic prophylaxis on the incidence of surgical site infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannien, J.; Kasteren, M.E.E. van; Nagelkerke, N.J.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Kullberg, B.J.; Wille, J.C.; Boer, A.S. de

    2006-01-01

    Objective. To compare the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) before and after an intervention period in which an optimized policy for antibiotic prophylaxis was implemented. To demonstrate that a more prudent, restrictive policy would not have a detrimental effect on patient outcomes.Design.

  5. Different duration strategies of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamouda, Khaled; Oezkur, Mehmet; Sinha, Bhanu; Hain, Johannes; Menkel, Hannah; Leistner, Marcus; Leyh, Rainer; Schimmer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background: All international guidelines recommend perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis (PAB) should be routinely administered to patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the duration of PAB is heterogeneous and controversial. Methods: Between 01.01.2011 and 31.12.2011, 1096 consecutive cardiac

  6. [Effect of compliance with an antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in surgical site infections in appendectomies. Prospective cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Santana, Tomás; Del-Moral-Luque, Juan Antonio; Gil-Yonte, Pablo; Bañuelos-Andrío, Luis; Durán-Poveda, Manuel; Rodríguez-Caravaca, Gil

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical site infection. This study assessed compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for acute appendicitis, and the effect of this compliance on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study to evaluate compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in appendectomies. An assessment was made of the level of compliance with prophylaxis, as well as the causes of non-compliance. The incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of 30 days. The relative risk adjusted with a logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of non-compliance of prophylaxis on surgical site infection. The study included a total of 930 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients, and administered in 71.3% of cases, with an overall protocol compliance of 86.1%. The principal cause of non-compliance was time of initiation. Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 4.6%. No relationship was found between inadequate prophylaxis compliance and infection (relative risk=0.5; 95% CI: 0.1-1.9) (P>.05). Compliance of antibiotic prophylaxis was high, but could be improved. No relationship was found between prophylaxis compliance and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial infections in afebrile neutropenic patients following chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Fraser, Abigail; Paul, Mical; Vidal, Liat; Lawrie, Theresa A; van de Wetering, Marianne D; Kremer, Leontien CM; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are neutropenic following chemotherapy for malignancy. Trials have shown the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of bacterial infections but not in reducing mortality rates. Our systematic review from 2006 also showed a reduction in mortality. Objectives This updated review aimed to evaluate whether there is still a benefit of reduction in mortality when compared to placebo or no intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Cancer Network Register of Trials (2011), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2011), EMBASE (1980 to March 2011), abstracts of conference proceedings and the references of identified studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing different types of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo or no intervention, or another antibiotic, to prevent bacterial infections in afebrile neutropenic patients. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently appraised the quality of each trial and extracted data from the included trials. Analyses were performed using RevMan 5.1 software. Main results One-hundred and nine trials (involving 13,579 patients) that were conducted between the years 1973 to 2010 met the inclusion criteria. When compared with placebo or no intervention, antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced the risk of death from all causes (46 trials, 5635 participants; risk ratio (RR) 0.66, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.79) and the risk of infection-related death (43 trials, 5777 participants; RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.48 to 0.77). The estimated number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one death was 34 (all-cause mortality) and 48 (infection-related mortality). Prophylaxis also significantly reduced the occurrence of fever (54 trials, 6658 participants; RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.87), clinically documented infection

  8. Cycling of antibiotics for the prophylaxis of recurrent spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in a cirrhotic patient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N Assy; S Schlesinger; D Miron; O Hussein

    2005-01-01

    @@ TO THE EDITOR More than 80% of cirrhotic patients who have been treated successfully for spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP)experience a recurrence[1,2]. Long-term prophylaxis with single daily oral antibiotic has been shown to be cost effective in delaying a recurrence but only for a short time[3].What has never been tested in this population is the cycling of antibiotics. We report the beneficial use of antibiotic cycling for 36 weeks in a 74-year-old woman with cryptogenic cirrhosis and recurrent SBP.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis versus no prophylaxis for preventing infection after cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaill, Fiona M; Grivell, Rosalie M

    2014-10-28

    The single most important risk factor for postpartum maternal infection is cesarean section. Although guidelines endorse the use of prophylactic antibiotics for women undergoing cesarean section, there is not uniform implementation of this recommendation. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1995 and last updated in 2010. To assess the effects of prophylactic antibiotics compared with no prophylactic antibiotics on infectious complications in women undergoing cesarean section. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 July 2014) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing the effects of prophylactic antibiotics versus no treatment in women undergoing cesarean section. Two review authors independently assessed the studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and carried out data extraction. The clinically important primary outcomes were wound infection, endometritis, serious maternal infectious complications and adverse effects on the infant. We presented dichotomous data as risk ratios (RR), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and combined trials in meta-analyses. We assessed the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. We identified 95 studies enrolling over 15,000 women. Compared with placebo or no treatment, the use of prophylactic antibiotics in women undergoing cesarean section reduced the incidence of wound infection (RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.46, 82 studies, 14,407 women), endometritis (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.42, 83 studies, 13,548 women) and maternal serious infectious complications (RR 0.31, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.49, 32 studies, 6159 women). When only studies that included women undergoing an elective cesarean section were analyzed, there was also a reduction in the incidence of wound infections (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.82, 17 studies, 3537 women) and endometritis (RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.61, 15 studies, 2502 women) with prophylactic

  10. [An increase of infective endocarditis cases in England seen with concomitant reduction in antibiotic prophylaxis since the implementation of NICE guidelines in 2008: possible explanations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberi, Simon; Pink, Frederick; Jayakumar, Angelina; Arioli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Dayer and colleagues recently reported in The Lancet an increased incidence of infective endocarditis in England since 2008, year of NICE guideline on the restriction of antibiotic prophylaxis. They observed a concomitant decrease in the use of antibiotic prophylaxis. The temporal link between reduction of prophylaxis prescribing and increase of infective endocarditis raises the question of whether there is a causal association. In view of this observation, should we rethink antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis?

  11. Antibiotic prophylaxis and complications following prostate biopsies - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemann, Nina; Helgstrand, John Thomas; Brasso, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies (TRUS-gb) are associated with both mild and serious complications. Prophylactic antibiotics reduce the risk of septicaemia and mortality; however, no international consensus exists on the timing and duration of antibiotics, including the optimal...... drug strategy. We reviewed the current evidence supporting use of prophylactic antibiotics and the risk of complications following prostate biopsies. METHODS: This review was drafted in accordance with the Prisma Guidelines. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. RESULTS: A total...... of 19 eligible trials were identified. One trial demonstrated a significant reduction in the risk of infection after biopsy and reported that oral ciprofloxacin as either a single-dose or a three-day regimen was superior to oral chloramphenicol and norfloxacin. Of three studies investigating the timing...

  12. Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean-contaminated head and neck oncologic surgery: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, C-J; Knecht, R; Münscher, A; Matern, J; Dalchow, C; Lörincz, B B

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used in head and neck oncologic surgery, due to the clean-contaminated nature of these procedures. There is a wide variety in the use of prophylactic antibiotics regarding the duration of application and the choice of agent. The purpose of this study was to determine whether short-term or long-term antibiotic prophylaxis has an impact on the development of head and neck surgical wound infection (SWI). Retrospective chart review was carried out in 418 clean-contaminated head and neck surgical oncology cases at our department. More than 50 variables including tumour type and stage, type of surgical treatment, co-morbidities, duration and choice of antibiotic prophylaxis, and the incidence of SWI were analysed. Following descriptive data analysis, Chi square test by Pearson and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical evaluation. Fifty-eight of the 418 patients (13.9 %) developed SWI. Patients with advanced disease and tracheotomy showed a significantly higher rate of SWI than those with early stage disease and without tracheotomy (p = 0.012 and p = 0.00017, respectively). However, there was no significant difference between the SWI rates in the short term and long term treatment groups (14.6 and 13.2 %, respectively; p = 0.689). Diabetes and body weight were not found to be risk factors for SWI. Long-term antibiotic prophylaxis was not associated with a decrease in SWI in the entire cohort of patients undergoing clean-contaminated major head and neck oncologic surgery. Our data confirmed the extent of surgery and tracheotomy as being risk factors for postoperative SWI.

  13. NICE guideline on antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis: attitudes to the guideline and implications for dental practice in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-03-28

    To investigate attitudes of Irish dental practitioners, cardiologists and patients with cardiac lesions to the new NICE guideline for antibiotic prophylaxis against infective endocarditis and to determine the implications of this guideline for dental practice in Ireland.

  14. Cost and morbidity associated with antibiotic prophylaxis in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namias, N; Harvill, S; Ball, S; McKenney, M G; Salomone, J P; Civetta, J M

    1999-03-01

    Although the high cost and inappropriate use of antibiotics have been documented before, we are not aware of any data on nonsurgical site infectious morbidity associated with prolonged courses of prophylactic antibiotics (PA). Data regarding antibiotic orders were collected using a custom designed microbiology database in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit of a teaching hospital from October 1, 1995 through April 30, 1997. The database was retrospectively reviewed. The cost of PA in excess of 1 day was calculated. Frequency of bacteremia and line infections were compared in patients receiving 1 day or less of PA versus more than 4 days of PA. Sixty-one percent of PA orders were continued for more than 1 day. Cost of PA beyond 1 day totaled $44,893. Bacteremia and line infection were more frequent in the patients receiving more than 4 days of PA. There was poor compliance with the protocol of stopping PA at 24 hours. The cost of noncompliance was $44,893. There were more bacteremias and line infections in patients with duration of PA of more than 4 days.

  15. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part II: non-abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luis González López

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in no-abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

  16. Risk factors of cellulitis in cirrhosis and antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing recurrence

    OpenAIRE

    Hamza, Rooby Erachamveettil; Villyoth, Mashhood Padincharepurathu; Peter, George; Joseph, Deni; Govindaraju, Chethan; Tank, Devang Chandrakanth; Sreesh, Sreejaya; Narayanan, Premalatha; Vinayakumar, Kattoor Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellulitis is a commonly encountered bacterial infection among cirrhotic patients apart from spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, urinary tract and respiratory infections. This study aimed to determine the risk factors of cellulitis in cirrhosis and whether antibiotic prophylaxis helps prevent recurrence of cellulitis. Methods The study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1, all cirrhotic patients admitted with cellulitis from August 2011 to August 2013 were taken as cases (n=70) a...

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound biopsy of the prostate in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, L G

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid cancer affecting men in Ireland. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies of the prostate are routinely performed to diagnose prostate cancer. They are, in general, a safe procedure but are associated with a significant risk of infective complications ranging from fever, urinary tract infection to severe urosepsis. At present, there are no recommended national guidelines on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to minimise the risk of infective complications post-TRUS biopsy.

  18. [Large-scale selective antibiotic prophylaxis during the 2004 cholera outbreak in Douala (Cameroon)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guévart, Edouard; Noeske, Jürgen; Sollé, Jérémie; Mouangue, Antoine; Bikoti, Joseph-Marie

    2007-01-01

    During the 2004 cholera outbreak in Douala, densely populated and poor suburban populations had very poor access to safe drinking water and were at high risk of transmission. The provincial task force thus decided to provide preventive antibiotic treatment of all patient contacts, that is, family members taking care of patients in the hospital and household members of patients or close neighbours living in houses directly adjacent to patients. This retrospective report, based on data from hospitals, local cholera committees, and pharmacies, describes the course of the epidemic, bacteriological monitoring, and antibiotic distribution. Suddenly appearing in January 2004, the outbreak affected 5,020 patients in 8 months. V.cholerae, which was isolated in 111/187 samples, remained susceptible to doxycycline, amoxicillin, and fluoroquinolones. A total of 182,366 persons (35 contacts per patient) received antibiotic treatment. The rate of contacts among new patients fell from 30% to less than 0.2%. Antibiotic prophylaxis was a part of a comprehensive package of community interventions that included health education, disinfection of homes, latrines and wells in all affected households, and bacteriological monitoring. Although it reduces the risk of the disease, mass antibiotic prophylaxis is not recommended against cholera outbreaks, because it does not prevent contamination and is limited by contraindications, costs, and modes of administration. Moreover, it increases the risk of developing resistance. It is impossible to eradicate vibrio from the environment. The individual risk of contracting cholera is not known and it is difficult to assess the impact of a collective prevention strategy. Because the bacteria remains susceptible to antibiotic drugs, a well-targeted antibiotic prophylaxis made it possible to reduce direct human transmission of cholera. This reduction did not affect the overall epidemic, however, because of the massive environmental contamination. The

  19. Antibiotic prophylaxis: different practice patterns within and outside the United States

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    Schwartz SG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen G Schwartz,1 Andrzej Grzybowski,2 Harry W Flynn Jr1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Poznan City Hospital, Poznan, Poland Abstract: Endophthalmitis remains a rare but important cause of visual loss. Prophylaxis strategies are important to reduce rates of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery, intravitreal injection, and other procedures. There is substantial variability between the US and the rest of the world. During cataract surgery, intracameral antibiotics are commonly used in many nations, especially in Europe, but are less commonly used in the US. A randomized clinical trial from the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons reported an approximately fivefold reduction in endophthalmitis rates associated with intracameral cefuroxime but these results are controversial. There are no randomized clinical trials regarding endophthalmitis associated with intravitreal injection. Topical antibiotics are commonly used in many nations, but are less commonly used in the US. At this time, there is no global consensus and it appears unlikely that additional major clinical trials will conclusively define the optimal endophthalmitis prophylaxis techniques. Keywords: cataract surgery, endophthalmitis, intracameral antibiotic, intravitreal injection, prophylaxis

  20. Antibiotic prophylaxis in orthopedic surgeries: the results of an implemented protocol

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    Raquel Queiroz

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Though the basic principles of antibiotic prophylaxis have been well established, there is still considerable incorrect usage, including how much is prescribed and especially in the duration of treatment, which is generally superior to what is indicated. The adequate use of these drugs contributes towards decreasing the time of internment of the patient, prevents surgical site infection (SSI, decreasing the development of resistant microorganisms, and towards reduced costs for the hospital pharmacy. A protocol for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Service of the Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo was developed. The objectives of the study were to promote rational antibiotic surgical prophylaxis, through the implantation of a protocol for the use of these drugs in a surgical unit, with the direct contribution of a druggist in collaboration with the Infection Control Committee, to evaluate the adhesion of the health team to the protocol during three distinct periods (daily pre-protocol, early post-protocol and late post-protocol and to define the consumption of antimicrobials used, measured as daily defined dose.

  1. A prospective study examining the incidence of bacteriuria and urinary tract infection after shock wave lithotripsy with targeted antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, R John D'A; Ordon, Michael; Ghiculete, Daniela; Wiesenthal, Joshua D; Kodama, Ronald; Pace, Kenneth T

    2013-06-01

    Controversy exists regarding antibiotic prophylaxis before shock wave lithotripsy. The AUA (American Urological Association) guideline recommends universal antibiotic prophylaxis, whereas the EAU (European Association of Urology) guideline recommends prophylaxis only for select patients. We evaluated the use of targeted antibiotic prophylaxis in preventing urinary tract infections in patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy. A prospective single cohort study was performed during 6 months with patients undergoing shock wave lithotripsy. All patients underwent urine dipstick and culture before shock wave lithotripsy. Targeted antibiotic prophylaxis was provided at the discretion of the treating urologist. All patients had a urine culture performed after shock wave lithotripsy and completed a survey documenting fevers or urinary symptoms. The primary outcome was the incidence of urinary tract infections, urosepsis and asymptomatic bacteriuria after shock wave lithotripsy. The secondary outcome was the sensitivity and specificity of urinary dipstick leukocytes and nitrites. A total of 526 patients were enrolled in the study. Of the 389 patients included in the determination of the primary outcome, urinary tract infection developed in only 1 (0.3%), urosepsis did not develop in any patients and asymptomatic bacteriuria developed in 11 (2.8%). Eight (2.1%) patients were administered antibiotic prophylaxis. The specificity of urine dipstick nitrites was high (95%) while the sensitivity was poor (9.7%). In our cohort study using targeted antibiotic prophylaxis the rates of urinary tract infection after shock wave lithotripsy and rates of asymptomatic bacteriuria were extremely low, with no development of urosepsis. This finding questions the need for universal antibiotic prophylaxis before shock wave lithotripsy. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis in elective cholecystectomy: protocol adequacy and related outcomes in a retrospective single-centre analysis

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    Gil Rodríguez-Caravaca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotic prophylaxis is an effective tool to reduce surgical infection rates. However, antibiotic prophylaxis in cholecystectomy is controversial when non-high risk patients are considered. This research aims to evaluate the adherence with antibiotic prophylaxis protocol in patients undergoing cholecystectomy, and its impact in the outcomes of surgical infection. Methods: This single-center observational and retrospective study analyzed all elective cholecystectomy procedures carried out at the Fundación Alcorcón University Hospital in the period 2007-2014. Data were recovered from hospital records; rates of adherence to the available hospital protocols were evaluated for choice, initiation, duration, administration route and dosages of antibiotics, and the starting and duration of the prophylaxis. Results: The overall adequacy rate to protocol was 72%. The adherence rates in both the administration route and dose were 100%. The most common violations of the protocol included the choice of antibiotic agent (19%, followed by the moment of initiating its administration (8.9%. The overall wound infection rate was lower in case of laparoscopy than in laparotomy cholecystectomy (1.4% vs. 4.3%, p < 0.05; odds rate [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-0.6. No relationship between adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical infection rate was documented, neither considering overall gallbladder surgeries (crude OR 0.26, 95% CI 0.1-2.0, nor laparoscopy vs. open surgery (MH adjusted OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.2-2.1. Conclusions: The overall adequacy rate to antibiotic prophylaxis protocol recommended for elective cholecystectomy in our hospital was high (72%. No significant association between the adequacy or antibiotic prophylaxis and surgical infection was found.

  3. Impact of Postoperative Antibiotic Prophylaxis Duration on Surgical Site Infections in Autologous Breast Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Kerry E; Lanier, Steven T; Khavanin, Nima; Hume, Keith M; Gutowski, Karol A; Thornton, Brian P; Hansen, Nora M; Murphy, Robert X; Fine, Neil A; Kim, John Y S

    2016-02-01

    Although some surgeons prescribe prolonged postoperative antibiotics after autologous breast reconstruction, evidence is lacking to support this practice. We used the Tracking Operations and Outcomes for Plastic Surgeons database to evaluate the association between postoperative antibiotic duration and the rate of surgical site infection (SSI) in autologous breast reconstruction. The intervention of interest for this study was postoperative duration of antibiotic prophylaxis: either discontinued 24 hours after surgery or continued beyond 24 hours. The primary outcome variable of interest for this study was the presence of SSI within 30 days of autologous breast reconstruction. Cohort characteristics and 30-day outcomes were compared using χ² and Fischer exact tests for categorical variables and Student t tests for continuous variables. Multivariate logistic regression was used to control for confounders. A total of 1036 patients met inclusion criteria for our study. Six hundred fifty-nine patients (63.6%) received antibiotics for 24 hours postoperatively, and 377 patients (36.4%) received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. The rate of SSI did not differ significantly between patients given antibiotics for only 24 hours and those continued on antibiotics beyond the 24-hour postoperative time period (5.01% vs 2.92%, P = 0.109). Furthermore, antibiotic duration was not predictive of SSI in multivariate regression modeling. We did not find a statistically significant difference in the rate of SSI in patients who received 24 hours of postoperative antibiotics compared to those that received antibiotics for greater than 24 hours. These findings held for both purely autologous reconstruction as well as latissimus dorsi reconstruction in conjunction with an implant. Thus, our study does not support continuation of postoperative antibiotics beyond 24 hours after autologous breast reconstruction.

  4. Surgical site wound infection in relation to antibiotic prophylaxis given before skin incision and after cord clamping during cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Marhatha, R; Giri, A; Jaisi, S; Maskey, U

    2014-12-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following Lower Segment Cesarean Section, which accounts for prolonged hospital stay thereby increasing expense. Prophylactic antibiotics in cesarean section reduces surgical site infection significantly. The best protection is provided when tissue level of antibiotics are adequate before incision, without prejudice to neonatal infectious morbidity. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of surgical site wound infection with prophylactic antibiotics given before skin incision and after cord clamping following delivery of baby. This was a prospective, hospital based study, in which hundred cases of cesarean deliveries who received antibiotics prophylaxis one hour before the skin incision were compared with another 100 cases where antibiotic was given after cord clamping following delivery of the baby. Surgical site infection occurred in 3% of women who received antibiotics prophylaxis before skin incision as compared to 6% in whom antibiotic was given after cord clamping. It was statistically not significant (p = 0.465).

  5. COMPARISON OF SUBLINGUAL THERAPEUTIC VACCINE WITH ANTIBIOTICS FOR THE PROPHYLAXIS OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

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    María Fernanda Lorenzo-Gómez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical impact of the prophylactic treatment with sublingual immunostimulation in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections (rUTIs compared with the use of antibiotics.Material and Methods: Retrospective cohort study evaluating the clinical records of 669 women with rUTIs; 339 had a 6-month prophylaxis with antibiotics and 360 had a 3-month prophylaxis with a sublingual bacterial preparation (MV 140-Uromune®. The time after the prophylaxis-period until the appearance of a new infection (assessed by uroculture was scored during one year. Absolute risk reduction (ARR and number needed to treat (NNT were also calculated.Results: All patients (100% treated with antibiotics experienced a new UTI during the scoring period of 12 months, being the mean time free of UTI 29 (±38 days. In the group treated with the bacterial preparation, only 35 (9.7% patients experienced UTI in the same period. Kaplan-Meier curves comparing the accumulated survival (disease-free time between both groups were significant (P < 0.0001. ARR was 90.28 % (87.18-93.38 and NNT 1.1 (1.1-1.1.Conclusions: These results suggest that the treatment with the bacterial preparation reduces rUTIs very effectively, arising as an effective strategy to reduce the frequency of rUTIs. It reduces antibiotic consumption, matching the current recommendations due to the raise of antimicrobial resistance. Randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled, clinical trials are needed to establish more accurately the clinical impact of this bacterial preparation in patients with rUTIs.

  6. Changing use of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in Thika Hospital, Kenya: a quality improvement intervention with an interrupted time series design.

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    Alexander M Aiken

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In low-income countries, Surgical Site Infection (SSI is a common form of hospital-acquired infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is an effective method of preventing these infections, if given immediately before the start of surgery. Although several studies in Africa have compared pre-operative versus post-operative prophylaxis, there are no studies describing the implementation of policies to improve prescribing of surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in African hospitals. METHODS: We conducted SSI surveillance at a typical Government hospital in Kenya over a 16 month period between August 2010 and December 2011, using standard definitions of SSI and the extent of contamination of surgical wounds. As an intervention, we developed a hospital policy that advised pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis and discouraged extended post-operative antibiotics use. We measured process, outcome and balancing effects of this intervention in using an interrupted time series design. RESULTS: From a starting point of near-exclusive post-operative antibiotic use, after policy introduction in February 2011 there was rapid adoption of the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis (60% of operations at 1 week; 98% at 6 weeks and a substantial decrease in the use of post-operative antibiotics (40% of operations at 1 week; 10% at 6 weeks in Clean and Clean-Contaminated surgery. There was no immediate step-change in risk of SSI, but overall, there appeared to be a moderate reduction in the risk of superficial SSI across all levels of wound contamination. There were marked reductions in the costs associated with antibiotic use, the number of intravenous injections performed and nursing time spent administering these. CONCLUSION: Implementation of a locally developed policy regarding surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is an achievable quality improvement target for hospitals in low-income countries, and can lead to substantial benefits for individual patients and

  7. Dosing antibiotic prophylaxis during cardiopulmonary bypass-a higher level of complexity? A structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paruk, Fathima; Sime, Fekade B; Lipman, Jeffrey; Roberts, Jason A

    2017-04-01

    In highly invasive procedures such as open heart surgery, the risk of post-operative infection is particularly high due to exposure of the surgical field to multiple foreign devices. Adequate antibiotic prophylaxis is an essential intervention to minimise post-operative morbidity and mortality. However, there is a lack of clear understanding on the adequacy of traditional prophylactic dosing regimens, which are rarely supported by data. The aim of this structured review is to describe the relevant pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) considerations for optimal antibiotic prophylaxis for major cardiac surgery including cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). A structured review of the relevant published literature was performed and 45 relevant studies describing antibiotic pharmacokinetics in patients receiving extracorporeal CPB as part of major cardiac surgery were identified. Some of the studies suggested marked PK alterations in the peri-operative period with increases in volume of distribution (Vd) by up to 58% and altered drug clearances of up to 20%. Mechanisms proposed as causing the PK changes included haemodilution, hypothermia, retention of the antibiotic within the extracorporeal circuit, altered physiology related to a systemic inflammatory response, and maldistribution of blood flow. Of note, some studies reported no or minimal impact of the CPB procedure on antibiotic pharmacokinetics. Given the inconsistent data, ongoing research should focus on clarifying the influence of CPB procedure and related clinical covariates on the pharmacokinetics of different antibiotics during cardiac surgery. Traditional prophylactic dosing regimens may need to be re-assessed to ensure sufficient drug exposures that will minimise the risk of surgical site infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Surgical Site Infections in Children: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshbin, Amir; So, Jeannette P; Aleem, Ilyas S; Stephens, Derek; Matlow, Anne G; Wright, James G

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the association between antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) and surgical-site infection in pediatric patients. Surgical-site infections (SSIs) are a major cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Despite numerous studies in adults, benefit of AP in preventing SSIs in children is uncertain. Patients aged 0 to 21 years who underwent surgical procedures at a pediatric acute care hospital from April 1, 2009, to December 31, 2010, were assessed. Antibiotic prophylaxis indication and administration according to an evidence-based guideline were recorded. Complete compliance was defined as AP given, when indicated, within 60 minutes before incision. Surgical-site infections were identified using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria and documented in the medical records using the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Multiple logistic regressions adjusting for age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, wound classification, admission status, surgical discipline, and surgical duration evaluated association of AP compliance and SSI. Of 5309 patients for whom antibiotics were indicated, 3901 (73.5%) with complete compliance had an infection rate of 3.0%, whereas 1408 (26.5%) who were not compliant had an infection rate of 4.3% (adjusted relative risk: 0.7; 95% confidence interval: 0.5-0.9; P = 0.02). Of 4156 patients for whom antibiotics were not indicated, the 895 (21.5%) who received antibiotics had an infection rate of 1.7% compared with 0.7% in the 3261 (78.5%) who did not receive antibiotics (adjusted relative risk: 1.6; 95% confidence interval: 0.8-3.1; P = 0.18). In pediatric surgery, complete compliance with AP was associated with 30% decreased risk of SSI.

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis compliance for clean-contaminated wounds in a district hospital in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syachroni Syachroni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Insidens infeksi luka operasi (ILO masih menjadi masalah namun kejadiannya dapatdikurangi dengan tindakan pencegahan yaitu antara lain dengan pemberian antibiotik profilaksis.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menilai kesesuaian penggunaan antibiotik profilaksis pada pasien bedahbersih-terkontaminasi.Metode: Penelitian potong lintang di sebuah rumah sakit umum daerah (RSUD di Jakarta pada periode1 Januari sampai 31 Desember 2013. Data berasal dari rekam medik pasien dewasa yang menjalanipembedahan dengan kriteria kelas luka bedah bersih-terkontaminasi kecuali bedah sesar. Analisis datadilakukan secara deskriptif. Sebagai standar penggunaan antibiotika digunakan Permenkes RI No.2406/2011 tentang pedoman antibiotik nasional dan pedoman standar internasional untuk profilaksis bedah.Hasil: Sebanyak 626 subjek diikutsertakan dalam penelitian dengan bedah ginekologi (49,5% dangenitourinari (32,6% merupakan tindakan bedah terbanyak dan lebih dari 80% bedah elektif. Jenisantibiotik yang paling umum digunakan baik preoperatif maupun postoperatif adalah seftriakson (49,8%,ampisilin/sulbaktam (11,7% dan sefuroksim (8,3%. Keseluruhan ketepatan antibiotik profilaksis diketahui96,8% tepat indikasi prosedur bedah, 21,5% tepat obat dan hanya 2,3% tepat waktu pemberiannya 60menit sebelum operasi.Kesimpulan: Kepatuhan antibiotik profilaksis untuk bedah bersih-terkontaminasi di suatu RSUD Jakartabelum sesuai dengan pedoman nasional dan standar internasional. (Health Science Journal of Indonesia2015;6:57-62Kata kunci: antibiotik, bedah, bersih-terkontaminasi, kepatuhan, profilaksis. AbstractBackground: The incidence of surgical site infection (SSI is still a problem, but its occurrence can bereduced by preventive action such as the provision of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery. This study aimedto describe the compliance of antibiotic prophylaxis in clean-contaminated wounds.Methods: This cross-sectional study design was conducted in a district

  10. Influence of the ischaemic tourniquet in antibiotic prophylaxis in total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats, Laura; Valls, Joan; Ros, Joaquim; Jover, Alfredo; Pérez-Villar, Ferran; Fernández-Martínez, José Juan

    2015-01-01

    There is level iv evidence that the preoperative administration of antibiotics helps in the prevention of prosthetic infection. There is controversy on whether the ischemia applied during surgery may affect the minimum inhibitory concentration of the antibiotic in the peri-prosthetic tissues. The aim of this study is to review this phenomenon through the determination of antibiotic concentration in the synovial tissue. A prospective observational clinical study was conducted on 32 patients undergoing total knee replacement. Cefonicid 2g was administered as prophylaxis, with a tourniquet used for all patients. The antibiotic concentration was quantified by high performance liquid chromatography in samples of synovial tissue collected at the beginning and at the end of the intervention. The mean concentration of antibiotic was 23.16 μg/g (95% CI 19.19 to 27.13) in the samples at the beginning of the intervention and 15.45 μg/g (95% CI 13.20 to 17.69) in the final samples, being higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration of cefonicid, set at 8 μg/g. These results were statistically significant for both concentrations (P<.00001). The antibiotic concentration throughout the standard total knee prosthesis surgery performed with tourniquet gradually decreases throughout the intervention. The concentration determined at the end of the intervention was higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration required for the antibiotic studied. In conclusion, the use of a tourniquet does not increase the risk of infection. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

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    Duncan NA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Natalie A Duncan,1 William G Kronenberger,2 Kisha C Hampton,1 Ellen M Bloom,1 Angeli G Rampersad,1 Christopher P Roberson,1 Amy D Shapiro11Department of Hematology, Indiana Hemophilia and Thrombosis Center, 2Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine Riley and Child Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, Indianapolis, IN, USABackground: Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation.Methods: A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures.Results: Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89 and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales.Conclusion: The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. Keywords: penicillin prophylaxis, SCAALE, newborn screening program, Sickle SAFE Program, hemoglobinopathy, compliance

  12. Weight Gain and Obesity in Infants and Young Children Exposed to Prolonged Antibiotic Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, M Bruce; Eickhoff, Jens C

    2017-02-01

    An association between antibiotic use and excessive weight gain or obesity in healthy infants and young children has been reported, but evidence is inconsistent and based on observational studies of growth in relation to incidental antibiotic exposures. To evaluate whether prolonged antibiotic exposure is associated with weight gain in children participating in a clinical trial of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection. Secondary analysis of data from the Randomized Intervention for Children With Vesicoureteral Reflux Study, a 2-year randomized clinical trial that enrolled participants from 2007 to 2011. All 607 children who were randomized to receive antibiotic (n = 302) or placebo (n = 305) were included. Children with urinary tract anomalies, premature birth, or major comorbidities were excluded from participation. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or placebo taken orally, once daily, for 2 years. Weight gain as measured by change in weight-for-age z score from baseline to the end-of-study visit at 24 months. Secondary outcomes included weight gain at 6, 12, and 18 months and the prevalence of overweight or obesity at 24 months. Participants had a median age of 12 months (range, 2-71 months) and 558 of 607 (91.9%) were female. Anthropometric data were complete at the 24-month visit for 428 children (214 in the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole group and 214 in the placebo group). Weight gain in the trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole group and the placebo group was similar (mean [SD] change in weight-for-age z score: +0.14 [0.83] and +0.18 [0.85], respectively; difference, -0.04 [95% CI, -0.19 to 0.12]; P = .65). There was no significant difference in weight gain at 6, 12, or 18 months or in the prevalence of overweight or obesity at 24 months (24.8% vs 25.7%; P = .82). Subgroup analyses showed no significant interaction between weight gain effect and age, sex, history of breastfeeding, prior antibiotic use, adherence to study

  13. ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS IN BARIATRIC SURGERY: a continuous infusion of cefazolin versus ampicillin/sulbactam and ertapenem

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    Álvaro Antônio Bandeira FERRAZ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The incidence of surgical site infection in bariatric patients is significant and the current recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis are sometimes inadequate. Objective The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of three prophylactic antibiotic regimens on the incidence of surgical site infection. Methods A prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted between January 2009 and January 2013 in which 896 Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses were performed to treat obesity. The study compared three groups of patients according to the perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis administered intravenously and beginning at anesthesia induction: Group I consisting of 194 patients treated with two 3-g doses of ampicillin/sulbactam; Group II with 303 patients treated with a single 1-g dose of ertapenem; and Group III with 399 patients treated with a 2-g dose of cefazolin at anesthesia induction followed by a continuous infusion of cefazolin 1g throughout the surgical procedure. The rate of surgical site infection was analyzed, as well as its association with age, sex, preoperative weight, body mass index and comorbidities. Results The rates of surgical site infection were 4.16% in the group treated prophylactically with ampicillin/sulbactam, 1.98% in the ertapenem group and 1.55% in the continuous cefazolin group. Conclusion The prophylactic use of continuous cefazolin in surgeries for morbid obesity shows very promising results. These findings suggest that some prophylactic regimens need to be reconsidered and even substituted by more effective therapies for the prevention of surgical site infections in bariatric patients.

  14. A novel protocol for antibiotic prophylaxis based on preoperative kidney function in patients undergoing open heart surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odaka, Mizuho; Minakata, Kenji; Toyokuni, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Kazuhiro; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Sakata, Ryuzo; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to develop and assess the effectiveness of a protocol for antibiotic prophylaxis based on preoperative kidney function in patients undergoing open heart surgery. We established a protocol for antibiotic prophylaxis based on preoperative kidney function in patients undergoing open heart surgery. This novel protocol was assessed by comparing patients undergoing open heart surgery before (control group; n = 30) and after its implementation (protocol group; n = 31) at Kyoto University Hospital between July 2012 and January 2013. Surgical site infections (SSIs) were observed in 4 control group patients (13.3 %), whereas no SSIs were observed in the protocol group patients (P protocol group (P protocol significantly decreased the total antibiotic dose used in the perioperative period (P protocol group patients required this additional change in the antibiotic regimen (P protocol based on preoperative kidney function effectively prevents SSIs in patients undergoing open heart surgery.

  15. Increasing Compliance With an Antibiotic Prophylaxis Guideline to Prevent Pediatric Surgical Site Infection: Before and After Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jeannette P; Aleem, Ilyas S; Tsang, Derek S; Matlow, Anne G; Wright, James G

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate an intervention for improving antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) guideline compliance to prevent surgical site infections in children. Although appropriate AP reduces surgical site infection, and guidelines improve quality of care, changing practice is difficult. To facilitate behavioral change, various barriers need to be addressed. A multidisciplinary task force at a pediatric hospital developed an evidence-based AP guideline. Subsequently, the guideline was posted in operating rooms and the online formulary, only recommended antibiotics were available in operating rooms, incoming trainees received orientation, antibiotic verification was included in time-out, computerized alerts were set for inappropriate postoperative prophylaxis, and surgeons received e-mails when guideline was not followed. AP indication and administration were documented for surgical procedures in July 2008 (preintervention), September 2011 (postintervention), and April-May 2013 (follow-up). Compliance was defined as complete--appropriate antibiotic, dose, timing, redosing, and duration when prophylaxis was indicated; partial--appropriate drug and timing when prophylaxis was indicated; and appropriate use--complete compliance when prophylaxis was indicated, no antibiotics when not indicated. Compliance at preintervention and follow-up was compared using χ(2) tests. AP was indicated in 43.9% (187/426) and 62.0% (124/200) of surgical procedures at preintervention and follow-up, respectively. There were significant improvements in appropriate antibiotic use (51.6%-67.0%; P < 0.001), complete (26.2%-53.2%; P < 0.001) and partial compliance (73.3%-88.7%, P = 0.001), correct dosage (77.5%-90.7%; P = 0.003), timing (83.3%-95.8%; P = 0.001), redosing (62.5%-95.8%, P = 0.003), and duration (47.1%-65.3%; P < 0.002). A multifaceted intervention improved compliance with a pediatric AP guideline.

  16. The influence of antibiotic prophylaxis on bacterial resistance in urinary tract infections in children with spina bifida

    OpenAIRE

    Zegers, Sebastiaan Hermanus Johannes; Dieleman, Jeanne; van der Bruggen, Tjomme; Kimpen, Jan; de Jong-de Vos van Steenwijk, Catharine; Zegers, Bas

    2017-01-01

    Background Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is an increasingly threatening consequence of antimicrobial exposure for many decades now. In urinary tract infections (UTIs), antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) increases bacterial resistance. We studied the resistance patterns of positive urinary cultures in spina bifida children on clean intermittent catheterization, both continuing and stopping AP. Methods In a cohort of 176 spina bifida patients, 88 continued and 88 stopped using AP. During 18 mont...

  17. Serotypes, genotypes, and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of group B streptococci causing neonatal sepsis and meningitis before and after introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijbels-Smeulders, M.A.; Kimpen, J.L.; Kollee, L.A.; Bakkers, J.; Melchers, W.J.; Spanjaard, L.; Wannet, W.J.; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    We studied the characteristics of strains isolated from neonates with group B streptococci sepsis and meningitis, before and after the introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in The Netherlands. In 1999, 1 year after this introduction the serotype and genotype distribution and the susceptibility

  18. Low Infection Rate after Tumor Hip Arthroplasty for Metastatic Bone Disease in a Cohort Treated with Extended Antibiotic Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner H. Hettwer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Compared to conventional hip arthroplasty, endoprosthetic reconstruction after tumor resection is associated with a substantially increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI, with reported rates of around 10% in a recent systematic review. The optimal duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for this patient population remains unknown. Material and Methods. To establish the infection rate associated with prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis in our department, we performed a retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent endoprosthetic reconstruction of the proximal femur after tumor resection for metastatic bone disease during a 4-year period from 2010 to 2013 (n=105 patients. Results. Intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis was administrated for an extended duration of a mean of 7.4 days. The overall infection rate was 3.6% (4/111 implants, infection free survival was 96% at 2 years, and the risk of amputation associated with infection was 25% (1/4 patients. Discussion. Preemptive eradication of bacterial contamination may be of value in certain clinical situations, where the risk level and consequences of implant-associated infection are unacceptable. Our findings suggest that extended postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis may reduce the risk of PJI in patients undergoing tumor resection and endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic bone disease associated impending or de facto pathologic fractures of the proximal femur.

  19. Low Infection Rate after Tumor Hip Arthroplasty for Metastatic Bone Disease in a Cohort Treated with Extended Antibiotic Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettwer, Werner H.; Horstmann, Peter Frederik; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Grum-Scwensen, Tomas Andreas; Petersen, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Compared to conventional hip arthroplasty, endoprosthetic reconstruction after tumor resection is associated with a substantially increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), with reported rates of around 10% in a recent systematic review. The optimal duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for this patient population remains unknown. Material and Methods. To establish the infection rate associated with prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis in our department, we performed a retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent endoprosthetic reconstruction of the proximal femur after tumor resection for metastatic bone disease during a 4-year period from 2010 to 2013 (n = 105 patients). Results. Intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis was administrated for an extended duration of a mean of 7.4 days. The overall infection rate was 3.6% (4/111 implants), infection free survival was 96% at 2 years, and the risk of amputation associated with infection was 25% (1/4 patients). Discussion. Preemptive eradication of bacterial contamination may be of value in certain clinical situations, where the risk level and consequences of implant-associated infection are unacceptable. Our findings suggest that extended postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis may reduce the risk of PJI in patients undergoing tumor resection and endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic bone disease associated impending or de facto pathologic fractures of the proximal femur. PMID:25705521

  20. Low infection rate after tumor hip arthroplasty for metastatic bone disease in a cohort treated with extended antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettwer, Werner H; Horstmann, Peter Frederik; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann; Grum-Scwensen, Tomas Andreas; Petersen, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    Background. Compared to conventional hip arthroplasty, endoprosthetic reconstruction after tumor resection is associated with a substantially increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), with reported rates of around 10% in a recent systematic review. The optimal duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for this patient population remains unknown. Material and Methods. To establish the infection rate associated with prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis in our department, we performed a retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent endoprosthetic reconstruction of the proximal femur after tumor resection for metastatic bone disease during a 4-year period from 2010 to 2013 (n = 105 patients). Results. Intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis was administrated for an extended duration of a mean of 7.4 days. The overall infection rate was 3.6% (4/111 implants), infection free survival was 96% at 2 years, and the risk of amputation associated with infection was 25% (1/4 patients). Discussion. Preemptive eradication of bacterial contamination may be of value in certain clinical situations, where the risk level and consequences of implant-associated infection are unacceptable. Our findings suggest that extended postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis may reduce the risk of PJI in patients undergoing tumor resection and endoprosthetic replacement for metastatic bone disease associated impending or de facto pathologic fractures of the proximal femur.

  1. Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Second generation cephalosporin antibiotic prophylaxis and Clostridium difficile infection in hip and knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawil, K; Babu, A; Loeffler, M; Williams, T

    2017-05-01

    Introduction The use of broad spectrum cephalosporin antibiotics has been discouraged by the Department of Health in England because of the link to increased Clostridium difficile infection rates. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a local protocol that included the use of second generation cephalosporin (cefuroxime) antibiotics as a prophylactic agent was associated with increased risk of C difficile in elective hip and knee arthroplasty patients. Methods A retrospective intention-to-treat study was conducted. An infection control database of all cases of C difficile infection both in hospital and in the community was reviewed and cross-referenced against surgical records. A positive correlation was identified when a C difficile positive sample was documented within eight weeks of arthroplasty surgery. Results Only 1 case (0.02%) of C difficile positive diarrhoea was identified that correlated to the 8-week postoperative period following 4,488 arthroplasty procedures. Conclusions The use of cephalosporin antibiotic prophylaxis in the elective hip and knee arthroplasty setting does not appear to be associated with increased C difficile infection rates, achieving surgical site infection rates that are comparable with the national average.

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis in prostate biopsy: a comparative randomized clinical assay between ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and chloramphenicol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Tobias-Machado

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare, prospectively, 4 different schemes of antibiotic prophylaxis previously to transrectal prostate biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 257 patients were randomized in 4 groups: Group I: single dose of ciprofloxacin 2 hours before the procedure; Group II: ciprofloxacin 3 days; Group III: chloramphenicol 3 days; and Group IV: norfloxacin 3 days. The complication rate was assessed in a blind way on the third and on the thirtieth days through a questionnaire. Groups were compared by the qui-square method and, in small samples, by the Fisher method, with statistical significance of 95%. RESULTS: Complications index throughout the sample differed between the 4 groups of patients under study, being 3.1% for group I, 2.1% for group II, 18.3% for group III and 10.5% for group IV. Schemes employing ciprofloxacin were statistically superior to those that used norfloxacin or chloramphenicol (p 0.05. CONCLUSION: Schemes using ciprofloxacin presented better results in prophylaxis previously to prostate biopsy. We recommend using a single dose of ciprofloxacin due to its posologic ease and low cost, associated with a therapeutic response equivalent to 3-day regimens.

  4. Comparative Effectiveness of Single versus Combination Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Infections after Transrectal Prostate Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Kaylee; Parlee, Anne; Orlando, Ralph; Lerner, Lori; Strymish, Judith; Gupta, Kalpana

    2015-12-01

    An increase in fluoroquinolone resistance and transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate (TRUS) biopsy infections has prompted the need for alternative effective antibiotic prophylaxis. We aimed to compare ciprofloxacin and other single-agent therapies to combination therapy for efficacy and adverse effects. Men who underwent a TRUS biopsy within the VA Boston health care system with documented receipt of prophylactic antibiotics periprocedure were eligible for inclusion. Postprocedure infections within 30 days were ascertained by chart review from electronic records, including any inpatient, outpatient, or urgent-care visits. Among 455 evaluable men over a 3-year period, there were 25 infections (5.49%), with sepsis occurring in 2.4%, urinary tract infections (UTI) in 1.54%, and bacteremia in 0.44% of patients. Escherichia coli was the most common urine (89%) and blood (92%) pathogen, with fluoroquinolone resistance rates of 88% and 91%, respectively. Ciprofloxacin alone was associated with significantly more infections than ciprofloxacin plus an additional agent (P = 0.014). Intramuscular gentamicin alone was also significantly associated with a higher infection rate obtained with all other regimens (P = 0.004). Any single-agent regimen, including ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, or gentamicin, was associated with significantly higher infection rates than any combination regimen (odds ratio [OR], 4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.47, 10.85; P = 0.004). Diabetes, immunosuppressive condition or medication, hospitalization within the previous year, and UTI within the previous 6 months were not associated with infection risk. Clostridium difficile infections were similar. These findings suggest that ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin alone are inferior to a combination regimen. Institutions with high failure rates of prophylaxis for TRUS biopsies should consider combination regimens derived from their local data.

  5. Cervical dilatation thresholds for initiation of group B streptococcus antibiotic prophylaxis for women with spontaneous preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Richard L; Parikh, Laura; Hansen, Clare; Hunter, Krystal M

    2015-11-01

    To determine the optimal time for initiating group B streptococcus (GBS) antibiotic prophylaxis for women in spontaneous preterm labor. In total, 227 women delivering singleton infants after presenting with spontaneous preterm labor and intact membranes at 24 0/7-36 6/7 weeks were evaluated, as well as 150 undelivered women with threatened preterm labor during the same time period. The date and time of each cervical examination throughout labor were recorded. We calculated the percentages who would have correctly received at least 4 h of GBS prophylaxis if antibiotics were routinely initiated for various cervical dilatation thresholds during labor, as well as the percentage of undelivered women who would have received unnecessary antibiotic exposure at each cervical dilatation cutoff. Delaying antibiotics until cervical dilatation reached 2 cm or greater would have resulted in 62.1% receiving four or more hours of antibiotics, compared to 66.5% if antibiotics were started on all women at admission (p = 0.33), while significantly reducing unnecessary antibiotic exposure in undelivered women from 100% to 62.0% (p labor until the cervix reaches 2 cm or greater at any time during labor.

  6. Optimal Timing and Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Periprosthetic Joint Infection (PJI: Literature Review and World Consensus (Part Five

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Parvizi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Context There is a need to find the optimal doses and any need for weight adjustment in patients who have higher than standard BMI. There is also a need to determine if repeating doses of antibiotics is necessary when the surgery takes longer than usual. Evidence Acquisition Delegates in workgroup 3 of the consensus meeting on PJI reviewed English literature for relevant articles. 28 of 221 articles were relevant to the 2 following questions regarding perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent PJI. Results Preoperative antibiotics have different pharmacokinetics based on patient weight and should be weight-adjusted. An additional dose of antibiotic should be administered intraoperatively after two half-lives of the prophylactic agent. The general guidelines for frequency of intraoperative antibiotic administration are provided. We recommend that re-dosing of antibiotics be considered in cases of large blood volume loss (> 2000 cc and fluid resuscitation (> 2000 cc. As these are independent variables, re-dosing should be considered as soon as the first of these parameters are met. Conclusions Recommendations for need for weight adjustment doses and repeat of doses in longer duration surgeries in terms of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in hip and knee arthroplasty were provided based on evidences in the literature and consensus of expert delegates from consensus meeting.

  7. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (P<.05). There is a lack of consensus on the appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in SCD children undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  8. Predisposing cardiac conditions, interventional procedures, and antibiotic prophylaxis among patients with infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirillo, Fabio; Faggiano, Pompilio; Cecconi, Moreno; Moreo, Antonella; Squeri, Angelo; Gaddi, Oscar; Cecchi, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis (AP) for prevention of infective endocarditis (IE) in patients with predisposing cardiac condition (PCC) undergoing invasive procedures is still debated. We sought to assess the prevalence of PCC, the type of interventional procedures preceding the onset of symptoms, and the usefulness of AP in a large cohort of consecutive patients with definite IE. We examined 677 (median age 65.34 years; male 492 [73%]) consecutive patients with IE enrolled from July 2007 through 2010 into the Italian Registry of Infective Endocarditis. Predisposing cardiac condition was present in 341 patients (50%).Thirty-two patients (4.7%) underwent dental procedures. Of 20 patients with PCC undergoing dental procedure, 13 had assumed AP. Viridans group streptococci were isolated from blood cultures in 8 of 20 patients with PCC and prior dental procedure. Nondental procedures preceded IE in 139 patients (21%). They were significantly older and had more comordibities compared with patients undergoing dental procedures. Predisposing cardiac condition was identified in 91 patients. Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered to 67 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent causative agent. Cardiac surgery was necessary in 85 patients (20 with prior dental and 65 with nondental procedure). Surgical mortality (12% vs 0%, P = .03) and hospital mortality (23% vs 3%, P = .001) were significantly larger among patients with nondental procedures. In a large unselected cohort of patients with IE, the incidence of preceding dental procedures was minimal. The number of cases potentially preventable by means of AP was negligible. Nondental procedures were more frequent than dental procedures and were correlated with poorer prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adherence to Surgical Antibiotic Prophylaxis Guidelines in New South Wales, Australia: Identifying Deficiencies and Regression Analysis of Contributing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Matthew C; Edye, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Surgical antibiotic prophylaxis is frequently reported in the literature to be suboptimal, a finding having both clinical and public health implications. This study aimed to calculate rates and patterns of adherence to guidelines at two sites and identify extrinsic contributing factors. A retrospective analysis was conducted over two 12-mo periods during 2013-2014 at the metropolitan Blacktown Hospital and regional Lismore Base Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. A group of 400 patients undergoing abdominal general surgery was selected via simple random sampling (n = 200 per site). Medical records were reviewed, and prophylactic antibiotic regimens were compared with the Australian guideline, Therapeutic Guidelines: Antibiotic (v. 14) with respect to drug choice, dosage, timing of administration, and duration of administration. The overall rate of adherence to the guidelines was 16.5% at Blacktown Hospital and 19.5% at Lismore Base Hospital. At each site, prophylaxis was administered to more than 95% of patients and was inappropriately withheld in 4%. Drug choice was the most frequent error type, specifically involving inappropriate omission of metronidazole and use of newer-generation cephalosporins. Errors in the timing of administration also were frequent, with prophylaxis typically occurring excessively early. Logistic regression identified emergency surgery as independently associated with prophylactic errors in both the Blacktown Hospital (p antibiotic prophylactic guidelines was poor at both the metropolitan and regional sites. Choice of antibiotic and timing of administration were identified as major error types. Consideration should be given to multidisciplinary involvement of anesthetists, implementation of focused interventions with an emphasis on emergency settings, and further research correlating antibiotic use with clinical significance.

  10. Prevention of post surgical infection in retained and semi retained third molar surgery using two antibiotic prophylaxis regimens with Clindamycin

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Infantes, Manuel; Departamento Académico Médico Quirúrgico, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Rodríguez Alfaro, Miguel; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Cabrejos Álvarez, Antonio; Departamento Académico Médico Quirúrgico, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Burga Sánchez, Jonny; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Chumpitaz Cerrate, Víctor; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; López Bellido, Roger; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Ramón Rosales, Arturo; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Varas Hilario, Roberto; Departamento Académico de Ciencias Básicas, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Zegarra Cuya, Juan; Bachiller en Odontología, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare two antibiotic prophylaxis regimens with Clindamycin in patients under semi-retained third lower molar surgery. Third molar extractions were carried out in healthy patients who complied with the inclusion criteria, in the central clinic surgery service of San Marcos University dentistry faculty. After having performed the exodontia control appointments were programmed during 5 days post – extraction where the infection signs were evaluated through the pres...

  11. Prospective study of antibiotic prophylaxis for prostate biopsy involving >1100 men.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manecksha, Rustom P

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to compare infection rates for two 3-day antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSgbp) and demonstrate local microbiological trends. In 2008, 558 men and, in 2009, 625 men had TRUSgpb. Regimen 1 (2008) comprised 400 mg Ofloxacin immediately before biopsy and 200 mg 12-hourly for 3 days. Regimen 2 (2009) comprised Ofloxacin 200 mg 12-hourly for 3 days commencing 24 hours before biopsy. 20\\/558 (3.6%) men had febrile episodes with regimen 1 and 10\\/625 (1.6%) men with regimen 2 (P = 0.03). E. coli was the most frequently isolated organism. Overall, 7\\/13 (54%) of positive urine cultures were quinolone resistant and (5\\/13) 40% were multidrug resistant. Overall, 5\\/9 (56%) patients with septicaemia were quinolone resistant. All patients were sensitive to Meropenem. There was 1 (0.2%) death with regimen 1. Commencing Ofloxacin 24 hours before TRUSgpb reduced the incidence of febrile episodes significantly. We observed the emergence of quinolone and multidrug-resistant E. coli. Meropenem should be considered for unresolving sepsis.

  12. The hip fracture best practice tariff: early surgery and the implications for MRSA screening and antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, David J; Gulihar, Abhinav; Aujla, Randeep S; Taylor, Grahame J S

    2015-01-01

    In April 2010, the Department of Health introduced the hip fracture best practice. Among the clinical criteria required to earn remuneration is surgery within 36 h of admission. However, early surgery may mean that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation status is not known before surgery, and therefore, appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis may not be administered. In view of this, our department's policy is to administer an additional dose of teicoplanin to patients with unknown MRSA status along with routine antimicrobial prophylaxis. The purpose of this study was to provide a safe and effective antimicrobial prophylaxis for hip fracture patients. We prospectively collected details of demographics and antimicrobial prophylaxis for all patients admitted with a hip fracture in November 2011. This was repeated in February 2012 after an educational and advertising drive to improve compliance with departmental antimicrobial policy. Microbiology results were obtained from the hospital microbiology database. A cost-benefit analysis was undertaken to assess this regime. A total of 144 hip fracture patients were admitted during the 2 months. The average admission to surgery time was 32 h, and the average MRSA swab processing time was 35 h. 86 % of patients reached theatre with unknown MRSA status. Compliance with the departmental antimicrobial policy improved from 25 % in November 2011 to 76 % in February 2012. Potential savings of £ 40,000 were calculated. With best practice tariff resulting in 86 % of patients reaching theatre with unknown MRSA status, we advocate an additional single dose of teicoplanin to cover against possible MRSA colonisation.

  13. An abscess due to Pasteurella multocida after a cat scratch: Case report and evaluation of antibiotic prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeşim Alpay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pasteurella multocida has been isolated from 50% to 70% of healthy cats and most commonly associated with acute skin and soft tissue infections following an animal bite or scratch. As the zone and depth of injury can lead to more serious infections such as deep tissue infections, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis. However, no predictive factor showing which wound would be infected. In our case, patient whom applied with abscess after a cat scratch and P. multocida was found as a causative agent. This situation has caused to review us, once more, that which cases should be taken antibiotic pro­phylaxis in addition to immunoprophylaxis (for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis, and anti-tetanus prophylaxis in the first admission. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be used for 3-5 days in selected cases if they include; moderate to severe crushing injuries especially edematous form, less than 8 hours old, bone or joint penetration, hand wounds, especially emphasizes the importance of hand injuries and deep penetrations. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2014; 4(4: 159-161

  14. [Assessment of antibiotic use and impact of an intervention intended to modify the prescribing behavior in surgical prophylaxis in 6hospitals in the metropolitan area of Monterrey, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo Del Carmen; de la Garza-Camargo, Mauricio; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Carmona-González, Sandra; García-Cabello, Ricardo; Islas-Esparza, Luis Arturo; Saldaña-Flores, Gustavo; González-Cano, Juan Roberto; González-Ruvalcaba, Román; Valadez-Botello, Francisco Javier; Muñoz-Maldonado, Gerardo Enrique; Montero-Cantú, Carlos Alberto; Díaz-Ramos, Rita Delia; Solórzano-Santos, Fortino

    2017-01-04

    Improper use of antibiotics increases antimicrobial resistance. Evaluate the use of antibiotics and the impact of an intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis in 6 hospitals of Monterrey, Mexico. Design: A prospective multicenter survey and a pretest-postest experimental study. Phase 1: Survey to evaluate the use of antibiotics through an especially designed guide. Phase 2: Intervention designed to improve antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by the medical staff by using printed, audiovisual and electronic messages. Phase 3: Survey to evaluate the impact of the intervention. Frequencies, percentages, medians, ranges and X(2) test. Phase 1: We evaluated 358 surgical patients, 274 prophylactic antibiotic regimens. A total of 96% of antibiotics regimens began with inappropriate timing (290/302), 82.8% were inappropriate regimens (274/331), 77.7% were in inappropriate dosage (230/296), 86% of inadequate length (241/280), and in 17.4% restricted antibiotics were used (52/299). Phase 2: 9 sessions including 189 physicians (14 department chairs, 58 general practitioners and 117 residents). Phase 3: We evaluated 303 surgical patients, 218 prophylactic antibiotics regimens. Inappropriate treatment commencement was reduced to 84.1% (180/214) (P<0.001), inappropriate regimens to 75.3% (162/215) (P=0.03), inappropriate dosages to 51.2% (110/215) (P<0.001), and use of restricted antibiotics to 8.3% (18/215) (P=0.003). Inappropriate use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery is a frequent problem in Monterrey. The intervention improved the antibiotic prescription for surgical prophylaxis by reducing inappropriate treatment commencement, regimens, dosages, and overuse of restricted antibiotics. It is necessary to strengthen strategies to improve the prescription of antibiotics in surgical prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with rheumatic heart disease diagnosed through screening in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelman, Daniel; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Ah Kee, Maureen; Donath, Susan; Parks, Tom; Steer, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) can detect subclinical cases; however, adequate adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) is required to alter disease outcomes. We aimed to investigate the adherence to SAP among young people with RHD diagnosed through echocardiographic screening in Fiji and to investigate factors associated with adherence. Patients diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji from 2006 to 2014 were included. Dates of benzathine penicillin G injections were collected from 76 health clinics nationally from December 2011 to December 2014. Adherence was measured using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with any adherence (≥1 injection received) and adequate adherence (PDC ≥0.80). Of 494 patients, 268 (54%) were female and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 203 (41%) had no injections recorded and just 33 (7%) had adequate adherence. Multivariate logistic regression showed increasing age (OR 0.93 per year, 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.79) to be inversely associated with any adherence. Non-iTaukei ethnicity (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.04-6.33) and urban residence (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.54-7.36) were associated with adequate adherence, whereas time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.17-0.83) was inversely associated with adequate adherence. Adherence to SAP after screening in Fiji is currently inadequate for individual patient protection or population disease control. Secondary prevention should be strengthened before further screening can be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of urinary tract infections in prenatal hydronephrosis: An updated systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easterbrook, Bethany; Capolicchio, John-Paul; Braga, Luis H.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: While continuous antibiotic prophylaxis (CAP) is currently recommended to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs) in infants with prenatal hydronephrosis (HN), this recommendation is not evidence-based. The objective of this study was to systematically determine whether CAP reduces UTIs in the HN population. Methods: Applicable trials were identified through an electronic search of MEDLINE (1946–2015), EMBASE (1980–2016), CINAHL (1982–2016), and CENTRAL (1993–2016) and through a hand search of American Urological Association (AUA) (2012–2015) and European Society for Pediatric Urology (ESPU) (2012–2015) abstracts, as well as reference lists of included trials. The search strategy was not limited by language or year of publication. Eligible studies compared CAP to no CAP in patients with antenatal HN, <2 years of age, and reported development of UTI and HN grades. Two independent reviewers performed title and abstract screening, full-text review, and quality appraisal. Results: Of 1518 citations screened, 11 were included, contributing 3909 patients for final analysis. Of these, four (36%) were considered high-quality when assessed by the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Meta-analysis of the non-randomized trials (n=10) provided similar pooled UTI rates, regardless of CAP use: 9.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.4–11.4%) for CAP and 7.5% (95% CI 6.4–8.6%) for no CAP. Conclusions: This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests there may be value in providing CAP to infants with high-grade HN; however, due to the very low-quality data from non-randomized studies, important clinical variables, such as circumcision status, were unable to be assessed.

  17. The use of some immunomodulators and non-antibiotic drugs in a prophylaxis and treatment of mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, E

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotics are widely used in treatment and prophylaxis of mastitis, but their antibacterial and therapeutic efficacy continues to decrease. New methods of prophylaxis of mastitis with the use of vaccines and biological response modifiers are reviewed. Prophylactic activity of staphylococcal vaccines should be investigated in the future because of difficulties in successful treatment of infections caused by these organisms. Vaccination with J5 bacterin (0111:B4) reduced duration of IMI and local signs of clinical coliform-mastitis. Some immunomodulators proved to be effective in treatment of mastitis during lactating period. Promising results were obtained with the use of giseng saponin, herbal gel, herbal extracts, propolis, lysosubtilin, antibacterial proteins, and lysozyme dimer especially.

  18. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part I: abdominal surgery) Profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en Cirugía Pediátrica (Parte I: cirugía abdominal)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Berta Fonseca Romero; Guillermo Cortiza Orbe; Lorenzo Pérez Romano; Carlos Cabrera Machado; Zoe Quintero Delgado; Rafael Trinchet Soler; Luis Marcano Sanz; Sergio Luis González López

    2005-01-01

    .... We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery...

  19. Antibiotic Prescriptions and Prophylaxis in Italian Children. Is It Time to Change? Data from the ARPEC Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Maia; Donà, Daniele; Montagnani, Carlotta; Lo Vecchio, Andrea; Romanengo, Marta; Tagliabue, Claudia; Centenari, Chiara; D'Argenio, Patrizia; Lundin, Rebecca; Giaquinto, Carlo; Galli, Luisa; Guarino, Alfredo; Esposito, Susanna; Sharland, Mike; Versporten, Ann; Goossens, Herman; Nicolini, Giangiacomo

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobials are the most commonly prescribed drugs. Many studies have evaluated antibiotic prescriptions in the paediatric outpatient but few studies describing the real antibiotic consumption in Italian children's hospitals have been published. Point-prevalence survey (PPS) has been shown to be a simple, feasible and reliable standardized method for antimicrobials surveillance in children and neonates admitted to the hospital. In this paper, we presented data from a PPS on antimicrobial prescriptions carried out in 7 large Italian paediatric institutions. A 1-day PPS on antibiotic use in hospitalized neonates and children was performed in Italy between October and December 2012 as part of the Antibiotic Resistance and Prescribing in European Children project (ARPEC). Seven institutions in seven Italian cities were involved. The survey included all admitted patients less than 18 years of age present in the ward at 8:00 am on the day of the survey, who had at least one on-going antibiotic prescription. For all patients data about age, weight, underlying disease, antimicrobial agent, dose and indication for treatment were collected. The PPS was performed in 61 wards within 7 Italian institutions. A total of 899 patients were eligible and 349 (38.9%) had an on-going prescription for one or more antibiotics, with variable rates among the hospitals (25.7% - 53.8%). We describe antibiotic prescriptions separately in neonates ( = 30 days to Italian situation in terms of antibiotic prescriptions in hospitalized neonates and children. An over-use of third generation cephalosporins both for prophylaxis and treatment was the most worrisome finding. A misuse and abuse of carbapenems and quinolones was also noted. Antibiotic stewardship programs should immediately identify feasible targets to monitor and modify the prescription patterns in children's hospital, also considering the continuous and alarming emergence of MDR bacteria.

  20. Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) of Primary Liver Tumors Necessary? Results From a Single-Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Shivank S., E-mail: sbhatia1@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States); Spector, Seth, E-mail: sspector@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Department of Surgery, VA Hospital (Veterans Affairs Medical Center) (United States); Echenique, Ana, E-mail: aechenique@med.miami.edu; Froud, Tatiana, E-mail: tfroud@med.miami.edu; Suthar, Rekha, E-mail: rsuthar@med.miami.edu; Lawson, Ivy, E-mail: i.lawson1@med.miami.edu; Dalal, Ravi, E-mail: rdalal@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States); Dinh, Vy, E-mail: vdinh@med.miami.edu [VA Hospital (Veterans Affairs Medical Center), Department of Medicine (United States); Yrizarry, Jose, E-mail: jyrizarr@med.miami.edu; Narayanan, Govindarajan, E-mail: gnarayanan@med.miami.edu [University of Miami, Vascular/Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Miller School of Medicine (United States)

    2015-08-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to evaluate need for antibiotic prophylaxis for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver tumors in patients with no significant co-existing risk factors for infection.Materials and MethodsFrom January 2004 to September 2013, 83 patients underwent 123 percutaneous RFA procedures for total of 152 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions. None of the patients had pre-existing biliary enteric anastomosis (BEA) or any biliary tract abnormality predisposing to ascending biliary infection or uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. No pre- or post-procedure antibiotic prophylaxis was provided for 121 procedures. Data for potential risk factors were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed for the frequency of infectious complications, including abscess formation.ResultsOne patient (1/121 (0.8 %) RFA sessions) developed a large segment 5 liver abscess/infected biloma communicating with the gallbladder 7 weeks after the procedure, successfully treated over 10 weeks with IV and PO antibiotic therapy and percutaneous catheter drainage. This patient did not receive any antibiotics prior to RFA. During the procedure, there was inadvertent placement of RFA probe tines into the gallbladder. No other infectious complications were documented.ConclusionThese data suggest that the routine use of prophylactic antibiotics for liver RFA is not necessary in majority of the patients undergoing liver ablation for HCC and could be limited to patients with high-risk factors such as the presence of BEA or other biliary abnormalities, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, and large centrally located tumors in close proximity to central bile ducts. Larger randomized studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis.

  1. [Treatment in the event of antibiotic prophylaxis failure in gynecologic surgery. A retrospective study of 20 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparella, P; Zullo, M A; Astorri, A L; Bondì, M; Maglione, A; Oliva, C; Mancuso Bondì, S

    1994-09-01

    A retrospective study was performed of the type of treatment used in 20 patients undergoing gynecological surgery in whom antibiotic prophylaxis with Mezlocillin (2 g i.v.) had failed. Patients were subdivided into three groups: A) Initial therapy with Mezlocillin (8 patients, 2 g/die i.m.) or Cefotetan (2 patients, 2 g/die i.m.) and subsequent addition of Gentamicin (8 patients, 240 mg/die i.m.) or Tobramycin (2 patients, 200 mg/die i.m.) and subsequently Metronidazole (7 patients, 1.5 g/die per os). B) Therapy with Imipenem/Cilastatin (6 patients, 1.5 g/die i.m.). C) Therapy with Imipenem/Cilastatin (4 patients, 1.5 g/die i.m.) after a variety of antibiotics: Cotrimoxazole (Trimethoprim 160 mg/die and sulphamethoxazole 800 mg/die per os), Pefloxacin (800 mg/die per os), Cefotetan (2 g/die i.m.) and Mezlocillin (2 g/die i.m.). Time taken to lower temperature was shorter in Group B (3.5 days) compared to Group A (6.8 days) and Group C (10 days). Postoperative hospital stay was also shorter in Group B (9 days) compared to Group C (16.5 days) and Group A (11.1 days). The immediate administration of an antibiotic active against Gram+ and Gram- germs, aerobes and anaerobes is therefore useful in the event of failure of antibiotic prophylaxis, rather than the use in succession of associations of antibiotics with a limited spectrum.

  2. Timing of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Elective Caesarean Delivery: A Multi-Center Randomized Controlled Trial and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Zhang

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis before skin incision with that after umbilical cord clamping in elective caesarean delivery.We conducted a randomized open-label controlled trial with two parallel arms at three hospitals in western China. Participants meeting the inclusion criteria received antibiotics 30-60 minutes before skin incision while others received antibiotics after umbilical cords clamping. For the meta-analysis, studies were identified from the database of PUBMED, Cochrane Library and EMbase and assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.Four hundred and ten patients were randomized to receive antibiotics before skin incision (n = 205 or after umbilical cords clamping (n = 205. There was no difference in the incidence of postpartum endometritis (RR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.04 to 3.24, wound infection (RR = 3.06, 95% CI 0.13 to 74.69 and total puerperal morbidity (RR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.47 to 2.22. No increase in the incidence of neonatal sepsis (RR = 0.34, 95% CI 0.04 to 3.24, septic workup (RR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.08 to 2.07, or intermediate NICU admission (RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.24 to 2.26 was observed. The meta-analysis involving nine RCTs showed that no statistically significant difference was found in terms of the risk of postpartum endometritis (RR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.39, 1.36, wound infection (RR = 0.80, 95%CI 0.55, 1.17, or puerperal morbidity (RR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.70, 1.13. No increase in the incidence of neonatal sepsis (RR = 0.65, 95% CI 0.35 to 1.20, septic workup (RR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.54, or intermediate NICU admission (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.18 was observed.For elective caesarean delivery, the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis before skin incision and after umbilical cord clamping were equal. Both antibiotic prophylaxis before skin incision and that after umbilical cord clamping were recommended for elective caesarean delivery. The outcome of further studies should address both maternal and neonatal

  3. Topical antibiotic prophylaxis for prevention of surgical wound infections from dermatologic procedures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saco, Michael; Howe, Nicole; Nathoo, Rajiv; Cherpelis, Basil

    2015-04-01

    Topical antibiotics are not indicated for postsurgical wound infection prophylaxis in clean and clean-contaminated dermatologic surgeries, yet many dermatologists continue to prescribe them. The objective of our systematic review and meta-analysis was to critically assess the efficacy of topical antibiotics in terms of preventing postsurgical wound infections in the dermatology outpatient setting. PubMed, Embase, MD Consult, Science Direct, Springer Link, DynaMed and Cochrane online medical databases were searched from 1980 to 2013. Using random effects modeling, the pooled odds ratio of developing a postsurgical wound infection was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.42-1.19). Pooled data of the four trials in the meta-analysis did not show a statistically significant difference in incidence of postsurgical wound infections between topical antibiotics and petrolatum/paraffin. In the setting of moist occlusive dressings, there is no statistically significant difference in prophylactic efficacy between applying and not applying ointment to surgical wounds. Wounds at increased risk of developing surgical site infections include wounds in diabetics, wounds located in certain anatomic regions, and wounds created by some surgical procedures. Petrolatum should be used instead of topical antibiotics as a prophylactic measure to prevent postsurgical wound infections in the outpatient dermatologic setting.

  4. Discrete choice experiment to evaluate factors that influence preferences for antibiotic prophylaxis in pediatric oncology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean A Regier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial and fungal infections in pediatric oncology patients cause morbidity and mortality. The clinical utility of antimicrobial prophylaxis in children is uncertain and the personal utility of these agents is disputed. Objectives were to use a discrete choice experiment to: (1 describe the importance of attributes to parents and healthcare providers when deciding between use and non-use of antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis; and (2 estimate willingness-to-pay for prophylactic strategies. METHODS: Attributes were chances of infection, death and side effects, route of administration and cost of pharmacotherapy. Respondents were randomized to a discrete choice experiment outlining hypothetical treatment options to prevent antibacterial or antifungal infections. Each respondent was presented 16 choice tasks and was asked to choose between two unlabeled treatment options and an opt-out alternative (no prophylaxis. RESULTS: 102 parents and 60 healthcare providers participated. For the antibacterial discrete choice experiment, frequency of administration was significantly associated with utility for parents but not for healthcare providers. Increasing chances of infection, death, side effects and cost were all significantly associated with decreased utility for parents and healthcare providers in both the antibacterial and antifungal discrete choice experiment. Parental willingness-to-pay was higher than healthcare providers for both strategies. CONCLUSION: Chances of infection, death, side effects and costs were all significantly associated with utility. Parents have higher willingness-to-pay for these strategies compared with healthcare providers. This knowledge can help to develop prophylaxis programs.

  5. Odontogenic bacteria in periodontal disease and resistance patterns to common antibiotics used as treatment and prophylaxis in odontology in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestre, J R; Bascones, A; Sánchez, P; Matesanz, P; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Giménez, M J; Pérez-Balcabao, I; Granizo, J J; Prieto, J

    2007-03-01

    Resistance in streptococci or Gram-negative bacteria is associated with antibiotic consumption. Scarce information exists on the antibiotic susceptibility of bacterial isolates from patients with periodontitis in countries with high antibiotic consumption, as this is an area in which microbiological testing is not performed in daily practice. The present study was undertaken to explore the susceptibility of bacterial isolates in periodontitis to antibiotics prescribed in odontology in Spain as treatment for local infections or prophylaxis for distant focal infections. Periodontal samples were prospectively collected in 48 patients classified by pocket depth of or=4 mm. Species were identified by culture, selecting the five most frequent morphotypes per sample, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Susceptibility was determined by E-test. A total of 261 isolates were identified: 72.9% patients had Streptococcus oralis; 70.8% Streptococcus mitis; 60.4% Prevotella buccae; 39.6% Prevotella denticola; 37.5% Fusobacterium nucleatum; 35.4% Prevotella intermedia; 25% Capnocytophaga spp.; 23% Veillonella spp.; 22.9% Prevotella melaninogenica and Streptococcus sanguis; and resistance rates were 0% for amoxicillin, approximately 10% for clindamycin, 9-22% for tetracycline, and for azithromycin ranged from 18.2% for S. sanguis to 47.7% for S. mitis. Prevotella isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, with amoxicillin resistance ranging from 17.1% in P. buccae to 26.3% in P. denticola. Metronidazole resistance was resistance ranged from 0 to 21.1%. beta-Lactamase production was positive in 54.1% Prevotella spp., 38.9% F. nucleatum, 30% Capnocytophaga spp., and 10% Veillonella spp. In this study, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most active antibiotic against all species tested, followed by metronidazole in the case of anaerobes.

  6. Fecal carriage of extended-spectrum and AmpC β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in surgical patients before and after antibiotic prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lotte; Kuhn, Katrin G; Hansen, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The impact of antibiotic prophylaxis on fecal carriage of ESBL-/AmpC-/carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) was investigated. Patients admitted for elective surgery or diagnostic procedure in a Department of Surgical Gastroenterology (SG) (n= 450) and Orthopedic Surgery (OS) (n= 300) p...

  7. Third-generation cephalosporins as antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery : What's the evidence?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Weiming; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Groen, Rob J. M.; Woernle, Christoph Michael; Grundmann, Hajo

    To analyze the role of third-generation cephalosporins as prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery. We reviewed the literature for data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on third-generation cephalosporins compared to other antibiotic regimen in neurosurgery. End point of the RCTs was the

  8. Efficacy of 48-hour post-operative antibiotics prophylaxis for patients undergoing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube in preventing site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Adnan; Alsaudi, Dib; Furnari, Manuele; Abdulhadi Ali, Mamdouh M; Al-Majadah, Saeed Salim Abdullah; Savarino, Vincenzo; Inferrera, Simona; Giannini, Edoardo G

    2011-06-01

    Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) is an endoscopic procedure for placing a feeding tube into the stomach through the skin, primarily to avoid malnutrition. Malnutrition can increase the risk of wound infection, whose incidence can be decreased by using antibiotic prophylaxis. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new antibiotic regimen in preventing acute post-PEG procedure complications. Ninety-seven consecutive patients were put on combined antibiotic therapy of clindamycin 600 mg and cefotaxime 1,000 mg every eight hours, starting with the insertion of the PEG tube and maintained for 48 hours. Pain/tenderness, leakage/drainage, bleeding fever, maximum white blood cells (WBC) count, pus/discharge, and PEG tube function were evaluated within 48 hours and 1 week from PEG insertion. Infection at the site of PEG insertion occurred in 3 cases (3.1%) within 48 hours and in 1 case (1.0%) within 7 days. Within 48 hours from the procedure, incidence of fever and increased WBC count was 10.3% and 9.3%, respectively, though at 7 days all were resolved. Pain, leak, and bleeding at the site of PEG placement were prevalently mild within 48 hours (74.2%, 12.4%,13.4% of patients, respectively) and subsided within 7 days (2.1%, 0%, 0%). One case (1.0%) of minor antibiotic side effect occurred. Two patients died due to complications not related to the procedure. The combined use of short-term cefotaxime and clindamycin seems to be effective in reducing incidence of acute complications due to PEG placement without increasing side-effects.

  9. Current Debate on the Use of Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Cesarean Section

    OpenAIRE

    Lamont, Ronald F.; Sobel, Jack; Kusanovic, Juan Pedro; Vaisbuch, Edi; Mazaki-Tovi, Shali; Kim, Sun Kwon; Uldbjerg, Neils; ROMERO, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Cesarean delivery is frequently complicated by surgical site infections (SSIs), endometritis and urinary tract infection. Most SSIs occur after discharge from hospital, and are increasingly being used as performance indicators. Worldwide, the rate of cesarean delivery is increasing. Evidence-based guidelines recommended the use of prophylactic antibiotics prior to surgical incision. An exception is made for cesarean delivery, where narrow-range antibiotics are administered post umbilical cord...

  10. Adoption of intracameral antibiotic prophylaxis of endophthalmitis following cataract surgery: update on the ESCRS Endophthalmitis Study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Peter

    2014-01-01

    To determine the use of intracameral cefuroxime at the end of cataract surgery since the beneficial results were first reported by the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons Endophthalmitis Study Group in 2006, 250 ophthalmic surgeons affiliated with both public and private hospitals and clinics across Europe were surveyed. The questions regarded their awareness of the results of the ESCRS endophthalmitis study and their current use or non-use of intracameral antibiotics in their cataract procedures. Seventy-four percent of respondents said they always or usually use intracameral antibiotics in their cataract surgery procedures. The most frequently cited reasons for not using cefuroxime or other intracameral antibiotics was the lack of an approved commercial preparation and related anxieties regarding the risk of dilution errors and contamination. More than 90% of respondents said they would use cefuroxime if an approved single-unit dose product were commercially available.

  11. Implementation assessment of perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines in pediatric abdominal surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmaris Losa Pérez

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: since the beginning of the 80s the term perioperative profilaxis is introduced, changing the previous criteria on antimicrobial profilaxis. This method helps to reduce the perioperative sepsis phenomenon and the medical cost, achieving more quality in pacient attention. In the surgical service area of the pediatric and universitary hospital ¨Paquito Gonzalez Cueto¨ a guide with good clinical practices in perioperative antibiotic profilaxis for abdominal surgery has been in use since the year 2000. Objective: To evaluate the following of this guide. Methods: a retrospective and descriptive study of a series of cases since february 2000 until february 2002. 235 pacients operated from abdominal affections were analized. The fallowing of the guide were tested by 4 questions, expressing the results in percentage lists. Conclussions: Despite the use of antibiotic profilaxis in more than 96% of the cases, there was a low percentage of global guide following (33,5%, since there were problems with the employed outline, dosis and moment of administration of the antibiotic, specially in surgery with high risk of developing infection of surgical injury.

  12. [Use of levofloxacin in the antibiotic prophylaxis for diagnostic procedures in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchieri, Alberto; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Lizzano, Renata

    2002-03-01

    Chemoprophylaxis is the use of antimicrobial agents before contamination in the hope of preventing infections. The need for prophylaxis depends on the type of procedure and the risk for each individual patient. The risk for infection from urethral catheterization in a hospital setting is 5% for men and 10-20% for women, after routine cystoscopy is 4.7%, after transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) is 39%, after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) is 6-43%, after transrectal biopsy of the prostate is 6.2-87%, and after shock wave lithotripsy is 5.7%. On this basis prophylactic treatment is recommended in all patients for transrectal prostate biopsy and transurethral surgery and in patients with increased risk of infection for diagnostic endoscopy of the urinary tract and SWL. Risk factors such as age, immunosuppression, metabolic dysfunction (e.g., diabetes), reduced general condition, prolonged operative time and bleeding, should be considered. Broad-spectrum cephalosporin, penicillins and fluoroquinolones are most often used. The choice of the drug also depends on its pharmacokinetic properties that should secure effective tissue levels during the procedure. Levofloxacin meets these criteria and reduces the incidence of infection after transrectal prostate biopsy and endoscopy of the urinary tract.

  13. Is antibiotic prophylaxis mandatory after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systemin order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, O; Radulescu, L; Bodean, O; Cirstoiu, C; Secara, D; Cirstoiu, M

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to determine if antibiotic prophylaxis is mandatory, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. We prospectively evaluated 44 patients, admitted in the Bucharest Emergency Hospital between the 1ⁱ of February 2012 and the 1ⁱ of October 2012, in whom the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system was inserted. The patients enrolled were divided into two groups. In group A, a number of 22 patients, received, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, 875mg Amoxicillin Trihydrate + 125 mg Potassium Clavulanate, a dose every 12 hours for 5 days. Group B was represented by the other 22 patients who did not receive antibiotic prophylaxis. All patients were reevaluated at 4 and 12 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. During the first 4 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system only two patients, one from group A and one from group B were diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease. At a second follow up visit - 12 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, no other patient was diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not mandatory, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease.

  14. Antibiotic prophylaxis in variceal hemorrhage:Timing,effectiveness and Clostridium difficile rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew; RL; Brown; Graeme; Jones; Kathryn; L; Nash; Mark; Wright; Indra; Neil; Guha

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate if antibiotics administered within 8 h of endoscopy reduce mortality or increase the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection(CDI).METHODS:A 2-year retrospective analysis of all patients who presented with first variceal hemorrhage was undertaken.The primary outcome measure was 28-d mortality.Secondary outcome measures were 28-d rebleeding rates and 28-d incidence of CDI.All patients were admitted to a tertiary liver unit with a consultantled,24-h endoscopy service.Patients received s...

  15. Risk of surgical site infection in older patients in a cohort survey: targets for quality improvement in antibiotic prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agodi, Antonella; Quattrocchi, Annalisa; Barchitta, Martina; Adornetto, Veronica; Cocuzza, Aldo; Latino, Rosalia; Li Destri, Giovanni; Di Cataldo, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) assess surgical site infection (SSI) incidence in a cohort of surgical patients and (2) estimate the compliance with national guidelines for perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis (PAP). SSIs, among the most common health care-associated infections, are an important target for surveillance and an official priority in several European countries. SSI commonly complicates surgical procedures in older people and is associated with substantial attributable mortality and costs. The implementation of PAP guidelines is difficult among surgeons, and failure to comply with the standard of care has been widely reported. A 12-month prospective survey was performed in accordance with the methods, protocols, and definitions of the Hospital in Europe Link for Infection Control through Surveillance (HELICS) protocol. The compliance of the current PAP practices with the published national guidelines was assessed. A total of 249 patients were enrolled. The cumulative SSI incidence was 3.2 per 100 operative procedures. Cumulative compliance for PAP was 12.4%. Overall, only infection risk index ≥ 1 was confirmed as a significant risk factor for SSI (odds ratio, 6.65; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-42.59; P = 0.045). When only older patients (age >65 years) were considered, no significant risk factors for SSI were identified. Our study indicates an overall inadequate compliance with PAP recommendations, thus highlighting the need to develop multimodal and targeted intervention programs to improve compliance with PAP guidelines.

  16. Randomized controlled trial of antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for transrectai ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAN Eddie Shu-yin; LO Ka-lun; NG Chi-fai; HOU See-ming; YIP Sidney Kam-hung

    2012-01-01

    Background A prior study showed significant antibioti resistance to quinotone in our poputation.In this study we aimed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of a single versus a combined prophylactic antibiotic regimen before transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy(TRUGPB).Methods A prospective randomized study was conducted at a university hospital.Patients undergoing TRUGPB were randomized into an amoicillin-clavulanate alone(1mg;one dose before and two doses after biopsy)or an amoxicllin-clavulanate+ciprofloxacin group(250mg;one dose before and two doses after biopsy).Patients were surveyed for infection symptoms by phine on days 3 and 30 after TRUGPB.We defined an infective complication as the iccurrence of symptoms including fever,chills or rigor within 30 days after prostate biopsy,requiring medical treatment or hospitalization,aided by a tertiory-wide etectronic medical record system.Results Between November 2007 and July 2009,367 patients were randomized to either amoxicillin-clavulanate alone or amoxicillin-caavulanate+ciprofloxacin group.The infection rates after TRUGPB were 3.9%in the former group(7 out of 179 patoents)versus 0.53%(1 out of 188 patients)in the latter.Sixty-three percent(5/8)of patients with infective complications needed hospitalization.There was no intensive care unit admission or mortality during the study period.Conclusions Combining prophylactic antibiotics with amoxicllin-clavulanate+soprofloxacin significantly reduced the in cidence of infective complications after TRUGPB.We recommended a combination regimen,especially in centre with high incidence of post-TRUGPB infection.

  17. [Antibiotic prophylaxis in oncologic pharyngolaryngeal surgery: ceftriaxone versus clindamycin and gentamycin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, F X; Lorente, J; Pérez, M; Quesada, J L; Grasa, J; Fortuny, P; Roselló, J; Quesada, P

    2001-03-01

    There are many papers comparing two antibiotic protocols for the profilaxis of head and neck infections after laryngeal surgery. We present one prospective and randomised study in 60 patients comparing the efficacy of two protocols. The comparison was between ceftriaxone versus the association of clindamicyn and gentamicyn. In our database we included the risk factors for infection, the surgical approach, the duration of surgery and the patient characteristics. We observed an incidence of 28% of infection, with a 23.3% in the clindamicyn + gentamicyn group and a 33.3% in the ceftriaxone group. The differences between the two groups were not statistically significant. In this study we observed a small difference between the amount of alcohol comsuption, the effectiveness of the surgical drainage, the surgical approach and the presence of wound infection. The difference was not statistical significant due to the small group of patients. The profilaxis was adequate for the total laryngectomy and cordectomy group, with a higher incidence of wound infection in patients treated with a supraglottic laryngectomy.

  18. Efficacy of ultra-short single agent regimen antibiotic chemo-prophylaxis in reducing the risk of meningitis in patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somma, Teresa; Maraolo, Alberto Enrico; Esposito, Felice; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tosone, Grazia; Orlando, Raffaele; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to evaluate the incidence of infectious complications (namely meningitis) within 30 days after endoscopic endonasal transspheinodal neurosurgery (EETS) in patients receiving an ultra-short peri-operative chemo-prophylaxis regimen with 2 doses of 1st generation cephalosporin or macrolide. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of 145 patients who received an ultra-short chemoprophylaxis with two doses of an antibiotic, given 30 min before and 8h after EETS, over a 30-month time-frame. Ninety-seven patients (66.89%) received endovenous cefazolin, a 1st generation cephalosporin, administered at a dosage of 1000 mg, and 48 patients (33.10%) with an history of allergy to various agents, received endovenous clarithromycin at a dosage of 500 mg. No case of peri- and post-operative meningitis occurred in patients receiving the 2 doses of antibiotic. Only one patient (0.68%) developed cerebral fluid leakage on the 7th postoperative day, which required the switching to a broad-spectrum antibiotic prophylaxis for one week; this patient received the ultrashort prophylaxis with a macrolide. In addition, 7 patients (4.82%) developed minor infectious complications such as low-grade fever (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), enlarged submandibular and cervical lymphnodes (3 cases, all of them receiving cefazolin), and upper and lower respiratory tract infection (1 case receiving clarithromycin). The cost of this prophylaxis regimen ranged from 7.76 Euro (cefazolin) to 39.54 Euro (clarithromycin). This study suggested that an ultra-short single-antibiotic prophylaxis is a safe, cheap and effective regimen to prevent post-operative meningitis in patients undergoing EETS and who do not require lumbar drainage after surgery. In these patients also the rate of minor infective complications was acceptable when compared with the previous more expensive regimen based on 3rd generation cephalosporin plus aminoglycoside or alone, that could be suitable only

  19. Closed hip and long bone fractures The regimen effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgical fixation%闭合性髋部骨折或长骨骨折围手术期抗生素预防性应用的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan C Norvell; 王簕; 杨云峰

    2009-01-01

    对22项随机对照研究进行Meta分析,以评价在闭合性髋部骨折或长骨骨折的围手术期中,静脉预防性抗生素应用的疗效.与未应用静脉抗生素组相比,术前静脉应用抗生素(术前单剂量抗生素应用或术前联合术后多次应用)可以明显降低术后深部感染、浅表感染、泌尿道感染的发生率.当应用短效抗生素预防术中感染时,多次剂量应用可以明显降低感染的发生率.但是,当应用长效抗生素预防感染时,单剂量应用组与多剂量应用其他短效抗生素组效果相当.在比较抗生素多剂量给药疗法间或不同给药方式间(口服或静脉给药)对预防感染的疗效时发现,不论采取何种方法 ,预防感染的效果均无明显差异.%A metaanalysis of 22 randomized controlled trials found evidence to support parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis regimens for patients undergoing surgical fixation of closed hip and long bone fractures. Preoperative parenteral antibiotic doses (single or combined with multiple postoperative doses) resulted in decreased risk of deep, superficial, and urinary tract infections compared with no antibiotic. Single doses of short acting agents may be less effective than multiple doses of the same agent in decreasing the risk of any of the infections evaluated. By contrast, there was no significant difference in infection risk between a single dose of a long acting agent and multiple doses of other agents with shorter half lives. No significant differences were found when multiple dose regimens were compared or when administration routes (oral versus parenteral) were compared.

  20. Early discontinuation of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with persistent primary vesicoureteral reflux initially detected during infancy: outcome analysis and risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, Kimihiko; Mitsui, Takahiko; Kitta, Takeya; Nakamura, Michiko; Kanno, Yukiko; Kon, Masafumi; Nishimura, Yoko; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively assessed the incidence of and risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection in children during active surveillance after early discontinuation of antibiotic prophylaxis. We retrospectively evaluated 9 females and 61 uncircumcised males diagnosed with primary vesicoureteral reflux before age 1 year who had persistent reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram and were subsequently followed under active surveillance without continuous antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with secondary vesicoureteral reflux or associated urological abnormality were excluded. Clinical outcomes, including incidence of febrile urinary tract infection and new scar formation, were evaluated. Risk factors for febrile urinary tract infection were also analyzed. Mean age at stopping continuous antibiotic prophylaxis was 21 months, and mean followup was 61 months. During active surveillance 21 patients had febrile urinary tract infection, and the 5-year infection-free rate under active surveillance was 67.5%. One or 2 foci of minimal new scarring developed in 4 of 16 patients who underwent followup dimercapto-succinic acid scan after febrile urinary tract infection. On multivariate analysis dilated vesicoureteral reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram was the only significant risk factor for febrile urinary tract infection. This study revealed that about two-thirds of patients with persistent vesicoureteral reflux were free of febrile urinary tract infection during 5 years of active surveillance. Those with dilated vesicoureteral reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram are at significantly greater risk for febrile urinary tract infection. Accordingly active surveillance, especially in patients with nondilated vesicoureteral reflux on followup voiding cystourethrogram, seems to be a safe option even in children who have not yet been toilet trained. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  1. Postoperative infection rates in patients with a negative baseline urine culture undergoing ureteroscopic stone removal: a matched case-control analysis on antibiotic prophylaxis from the CROES URS global study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martov, Alexey; Gravas, Stavros; Etemadian, Masoud; Unsal, Ali; Barusso, Gabriel; D'Addessi, Alessandro; Krambeck, Amy; de la Rosette, Jean

    2015-02-01

    To examine the effects of antibiotic prophylaxis on postoperative infection rate in patients with negative urine cultures undergoing ureteroscopy (URS). Using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) URS Global Study database, patients with a negative baseline urine culture undergoing URS for ureteral stones (n=1141) or kidney stones (n=184) not receiving antibiotic prophylaxis were matched with those who were predefined by risk factors, including gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and ureteral stent placement. Patient characteristics, operative data, and postoperative outcomes, including the development of urinary tract infection (UTI) and fever, in the two groups were compared. Antibiotic prophylaxis use differed widely across participating countries (13%-100%). Differences were found between patients who did or did not receive antibiotic prophylaxis regarding the frequency of anticoagulation medication, previous treatment with URS, stone burden, previous presence of kidney stones, duration of current URS, and complications post-URS. The prevalence of fever and UTI was low (≤2.2%) and similar in both groups. Factors predictive of postoperative UTI or fever were female gender, Crohn's and cardiovascular disease, a high stone burden, and an ASA score of II or higher. In patients with a negative baseline urine culture undergoing URS for ureteral or renal stones, rates of postoperative UTI and fever were not reduced by preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis. Female gender and a high ASA score were specific risk factors for postoperative infection in this patient group.

  2. Effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus virulence factor profiles in patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Yolanda; Samudio, Margarita; Fariña, Norma; Castillo, Verónica; Abente, Sonia; Nentwich, Martin M; González-Britez, Nilsa; Laspina, Florentina; Carron, Agustín; Cibils, Diógenes; de Kaspar, Herminia Miño

    2017-08-01

    In this prospective study, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to identify genes encoding virulence factors (ica, atlE and mecA) in Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) isolates from the ocular microbiota of patients undergoing cataract surgery and to investigate possible changes in the CNS profile due to antibiotic prophylaxis. Between 09/2011 and 08/2013, patients undergoing cataract surgery were recruited at the Department of Ophthalmology, National University of Asuncion, Paraguay. In the eye to be operated on, patients received moxifloxacin 0.5 % eye drops four times at the day before surgery and a last drop 1 hour before surgery (T1). The other eye remained as control (T0). Conjunctival swabs were taken from both eyes 1 hour after the last drop. The presence of genes encoding biofilm formation (ica and atlE) and methicillin resistance (mecA) was detected by a multiplex PCR. Of the 162 patients (162 study eyes, 162 fellow eye as control group), 87 (53.7 %) eyes were positive for CNS at T0 yielding 96 CNS isolates; 70 eyes (43.2 %) were positive at T1 yielding 77 CNS isolates. For this study, 43 CNS isolates (44.8 %) from T0 and 45 (64.3 %) from T1 were used. Of the total isolates, 81.8 % (72/88) had at least one virulence factor gene (37/43 from T0 and 35/45 from T1) (p = 0.314). Simultaneous detection of ica and atlE genes was higher in T0 (58.0 %) than T1 (46.7 %), but the difference was not significant (p = 0.28). A high frequency of genes encoding virulence factors was observed in the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates. The use of moxifloxacin did not significantly modify the CNS virulence factor profiles.

  3. INFECTION AFTER RADICAL ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY AND PELVIC LYMPHADENECTOMY - PREVENTION OF INFECTION WITH A 2-DOSE PERIOPERATIVE ANTIBIOTIC-PROPHYLAXIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOUMA, J

    1993-01-01

    Surgical site-related infections occurred in 21% of 87 consecutive patients undergoing radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHPL) without planned peri-operative prophylaxis. A prospective, randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in 68 consecutive RHPL patients.

  4. THE EFFECTS OF ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS ON INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS AFTER CAESAREAN SECTION: A RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL IN A TERTIARY HOSPITAL OF EASTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Infectious complications after caesarean deliveries are an important and substantial cause of maternal morbidity and inc rease in the hospital stay and cost of treatment. Routine prophylaxis with antibiotics may reduce this risk. AIMS: To determine whether prophylactic antibiotic administration using ceftriaxone at the time of caesarean section significantly reduces maternal and neonatal infectious complications . SETTINGS AND DESIGN: The study was conducted in a tertiary teaching hospi tal of eastern India during March 2011 to October 2011. It was a prospective, double-b lind randomised placebo-controlled trial. METHODS AND MATERIAL: After exclusion due to different reasons, 288 patien ts were enrolled in study group and received prophylactic inje ction ceftriaxone. 293 patients were enrolled in control group who received placebo. Patie nts were randomly selected according to computerized randomization protocol. Postpartum infect ious complications were recorded, as were the duration of hospital stay and neonatal compl ications. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Analysis of statistical data was done by using stat istical software Open Epi, 8version 2.3.1. RESULTS: Wound indurations, discharge, erythema were 2.43% a nd 5.80% in study and control group respectively and it was statistically significa nt with p value 0.043 (RR=0.419, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.405. Endomyometritis was more in control group (1.04% vs. 3.75% with p value 0.036 and RR=0.279 and CMLE OR= 0.272. No significant relationship with neonatal morbidities was found. Maternal stay in ho spital was significantly more with p=0.01 in control group. CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotic prophylaxis prior to skin incision of caes arean sections resulted in better maternal outcome when i nfectious morbidity and postoperative hospital stay were concerned, without influencing th e neonatal outcome.

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis during perioperative period of surgery%外科围手术期预防应用抗菌药物调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉素平; 张洪姣; 王惠; 李东杰

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To understand the current status of antibiotic prophylaxis during the perioperative period of surgery and analyze its rationality so as to provide basis for clinical reasonable use of antibiotics. METHODS A total of 419 patient who discharged from the hospital in Aug 2010 were randomly selected, the statistics were taken for statistical analysis. RESULTS All the 419 patients used antibiotics with the utilization rate of 100. 0%, cephalosporins were the most frequently used. There were 79 (18. 85%) patients who used antibiotics more than 2 hours before the surgery, 151 (36.04%) patients who used antibiotics less than 2 hours before the surgery, 189 (45. 11 %) patients who used after the surgery and did not use before the surgery. There were 8(1. 91%) patients who used antibiotics continuously for less than 24 hours after the surgery, 75 (17. 90%) patients who used antibiotics between 25-72 hours, and 336 (80. 19%) patients who used antibiotics for more than 72 hours. The patients who used two-therapy accounted for 24. 82%. and the patients who used multiple drugs accounted for 15.04%. CONCLUSION There are some errors in the antibiotics prophylaxis during the perioperative period, including the high starting point of drug selection, inappropriate medication timing, and unclear indications for combination use. It is necessary to strengthen the standard use of antibiotics so as to reduce the incidence of bacterial drug resistance.%目的 了解外科围手术期预防应用抗菌药物的现状,分析评价其使用的合理性,为临床合理使用抗菌药物提供参考依据.方法 抽查2010年8月部分外科出院手术病历419份,对数据进行统计分析.结果 419例手术患者均使用抗菌药物,使用率为100.00%,使用最频繁的为头孢菌素类;术前用药>2 h者79例占18.85%,术前用药≤2h者151例占36.04%,术前未用术后用药者189例占45.11%;术后持续用药≤24 h者8例占1.91%,25~72 h者75例,占17

  6. Low infection rate after tumor hip arthroplasty for metastatic bone disease in a cohort treated with extended antibiotic prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hettwer, Werner H; Horstmann, Peter Frederik; Hovgaard, Thea Bechmann;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Compared to conventional hip arthroplasty, endoprosthetic reconstruction after tumor resection is associated with a substantially increased risk of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), with reported rates of around 10% in a recent systematic review. The optimal duration of antibiotic...

  7. Contamination study of multiple-dose vials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, P S; Shevchuk, Y M; Conly, J M; Richardson, C J

    1993-03-01

    To document the number of opened, dated, and expired multiple-dose vials (MDVs) in patient-care areas and to determine what proportion of MDVs were contaminated with bacteria or cellular debris. Every tenth opened MDV (69/656) identified on the wards was collected, ensuring representation from each nursing unit. Contents were examined for contamination. Medical-school-affiliated, tertiary care center. (1) Visual inspection for debris, medication type, location, lot number, manufacturer's expiration date, and date of opening; (2) culture in solid and broth media for bacterial growth; and (3) staining and microscopic examination for cellular constituents. No vials had been dated after opening and 4.6 percent were expired according to the manufacturer's expiration date. No bacterial contamination was evident; however, one vial was contaminated with red blood cells. Transmission of infection via contaminated MDVs has been well documented and contamination with red blood cells raises concerns about potential for transmission of bloodborne pathogens. Recommendations include dating MDVs after opening, emphasizing the need for proper aseptic technique, and discarding MDVs on the manufacture's date of expiration.

  8. Dental procedures, antibiotic prophylaxis, and endocarditis among people with prosthetic heart valves: nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubiana, Sarah; Blotière, Pierre-Olivier; Hoen, Bruno; Lesclous, Philippe; Millot, Sarah; Rudant, Jérémie; Weill, Alain; Coste, Joel; Alla, François; Duval, Xavier

    2017-09-07

    Objective To assess the relation between invasive dental procedures and infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci among people with prosthetic heart valves.Design Nationwide population based cohort and a case crossover study.Setting French national health insurance administrative data linked with the national hospital discharge database.Participants All adults aged more than 18 years, living in France, with medical procedure codes for positioning or replacement of prosthetic heart valves between July 2008 and July 2014.Main outcome measures Oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was identified using primary discharge diagnosis codes. In the cohort study, Poisson regression models were performed to estimate the rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis during the three month period after invasive dental procedures compared with non-exposure periods. In the case crossover study, conditional logistic regression models calculated the odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals comparing exposure to invasive dental procedures during the three month period preceding oral streptococcal infective endocarditis (case period) with three earlier control periods.Results The cohort included 138 876 adults with prosthetic heart valves (285 034 person years); 69 303 (49.9%) underwent at least one dental procedure. Among the 396 615 dental procedures performed, 103 463 (26.0%) were invasive and therefore presented an indication for antibiotic prophylaxis, which was performed in 52 280 (50.1%). With a median follow-up of 1.7 years, 267 people developed infective endocarditis associated with oral streptococci (incidence rate 93.7 per 100 000 person years, 95% confidence interval 82.4 to 104.9). Compared with non-exposure periods, no statistically significant increased rate of oral streptococcal infective endocarditis was observed during the three months after an invasive dental procedure (relative rate 1.25, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1

  9. Fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli in intestinal flora of patients undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy--should we reassess our practices for antibiotic prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensels, D; Slabbaert, K; De Wever, L; Vermeersch, P; Van Poppel, H; Verhaegen, J

    2012-06-01

    Although the estimate of the incidence of sepsis following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUSPB) is low, fluoroquinolone-resistant infections after prostate biopsy are being increasingly noted. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli strains before TRUSPB and at evaluating potential predisposing risk factors. The incidence of sepsis after prostate biopsy was determined, and our routine practice for antibiotic prophylaxis for TRUSPB was evaluated. A prospective study was conducted in 342 consecutive patients undergoing prostate biopsy between December 2009 and July 2010. Before TRUSPB, a rectal swab was cultured. The correlation between the presence of fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and plausible risk factors was investigated by the use of a questionnaire. Of the 236 patients included, 22.0% (52/236) harboured ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains. The use of fluoroquinolones in the 6 months before biopsy was associated with an increased risk of faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (p fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains was an important risk factor for infectious complications after TRUSPB (p fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains (22.0%) before TRUSPB. The use of fluoroquinolones in the previous 6 months before biopsy is a risk factor for faecal carriage of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli strains and for infectious complications after TRUSPB. Hence, the universal administration of fluoroquinolones should be reconsidered. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  10. Efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing intrathoracic infections, after thoracostomy, for traumatic haemo/pneumothorax - experience of Oradea county emergency hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorescu, D; Maghiar, A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to observe the effectiveness of prophylactic administration of antibacterials against empyema and pneumonia after tube thoracostomy for traumatic collections. Observational retrospective study over a ten years period (2002-2011), at the Oradea County Emergency Hospital on 939 patients with chest tube drainage for traumatic haemo/pneumothoraces. The morbidity by intrathoracic infections was 5,5% in the curative antibiotic group. The median number of risk factors for surgical infections and case severity were not statistically different (p=0.9653 and p=0,6601) between cases with antibioprophylaxis and curative treatment, but the incidence of intrathoracic infection in the prophylaxis group (n=86) was half (2,3%). Antibioprophylaxis was effective in over 95% of the cases and it associated in-hospital length of stay, length of stay in the ICU and costs of care significantly (pthoracostomy for traumatic collections was justified by case severity and risk factors and was effective and cost-efficient, but it should be administered selectively.

  11. 3种清洁手术抗菌药物预防使用情况调查%Surveillance of antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing three kinds of clean surgical procedure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季闽春; 孙光春; 宋锦飞

    2012-01-01

    Objective To collect some information on antibiotic prophylaxis for patients undergoing clean surgical procedure such as inguinal hernia repair, thyroidectomy and breast surgery in a hospital. Methods Retrospectively surveyed with medical record about antimicrobial prophylaxis for in - patients in surgerical department between May and Dec in 2010. We recorded information about gender and age of patients, types of operations, appropriate of antimicrobial choice, administration, duration and cost,and complied with guidelines. Results Two hundred and sixty - six records were reviewed, patients aged from 2 to 88 years old (median ; 52 years ). Cefuroxime was the most frequently used antibiotics. Major irrationally antimicrobial prophylaxis were improper timing, duration, excess postoperatively use, inappropriate drug selection, frequency and infusion diluents. Conclusion Strategies should be made to standardize the duration of peroperation antibiotic use, restricting antibiotic prophylaxis for clean operation and medical satffs trained to promote rational prophylaxis in clinical practice.%目的 了解本院腹外疝、甲状腺和乳房3种清洁手术抗菌药物预防使用情况.方法 回顾性调查手术科室2010年5至12月住院患者的病历,包括患者的基本情况、手术类型、抗菌药物的品种、给药途径、疗程和费用等,并与指南比较和分析.结果 共266份病历,病人年龄2 ~ 88岁(中位数:52岁).头孢呋辛是最常预防使用的抗菌药物.不合理用药主要为给药时机不当、术后用药时间过长、药物选择、用药频度及溶媒不当等.结论 医院应该建立和完善清洁手术围手术期抗菌药物预防使用的管理制度,加强对医务人员的培训,促使临床合理用药.

  12. Local antimicrobial administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huiras, Paul; Logan, Jill K; Papadopoulos, Stella; Whitney, Dana

    2012-11-01

    Despite a lack of consensus guidelines, local antibiotic administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections is used during many surgical procedures. The rationale behind this practice is to provide high antibiotic concentrations at the site of surgery while minimizing systemic exposure and adverse effects. Local antibiotic administration for surgical site prophylaxis has inherent limitations in that antibiotics are applied after the incision is made, rather than the current standard for surgical site prophylaxis that recommends providing adequate antibiotic concentrations at the site before the incision. The efficacy and safety of local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis have been assessed in different types of surgery with a variety of antibiotic agents and methods of application. We identified 22 prospective, randomized, controlled trials that evaluated local application of antibiotics for surgical site prophylaxis. These trials were subsequently divided and analyzed based on the type of surgical procedure: dermatologic, orthopedic, abdominal, colorectal, and cardiothoracic. Methods of local application analyzed included irrigations, powders, ointments, pastes, beads, sponges, and fleeces. Overall, there is a significant lack of level I evidence supporting this practice for any of the surgical genres evaluated. In addition, the literature spans several decades, and changes in surgical procedures, systemic antibiotic prophylaxis, and microbial flora make conclusions difficult to determine. Based on available data, the efficacy of local antibiotic administration for the prophylaxis of surgical site infections remains uncertain, and recommendations supporting this practice for surgical site prophylaxis cannot be made.

  13. Tinidazol versus cefazolina na antibioticoprofilaxia de histerectomia vaginal e abdominal Tinidazole versus cefazolin in antibiotic prophylaxis of vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Simões

    2008-11-01

    das mulheres submetidas à histerectomia vaginal sugere que essa infecção deve ser melhor pesquisada e devidamente tratada antes da cirurgia.PURPOSE: to compare the efficacy of tinidazole and cephazolin on the febrile and infectious morbidity of post vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy antibiotic prophylaxis. METHODS: randomized clinical study, where women admitted to hospital for hysterectomy were randomly allocated in one of the following antibiotic prophylaxis groups: Group C (2 g of IV cephazolin in the anesthetic induction; Group T (2 g of tinidazole orally, 12 hours before the surgery; or Group C+T (2 g of tinidazole orally 12 hours before the surgery and 2g of IV cephazolin in the anesthetic induction. Cervicovaginal smears were collected for specific cultures and the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV was based in Amsel and Nugent's criteria. The patients were reevaluated 7 and 30 days after the surgery for signs of febrile and/or infectious morbidity. The χ2 or the Fisher's exact test was used to assess differences among the three groups, with a significance level of 5%. The sample power (1-β was calculated through the SAS program. RESULTS: seven days after the hysterectomy, infectious morbidity was diagnosed in 6.6% of the women, but with no significant difference among the three groups studied (p=0.12. There was no febrile or infectious morbidity at the immediate post-surgical period or after 30 days from the surgery. BV ratio at the pre-surgical period was significantly higher among the women submitted to vaginal hysterectomy, rather than among the ones submitted to abdominal hysterectomy (27 versus 7%, p=0.02. BV ratio was also higher after 30 days, among the women submitted to vaginal hysterectomy (20 versus 8%, though without statistical significance (p=0.19. CONCLUSIONS: the use of tinidazole, isolated or associated with cephazolin has not presented higher efficacy, than the use of cephazolin, alone to prevent febrile or infectious morbidity post

  14. 两种抗生素用药方案预防绝经后女性复发性尿路感染的比较%Comparison of two antibiotic prophylaxis schemes for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟一红; 方艺; 傅辰生; 袁敏; 吉俊; 滕杰; 邹建洲; 丁小强

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of intermittent patient-initiated single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis and continuous antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) in postmenopausal women. Methods A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection. Single dose of antibiotic was given every night in continuous antibiotic prophylaxis group and every time after exposure to conditions predisposed to UTI in intermittent antibiotic prophylaxis group. The duration of prevention was 12 months in both groups. Results The effective rates of intermittent antibiotic prophylaxis and continuous antibiotic prophylaxis were 71.0% and 81.8% respectively (P>0.05). The incidence of gastrointestinal adverse reaction in intermittent antibiotic prophylaxis group was significantly lower than that in continuous antibiotic prophylaxis group (7.7% vs 28.6%,P<0.05). Conclusions Compared with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, intermittent patient-initiated single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis is a better prophylaxis with less gastrointestinal adverse reactions for the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection in postmenopausal women.%目的 比较两种抗生素用药方案对绝经后女性复发性尿路感染急性发作的预防效果.方法 采用前瞻性随机对照研究,将2004年8月至2007年9月本科门诊随访的68例绝经后女性复发性尿感患者随机分为两组,分别采用单剂量抗生素持续抑菌和患者自主的单剂量抗生素间歇抑菌两种预防方法.观察两组患者开始抗生素预防后的12个月内,尿路感染急性发作以及胃肠道症状、阴道真菌感染等不良反应的发生率.结果 患者自主的间歇抑菌组与持续抑菌组的总有效率差异无统计学意义(71.0%比81.8%,P0.05),但前者胃肠道并发症发生率显著低于持续抑菌组(7.7%比28.6%,P<0.05).结论 患者自主的单剂量抗生

  15. Inhibitory Effects of Multiple-Dose Treatment with Baicalein on the Pharmacokinetics of Ciprofloxacin in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Youn-Hwan; Yang, Hye Jin; Kim, Dong-Gun; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2017-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is used as a treatment for urinary and respiratory tract infections in clinical practice. Baicalein, a major flavonoid present in Scutellaria baicalensis, is a well-known and potent antibacterial compound used in complementary and alternative medicine practices. The present study aimed to clarify the effects of multiple-dose treatment with baicalein on the pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin in rats. Following the oral administration of baicalein (20, 40, or 80 mg/kg) for five consecutive days, the rats received an oral administration of ciprofloxacin (20 mg/kg). Blood samples were collected at specific time points, and the plasma concentrations of ciprofloxacin were determined by using high-performance liquid chromatography. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying the interaction between baicalein and ciprofloxacin, a rhodamine 123 accumulation assay was performed in LS-180 cells. A pharmacokinetic study revealed that multiple-dose treatment with baicalein significantly decreased the peak serum concentration (Cmax ), area under the curve (AUC0 → 480 min ), and relative bioavailability (Frel ) of ciprofloxacin (p ciprofloxacin or other quinolone-based antibiotics used for chemotherapy in clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. An outbreak of scrub typhus in military personnel despite protocols for antibiotic prophylaxis: doxycycline resistance excluded by a quantitative PCR-based susceptibility assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Patrick N A; Oltvolgyi, Csongor; Islam, Aminul; Hussain-Yusuf, Hazizul; Loewenthal, Mark R; Vincent, Gemma; Stenos, John; Graves, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Scrub typhus is caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi and is endemic to many countries in the Asia-Pacific region, including tropical Australia. We describe a recent large outbreak amongst military personnel in north Queensland. A total of 45 clinical cases were identified (36% of all potentially exposed individuals). This occurred despite existing military protocols stipulating the provision of doxycycline prophylaxis. Doxycycline resistance in O. tsutsugamushi has been described in South-East Asia, but not Australia. In one case, O. tsutsugamushi was cultured from eschar tissue and blood. Using quantitative real-time PCR to determine susceptibility to doxycycline for the outbreak strain, a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≤0.04 μg/mL was found, indicating susceptibility to this agent. It seems most probable that failure to adhere to adequate prophylaxis over the duration of the military exercise accounted for the large number of cases encountered rather than doxycycline resistance.

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis in third molar surgery: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial using split-mouth technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, A; Morkel, J A; Zafar, S

    2010-02-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics to reduce postoperative complications in third molar surgery remains controversial. The study was a prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. 100 patients were randomly assigned to two groups. Each patient acted as their own control using the split-mouth technique. Two unilateral impacted third molars were removed under antibiotic cover and the other two were removed without antibiotic cover. The first group received antibiotics on the first surgical visit. On the second surgical visit (after 3 weeks), placebo capsules were given or vice versa. The second group received antibiotics with continued therapy for 2 days on the first surgical visit and on the second surgical visit (after 3 weeks) placebo capsules were given or vice versa. Pain, swelling, infection, trismus and temperature were recorded on days 3, 7 and 14 after surgery. Of 380 impactions, 6 sockets (2%) became infected. There was no statistically significant difference in the infection rate, pain, swelling, trismus, and temperature between the two groups (p>0.05). Results of the study showed that prophylactic antibiotics did not have a statistically significant effect on postoperative infections in third molar surgery and should not be routinely administered when third molars are removed in non-immunocompromised patients.

  18. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales Consensus document on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental surgery and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Gutiérrez

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología tiene como objetivo prevenir la aparición de infección a partir de la puerta de entrada que produce la actuación terapéutica, por lo que se encuentra indicada siempre que exista un riesgo importante de infección, ya sea por las características mismas de la operación o por las condiciones locales o generales del paciente. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con antibióticos en patologías dentarias responden poco a los criterios metodológicos requeridos, y además no son lo suficientemente numerosos. Se presentan los resultados de una conferencia de expertos integrada por los Presidentes de Sociedades científicas españolas más representativas que han analizado la bibliografía existente y han aportado sus valiosas experiencias profesionales. Se describen las circunstancias técnicas, se analizan los fundamentos biológicos y farmacológicos y se aplican a las situaciones médicas más representativas. Se concluye que la profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología cuenta con indicaciones bien fundamentadas y precisas, ofreciendo a la comunidad científica internacional un protocolo práctico de actuación.The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entrance way provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated provided there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the characteristics of the operation itself or the patient’s local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies scarcely adhere to the required methodological criteria and, in addition, are not sufficiently numerous. This text presents the results of an expert conference comprising the Presidents of the most representative Scientific Societies in Spain who have analyzed the existing literature and have drawn on their valuable professional experience. It describes the technical circumstances, analyzes the

  19. Documento de consenso sobre la utilización de profilaxis antibiótica en cirugía y procedimientos dentales Consensus document on the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in dental surgery and procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Gutiérrez

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología tiene como objetivo prevenir la aparición de infección a partir de la puerta de entrada que produce la actuación terapéutica, por lo que se encuentra indicada siempre que exista un riesgo importante de infección, ya sea por las características mismas de la operación o por las condiciones locales o generales del paciente. Sin embargo, los ensayos clínicos con antibióticos en patologías dentarias responden poco a los criterios metodológicos requeridos, y además no son lo suficientemente numerosos. Se presentan los resultados de una conferencia de expertos integrada por los Presidentes de Sociedades Científicas Españolas más representativas que han analizado la bibliografía existente y han aportado sus valiosas experiencias profesionales. Se describen las circunstancias técnicas, se analizan los fundamentos biológicos y farmacológicos y se aplican a las situaciones médicas más representativas. Se concluye que la profilaxis antibiótica en Odontología cuenta con indicaciones bien fundamentadas y precisas, ofreciendo a la comunidad científica internacional un protocolo práctico de actuación.The goal of antibiotic prophylaxis in Odontology is to prevent the onset of infections through the entranceway provided by the therapeutic action, therefore it is indicated providing there is a considerable risk of infection, either because of the characteristics of the operation itself or the patient’s local or general condition. Nonetheless, clinical trials with antibiotics in dental pathologies have had scant regard for the required methodological criteria and, in addition, are not sufficiently numerous. This text presents the results of an expert conference comprising the Presidents of the most representative Scientific Societies in Spain who have analyzed the existing literature and have drawn on their valuable professional experience. It describes the technical circumstances, analyzes the

  20. Antibacterial prophylaxis in neutropenic children with cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Barone

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available During the period of neutropenia due to chemotherapy, patients have high risk of infections. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis to reduce neutropenia-related complications in oncologic patients is still disputed. Recent meta-analysis and clinical trials demonstrated that antibiotic prophylaxis with chinolons reduces fever episodes, bacterial infections and mortality in adult oncologic patients with neutropenia due to chemotherapy for acute leukaemia. In paediatric patients, the only randomized, double-blind, prospective study up till now suggested that Amoxicillin clavulanate may represent an effective prophylactic treatment to reduce fever and infections in oncologic children with neutropenia, with an efficacy statistically demonstrated only in patients with acute leukaemia. Considering the risk of resistances, antibiotic-prophylaxis should be used only in selected patients.

  1. 心脏起搏器围术期预防性应用抗生素现状调查%Current status of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for permanent pacemaker implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈柯萍; 樊晓寒; 华伟; 张澍

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this survey was to describe the current status of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for permanent pacemaker (PPM) implantation in our clinical practice.Methods From January to March in 2012,questionnaires were sent by e-mails to directors of PPM implanting hospitals,for clinical details with respect to use of antibiotics around implantation.Data would be verified via telephone,e-mail or follow-up if no response or some doubts existed.Results Available questionnaires were returned from135 hospitals.Before or during procedure,112 of the 135 centers (82.9%) gave prophylactic antibiotics to patients,while 14 hospitals (10.4%) used postoperative antibiotics and 9 (6.7%) with no prescription of antibiotics.The first/second generation cephalosporins or penicillins were used in significant proportion (79.2%) of hospitals.Other options included the third generation cephalosporins (6.7%) and quinolones (2.2%).As for the onset time,in 74.1% of the hospitals antibiotics were administered 0.5 to 2.0 hours prior to implantation,with 5.2% 3 to 6 hours before procedure,3.7% at implantation,10.3% post operation.The duration also showed great variation in different hospitals.Single dose of antibiotics prescription before or during procedure was given in 10 centers (7.9%).The duration was over 72 hours in seventeen hospitals and ranged from 24 to 72 hours in the rest hospitals.Intra-pocket antibiotic infusion at implantation was used in forty-eight centers (35.6%),and most (81.3%) were gentamicin.Conclusion There are no guidelines on the antibiotics prophylaxis in PPM implantation,such as indication,choice,timing and duration,resulting in wide variation in practice.In majority of the hospitals prophylactic antibiotics were used prior to implantation and β-lactam antibiotic for a board antibacterial spectrum was selected which covering staphylococcus aureus.However,further studies are required to determine the duration of antibiotics

  2. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part II: non-abdominal surgery. Profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en Cirugía Pediátrica (Parte II: cirugía no abdominal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Cortiza Orbe

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in no-abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

    La infección posoperatoria de la herida quirúrgica es la mayor causa de morbilidad infecciosa en el paciente quirúrgico. Ocasiona prolongadas estadías hospitalarias, incremento de los costos de la atención médica y serios inconvenientes a los pacientes y sus familiares. El 25 % de todas las infecciones nosocomiales son infecciones de la herida quirúrgica. Uno de los grandes avances que ha experimentado la cirugía en las tres últimas décadas, es la introducción de la profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en la práctica quirúrgica. Se considera que en los últimos 20 años ha salvado más vidas que cualquier otro procedimiento novedoso en cirugía. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en cirugía abdominal, aprobada por consenso en el 1er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Cienfuegos, 7 al 9 de marzo del 2002.

  3. Perioperatory antibiotic prophylaxis in Pediatric Surgery (Part I: abdominal surgery Profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en Cirugía Pediátrica (Parte I: cirugía abdominal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Fonseca Romero

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The surgical wound infection is the biggest cause of infectious morbility in surgical patients. It is an important cause of morbility that causes lincreased hospital demurrages, increased cost of medical attention and serious inconveniences to the patients and their familiies. 25% of all nosocomial infections are surgical wound infection. One of the big advances of the surgery in the last three decades is an introduction of antibiotic prophylaxis in the surgical practice. Is considered that it has saved more lives than any other novel procedure in surgery in the last 20 years. We presented the Good Clinical Practices Guideline for Antibiotic prophylaxis in abdominal surgery, approved by consensus in the 1st National Good Clinical Practices Workshop in Pediatric Surgery (Cienfuegos, Cuba, March 7 – 9, 2002.

    La infección posoperatoria de la herida quirúrgica es la mayor causa de morbilidad infecciosa en el paciente quirúrgico. Ocasiona prolongadas estadías hospitalarias, incremento de los costos de la atención médica y serios inconvenientes a los pacientes y sus familiares. El 25 % de todas las infecciones nosocomiales son infecciones de la herida quirúrgica. Uno de los grandes avances que ha experimentado la cirugía en las tres últimas décadas, es la introducción de la profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en la práctica quirúrgica. Se considera que en los últimos 20 años ha salvado más vidas que cualquier otro procedimiento novedoso en cirugía. Se presenta la Guía de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas para profilaxis antibiótica perioperatoria en cirugía abdominal, aprobada por consenso en el 1er Taller Nacional de Buenas Prácticas Clínicas en Cirugía Pediátrica (Cienfuegos, 7 al 9 de marzo del 2002.

  4. Antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infections after breast cancer surgery%乳腺癌手术预防应用抗菌药物对降低手术部位感染的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾会学; 林金兰

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the incidence of surgical site infections after breast cancer surgery. METHODS We searched the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDI.INE and EMBASE to select articles published before Dec 2011. No language restrictions were applied. Randomized controlled trials of pre and peri-operative antibiotics for patients undergoing surgery for breast cancer were included. Primary outcomes were incidence of breast wound infections. The authors examined the titles and abstracts of all studies identified by the search strategy, then assessed study quality and extracted data from those that met the inclusion criteria. RESULTS A total of eight studies were included in the review. All eight evaluated pre-operative antibiotic compared with no antibiotic or placebo, and all of them had high quality as randomized controlled trial. The results demonstrated that prophylactic antibiotics significantly reduced the incidence of surgical site infections for the patients undergoing breast cancer surgery (pooled RR= 0. 71, 95% CI:.0. 55 to 0. 92); through the Begg's test (z = 0. 12, P = 0. 90) and Egger's test (t = 0. 16. P = 0. 88), there were no obvious publication bias. CONCLUSION Prophylactic antibiotics may reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in the patients undergoing breast cancer surgery. The potential risks caused by the infections, such as the increase in the cost, drug reaction and the bacterial resistance due to the delay in wound healing or adjuvant antibiotics, must be weighed.%目的 明确预防应用抗菌药物对乳腺癌手术后手术部位感染发病率的影响.方法 通过检索Medline、Embase和Cochrane图书馆数据库,筛选2011年12月之的公开发表的文献,无语言限制;选择标准为乳腺癌患者接受围手术期抗菌药物的随机对照试验、研究结局为手术部位感染;数据收集和分析由作者审查检索的所有研究的标题和摘要,然后评估研究质

  5. Pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple-dose administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Klitgaard, Niels A; Brosen, Kim

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the safety and the pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple dose administration in healthy volunteers. METHODS: This was a prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled, two-sequence, two-period multiple dose study with 18 healthy subjects....

  6. Is Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes Latency Influenced by Single Versus Multiple Agent Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Group B Streptococcus Positive Women Delivering Preterm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Anita; Allen, Victoria M; Walsh, Jennifer; Jangaard, Krista; O'Connell, Colleen M

    2015-09-01

    Objectif : Évaluer l’influence d’un schéma antibiotique sur la durée de la latence (période séparant la rupture prématurée des membranes préterme [RPMP] et l’accouchement) et la présence d’une morbidité infectieuse néonatale considérable, entre la rupture des membranes et l’accouchement à logistique a été utilisée pour estimer les rapports de cotes corrigés, les intervalles de confiance à 95 % et les différences moyennes pour toutes les issues et pour tenir compte des variables parasites. Résultats : Entre 1988 et 2011, la population d’étude potentielle s’élevait à 119 158 grossesses. Au total, 3 435 accouchements ont été identifiés comme présentant une RPMP (3 %). La présence de SGB avait été déterminée par uroculture ou par mise en culture d’écouvillonnages chez 303 paires mère-enfant (9 %) de ce groupe. Les comparaisons corrigées de la latence et de la septicémie néonatale n’ont indiqué aucune différence en fonction du schéma antibiotique (P > 0,05). Conclusion : La directive de 2013 de la SOGC sur la prophylaxie anti-SGB recommande la mise en œuvre d’une antibiothérapie chez les femmes qui présentent une RPMP, et ce, tant pour la latence que pour la prévention de la septicémie néonatale attribuable aux SGB. Cette évaluation pertinente sur le plan clinique auprès d’un groupe sélectionné d’accouchements prétermes a démontré que le type de schéma antibiotique n’influençait ni la latence (en présence d’une RPMP et de résultats positifs à la suite de la mise en culture des SGB) ni les taux de septicémie néonatale. La poursuite de l’évaluation des issues néonatales graves s’avère essentielle à la lumière de cette nouvelle recommandation.

  7. Adesão à antibioticoterapia profilática em crianças com anemia falciforme: um estudo prospectivo Compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell anemia: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Latini Bitarães

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a adesão a antibiótico profilático em crianças com anemia falciforme. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo de 108 crianças (idade entre 3 meses e 4,5 anos, 45% masculino seguidas por 15 meses no Hemocentro de Belo Horizonte. Avaliou-se a adesão por meio de três entrevistas com cuidadores, análise de prontuário médico e atividade antibacteriana em uma amostra de urina em 81 crianças. Os antibióticos foram dispensados gratuitamente. RESULTADOS: Penicilina foi usada em 106 casos (maioria via oral, e eritromicina, dois casos. O antibiótico foi detectado na urina de 56% das crianças; 48% dos cuidadores afirmaram nas entrevistas que nenhuma dose deixou de ser administrada; em 89% dos prontuários médicos, não se registrou falha de adesão. Considerando-se aderente a criança que não apresentasse falhas em nenhum ou em apenas um dos métodos, a taxa de adesão foi de 67%. O grau de concordância entre os três métodos para medir a adesão foi baixo. Não se demonstrou qualquer associação entre a taxa de adesão e o gênero, estado nutricional, renda familiar per capita, nível educacional dos cuidadores ou número de membros da família. CONCLUSÕES: A taxa de adesão à antibioticoterapia profilática foi baixa quando avaliada por meio de questionários e testes urinários, e superestimada quando avaliada pela consulta ao prontuário médico. A adesão deve ser preferencialmente avaliada por vários métodos, pois sua mensuração é complexa. Os resultados do presente estudo sugerem a necessidade de programas educacionais abrangentes para os profissionais de saúde, para as famílias e crianças portadoras de anemia falciforme.OBJECTIVE: To prospectively assess compliance with antibiotic prophylaxis among children with sickle cell anemia. METHODS: A total of 108 children (aged 3 months to 4½ years, 45% male were recruited from the Hematology Center in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, and followed up for 15 months. Data on

  8. 预防性应用抗菌药物对腹股沟无张力疝修补术后切口感染效果的荟萃分析%Meta-analysis of effect of antibiotics prophylaxis on surgical incision infections after tension-free inguinal herniorrhaphy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨杰; 何彪; 张侠均

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价预防性应用抗菌药物对腹股沟无张力疝修补术后切口感染的作用,明确对于该类手术患者是否需要预防性使用抗菌药物。方法检索2000年1月-2013年11月所有公开发表的关于预防性使用抗菌药物对腹股沟无张力疝修术切口感染的影响,临床随机对照试验,对符合纳入标准的研究使用Revman5.2软件进行统计分析。结果按照筛选标准,共有14项随机对照试验,5940例患者纳入研究,预防性使用抗菌药物组与未使用抗菌药物组患者一般情况及病例特征分布均衡,预防性应用抗菌药物组术后切口总体感染率2.82%及切口浅部感染率2.25%,较对照组的3.88%及4.36%明显降低( P<0.05),而切口深部感染率两组比较差异无统计学意义。结论行腹股沟疝无张力修补术术前预防性应用抗菌药物能有效降低切口浅部感染的发生率,而对预防切口深部感染无实质性效果。%OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of antibiotics prophylaxis on surgical incision infections after the tension-free inguinal herniorrhaphy so as to determine whether the patients undergoing such surgery need the antibiotics prophylaxis or not .METHODS The papers concerning the effect of antibiotics prophylaxis on the surgical incision infections after the tension-free inguinal herniorrhaphy ,which were published from Jan 2000 to Jan 2013 ,were retrieved ,then the clinical randomized controlled trial was performed ,and the researches that conformed to the inclusion criteria were statistically analyzed by using the Revman5 .2 software .RESULTS According to the screening criteria ,totally 14 randomized controlled trials were included ,with 5940 patients involved ;the baseline condition and the case characteristics showed an balanced distribution between the patients who used prophylactic antibiotics and the patients who did not .The overall incidence of postoperative

  9. Multiple dose bioequivalence study with josamycin propionate, a drug with highly variable kinetics, in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoogdalem, E J; Terpstra, I J; Krauwinkel, W J; Volkers-Kamermans, N J; Baven, A L; Verschoor, J S

    1996-05-01

    Josamycin is a macrolide antibiotic with considerable intra- and interindividual variability in kinetics. In the present study bioequivalence of an intact and dispersed josamycin Solutab tablet, containing 1,000 mg of josamycin in the form of josamycin propionate ester, was tested versus a Josacine 1,000 mg reference sachet. The design of this bioequivalence study was adapted to the drug's pharmacokinetic variability, comprising testing in steady-state, testing the reference in replicate, and maintaining a widened bioequivalence margin. The study was performed in a group of 24 male and 12 female healthy subjects, according to a 3-treatment 4-period crossover design. Blood sampling for establishing josamycin propionate and josamycin base serum level profiles were collected during the 12 h dosing interval on day 4. Steady-state serum levels were reached on day 4. With the reference sachet mean peak levels of 1.02 micrograms/ml and 0.36 microgram/ml were observed for parent drug and metabolite, respectively, reached at peak times of 1.5 h and 1.8 h. Comparable profiles were observed with the intact and dispersed Solutab tablets, both tending towards higher serum levels than the sachet. In terms of josamycin propionate levels as well as josamycin base levels, the intact and dispersed Solutab tablet was bioequivalent with the referent sachet within the preset 0.70-1.43 margins. Variability in josamycin kinetics proved to be substantial, maximum differences in peak levels and AUC values being about 10-fold between individuals, and 3-fold within individuals. Retrospectively, the multiple dosing regimen appeared not to result in a clear reduction of intrasubject variability.

  10. [Optimalisation of the antibiotic policy in The Netherlands. XI. The national electronic antibiotic guide'SWAB-ID' for use in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonderen, M.G. van; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Hartwig, N.G.; Kullberg, B.J.; Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Natsch, S.S.; Prins, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 'Stichting Werkgroep Antibioticabeleid' (Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy) has developed an electronic national antibiotic guide for the antibiotic treatment and prophylaxis of common infectious diseases in hospitals. This guide also contains information on the most important

  11. Is endocarditis prophylaxis for dental procedures necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubert, Kathryn A; Wilson, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our purpose is to address whether antimicrobial prophylaxis is necessary before certain dental procedures for patients at increased risk for acquiring infective endocarditis (IE). Methods We reviewed recommendations for IE prophylaxis made by the American Heart Association (AHA) from 1995 to the present time. We also compared and contrasted the current recommendations from the AHA, European Society of Cardiology (ESC), United Kingdom’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and a consortium of French organisations. We further reviewed recent papers that have observed the incidence of IE since these current recommendations were published. Results Beginning in the 1990s, questions were raised about the advisability of using antimicrobial prophylaxis before certain dental procedures to prevent IE. Various groups in Europe and the US were increasingly aware that there were not any clinical trials showing the effectiveness, or lack thereof, of such prophylaxis. In the early to mid-2000s, the AHA, ESC and French consortium published guidelines recommending restriction of prophylaxis before dental procedures to patients with highest risk for developing IE and/or the highest risk for an adverse outcome from IE. The NICE guidelines eliminated recommendations for prophylaxis before dental procedures. Studies published after these changes were instituted have generally shown that the incidence of IE has not changed, although two recent reports have observed some increased incidence (but not necessarily related to an antecedent dental procedure). Conclusion A multi-national randomised controlled clinical trial that would include individuals from both developed and developing countries around the world is needed to ultimately define whether there is a role for antibiotic prophylaxis administered before certain dental procedures to prevent IE.

  12. 颅底骨折患者预防性使用抗生素预防脑膜炎的系统评价%Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Preventing Meningitis in Patients With Basilar Skull Fractures: A Systematic Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ratilal B; Costa J; Sampaio C; 陈耀龙

    2006-01-01

    to June 2005), and LILACS (1982 to September 2005). We also performed an electronic search of meeting proceedings from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (1997 to September 2005) and handsearched the abstracts of meeting proceedings of the European Association of Neurosurgical Societies (1995, 1999 and 2003). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any antibiotic versus placebo or no intervention were identified. We also identified nonRCTs to perform a separate meta-analysis to compare results. At least two authors independently appraised the quality and extracted the data of each trial. Metaanalysis was conducted using RevMan 4.2 software.Results Five RCTs and 17 non-RCTs comparing different types of antibioticprophylaxis with placebo or no intervention in patients with BSF were identified.Most trials presented insufficient methodological detail. All studies included meningitis in their primary outcome. Overall, we evaluated 208 participants from the four RCTs that were considered suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between antibiotic prophylaxis groups and control groups in terms of reduction of the frequency of meningitis, all-cause mortality,meningitis-related mortality, and need for surgical correction in patients with CSF leakage. We performed a subgroup analysis to evaluate the primary outcome in patients with and without CSF leakage. We also completed a meta-analysis of all the identified controlled non-RCTs (enrolling a total of 2 168 patients), producing results consistent with the randomised data.Conclusions Currently available evidence from RCTs does not support prophylactic antibiotic use in patients with BSF, whether there is evidence of CSF leakage or not. Until more research is completed, the effectiveness of antibiotics in patients with BSF cannot be determined because studies published to date are flawed by biases. Large, appropriately designed RCTs are needed.

  13. Antibiotic prophylaxis in biliary tract surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.S. Meijer (Willem)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractEven in health, man's environment is one of ubiquitous bacterial presence. As a consequence all wounds are, to a certain extent, contaminated, if only from the normal skin flora. Along with a number of other factors, the development of a wound infection is related to the degree of thls b

  14. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzler, Mark J; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement, and bite wounds. Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is recommended for various surgical procedures to prevent surgical site infections. Optimal antimicrobial agents for prophylaxis should be bactericidal, nontoxic, inexpensive, and active against the typical pathogens that can cause surgical site infection postoperatively. To maximize its effectiveness, intravenous perioperative prophylaxis should be administered within 30 to 60 minutes before the surgical incision. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be of short duration to decrease toxicity and antimicrobial resistance and to reduce cost.

  15. Investigation on the need of multiple dose bioequivalence studies for prolonged-release generic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Arieta, Alfredo; Morales-Alcelay, Susana; Herranz, Marta; de la Torre-Alvarado, José María; Blázquez-Pérez, Antonio; Suárez-Gea, Ma Luisa; Alvarez, Covadonga

    2012-02-28

    In the European Union multiple dose bioequivalence studies are required for the approval of generic prolonged-release products, but they are not required by the US-FDA. In order to investigate if the multiple dose bioequivalence studies are necessary, the bioequivalence studies assessed in the Spanish Agency for Medicines and Health Care Products in the last 10 years were searched to find all reasons for rejection and identify those cases where the multiple dose study had failed to show bioequivalence and the single dose study had shown bioequivalence. In these latter cases, the plasma concentration at the end of the dosing interval (C(τ)) in the single dose study was assessed to investigate its sensitivity to predict non-bioequivalence in the steady state. The search identified six cases where the non-equivalence in the multiple dose study was not detected by the corresponding single dose study. C(τ) was not able to detect the difference in five cases and in general it was more variable than conventional metrics. In conclusion, the multiple dose bioequivalence study is necessary to ensure therapeutic equivalence and the use of C(τ) would be counterproductive, increasing the sample size of the studies without enough sensitivity to detect differences in the steady state.

  16. Economic Evaluation of Adjunctive Azithromycin Prophylaxis for Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lorie M; Kilgore, Meredith; Szychowski, Jeff M; Andrews, William W; Tita, Alan T N

    2017-08-01

    To compare the costs associated with adjunctive azithromycin compared with standard cefazolin antibiotic prophylaxis alone for unscheduled and scheduled cesarean deliveries. A decision analytic model was created to compare cefazolin alone with azithromycin plus cefazolin. Published incidences of surgical site infection after cesarean delivery were used to estimate the baseline incidence of surgical site infection in scheduled and unscheduled cesarean delivery using standard antibiotic prophylaxis. The effectiveness of adjunctive azithromycin prophylaxis was obtained from published randomized controlled trials for unscheduled cesarean deliveries. No randomized study of its use in scheduled procedures has been completed. Cost estimates were obtained from published literature, hospital estimates, and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and considered costs of azithromycin and surgical site infections. A series of sensitivity analyses were conducted by varying parameters in the model based on observed distributions for probabilities and costs. The outcome was cost per cesarean delivery from a health system perspective. For unscheduled cesarean deliveries, cefazolin prophylaxis alone would cost $695 compared with $335 for adjunctive azithromycin prophylaxis, resulting in a savings of $360 (95% CI $155-451) per cesarean delivery. In scheduled cesarean deliveries, cefazolin prophylaxis alone would cost $254 compared with $111 for adjunctive azithromycin prophylaxis, resulting in a savings of $143 (95% CI 98-157) per cesarean delivery, if proven effective. These findings were robust to a multitude of inputs; as long as adjunctive azithromycin prevented as few as seven additional surgical site infections per 1,000 unscheduled cesarean deliveries and nine additional surgical site infections per 10,000 scheduled cesarean deliveries, adjunctive azithromycin prophylaxis was cost-saving. Adjunctive azithromycin prophylaxis is a cost-saving strategy in both unscheduled

  17. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mensa, José; Trilla, Antoni; Cainzos, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery refers to a very brief course of an antimicrobial agent initiated just before the start of the procedure. The efficacy of antimicrobials to prevent postoperative infection at the site of surgery (incisional superficial, incisional deep, or organ/space infection) has been demonstrated for many surgical procedures. Nevertheless, the majority of studies centering on the quality of preoperative prophylaxis have found that a high percentage of the antimicrobials used are inappropriate for this purpose. This work discusses the scientific basis for antimicrobial prophylaxis, provides general recommendations for its correct use and specific recommendations for various types of surgery. The guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis are based on results from well-designed studies, whenever possible. These guidelines are focussed on reducing the incidence of infection at the surgical site while minimizing the contribution of preoperative administration of antimicrobials to the development of bacterial resistance.

  18. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Single- and Multiple-Dose Pitavastatin Calcium Tablets in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Luo, MD

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: In healthy Chinese volunteers, single dosing of 1 mg, 2 mg, and 4 mg pitavastatin resulted in linear plasma pharmacokinetic properties. Compared with single dosing, multiple dosing of pitavastatin showed different distribution and elimination characteristics. Sex did not appear to affect the pharmacokinetic properties of pitavastatin. Chictr.org identifier: ChiCTR-OO-13004294.

  19. The guinea pig maximization test--with a multiple dose design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Vølund, A; Frankild, S

    1995-01-01

    The guinea pig maximization test (GPMT) is usually performed with one moderately irritant induction dose of the allergen and gives a qualitative assessment-hazard identification-of the allergenicity of the chemical. We refined the GPMT by applying a multiple dose design and used 30 guinea pigs...

  20. Infective endocarditis prophylaxis: current practice trend among paediatric cardiologists: are we following the 2007 guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Ronak J; Patel, Neil R; Wang, Ming; Shah, Nishant C

    2016-08-01

    In 2007, the American Heart Association modified the infective endocarditis prophylaxis guidelines by limiting the use of antibiotics in patients with cardiac conditions associated with the highest risk of adverse outcomes after infective endocarditis. Our objective was to evaluate current practice for infective endocarditis prophylaxis among paediatric cardiologists. A web-based survey focussing on current practice, describing the use of antibiotics for infective endocarditis prophylaxis in various congenital and acquired heart diseases, was distributed via e-mail to paediatric cardiologists. The survey was kept anonymous and was distributed twice. Data from 253 participants were analysed. Most paediatric cardiologists discontinued infective endocarditis prophylaxis in patients with simple lesions such as small ventricular septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus, and bicuspid aortic valve without stenosis or regurgitation; however, significant disagreement persists in prescribing infective endocarditis prophylaxis in certain conditions such as rheumatic heart disease, Fontan palliation without fenestration, and the Ross procedure. Use of antibiotic prophylaxis in certain selected conditions for which infective endocarditis prophylaxis has been indicated as per the current guidelines varies from 44 to 83%. Only 44% follow the current guidelines exclusively, and 34% regularly discuss the importance of oral hygiene with their patients at risk for infective endocarditis. Significant heterogeneity still persists in recommending infective endocarditis prophylaxis for several cardiac lesions among paediatric cardiologists. More than half of the participants (56%) do not follow the current guidelines exclusively in their practice. Counselling for optimal oral health in patients at risk for infective endocarditis needs to be optimised in the current practice.

  1. Preliminary consultation on preferred product characteristics of benzathine penicillin G for secondary prophylaxis of rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyber, Rosemary; Boyd, Ben J; Colquhoun, Samantha; Currie, Bart J; Engel, Mark; Kado, Joseph; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Sullivan, Mark; Saxena, Anita; Sheel, Meru; Steer, Andrew; Mucumbitsi, Joseph; Zühlke, Liesl; Carapetis, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatic fever is caused by an abnormal immune reaction to group A streptococcal infection. Secondary prophylaxis with antibiotics is recommended for people after their initial episode of rheumatic fever to prevent recurrent group A streptococcal infections, recurrences of rheumatic fever and progression to rheumatic heart disease. This secondary prophylaxis must be maintained for at least a decade after the last episode of rheumatic fever. Benzathine penicillin G is the first line antibiotic for secondary prophylaxis, delivered intramuscularly every 2 to 4 weeks. However, adherence to recommended secondary prophylaxis regimens is a global challenge. This paper outlines a consultation with global experts in rheumatic heart disease on the characteristics of benzathine penicillin G formulations which could be changed to improve adherence with secondary prophylaxis. Characteristics included dose interval, pain, administration mechanism, cold chain independence and cost. A sample target product profile for reformulated benzathine penicillin G is presented.

  2. 21 CFR 320.27 - Guidelines on the design of a multiple-dose in vivo bioavailability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Guidelines on the design of a multiple-dose in... Guidelines on the design of a multiple-dose in vivo bioavailability study. (a) Basic principles. (1) In... therapeutic moiety in the body. (2) The test product and the reference material should be administered to...

  3. Pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple-dose administration in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Ulrik S; Klitgaard, Niels A; Brosen, Kim

    2003-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the safety and the pharmacokinetic interaction between amprenavir and delavirdine after multiple dose administration in healthy volunteers. METHODS: This was a prospective, open-label, randomized, controlled, two-sequence, two-period multiple dose study with 18 healthy subjects....... Volunteers were randomly assigned to amprenavir, 600 mg twice a day, or delavirdine, 600 mg twice a day, for 10 days, followed by both drugs for another 10 days with pharmacokinetic evaluation on day 10 and day 20. Adverse events were recorded throughout the study. RESULTS: Amprenavir decreased all...... the delavirdine pharmacokinetic parameters apart from tmax. Delavirdine C12h dropped from 7,916 to 933 ng ml-1 (median decrease 5,930 ng ml-1, 95% CI 3,013, 8,955 ng ml-1). A decrease in amprenavir t(1/2) was also seen leading to almost identical median amprenavir C24h values. No serious clinical adverse events...

  4. Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics Just Diagnosed: Next Steps After Testing ... HIV HIV and Mental Health How to Find HIV Treatment Services HIV Prevention Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) (Last ...

  5. Statistical strategies for averaging EC50 from multiple dose-response experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette

    2015-11-01

    In most dose-response studies, repeated experiments are conducted to determine the EC50 value for a chemical, requiring averaging EC50 estimates from a series of experiments. Two statistical strategies, the mixed-effect modeling and the meta-analysis approach, can be applied to estimate average behavior of EC50 values over all experiments by considering the variabilities within and among experiments. We investigated these two strategies in two common cases of multiple dose-response experiments in (a) complete and explicit dose-response relationships are observed in all experiments and in (b) only in a subset of experiments. In case (a), the meta-analysis strategy is a simple and robust method to average EC50 estimates. In case (b), all experimental data sets can be first screened using the dose-response screening plot, which allows visualization and comparison of multiple dose-response experimental results. As long as more than three experiments provide information about complete dose-response relationships, the experiments that cover incomplete relationships can be excluded from the meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates. If there are only two experiments containing complete dose-response information, the mixed-effects model approach is suggested. We subsequently provided a web application for non-statisticians to implement the proposed meta-analysis strategy of averaging EC50 estimates from multiple dose-response experiments.

  6. Acute, Multiple-Dose Dermal and Genetic Toxicity of Nu-3: A Novel Antimicrobial Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Sun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nu-3 [butyl-phosphate-5-thymidine-3-phosphate-butyl] is a modified nucleotide that has been shown to have antimicrobial activity against a range of bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, data on the toxicological profile of Nu-3 are still lacking. In the present study, the toxicity of Nu-3 was evaluated by the following studies: acute oral toxicity, dermal and mucous membrane irritation, multiple-dose toxicity and genotoxicity in vivo and vitro. The acute oral toxicity test in mice showed that Nu-3 had an LD50 of 2001mg/kg body weight. The irritation tests on rats revealed that Nu-3 was not irritant, with an irritation scoring of 0. The multiple-dose toxicity study in rats showed that Nu-3 did not cause significant changes in histology, selected serum chemistry, and hematological parameters compared to the controls. Rats administrated with multiple-doses of Nu-3 showed no visible toxic symptoms. Both in vitro and in vivo, Nu-3 exhibited no notable genetic toxicity. Overall, the data suggest that Nu-3 is hypotoxic or nontoxic antimicrobial compound that warrants being further developed for treating Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

  7. Effect of special rectification activity on antibiotic prophylaxis of patients undergoing type Ⅰ incision surgery%专项整治活动对Ⅰ类切口手术患者抗菌药物预防使用的效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金秀; 吴振波; 王荣土; 应学清; 王选锭

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To improve the perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis of the patients undergoing type Ⅰincision surgery in grassroots hospitals through special rectification activity .METHODS A total of 225 patients who underwent the type Ⅰ incision surgery from Jan to Jun 2011 (before the special rectification ) and 419 patients who underwent the type Ⅰ incision surgery in the general surgery department from Jan to Jun 2014 (after the special rectification) were enrolled in the study ,then the rate of prophylactic use of antibiotics during perioperative period ,rate of reasonable use of antibiotics ,rate of accordance to antibiotics prophylaxis time no more than 24 hours ,and incidence of surgical incision infections were retrospectively analyzed ,and the statistical analysis was performed with the use of SPSS13 .0 software .RESULTS The rate of perioperative antibiotics prophylaxis was 68 .89% before the special rectification and was decreased to 14 .32% after the rectification , and there was significant difference (P<0 .05) .All the surgery cases received the one‐drug therapy before and after the special rectification ,and no case received the combined drug therapy .The accordance rate of the antibiotics prophylaxis time less than 24 hours was 69 .68% before the special rectification ,91 .67% after the special rectification the difference was significant (P< 0 .05) .The incidence of surgical site infections was 0 .44% before the special rectification ,0 .48% after the special rectification ,and there was no significant difference .CONCLUSIONS The conduct of special rectification through comprehensive interventions may promote the perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis of the patients undergoing the type Ⅰ incision surgery in the grassroots hospitals ,without increase of the incidence of surgical site infections .%目的:通过专项整治活动,改进基层医院外科Ⅰ类切口手术患者围手术期抗菌药物预防使用。方法选择整治前的2011

  8. Ciprofloxacin-Ceftriaxone Combination Prophylaxis for Prostate Biopsy; Infective Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper Ozorak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To present our clinical experience about infective complications due to ultrasound guided transrectal prostate biopsy under ciprofloxacin plus third-generation cephalosporin (Ceftriaxone combination prophylaxis. Material and Method: The 1193 patients that used combination of ceftriaxone 1 g intramuscular 1 hour before biopsy and ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice a day for 5 days after biopsy were included to study. Before biopsy, urine analysis and urinary cultures were not performed routinely. Serious infective complications such as acute prostatitis and urosepsis, causing microorganisms were evaluated. Results: Serious infective complications occurred in (1.3% 16 patients. Fifteen of them had acute prostatitis and urine culture results were positive in 10/15 patients for Escherichia coli. The strains were uniformly resistant to ciprofloxacin. Only 1 patient had urosepsis and his blood and urine cultures demonstrated extended- spectrum %u03B2-lactamase-producing (ESBL Escherichia coli also resistant to ciprofloxacin. Antibiotic treatment-related side effects were not observed in any patient. Discussion: Although there is not a certain procedure, ciprofloxacin is the most common used antibiotic for transrectal prostate biopsy prophylaxis. On the other hand, the incidence of ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli strain is increasing. Thus, new prophylaxis strategies have to be discussed. Ceftriaxone plus ciprofloxacin prophylaxis is safe and can be useable option for prophylaxis of prostate biopsy.

  9. Antimicrobial Prophylaxis in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Enzler, Mark J.; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement...

  10. Single-dose antibiotic prophylaxis for urinary catheter removal does not reduce the risk of urinary tract infection in surgical patients: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, B C; Vijverberg, P L M; Hoorntje, L E; Wiltink, E H H; Go, P M N Y H; Tersmette, M

    2011-07-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial to assess the effect of single-dose prophylaxis using co-trimoxazole (960 mg) (n = 46) or ciprofloxacin (500 mg) (n = 43) vs. placebo (n = 51) before urinary catheter removal on significant bacteriuria (SBU) (primary outcome) and urinary tract infection (UTI) in surgical patients with scheduled bladder drainage for 3-14 days. SBU was determined directly after catheter removal, and UTI 12-14 days after catheter removal. After 12-14 days, incidences of SBU were 19%, 19% and 33% for patients receiving ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole and placebo, respectively (p ns), and incidences of UTI were 3%, 0% and 3% for patients receiving ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole and placebo, respectively (p ns). © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  11. Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Multiple-Dose Intravenous Nemonoxacin in Healthy Chinese Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiao-jie; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Bei-ning; Zhang, Ying-yuan; Yu, Ji-cheng; Cao, Guo-ying; Chen, Yuan-cheng; Zhu, De-mei; Ye, Xin-yu; Wu, Ju-Fang; Shi, Yao-guo; Chang,Li-Wen; Chang, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Cheng-yuan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles of nemonoxacin in healthy Chinese volunteers following multiple-dose intravenous infusion once daily for 10 consecutive days. The study was composed of two stages. In the open-label stage, 500 mg or 750 mg of nemonoxacin (n = 12 each) was administered at an infusion rate of 5.56 mg/min. In the second stage, with a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, 500, 650, or 750 mg of nemonoxacin (n = 16 in each co...

  12. Percutaneous absorption of crotamiton in man following single and multiple dosing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dika, E; Tosti, A; Goldovsky, M; Wester, R; Maibach, H I

    2006-01-01

    Crotamiton is a topical drug used in the treatment of scabies and pruritus. We determined its percutaneous absorption following single and multiple dosing in normal skin. We used in vivo measurement of percutaneous absorption of [14C] crotamiton in a multidose regimen by measuring urinary excretion and liquid scintillation counting in three groups of four healthy volunteers. The Feldmann urinary excretion method was utilized to ascertain percutaneous absorption. Our results showed that tape stripping does not increase percutaneous absorption of crotamiton; upon repeated application.

  13. Novel approaches to antifungal prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrosky-Zeichner, Luis

    2004-06-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis represents a significant advance in the management of patients at risk from fungal infections in a variety of settings. Identification of patients at the highest risk and the utilisation of safe and effective drugs maximises the benefits of prophylaxis. Situations in which antifungal prophylaxis has been shown to be useful are bone marrow transplantation, liver and lung transplantation, surgical and neonatal intensive care units, secondary prophylaxis of fungal infections associated with HIV and neutropenia associated haematological malignancies and their treatment. New antifungal agents, such as the echinocandins and the new azoles, are available and have a potential role in antifungal prophylaxis. Future studies should evaluate which strategy is more useful; prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy.

  14. Fighting urinary tract infections with antibiotic and non-antibiotic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Lluis

    2016-06-25

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) place a considerable burden on the patient and are associated with substantial economic cost. Treatment of UTIs is mainly achieved using antibiotics, however, the rise in antibiotic resistance is concerning and the use of non-antimicrobial prophylaxis offers alternative treatment methods.

  15. Severe Acute Pancreatitis of Different Ways of Using Antibiotic Prophylaxis%重症急性胰腺炎预防性使用抗生素的不同途径

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘顺海; 刘作金

    2015-01-01

    重症急性胰腺炎病情进展迅速、病死率高。能否通过早期预防性使用抗生素来减少患者病死率仍争议不断。随着医疗技术的发展,预防性使用抗生素的途径增多,通过不同途径预防性使用抗生素的疗效不同。本文从静脉滴注、持续动脉灌注、腹腔灌洗途径阐述了目前重症急性胰腺炎中预防性使用抗生素的现状。%Sever acute pancreatitis (SAP) progresses quickly and has a high mortality. It is still controversial to decrease the death rate through prophylactic antibiotics. With the development of the medical technique, there exist various approaches to use antibiotics preventively.And different ways result in different therapeutic effect. In this review, we elucidate current status of preventive use of antibiotics in SAP by intravenous infusion, continuous regional arterial infusion and peritoneal lavage.

  16. Infection Prophylaxis Update

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, Patrick; Bullocks, Jamal; Matthews, Martha

    2006-01-01

    The use of prophylactic antibiotics in surgery has been debated for numerous years. Although their indications have been elucidated in the general surgery literature, their role in plastic surgery has yet to be clearly defined. Although the incidence of surgical site infections in clean, elective plastic surgery procedures has been reported to be as low as 1.1%, the use of antibiotics has surged over the past 20 years. Much of the increased use has been attributed to common surgical practice ...

  17. Fluoroquinolone Prophylaxis Against Febrile Neutropenia in Areas With High Fluoroquinolone Resistance—An Asian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Shu-Ting Ng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Febrile neutropenia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving chemotherapy. Major prophylactic strategies include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and antibiotics, the most widely used of which are fluoroquinolones. While fluoroquinolone prophylaxis has been shown to be effective in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is low, this same efficacy has not been proven in areas where resistance is high, such as in Asia. Given the increase in antimicrobial resistance with the use of prophylaxis, the risks and benefits of this strategy need to be carefully considered. This review presents the evidence for and against fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in areas of high fluoroquinolone resistance.

  18. Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia in areas with high fluoroquinolone resistance--an Asian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Esther Shu-Ting; Liew, Yixin; Koh, Liang Piu; Hsu, Li Yang

    2010-09-01

    Febrile neutropenia remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving chemotherapy. Major prophylactic strategies include granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and antibiotics, the most widely used of which are fluoroquinolones. While fluoroquinolone prophylaxis has been shown to be effective in areas where fluoroquinolone resistance is low, this same efficacy has not been proven in areas where resistance is high, such as in Asia. Given the increase in antimicrobial resistance with the use of prophylaxis, the risks and benefits of this strategy need to be carefully considered. This review presents the evidence for and against fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in areas of high fluoroquinolone resistance.

  19. PHARMACOKINETICS OF ORALLY ADMINISTERED VORICONAZOLE IN AFRICAN PENGUINS (SPHENISCUS DEMERSUS) AFTER SINGLE AND MULTIPLE DOSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Michael W; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Hope, William W; Stott, Katharine E

    2017-06-01

    Aspergillosis is a common respiratory fungal disease in African penguins ( Spheniscus demersus ) under managed care, and treatment failures with itraconazole due to drug resistance are increasingly common, leading to recent use of voriconazole. Empirical dosing with voriconazole based on other avian studies has resulted in adverse clinical drug effects in penguins. The objective of this study was to determine oral voriconazole pharmacokinetics (PK) in African penguins (n = 18). Single and once daily multiple oral doses of 5 mg/kg voriconazole were evaluated with a 4-mo washout period between trials. Plasma voriconazole concentrations were determined via high-performance liquid chromatography. Data was modeled using 3-compartamental population methodologies that supported first-order elimination. Observed mean peak concentration (1.89 μg/ml) after single dosing PK analysis was determined within the first hour following voriconazole administration. In the multiple-dose trial average plasma voriconazole concentrations were significantly higher on days 4 and 7 as compared with day 2. The mean estimates for volume of distribution (V/F) and clearance (Cl/F) for the multiple-dose study were 3.34 L and 0.18 L/hr, respectively. Monte Carlo simulations determined the median area under the curve (AUC0-24) at 84 hr was 37.7 μg·h/ml. As this assessment was comparable with the average AUC in humans receiving the recommended human oral dosage 200 mg b.i.d., it suggests that 5 mg/kg p.o. s.i.d. could be a safe and effective regimen in African penguins for treatment of aspergillosis. However, due to potential drug accumulation and subsequent toxicity, therapeutic drug monitoring with dosage adjustments is recommended to individualize dosing.

  20. Awareness of Iranian’s General Dentists Regarding the Latest Prophylaxis Guideline for Prevention of Infective Endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaderi F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Dental procedures leading to oral tissue injuries may provoke bacterial release to the blood stream causing infective endocarditis (IE in vulnerable patients. The guideline which was proposed by AHA has been updated 9 times having the last update published in 2007. This study was endeavored to uncover the level of knowledge of general dental practitioners in Shiraz, concerning the 2007 AHA guidelines for endocarditis prophylaxis in patients with cardiac problems receiving dental treatments.Materials and Method: This cross- sectional and descriptive analytical study included 150 dentists as participants. All practitioners were given a self –report questionnaire which consisted of three sections. Questions were designed to assess their knowledge of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with cardiac disease. Results: Almost all participants (93% were aware of antibiotic prophylaxis to be essential for tooth extraction. Most participants did not believe in prophylaxis for noninvasive procedures (such as shedding of primary teeth, impression, intraoral radiography. From all of the respondents, 75% considered Amoxicillin to be the anti-biotic of choice and 57% were acquainted with the correct dose of Amoxicillin for high risk patients.Conclusion: The study identified a potential for under/over prescription of antibiotic prophylaxis under the current guideline. Burden of IE necessitates more accurate knowledge of antibiotic prophylaxis in the undergraduate curriculum and continuing education programs of dentistry.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  2. Antibiotic Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are not effectively treated with an antibiotic • Viral gastroenteritis Bacterial infections should be treated with antibiotics. Some ... you antibiotics for a viral infection. Antibiotics kill bacteria, not viruses. • T ake all of your prescribed ...

  3. Fluconazole prophylaxis for fungal infection in high risk preterm infants receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics over 10 days%氟康唑预防高危因素早产儿广谱抗生素使用后真菌感染的效果及安全性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈涵强; 杨文庆; 杨长仪

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the benefits of fluconazole prophylaxis in preventing fungal infection in high risk premature infants using broad-spectrum antibiotics consecutively more than 10 days. Methods From October 2007 to September 2009, 164 preterm infants in high risk of fungal infection using broad-spectrum antibiotics consecutively more than 10 days were eligible for the study. Eighty-five infants,hospitalized from October 2008 to September 2009, were in the fluconazole group and were administered intravenously 3 mg/kg fluconazole every day for three days since the 11th day of antibiotic course. The other 79 infants, hospitalized from October 2007 to September 2008, were in the control group with no fluconazole administration. Fungal infection and colonizations and common complications were observed in the two groups. Results Fungal infection occured in six infants in the control group and none in the fluconazole group(χ2 = 4. 719,P = 0.03). There were no significant differences between the two groups in fungal colonization(χ2 =0. 175,P = 0. 675). No adverse effects of fluconazole therapy were documented. Conclusions Fluconazole prophylaxis may reduce the risk for fungal infection in high risk preterm infants.%目的 评估氟康唑对连续使用广谱抗生素10 d以上,且具有高危因素的早产儿发生侵袭性真菌感染的预防作用.方法 以2007年10月至2009年9月间入院,具有真菌感染高危因素并连续使用广谱抗生素10 d以上的164例早产儿为研究对象,将2008年10月至2009年9月入院的符合条件的85例早产儿作为预防组.予氟康唑3 mg/(kg·次)静脉滴注,每天1次,连续用3 d;将2007年10月至2008年9月入院的符合条件的79例早产儿作为对照组,不应用氟康唑预防.观察两组真菌感染和定植情况,以及常见并发症.结果 预防组无一例发生侵袭性真菌感染,对照组发生6例深部真菌感染,差异有统计学意义(χ2=4.719,P=0.03);预防组真菌定植11

  4. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  5. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  6. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and tolerability of gemifloxacin administered orally to healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, A; Bygate, E; Vousden, M; Oliver, S; Johnson, M; Ward, C; Cheon, A; Choo, Y S; Kim, I

    2001-02-01

    Gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805-S, LB-20304a) is a potent, novel fluoroquinolone agent with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of oral gemifloxacin were characterized in two parallel group studies in healthy male volunteers after doses of 160, 320, 480, and 640 mg once daily for 7 days. Multiple serum or plasma and urine samples were collected on days 1 and 7 and were analyzed for gemifloxacin by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence (study 1) or HPLC-mass spectrometry (study 2). Safety assessments included vital signs, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) readings, hematology, clinical chemistry, urinalysis, and adverse experience monitoring. Gemifloxacin was rapidly absorbed, with a time to maximum concentration of approximately 1 h after dosing followed by a biexponential decline in concentration. Generally, maximum concentration and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) increased linearly with dose after either single or repeat doses. Mean +/- standard deviation values of AUC(0-tau) on day 7 were 4.92 +/- 1.08, 9.06 +/- 2.20, 12.2 +/- 3.69, and 20.1 +/- 3.67 microg x h/ml following 160-, 320-, 480-, and 640-mg doses, respectively. The terminal-phase half-life was approximately 7 to 8 h, independent of dose, and was similar following single and repeated administrations. There was minimal accumulation of gemifloxacin after multiple dosing. Approximately 20 to 30% of the administered dose was excreted unchanged in the urine. The renal clearance was 160 ml/min on average after single and multiple doses, which was slightly greater than the accepted glomerular filtration rate (approximately 120 ml/min). These data show that the pharmacokinetics of gemifloxacin are linear and independent of dose. Gemifloxacin was generally well tolerated, although one subject was withdrawn from the study after 6 days at 640 mg for mild, transient elevations of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate

  7. The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in mesh repair of inguinal hernias: A randomized, double- blind,placebo- controlled study%腹股沟无张力疝修补术前一次性使用抗生素的随机、双盲、空白对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李小军; 王小强; 龙延滨; 段降龙; 张瑞鹏

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for tension-free repair of inguinal hernia. Methods A randomized, prospective double-blind control trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for tension-free mesh repair in 180 cases of inguinal hernia from March 2007 to March 2008. Intravenous cefuroxime ( 1.5 g ) was given immediately before the surgery in two groups followed by postoperative administration of cefuroxime 1.5 g twice a day for 3 days in test group compared with NS infusion in the control group. Postoperatively 16 patients (8. 89 per cent) could not be contacted at any point, giving a response rate of91. 11%. The total number of subjects for per- protocol (PP) analysis was 180, 84 cases in test group and 80 cases in control group. Results Complete data were available for 164 patients, 3 ( 1.83 per cent) developed surgical site infection (SSI) including 2 cases of surgical site infection in test group and 1 case of superficial incision surgical site infection in control group. The differences were not statistically significant. The time to follow up was 12 -29 months, the mean follow up time in test group was (15.6 ±2.2) months and (18 ±3)months in control group respectively. 93.33% patients in test group were followed up and 88. 89% patients in control group. There were not hernia recurrence and side effect of antibiotics reported in the two groups.Conclusions To prevent SSI, it is necessary to use preoperative antibiotics prophylaxis just one time for inguinal hernia repair.%目的 探讨腹股沟无张力疝手术后是否需要使用抗生素.方法 按照随机双盲法,前瞻性的研究分析2007年3月至2008年3月陕西省人民医院普通外科收治的180例腹股沟疝无张力疝修补手术后患者.两组术前30 min均给予二代头孢菌素1.5 g,术后试验组连用3 d,而对照组仅给予生理盐水输注.术后16例患者无法联系随访,入组率为91

  8. Successful control program to implement the appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis for cesarean section Sucesso de um programa para a implantação de profilaxia antimicrobiana apropriada em cesárea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Nunes Szente Fonseca

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Describe implementation of a successful program to reduce doses (cefazolin 2 to 1 g used for antimicrobial prophylaxis. METHODS: Evaluation of an intervention program to reduce prophylactic antimicrobial doses. The intervention included weekly staff discussions, automatic dispensation of 1g-vial of cefazolin by the pharmacy unless expressly requested by surgeon and increase in post-discharge surveillance as a strategy to reassure surgeons of the safety of the reduction. In the pre and post intervention periods, a prospective study of antimicrobial consumption and surgical site infections were measured. RESULTS: There were 5,164 and 5,204 deliveries in 2001-2002 and 2003-2004, respectively; 1,524 (29.5% and 1,363 (26% were cesarean sections. There was a 45% decrease in cefazolin vials used on average per cesarean section (2.29 to 1.25. Patients evaluated increased from 16% to 67% and the SSI rates in both periods were 3.34% to 2.42%, respectively. CONCLUSION: An ample intervention, including administrative and educational measures, led to high compliance with dose reduction and saved more than US$4,000 in cefazolin, considered important because government reimbursement in Brazil for cesarean section is $80.OBJETIVO: descrever a implantação de um programa de redução de doses usadas para profilaxia antimicrobiana em cesárea. MÉTODOS: Descrição a implantação de um programa de redução de profilaxia com cefazolina de 2 g para 1 g através de discussões semanais com profissionais, dispensação automática de frascos de 1 g de cefazolina pela farmácia exceto quando feito pedido expresso pelo cirurgião. Houve um trabalho para aumentar a vigilância pós alta, com o objetivo de tranquilizar os cirurgiões quanto à segurança da nova dose. Foi realizada uma avaliação prospectiva, antes e depois da implantação do programa, do consumo de cefazolina e das taxas de infecção obtidas por vigilância durante a hospitalização e

  9. Feasibility, efficacy, and adverse effects of outpatient antibacterial prophylaxis in children with acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Hiroto; Gaur, Aditya H; Cao, Xueyuan; Flynn, Patricia M; Pounds, Stanley B; Avutu, Viswatej; Marszal, Lindsay N; Howard, Scott C; Pui, Ching-Hon; Ribeiro, Raul C; Hayden, Randall T; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intensive chemotherapy for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) incurs the risk of infectious complications, but the benefits of antibiotic prophylaxis remain unclear. METHODS In 103 children treated on the AML02 protocol between October 2002 and October 2008 at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, we retrospectively assessed the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the frequency of febrile neutropenia, clinically or microbiologically confirmed infections (including bacteremia), and antibiotic resistance, and on the results of nasal and rectal surveillance cultures. Initially, patients received no prophylaxis or oral cephalosporin (Group A). Then the protocol was amended to give intravenous cefepime alone or intravenous vancomycin plus either oral cephalosporin, oral ciprofloxacin, or intravenous cefepime (Group B). RESULTS There were 334 infectious episodes. Group A had a significantly greater frequency of documented infections and bacteremia (both P < .0001) (including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteremia, P = .0003 and .001, respectively) than Group B, especially viridans streptococcal bacteremia (P = .001). The incidence of febrile neutropenia without documented infection was not different between the two groups. Five cases of bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) occurred in group B (vs. none in Group A), without related mortality. Two of these cases were preceded by positive VRE rectal surveillance cultures. CONCLUSIONS Outpatient intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis is feasible in children with AML and reduces the frequency of documented infection but not of febrile neutropenia. Despite emergence of VRE bacteremia, the benefits favor antibiotic prophylaxis. Creative approaches to shorten the duration of prophylaxis and thereby minimize resistance should be explored. PMID:24677028

  10. Lymphedema Prophylaxis Utilizing Perloperative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-00-1-0495 TITLE: Lymphedema Prophylaxis Utilizing Perloperative Education PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mary Ann Kosir, M.D...NUMBER Lymphedema Prophylaxis Utilizing Perloperative Education 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAM D1 7-00-1-0495 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...perioperative training for lymphedema assessment and protection. The hypothesis is that structured perioperative training in lymphedema protection will

  11. Antibiotics in dental implants: A review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Hemchand; Yalamanchili, Pallavi Samatha; Basha, Md. Hafeez; Potluri, Sushma; Elisetti, Nirupa; Kiran Kumar, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    The routine use of antibiotics in oral implant treatment seems to be widespread. The pre- or post-operative use of antibiotics in conjunction with implant surgery and its correlation with failure and success rates are poorly documented in the literature. The debate regarding overprescription of antibiotics raises the need for a critical evaluation of proper antibiotic coverage in association with implant treatment. The benefits of prophylactic antibiotics are well-recognized in dentistry. However, their routine use in the placement of endosseous dental implants remains controversial. The purpose of this review is to know the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in implant dentistry. PMID:27829741

  12. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context.......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...

  13. Bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Carrión, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial endocarditis (BE) is a disease resulting from the association of morphological alterations of the heart and bacteraemia originating from different sources that at times can be indiscernible (infectious endocarditis). It is classified on the basis of the morphological alteration involved, depending on the clinical manifestations and course of illness, which varies according to the causative microorganism and host conditions (for example, it is characteristic in I.V. drug users). The most common microorganisms involved are: Streptococcus viridans (55%), Staphylococcus aureus (30%), Enterococcus (6%) and HACEK bacteria (corresponding to the initials: Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and Kingella), although on occasions it can also be caused by fungi. The oral microbiological flora plays a very important role in the aetiopathogenesis of BE, given that the condition may be of oral or dental origin. This paper will deal with the prevention of said bacteraemia. Prophylaxis will be undertaken using amoxicillin or clindamycin according to action protocols, with special emphasis placed on oral hygiene in patients with structural defects of the heart.

  14. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of fesoterodine sustained-release in healthy Korean volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongseong; Shin, Kwang-Hee; Lee, SeungHwan; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Cho, Joo-Youn; Jang, In-Jin; Shin, Sang-Goo; Yu, Kyung-Sang

    2012-10-01

    Fesoterodine is a pro-drug of the active metabolite 5-hydroxymethyl tolterodine (5-HMT), a muscarinic receptor antagonist. This study aimed to evaluate the safety profile and pharmacokinetic characteristics of multiple oral doses of sustained-release fesoterodine (fesoterodine SR) in healthy Korean males. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multiple-dose study with two oral doses (4 mg and 8 mg) was conducted in healthy Korean male participants. The study drug was administered once daily for 5 days. The plasma concentration of 5-HMT was measured up to 72 hours after the last drug administration. The CYP2D6 genotype was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to assess the effect of genetic polymorphisms on the pharmacokinetic parameters. 20 participants completed the study. The mean (SD) areas under the plasma concentration-time curves during the dosing interval (AUCτ) of the 4 mg and 8 mg dose groups were 26.1 (8.0) and 64.2 (30.5) μg·h/ml and the mean peak concentrations (Cmax) were 2.6 (0.7) and 6.0 (2.0) μg/ml, respectively, at steady-state. The mean AUCτ and Cmax of 5-HMT increased in approximately the same proportion as the dose increased. Fesoterodine SR was well tolerated without any serious adverse events or abnormal clinical laboratory findings. Systemic 5-HMT exposure showed dose-proportional characteristics in the 4 mg to 8 mg dose range in healthy Korean males. Thus, 4 mg or 8 mg doses of fesoterodine SR taken once-daily were tolerable in healthy Korean males.

  15. Multiple dose pharmacokinetics of quetiapine and some of its metabolites in Chinese suffering from schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-yan LI; Xin LI; Ze-neng CHENG; Wen-xing PENG; Bi-kui ZHANG; Huan-de LI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the multiple dose pharmacokinetics of quetiapine and its sulfoxide-, 7-hydroxy-, 7-hydroxy-Ndealkyl-metabolites in Chinese suffering from schizophrenia. METHODS: Twenty-one patients (11 females and 10males) were given quetiapine twice daily to control the symptoms. After the dose reached 200 mg twice daily,blood were sampled to study the pharmacokinetics. The plasma concentrations of quetiapine and its metabolites were assayed by HPLC-MS. RESULTS: The main pharmacokinetic parameters of quetiapine, 7-hydroxy-N-dealkylquetiapine, quetiapine sulfoxide, and 7-hydroxy-quetiapine were as follows: tmax were 2.0 (0.3-5.0), 4.0 (1.5-6.0),3.0 (0.5-5.0), and 3.0 (0.5-5.0) h respectively; t1/2 were (7±3), (9.4±2.7), (7±3), and (8±5) h, respectively; CSSmaxwere (678±325), (19±5), (451±216), and (58±22) μg/L, respectively; CSSmin were (51±68), (3.3±1.6), (35±36), and (5±4) μg/L, respectively; CSSav were (295±144), (13±4), (209±71), and (28±9) μg/L, respectively; AUCSS0-12 were (0.103±0.028) h-1, respectively; CL/F and V/F of quetiapine were (67±25) L.h-1 and (672±394) L, respectively.The plasma concentrations for the four compounds reached a steady state within 48 h at the dose of 200 mg initiation. These parameters were not statistically different between genders. CONCLUSIONS: Quetiapine was absorbed quickly, distributed widely, and metabolized mainly to be quetiapine sulfoxide. The elimination speeds of quetiapine and its three metabolites were similar. Gender had no effect on the pharmacokinetics of quetiapine and its metabolites. The clinical dosage regime caused no drug accumulation.

  16. Multiple dose study of the combined radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 (pimonidazole) and SR 2508 (etanidazole)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleehen, N.M.; Newman, H.F.; Maughan, T.S.; Workman, P.

    1989-04-01

    The hypoxic cell radiosensitizers Ro 03-8799 and SR 2508 have different clinical toxicities. The former produces an acute but transient central nervous system syndrome, whereas the latter produces cumulative peripheral neuropathy. Following single dose studies, an escalating multiple dose schedule using both drugs in combination showed no unexpected adverse reactions at lower doses. This study identifies the clinical tolerance and pharmacokinetics when doses in the region of the maximal tolerated dose are given to 26 patients receiving infusions of 0.75 g/m2 Ro 03-8799 and 2 g/m2 SR 2508 three times per week. At 15 doses, 3/4 patients experienced WHO grade 2 peripheral neuropathy, whereas at 12 doses 1/9 developed grade 2 and 6/9 developed grade 1 neuropathies. This represents a lower dose of SR 2508 than can be given alone suggesting that some interaction between the two drugs does exist in terms of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. Pharmacokinetic studies show no adverse interactions between the two drugs and minimal inter-patient variation. From bivariate analysis, cumulative AUC for Ro 03-8799 has the most significant correlation with the development of peripheral neuropathy. Tumor drug concentrations normalized to the administered dose show mean values of 34 micrograms/g Ro 03-8799 and 76 micrograms/g SR 2508 30 minutes after infusion. These could be expected to produce a single dose sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.5. The combination of the two sensitizers at the maximum tolerable dose may be expected to give an increased therapeutic efficacy over either drug alone.

  17. Multiple dose pharmacokinetics of a new once daily extended release tolterodine formulation versus immediate release tolterodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, B; Szamosi, J

    2001-01-01

    To determine the multiple dose pharmacokinetics of a new extended release (ER) capsule formulation of tolterodine, compared with the existing immediate release (IR) tablet, in healthy volunteers. Nonblind, randomised, 2-way crossover trial. 19 healthy volunteers (7 females, 12 males), mean age 33 years (range 18 to 55 years). Prior to the study, all volunteers were classified as either extensive or poor metabolisers by cytochrome P450 2D6 genotyping. Volunteers received tolterodine ER 4mg once daily or tolterodine IR 2mg twice daily for 6 days (all doses given as the L-tartrate salt). A washout period of 7 days separated the 2 treatments. Serum concentrations of tolterodine, its active 5-hydroxymethyl metabolite (5-HM) and the active moiety (extensive metabolisers: sum of unbound tolterodine + 5-HM; poor metabolisers: unbound tolterodine) were measured for up to 48 hours post-dose on day 6 (steady state). Tolerability was also determined. 17 volunteers (13 extensive metabolisers, 4 poor metabolisers) completed the study and were evaluable for both treatment periods. The 90% confidence interval for the geometric mean ratio of area under the serum concentration-time curve to 24 hours (AUC24) of the active moiety, for all volunteers combined, indicated equivalence for the 2 formulations. Pooled analysis also demonstrated that the peak serum concentration (Cmax) of the active moiety following administration of tolterodine ER was around 75% of that observed for the IR tablet, whereas the trough concentration was around 1.5-fold higher. Overall, the pharmacokinetics of tolterodine (irrespective of genotype) and 5-HM (extensive metabolisers only) were consistent with sustained drug release over 24 hours. Tolterodine ER was well tolerated. The new once daily ER formulation of tolterodine 4mg shows pharmacokinetic equivalence (AUC24) to the existing IR tablet given at a dose of 2mg twice daily. Findings of lower Cmax for tolterodine ER may explain the significantly lower

  18. Adherence of Surgeons to Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Guidelines in a Tertiary General Hospital in a Rapidly Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel-Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To assess the standard practice of care of surgeons regarding surgical antibiotic prophylaxis, to identify gaps, and to set recommendations. Methods. A retrospective analysis of data obtained from different surgical units in a single center in Qatar over a 3-month period in 2012. A total of 101 patients who underwent surgery and followed regimes for surgical prophylaxis as per hospital guidelines were included in the study. Results. The overall use of antibiotic was 89%, whereas the current practice did not match the recommended hospital protocols in 53.5% of cases. Prolonged antibiotics use (59.3% was the commonest reason for nonadherence followed by the use of an alternative antibiotic to that recommended in the protocol (31.5% and no prophylaxis was used in 9.2% of cases. The rate of compliance was significantly higher among clean surgery than clean contaminated group (P=0.03. Forty-four percent of clean and 65% of clean-contaminated procedures showed noncompliance with the recommended surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis hospital guidelines. Conclusion. Lack of adherence to hospital protocols is not uncommon. This finding remains a challenge to encourage clinicians to follow hospital guidelines appropriately and to consistently apply the surgical antibiotic prophylaxis. The role of clinical pharmacist may facilitate this process across all surgical disciplines.

  19. Mycobacterium abscessus post-injection abscesses from extrinsic contamination of multiple-dose bottles of normal saline in a rural clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jun; Liu, Yufei; Yang, Zhicong; Cai, Yanshan; Deng, Zhiai; Qin, Pengzhe; Li, Tiegang; Dong, Zhiqiang; Yan, Ziqiang; Zhou, Duanhua; Luo, Huiming; Ma, Huilai; Pang, Xinglin; Fontaine, Robert E

    2009-09-01

    We investigated an outbreak of gluteal abscesses following intramuscular (IM) injections given at a clinic in rural China to identify the causative agent, source, and method of exposure. We defined a case as an abscess that appeared at the site of an injection given since June 1, 2006. We compared case rates by injection route, medication, and diluents. We reviewed injection practices, and cultured abscesses and environmental sites for mycobacteria. From October through December 2006, 5.8% (n=35) of 604 persons who had received injections at the clinic developed a case. All 35 cases occurred in 184 patients (attack rate=19.0%) who had received IM injections with various drugs that had been mixed with normal saline (NS); risk ratio=infinity; prubber septum of 100 ml multiple-dose bottles of NS in the clinic. Fourteen percent (n=527) of the 3887 registered residents of this village had been treated with IM drugs over a three-month period, often for minor illnesses. This outbreak of M. abscessus occurred from exposure to extrinsically contaminated NS through improper injection practices. Frequent treatment of minor illnesses with IM injections of antibiotics was likely an important contributing factor to the size of this outbreak.

  20. Effect of special rectification for clinical antibiotics application on antibiotics prophylaxis during perioperative period of inguinal hernia surgery%抗菌药物临床应用专项整治对腹股沟疝围手术期预防用药的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    殷卫清; 沈宏; 归莱; 唐叶秋

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of the special rectification for clinical antibiotics application on the use of antibiotics in general surgery department during perioperative period. METHODS The medical records of the discharge patients undergoing inguinal hernia surgery were randomly extracted from Jul to Aug 2010 (the control group) and from Jul to Aug 2011 (the intervention group). By means of self-designed questionnaires, the application of antibiotics was taken for statistical analysis. RESULTS The utilization rates of antibiotics were significantly decreased before and after the interventions, which were 100. 00% and 58. 33%, respectively (P< 0. 05) , the coincidence rate of the antibiotics medication indications raised from 45. 16% to 85. 71 % (P<0. 05) ; the reasonable rates of the first medication were 4. 84% and 28. 57%, respectively (P<0. 05); the median medication duration were (4. 72 ± 1. 50) days and (2. 06 ± 1. 47) days ( P < 0. 001), the differences were statistically significant; both groups were administrated with antibiotics by the intravenous infusion, and there were no combination use of antibiotics. CONCLUSION The special rectification for clinical antibiotics application can significantly improve the rationality of use of antibiotics during preoperative period of inguinal hernia surgery yet remains with the insufficiencies to be further improved.%目的 了解抗菌药物临床应用专项整治活动对普外科围手术期抗菌药物应用的影响.方法 采取回顾性调查方法,随机抽取2010年7-8月62例(对照组)和2011年7-8月72例(干预组)行腹股沟疝手术的患者出院病历,填写抗菌药物应用情况调查表,并进行比较分析.结果 干预前后抗菌药物使用率显著降低,分别为100.00%、58.33% (P<0.05),预防用药指征符合率从45.16%提高至85.71%(P<0.05);首剂给药时机合理率分别为4.84%、28.57% (P<0.05);平均用药时间分别为(4.72±1.50)d、(2.06±1

  1. Increased incidence of postoperative infections during prophylaxis with cephalothin compared to doxycycline in intestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Nilsen, Roy M; Svensen, Rune;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The antibiotics used for prophylaxis during surgery may influence the rate of surgical site infections. Tetracyclines are attractive having a long half-life and few side effects when used in a single dose regimen. We studied the rate of surgical site infections during changing regimen...

  2. Treatment of febrile neutropenia and prophylaxis in hematologic malignancies: a critical review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafuerte-Gutierrez, Paola; Villalon, Lucia; Losa, Juan E; Henriquez-Camacho, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is one of the most serious complications in patients with haematological malignancies and chemotherapy. A prompt identification of infection and empirical antibiotic therapy can prolong survival. This paper reviews the guidelines about febrile neutropenia in the setting of hematologic malignancies, providing an overview of the definition of fever and neutropenia, and categories of risk assessment, management of infections, and prophylaxis.

  3. Our patients do not need endocarditis prophylaxis for genitourinary tract procedures: insights from the 2007 American Heart Association guidelines.

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, E.; Magee, LA; von Dadelszen, P.; Money, D; Blondel-Hill, E; van Schalkwyk, J

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 American Heart Association guidelines for the prevention of infective endocarditis have dramatically reduced both the types of eligible procedures and the types of eligible cardiac lesions that require prophylaxis. Antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infective endocarditis is not indicated for any patient undergoing obstetric and/or gynaecological procedures, not even for patients with underlying cardiac lesions with the highest risk of developing complications from endocarditis. This ...

  4. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of inhaled indacaterol in healthy Chinese volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ji; Li, Lilly; Yin, Hequn; Woessner, Ralph; Emotte, Corinne; Li, Ruobing; Khindri, Sanjeev; Pei, Hu

    2015-06-01

    Indacaterol is an inhaled, ultra-long-acting β2-agonist that provides 24-h bronchodilation with once-daily dosing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. This study evaluated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and tolerability of multiple daily inhaled doses of indacaterol 150 or 300 μg once daily in healthy Chinese volunteers. This was a single-center, randomized, double-blind, multiple-dose, parallel-group study, placebo-controlled trial including two doses of indacaterol: 150 and 300 μg. Serum indacaterol was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with a lower limit of quantification of 0.01 ng/mL. The pharmacokinetic parameters were analyzed using non-compartmental analysis and included C max, T max, and AUC0-24h on Day 1 and AUC0-24h,ss, C max,ss, C min,ss, C av,ss, T max,ss, T 1/2, T 1/2,acc, CL/F, V z/F, and R acc on Day 14 (after repeated once-daily doses). Safety analyses were recorded using physical examination, biochemical tests, and ECG. Indacaterol steady state was achieved after 12-14 days of daily dosing. The mean effective half-life of indacaterol (based on drug accumulation at steady state) was 33.9 and 35.8 h for 150 and 300 μg, respectively. Systemic exposure to indacaterol increased 1.27 and 1.34-fold between the 150- and 300-μg doses on Day 1 (first dose) and Day 14 (repeated dose), respectively. Indacaterol 150 and 300 μg were safe and well tolerated in these volunteers. The pharmacokinetics of multiple inhaled doses of indacaterol 150 and 300 μg (for 14 days) were consistent with moderate systemic accumulation at steady state after repeated once-daily inhalation in healthy Chinese volunteers.

  5. Multiple dose pharmacokinetics of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone in Chinese female patients with schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-ling ZHOU; Qiu-xiong LIN; Chuan-yue WANG; Wen-biao LI; Shu-guang LIN; Huan-de LI; Xin LI; Huai-yan PENG; Xi-yong YU; Ming YANG; Feng-li SU; Feng WANG; Rong-hua ZHU; Chun-yu DENG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the multiple dose clinical pharmacokinetics of risperidone and its main active metabolite, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, in Chinese female patients with schizophrenia. Methods: The subjects were 23 Chinese female inpatients aged 18-65 years who met the CCMD-Ⅲ (third revision of the Chinese Criteria of Mental Disorders) criteria for schizophrenia. Subjects were tested after 17 d of treatment with 2 mg risperidone twice daily. Plasma concentrations of risperidone and 9-hydroxy-risperidone were assayed by using validated high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) methods. Results: Risperidone was rapidly absorbed (Tmax was 1.6 h) and its Tin in plasma was short (3.2 h).9-hydroxy-risperidone was quickly metabolized from the parent drug with a mean Tmax of 2.5 h. It had a long half-life of 24.7 h. The Cssav of risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone were 36.9±33.1 and 110.6±30.5 μg·h·L-1, respectively, and the AUCss0-12 were 443.2±397.4 and 1327.2±402.3 μg·h·L-1, respectively. CL/F and V/F of risperidone were 8.7±6.2 L/h and 34.1±24.3 L, respectively. Interindividual variations for pharmacokinetic parameters were quite large for risperidone. All 23 subjects experienced high prolactin levels when treated with risperidone. However there was no correlation between prolactin level and the concentration of risperidone, 9-hydroxy-risperidone, or the active moiety. Conclusion: Risperidone showed large interindividual variations in pharmacokinetics. Administration of risperidone resulted in high serum prolactin levels. The results indicate that systemic exposure to risperidone and 9-hydroxy-risperidone in female Chinese schizophrenic patients is higher relative to published data for white Caucasian patients. Larger studies regarding the PK/PD relationship may be required to develop a reasonable clinical dosage regimen for Chinese female patients.

  6. Ciprofloxacin versus colistin prophylaxis during neutropenia in acute myeloid leukemia: two parallel patient cohorts treated in a single center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlen, Michele; Marx, Julia; Mellmann, Alexander; Becker, Karsten; Mesters, Rolf M.; Mikesch, Jan-Henrik; Schliemann, Christoph; Lenz, Georg; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Büchner, Thomas; Krug, Utz; Stelljes, Matthias; Karch, Helge; Peters, Georg; Gerth, Hans U.; Görlich, Dennis; Berdel, Wolfgang E.

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia are at high risk for bacterial infections during therapy-related neutropenia. However, the use of specific antibiotic regimens for prophylaxis in afebrile neutropenic acute myeloid leukemia patients is controversial. We report a retrospective evaluation of 172 acute myeloid leukemia patients who received 322 courses of myelosuppressive chemotherapy and had an expected duration of neutropenia of more than seven days. The patients were allocated to antibiotic prophylaxis groups and treated with colistin or ciprofloxacin through 2 different hematologic services at our hospital, as available. The infection rate was reduced from 88.6% to 74.2% through antibiotic prophylaxis (vs. without prophylaxis; P=0.04). A comparison of both antibiotic drugs revealed a trend towards fewer infections associated with ciprofloxacin prophylaxis (69.2% vs. 79.5% in the colistin group; P=0.07), as determined by univariate analysis. This result was confirmed through multivariate analysis (OR: 0.475, 95%CI: 0.236–0.958; P=0.041). The prophylactic agents did not differ with regard to the microbiological findings (P=0.6, not significant). Of note, the use of ciprofloxacin was significantly associated with an increased rate of infections with pathogens that are resistant to the antibiotic used for prophylaxis (79.5% vs. 9.5% in the colistin group; P<0.0001). The risk factors for higher infection rates were the presence of a central venous catheter (P<0.0001), mucositis grade III/IV (P=0.0039), and induction/relapse courses (vs. consolidation; P<0.0001). In conclusion, ciprofloxacin prophylaxis appears to be of particular benefit during induction and relapse chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia. To prevent and control drug resistance, it may be safely replaced by colistin during consolidation cycles of acute myeloid leukemia therapy. PMID:27470601

  7. Vaccine prophylaxis: achievements, problems, perspectives of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mavrutenkov V.V.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents medical and social aspects of immune prophylaxis of infectious diseases; the history of vaccines and vaccination is presented, as well as perspectives of development of vaccine prophylaxis.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Single and Multiple Doses of ACHN-490 Injection Administered Intravenously in Healthy Subjects▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cass, Robert T.; Brooks, Carter D.; Havrilla, Nancy A.; Tack, Kenneth J.; Borin, Marie T; Young, Don; Bruss, Jon B.

    2011-01-01

    ACHN-490 is an aminoglycoside with activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, including those resistant to currently used aminoglycosides. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of ACHN-490 injection in healthy subjects. Study 1 used a parallel-group design with escalating single (SD) and multiple doses (MD). Study 2 explored a longer duration of the highest dose tolerated in the first study. Subj...

  9. Survival of Serratia marcescens in benzalkonium chloride and in multiple-dose medication vials: relationship to epidemic septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, A K; Highsmith, A K; Martone, W J

    1987-01-01

    In an epidemic of septic arthritis due to Serratia marcescens, the intra-articular injection of contaminated methylprednisolone may have played a key role. The epidemic strain was found in used multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone and in a canister of cotton balls soaked in benzalkonium chloride. The cotton balls had been used for antisepsis and disinfection. Growth characteristics of the epidemic strain of S. marcescens were compared with those of control strains of S. marcescens which had been obtained from unrelated nosocomial outbreaks. The epidemic strain was able to survive in 1:100 dilutions of benzalkonium chloride and was able to grow to greater than 10(5) CFU/ml in multiple-dose vials of methylprednisoline; control strains could not be recovered after 24 h in the same solutions. The preservative in methylprednisolone is gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride, a compound chemically related to benzalkonium chloride. We speculate that the epidemic strain of S. marcescens, which was resistant to benzalkonium chloride, had cross-resistance to gamma-myristyl picolinium chloride. If the cotton balls were used to disinfect the tops of the multiple-dose vials of methylprednisolone, small numbers of organisms subsequently introduced into the solution could have grown to high concentrations. PMID:3298309

  10. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (co-trimoxazole) prophylaxis is effective against acute murine inhalational melioidosis and glanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kay B; Steward, Jackie; Thwaite, Joanne E; Lever, M Stephen; Davies, Carwyn H; Armstrong, Stuart J; Laws, Thomas R; Roughley, Neil; Harding, Sarah V; Atkins, Timothy P; Simpson, Andrew J H; Atkins, Helen S

    2013-06-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of the disease melioidosis, which is prevalent in tropical countries and is intractable to a number of antibiotics. In this study, the antibiotic co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole) was assessed for the post-exposure prophylaxis of experimental infection in mice with B. pseudomallei and its close phylogenetic relative Burkholderia mallei, the causative agent of glanders. Co-trimoxazole was effective against an inhalational infection with B. pseudomallei or B. mallei. However, oral co-trimoxazole delivered twice daily did not eradicate infection when administered from 6h post exposure for 14 days or 21 days, since infected and antibiotic-treated mice succumbed to infection following relapse or immunosuppression. These data highlight the utility of co-trimoxazole for prophylaxis both of B. pseudomallei and B. mallei and the need for new approaches for the treatment of persistent bacterial infection.

  11. Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be exposed to HIV frequently. Another HIV prevention method, called pre-exposure prophylaxis or PrEP, is when people at high risk for HIV take a specific HIV medicine daily to prevent getting HIV. For more information on PrEP, see the AIDS info fact sheet ...

  12. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in colorectal surgery: focus on ertapenem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto de Lalla

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fausto de LallaLibero Docente of Infectious Diseases, University of Milano, Milano, ItalyAbstract: Despite improvement in infection control measures and surgical practice, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In colorectal surgery, perioperative administration of a suitable antimicrobial regimen that covers both anaerobic and aerobic bacteria is universally accepted. In a prospective, double-blind, randomized study ertapenem was recently found to be more effective than cefotetan, a parenteral cephalosporin so broadly used as to be considered as gold standard in the prevention of SSIs following colorectal surgery. In this adequate and well controlled study, the superiority of ertapenem over cefotetan was clearly demonstrated from the clinical and bacteriological points of view. However, data that directly compares ertapenem with other antimicrobial regimen effective in preventing SSIs following colorectal surgery are lacking; furthermore, the possible risk of promotion of carbapenem resistance associated with widespread use of ertapenem prophylaxis as well as the ertapenem effects on the intestinal gut flora are of concern. Further comparative studies of ertapenem versus other widely used prophylactic regimens for colorectal surgery in patients submitted to mechanical bowel preparation versus no preparation as well as further research on adverse events of antibiotic prophylaxis, including emergence of resistance and Clostridium difficile infection, seem warranted.Keywords: colorectal surgery, surgical prophylaxis, ertapenem

  13. Is antibiotic prophylaxis beneficial in acute pancreatitis? - First update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rada

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Este resumen Epistemonikos (Living FRISBEE: Living FRIendly Summary of the Body of Evidence using Epistemonikos es una actualización del resumen publicado en Agosto de 2014, basado en dos nuevas revisiones sistemáticas aparecidas en Enero y Febrero de 2015. Existe controversia sobre los efectos del uso de antibióticos profilácticos en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda. Utilizando la base de datos Epistemonikos, la cual es mantenida mediante búsquedas en 30 bases de datos, identificamos 18 revisiones sistemáticas que en conjunto incluyen 19 estudios aleatorizados. Los combinamos mediante un metanálisis y generamos tablas de resumen de resultados utilizando el método GRADE. Concluimos que el uso de antibióticos profilácticos podría disminuir la mortalidad y el tiempo de hospitalización en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda, pero la certeza de la evidencia es baja. La probabilidad que la aparición de nueva evidencia cambie lo que sabemos es alta.

  14. [Antibiotic prophylaxis of immediate and late complications of scarlet fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlău, A; Cucuruz, L

    1979-01-01

    Patients with scarlet fever were followed by clinical and laboratory investigation (bacteriologic and immunologic reactions, etc.), in relation with the early application, and the duration of penicillin therapy. The patients were also followed for a period of 30 days after discharge from the hospital. The results show a decrease in the number of early and late complications, as well as a reduction in the number of carriers of beta-haemolytic streptococcus in those patients in whom penicillin treatment was applied early, and when it was prolonged in the recovery period. The clinical and statistical data stress the pathologic morphology of scarlet fever, and the restructuration of complications when penicillin treatment is applied.

  15. [Perspective applications of multi-species probiotics in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenskiĭ, Iu P; Zakharenko, S M; Fominykh, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The problem of antibiotic-associated conditions is one of the most actual problems of clinical practice. The antibiotic-associated diarrhea is a multidisciplinary problem. Investigations of the small intestine microecological status and assessment of microflora at the patients receiving antibiotics testifies to dysbiosis existence. In article results of open-label investigation of a multispecies probiotic RioFlora Balance using for antibiotic-associated diarrhea prophylaxis in patients used antibacterial therapy are presented.

  16. Antibiotic stewardship through the EU project "ABS International".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, Franz; Frank, Annegret; Gareis, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance requires implementation of antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programs. The project "ABS International--implementing antibiotic strategies for appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals in member states of the European Union" was started in September 2006 in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia. A training program for national ABS trainers was prepared and standard templates for ABS tools (antibiotic list, guides for antibiotic treatment and surgical prophylaxis, antibiotic-related organization) and valid process measures, as well as quality indicators for antibiotic use were developed. Specific ABS tools are being implemented in up to five healthcare facilities in each country. Although ABS International clearly focuses on healthcare institutions, future antimicrobial stewardship programs must also cover public education and antibiotic prescribing in primary care.

  17. ANTIFUNGAL PROPHYLAXIS IN IMMUNOCOMPROMISED PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Vazquez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasive fungal infections (IFIs represent significant complications in patients with hematological malignancies. Chemoprevention of IFIs may be important in this setting, but most antifungal drugs have demonstrated poor efficacy, particularly in the prevention of invasive aspergillosis. Antifungal prophylaxis in hematological patients is currently regarded as the gold standard in situations with a high risk of infection, such as acute leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Over the years, various scientific societies have established a series of recommendations for antifungal prophylaxis based on prospective studies performed with different drugs. However, the prescription of each agent must be personalized, adapting its administration to the characteristics of individual patients and taking into account possible interactions with concomitant medication.

  18. Antibiotics Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotics Quiz Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Try your hand at this quiz. Read each question and then click the button to the right of the answer ...

  19. Gastrointestinal prophylaxis in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirmer, Clemens M; Kornbluth, Joshua; Heilman, Carl B; Bhardwaj, Anish

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study is to review and summarize the relevant literature regarding pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic methods of prophylaxis against gastrointestinal (GI) stress ulceration, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill patients. Stress ulcers are a known complication of a variety of critical illnesses. The literature regarding epidemiology and management of stress ulcers and complications thereof, is vast and mostly encompasses patients in medical and surgical intensive care units. This article aims to extrapolate meaningful data for use with a population of critically ill neurologic and neurosurgical patients in the neurological intensive care unit setting. Studies were identified from the Cochrane Central Register of controlled trials and NLM PubMed for English articles dealing with an adult population. We also scanned bibliographies of relevant studies. The results show that H(2)A, sucralfate, and PPI all reduce the incidence of UGIB in neurocritically ill patients, but H(2)A blockers may cause encephalopathy and interact with anticonvulsant drugs, and have been associated with higher rates of nosocomial pneumonias, but causation remains unproven and controversial. For these reasons, we advocate against routine use of H(2)A for GI prophylaxis in neurocritical patients. There is a paucity of high-level evidence studies that apply to the neurocritical care population. From this study, it is concluded that stress ulcer prophylaxis among critically ill neurologic and neurosurgical patients is important in preventing ulcer-related GI hemorrhage that contributes to both morbidity and mortality. Further, prospective trials are needed to elucidate which methods of prophylaxis are most appropriate and efficacious for specific illnesses in this population.

  20. Clinical impact of fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in the fecal flora of hematological patients with neutropenia and levofloxacin prophylaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia and hematological malignancies is said to be effective on febrile netropenia (FN-related infection and mortality; however, the emergence of antibiotic resistance has become a concern. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin prophylaxis are most commonly recommended. A significant increase in the rate of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in fecal flora has been reported following ciprofloxacin prophylaxis. The acquisition of quinolone-resistant E. coli after levofloxacin use has not been evaluated. METHODS: We prospectively examined the incidence of quinolone-resistant E. coli isolates recovered from stool cultures before and after levofloxacin prophylaxis in patients with neutropenia from August 2011 to May 2013. Some patients received chemotherapy multiple times. RESULTS: In this trial, 68 patients were registered. Levofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates were detected from 11 and 13 of all patients before and after the prophylaxis, respectively. However, this was not statistically significant (P = 0.65. Multiple prophylaxis for sequential chemotherapy did not induce additional quinolone resistance among E. coli isolates. Interestingly, quinolone-resistant E. coli, most of which were extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producers, were already detected in approximately 20% of all patients before the initiation of prophylaxis. FN-related bacteremia developed in 2 patients, accompanied by a good prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: Levofloxacin prophylaxis for neutropenia did not result in a significant acquisition of quinolone-resistant E. coli. However, we detected previous colonization of quinolone-resistant E. coli before prophylaxis, which possibly reflects the spread of ESBL. The epidemic spread of resistant E. coli as a local factor may influence strategies toward the use of quinolone prophylaxis.

  1. Pharmacokinetics of antibiotics in pregnancy and labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipson, A

    1979-01-01

    Few of the articles published on antibiotics and pregnancy are concerned with pharmacokinetics. It is particularly difficult to evaluate possible alterations in pharmacokinetic parameters that may be due to pregnancy. Most data available have been obtained in connection with abortion or delivery. Such data may not be representative for pregnancy as such. Marked changes in most organ systems, particularly in renal function, but in composition and amounts of body fluids as well, make it likely that several pharmacokinetic parameters change, possibly gradually as pregnancy progresses. Accumulated data for several beta-lactam antibiotics, and also for aminoglycosides indicate that antibiotics eliminated mainly by renal excretion will produce lower levels in serum or plasma in pregnant women than in other individuals. Also, the half-life of certain antibiotics in serum is shorter during pregnancy. Transplacental passage occurs for all antibiotics according to the physicochemical properties of the drug. Bolus injections to a pregnant woman are more efficient than continuous infusion in producing high levels of antibiotic in fetal serum and amniotic fluid. Fetal tissue levels are higher following multiple doses than after a single dose. Lower serum levels of antibiotics in pregnant women than in other individuals following the same dosage will be unsatisfactory as micr-organisms are less likely to be affected.

  2. Lactobacilli vs antibiotics to prevent urinary tract infections: A randomized, double-blind, noninferiority trial in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.J. Beerepoot (Mariëlle); G. ter Riet; S. Nys (Sita); W. van der Wal (Willem); C.A. de Borgie (Corianne); T.M. de Reijke (Theo); J.M. Prins (Jan); J. Koeijers (Jeanne); A. Verbon (Annelies); E.E. Stobberingh (Ellen); S.E. Geerlings (Suzanne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Growing antibiotic resistance warrants studying nonantibiotic prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Use of lactobacilli appears to be promising. Methods: Between January 2005 and August 2007, we randomized 252 postmenopausal women with recurrent UTIs taki

  3. Prophylaxis and Treatment of Cyanide Intoxication. Cyanide - Mechanism of Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-15

    AD-A142 380 PROPHYLAXIS AND TREATMENT OF CYANIDE INTOXICATION I/f CYANIDE - MECHANISM OF PROPHYLAXISU) WASHINGTON STATE UNIV PULLMAN d L WAY 15 APR...invaluable contributions to completion of this work. My thanks to fellow students Linda Baker, for helping write a computer program which provided...8217 COMPILED BY KORIAT, LICHTENSTEIN, AND FISCHHOFF(1980) 25 ’PROGRAM DEVELOPED BY 26 ’JOHN R. TIFFANY AND LINDA S. BAKER 27 30 LI$:’A’:L2$:’A’:L3$:’B’:L4$:’B

  4. Patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial prophylaxis for anthrax during the 2001 bioterrorism-related outbreak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aber Robert C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inappropriate use of antibiotics by individuals worried about biological agent exposures during bioterrorism events is an important public health concern. However, little is documented about the extent to which individuals with self-identified risk of anthrax exposure approached physicians for antimicrobial prophylaxis during the 2001 bioterrorism attacks in the United States. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of randomly selected members of the Pennsylvania Chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians to assess patients' request for and emergency physicians' prescription of antimicrobial agents during the 2001 anthrax attacks. Results Ninety-seven physicians completed the survey. Sixty-four (66% respondents had received requests from patients for anthrax prophylaxis; 16 (25% of these physicians prescribed antibiotics to a total of 23 patients. Ten physicians prescribed ciprofloxacin while 8 physicians prescribed doxycycline. Conclusion During the 2001 bioterrorist attacks, the majority of the emergency physicians we surveyed encountered patients who requested anthrax prophylaxis. Public fears may lead to a high demand for antibiotic prophylaxis during bioterrorism events. Elucidation of the relationship between public health response to outbreaks and outcomes would yield insights to ease burden on frontline clinicians and guide strategies to control inappropriate antibiotic allocation during bioterrorist events.

  5. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following single- and multiple-dosing of oral artesunate in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background The population pharmacokinetics of artesunate (AS) and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA) were studied in healthy subjects receiving single- or multiple-dosing of AS orally either in combination with pyronaridine (PYR) or as a monotherapy with or without food. Methods Data from 118 concentration-time profiles arising from 91 healthy Korean subjects were pooled from four Phase I clinical studies. Subjects received 2-5 mg/kg of single- and multiple-dosing of oral AS either in combination with PYR or as a monotherapy with or without food. Plasma AS and DHA were measured simultaneously using a validated liquid chromatography- mass spectrometric method with a lower limit of quantification of 1 ng/mL for both AS and DHA. Nonlinear mixed-effect modelling was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and variability (inter-individual and residual variability) parameter estimates. Results A novel parent-metabolite pharmacokinetic model consisting of a dosing compartment, a central compartment for AS, a central compartment and a peripheral compartment for DHA was developed. AS and DHA data were modelled simultaneously assuming stoichiometric conversion to DHA. AS was rapidly absorbed with a population estimate of absorption rate constant (Ka) of 3.85 h-1. The population estimates of apparent clearance (CL/F) and volume of distribution (V2/F) for AS were 1190 L/h with 36.2% inter-individual variability (IIV) and 1210 L with 57.4% IIV, respectively. For DHA, the population estimates of apparent clearance (CLM/F) and central volume of distribution (V3/F) were 93.7 L/h with 28% IIV and 97.1 L with 30% IIV, respectively. The population estimates of apparent inter-compartmental clearance (Q/F) and peripheral volume of distribution (V4/F) for DHA were 5.74 L/h and 18.5 L, respectively. Intake of high-fat and high-caloric meal prior to the drug administration resulted in 84% reduction in Ka. Body weight impacted CLM/F, such that a unit change in weight resulted in 1

  6. Population pharmacokinetics of artesunate and dihydroartemisinin following single- and multiple-dosing of oral artesunate in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsch Lee E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The population pharmacokinetics of artesunate (AS and its active metabolite dihydroartemisinin (DHA were studied in healthy subjects receiving single- or multiple-dosing of AS orally either in combination with pyronaridine (PYR or as a monotherapy with or without food. Methods Data from 118 concentration-time profiles arising from 91 healthy Korean subjects were pooled from four Phase I clinical studies. Subjects received 2-5 mg/kg of single- and multiple-dosing of oral AS either in combination with PYR or as a monotherapy with or without food. Plasma AS and DHA were measured simultaneously using a validated liquid chromatography- mass spectrometric method with a lower limit of quantification of 1 ng/mL for both AS and DHA. Nonlinear mixed-effect modelling was used to obtain the pharmacokinetic and variability (inter-individual and residual variability parameter estimates. Results A novel parent-metabolite pharmacokinetic model consisting of a dosing compartment, a central compartment for AS, a central compartment and a peripheral compartment for DHA was developed. AS and DHA data were modelled simultaneously assuming stoichiometric conversion to DHA. AS was rapidly absorbed with a population estimate of absorption rate constant (Ka of 3.85 h-1. The population estimates of apparent clearance (CL/F and volume of distribution (V2/F for AS were 1190 L/h with 36.2% inter-individual variability (IIV and 1210 L with 57.4% IIV, respectively. For DHA, the population estimates of apparent clearance (CLM/F and central volume of distribution (V3/F were 93.7 L/h with 28% IIV and 97.1 L with 30% IIV, respectively. The population estimates of apparent inter-compartmental clearance (Q/F and peripheral volume of distribution (V4/F for DHA were 5.74 L/h and 18.5 L, respectively. Intake of high-fat and high-caloric meal prior to the drug administration resulted in 84% reduction in Ka. Body weight impacted CLM/F, such that a unit change in

  7. Interferon prophylaxis of hepatic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiosu, R; Dimitriu, L; Dragomir, P; Eremia, L

    1999-01-01

    The present article reveals the importance of hepatic carcinoma among the other diseases in digestive oncology, and also the importance of a correct designation of these cases. Epidemiology and actual hypothesis on the mechanisms of oncogenesis are discussed. There are reviewed some studies in the literature concerning infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, coinfection (B and C viruses, B and D viruses), the role of interferon prophylaxis in such cases. Also there is present a statistics on chronic viral hepatits, cirrhosis of viral etiology and hepatic carcinoma, diagnosed in patients in "N.Gh.Lupu" Hospital, over two decades.

  8. [Prospective randomized study regarding the effect of the preoperative antibiotic and chlorhexidine rinse on wound healing after mandibular third molar surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposvári, István; Körmöczi, Kinga; László, Zsuzsa Beáta; Oberna, Ferenc; Horváth, Ferenc; Joób-Fancsaly, Árpád

    2017-01-01

    The study compares the antibiotic prophylaxis combined with postoperative antibiotic therapy to preoperative chlorhexidine rinse combined with postoperative antibiotic therapy in preventing complications after surgical removal of a mandibular third molar. 71 healthy patients in four groups were enrolled in the study: I. prophylactic dose of 2000 mg of amoxicillin clavulanate, continued with amoxicillin clavulanate postoperatively; II. prophylactic dose of 600 mg of clindamycin, continued with clindamycin postoperatively; III. prophylactic chlorhexidin rinsing, continued randomized amoxicillin clavulanate or clindamycin postoperatively; IV. control, with clindamycin postoperatively. The pain was smaller in the prophylaxis groups. Alveolitis occurred only in the control group: 2 patients. Wound opening occurred in 22,2 % in group IV., 14,2 % in group II, 10 % in group I., 5 % in group III. We consider completing the indicated postoperative antibiotic prescription with antibiotic or antiseptic prophylaxis. Chlorhexidin prophylaxis could have the same positive effect. Orv. Hetil., 2017, 158(1), 13-19.

  9. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt tube infection and changing pattern of antibiotic sensitivity in neurosurgery practice: Alarming trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Ventriculoperitoneal shunt infection has become an important concern in cases of hydrocephalus. Due to the development of a high proportion of antibiotic resistance, we recommend an empirical therapy of antibiotic therapy for prophylaxis and suspected infection in ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery.

  10. Treatment of Febrile Neutropenia and Prophylaxis in Hematologic Malignancies: A Critical Review and Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Villafuerte-Gutierrez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Febrile neutropenia is one of the most serious complications in patients with haematological malignancies and chemotherapy. A prompt identification of infection and empirical antibiotic therapy can prolong survival. This paper reviews the guidelines about febrile neutropenia in the setting of hematologic malignancies, providing an overview of the definition of fever and neutropenia, and categories of risk assessment, management of infections, and prophylaxis.

  11. Assessment of radioactive residues arising from radiolabel instability in a multiple dose tissue distribution study in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slatter, J.G. [Pharmacia Corp., Peapack, NJ (United States); Sams, J.P.; Easter, J.A. [Pharmacia Corp., Kalamazoo, MI (United States)] [and others

    2003-05-01

    Our study objectives were to quantitatively determine the effect of radiolabel instability on terminal phase radioactive tissue residues in a multiple dose tissue distribution study, to quantitatively compare tissue residue artifacts (non drug-related radioactivity) from two chemically-distinct radiolabel locations, and to conduct a definitive multiple dose tissue distribution study using the better of the two radiolabeled compounds. We compared the excretion and tissue distribution in rats of [{sup 14}C]linezolid, radiolabeled in two different locations, after 7 consecutive once daily [{sup 14}C] oral doses. The radiolabels were in the acetamide (two carbon) and oxazolidinone (isolated carbon) functional groups. Terminal phase tissue residue and excretion data were compared to data from rats dosed orally with [{sup 14}C]sodium acetate. Drug-related radioactivity was excreted rapidly over 24 h. After a single dose, the acetamide and oxazolidinone radiolabel sites both gave 3% of dose as exhaled {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. After 7 daily [{sup 14}C] oral doses, terminal phase radioactive tissue residues were higher from the acetamide radiolabel, relative to the oxazolidinone radiolabel, and were primarily not drug-related. In the definitive tissue distribution study, low concentrations of drug-related radioactivity in skin and thyroid were observed. We conclude that although small amounts of radiolabel instability do not significantly affect single dose tissue radioactivity C{sub max} and area under the curve (AUC), artifacts arising from radiolabel instability can prolong the apparent terminal phase half life and complicate study data interpretation. When possible, it is always preferable to use a completely stable radiolabel site. (author)

  12. PROSPECTIVE STUDY COMPARING EFFECTIVENESS OF SINGLE AND MULTIPLE DOSE 25 MICROGRAMS INTRAVAGINAL MISOPROSTOL FOR INDUCTION OF LABOUR AT TERM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati Achamma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES/PURPOSE To compare two dosing regimens of the same 25 mcg misoprostol with respect to Induction delivery interval, successful vaginal delivery and its associated maternal and neonatal outcomes. METHODS Prospective study was conducted among 300 low risk pregnant patients at 40 weeks’ gestation, attending labour room in the Dept. of OBG, Amala Institute of Medical sciences, comparing, A-single dose 25 mcg misoprostol in 24 hours Vs. B-multiple dose 25 mcg misoprostol (4 hourly up to 3 doses intravaginally for its effectiveness. RESULTS Statistically significant difference was obtained in the number of deliveries within 24 hours in group A and B (36.6% Vs. 63.4% with p value 0.002. The induction delivery interval between primigravidae and multigravidae were statistically significant (12.5 =/-3.9 Vs 11.08=/-4.3 with p value 0.035 but not significant between groups A and B. There was no statistical difference in other maternal and neonatal outcomes. Incidence of MSL and foetal distress were higher in primigravidae after single dose itself. Serious adverse outcomes like MAS, NND, APGAR<7 at one minute and uterine rupture were not encountered in this study. CONCLUSION Around 65% of women delivered with a single dose of misoprostol in 24 hours. Most multigravidae delivered vaginally with a single dose in 24 hours. It appears that in multigravidae a single dose induction is adequate; however, in primigravidae multiple doses of 25 mcg misoprostol is best to achieve delivery within 24 hours.

  13. Antibiotics as immunomodulant agents in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Francesco; Mantero, Marco; Aliberti, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    It is widely accepted that some antibiotics have activities beyond their direct antibacterial effects. Macrolide is the antibiotic class with more convincing studies and evidence on its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory activities. Different clinical studies have shown that macrolide prophylaxis in patients with moderate-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can have a significant impact on the exacerbation rate reducing morbidity and, potentially, mortality of the disease. Other antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones, demonstrate a variety of immunomodulatory effects but only few clinical data are available in COPD. New macrolide derivatives devoid of antibacterial activity have been synthetized. This review analyses the relevance of immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of antibiotics in the management of COPD.

  14. Role of Old Antibiotics in the Era of Antibiotic Resistance. Highlighted Nitrofurantoin for the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Jose Munoz-Davila

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant isolates have become a major health problem in recent years, since they are very difficult to treat, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality. Nitrofurantoin is a broad-spectrum bactericidal antibiotic that, through a complex mode of action which is not completely understood, affects both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Nitrofurantoin has been used successfully for a long time for the prophylaxis and treatment of acute lo...

  15. Prophylactic Antibiotics in Otolaryngologic Surgeries: From Knowledge to Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Khatami-Moghadam

    2011-01-01

    Our results indicate that prophylactic antibiotics were being significantly misused in a tertiary referral center of a university hospital. Although teaching the principles of prophylaxis to physicians is important, we think that finding a way to bring this knowledge to practice is more important.

  16. Influence of Al³⁺ addition on the flocculation and sedimentation of activated sludge: comparison of single and multiple dosing patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yue; Zheng, Wanlin; Yang, Yundi; Cao, Asheng; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the flocculation and sedimentation performance of activated sludge (AS) with single and multiple dosing of trivalent aluminum (Al(3+)) were studied. The AS samples were cultivated in sequencing batch reactors at 22 °C. The dosages of Al(3+) were 0.00, 0.125, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 meq/L for single dosing, and 0.1 meq/L for multiple dosing. Under single dosing conditions, as Al(3+) dosage increased, the zeta potential, total interaction energy, and effluent turbidity decreased, whereas the sludge volume index (SVI) increased, indicating that single Al(3+) dosing could enhance sludge flocculation, but deteriorate sedimentation. By comparison, adding an equal amount of Al(3+) through multiple dosing achieved a similar reduction in turbidity, but the zeta potential was higher, while the loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) content and SVI remarkably declined. Although the difference in the flocculation performances between the two dosing patterns was not significant, the underlying mechanisms were quite distinct: the interaction energy played a more important role under single dosing conditions, whereas multiple dosing was more effective in reducing the EPS content. Multiple dosing, which allows sufficient time for sludge restructuring and floc aggregation, could simultaneously optimize sludge flocculation and sedimentation.

  17. Forgotten antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pulcini, Céline; Bush, Karen; Craig, William A

    2012-01-01

    In view of the alarming spread of antimicrobial resistance in the absence of new antibiotics, this study aimed at assessing the availability of potentially useful older antibiotics. A survey was performed in 38 countries among experts including hospital pharmacists, microbiologists, and infectiou...

  18. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Hoffmann, Tammy C; McCullough, Amanda R

    2015-01-01

    Numerous opportunities are available in primary care for alleviating the crisis of increasing antibiotic resistance. Preventing patients from developing an acute respiratory infection (ARI) will obviate any need for antibiotic use downstream. Hygiene measures such as physical barriers and hand...... will greatly improve the use of antibiotics for ARIs. However, used in concert, combinations are likely to enable clinicians and health care systems to implement the strategies that will reduce antimicrobial resistance in the future....... antibiotic prescribing are a major factor in the prescribing for ARIs. Professional interventions with educational components are effective, although they have modest effects, and are expensive. GPs' perceptions - that mistakenly assume as a default that patients want antibiotics for their ARIs - are often...

  19. Perioperative prophylaxis for endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Katibeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe prophylactic patterns employed against endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 486 ophthalmologists filling in a self-administered questionnaire during the 20 th Annual Congress of the Iranian Society of Ophthalmology in December 2010, Tehran, working in both private and academic medical centers. Prophylactic measures used preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively and self-reported rates of endophthalmitis were assessed as the main outcome measurements. Results: In the preoperative phase, 75.5% of surgeons used povidone-iodine in the conjunctival sac and 71.4% of them did not use antibiotics. The rate of intraoperative prophylaxis was 61.9% either in the form of intracameral antibiotics or subconjunctival injection (mostly cephazolin or gentamicin. Only 7.8% of participants used intracameral cephalosporins. Postoperative antibiotics [mostly chloramphenicol (57% and ciprofloxacin (28%] were used by 94.2% of surgeons. On average, ten years of practice were required to observe one case of endophthalmitis. Conclusion: The surgeons in present setting used various prophylactic regimens against endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Setting a local and evidence-based clinical practice guideline seems necessary.

  20. CURRENT EVIDENCE REGARDING THE EFFICACY OF PROPHYLACTIC ANTIBIOTICS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FACIAL FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilkumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the facial region are commonly treated by surgeons operating in the head and neck. Antibiotic prophylaxis is used by these surgeons to decrease the rate of infections, however the role of prophylactic antibiotics remains controversial. Evidence exists for the beneficial use of prophylactic antibiotics for tympanostomy, orthognathic surgery and third molar surgeries. Unfortunately there is little evidence regarding the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in the management of facial fractures. In numerous cases no clear benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown, particularly considering their potential adverse side effects. The aim of this paper is to present the available evidence regarding the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics in the management of facial fractures.

  1. Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients

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    Serdar Toker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE. Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of\t5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH, low molecular weight heparin (LMWH, and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs, pneumatic compression devices (PCDs, and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  2. Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis in trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, Serdar; Hak, David J; Morgan, Steven J

    2011-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) are known collectively as venous thromboembolism (VTE). Venous thromboembolic events are common and potentially life-threatening complications following trauma with an incidence of 5 to 63%. DVT prophylaxis is essential in the management of trauma patients. Currently, the optimal VTE prophylaxis strategy for trauma patients is unknown. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been considered risk factors for VTE; however it is unclear which combination of risk factors defines a high-risk group. Modalities available for trauma patient thromboprophylaxis are classified into pharmacologic anticoagulation, mechanical prophylaxis, and inferior vena cava (IVC) filters. The available pharmacologic agents include low-dose heparin (LDH), low molecular weight heparin (LMWH), and factor Xa inhibitors. Mechanical prophylaxis methods include graduated compression stockings (GCSs), pneumatic compression devices (PCDs), and A-V foot pumps. IVCs are traditionally used in high risk patients in whom pharmacological prophylaxis is contraindicated. Both EAST and ACCP guidelines recommend primary use of LMWHs in trauma patients; however there are still controversies regarding the definitive VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients. Large randomized prospective clinical studies would be required to provide level I evidence to define the optimal VTE prophylaxis in trauma patients.

  3. Effects of multiple-dose ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, on lymphocyte subsets in healthy humans

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    Jurcevic S

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Stipo Jurcevic,1 Pierre-Eric Juif,2 Colleen Hamid,3 Roseanna Greenlaw,3 Daniele D’Ambrosio,2 Jasper Dingemanse2 1Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Westminster, London, UK; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Actelion Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Allschwil, Switzerland; 3Division of Transplantation Immunology & Mucosal Biology, King’s College London, London, UK Abstract: This study investigated the effects of ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, on T lymphocyte subsets in 16 healthy subjects. Lymphocyte subset proportions and absolute numbers were determined at baseline and on Day 10, after once-daily administration of ponesimod (10 mg, 20 mg, and 40 mg each consecutively for 3 days or placebo (ratio 3:1. The overall change from baseline in lymphocyte count was -1,292±340×106 cells/L and 275±486×106 cells/L in ponesimod- and placebo-treated subjects, respectively. This included a decrease in both T and B lymphocytes following ponesimod treatment. A decrease in naïve CD4+ T cells (CD45RA+CCR7+ from baseline was observed only after ponesimod treatment (-113±98×106 cells/L, placebo: 0±18×106 cells/L. The number of T-cytotoxic (CD3+CD8+ and T-helper (CD3+CD4+ cells was significantly altered following ponesimod treatment compared with placebo. Furthermore, ponesimod treatment resulted in marked decreases in CD4+ T-central memory (CD45RA-CCR7+ cells (-437±164×106 cells/L and CD4+ T-effector memory (CD45RA-CCR7- cells (-131±57×106 cells/L. In addition, ponesimod treatment led to a decrease of -228±90×106 cells/L of gut-homing T cells (CLA-integrin β7+. In contrast, when compared with placebo, CD8+ T-effector memory and natural killer (NK cells were not significantly reduced following multiple-dose administration of ponesimod. In summary, ponesimod treatment led to a marked reduction in overall T and B cells. Further investigations revealed that the number of CD4+ cells was dramatically reduced, whereas

  4. Infection, antibiotics, and preterm delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locksmith, G; Duff, P

    2001-10-01

    , antibiotics should be used only for protecting the neonate from group B streptococci sepsis. They should not be used for the purpose of prolonging pregnancy. Multiple investigations have shown that, in patients with preterm premature rupture of the membranes, prophylactic antibiotics are of value in prolonging the latent period between rupture of the membranes and onset of labor and in reducing the incidence of maternal and neonatal infection. The most extensively tested effective antibiotic regimen for prophylaxis involves erythromycin alone or in combination with ampicilln. Controversy still exists regarding the appropriate length and route of antibiotic prophylaxis.

  5. Prophylactic antibiotics and anticonvulsants in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratilal, B; Sampaio, C

    2011-01-01

    The prophylactic administration of antibiotics to prevent infection and the prophylactic administration of anticonvulsants to prevent first seizure episodes are common practice in neurosurgery. If prophylactic medication therapy is not indicated, the patient not only incurs the discomfort and the inconvenience resulting from drug treatment but is also unnecessarily exposed to adverse drug reactions, and incurs extra costs. The main situations in which prophylactic anticonvulsants and antibiotics are used are described and those situations we found controversial in the literature and lack further investigation are identified: anticonvulsants for preventing seizures in patients with chronic subdural hematomas, antiepileptic drugs for preventing seizures in those suffering from brain tumors, antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing meningitis in patients with basilar skull fractures, and antibiotic prophylaxis for the surgical introduction of intracranial ventricular shunts.In the following we present systematic reviews of the literature in accordance with the standard protocol of The Cochrane Collaboration to evaluate the effectiveness of the use of these prophylactic medications in the situations mentioned. Our goal was to efficiently integrate valid information and provide a basis for rational decision-making.

  6. Use of antibiotics to prevent preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, R S; Eschenbach, D A

    1997-08-01

    Our purpose is to review recent data and provide a clinical opinion on the use of antibiotics to prevent preterm birth or related maternal-neonatal complications. A literature review and a synthesis of opinion are provided. During prenatal care, standard practices should be applied regarding Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and bacteriuria. In addition, screen for and treat bacterial vaginosis in patients at high risk for preterm birth but do not treat Ureaplasma urealyticum or group B streptococci genital colonization. With preterm labor and intact membranes, standard practices should be applied regarding group B streptococci prophylaxis. Do not give antibiotics routinely to prolong pregnancy, but in patients with bacterial vaginosis and Trichomonas vaginalis specific treatment should be given. With preterm premature rupture of membranes, standard practices should be applied regarding group B streptococci prophylaxis, but additional antibiotics should also be given to prolong pregnancies at 24 to 32 weeks' gestation. Reported adverse effects have been few to date. However, increased diligence is needed for resistant organisms. In selected clinical settings antibiotic therapy is now indicated to prolong pregnancy and prevent maternal-neonatal complications associated with preterm birth.

  7. Multiple-dose pharmacokinetics confirm no accumulation and dose proportionality of the novel promotile drug tegaserod (HTF 919).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel-Dingemanse, S; Hirschberg, Y; Osborne, S; Pommier, F; McLeod, J

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate the steady-state pharmacokinetics (PK) and dose proportionality of the selective 5-HT4 receptor partial agonist tegaserod (HTF 919) in healthy subjects. Eighteen subjects were given 2, 6, or 12-mg doses of tegaserod twice daily (b.i.d.) for 5 days, with PK and safety assessments made during the 12 h or 24 h following first administration, and 12 h after the final dose. Tegaserod was rapidly absorbed [time to reach measured maximum plasma concentration after multiple administrations (tmax,ss) 1 h]. Steady-state PK were consistent with single-dose PK characteristics supporting that there was no accumulation of tegaserod in plasma based on systemic exposure. Mean measured maximum plasma concentration after multiple administrations (Cmax,ss) and area under the plasma concentration-time curve over one dosing interval (tau, 0-12 h after drug administration, AUC tau) were between 0.7 +/- 0.3 ng/ml and 5.6 +/- 2.9 ng/ml and 2.4 +/- 1.3 h.ng/ml and 20.4 +/- 14.0 h.ng/ml, respectively, indicating dose-proportional PK of tegaserod in the range 2-12 mg b.i.d. Tegaserod was safe and well tolerated. No serious adverse events were reported. Tegaserod exhibits no accumulation and dose-proportional PK after multiple doses.

  8. Women with recurrent urinary tract infections: antibiotic resistance and non-antibiotic prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerepoot, M.A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Niet-antibiotische middelen, zoals lactobacillen, kunnen een aanvaardbaar alternatief zijn voor antibiotica om urineweginfecties te voorkomen. Dit concludeert Mariëlle Beerepoot naar aanleiding van twee grote landelijke studies waarin ze onderzoekt of cranberry’s (veenbessen) en lactobacillen (melkz

  9. Use of Probiotics as Prophylaxis for Postoperative Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Mangell

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative bacterial infections are common despite prophylactic administration of antibiotics. The wide-spread use of antibiotics in patients has contributed to the emergence of multiresistant bacteria. A restricted use of antibiotics must be followed in most clinical situations. In surgical patients there are several reasons for an altered microbial flora in the gut in combination with an altered barrier function leading to an enhanced inflammatory response to surgery. Several experimental and clinical studies have shown that probiotics (mainly lactobacilli may reduce the number of potentially pathogenia bacteria (PPM and restore a deranged barrier function. It is therefore of interest to test if these abilities of probiotics can be utilized in preoperative prophylaxis. These factors may be corrected by perioperative administration of probiotics in addition to antibiotics. Fourteen randomized clinical trials have been presented in which the effect of such regimens has been tested. It seems that in patients undergoing liver transplantation or elective surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract prophylactic administration of different probiotic strains in combination with different fibers results in a three-fold reduction in postoperative infections. In parallel there seems to be a reduction in postoperative inflammation, although that has not been studied in a systematic way. The use of similar concepts in colorectal surgery has not been successful in reducing postoperative infections. Reasons for this difference are not obvious. It may be that higher doses of probiotics with longer duration are needed to influence microbiota in the lower gastrointestinal tract or that immune function in colorectal patients may not be as important as in transplantation or surgery in the upper gastrointestinal tract. The favorable results for the use of prophylactic probiotics in some settings warrant further controlled studies to elucidate potential

  10. Safety and efficacy of single dose versus multiple doses of AmBisome for treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in eastern Africa: a randomised trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eltahir A G Khalil

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-leishmanial drug regimens that include a single dose AmBisome could be suitable for eastern African patients with symptomatic visceral leishmaniasis (VL but the appropriate single dose is unknown. METHODOLOGY: A multi-centre, open-label, non-inferiority, randomized controlled trial with an adaptive design, was conducted to compare the efficacy and safety of a single dose and multiple doses of AmBisome for the treatment of VL in eastern Africa. The primary efficacy endpoint was definitive cure (DC at 6 months. Symptomatic patients with parasitologically-confirmed, non-severe VL, received a single dose of AmBisome 7.5 mg/kg body weight or multiple doses, 7 times 3 mg/kg on days 1-5, 14, and 21. If interim analyses, evaluated 30 days after the start of treatment following 40 or 80 patients, showed the single dose gave significantly poorer parasite clearance than multiple doses at the 5% significance level, the single dose was increased by 2·5 mg/kg. In a sub-set of patients, parasite clearance was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase (qRT PCR. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The trial was terminated after the third interim analysis because of low efficacy of both regimens. Based on the intention-to-treat population, DC was 85% (95%CI 73-93%, 40% (95%CI 19-64%, and 58% (95%CI 41-73% in patients treated with multiple doses (n = 63, and single doses of 7·5 (n = 21 or 10 mg/kg (n = 40, respectively. qRT-PCR suggested superior parasite clearance with multiple doses as early as day 3. Safety data accorded with the drug label. CONCLUSIONS: The tested AmBisome regimens would not be suitable for VL treatment across eastern Africa. An optimal single dose regimen was not identified. TRIALS REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.govNCT00832208.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of Co-Crystal of Tramadol-Celecoxib: findings from a 4-way randomized open-label Phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videla, Sebastián; Lahjou, Mounia; Vaqué, Anna; Sust, Mariano; Escriche, Marisol; Soler, Lluis; Sans, Artur; Sicard, Eric; Gascón, Neus; Encina, Gregorio; Plata-Salamán, Carlos

    2017-09-09

    We compared the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of Co-Crystal of Tramadol-Celecoxib (CTC) versus each reference product (alone and in open combination) after single (first dose) and multiple dosing. Healthy adults aged 18-50 years received, under fasted conditions, 15 twice-daily doses of the following treatments (separated by ≥14-day wash-out): 200 mg immediate-release (IR) CTC (equivalent to 88 mg tramadol and 112 mg celecoxib; Treatment-1); 100 mg IR tramadol (Treatment-2), 100 mg celecoxib (Treatment-3); and 100 mg IR tramadol and 100 mg celecoxib (Treatment-4). Treatment sequence was assigned by computer-generated randomization. PK parameters were calculated using non-compartmental analysis. Parameters for CTC were adjusted according to reference product dose. Thirty subjects (20 males, mean age 35 years) were included. Multiple-dose tramadol PK parameters for Treatments-1, -2 and -4, respectively, were 551, 632 and 661 ng ml(-1) (mean maximum plasma concentration [Cmax ]); 4796, 4990 and 5284 ng h ml(-1) (area under the plasma concentration-time curve over the dosing interval at steady state); and 3.0, 2.0 and 2.0 h (median time to Cmax at steady state). For Treatments-1, -3 and -4, multiple-dose celecoxib PK parameters were 445, 536 and 396 ng ml(-1) ; 2803, 3366 and 2897 ng h ml(-1) ; and 2.0, 2.0 and 3.0 h. Single-dose findings were consistent with multiple-dose data. Types of adverse events were consistent with known reference product safety profiles. After single (first dose) and multiple dosing, PK parameters of each active pharmaceutical ingredient in CTC were modified by co-crystallization compared with reference products alone or in open combination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Tooth brushing for oral prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruaki Hayasaki, DDS, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Control of plaque and debris is essential for the prevention of inflammatory periodontal diseases and dental caries, because plaque is the primary etiological factor in the introduction and development of both of these infection-oriented diseases. Plaque removal with a toothbrush is the most frequently used method of oral hygiene. Powered toothbrushes were developed beginning in the 1960s and are now widely used in developed countries. The bristles of a toothbrush should be able to reach and clean efficiently most areas of the mouth, and recently the design of both manual and powered toothbrushes has focused on the ability to reach and clean interproximal tooth surfaces. An individual's tooth brushing behavior, including force, duration, motivation and motion, are also critical to tooth brushing efficacy. Dental floss and the type of toothpaste play additional important roles as auxiliary tools for oral prophylaxis. Dental professionals should help their care-receivers’ meet the requirements of oral hygiene to maintain their QOL. This article reviews these topics.

  13. Pharmacokinetics and Safety of Single and Multiple Doses of ACHN-490 Injection Administered Intravenously in Healthy Subjects▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Robert T.; Brooks, Carter D.; Havrilla, Nancy A.; Tack, Kenneth J.; Borin, Marie T.; Young, Don; Bruss, Jon B.

    2011-01-01

    ACHN-490 is an aminoglycoside with activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, including those resistant to currently used aminoglycosides. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of ACHN-490 injection in healthy subjects. Study 1 used a parallel-group design with escalating single (SD) and multiple doses (MD). Study 2 explored a longer duration of the highest dose tolerated in the first study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either ACHN-490 injection or a placebo administered by a 10-min intravenous infusion. Study 1 enrolled 39 subjects (30 active and 9 placebo) and consisted of a single dose of 1 mg/kg body weight followed by ascending SD and MD cohorts of 4, 7, 11, and 15 mg/kg for 10, 10, 5, and 3 days, respectively. Study 2 enrolled 8 subjects (6 active and 2 placebo) who received 15 mg/kg for 5 days. Safety was assessed from adverse event (AE) reporting, standard clinical laboratory procedures, and testing for renal, cochlear, and vestibular function. ACHN-490 exhibited linear and dose-proportional PK, with agreement between the studies for PK parameters assessed. The 15-mg/kg dose did not accumulate with repeated dosing over 5 days. Mean steady-state (±standard deviation) area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24), maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax), half-life (t1/2), clearance, and volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) for the 15-mg/kg, day 5 dose were 239 ± 45 h·mg/liter, 113 ± 17 mg/liter, 3 ± 0.3 h, 1.1 ± 0.1 ml/min/kg, and 0.24 ± 0.04 liters/kg, respectively. AEs were mild to moderate and rapidly resolved. No evidence of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity was observed. PMID:21911572

  14. Pharmacokinetics and safety of single and multiple doses of ACHN-490 injection administered intravenously in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cass, Robert T; Brooks, Carter D; Havrilla, Nancy A; Tack, Kenneth J; Borin, Marie T; Young, Don; Bruss, Jon B

    2011-12-01

    ACHN-490 is an aminoglycoside with activity against multidrug-resistant pathogens, including those resistant to currently used aminoglycosides. Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies investigated the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of ACHN-490 injection in healthy subjects. Study 1 used a parallel-group design with escalating single (SD) and multiple doses (MD). Study 2 explored a longer duration of the highest dose tolerated in the first study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive either ACHN-490 injection or a placebo administered by a 10-min intravenous infusion. Study 1 enrolled 39 subjects (30 active and 9 placebo) and consisted of a single dose of 1 mg/kg body weight followed by ascending SD and MD cohorts of 4, 7, 11, and 15 mg/kg for 10, 10, 5, and 3 days, respectively. Study 2 enrolled 8 subjects (6 active and 2 placebo) who received 15 mg/kg for 5 days. Safety was assessed from adverse event (AE) reporting, standard clinical laboratory procedures, and testing for renal, cochlear, and vestibular function. ACHN-490 exhibited linear and dose-proportional PK, with agreement between the studies for PK parameters assessed. The 15-mg/kg dose did not accumulate with repeated dosing over 5 days. Mean steady-state (±standard deviation) area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC(0-24)), maximum concentration of drug in serum (C(max)), half-life (t(1/2)), clearance, and volume of distribution at steady state (V(ss)) for the 15-mg/kg, day 5 dose were 239 ± 45 h·mg/liter, 113 ± 17 mg/liter, 3 ± 0.3 h, 1.1 ± 0.1 ml/min/kg, and 0.24 ± 0.04 liters/kg, respectively. AEs were mild to moderate and rapidly resolved. No evidence of nephrotoxicity or ototoxicity was observed.

  15. The pharmacokinetics of methocarbamol and guaifenesin after single intravenous and multiple-dose oral administration of methocarbamol in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpler, M J; Colahan, P; Sams, R A

    2014-02-01

    A simple LC/MSMS method has been developed and fully validated to determine concentrations and characterize the concentration vs. time course of methocarbamol (MCBL) and guaifenesin (GGE) in plasma after a single intravenous dose and multiple oral dose administrations of MCBL to conditioned Thoroughbred horses. The plasma concentration-time profiles for MCBL after a single intravenous dose of 15 mg/kg of MCBL were best described by a three-compartment model. Mean extrapolated peak (C0 ) plasma concentrations were 23.2 (± 5.93) μg/mL. Terminal half-life, volume of distribution at steady-state, mean residence time, and systemic clearance were characterized by a median (range) of 2.96 (2.46-4.71) h, 1.05 (0.943-1.21) L/kg, 1.98 (1.45-2.51) h, and 8.99 (6.68-10.8) mL/min/kg, respectively. Oral dose of MCBL was characterized by a median (range) terminal half-life, mean transit time, mean absorption time, and apparent oral clearance of 2.89 (2.21-4.88) h, 2.67 (1.80-2.87) h, 0.410 (0.350-0.770) h, and 16.5 (13.0-20) mL/min/kg. Bioavailability of orally administered MCBL was characterized by a median (range) of 54.4 (43.2-72.8)%. Guaifenesin plasma concentrations were below the limit of detection in all samples collected after the single intravenous dose of MCBL whereas they were detected for up to 24 h after the last dose of the multiple-dose oral regimen. This difference may be attributed to first-pass metabolism of MCBL to GGE after oral administration and may provide a means of differentiating the two routes of administration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Unravelling adherence to prophylaxis in haemophilia: a patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijvers, L H; Kars, M C; Beijlevelt-van der Zande, M; Peters, M; Schuurmans, M J; Fischer, K

    2015-09-01

    Given the lifelong therapy in haemophilia patients, insight in non-adherence behaviour from a patient perspective is important to understand patients' difficulties with the following treatment recommendations. The aim of this study was to clarify the process underlying adherence (behaviour) to prophylactic treatment, from a patients' perspective. To develop a grounded theory, a qualitative study using individual in-depth interviews was performed to understand experiences, perceptions and beliefs concerning adherence to prophylaxis. From two Dutch treatment centres, 21 adults with haemophilia using prophylaxis were interviewed. Patients were asked how they experience their task to administer prophylaxis and how they adhere to this. The interviews were transcribed, coded and analysed in an iterative process, leading to the development of the grounded theory. Adherence was determined by the position of prophylaxis in life. The position of prophylaxis was determined by the perception of prophylaxis and the ability to exert prophylaxis. Patients' perception was influenced by two main factors: acceptance of haemophilia and feeling/fearing symptoms. The ability to exert prophylaxis was influenced by understanding haemophilia and prophylaxis and planning/infusion skills. The combination of different perceptions and skills led to four main positions of prophylaxis in life: (i) prophylaxis integrated in life, (ii) prophylaxis according to doctors' advice, struggling with irregular situations, (iii) prophylaxis is too much to handle, (iv) prophylaxis is a confrontation with illness. The adherence level gradually decreased from position 1 to 4. This information can be used to design tailored interventions to promote adherence.

  17. Aerosolized Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Marcos I; Keyt, Holly; Reyes, Luis F

    2015-06-01

    Administration of medications via aerosolization is potentially an ideal strategy to treat airway diseases. This delivery method ensures high concentrations of the medication in the targeted tissues, the airways, with generally lower systemic absorption and systemic adverse effects. Aerosolized antibiotics have been tested as treatment for bacterial infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), non-CF bronchiectasis (NCFB), and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The most successful application of this to date is treatment of infections in patients with CF. It has been hypothesized that similar success would be seen in NCFB and in difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections such as VAP. This review summarizes the available evidence supporting the use of aerosolized antibiotics and addresses the specific considerations that clinicians should recognize when prescribing an aerosolized antibiotic for patients with CF, NCFB, and VAP.

  18. Antibiotic Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian

    morbidity and mortality as well as an increase in the cost of treatment. Understanding how bacteria respond to antibiotic exposure gives the foundations for a rational approach to counteract antimicrobial resistance. In the work presented in this thesis, I explore the two fundamental sources...... of antimicrobial resistance: (1) adaptive mutations and (2) horizontal acquisition of resistance genes from antibiotic gene reservoirs. By studying the geno- and phenotypic changes of E. coli in response to single and drug-pair exposures, I uncover the evolutionary trajectories leading to adaptive resistance. I...... to rationally design drug combinations that limit the evolution of antibiotic resistance due to counteracting evolutionary trajectories. My results highlight that an in-depth knowledge about the genetic responses to the individual antimicrobial compounds enables the prediction of responses to drug combinations...

  19. Decreasing candidaemia rate in abdominal surgery patients after introduction of fluconazole prophylaxis*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzknecht, Barbara; Thorup, Jens Frederik; Arendrup, M C;

    2011-01-01

    -intervention, p 0.43). The introduction of fluconazole prophylaxis was followed by a significantly decreased candidaemia rate. However, the observational study design does not allow conclusions regarding causality. No increase in resistance was detected, but follow-up was short and continuing surveillance......Clin Microbiol Infect ABSTRACT: Although abdominal surgery is an established risk factor for invasive candidiasis, the precise role of antifungal prophylaxis in these patients is not agreed upon. In 2007, fluconazole was added to the prophylactic antibiotic treatment for patients...... in the two abdominal surgery departments increased from 4.6 to 12.2 defined daily doses per 100 bed-days (p resistant strains (14/29 pre- and 2/7 post...

  20. Compliance with RSV prophylaxis: Global physicians’ perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari S Anderson

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Kari S Anderson, Victoria M Mullally, Linda M Fredrick, Andrew L CampbellAbbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL, USAAbstract: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a significant cause of morbidity in high-risk infants. Palivizumab is proven to prevent serious RSV disease, but compliance with prophylaxis (monthly doses during the RSV season is essential to ensure protection. We invited 453 pediatricians to participate in a survey to identify their perspectives of barriers to compliance and interventions to improve compliance with palivizumab prophylaxis schedules. One hundred physicians from five continents completed the survey, identifying caregiver inconvenience, distance to clinic, cost of prophylaxis, and lack of understanding of the severity of RSV as the most common reasons for noncompliance. They recommended provision of educational materials about RSV, reminders from hospital or clinic, and administration of prophylaxis at home to increase compliance. Globally, physicians recognize several obstacles to prophylaxis compliance. This survey suggests that focused proactive interventions such as empowering caregivers with educational materials and reducing caregiver inconvenience may be instrumental to increase compliance.Keywords: medication adherence, respiratory syncytial virus infections, infant, premature, immunization, passive

  1. The efficacy and safety of multiple doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu J

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jie Fu,1 Lilei Peng,2 Xiaogang Li1 1Department of Neurology, 2Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, People’s Republic of China Objective: Vortioxetine is a novel antidepressant approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder by the US Food and Drug Administration in September 2013. This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of different doses of vortioxetine for generalized anxiety disorder of adults.Methods: PubMed, Cochrane Library, PsycINFO, and Clinical Trials databases were searched from 2000 through 2015. The abstracts of the annual meetings of the American Psychiatric Association and previous reviews were searched to identify additional studies. The search was limited to individual randomized controlled trials (RCTs, and there was no language restriction. Four RCTs met the selection criteria. These studies included 1,843 adult patients. Results were expressed as odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. The data were pooled with a random-effects or fixed-effects model.Results: The results showed that multiple doses (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/d of vortioxetine did not significantly improve the generalized anxiety disorder symptoms compared to placebo (OR=1.16, 95% CI=0.84–1.60, Z=0.89, P=0.38; OR=1.41, 95% CI=0.82–2.41, Z=1.25, P=0.21; OR=1.05, 95% CI=0.76–1.46, Z=0.32, P=0.75, respectively. We measured the efficacy of 2.5 mg/d vortioxetine compared to 10 mg/d, and no significant differences were observed. The common adverse effects included nausea and headache. With increased dose, nausea was found to be more frequent in the vortioxetine (5 and 10 mg/d group (OR=2.99, 95% CI=1.31–6.84, Z=2.60, P=0.009; OR=2.80, 95% CI=1.85–4.25, Z=4.85, P<0.00001, respectively, but no significant differences were observed for headache.Conclusion: The results showed no significant improvement in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorder for vortioxetine compared to placebo

  2. The pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of multiple doses of the new H2-receptor antagonist, roxatidine acetate, in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassman, H B; Ho, I; Puri, S K; Sabo, R; Scheffler, M R

    1988-01-01

    Roxatidine acetate (HOE 760, TZU 0460) is a new H2-receptor antagonist which is more potent than cimetidine and ranitidine. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in healthy men to determine the effects of multiple oral doses of roxatidine acetate on unstimulated gastric acid secretion, and to assess the preliminary multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of its active desacetyl metabolite. The subjects were randomised to receive either roxatidine acetate 150 mg or placebo daily at 9 pm for 14 days. Gastric secretions were collected by aspiration using a nasogastric tube placed in the distal part of the stomach. Gastric fluid volume, pH, and acid concentrations were determined for 2 hours before drug administration and over 24 hours after administration on days 1, 7, 14 (the last day of dosing), and 17 (3 days after the last dose). Plasma and urine samples were collected throughout the study for the pharmacokinetic assessment. All subjects completed the study without side effects or clinically significant changes in any of the safety variables. Subjects receiving roxatidine acetate had substantial increases in gastric pH and decreases in acid secretion compared to baseline and to placebo-treated subjects. The duration of effect was approximately 12 hours. Nocturnal pH was greater than or equal to 6.0 in 80% of the roxatidine acetate-treated subjects. When sampled 3 days after the last dose (day 17) no differences in pH, acid secretion, or gastric volume were observed between the roxatidine acetate- and placebo-treated groups. The gastric pH increased with the mean plasma concentrations of the desacetyl metabolite. Mean plasma levels at steady state were attained between the 4th and 7th days after which there was no evidence of appreciable accumulation of the desacetyl metabolite. Roxatidine acetate 150 mg administered orally at 9 pm for 14 days to healthy men was safe, well tolerated, and produced clinically relevant increases in gastric pH, and

  3. Effects of multiple-dose ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, on lymphocyte subsets in healthy humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcevic, Stipo; Juif, Pierre-Eric; Hamid, Colleen; Greenlaw, Roseanna; D’Ambrosio, Daniele; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, on T lymphocyte subsets in 16 healthy subjects. Lymphocyte subset proportions and absolute numbers were determined at baseline and on Day 10, after once-daily administration of ponesimod (10 mg, 20 mg, and 40 mg each consecutively for 3 days) or placebo (ratio 3:1). The overall change from baseline in lymphocyte count was −1,292±340×106 cells/L and 275±486×106 cells/L in ponesimod- and placebo-treated subjects, respectively. This included a decrease in both T and B lymphocytes following ponesimod treatment. A decrease in naïve CD4+ T cells (CD45RA+CCR7+) from baseline was observed only after ponesimod treatment (−113±98×106 cells/L, placebo: 0±18×106 cells/L). The number of T-cytotoxic (CD3+CD8+) and T-helper (CD3+CD4+) cells was significantly altered following ponesimod treatment compared with placebo. Furthermore, ponesimod treatment resulted in marked decreases in CD4+ T-central memory (CD45RA−CCR7+) cells (−437±164×106 cells/L) and CD4+ T-effector memory (CD45RA−CCR7−) cells (−131±57×106 cells/L). In addition, ponesimod treatment led to a decrease of −228±90×106 cells/L of gut-homing T cells (CLA−integrin β7+). In contrast, when compared with placebo, CD8+ T-effector memory and natural killer (NK) cells were not significantly reduced following multiple-dose administration of ponesimod. In summary, ponesimod treatment led to a marked reduction in overall T and B cells. Further investigations revealed that the number of CD4+ cells was dramatically reduced, whereas CD8+ and NK cells were less affected, allowing the body to preserve critical viral-clearing functions. PMID:28096659

  4. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Everyone Should Know What You Can Do Antibiotic Resistance Q&As Fast Facts Antibiotics Quiz Glossary For ... Pharmacists Continuing Education & Curriculum Opportunities Weighing in on Antibiotic Resistance Improving Prescribing Core Elements of Outpatient Antibiotic Stewardship ...

  5. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  6. PNEUMOCOCCAL INFECTION IN CHILDREN: OPPORTUNITIES OF PROPHYLAXIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Kharit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the actual problem of modern health care — pneumococcal infections and opportunities of its prophylaxis. Authors describe risk groups of development of invasive pneumococcal infections. A characteristics of available at the present times in Russia and all over the world vaccines, including pneumococcal 7-valent vaccine (PCV7 Prevenar, intended to the prophylaxis of pneumococcal infections in children under the age 2 months — 5 years old. An experience of PCV7 use in the world in analyzed. The article gives an estimation of perspectives of inclusion of PCV7 to the national immunizations schedule.Key words: children, pneumococcal infections, prophylaxis, pneumococcal conjugated 7-valent vaccine.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(5:62-69

  7. Cefotaxime, cefazolin, or ampicillin prophylaxis of febrile morbidity in emergency cesarean sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louie, T J; Binns, B A; Baskett, T F; Ross, J; Koss, J

    1982-01-01

    Cefotaxime, a new third-generation cephalosporin, was compared with ampicillin and cefazolin in a randomized double-blind trial to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis of febrile morbidity associated with emergency cesarean sections. A 1-gm intravenous dose of one of the three antibiotics was given by bolus injection immediately after clamping of the umbilical cord and six and 12 hours later. All patients were in labor with membranes ruptured and had a temperature less than or equal to 37.8 C, and none had a history of penicillin or cephalosporin allergy. A total of 195 women were entered into the trial. Initially, the study included a placebo control group which was switched to ampicillin after 30 patients. Of the 188 evaluable patients, 51 of 59 (86.5%) ampicillin recipients, 59 of 67 (88.1%) cefazolin recipients, 48 of 55 (87.3%) cefotaxime recipients, and two of seven (28.5%) placebo recipients had uneventful postoperative courses. During the study, an additional 39 women who were in labor with ruptured membranes but who were allergic to penicillin or who declined antibiotic prophylaxis were classified as untreated patients and observed for postoperative complications. Standard febrile morbidity, primarily related to endometritis or wound infections, occurred in 6 of 59 (10.1%) ampicillin, 5 of 67 (7.5%) cefazolin, 5 of 55 (9.1%) cefotaxime, and 18 (40.0%) of placebo or untreated patients. Cefotaxime, cefazolin, and ampicillin were equally effective in reducing febrile morbidity in emergency cesarean sections.

  8. Posaconazole prophylaxis in experimental azole-resistant invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seyedmousavi, S.; Mouton, J.W.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Verweij, P.E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of posaconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Using a neutropenic murine model of pulmonary infection, posaconazole prophylaxis was evaluated using three isogenic clinical isolates, with posaconazo

  9. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of canagliflozin, a selective inhibitor of sodium glucose co-transporter 2, in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Vaccaro, Nicole; Polidori, David; Stieltjes, Hans; Wajs, Ewa

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of oral canagliflozin and its O-glucuronide metabolites (M7 and M5) after single and multiple doses in healthy adult participants. The pharmacodynamics, safety, and tolerability of canagliflozin were also evaluated. In this open-label, single- (day 1) and multiple-dose (days 4-9), parallel-group, phase 1 study, 27 healthy participants were randomized into three groups (1:1:1) to receive 50, 100, or 300 mg canagliflozin. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were assessed at pre-pecified timepoints on days 1, 9, and 10. Mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve, and the maximum observed plasma concentration of canagliflozin, M7, and M5 increased in a dose-dependent manner, across all the 3 doses, following single- and multiple-dose administration. The mean apparent elimination half-lives of canagliflozin, M7, and M5 were independent of the dose. Canagliflozin decreased the renal threshold for glucose (RTG) and increased the urinary glucose excretion (UGE) in a concentration- and dose-dependent manner. The relationship between drug concentrations and RTG was described by a sigmoidal relationship with RTGmin (minimum value of RTG) of 37.5 ng/mL (95% confidence interval (CI): 34.3, 40.8) and half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 21 ng/mL (95% CI: 18.3, 23.8). No deaths, serious adverse events, hypoglycemic events, or discontinuations due to adverse events were observed. Pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin and its metabolites (M7 and M5) were linear, and no time-dependent changes were observed after single- and multiple-dose administration. Similarly, pharmacodynamic effects of canagliflozin on RTG and UGE were found to be dose- and concentration-dependent. Overall, canagliflozin was well-tolerated in healthy participants.

  10. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne Christina; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    .3), 1.6 (1.3), 2.1 (0.5), and 4.4 (0.9) in the four dose groups, respectively]. Conclusion: After multiple dosing of NNC126-0083, a sustained pharmacodynamic response was observed. NNC126-0083 has the potential to serve as an efficacious, safe, and well-tolerated once-weekly treatment of adult patients...

  11. Topical azithromycin or ofloxacin for endophthalmitis prophylaxis after intravitreal injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Aroca P

    2012-10-01

    observed in 12 cases in the azithromycin group and none in the ofloxacin group.Conclusion: The risk of endophthalmitis was significantly greater with ofloxacin than with azithromycin. These findings provide a valuable addition to the ever-increasing pool of information on endophthalmitis prophylaxis after intravitreal injection, although further large-scale studies are required to provide definitive conclusions.Keywords: endophthalmitis prophylaxis, intravitreal injections, azithromycin, ofloxacin, antibiotics

  12. Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0098 TITLE: Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Natasa Strbo CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NATASA STRBO, M.D., D.SC NAME(S) AND E-M tzA UNIVERS]TY OF MTAMI 1600 NW 1OTH AVENUE ROOM...Here we developed malaria vaccine that relies on secreted gp96-lg chaperon-ing Plasmodium falciparum antigenic sporozoite proteins CSP and AMA1. The

  13. Prophylaxis with levofloxacin: impact on bacterial susceptibility and epidemiology in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Amaral Alonso Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of resistance has been demonstrated in cancer treatment centers where prophylaxis with fluoroquinolone is used. Objective: Considering the importance of epidemiological monitoring as a strategy in choosing protocols involving antibiotics, this study aimed to evaluate the emergence of quinolone resistance and changes in the local epidemiology in a hematopoietic stem cell transplant service. Methods: For this study, 60 positive cultures before the prophylactic use of levofloxacin (period A: 2007-2008 and 118 cultures after starting the use of prophylactic levofloxacin (period B: 2010-2011 were evaluated. Results: Resistance increased for all the different types of bacteria isolated (from 46.0% to 76.5%; p-value = 0.0002. Among Gram-negative bacteria, resistance increased from 21.4% to 60.7% (p-value = 0.0163 and among Gram-positive bacteria, it increased from 55.6% to 82.9% (p-value = 0.0025. The use of levofloxacin increased from 19.44 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days in period A to 166.64 in period B. The use of broad spectrum antibiotics remained unchanged. Considering bacteria associated with infection, 72 and 76 were isolated in periods A and B, respectively. There was a reduction in the rate of Gramnegative bacteria in cultures associated with infection (3.81 vs. 2.00 cultures/1,000 patientdays; p-value = 0.008. Conclusion: The study of prophylaxis with levofloxacin demonstrated that there was a decrease in infections by Gram-negative bacteria; however, bacterial resistance increased, even though the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics remained unchanged. Constant monitoring of local epidemiology combined with research on clinical outcomes is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of prophylaxis.

  14. Appropriate VTE prophylaxis is associated with lower direct medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alpesh; Hussein, Mohamed; Battleman, David; Lin, Jay; Stemkowski, Stephen; Merli, Geno J

    2010-11-01

    To calculate and compare the direct medical costs of guideline-recommended prophylaxis with prophylaxis that does not fully adhere with guideline recommendations in a large, real-world population. Discharge records were retrieved from the US Premier Perspective™ database (January 2003-December 2003) for patients aged≥40 years with a primary diagnosis of cancer, chronic heart failure, lung disease, or severe infectious disease who received some form of thromboprophylaxis. Univariate analysis and multivariate regression modeling were performed to compare direct medical costs between discharges who received appropriate prophylaxis (correct type, dose, and duration based on sixth edition American College of Chest Physicians [ACCP] recommendations) and partial prophylaxis (not in full accordance with ACCP recommendations). Market segmentation analysis was used to compare costs stratified by hospital and patient characteristics. Of the 683 005 discharges included, 148,171 (21.7%) received appropriate prophylaxis and 534,834 (78.3%) received partial prophylaxis. The total direct unadjusted costs were $15,439 in the appropriate prophylaxis group and $17,763 in the partial prophylaxis group. After adjustment, mean adjusted total costs per discharge were lower for those receiving appropriate prophylaxis ($11,713; 95% confidence interval [CI], $11,675-$11,753) compared with partial prophylaxis ($13,369; 95% CI, $13,332-$13 406; Panalysis suggests that appropriate prophylaxis, in adherence with ACCP guidelines, is potentially cost-saving compared with partial prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients.

  15. Prophylaxis for Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in non-HIV immunocompromised patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Anat; Green, Hefziba; Paul, Mical; Vidal, Liat; Leibovici, Leonard

    2014-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a disease affecting immunocompromised patients. PCP among these patients is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To assess the effectiveness of PCP prophylaxis among non-HIV immunocompromised patients; and to define the type of immunocompromised patient for whom evidence suggests a benefit for PCP prophylaxis. Electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (to March 2014), LILACS (to March 2014), relevant conference proceedings; and references of identified trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing prophylaxis with an antibiotic effective against PCP versus placebo, no intervention, or antibiotic(s) with no activity against PCP; and trials comparing different antibiotics effective against PCP among immunocompromised non-HIV patients. We only included trials in which Pneumocystis infections were available as an outcome. Two review authors independently assessed risk of bias in each trial and extracted data from the included trials. We contacted authors of the included trials to obtain missing data. The primary outcome was documented PCP infections. Risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated and pooled using the random-effects model. Thirteen trials performed between the years 1974 and 2008 were included, involving 1412 patients. Four trials included 520 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and the remaining trials included adults with acute leukemia, solid organ transplantation or autologous bone marrow transplantation. Compared to no treatment or treatment with fluoroquinolones (inactive against Pneumocystis), there was an 85% reduction in the occurrence of PCP in patients receiving prophylaxis with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, RR of 0.15 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.62; 10 trials, 1000 patients). The evidence was graded as moderate due to possible risk of bias. PCP

  16. Antiviral Prophylaxis and H1N1

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Richard Pebody, a consultant epidemiologist at the Health Protection Agency in London, UK, discusses the use of antiviral post-exposure prophylaxis and pandemic H1N1.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  17. Prophylaxis after Exposure to Coxiella burnetii

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-02

    In this podcast, Dr. David Swerdlow discusses prophylaxis after exposure to Coxiella burnetii. It is important to know who should be treated and how they should be treated after an intentional release with possible bioterrorism agents, including Coxiella burnetii.  Created: 10/2/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 10/2/2008.

  18. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lin-tao; MA Bao-tong

    2006-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism ( VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability,and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use.Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin,low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral Ⅱa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  19. Prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin-tao; Ma, Bao-tong

    2006-08-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), which is manifested as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), represents a significant cause of death, disability, and discomfort. They are frequent complications of various surgical procedures. The aging population and the survival of more severely injured patients may suggest an increasing risk of thromboembolism in the trauma patients. Expanded understanding of the population at risk challenges physicians to carefully examine risk factors for VTE to identify high-risk patients who can benefit from prophylaxis. An accurate knowledge of evidence-based risk factors is important in predicting and preventing postoperative DVT, and can be incorporated into a decision support system for appropriate thromboprophylaxis use. Standard use of DVT prophylaxis in a high-risk trauma population leads to a low incidence of DVT. The incidence of VTE is common in Asia. The evaluation includes laboratory tests, Doppler test and phlebography. Screening Doppler sonography should be performed for surveillance on all critically injured patients to identify DVT. D-Dimer is a useful marker to monitor prophylaxis in trauma surgery patients. The optimal time to start prophylaxis is between 2 hours before and 10 hours after surgery, but the risk of PE continues for several weeks. Thromboprophylaxis includes graduated compression stockings and anticoagulants for prophylaxis. Anticoagulants include Warfarin, which belongs to Vitamin K antagonists, unfractionated heparin, low molecular weight heparins, factor Xa indirect inhibitor Fondaparinux, and the oral IIa inhibitor Melagatran and ximelagatran. Recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin is a new and highly effective antithrombotic agent. Prophylactic placement of vena caval filters in selected trauma patients may decrease the incidence of PE. The indications for prophylactic inferior vena cava filter insertion include prolonged immobilization with multiple injuries, closed head injury, pelvic

  20. Beyond Antibiotics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LE Nicolle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMMI Canada meeting in March 2006 hosted a symposium exploring the potential alternatives to antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of infection. Four papers summarizing talks from that session are published in this issue of the Journal (1-4. These reviews address the scientific underpinnings for a number of proposed concepts, and summarize the current status of clinical use. The approaches - probiotics, bacteriophage therapy, and manipulation of innate immunity - are all intriguing but are still removed from immediate practical applications.

  1. Bacteriophage therapy: a potential solution for the antibiotic resistance crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar, Zhabiz; Bagasra, Omar; Pace, Donald Gene

    2014-02-13

    The emergence of multiple drug-resistant bacteria has prompted interest in alternatives to conventional antimicrobials. One of the possible replacement options for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. Phage therapy is an important alternative to antibiotics in the current era of drug-resistant pathogens. Bacteriophages have played an important role in the expansion of molecular biology and have been used as antibacterial agents since 1966. In this review, we describe a brief history of bacteriophages and clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophages as therapeutic agents in this regard.

  2. Time is now: venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in blunt splenic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Amy M; Davis, James W; Dirks, Rachel C; Wolfe, Mary M; Kaups, Krista L

    2016-12-01

    The safety and timing of venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in patients with blunt splenic injuries is not well known. We hypothesized that early initiation of VTE prophylaxis does not increase failure of nonoperative management or transfusion requirements in these patients. A retrospective review of trauma patients with blunt splenic injury was performed. Patients were compared based on initiation and timing of VTE prophylaxis (72 hours). Patients who received VTE prophylaxis were matched with those who did not. Primary outcomes included were operation or angioembolization. A total of 497 patients (256 received VTE prophylaxis and 241 did not) were included. There was no difference in the number of interventions based on presence of or time to VTE prophylaxis initiation. Early initiation (<48 hours) of VTE prophylaxis is safe in patients with blunt splenic injuries treated nonoperatively, and may be safe as early as 24 hours. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prophylaxis against febrile neutropenia with pegfilgrastim in Italy: a budget impact analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Rosti

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: prophylaxis with granulocyte colony-stimulating factors (G-CSF is indicated for reduction in the duration of neutropenia and the incidence of febrile neutropenia in patients treated with cytotoxic chemotherapy for malignancy.
Objective: to evaluate the budgetary impact for the Italian NHS.
Design: a decision-analytic model has been developed to analyze the budget impact from the national health care system perspective. Costs include direct healthcare costs to the public payer of G-CSFs as well as their administration costs and costs of FN-related events. The comparison has been done using prophylaxis with G‑CSF (filgrastim for 11 days, pegfilgrastim, lenograstim for 11 days and antibiotics.
Patients and participants: The population of interest for the analysis were patients with breast cancer in stage II and III and patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL.
Main outcome measures and results: for all the three patients group (NHL, Breast II and III, and for all the chemotherapy regimens (CHOP 21 and R-CHOP 21 for NHL, AC-T, TAC and TC for Breast stage II and III the budget impact analyses shows a cost reduction for the Italian NHS, as a result of an increase of the use of pegfilgrastim.
Conclusions: in Italy, a treatment strategy including pegfilgrastim as either primary or secondary prophylaxis provides value for money.


  4. Quinolone Prophylaxis in Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy: An Eight-Year Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing-Juin Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of prophylaxis with pipemidic acid and levofloxacin in transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (TRUSP-Bx. From January 2002 to December 2004, patients receiving oral pipemidic acid 500 mg twice daily for three days with or without a preoperative intravenous cefazolin 1 gm injection comprised group A. Between January 2005 and December 2009, patients receiving oral levofloxacin 500 mg one hour before biopsy comprised group B. We calculated the annual febrile urinary tract infection (fUTI rates. Patients’ characteristics, including age, prophylactic antibiotics, biopsy core numbers, pathologic results, PSA, and the spectrums and susceptibility of pathogens, were also evaluated. A total of 1313 (35.5% patients belonged to group A, while 2381 (64.5% patients belonged to group B. Seventy-three patients experienced postoperative infectious complications. There was a significant difference in the fUTI rate between groups A and B (3.7% versus 1.0%, P<0.001. The yearly fUTI rates varied from 0.6 to 3.9% between 2002 and 2009. Of the 73 patients with fUTI, those receiving levofloxacin prophylaxis were more likely to harbor fluoroquinolone-resistant pathogens (P<0.001. E. coli was the most common pathogen in both groups. Levofloxacin remains effective and appears superior to pipemidic acid based prophylaxis.

  5. Behaviour of health professionals concerning the recommendations for prophylaxis for infectious endocarditis in our setting: Are the guidelines followed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita, P; Castillo, F; Gámez, P; Carrasco, F; Roldán, R; Jurado, B; Castillo, J C; Martín, E; Anguita, M

    2017-03-01

    The prophylaxis regimens for infectious endocarditis recommended by the clinical practice guidelines have recently changed. We do not know whether the current regimens are correctly followed in our setting. Our objective was to describe the approaches of various health professionals concerning these guidelines. We conducted a survey in Cordoba, using a 16-item online questionnaire on this topic. We randomly selected a sample of 180 practitioners (20 cardiologists, 80 dentists and 80 primary care physicians), of whom 173 responded. Half of the participants were men; 52% had more than 20 years of professional experience. Some 88.3% of the participants considered that prophylaxis of endocarditis is effective (77.8% of the cardiologists, 93.7% of the dentist; p=.086). In general, prophylaxis is performed in conditions of clearly established risk (>90% of those surveyed). However, prophylaxis is also performed in a high proportion of cases with no risk of endocarditis, varying between 30 and 60% according to the procedure (mostly the dentists, between 36 and 67%, followed by the primary care physicians, between 28 and 59%). The antibiotic regimens employed varied significantly. The primary care physicians were furthest from the recommended regimen (only 25.8% used the recommended regimen vs. 54.4% of dentists and 72.2% of cardiologists; p=.002). Compliance with the recommendations on prophylaxis for endocarditis should be improved in our setting. We observed a tendency, especially among noncardiologists, to "overindicate" the prophylaxis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  6. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cost References Español: Datos breves Facts about Antibiotic Resistance Antibiotic resistance is one of the world’s most pressing public ... antibiotic use is a key strategy to control antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance in children and older adults are ...

  7. Current Evidence regarding Prophylactic Antibiotics in Head and Neck and Maxillofacial Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilian Kreutzer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic prophylaxis is commonly used to decrease the rate of infections in head and neck surgery. The aim of this paper is to present the available evidence regarding the application of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgical procedures of the head and neck region in healthy patients. A systemic literature review based on Medline and Embase databases was performed. All reviews and meta-analyses based on RCTs in English from 2000 to 2013 were included. Eight out of 532 studies fulfilled all requirements. Within those, only seven different operative procedures were analyzed. Evidence exists for the beneficial use of prophylactic antibiotics for tympanostomy, orthognathic surgery, and operative tooth extractions. Unfortunately, little high-level evidence exists regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics in head and neck surgery. In numerous cases, no clear benefit of antibiotic prophylaxis has been shown, particularly considering their potential adverse side effects. Antibiotics are often given unnecessarily and are administered too late and for too long. Furthermore, little research has been performed on the large number of routine cases in the above-mentioned areas of specialization within the last few years, although questions arising with respect to the treatment of high-risk patients or of specific infections are discussed on a broad base.

  8. An Analogue of the Antibiotic Teicoplanin Prevents Flavivirus Entry In Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Burghgraeve, Tine; Kaptein, Suzanne J. F.; Ayala Nunez, Vanesa; Mondotte, Juan A.; Pastorino, Boris; Printsevskaya, Svetlana S.; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Jacobs, Michael; Preobrazhenskaya, Maria; Gamarnik, Andrea V.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Neyts, Johan

    2012-01-01

    There is an urgent need for potent inhibitors of dengue virus (DENV) replication for the treatment and/or prophylaxis of infections with this virus. We here report on an aglycon analogue of the antibiotic teicoplanin (code name LCTA-949) that inhibits DENV-induced cytopathic effect (CPE) in a dose-d

  9. Quantifying attachment and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from conventional and organic swine manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad spectrum antibiotics, used to treat infections in livestock, are often administered at sub-therapeutic levels in feed rations to promote growth and for prophylaxis. Previous studies have shown that bacteria preferentially attach to sediments affecting their transport in overland flow; however...

  10. Surgeon`s adherence to guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru Shing Ng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSurgical site infections are the most common nosocomial infection among surgical patients. Patients who experience surgical site infections are associated with prolonged hospital stay, rehospitalisation, increased morbidity and mortality, and costs. Consequently, surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis (SAP, which is a very brief course of antibiotic given just before the surgery, has been introduced to prevent the occurrence of surgical site infections. The efficacy of SAP depends on several factors, including selection of appropriate antibiotic, timing of administration, dosage, duration of prophylaxis and route of administration. In many institutions around the globe, evidence-based guidelines have been developed to advance the proper use of SAP. This paper aims to review the studies on surgeons’ adherence to SAP guidelines and factors influencing their adherence. A wide variation of overall compliance towards SAP guidelines was noted, ranging from 0% to 71.9%. The misuses of prophylactic antibiotics are commonly seen, particularly inappropriate choice and prolonged duration of administration. Lack of awareness of the available SAP guidelines, influence of initial training, personal preference and influence from colleagues were among the factors which hindered the surgeons’ adherence to SAP guidelines. Immediate actions are needed to improve the adherence rate as inappropriate use of SAP can lead to the emergence of a strain of resistant bacteria resulting in a number of costs to the healthcare system. Corrective measures to improve SAP adherence include development of guidelines, education and effective dissemination of guidelines to targeted surgeons and routine audit of antibiotic utilisation by a dedicated infection control team.

  11. Aerosinusitis: pathophysiology, prophylaxis, and management in passengers and aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, K Christopher; Rajapaksa, Suresh; Wormald, Peter-John

    2008-01-01

    Patients presenting before flight with an upper respiratory infection are at risk for aerosinusitis. Prophylaxis of this condition consists of an oral decongestant before flight and nasal decongestant spray during the flight just prior to descent. Evaluation of the patient presenting with aerosinusitis consists of a careful physical exam with emphasis on diagnosing treatable nasal and sinus pathology. Categorization of the patient into the Weissman classification is important for determining prognostic factors for recovery. Management of this condition is based on the Weissman stage. Stage I or II lesions are generally treated conservatively with a 1-wk course of topical sprays, analgesics, a tapering course of steroids, and oral decongestants. Use of antibiotics is reserved for those cases initiated by bacterial sinusitis. Additionally, antihistamines are reserved for cases where allergies were the inciting cause. Stage III lesions are rarely seen in civilian air travelers due to the relatively low fluctuations in ambient air pressure. Aircrew that suffer Stage III aerosinusitis are at risk for recurrent sinus barotrauma that may require an expertly performed functional endoscopic sinus surgery to successfully manage it.

  12. A multiple-dose, double-blind comparison of intramuscularly and orally administered ketorolac tromethamine and Ketogan in patients with pain following orthopaedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Strauss, W

    1994-01-01

    In this multiple-dose, double-blind study 100 patients with moderate, severe or very severe pain following orthopaedic surgery were randomly assigned to receive ketorolac, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with potent analgesic properties (10 mg), or the standard regimen of Ketogan (a......-mg doses of oral ketorolac are as effective as Ketogan for the treatment of pain following orthopaedic surgery. Ketorolac appears to be better tolerated than Ketogan since significantly fewer patients reported adverse events (P = 0.004) when taking ketorolac....

  13. Characterisation of Population Pharmacokinetics and Endogenous Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Levels after Multiple Dosing of a Recombinant Human FSH, FE 999049, in Healthy Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Trine Høyer; Roshammer, Daniel; Erichsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to characterise the population pharmacokinetics of FE 999049, a novel recombinant human follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), after multiple dosing in healthy women, taking into account endogenous FSH levels and the reproductive hormone dynamics. Methods......: Longitudinal measurements of FSH, luteinising hormone, progesterone, estradiol, and inhibin B levels were collected after repeated subcutaneous dosing with 225 IU of FE 999049 in 24 gonadotropin downregulated healthy women. The FSH data were described using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Results...

  14. Comparison of infection and urosepsis rates of ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone prophylaxis before percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a prospective and randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirtas, Abdullah; Yildirim, Yunus Emre; Sofikerim, Mustafa; Kaya, Esma Gunduz; Akinsal, Emre Can; Tombul, Sevket Tolga; Ekmekcioglu, Oguz; Gulmez, Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at determining the choice and administration duration of ideal antibiotic prophylaxis before percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) operation, a treatment modality for nephrolithiasis. The study included 90 patients who had no internal problem, yet had a negative urine culture and underwent a PNL operation. We compared infection rates between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone groups and their subgroups. The results showed no statistical difference between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone groups in terms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (CIP(P) = 0.306,  CTX P = 0.334. As a result of this study no statistical difference was observed between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone in terms of SIRS. It seems, however, reasonable to choose ceftriaxone, considering antibiotic sensitivity of microorganisms and detection of three cases accepted as urosepsis in the ciprofloxacin group. As there is no difference between short, and long-term prophylactic use of these antibiotics, preference of short-term prophylaxis for patients with no risk of infection will be important to avoid inappropriate antibiotic usage.

  15. Comparison of Infection and Urosepsis Rates of Ciprofloxacin and Ceftriaxone Prophylaxis before Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy: A Prospective and Randomised Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Demirtas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the choice and administration duration of ideal antibiotic prophylaxis before percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL operation, a treatment modality for nephrolithiasis. The study included 90 patients who had no internal problem, yet had a negative urine culture and underwent a PNL operation. We compared infection rates between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone groups and their subgroups. The results showed no statistical difference between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone groups in terms of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS (CIPP=0.306, CTX P=0.334. As a result of this study no statistical difference was observed between ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone in terms of SIRS. It seems, however, reasonable to choose ceftriaxone, considering antibiotic sensitivity of microorganisms and detection of three cases accepted as urosepsis in the ciprofloxacin group. As there is no difference between short, and long-term prophylactic use of these antibiotics, preference of short-term prophylaxis for patients with no risk of infection will be important to avoid inappropriate antibiotic usage.

  16. Thromboembolism prophylaxis practices in orthopaedic arthroplasty patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cawley, D

    2010-10-01

    Thromboembolic events are a post-operative complication of arthroplasty surgery for up to 3 months. The incidence however, is not fully known. Some form of prophylaxis should be provided to all arthroplasty patients. Clinicians are wary of side effects, compliance profile and the associated cost. The objective of this study is to investigate practice patterns and their relevance to 3 risk groups. Ninety questionnaires were sent to orthopaedic surgeons with 3 hypothetical clinical scenarios and 10 prophylaxis regimes for thromboembolism across different risk groups. The response rate was 81\\/90 (90%). The most popular options in all 3 cases were early mobilisation, thrombo-embolism deterrant (TED) stockings and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) (51\\/81, 62% of all cases). An inconsistent relationship exists between preferred practice and relevant guidelines. Preferred practice does not correlate with each level of risk.

  17. Historical Review: Problematic Malaria Prophylaxis with Quinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G Dennis

    2016-08-03

    Quinine, a bitter-tasting, short-acting alkaloid drug extracted from cinchona bark, was the first drug used widely for malaria chemoprophylaxis from the 19th century. Compliance was difficult to enforce even in organized groups such as the military, and its prophylaxis potential was often questioned. Severe adverse events such as blackwater fever occurred rarely, but its relationship to quinine remains uncertain. Quinine prophylaxis was often counterproductive from a public health viewpoint as it left large numbers of persons with suppressed infections producing gametocytes infective for mosquitoes. Quinine was supplied by the first global pharmaceutical cartel which discouraged competition resulting in a near monopoly of cinchona plantations on the island of Java which were closed to Allied use when the Japanese Imperial Army captured Indonesia in 1942. The problems with quinine as a chemoprophylactic drug illustrate the difficulties with medications used for prevention and the acute need for improved compounds.

  18. Prophylaxis of human hydrophobia in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang Ree

    2014-09-01

    Domestic human hydrophobia has not been reported since the one case of 2004 in South Korea, but still a few animal rabies occur persistently since the reemerging stage of rabies from 1993. The government has made efforts to control animal rabies in many aspects, but whether prophylactic strategy for human hydrophobia is performed adequately is in question. The rate of proper post-exposure prophylaxis for animal bite case in 'high-risk region' of rabies is very low with 20% between 2011 and 2013. The National Animal Bite Patient Surveillance targeting 'high-risk region' is missing out animal bite cases who visit directly to hospitals in 'suspect-risk region' of rabies. Little data seems to exist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of domestic hydrophobia. Danger of reoccurrence of human hydrophobia always remain in South Korea. The medical personnel needs to have greater interest on the matter and the government strengthen the management system.

  19. [Prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism after severe stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabinkina, Iu V; Gnedovskaia, E V; Piradov, M A; Kuntsevich, G I

    2010-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE), a deep and superficial thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is a very important problem of severe stroke. Pulmonary embolism (PE) significantly influences the course and outcome of severe stroke. The cause of this effect lies not only in severe patient's condition, high risk of VTE and difficulties in diagnosis of VTE but in still common limits in prophylaxis and treatment of PE in severe stroke, first of all, in brain hemorrhages and large brain infarctions with secondary hemorrhage. The paper presents the main principles and methods of prophylaxis of VTE in severe stroke. The suggested approach allows to decrease the frequency of VTE and fatal outcomes in severe stroke in the modern neuro-intensive care units.

  20. Surveillance of antibiotic resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Alan P

    2015-01-01

    .... Surveillance of antibiotic resistance involves the collection of antibiotic susceptibility test results undertaken by microbiology laboratories on bacteria isolated from clinical samples sent for investigation...

  1. Comparison of two different starting multiple dose gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocols in a selected group of in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Ernesto; Bosch, Ernesto; Crespo, Juana; Simón, Carlos; Remohí, José; Pellicer, Antonio

    2004-03-01

    To compare the efficacy of two starting protocols of multiple dose GnRH antagonists (GnRH-a). Prospective randomized controlled study. In vitro fertilization-embryo transfer program at the Instituto Valenciano de Infertilidad, Valencia, Spain. One hundred nine patients undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) with recombinant gonadotropins and GnRH-a (0.25 mg/d). Patients started GnRH-a administration on stimulation day 6 (group 1) or when the leading follicle reached a mean diameter of 14 mm (group 2). Implantation and pregnancy rates; serum E(2) and LH levels during ovarian stimulation; days of stimulation and GnRH-a administration. Days needed for ovarian stimulation were similar in both groups but there was a significant difference when comparing days of GnRH-a administration. Serum E(2) and LH followed similar curves in both groups. Implantation and pregnancy rates were 23.7% and 44.4 % in group 1 and 28.6% and 50.9 % in group 2 (P=not significant [NS]). The efficacy of the two starting protocols of the multiple dose GnRH-a evaluated in this study is similar; however, this remark can only be drawn for a selected group of patients.

  2. Pegylated Long-Acting Human Growth Hormone Possesses a Promising Once-Weekly Treatment Profile, and Multiple Dosing Is Well Tolerated in Adult Patients with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Esben; Klose, Marianne; Hansen, Mette

    2011-01-01

    .3), 1.6 (1.3), 2.1 (0.5), and 4.4 (0.9) in the four dose groups, respectively]. Conclusion: After multiple dosing of NNC126-0083, a sustained pharmacodynamic response was observed. NNC126-0083 has the potential to serve as an efficacious, safe, and well-tolerated once-weekly treatment of adult patients......Background: Recombinant human GH (rhGH) replacement therapy in children and adults currently requires daily sc injections for several years or lifelong, which may be both inconvenient and distressing for patients. NNC126-0083 is a pegylated rhGH developed for once-weekly administration. Objectives......: Our objective was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of multiple doses of NNC126-0083 in adult patients with GH deficiency (GHD). Subjects and Methods: Thirty-three adult patients with GHD, age 20-65 yr, body mass index 18.5-35.0 kg/m(2), and glycated...

  3. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in the pediatric trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, John K

    2017-02-01

    Although venous thromboembolism (VTE) occurs in less than 1% of hospitalized pediatric trauma patients, care providers must make decisions about VTE prophylaxis on a daily basis. The consequences of VTE are significant; the risks of developing VTE are variable; and the effectiveness of prophylaxis against VTE is not conclusive in children. While the value of VTE prophylaxis is well defined in adult trauma care, it is unclear how this translates to the care of injured children. This review evaluates the incidence and risks of VTE in pediatric trauma and assesses the merits of prophylaxis in children. Pharmacologic prophylaxis against VTE is a reasonable strategy in critically injured adolescent trauma patients. Further study is needed to establish the risks and benefits of VTE prophylaxis across the spectrum of injured children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prophylactic antibiotics in vesicoureteric reflux: Evidence-based analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Ansari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this review was to systematically examine the available evidence for the effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in cases of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR. Materials and Methods: We searched the relevant data on medical management of VUR and the date of last search was June 2008. The search included both randomized controlled trials as well as the nonrandomized trials and the data sources were; MEDLINE, online peer reviewed journals, Cochrane database and abstracts from conference proceedings. Results: Barring few most of the studies published on medical management were nonrandomized. Besides being small in number many of these studies were of poor-quality and poorly designed eventually failing in giving a reliable answer in this regard. Few of the studies suggest that the children with low grade VUR might do well even without antibiotic prophylaxis. Conclusions : In the absence of properly designed, randomized controlled trials and long-term follow-up the question of antibiotic prophylaxis in cases of VUR remains unanswered in large part of it. Whether to give prophylactic antibiotics or not would ultimately need a shared decision-making involving both the treating physician and the parents assessing both the risks and the benefits.

  5. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel; Steiner, Ulrich

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  6. Do antibiotics reduce the frequency of surgical site infections after impacted mandibular third molar surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Sharaf, Basel; Dodson, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Surgical removal of impacted third molars remains the most common procedure performed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Given the abundance of host bacteria within the operative sites, surgical site infections are among the most common complications of third molar removal, with an estimated frequency of 1% to 30%. In this setting, significant controversy has surrounded the use of prophylactic antibiotics in the surgical management of impacted third molars. This article provides a comprehensive review of the available data on antibiotic prophylaxis in impacted third molar surgery and offers specific recommendations on antibiotic use.

  7. Early Antibiotic Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis: More News

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan J De Waele

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Early antibiotic treatment still remains a therapeutic challenge in the clinical management of acute pancreatitis and several papers have been published in this field [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14]. In particular, the antibiotic of choice in preventing the infection of pancreatic necrosis seems to be imipenem [4, 9, 10, 11, 13]. Subsequently, Manes et al. [15] have reported that meropenem, an antibiotic of the same family as imipenem having considerable stability in the presence of renal dehydropeptidase-I and enhanced activity against gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has an efficacy similar to imipenem in terms of the incidence of pancreatic infection and extrapancreatic infections. We have previously emphasized that further studies should be carried out to specifically decide on the optimal doses of meropenem in patients with acute pancreatitis and that there is a need for studies which answer the following questions. What should the timing of early antibiotic treatment be?. What are the resistant strains selected by meropenem?. Which are the nosocomial infections and fungal superinfections resulting from this new treatment? [16, 17]. These questions are still open and the study from Manes et al. is welcome to attempt to answer some of the aforementioned questions [18]. In this study, the authors compared antibiotic prophylaxis with early antibiotic treatment started after the demonstration of pancreatic necrosis. They studied 215 consecutive patients with acute pancreatitis who were randomized to either Group A (n=108, who started antibiotic therapy (meropenem 500 mg tid at admission, or Group B (n=107, who received antibiotics after computed tomography showed necrosis. C-reactive protein was determined in all patients within 48 hours from the onset of symptoms and computed tomography was performed in both groups after at least 48 h of hospitalization; the clinical course of disease was also compared

  8. Pharmacokinetic Properties of Three Forms of Vaginal Progesterone Administered in Either Single Or Multiple Dose Regimen in Healthy Post-menopausal Chinese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Shentu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A generic vaginal progesterone gel has recently been developed in China. Little is known about its pharmacokinetic properties in Chinese subjects. The purpose of our study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of three forms of vaginal progesterone gel (test formulations at 4 and 8% strength vs. a reference formulation: Crinone 8% in Chinese healthy post-menopausal women.Methods: This study consisted of two parts study. The part 1 study was a single-center, open-label, 3-period study. Twelve healthy post-menopausal women were to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of 45 mg vaginal progesterone gel (Test 4% following single dose and multiple doses administered once every other day (q.o.d. for six times or once daily (q.d. for 6 days. The part 2 study was a randomized, open-label, 3-stage crossover study. Twelve post-menopausal women received 90 mg vaginal progesterone gel (Test 8% or 90 mg Crinone (Reference 8% following single dose and multiple doses (q.o.d. or q.d.. Plasma concentrations of progesterone were measured up to 72 h by using a validated liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry method. The primary pharmacokinetic parameters, maximum plasma concentration (Cmax and area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC from time zero to last measurable concentration (AUC0-t and extrapolated to infinity (AUC0-∞ were compared by an analysis of variance using log-transformed data.Results: Totally 24 subjects were enrolled in and completed the study. Following single dose, The geometric mean Cmax values for Test 4%, Test 8%, and Crinone 8% were 6.35, 10.34, 10.45 ng/mL, and their geometric mean AUC0-t (AUC0-∞ were 113.73 (118.00, 169.39 (173.98, and 190.07 (201.13 ng⋅h/mL, respectively. The mean T1/2 values of progesterone were 11.00, 10.92, and 11.40 h, respectively. For 8% test formulation vs. reference, the 90% CIs of the least squares mean test/reference ratios of Cmax, AUC0-t, and AUC0-∞ were 78.32–124

  9. Routine Ertapenem Prophylaxis for Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy does Not Select for Carbapenem Resistant Organisms: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Maxim G; Page, Matthew J; McLachlan, Alice G; Studd, Rodney C; Blackmore, Timothy K

    2017-03-10

    Sepsis after transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy is an increasing problem in this era of rising antibiotic resistance. Although ertapenem prophylaxis has proved effective at our institution to reduce this, it has raised local and regional antimicrobial stewardship concerns. We investigated the possible selective effect of single dose ertapenem prophylaxis on fecal colonization with carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Patients underwent a rectal swab prior to receiving prebiopsy ertapenem prophylaxis. A second swab was obtained at followup 4 to 6 weeks later. Swabs were screened for carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae using an enhanced CDC (Centers for Disease Control) method. Prebiopsy swabs were also screened for extended spectrum β-lactamase producing and ciprofloxacin resistant Enterobacteriaceae. Patients were monitored for post-biopsy sepsis. A total of 326 patients were enrolled in the study. At baseline 6.4% and 9.0% of patients had colonization with extended spectrum β-lactamase producing and ciprofloxacin resistant Enterobacteriaceae, respectively. Carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae were not detected at baseline or followup in any patients. Colonization with nonfermentative organisms with intrinsic ertapenem resistance was detected in 29.4% of patients at baseline and followup (p = 1.0). Three cases (0.9%, 95% CI 0.2-2.8) of probable post-biopsy sepsis were identified during the study period. None was bacteremic or required intensive care unit admission. Single dose ertapenem prophylaxis did not appear to have a significant selective effect on fecal colonization with carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae or other ertapenem resistant gram-negative organisms in this outpatient group. It is highly effective prophylaxis for transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. In the right setting ertapenem may represent a useful prophylactic option to prevent post-transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy sepsis. Copyright © 2017

  10. Streamlining HIV Testing for HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Guanira, Juan V.; Leigler, Teri; Kallas, Esper; Schechter, Mauro; Sharma, Usha; Glidden, David; Grant, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-testing algorithms for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) should be optimized to minimize the risk of drug resistance, the time off PrEP required to evaluate false-positive screening results, and costs and to expedite the start of therapy for those confirmed to be infected. HIV rapid tests (RTs) for anti-HIV antibodies provide results in less than 1 h and can be conducted by nonlicensed staff at the point of care. In many regions, Western blot (WB) testing is required to confirm reactive RT r...

  11. Prophylaxis of Human Hydrophobia in South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yang Ree

    2014-01-01

    Domestic human hydrophobia has not been reported since the one case of 2004 in South Korea, but still a few animal rabies occur persistently since the reemerging stage of rabies from 1993. The government has made efforts to control animal rabies in many aspects, but whether prophylactic strategy for human hydrophobia is performed adequately is in question. The rate of proper post-exposure prophylaxis for animal bite case in 'high-risk region' of rabies is very low with 20% between 2011 and 20...

  12. Perioperative antibiotics for prevention of acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Emily W; Lindsley, Kristina; Nanji, Afshan A; Leyngold, Ilya; McDonnell, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Background Endophthalmitis is a severe inflammation of the anterior and/or posterior chambers of the eye that may be sterile or associated with infection. It is a potentially vision-threatening complication of cataract surgery. Prophylactic measures for endophthalmitis are targeted against various sources of infection. Objectives The objective of this review was to evaluate the effects of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis for endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE, (January 1950 to October 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 25 October 2012. We also searched for additional studies that cited any included trials using the Science Citation Index. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials that enrolled adults undergoing cataract surgery (any method and incision type) for lens opacities due to any origin. Trials that evaluated preoperative antibiotics, intraoperative (intracameral, subconjunctival or systemic) or postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis for acute endophthalmitis were included. We did not include studies that evaluated antiseptic preoperative preparations using agents such as povidone iodine, nor did we include studies that evaluated antibiotics for treating acute endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis Two

  13. Biodistribution and tissue toxicity of amphotericin B in mice following multiple dose administration of a novel oral lipid-based formulation (iCo-009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershkovich, Pavel; Sivak, Olena; Wasan, Ellen K; Magil, Alex B; Owen, David; Clement, John G; Wasan, Kishor M

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the biodistribution and toxicity of amphotericin B (AMB) following multiple dose administration of an oral lipid-based formulation (iCo-009). BALB/c female mice were used. ICo-009 was administered twice daily for 5 days at doses of 2.5-20 mg/kg. Untreated animals, oral vehicle or intravenous Fungizone® (1 or 2 mg/kg) served as control groups. The animals were sacrificed 12 h following the last administration of AMB, and blood and multiple tissues were harvested for drug analysis and histopathological evaluation. Plasma or tissue samples were analysed for concentrations of AMB or creatinine by means of HPLC-UV. A dose-dependent accumulation of AMB in liver, spleen, kidney and lung tissues was found. The concentration of the drug in all these organs exceeded the corresponding concentrations in plasma at the same dose. The concentrations of AMB in heart and brain were similar to the corresponding concentrations in plasma. Creatinine concentrations were elevated above normal concentrations in the 2 mg/kg Fungizone® group only. Histopathological analysis of kidney and liver tissues revealed a normal pattern in all treated groups, except the 2 mg/kg Fungizone® group. No gastrointestinal toxicity was found in this study. A multiple dose treatment regimen with iCo-009 in mice results in a gradual accumulation of AMB in tissues. Despite significant concentrations of AMB, no kidney or liver toxicity of orally administered AMB was detected in this study. Furthermore, multiple oral administration of iCo-009 or of vehicle control did not induce gastrointestinal toxicity.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and parasitological evaluation of the bone marrow of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis submitted to multiple dose treatment with liposome-encapsulated meglumine antimoniate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Schettini

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a multiple dose regimen of a liposomal formulation of meglumine antimoniate (LMA on the pharmacokinetics of antimony in the bone marrow of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis and on the ability of LMA to eliminate parasites from this tissue. Dogs naturally infected with Leishmania chagasi received 4 intravenous doses of either LMA (6.5 mg antimony/kg body weight, N = 9, or empty liposomes (at the same lipid dose as LMA, N = 9 at 4-day intervals. A third group of animals was untreated (N = 8. Before each administration and at different times after treatment, bone marrow was obtained and analyzed for antimony level (LMA group by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, and for the presence of Leishmania parasites (all groups. There was a significant increase of antimony concentration from 0.76 µg/kg wet organ (4 days after the first dose to 2.07 µg/kg (4 days after the fourth dose and a half-life of 4 days for antimony elimination from the bone marrow. Treatment with LMA significantly reduced the number of dogs positive for parasites (with at least one amastigote per 1000 host cells compared to controls (positive dogs 30 days after treatment: 0 of 9 in the LMA group, 3 of 9 in the group treated with empty liposomes and 3 of 8 in the untreated group. However, complete elimination of parasites was not achieved. In conclusion, the present study showed that multiple dose treatment with LMA was effective in improving antimony levels in the bone marrow of dogs with visceral leishmaniasis and in reducing the number of positive animals, even though it was not sufficient to achieve complete elimination of parasites.

  15. Post-operative antibiotics after appendectomy and post-operative abscess development: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael J; Harrison, Ewen; Paterson-Brown, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Appendectomy is one of the most common emergency operations. Prophylaxis against infective complications involves post-operative antibiotics. There is no consensus as to the optimum antibiotic regimen. This study aimed to assess the relation between the duration of the post-operative antibiotic administration and intra-abdominal infections (IAIs). All patients who underwent appendectomy between September 1, 2009, and August 31, 2010, were identified. The appearance of the appendix at operation, post-operative antibiotics, white blood cell count, and temperature at the time of conversion of intravenous (IV) to oral antibiotics were compiled. IAIs were assessed as the final outcome. Two hundred sixty six patients underwent appendectomy-188 for simple appendicitis and 78 for complicated appendicitis. There were 18 IAIs (6.8%) overall, 10 (12.8%) after complicated appendicitis and eight (4.2%) after simple appendicitis. Prolonging antibiotics beyond the operation in the simple appendicitis group did not alter the incidence of IAI. Similarly, in the complicated appendicitis group, prolonging antibiotics beyond five days did not alter the incidence of IAI. Furthermore, in patients with complicated appendicitis, the presence of leukocytosis, fever, or both when IV antibiotics were converted to oral drugs was associated with the development of IAI (p=0.013). In simple appendicitis, post-operative antibiotics may not be beneficial at all. In complicated appendicitis, prolonging the course of antibiotics was not associated with a reduced IAI rate. However, cessation of IV antibiotics when fever or leukocytosis was present was associated with IAI development.

  16. Pharmacokinetics of armodafinil and modafinil after single and multiple doses in patients with excessive sleepiness associated with treated obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized, open-label, crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Kirby, Mary; D'Andrea, Denise M; Yang, Ronghua; Hellriegel, Edward T; Robertson, Philmore

    2010-11-01

    Armodafinil (the R-isomer of racemic modafinil) and modafinil are wakefulness-promoting medications for excessive sleepiness associated with treated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The R-isomer of racemic modafinil has a half-life of approximately15 hours; the S-isomer has a half-life of 4 to 5 hours. The R-and S-isomers are equipotent, producing equivalent pharmacologic activity at equal concentrations. The aim of this work was to compare the pharmacokinetic profiles of armodafinil (R-modafinil) and modafinil (racemic mixture with equal quantities of R- and S-isomers) at equal doses in patients with residual excessive sleepiness associated with continuous positive airway pressure-treated OSA. This open-label study was conducted at 5 US centers from July 2008 to March 2009. Patients were randomized to 1 of 2 crossover administration sequences, ABCD or BADC, where A was a single armodafinil 200-mg dose, B was a single modafinil 200-mg dose, C was multiple daily modafinil 200-mg doses, and D was multiple daily armodafinil 200-mg doses. During multiple-dose administration, patients received 100 mg once daily for days 1 and 2, and 200 mg once daily for days 3 through 10. The pharmacokinetic parameters of principal interest for assessing the bioequivalence of armodafinil and modafinil were maximum concentration at 7 to 11 hours after dosing and the concentration-versus-time curve for this period. Analysis was performed via achiral high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection using blood samples obtained over 72 hours after single-dose administration and over 24 hours after the multiple-dose regimen. For post hoc evaluation of bioequivalence, 90% CI values were also constructed for the geometric mean ratios of armodafinil to modafinil. Tolerability was assessed by the reported adverse events, clinical laboratory testing, vital sign measurements, ECGs, and physical exams. The study population was 83.3% male (35/42) and 76.2% white (32/42) with a mean

  17. Attitudes toward infection prophylaxis in pediatric oncology: a qualitative approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Diorio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The risks and benefits of infection prophylaxis are uncertain in children with cancer and thus, preferences should be considered in decision making. The purpose of this report was to describe the attitudes of parents, children and healthcare professionals to infection prophylaxis in pediatric oncology. METHODS: THE STUDY WAS COMPLETED IN THREE PHASES: 1 An initial qualitative pilot to identify the main attributes influencing the decision to use infection prophylaxis, which were then incorporated into a discrete choice experiment; 2 A think aloud during the discrete choice experiment in which preferences for infection prophylaxis were elicited quantitatively; and 3 In-depth follow up interviews. Interviews were recorded verbatim and analyzed using an iterative, thematic analysis. Final themes were selected using a consensus approach. RESULTS: A total of 35 parents, 22 children and 28 healthcare professionals participated. All three groups suggested that the most important factor influencing their decision making was the effect of prophylaxis on reducing the chance of death. Themes of importance to the three groups included antimicrobial resistance, side effects of medications, the financial impact of outpatient prophylaxis and the route and schedule of administration. CONCLUSION: Effect of prophylaxis on risk of death was a key factor in decision making. Other identified factors were antimicrobial resistance, side effects of medication, financial impact and administration details. Better understanding of factors driving decision making for infection prophylaxis will help facilitate future implementation of prophylactic regiments.

  18. Prophylaxis for stress ulcer bleeding in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Avendaño-Reyes

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Admittance to the intensive care unit in itself does not justify prophylaxis. PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. We should individualize the treatment of each patient in the intensive care unit, determining risk and evaluating the need to begin prophylaxis.

  19. Antibiotic cements in articular prostheses: current orthopaedic concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, F; Belot, N; Ropars, M; Thomazeau, H; Lambotte, J C; Cathelineau, G

    2006-08-01

    The possibilities and limits of antibiotic cements (ACs) have been assessed by many researchers. ACs are now approved by many drug agencies, including the US Food and Drug Administration (approval in 2003), with widespread use in prophylaxis and curative treatments. Laboratory experiments have achieved satisfactory antibiotic delivery without impairing the mechanical properties of ACs. Implantation in large animals (e.g. sheep) showed an antibiotic concentration in the bone cortex four times the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 6 months after implantation. Human pharmacokinetics during total hip replacement (THR) show antibiotic concentrations 20 times the MIC in drainage fluids. No toxic concentrations have been detected in blood or urine, and no allergies, toxic effects, mechanical failures or selection of resistant microorganisms have been observed. Antibioprophylaxis has been assessed in prospective studies in over 1600 cases. In data from the Scandinavian arthroplasty registers, with an exhaustive follow-up of more than 240000 THRs, infection rate was reduced by ca. 50% (0.9% compared with 1.9%). In prostheses with severe infection, use of AC increases the infection control rate from 86% to 93% when using two-stage prosthetic exchanges. In moderate infection, a similar infection control rate (86%) was achieved either by two-stage exchange without local antibiotic or by one-stage exchange with AC; however, one-stage exchange achieved better functional results at lower cost and with reduced pain and hospital stay. Therefore, AC prophylaxis is widely used in countries with prostheses registers (Northern Europe), and use of ACs as treatment for infected prostheses is often considered as the gold standard in the EU and North America. However, AC is only an adjuvant treatment, and excision of infected and devascularized tissues as well as systemic antibiotic treatment managed by a multidisciplinary team remain the main factors of infection control.

  20. Supplementary iron dose in pregnancy anemia prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddaiah, V P; Raj, P P; Ramachandran, K; Nath, L M; Sood, S K; Madan, N; Rusia, U

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the optimum dose of supplemental iron for prophylaxis against pregnancy anemia. One hundred and ten pregnant women were randomly allocated to three groups: Group A receiving equivalent of 60 mg, group B 120 mg and Group C 240 mg, elemental iron as ferrous sulphate daily; the content of folic acid was constant in all the three groups (0.5 mg). These women had at least consumed 90 tablets in 100 +/- 10 days. Blood was drawn at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Fifty percent were anemic (less than 11 g/100 ml). The hemoglobin levels rose similarly in all groups and the differences were statistically not significant. Fifty-six percent had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin value less than 12 micrograms/l) at the beginning of the study. Following therapy a statistically significant increase in iron stores was observed in group B and C as compared to group A. The difference between group B and C was not significant. The side effects increased with increasing doses of iron; 32.4%, 40.3% and 72% in group A, B and C respectively. Based on these findings, the authors advocate that optimum dose of iron should be 120 mg instead of 60 mg as is currently being used in the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme.

  1. Rh isoimmunization during pregnancy: antenatal prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, J M; Chown, B; Lewis, M; Pollock, J M

    1978-03-18

    Of 3533 Rh-negative women who began a pregnancy without detectable Rh antibodies, 62 (1.8%) demonstrated evidence of Rh isoimmunization during pregnancy or within 3 days after delivery. All denied transfusions as well as abortions or previous pregnancies not followed by the administration of Rh immune globulin. Rh isoimmunization during pregnancy or within 3 days after delivery, which will not be prevented by the administration of Rh immune globulin after delivery, is the most important cause of residual Rh isoimmunization. A clinical trial of antenatal administration of Rh immune globulin, initially at 34 weeks's and subsequently at 28 and 34 weeks' gestation, in 1357 Rh-negative pregnant women who were delivered of Rh-positive babies, was effective in preventing the development of Rh isoimmunization during pregnancy or within 3 days after delivery. Antenatal prophylaxis with Rh immune globulin will be necessary if the incidence of Rh isoimmunization is to be reduced to its lowest possible level. Antenatal prophylaxis at 28 weeks' gestation is now an insured service in Manitoba.

  2. Infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: incidence, risk factors, and prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzenberger, Leo; Grieb, Annemarie; Hexel, Michael; Laky, Brenda; Anderl, Werner; Heuberer, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    The primary aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in a single department over a 10-year period. Secondary goals included the evaluation of potential risk factors for infections and to investigate the efficacy of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis in the reduction of infectious complications. A retrospective evaluation of 3294 all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs performed between 2004 and 2014 at a single institution was conducted to determine the rate of infection in all-arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs. Detailed data including demographics, co-morbidities, initial surgical procedure, time from index surgery to infection, clinical presentation, isolated pathogens, and subsequent treatment were recorded of patients with infections. Univariate logistic regression was performed, and a multivariate model was developed to identify variables that were predictive of infections following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The rate of infection was 8.5/1000 in whom rotator cuff repairs were performed (95 % CI 0.58-1.23 %) during the study period. The most commonly identified pathogen was Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 11, 39.3 %), followed by Propionibacterium acnes (n = 8, 28.6 %) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2, 7.1 %). Patients presented at our institution with signs of infection an average of 28.9 ± 14.7 days after the index surgery. The leading symptom that was present in all patients was diffuse or localized shoulder pain, followed by local signs of infection in 19 (67.9 %), secretion in 14 (50 %), and fever in 9 (32.1 %) patients, respectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the male gender, age over 60, and duration of surgery over 90 min as predictive factors for infection. Administration of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis was an independent mitigating factor for postoperative infection and reduced the infection rate from 1.54 % (95 % CI 0

  3. Optimizing prophylactic antibiotic regimen in patients admitted for transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Fahmy

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Determining the prevalence of fluoroquinolone resistance in rectal flora has important implications in the selection of targeted prophylactic antibiotic regimens. Antimicrobial profiles guided by rectal swabs may prove useful to optimize prophylaxis prior to TRUSBx; this strategy is effective at reducing the rates of infectious complications, including sepsis, especially in men at higher risk of infectious complications.

  4. Antibiotic overusage and resistance: A cross-sectional survey among pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Konde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most human orofacial infections originate from odontogenic infections and prescribing antibiotics has become a ubiquitous phenomenon. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the inappropriate, indiscriminate, and irrational use of antibiotics leading to antibiotic resistance as a global problem. Objective: The objective of this survey is to compare the antibiotic prescription pattern and the awareness of antibiotic resistance among Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists. Materials and methods: A hundred BDS practitioners and 100 pediatric dentists included in the study were given a questionnaire containing both open-ended and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire comprised information pertaining to antibiotic prescription for most common oral conditions, commonly prescribed antibiotics, their dosage, etc. Results: The majority of the practitioners prescribed antibiotics for managing oral diseases. On comparing the prescription patterns between the BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists, there was an overprescription in the BDS group for many conditions, which was statistically significant. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed drug in both the groups. In the presence of an anaerobic infection, the most preferred drug was a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid with metronidazole. With regard to the duration of antibiotic prescription, 74% BDS practitioners prescribed antibiotics as a 3-day course and 60% pediatric dentists resorted to a 5-day course, which was statistically significant. The awareness regarding antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic resistance was found to be adequate in both the groups. However, there was a general lack of awareness with regard to the guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in both the groups. Conclusion: Practitioners should prescribe antibiotics in accordance with the guidelines to curb antibiotic resistance, an emerging public health

  5. Antibiotics in the environment

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Molecules with antibiotic properties, produced by various microbes, have been around long before mankind recognized their usefulness in preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteria have therefore been exposed to selection pressures from antibiotics for very long times, however, generally only on a micro-scale within the immediate vicinity of the antibiotic-producing organisms. In the twentieth century we began mass-producing antibiotics, mainly synthetic derivatives of naturally pro...

  6. A point prevalence survey of antibiotic use in four acute-care teaching hospitals utilizing the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC) audit tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeyab, M A; Kearney, M P; McElnay, J C; Magee, F A; Conlon, G; MacIntyre, J; McCullagh, B; Ferguson, C; Friel, A; Gormley, C; McElroy, S; Boyce, T; McCorry, A; Muller, A; Goossens, H; Scott, M G

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this research was to assess current patterns of hospital antibiotic prescribing in Northern Ireland and to determine targets for improving the quality of antibiotic prescribing. A point prevalence survey was conducted in four acute teaching hospitals. The most commonly used antibiotics were combinations of penicillins including β-lactamase inhibitors (33·6%), metronidazole (9·1%), and macrolides (8·1%). The indication for treatment was recorded in 84·3% of the prescribing episodes. A small fraction (3·9%) of the surgical prophylactic antibiotic prescriptions was for >24 h. The results showed that overall 52·4% of the prescribed antibiotics were in compliance with the hospital antibiotic guidelines. The findings identified the following indicators as targets for quality improvement: indication recorded in patient notes, the duration of surgical prophylaxis and compliance with hospital antibiotic guidelines. The results strongly suggest that antibiotic use could be improved by taking steps to address the identified targets for quality improvement.

  7. Fungal infections in marrow transplant recipients under antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira J.S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fungal infection is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients. The growing incidence of these infections is related to several factors including prolonged granulocytopenia, use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, conditioning regimens, and use of immunosuppression to avoid graft-versus-host disease (GvHD. In the present series, we report five cases of invasive mold infections documented among 64 BMT recipients undergoing fluconazole antifungal prophylaxis: 1 A strain of Scedosporium prolificans was isolated from a skin lesion that developed on day +72 after BMT in a chronic myeloid leukemic patient. 2 Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (Aspergillus fumigatus was diagnosed on day +29 in a patient with a long period of hospitalization before being transplanted for severe aplastic anemia. 3 A tumoral lung lesion due to Rhizopus arrhizus (zygomycosis was observed in a transplanted patient who presented severe chronic GvHD. 4 A tumoral lesion due to Aspergillus spp involving the 7th, 8th and 9th right ribs and local soft tissue was diagnosed in a BMT patient on day +110. 5 A patient with a history of Ph1-positive acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibited a cerebral lesion on day +477 after receiving a BMT during an episode of severe chronic GvHD. At that time, blood and spinal fluid cultures yielded Fusarium sp. Opportunistic infections due to fungi other than Candida spp are becoming a major problem among BMT patients receiving systemic antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole.

  8. Know When Antibiotics Work

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-15

    This podcast provides a brief background about antibiotics and quick tips to help prevent antibiotic resistance.  Created: 4/15/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  9. Strengthening Control of Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EthelLu

    2005-01-01

    IT is a well-known fact that buy-ng guns is much easier than purchasing antibiotics in the United States. In China, however, the situation is different. According to a recent WHO survey,about 80 percent of Chinese inpatients take antibiotic medicines, and 58 percent of them are prescribed multifunctional antibiotics,

  10. Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the Farm Get Smart About Antibiotics Week Antibiotic Resistance Questions and Answers Language: English (US) Español ( ... Many ear infections Top of Page Questions about Antibiotic Resistance Examples of How Antibiotic Resistance Spreads Click for ...

  11. Risk of Bacterial Infection in Patients With Cirrhosis and Acute Variceal Hemorrhage, Based on Child-Pugh Class, and Effects of Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Puneeta; Abraldes, Juan G; Keough, Adam; Bastiampillai, Ravin; Jayakumar, Saumya; Carbonneau, Michelle; Wong, Eric; Kao, Dina; Bain, Vince G; Ma, Mang

    2015-06-01

    Antibiotics frequently are overused and are associated with serious adverse events in patients with cirrhosis. However, these drugs are recommended for all patients presenting with acute variceal hemorrhage (AVH). We investigated whether patients should be stratified for antibiotic prophylaxis based on Child-Pugh scores, to estimate risks of bacterial infection, rebleeding, and mortality, and whether antibiotics have equal effects on patients of all Child-Pugh classes. We performed a sensitivity analysis using model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores. In a retrospective study, we analyzed data from 381 adult patients with cirrhosis and AVH (70% men; mean age, 56 y), admitted from 2000 through 2009 to 2 tertiary care hospitals in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. We excluded patients with bacterial infection on the day of AVH. The association between antibiotic prophylaxis and outcomes was adjusted by liver disease severity and by a propensity score. The patients included in the study had mean MELD scores of 16, and 54% received antibiotic prophylaxis. Overall, antibiotic therapy was associated with lower risks of infection (adjusted odds ratio, 0.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-0.74) and mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 0.63; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-1.29). Among patients categorized as Child-Pugh class A given antibiotics, only 2% developed infections and the mortality rate was 0.4%. Among patients categorized as Child-Pugh class B given antibiotics, 6% developed infections, compared with 14% of patients who did not receive antibiotics; antibiotics did not affect mortality. Administration of antibiotics to patients categorized as Child-Pugh class C reduced infections and mortality by approximately 50%, compared with patients who did not receive antibiotics. MELD scores were not as useful as Child-Pugh class in identifying patients at risk for infection. Based on a retrospective analysis of patients with cirrhosis and AVH, those categorized as Child

  12. Multicenter Investigation of the Micro-Organisms Involved in Penile Prosthesis Infection: An Analysis of the Efficacy of the AUA and EAU Guidelines for Penile Prosthesis Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin S; Phillips, Elizabeth A; Carrasquillo, Robert J; Thornton, Amanda; Greenfield, Jason M; Levine, Laurence A; Alukal, Joseph P; Conners, William P; Glina, Sidney; Tanrikut, Cigdem; Honig, Stanton C; Becher, Edgardo F; Bennett, Nelson E; Wang, Run; Perito, Paul E; Stahl, Peter J; Rosselló Gayá, Mariano; Rosselló Barbará, Mariano; Cedeno, Juan D; Gheiler, Edward L; Kalejaiye, Odunayo; Ralph, David J; Köhler, Tobias S; Stember, Doron S; Carrion, Rafael E; Maria, Pedro P; Brant, William O; Bickell, Michael W; Garber, Bruce B; Pineda, Miguel; Burnett, Arthur L; Eid, J Francois; Henry, Gerard D; Munarriz, Ricardo M

    2017-03-01

    Penile prosthesis infections remain challenging despite advancements in surgical technique, device improvements, and adoption of antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines. To investigate penile prosthesis infection microbiology to consider which changes in practice could decrease infection rates, to evaluate current antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines, and to develop a proposed algorithm for penile prosthesis infections. This retrospective institutional review board-exempt multi-institutional study from 25 centers reviewed intraoperative cultures obtained at explantation or Mulcahy salvage of infected three-piece inflatable penile prostheses (IPPs). Antibiotic usage was recorded at implantation, admission for infection, and explantation or salvage surgery. Cultures were obtained from purulent material in the implant space and from the biofilm on the device. Intraoperative culture data from infected IPPs. Two hundred twenty-seven intraoperative cultures (2002-2016) were obtained at salvage or explantation. No culture growth occurred in 33% of cases and gram-positive and gram-negative organisms were found in 73% and 39% of positive cultures, respectively. Candida species (11.1%), anaerobes (10.5%) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9.2%) constituted nearly one third of 153 positive cultures. Multi-organism infections occurred in 25% of positive cultures. Antibiotic regimens at initial implantation were generally consistent with American Urological Association (AUA) and European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines. However, the micro-organisms identified in this study were covered by these guidelines in only 62% to 86% of cases. Antibiotic selection at admissions for infection and salvage or explantation varied widely compared with those at IPP implantation. This study documents a high incidence of anaerobic, Candida, and methicillin-resistant S aureus infections. In addition, approximately one third of infected penile prosthesis cases had negative cultures

  13. New drugs in migraine treatment and prophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Lars; Linde, Mattias

    2010-01-01

    Although the triptan drugs provide effective relief from migraine for many patients, a substantial number of affected individuals are unresponsive to these compounds, and such therapy can also lead to a range of adverse effects. Telcagepant represents a new class of antimigraine drug-the calcitonin...... of triptans. Comparisons with triptans in clinical trials for acute treatment of migraine attacks revealed clinical effects similar to those of triptans but better than those of placebo. Telcagepant might provide hope for those who have a poor response to, or are unable to use, older drugs. In patients who...... need prophylaxis because of frequent attacks of migraine, topiramate is a first-line drug for migraine prevention inmany countries; it is generally safe and reasonably well tolerated. Data suggest that topiramate could aid reversion of chronic migraine to episodic migraine....

  14. [Aerosinusitis: part 1: Fundamentals, pathophysiology and prophylaxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, R; Kühnel, T; Graf, J; Hosemann, W

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of aerosinusitis stems from the high number of flight passengers and the impaired fitness for work of the flight personnel. The frontal sinus is more frequently affected than the maxillary sinus and the condition generally occurs during descent. Sinonasal diseases and anatomic variations leading to obstruction of paranasal sinus ventilation favor the development of aerosinusitis. This Continuing Medical Education (CME) article is based on selective literature searches of the PubMed database (search terms: "aerosinusitis", "barosinusitis", "barotrauma" AND "sinus", "barotrauma" AND "sinusitis", "sinusitis" AND "flying" OR "aviator"). Additionally, currently available monographs and further articles that could be identified based on the publication reviews were also included. Part 1 presents the pathophysiology, symptoms, risk factors, epidemiology and prophylaxis of aerosinusitis. In part 2, diagnosis, conservative and surgical treatment will be discussed.

  15. Secondary prophylaxis for esophageal variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albillos, Agustín; Tejedor, Marta

    2014-05-01

    Combination therapy with beta-blockers and endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the standard prophylaxis of esophageal variceal rebleeding in cirrhosis. Beta-blockers are the backbone of combination therapy, since their benefit extend to other complications of portal hypertension. EBL carries the risk of post-banding ulcer bleeding, which explains why overall rebleeding is reduced when beta-blockers are added to EBL, and not when EBL is added to beta-blockers. TIPS is the rescue treatment, but it could be considered as first choice in patients that first bleed while on beta-blockers, those with contraindications to beta-blockers or with refractory ascites, and those with fundal varices.

  16. Fatal rabies despite post-exposure prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D G Deshmukh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Only sporadic reports of failure of post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies exist in the published literature. We are reporting such a case in a 3-year-old boy. The child had Category III dog bite on his right thigh. He presented with progressive ascending paralysis, finally developing quadriplegia and respiratory paralysis. Typical hydrophobia and aerophobia were absent. He received four doses of antirabies cell culture vaccine. He did not receive antirabies immunoglobulin. The boy succumbed on the 23 rd day of the dog bite. Diagnosis of rabies was confirmed in the laboratory by demonstration of Negri bodies, direct fluorescent antibody test and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction either on impression smear of brain or a piece of brain taken during autopsy.

  17. Obiltoxaximab Prevents Disseminated Bacillus anthracis Infection and Improves Survival during Pre- and Postexposure Prophylaxis in Animal Models of Inhalational Anthrax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Brent J; Shadiack, Annette M; Carpenter, Sarah; Sanford, Daniel; Henning, Lisa N; Gonzales, Nestor; O'Connor, Edward; Casey, Leslie S; Serbina, Natalya V

    2016-10-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend adjunctive antitoxins when systemic anthrax is suspected. Obiltoxaximab, a monoclonal antibody against protective antigen (PA), is approved for treatment of inhalational anthrax in combination with antibiotics and for prophylaxis when alternative therapies are not available. The impact of toxin neutralization with obiltoxaximab during pre- and postexposure prophylaxis was explored, and efficacy results that supported the prophylaxis indication are presented here. New Zealand White rabbits and cynomolgus macaques received obiltoxaximab as a single intramuscular or intravenous dose of 2 to 16 mg/kg of body weight at various times relative to Bacillus anthracis aerosol spore challenge. The primary endpoint was survival, and effect of treatment timing was explored. In rabbits, obiltoxaximab administration 9 h postchallenge singly or combined with a 5-day levofloxacin regimen protected 89% to 100% of animals compared to 33% with levofloxacin monotherapy. In cynomolgus macaques, a single intramuscular dose of 16 mg/kg obiltoxaximab led to 100% survival when given 1 to 3 days preexposure and 83% to 100% survival when given 18 to 24 h postexposure and prior to systemic bacteremia onset. Obiltoxaximab administration after bacteremia onset resulted in lower (25% to 50%) survival rates reflective of treatment setting. Prophylactic administration of obiltoxaximab before spore challenge or to spore-challenged animals before systemic bacterial dissemination is efficacious in promoting survival, ameliorating toxemia, and inhibiting bacterial spread to the periphery. Copyright © 2016 Yamamoto et al.

  18. Posaconazole Prophylaxis in Experimental Azole-Resistant Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    OpenAIRE

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Mouton, Johan W.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of posaconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Using a neutropenic murine model of pulmonary infection, posaconazole prophylaxis was evaluated using three isogenic clinical isolates, with posaconazole MICs of 0.063 mg/liter (wild type), 0.5 mg/liter (F219I mutation), and 16 mg/liter. A fourth isolate harboring TR34/L98H (MIC of 0.5 mg/liter) was also tested. Posaconazole prophylaxis was effec...

  19. High Antibiotic Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; José Rabanaque, María; Feja, Cristina;

    2014-01-01

    with highest consumption) were responsible for 21% of the total DDD consumed and received ≥6 packages per year. Elderly adults (≥60 years) and small children (0-9 years) were those exposed to the highest volume of antibiotics and with the most frequent exposure, respectively. Heavy users received a high...... proportion of antibiotics not recommended as first choice in primary health care. In conclusion, heavy antibiotic users consisted mainly of children and old adults. Inappropriate overuse of antibiotics (high quantity, high frequency, and inappropriate antibiotic choice) leads to a substantial risk...

  20. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  1. Antibiotic resistance in Chlamydiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Rockey, Daniel D

    2010-09-01

    There are few documented reports of antibiotic resistance in Chlamydia and no examples of natural and stable antibiotic resistance in strains collected from humans. While there are several reports of clinical isolates exhibiting resistance to antibiotics, these strains either lost their resistance phenotype in vitro, or lost viability altogether. Differences in procedures for chlamydial culture in the laboratory, low recovery rates of clinical isolates and the unknown significance of heterotypic resistance observed in culture may interfere with the recognition and interpretation of antibiotic resistance. Although antibiotic resistance has not emerged in chlamydiae pathogenic to humans, several lines of evidence suggest they are capable of expressing significant resistant phenotypes. The adept ability of chlamydiae to evolve to antibiotic resistance in vitro is demonstrated by contemporary examples of mutagenesis, recombination and genetic transformation. The isolation of tetracycline-resistant Chlamydia suis strains from pigs also emphasizes their adaptive ability to acquire antibiotic resistance genes when exposed to significant selective pressure.

  2. Design space construction of multiple dose-strength tablets utilizing bayesian estimation based on one set of design-of-experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Jin; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    Design spaces for multiple dose strengths of tablets were constructed using a Bayesian estimation method with one set of design of experiments (DoE) of only the highest dose-strength tablet. The lubricant blending process for theophylline tablets with dose strengths of 100, 50, and 25 mg is used as a model manufacturing process in order to construct design spaces. The DoE was conducted using various Froude numbers (X(1)) and blending times (X(2)) for theophylline 100-mg tablet. The response surfaces, design space, and their reliability of the compression rate of the powder mixture (Y(1)), tablet hardness (Y(2)), and dissolution rate (Y(3)) of the 100-mg tablet were calculated using multivariate spline interpolation, a bootstrap resampling technique, and self-organizing map clustering. Three experiments under an optimal condition and two experiments under other conditions were performed using 50- and 25-mg tablets, respectively. The response surfaces of the highest-strength tablet were corrected to those of the lower-strength tablets by Bayesian estimation using the manufacturing data of the lower-strength tablets. Experiments under three additional sets of conditions of lower-strength tablets showed that the corrected design space made it possible to predict the quality of lower-strength tablets more precisely than the design space of the highest-strength tablet. This approach is useful for constructing design spaces of tablets with multiple strengths.

  3. Single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ethambutol and rifampicin in a tuberculosis patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome undergoing extended daily dialysis and ECMO treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kathrin Strunk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The dosing of drugs in critically ill patients undergoing renal replacement therapy is based on limited data. We report for the first time single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of ethambutol (EMB, which is cleared renally to 80%, and rifampicin (RIF, which is cleared renally to <30%, in a patient requiring both extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO and renal replacement therapy. Extended dialysis removed a considerable amount of both EMB and RIF, with a dialyser plasma clearance ranging between 37 and 95 ml/min for EMB and between 39 and 53 ml/min for RIF. The EMB peak level (3 h after a 2-h infusion using a dose of 1000 mg/day on the first day of treatment was 2.3 mg/l, which is in the low therapeutic range (2–5 mg/l. Doubling the dose to 2000 mg/day resulted in peak levels slightly to markedly above the recommended range. There was no detectable effect of the ECMO membrane on the removal of both drugs. After an initial dose as for patients without renal impairment (15 mg/kg/day, therapeutic drug monitoring should be used to guide EMB dosing in patients undergoing extended daily dialysis.

  4. Are postoperative intravenous antibiotics necessary after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery? A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S K; Lo, J; Zwahlen, R A

    2011-12-01

    Postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis is often administered intravenously, despite an increased morbidity rate compared with oral application. This study investigates whether a postoperative oral antibiotic regimen is as effective as incorporation of intravenous antibiotics after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery. 42 patients who underwent bimaxillary orthognathic surgery between December 2008 and May 2010 were randomly allocated to 2 placebo-controlled postoperative antibiotic prophylaxis groups. Group 1 received oral amoxicillin 500mg three times daily; group 2 received intravenous ampicillin 1g four times daily, during the first two postoperative days. Both groups subsequently took oral amoxicillin for three more days. Clinically, the infection rate was assessed in both study groups for a period of 6 weeks after the surgery. 9 patients (21.4%) developed infection. No adverse drug event was detected. No significant difference (p=0.45) was detected in the infection rate between group 1 (3/21) and group 2 (6/21). Age, type of surgical procedures, duration of the operative procedure, surgical procedure-related events, blood loss, and blood transfusion were all found not related to infection (p>0.05). Administration of more cost-effective oral antibiotic prophylaxis, which causes less comorbidity, can be considered to be safe in bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with segmentalizations. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Prospective randomized controlled study of prophylaxis with cefamandole in high risk patients undergoing operations upon the biliary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáinzos, M; Potel, J; Puente, J L

    1985-01-01

    In this study, 52 high risk patients who underwent operations upon the biliary tract were assigned to receive either antibiotic prophylaxis or no treatment with antibiotics. Twenty-seven patients were given 2 grams of cefamandole intramuscularly 30 minutes before operation and 2 grams every eight hours for two days postoperatively. The remaining patients were in the control group and did not receive antibiotics. Surgical wounds were inspected daily by a surgeon while the patients were in the hospital and a follow-up revision was done four weeks after discharge from the hospital. Samples of exudate or pus were taken when the wound appeared infected and cultures of aerobic and anaerobic organism done. Chi-square affinity test with Yate's correction was used for statistical results; only p values more than or equal to 0.5 were considered significant. Seven patients (28 per cent) in the control group had complications develop postoperatively; seven surgical wound infections, one of which included a subphrenic abscess. Postoperatively, there were no septic complications in the group who received cefamandole as a prophylaxis. The incidence of infection was higher for females than males. The organisms most frequently isolated were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella; only in one instance was Clostridum sporogenes found. Polymicrobial infections accounted for 42.8 per cent of the infections. No incidences were reported with the use of cefamandole in those patients who were treated prophylactically. In view of these results, we believe that cefamandole is an ideal antibiotic to be used in the prophylactic treatment of infections of high risk patients who undergo operations upon the biliary tract.

  6. Clinical Outcomes and Cost-effectiveness of Primary Prophylaxis of Febrile Neutropenia During Adjuvant Docetaxel and Cyclophosphamide Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Joanne L; Chan, Kelvin; Kurin, Michael; Pasetka, Mark; Kiss, Alex; Sridhar, Srikala S; Warner, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) is a widely used breast cancer adjuvant regimen. We sought to compare the rates of febrile neutropenia (FN) between patients receiving no primary prophylaxis (PP) and those receiving PP with either granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) or antibiotics. We also analyzed cost-effectiveness of TC with and without either G-CSF or antibiotics. Charts were reviewed of all 340 patients who received adjuvant TC between January 2008 and December 2012 at two major cancer centers. Rates of FN in the three groups - no PP, PP with G-CSF and PP with antibiotics were compared. A Markov model was constructed comparing cost-effectiveness of PP with G-CSF, PP with antibiotics, and secondary prophylaxis (SP) with G-CSF after an episode of FN in a previous cycle. Costs were based on actual resource utilization and supplemented by the published literature, adjusted to 2012 Canadian dollars. Of the 73 (21%) patients who did not receive any PP, 23 (32%) of patients developed FN. Of the 192 (57%) patients receiving PP with G-CSF alone, only two (1%; p < 0.0001) developed FN; and of the 53 (16%) receiving PP with antibiotics alone, six (11%; p < 0.01) developed FN. From a cost-standpoint, PP with G-CSF was less cost-effective than PP with antibiotics. The rate of FN with TC chemotherapy exceeds 30%, and American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines recommend PP with G-CSF in this situation. PP with antibiotics is more cost-effective, and is a reasonable option in resource-limited settings or for patients who decline or do not tolerate G-CSF.

  7. Fosfluconazole for Antifungal Prophylaxis in Very Low Birth Weight Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daijiro Takahashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a retrospective case series study to evaluate the safety of fosfluconazole prophylaxis for preventing invasive fungal infection in VLBW infants with a central vascular access. Fosfluconazole was administered intravenously at a dose of 6 mg/kg everyday during which time a central venous catheter was placed. A total of 23 infants met the criteria for enrollment in our study. No cases of fungal infection were detected during the central venous catheter placement in the group. None of the infants had an elevated β-D-glucan, and all of them were still alive at discharge. Regarding the liver and renal function, no statistically significant differences were observed before and at the end of fosfluconazole prophylaxis. The results of this study demonstrate that fosfluconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive fungal infection was well tolerated by VLBW infants. This is a first report to describe antifungal prophylaxis using fosfluconazole for VLBW infants.

  8. Sexual Assault: A Report on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Postexposure Prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Griffith

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this report is to describe an urban county hospital human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection prevention protocol offering prophylactic combination antiretroviral medications to female victims of sexual assault. A retrospective chart review was conducted from June, 2007 through June, 2008 of 151 women who were prescribed antiretroviral prophylaxis by protocol. All women receiving HIV prophylaxis initially screened HIV seronegative. Of the 58 women who reported taking any HIV prophylaxis, 36 (62% were HIV screened at 12 and/or 24 weeks and none had HIV seroconverted. Although the initiation of an HIV post exposure prophylaxis protocol for sexual assault in a county hospital population is feasible, patient follow-up for counseling and HIV serostatus evaluation is an identified barrier

  9. Antifungal prophylaxis in stem cell transplantation centers in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Akan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to determine the current state of antifungal prophylaxis in Turkish stem cell transplantation (SCT centers. Materials and Methods: The were 38 active stem cell transplantation centers in Turkey, 28 of which were registered with the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT. Survey questionnaires were sent to the 28 EBMT centers in an effort to collect data on antifungal prophylaxis in different settings. In all, 24 of the centers completed the survey; 1 of the 24 centers was excluded from the study, as it was under construction at the time and was not performing transplantation.Results: In all, 15 (65% of the 23 centers were adult SCT centers, 7 (31% were pediatric SCT centers, and 1 center treated both adult and pediatric patients. All centers (23/23 performed both allogeneic and autologous transplants, 20 centers performed non-myeloablative transplants, 8 performed cord blood transplants, and 7 performed unrelated transplants. Primary antifungal prophylaxis was used at all 23 centers during allogeneic transplants, whereas 18 of the 23 centers used it during every autologous transplant and 2 of the 23 centers used it during autologous transplants on a per case basis. The most common drug used for prophylaxis was fluconazole (F (21/23, followed by itraconazole (I (3/23, amphotericin-B (2/23, and posaconazole (1/23. Among the 23 centers, 3 reported that for allogenic transplants they changed the antifungal prophylactic in cases of graft versus host disease (GVHD, and 12 of the 23 centers reported that they changed the antifungal prophylactic in case of nearby construction. All 23 centers performed secondary prophylaxis. Conclusion: Antifungal prophylaxis for hematopoetic SCT patients was the standard protocol in the 23 centers included in the study, usually with such azoles as F. The introduction of posaconazole in Turkey and the potential approval of voriconazole for antifungal prophylaxis will

  10. Conformity with guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagert, G; Austin, T W; Bombassaro, A M; Parbtani, A

    1994-10-01

    The extent to which prescribed antimicrobial prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis conformed with American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines was determined and the frequency of nonconformity with specific elements of the guidelines was evaluated. Patients with conditions defined by AHA as placing them at risk for developing endocarditis were identified through medical records for a four-year period at an 850-bed hospital. Data about the procedures they underwent and prophylaxis prescribed were compared with the AHA guidelines. Conformity with the guidelines was evaluated according to whether prophylaxis was recommended, optional, or unnecessary; nonconformity with specific elements of the guidelines (indication, choice of antimicrobial, dose, dosage interval, timing, and duration) was also evaluated. The following variables were evaluated for possible association with nonconformity to the guidelines: patient's age and sex, penicillin allergy, use of a consultant, and whether the procedure was the first performed in the patient after identification of the cardiac condition. Of the 131 cases analyzed, 29 (22%) involved prophylaxis that conformed with the AHA guidelines. Conformity with the guidelines was significantly lower when prophylaxis was recommended or optional than when it was unnecessary. Nonconformity was most common with the following elements: indication, choice of antimicrobial, and dose. Recommended prophylaxis was given more often in children than in adults and more often before first procedures than before subsequent procedures. More of the regimens prescribed for children exceeded the recommended duration than those prescribed for adults. Unnecessary prophylaxis was given more often when a consultant was involved than when no consultant was involved. In hospitalized patients, conformity with AHA guidelines for antimicrobial prophylaxis against endocarditis was low.

  11. Ribosomal Antibiotics: Contemporary Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Auerbach-Nevo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Most ribosomal antibiotics obstruct distinct ribosomal functions. In selected cases, in addition to paralyzing vital ribosomal tasks, some ribosomal antibiotics are involved in cellular regulation. Owing to the global rapid increase in the appearance of multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacterial strains, and to the extremely slow progress in developing new antibiotics worldwide, it seems that, in addition to the traditional attempts at improving current antibiotics and the intensive screening for additional natural compounds, this field should undergo substantial conceptual revision. Here, we highlight several contemporary issues, including challenging the common preference of broad-range antibiotics; the marginal attention to alterations in the microbiome population resulting from antibiotics usage, and the insufficient awareness of ecological and environmental aspects of antibiotics usage. We also highlight recent advances in the identification of species-specific structural motifs that may be exploited for the design and the creation of novel, environmental friendly, degradable, antibiotic types, with a better distinction between pathogens and useful bacterial species in the microbiome. Thus, these studies are leading towards the design of “pathogen-specific antibiotics,” in contrast to the current preference of broad range antibiotics, partially because it requires significant efforts in speeding up the discovery of the unique species motifs as well as the clinical pathogen identification.

  12. Antibiotics in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, D G Joakim

    2014-05-01

    Molecules with antibiotic properties, produced by various microbes, have been around long before mankind recognized their usefulness in preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteria have therefore been exposed to selection pressures from antibiotics for very long times, however, generally only on a micro-scale within the immediate vicinity of the antibiotic-producing organisms. In the twentieth century we began mass-producing antibiotics, mainly synthetic derivatives of naturally produced antibiotic molecules, but also a few entirely synthetic compounds. As a consequence, entire bacterial communities became exposed to unprecedented antibiotic selection pressures, which in turn led to the rapid resistance development we are facing today among many pathogens. We are, rightly, concerned about the direct selection pressures of antibiotics on the microbial communities that reside in or on our bodies. However, other environments, outside of our bodies, may also be exposed to antibiotics through different routes, most often unintentionally. There are concerns that increased selection pressures from antibiotics in the environment can contribute to the recruitment of resistance factors from the environmental resistome to human pathogens. This paper attempts to 1) provide a brief overview of environmental exposure routes of antibiotics, 2) provide some thoughts about our current knowledge of the associated risks for humans as well as ecosystems, and 3) indicate management options to reduce risks.

  13. Is there an improvement of antibiotic use in China? Evidence from the usage analysis of combination antibiotic therapy for type I incisions in 244 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Juan; Luo, Zhen-Ni; Tang, Chang-Min; Zou, Xiao-Xu; Zhao, Lu; Fang, Peng-Qian

    2016-10-01

    The improvement of antibiotic rational use in China was studied by usage analysis of combination antibiotic therapy for type I incisions in 244 hospitals. Five kinds of hospitals, including general hospital, maternity hospital, children's hospital, stomatological hospital and cancer hospital, from 30 provinces were surveyed. A systematic random sampling strategy was employed to select outpatient prescriptions and inpatient cases in 2011 and 2012. A total of 29 280 outpatient prescriptions and 73 200 inpatient cases from 244 hospitals in each year were analyzed. Data were collected with regards to the implementation of the national antibiotic stewardship program (NASP), the overall usage and the prophylactic use of antibiotic for type I incisions. Univariate analysis was used for microbiological diagnosis rate before antimicrobial therapy, prophylactic use of antibiotics for type I incision operation, and so on. For multivariate analysis, the use of antibiotics was dichotomized according to the guidelines, and entered as binary values into logistic regression analysis. The results were compared with the corresponding criteria given by the guidelines of this campaign. The antibiotic stewardship in China was effective in that more than 80% of each kind of hospitals achieved the criteria of recommended antibiotics varieties. Hospital type appeared to be a factor statistically associated with stewardship outcome. The prophylactic use of antibiotics on type I incision operations decreased by 16.22% (Pantibiotic therapy for type I incisions was also decreased. Region and bed size were the main determinants on surgical prophylaxis for type I incision. This national analysis of hospitals on antibiotic use and stewardship allows relevant comparisons for bench marking. More efforts addressing the root cause of antibiotics abuse would continue to improve the rational use of antibiotics in China.

  14. [Contemporary view on the role of bacteriophages in evolution of nosocomial strains and prophylaxis of healthcare associated infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueva, L P; Aslanov, B I; Akimkin, V G

    2014-01-01

    One of the actual problems of contemporary healthcare are healthcare associated infections (HAI). An important aspect of study of HAI problem is the study of evolution of hospital strains causing HAI. The knowledge accumulated to date in the field of bacteria genetics gives evidence on the significant role of phages in the mechanism of virulence obtaining by pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms. The studies of the authors of this article show that bacteriophages may play a significant role in the formation of virulent properties in hospital conditions that in different hospitals with participation of phages form virulent and antibiotic resistant hospital strains of HAI causative agents. At the same time bacteriophages are effective means for HAI therapy and prophylaxis. Under the condition of mass and irrational use of antibiotics, HAI causative agents form multiple resistance to the existing antibacterial preparations. In this regard bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents become especially actual. To date in Russian and foreign literature considerable material has been accumulated that shows high effectiveness of bacteriophages under the conditions of rational use. The aim of this review is to evaluate contemporary achievements in the field of study of bacteriophage role in evolution of hospital strains and therapy and prophylaxis of healthcare associated infections.

  15. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibiotic use and cost in a teaching hospital in İstanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Dağlı

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the usage patterns and the cost of antibiotics, along with theevaluation of the effects of infectious diseases (ID specialists on appropriate antimicrobial use in hospitalized patients.Materials and methods: A one-day, cross-sectional study was conducted in a major tertiary hospital and data on theuse of antibiotics were collected by using a standard form. The appropriateness of the antibiotic usage was evaluatedusing the Council for Appropriate and Rational Antibiotic Therapy (CARAT criteria; and the consumption and daily costof antibiotics were determined.Results: On the study day, antibiotics were prescribed in 199 (35.6% of 553 hospitalized patients, in 109 (32.9% onthe surgical and 90 patients (40.5% on the medical wards. The total empirical antibiotic use was more frequent (49.7%than prophylactic (29.1% and culture-based therapy (21.2%. In 44 patients (22.1% the antibiotics were used inappropriately;any of these antibiotics needed the approval of ID specialist. The inappropriate usage was more common inprophylactic therapy (46.5% than empirical (16.1% and specific antibiotic administration (2.3%. ID consultation rateswere significantly higher in the appropriate antibiotic administrations (69.6% than in the inappropriate group [(6.8%,p<0.0001, odds ratio (OR 10.2, confidence intervals (CI =3.0–3.7]. The total one-day cost of antibiotic therapy in ourhospital was US $3350.6, and the total daily cost for hospital infection was $2137.1. The mean daily cost per patientwas $2.1 for prophylaxis, $10.7 for community-acquired infections and $54.7 for hospital infections (p<0.001, OR 9.8,CI 4.7–20.7.Conclusion: This study showed that antibiotic prescription rates are high, surgical prophylaxis is still a major problemin our hospital, ID approval is effective for appropriate use of antibiotics, and the antibiotic cost of hospital infections isan important part of extra costs. J Microbiol Infect

  17. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole prophylaxis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiuzzi, Gloria; Yilmaz, Musa; Kantarjian, Hagop; Borthakur, Gautam; Konopleva, Marina; Jabbour, Elias; Brown, Yolanda; Pierce, Sherry; Cortes, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Antifungal prophylaxis is routinely given to patients with hematologic malignancies at high risk for invasive fungal infections (IFI), yet breakthrough IFI may still occur. Posaconazole emerged as an excellent alternative for fungal prophylaxis in high-risk patients. There is limited data about pharmacokinetics and plasma concentrations of posaconazole when given as prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. We recruited 20 adult patients for prospective, open label trial of posaconazole given as a prophylaxis in patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) undergoing induction chemotherapy or first salvage therapy. The median age of all patients was 65 years and received prophylaxis for a median of 38 days (range: 5-42 days).Ten patients (50%) completed 42 days on posaconazole prophylaxis. Median plasma posaconazole levels showed no statistical difference across gender, body surface area, patients developing IFI, and patients acquiring grade 3 or 4 elevation of liver enzymes. However, there was an overall trend for higher trough concentrations among patients with no IFI than those with IFI. Pharmacokinetics of posaconazole varies from patient to patient, and AML patients receiving induction chemotherapy who never develop IFI tend to have higher plasma concentrations after oral administration of posaconazole.

  18. Prophylaxis of migraine: general principles and patient acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico D’Amico

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Domenico D’Amico1, Stewart J Tepper21Headache Center, Department of Neurological Sciences, C Besta Neurological Institute, Milan, Italy; 2Center for Headache and Pain, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Migraine is a chronic neurological condition with episodic exacerbations. Migraine is highly prevalent, and associated with significant pain, disability, and diminished quality of life. Migraine management is an important health care issue. Migraine management includes avoidance of trigger factors, lifestyle modifications, non-pharmacological therapies, and medications. Pharmacological treatment is traditionally divided into acute or symptomatic treatment, and preventive treatment or prophylaxis. Many migraine patients can be treated using only acute treatment. Patients with severe and/or frequent migraines require long-term preventive therapy. Prophylaxis requires daily administration of anti-migraine compounds with potential adverse events or contraindications, and may also interfere with other concurrent conditions and treatments. These problems may induce patients to reject the idea of a preventive treatment, leading to poor patient adherence. This paper reviews the main factors influencing patient acceptance of anti-migraine prophylaxis, providing practical suggestions to enhance patient willingness to accept pharmacological anti-migraine preventive therapy. We also provide information about the main clinical characteristics of migraine, and their negative consequences. The circumstances warranting prophylaxis in migraine patients as well as the main characteristics of the compounds currently used in migraine prophylaxis will also be briefly discussed, focusing on those aspects which can enhance patient acceptance and adherence.Keywords: migraine, prophylaxis, preventive therapy, acceptance, adherence

  19. Fluconazole prophylaxis in preterm infants: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Juliana Ferreira da Silva; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Corrêa, Luísa Petri; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    This article aims to review the use of antifungal prophylaxis with intravenous fluconazole in premature newborns and the occurrence of Invasive Candidiasis. This is a systematic review with search at databases: PubMed, Capes Portal, Virtual Health Library (BVS - Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde)/Lilacs, Scopus and Cochrane. The keywords used were: "Antifungal", "Candida" "Fluconazole prophylaxis" and "Preterm infants". Invasive Candidiasis was evaluated in all the twelve items. In eleven of them, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups receiving prophylactic fluconazole, with lower frequency of Invasive Candidiasis, compared to placebo or no prophylaxis group. Colonization by Candida species was also evaluated in five studies; four of them presented statistically lower proportion of colonization in patients with Fluconazole prophylaxis, compared to placebo or no drugs. In one study, there was a significant difference, favoring the use of fluconazole, and reduction of death. Studies indicate the effectiveness of prophylaxis with fluconazole, with reduction in the incidence of colonization and invasive fungal disease. The benefits of prophylaxis should be evaluated considering the incidence of candidiasis in the unit, the mortality associated with candidiasis, the safety and toxicity of short and long-term medication, and the potential for development of resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. The action of certain antibiotics and ether on swine enzootic pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, R G

    1971-01-01

    The susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae to the action of three antibiotics and diethyl ether was determined. Infected swine were used in an in vivo sensitivity detection system. The parameter of susceptibility was lesion prophylaxis. In vivo, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae appeared to be resistant to diethyl ether, tylosin tartrate, and erythromycin, but was susceptible to the action of chlortetracycline. Chlortetracycline was effective in preventing the development of lesions when given at levels which would be practical in commercial swine operations.

  1. Antibiotics and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sá Del Fiol, Fernando; Barberato-Filho, Silvio; de Cássia Bergamaschi, Cristiane; Lopes, Luciane Cruz; Gauthier, Timothy P

    2016-01-01

    During the breastfeeding period, bacterial infections can occur in the nursing mother, requiring the use of antibiotics. A lack of accurate information may lead health care professionals and mothers to suspend breastfeeding, which may be unnecessary. This article provides information on the main antibiotics that are appropriate for clinical use and the interference of these antibiotics with the infant to support medical decisions regarding the discontinuation of breastfeeding. We aim to provide information on the pharmacokinetic factors that interfere with the passage of antibiotics into breast milk and the toxicological implications of absorption by the infant. Publications related to the 20 most frequently employed antibiotics and their transfer into breast milk were evaluated. The results demonstrate that most antibiotics in clinical use are considered suitable during breastfeeding; however, the pharmacokinetic profile of each drug must be observed to ensure the resolution of the maternal infection and the safety of the infant.

  2. [Rational use of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walger, P

    2016-06-01

    International and national campaigns draw attention worldwide to the rational use of the available antibiotics. This has been stimulated by the high prevalence rates of drug-resistant pathogens, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), a threatening spread of development of resistance in Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria and the selection of Clostridium difficile with a simultaneous clear reduction in the development of new antibiotics. The implementation of antibiotic stewardship programs aims to maintain their effectiveness by a rational use of the available antibiotics. The essential target of therapy with antibiotics is successful treatment of individual patients with bacterial infections. The optimal clinical treatment results can only be achieved when the toxicity, selection of pathogens and development of resistance are minimized. This article presents the principles of a rational antibiotic therapy.

  3. Platforms for antibiotic discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kim

    2013-05-01

    The spread of resistant bacteria, leading to untreatable infections, is a major public health threat but the pace of antibiotic discovery to combat these pathogens has slowed down. Most antibiotics were originally isolated by screening soil-derived actinomycetes during the golden era of antibiotic discovery in the 1940s to 1960s. However, diminishing returns from this discovery platform led to its collapse, and efforts to create a new platform based on target-focused screening of large libraries of synthetic compounds failed, in part owing to the lack of penetration of such compounds through the bacterial envelope. This article considers strategies to re-establish viable platforms for antibiotic discovery. These include investigating untapped natural product sources such as uncultured bacteria, establishing rules of compound penetration to enable the development of synthetic antibiotics, developing species-specific antibiotics and identifying prodrugs that have the potential to eradicate dormant persisters, which are often responsible for hard-to-treat infections.

  4. Resistance to antibiotics

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The antibiotics represent the most important therapeutic arsenal in the fight against pathogen microorganisms. Even in the beginning of their use, there was registered bacterial resistance, phenomenon thatbecame an alarming subject in the last decades. There are some types of resistance to antibiotics that are influenced by many factors. The resistance term can be used as microbiological resistance and clinical resistance. The resistance to antibiotics can be a natural phenomenon or a gained ...

  5. Telmisartan increases systemic exposure to rosuvastatin after single and multiple doses, and in vitro studies show telmisartan inhibits ABCG2-mediated transport of rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Miao; Lee, Hon-Kit; To, Kenneth K W; Fok, Benny S P; Wo, Siu-Kwan; Ho, Chung-Shun; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Zuo, Zhong; Chan, Thomas Y K; Chan, Juliana C N; Tomlinson, Brian

    2016-12-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (ABCG2) plays an important role in the disposition of rosuvastatin. Telmisartan, a selective angiotension-II type 1 (AT1) receptor blocker, inhibits the transport capacity of ABCG2, which may result in drug interactions. This study investigated the pharmacokinetic interaction between rosuvastatin and telmisartan and the potential mechanism. In this two-phase fixed-order design study, healthy subjects received single doses of 10 mg rosuvastatin at baseline and after telmisartan 40 mg daily for 14 days. Patients with hyperlipidaemia who had been taking rosuvastatin 10 mg daily for at least 4 weeks were given telmisartan 40 mg daily for 14 days together with rosuvastatin. Plasma concentrations of rosuvastatin were measured over 24 h before and after telmisartan administration. In vitro experiments using a bidirectional transport assay were performed to investigate the involvement of ABCG2 in the interaction. Co-administration of telmisartan significantly increased the maximum plasma concentration (C max) and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) of rosuvastatin by 71 and 26 %, respectively. The T max values were reduced after administration of telmisartan. There was no significant difference in the interaction of rosuvastatin with telmisartan between healthy volunteers and patients receiving long-term rosuvastatin therapy or among subjects with the different ABCG2 421 C>A genotypes. The in vitro experiment demonstrated that telmisartan inhibited ABCG2-mediated efflux of rosuvastatin. This study demonstrated that telmisartan significantly increased the systemic exposure to rosuvastatin after single and multiple doses.

  6. Multiple doses of erythropoietin impair liver regeneration by increasing TNF-alpha, the Bax to Bcl-xL ratio and apoptotic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Klemm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Liver resection and the use of small-for-size grafts are restricted by the necessity to provide a sufficient amount of functional liver mass. Only few promising strategies to maximize liver regeneration are available. Apart from its erythropoiesis-stimulating effect, erythropoietin (EPO has meanwhile been recognized as mitogenic, tissue-protective, and anti-apoptotic pleiotropic cytokine. Thus, EPO may support regeneration of hepatic tissue. METHODOLOGY: Rats undergoing 68% hepatectomy received daily either high dose (5000 IU/kg bw i.v. or low dose (500 IU/kg bw i.v. recombinant human EPO or equal amounts of physiologic saline. Parameters of liver regeneration and hepatocellular apoptosis were assessed at 24 h, 48 h and 5 d after resection. In addition, red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum EPO levels as well as plasma concentrations of TNF-alpha and IL-6 were evaluated. Further, hepatic Bcl-x(L and Bax protein expression were analyzed by Western blot. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Administration of EPO significantly reduced the expression of PCNA at 24 h followed by a significant decrease in restitution of liver mass at day 5 after partial hepatectomy. EPO increased TNF-alpha levels and shifted the Bcl-x(L to Bax ratio towards the pro-apoptotic Bax resulting in significantly increased hepatocellular apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple doses of EPO after partial hepatectomy increase hepatocellular apoptosis and impair liver regeneration in rats. Thus, careful consideration should be made in pre- and post-operative recombinant human EPO administration in the setting of liver resection and transplantation.

  7. Primary osteoporosis prophylaxis with different calcium preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Toroptsova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess efficacy of different modes of management in women with osteopenia. Material and methods. 190 women with osteopenia of spine and/or femoral neck aged 50 to 70 years (mean 60,6±5 years were followed up during a year. Different modes of prophylaxis were applied. 59 pts of group 1 received Calcium D3 Nicomed 2 tablets a day, 25 pts of group 2 - Vitrum Osteomag 2 tablets a day, 46 pts of group 3 - calcium carbonate 2500 mg/day, 60 pts of control group received recommendations about diet and physical activity. Results. 3,5% from 114 pts examined had normal 25(OHD blood level while 23% showed deficiency of vitamin D. Mean calcium consumption with milk products was 350 mg/day. Bone mineral density (BMD significantly increased on 1,6-1% in pts older than 60 years receiving Vitrum Osteomag and Calcium D3 Nicomed respectively while younger pts did not show such changes. BMD in pts olderthan 60 years receiving calcium carbonate increased on 0,5% but this difference was not significant. Tolerability of all 3 drugs was comparable.

  8. Streamlining HIV Testing for HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigler, Teri; Kallas, Esper; Schechter, Mauro; Sharma, Usha; Glidden, David; Grant, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-testing algorithms for preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) should be optimized to minimize the risk of drug resistance, the time off PrEP required to evaluate false-positive screening results, and costs and to expedite the start of therapy for those confirmed to be infected. HIV rapid tests (RTs) for anti-HIV antibodies provide results in less than 1 h and can be conducted by nonlicensed staff at the point of care. In many regions, Western blot (WB) testing is required to confirm reactive RT results. WB testing, however, causes delays in diagnosis and adds expense. The iPrEx study evaluated the safety and efficacy of daily oral emtricitabine-tenofovir disoproxil fumarate among HIV-seronegative men and transgender women who have sex with men: HIV infection was assessed with two RTs plus WB confirmation, followed by HIV-1 plasma viral load testing. During the iPrEx study, there were 51,260 HIV status evaluations among 2,499 volunteers using RTs: 142 (0.28%) had concordant positive results (100% were eventually confirmed) and 19 (0.04%) had discordant results among 14 participants; 11 were eventually determined to be HIV infected. A streamlined approach using only one RT to screen and a second RT to confirm (without WB) would have had nearly the same accuracy. Discrepant RT results are best evaluated with nucleic acid testing, which would also increase sensitivity. PMID:25378570

  9. Randomised controlled trial of prophylactic antibiotic treatment for the prevention of endophthalmitis after open globe injury at Groote Schuur Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, N; Mustak, S; Cook, C

    2017-07-01

    Most post-traumatic acute infectious endophthalmitis occur within a week of open globe trauma, necessitating early antibiotic prophylaxis. There are few randomised studies that demonstrate the benefits of prophylactic antibiotics. This randomised controlled non-inferiority trial was aimed at determining the incidence of post-traumatic endophthalmitis using established intravenous/oral prophylaxis and comparing this to the incidence using oral antibiotics only. All adult patients admitted with open globe injury were included. Those with proven endophthalmitis, high-risk features, who underwent primary evisceration and those allergic to the trial antibiotics were excluded. Patients were randomised to receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin or oral ciprofloxacin and oral cefuroxime for 3 days from admission. Acute endophthalmitis was the primary outcome. Patients completed the study if they were followed up for 6 weeks post injury. Three hundred patients were enrolled, with 150 in each arm. There were 99 exclusions. Seven patients developed endophthalmitis despite prophylaxis-2.0% (three cases) in the intravenous and oral arm, compared with 2.7% (four cases) in the oral-only arm-this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.703). The incidence of endophthalmitis with prophylaxis was 2-3%. Selected patients with open globe injuries (without high-risk features) may receive either intravenous cefazolin and oral ciprofloxacin, or oral cefuroxime and oral ciprofloxacin as prophylaxis against acute endophthalmitis-the latter regimen has the advantage of shortening patients' hospital stays and reducing costs. Non-inferiority study-design limitations should be taken into account, however. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Identification of Antibiotics used in Clinical Surgery and Orthopedic Unit from Midsized Hospital in Mato Grosso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. G. Lima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study aimed to identify the pattern of antimicrobial use in a unit and orthopedic surgical clinic of a medium-sized hospital in Mato Grosso. The study based in analysis of 500 medical charts and filling out forms previously prepared from Regional Hospital of Sorriso, between March and April 2012, after approval of the project by CEP Julio Muller University Hospital (Protocol No. 219/2011. It was observed that 69% (345 of the sample were male, with ages ranging between 18 and 112 years. In all the charts can observe the prescription of antibiotics, the most prescribed the cephalothin 49.2% (297, Amikacin 12.27% (74 5.3% Gentamicin (32, Ciprofloxacin 4.31 % (26 and Clindamycin 3.31% (20. Among the 500 records analyzed only 9 (1.8% underwent antimicrobial prophylaxis and 491 (98.2 did not receive prophylaxis. Among the antimicrobials used in surgical prophylaxis met the cephalothin, used in 77.8% of cases and Clindamycin in 22.2% of cases, these drugs of second choice within the parameters of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA. The rational use of antibiotics reduce any risk of emergence of resistant microbial strains and still be profitable in terms pharmacoeconomicsKeywords: Antimicrobial; Surgical Clinic, Nursing; Antibiotic.

  11. Demographics of antibiotic persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Ulrich; Kollerova, Silvia; Jouvet, Lionel

    2016-01-01

    Persister cells, cells that can survive antibiotic exposure but lack heritable antibiotic resistance, are assumed to play a crucial role for the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Persistence is a stage associated with reduced metabolic activity. Most previous studies have been done on batch...... cultures, rather than the individual level. Here, we used individual level bacteria data to confirm previous studies in how fast cells switch into a persistence stage, but our results challenge the fundamental idea that persistence comes with major costs of reduced growth (cell elongation) and division due...... even play a more prominent role for the evolution of resistance and failures of medical treatment by antibiotics as currently assumed....

  12. Antibiotics: Miracle Drugs

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-16

    The overuse of antibiotics has led to the development of resistance among bacteria, making antibiotics ineffective in treating certain conditions. This podcast discusses the importance of talking to your healthcare professional about whether or not antibiotics will be beneficial if you’ve been diagnosed with an infectious disease.  Created: 4/16/2015 by Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Disease (NCIRD), Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Program.   Date Released: 4/16/2015.

  13. Diet as prophylaxis and treatment for venous thromboembolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cundiff David K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both prophylaxis and treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE: deep venous thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary emboli (PE with anticoagulants are associated with significant risks of major and fatal hemorrhage. Anticoagulation treatment of VTE has been the standard of care in the USA since before 1962 when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration began requiring randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs showing efficacy, so efficacy trials were never required for FDA approval. In clinical trials of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients before the 1980s, anticoagulant prophylaxis was clearly beneficial (fatal pulmonary emboli (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.99%, FPE with anticoagulants = 0.31%. However, observational studies and RCTs of 'high VTE risk' surgical patients from the 1980s until 2010 show that FPE deaths without anticoagulants are about one-fourth the rate that occurs during prophylaxis with anticoagulants (FPE without anticoagulants = 0.023%, FPE while receiving anticoagulant prophylaxis = 0.10%. Additionally, an FPE rate of about 0.012% (35/28,400 in patients receiving prophylactic anticoagulants can be attributed to 'rebound hypercoagulation' in the two months after stopping anticoagulants. Alternatives to anticoagulant prophylaxis should be explored. Methods and Findings The literature concerning dietary influences on VTE incidence was reviewed. Hypotheses concerning the etiology of VTE were critiqued in relationship to the rationale for dietary versus anticoagulant approaches to prophylaxis and treatment. Epidemiological evidence suggests that a diet with ample fruits and vegetables and little meat may substantially reduce the risk of VTE; vegetarian, vegan, or Mediterranean diets favorably affect serum markers of hemostasis and inflammation. The valve cusp hypoxia hypothesis of DVT/VTE etiology is consistent with the development of VTE being affected directly or indirectly by diet. However, it is less consistent with

  14. [Comparative study of two protocols of antibiotic prophylaxis in endoscopic urologic surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, J Y; Malinowsky, J M; Cozian, A; Viers, M F; Rolland, M T; Péron, M; Souron, R; Baron, D

    1990-06-01

    We report an open, prospective, randomized and double-blind study which compared two groups of patients without preoperative bacteriuria, undergoing transurethral urologic surgery. A first group received cefazoline 3 g perioperatively and a second group a single preoperative dose of cefotiam 1 g. A hundred patients were included in each group which were well matched on all essential characteristics, risk factors, surgery, anesthesia and postoperative temperature. The incidence of postoperative infection (bacteriemia and bacteriuria) was the same in both groups (16%). It is concluded that in transurethral urologic surgery performed in patients without preoperative bacteriuria, 1 preoperative dose cefotiam is as efficacious as 3 perioperative doses cefazoline.

  15. Patterns of Antibiotic Resistance Among Group B StreptococcusIsolates: 2001–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives were to determine the prevalence of group B streptococcus (GBS and to characterize antibiotic resistance patterns. All pregnant women presenting to the triage units at two urban hospitals during three intervals from 2001 to 2004 were included. Each interval lasted approximately four weeks. Swabs were inoculated into selective broth and cultured on tryptic soy agar with 5% sheep blood. GBS was identified using the StrepTex latex agglutination system. GBS positive cultures were tested for their resistance to ampicillin, erythromycin, clindamycin, and cefazolin. GBS was isolated from 154 (12.2% of 1264 swabs collected during the study period. African-American women were more likely to be colonized with GBS than Caucasians and Hispanics. Resistance to routinely administered antibiotics was common, but there were no statistically significant increases in resistance to antibiotics over the study period. Ongoing surveillance of antibiotic resistance patterns is important in determining optimal prophylaxis and therapy.

  16. Possibilities of Correction and Prophylaxis of Intestinal Microbiocenosis Disorders in Frequently Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Surkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequently and protractedly ill children constitute a special for pediatricians group of patients. Acute respiratory infections with severe and frequently relapsing course badly affect children’s health and contribute to the decrease of the functional activity of the immune system. Risk factors of the high prevalence of acute respiratory infections are changes in the immune responses at the background of unfavorable ante- and perinatal conditions, numerous contacts with potential causative agents at the beginning of attendance of infant schools, widespread intra- and inter-family contacts as well as susceptibility to Th2 immune response (allergy and prolonged course of inflammatory process. Etiotropic treatment of acute respiratory infections often includes antibacterial drugs, which, however, have negative effects on intestinal microflora, such as dyspeptic syndrome and antibiotic-induced diarrhea. Intestinal dysbiosis affects homeostasis, leads to significant changes in functional activity of various organs and systems. That is why correction and prophylaxis of intestinal dysbacteriosis is very important in pediatric practice. In this article the main data on epidemiology, pathogenesis, forms, clinical manifestation, diagnostics and treatment of antibiotic-induced diarrhea in children.

  17. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation without fluconazole and fluoroquinolone prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, D; Kreil, S; Nolte, F; Reinwald, M; Hofmann, W-K; Klein, S A

    2016-01-01

    Fluoroquinolone (FQ) and fluconazole prophylaxis is recommended for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). However, due to an uncertain scientific basis and the increasing emergence of resistant germs, this policy should be questioned. Therefore, FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis was omitted in alloHCT at our center. In this retrospective analysis, all consecutive patients (n = 63) who underwent first alloHCT at our institution from September 2010 to September 2013 were included. Patients neither received FQ nor fluconazole prophylaxis. Day 100 mortality, incidence of febrile neutropenia, bacterial infections, and invasive fungal diseases (IFD) were assessed. Sixteen patients who started conditioning under antimicrobial treatment/prophylaxis due to pre-existing neutropenia (3/16), IFD (12/16), or aortic valve replacement (1/16) were excluded from the analysis. Finally, 47 patients were transplanted without prophylaxis as intended. Day 100 mortality was 9 %. Febrile neutropenia occurred in 62 % (29/47); 17/47 patients (36 %) experienced a blood stream infection (BSI) with detection of Gram-positive bacteria in 14 patients, Gram-negative bacteria in five patients, and candida in one patient, respectively. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacteria; 12/21 isolated Gram-positive and 3/6 Gram-negative bacteria were FQ resistant. In 21 % (10/47) of the patients, IFD (1x proven, 1x probable, and 8x possible) were diagnosed. To conclude, all three criteria, day 100 mortality, the incidence of IFD, and BSI, are in the range of published data for patients transplanted with FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis. These data demonstrate that alloHCT is feasible without FQ and fluconazole prophylaxis.

  18. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods, antibi

  19. Handling Time-dependent Variables : Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Price, L. Silvia; Frencken, Jos F.; Tarima, Sergey; Bonten, Marc|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating quantitative associations between antibiotic exposure and antibiotic resistance development is important. In the absence of randomized trials, observational studies are the next best alternative to derive such estimates. Yet, as antibiotics are prescribed for varying time periods,

  20. Colonoscopy ‘My Way’: Preparation, Anticoagulants, Antibiotics and Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome D Waye

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonoscopy was introduced in the 1960s. The facility with which this technique is performed has been enhanced by vast improvements in instrumentation. In spite of this, physician attitudes concerning colonoscopy have changed little over the past several decades. The diet for precolonoscopic preparation has not been altered for 30 years. Colonoscopists have a great reluctance to use a new preparation instead of the 4 L electrolyte solution, perhaps because this was such a significant advance in colonoscopic cleansing, its predecessor being castor oil and enemas. Physicians continue to be wary of the patient who is taking acetylsalicylic acid in the absence of any studies that show that this is detrimental for polypectomy. The management of the patient on warfarin anticoagulation remains a subject for debate. As for antibiotic prophylaxis, most endoscopy units do not have a standardized approach, although there are good guidelines that, if followed, should decrease the risk of infective endocarditis. Sedation for the endoscopic examination is usually administered by the colonoscopist, although anesthesiologists may, in some countries (and in some defined areas of the United States be the primary administrators of sedation and analgesia. The present article is a personal approach to the following issues: the preparation of the colon for an examination, current thoughts about anticoagulation and acetylsalicylic acid, antibiotic prophylaxis for colonoscopy and the technique for sedation out of the hospital.

  1. Orbitozygomatic Fracture Repairs: Are Antibiotics Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weber; Lynham, Anthony; Wullschleger, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Orbitozygomatic fractures are one of the most common maxillofacial injuries encountered. This study aims to investigate and review the management and complications of orbitozygomatic fractures at the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH). Specifically the postoperative infection rate will be closely examined to determine whether adjunctive antibiotics are necessary in its surgical management. A retrospective case selection study of all patients with orbitozygomatic fractures treated at the RBWH in 2011 was performed. The cases were collected from the maxillofacial database. Chart review of the admission with consecutive follow-up of up to 6 weeks including clinical and radiological assessment and consecutive data analysis was performed. A total of 160 patients with orbitozygomatic fractures were managed at the RBWH with three complications. Eighty-five (53.1%) cases were treated surgically and 155 (97.5%) cases had follow-up until 6 weeks postoperatively. Twenty-six surgical cases (16.3%) were treated via elevation without fixation. A further 26 surgical cases (16.3%) were treated with one fixation point, 19 cases (11.9%) with two fixation points, 12 cases (7.5%) with three fixation points, and 2 cases (1.3%) treated with four fixation points. The three complications (1.9%) returned for surgical correction without further consequence; two were due to inadequate cosmesis and one was due to exposure of the fixation plate. No early postoperative infections were seen. This study presents an excellent outcome with minimal early complications of orbitozygomatic fractures treated at the RBWH, a trauma center with high caseload. All operatively treated cases received perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis as per the unit's protocol. With a nil infection rate at the RBWH, future studies should focus on whether the use of prophylactic antibiotics is appropriate. PMID:26576230

  2. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  3. Replacement for antibiotics: Lysozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibiotics have been fed at subtherapeutic levels to swine as growth promoters for more than 60 years, and the majority of swine produced in the U.S. receive antibiotics in their feed at some point in their production cycle. These compounds benefit the producers by minimizing production losses by ...

  4. The future of antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance continues to spread even as society is experiencing a market failure of new antibiotic research and development (R&D). Scientific, economic, and regulatory barriers all contribute to the antibiotic market failure. Scientific solutions to rekindle R&D include finding new screening strategies to identify novel antibiotic scaffolds and transforming the way we think about treating infections, such that the goal is to disarm the pathogen without killing it or modulate the host response to the organism without targeting the organism for destruction. Future economic strategies are likely to focus on ‘push’ incentives offered by public-private partnerships as well as increasing pricing by focusing development on areas of high unmet need. Such strategies can also help protect new antibiotics from overuse after marketing. Regulatory reform is needed to re-establish feasible and meaningful traditional antibiotic pathways, to create novel limited-use pathways that focus on highly resistant infections, and to harmonize regulatory standards across nations. We need new antibiotics with which to treat our patients. But we also need to protect those new antibiotics from misuse when they become available. If we want to break the cycle of resistance and change the current landscape, disruptive approaches that challenge long-standing dogma will be needed. PMID:25043962

  5. [Pattern of injuries and prophylaxis in paragliding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, W; Hesse, B; Blatter, G; Schmidtler, B; Muhr, G

    2000-06-01

    This study will present trends and recommendations to increase active and passive safety in paragliding on the basis of current state-of-the-art equipment and typical patterns of injury. This German-Swiss teamwork presents data of 55 male and 9 female patients treated after paragliding accidents between 1994 to 1998 respectively 1996 to 1998. 43.7% of the pilots presented with multiple injuries, 62.5% suffered spinal fractures and 18.8% pelvic fractures. 28.4% of the injured pilots were admitted with injuries of the lower extremities mainly affecting the tarsus or the ankle joint. Only three patients with single injuries could be treated in an ambulatory setting. 54.0% of the injuries left the patients with lasting functional residues and complaints. Main causes of accidents were either pilot error in handling the paraglider or general lack of awareness about potential risk factors. 46.0% of injuries occurred during landing, 42.9% of injuries during the flight and another 11.1% of injuries during starting procedures. With noticeable enhanced performance sails of the beginners and intermediate level are increasingly popular. Protective helmets and sturdy footwear reaching above the ankle joint are indispensable pieces of equipment. The use of protective gloves is highly recommended. Back protection devices of the new generation provide the best passive prophylaxis for the pilot against pelvic and spinal cord injuries. This area hold the most promise for increasing safety and reducing risk of injury in future, apart from using beginners and intermediate wings. After acquisition of the pilot license performance and security training provide the best preparing to master unforeseeable situations.

  6. History of Antibiotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Kathrin I

    2016-01-01

    For thousands of years people were delivered helplessly to various kinds of infections, which often reached epidemic proportions and have cost the lives of millions of people. This is precisely the age since mankind has been thinking of infectious diseases and the question of their causes. However, due to a lack of knowledge, the search for strategies to fight, heal, and prevent the spread of communicable diseases was unsuccessful for a long time. It was not until the discovery of the healing effects of (antibiotic producing) molds, the first microscopic observations of microorganisms in the seventeenth century, the refutation of the abiogenesis theory, and the dissolution of the question "What is the nature of infectious diseases?" that the first milestones within the history of antibiotics research were set. Then new discoveries accelerated rapidly: Bacteria could be isolated and cultured and were identified as possible agents of diseases as well as producers of bioactive metabolites. At the same time the first synthetic antibiotics were developed and shortly thereafter, thousands of synthetic substances as well as millions of soil borne bacteria and fungi were screened for bioactivity within numerous microbial laboratories of pharmaceutical companies. New antibiotic classes with different targets were discovered as on assembly line production. With the beginning of the twentieth century, many of the diseases which reached epidemic proportions at the time-e.g., cholera, syphilis, plague, tuberculosis, or typhoid fever, just to name a few, could be combatted with new discovered antibiotics. It should be considered that hundred years ago the market launch of new antibiotics was significantly faster and less complicated than today (where it takes 10-12 years in average between the discovery of a new antibiotic until the launch). After the first euphoria it was quickly realized that bacteria are able to develop, acquire, and spread numerous resistance mechanisms

  7. Metagenomics and antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, L; Hernandez, A; Sanchez, M B; Martinez, J L

    2012-07-01

    Most of the bacterial species that form part of the biosphere have never been cultivated. In this situation, a comprehensive study of bacterial communities requires the utilization of non-culture-based methods, which have been named metagenomics. In this paper we review the use of different metagenomic techniques for understanding the effect of antibiotics on microbial communities, to synthesize new antimicrobial compounds and to analyse the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems. These techniques include functional metagenomics, which serves to find new antibiotics or new antibiotic resistance genes, and descriptive metagenomics, which serves to analyse changes in the composition of the microbiota and to track the presence and abundance of already known antibiotic resistance genes in different ecosystems.

  8. A review of prophylactic antibiotics use in plastic surgery in China and a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ge-hong; Hou, Dian-ju; Fu, Hua-dong; Guo, Jing-ying; Guo, Xiao-bo; Gong, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of antibiotic prophylaxis for plastic surgical procedures at our hospital, and to perform a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of prophylactic antibiotics in plastic surgery. The records of patients who received plastic surgical procedures with Class I surgical incisions between 2009 and 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. A systematic literature review was conducted for studies examining the use of prophylactic antibiotics for Class I surgical wounds. A total of 13,997 cases with Class I surgical incisions were included. Prophylactic antibiotics were given in 13,865 cases (99.1%). The antibiotics used were primarily cefuroxime, clindamycin, metronidazole, cefoxitin sodium, and gentamicin. The average duration of administration was 4.84 ± 3.07 (range, 1-51) days. Antibiotics were administered postoperatively in >99% of cases while preoperative antibiotic administration was only given in 32 cases (0.23%). Wound infections occurred in 21 cases for an overall infection rate of 0.15%. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria of the systematic review. There was marked variation in the timing of antibiotic administration with antibiotics given pre-, peri-, and postoperatively. Of studies that compared the use of prophylactic antibiotics with placebo, a reduction in wound infections was noted in 4 trials and no difference was noted in 6 trials. No significant difference in infection rates was shown between the prophylactic and postoperative arms. In conclusion, prophylactic antibiotics are overused in plastic surgical procedures. Evidence-based guidelines for the use of prophylactic antibiotics in plastic surgical procedures are needed.

  9. Pharmacokinetic interaction between rosuvastatin and telmisartan in healthy Korean male volunteers: a randomized, open-label, two-period, crossover, multiple-dose study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Mijeong; Kim, Yukyung; Lee, Donghwan; Roh, Hyerang; Son, Hankil; Guk, Jinju; Jang, Seong Bok; Nam, Su Youn; Park, Kyungsoo

    2014-08-01

    Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, and telmisartan, an angiotensin receptor blocker, are commonly prescribed in combination for the treatment of dyslipidemia accompanied by hypertension. However, the nature of the pharmacokinetic interaction between the 2 drugs is not clearly understood. The goal of the present study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction between rosuvastatin and telmisartan in a healthy Korean population. This was a randomized, 2-part, open-label, 2-period, crossover, multiple-dose study, with each part composed of different subjects between the ages of 20 and 55 years. In part 1, each subject received rosuvastatin 20 mg with and without telmisartan 80 mg once daily for 6 consecutive days. In part 2, each subject received telmisartan 80 mg with and without rosuvastatin 20 mg once daily for 6 consecutive days. In both parts, there was a 16-day washout period between mono- and coadministration. Blood samples were collected up to 72 hours after the last dose. Adverse events (AEs) were evaluated through interviews and physical examinations. In part 1, the 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios for the primary pharmacokinetic parameters for coadministration of the 2 drugs to monoadministration of each drug were 1.0736-1.2932 for AUCτ and 1.7442-2.3229 for Cmax,ss for rosuvastatin and 0.9942-1.1594 for AUCτ and 1.3593-1.7169 for Cmax,ss for N-desmethyl rosuvastatin, whereas in part 2, the CIs were 1.0834-1.2672 for AUCτ and 1.1534-1.5803 for Cmax,ss for telmisartan. The most frequently noted AE was cough in part 1, which occurred in 2 subjects receiving the combination therapy, and oropharyngeal pain in part 2, which occurred in 3 subjects receiving the combination therapy. All reported AEs were mild or moderate, and there was no significant difference in incidence between the treatments. These findings demonstrated that rosuvastatin and telmisartan mutually affected each other

  10. A biodegradable gentamicin-hydroxyapatite-coating for infection prophylaxis in cementless hip prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Neut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A degradable, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, gentamicin-loaded prophylactic coating for hydroxyapatite (HA-coated cementless hip prostheses is developed with similar antibacterial efficacy as offered by gentamicin-loaded cements for fixing traditional, cemented prostheses in bone. We describe the development pathway, from in vitro investigation of antibiotic release and antibacterial properties of this PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating in different in vitro models to an evaluation of its efficacy in preventing implant-related infection in rabbits. Bone in-growth in the absence and presence of the coating was investigated in a canine model. The PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating showed high-burst release, with antibacterial efficacy in agar-assays completely disappearing after 4 days, minimising risk of inducing antibiotic resistance. Gentamicin-sensitive and gentamicin-resistant staphylococci were killed by the antibiotic-loaded coating, in a simulated prosthesis-related interfacial gap. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coatings prevented growth of bioluminescent staphylococci around a miniature-stem mounted in bacterially contaminated agar, as observed using bio-optical imaging. PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins inserted in bacterially contaminated medullary canals in rabbits caused a statistically significant reduction in infection rates compared to HA-coated pins without gentamicin. Bone ingrowth to PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coated pins, in condylar defects of Beagle dogs was not impaired by the presence of the degradable, gentamicin-loaded coating. In conclusion, the PLGA-gentamicin-HA-coating constitutes an effective strategy for infection prophylaxis in cementless prostheses.

  11. Present and future of prophylactic antibiotics for severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Jiang; Wei Huang; Xiao-Nan Yang; Qing Xia

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of prophylactic antibiotics in the reduction of mortality of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients, which is highly questioned by more and more randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses.METHODS: An updated meta-analysis was performed. RCTs comparing prophylactic antibiotics for SAP with control or placebo were included for meta-analysis. The mortality outcomes were pooled for estimation, and re-pooled estimation was performed by the sensitivity analysis of an ideal large-scale RCT. RESULTS: Currently available 11 RCTs were included. Subgroup analysis showed that there was significant reduction of mortality rate in the period before 2000, while no significant reduction in the period from 2000 [Risk Ratio, (RR) = 1.01, P = 0.98]. Funnel plot indicated that there might be apparent publication bias in the period before 2000. Sensitivity analysis showed that the RR of mortality rate ranged from 0.77 to 1.00 with a relatively narrow confidence interval (P < 0.05). However, the number needed to treat having a minor lower limit of the range (7-5096 patients) implied that certain SAP patients could still potentially prevent death by antibiotic prophylaxis.CONCLUSION: Current evidences do not support prophylactic antibiotics as a routine treatment for SAP, but the potentially benefited sub-population requires further investigations.

  12. Present and future of prophylactic antibiotics for severe acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kun; Huang, Wei; Yang, Xiao-Nan; Xia, Qing

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of prophylactic antibiotics in the reduction of mortality of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) patients, which is highly questioned by more and more randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses. METHODS: An updated meta-analysis was performed. RCTs comparing prophylactic antibiotics for SAP with control or placebo were included for meta-analysis. The mortality outcomes were pooled for estimation, and re-pooled estimation was performed by the sensitivity analysis of an ideal large-scale RCT. RESULTS: Currently available 11 RCTs were included. Subgroup analysis showed that there was significant reduction of mortality rate in the period before 2000, while no significant reduction in the period from 2000 [Risk Ratio, (RR) = 1.01, P = 0.98]. Funnel plot indicated that there might be apparent publication bias in the period before 2000. Sensitivity analysis showed that the RR of mortality rate ranged from 0.77 to 1.00 with a relatively narrow confidence interval (P antibiotic prophylaxis. CONCLUSION: Current evidences do not support prophylactic antibiotics as a routine treatment for SAP, but the potentially benefited sub-population requires further investigations. PMID:22294832

  13. Effects of a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup and various prophylaxis polishing pastes on tooth enamel and restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, David A; Barnes, Caren; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W

    2011-01-01

    The application of cleaning and polishing agents to a patient's dentition is a routine part of many dental practices. This study measured the surface roughness and surface gloss of tooth enamel, composite resin, and dental porcelain restorative materials when exposed to a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup as well as a conventional prophylaxis polishing paste. Samples of human tooth enamel, a composite resin restorative material, and dental porcelain were prepared by a series of polishing papers to produce a flat smooth surface. The baseline average surface roughness (Ra) was measured using a contact stylus profilometer, and the surface gloss was measured with a glossmeter. The test samples were subjected to a standardized polishing routine using a paste-free prophylaxis polishing cup and a fine- or coarse-particle prophylaxis paste. Post-treatment surface roughness and gloss measurements were compared using a paired t statistical test. The conventional prophylaxis pastes increased surface roughness and decreased the gloss of the composite resin and tooth enamel test groups. The paste-free cups did not significantly affect the surface roughness of the enamel or the restorative materials. Dental porcelain surface roughness essentially was not affected by the application of paste-free cups and the fine and coarse pastes.

  14. Posaconazole prophylaxis in experimental azole-resistant invasive pulmonary aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba; Mouton, Johan W; Melchers, Willem J G; Verweij, Paul E

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the efficacy of posaconazole prophylaxis in preventing invasive aspergillosis due to azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus isolates. Using a neutropenic murine model of pulmonary infection, posaconazole prophylaxis was evaluated using three isogenic clinical isolates, with posaconazole MICs of 0.063 mg/liter (wild type), 0.5 mg/liter (F219I mutation), and 16 mg/liter. A fourth isolate harboring TR34/L98H (MIC of 0.5 mg/liter) was also tested. Posaconazole prophylaxis was effective in A. fumigatus with posaconazole MICs of ≤0.5 mg/liter, where 100% survival was reached. However, breakthrough infection was observed in mice infected with the isolate for which the posaconazole MIC was >16 mg/liter.

  15. DIAGNOSTIC AND THERAPEUTIC POSSIBILITIES IN THE PROPHYLAXIS OF CERVICAL CANCER

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    Marzena Wrześniewska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Poland is one of the countries with high cervical cancer morbidity and mortality. The main means to change this situation is to manage an active and modern programme of cervical cancer prophylaxis and diagnostics. To a large extent, the effectiveness of a cervical cancer prophylaxis programme is decided by the availability of modern diagnostic research. The conventional Papanicolaou test and modern LBC cytology techniques were discussed in the article, taking into consideration HPV diagnostics in the procedures for carefully selected cytological diagnosis, in the so called in-depth stage of preventive screening tests and the role of the p16 biomarker in predicting the development of a higher degree of epithelial-cell pathologies of the cervix. Colposcopy as a diagnostic method for the verification of cytological and virological abnormalities. The modern LEEP/LLETZ procedure used in diagnosis and treatment of cervical changes is used to realise the in-depth stage of cervical cancer prophylaxis programmes.

  16. The incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections after prostate biopsy--are fluoroquinolones still effective prophylaxis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciano, Joseph; Teper, Ervin; Ferrandino, Michael; Macchia, Richard J; Blank, William; Grunberger, Ivan; Colon, Ivan

    2008-03-01

    Fluoroquinolones have been shown to decrease infective complications after prostate biopsy. However, fluoroquinolone resistance is emerging. We quantified contemporary rates of infective complications and the incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections after prostate biopsy under fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. We retrospectively evaluated the records of 1,273 patients who underwent prostate biopsy at New York Harbor Veterans Affairs Hospital from January 2004 to December 2006. Patients received levofloxacin or gatifloxacin. Using the Veterans Affairs computerized patient record system we reviewed all patient visits within 1 month after prostate biopsy. Visits were queried for infective symptoms. Positive cultures were evaluated for resistance patterns. The annual and overall incidence of infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistant infections was calculated. Of 1,273 patients 31 (2.4%) presented with infective symptoms after biopsy. The overall incidence of fluoroquinolone resistant infections was 1.2% (15 cases). When stratified by year, there were statistically significant increases in the incidence of infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistance from 2004 to 2006. Of the positive cultures those from 89% of patients yielded Escherichia coli and 90% were fluoroquinolone resistant. Fluoroquinolone resistant E. coli were also resistant to gentamicin in 22% of cases, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in 44%, piperacillin in 72% and ampicillin in 94%. However, 100% sensitivity was demonstrated for amikacin, ceftazidime and ceftriaxone. Fluoroquinolones are still effective as antibiotic prophylaxis for prostate biopsies but there is an increase in infective complications and fluoroquinolone resistance. When patients present with post-prostate biopsy infective symptoms, almost 50% are associated with fluoroquinolone resistant pathogens. Empirical treatment with ceftriaxone, ceftazidime or amikacin should be initiated until culture specific therapy can

  17. Modeling the cost effectiveness of secondary febrile neutropenia prophylaxis during standard-dose chemotherapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Adang, E.M.M.; Termeer, E.; Severens, J.L.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current guidelines (ie, by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer) do not recommend secondary infection prophylaxis, whereas, in contrast, caregivers prefer secondary prophylaxis to chemotherapy dose reduction after an

  18. Improving adherence to venous thromoembolism prophylaxis using multiple interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Tawfiq Jaffar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : In hospital, deep vein thrombosis (DVT increases the morbidity and mortality in patients with acute medical illness. DVT prophylaxis is well known to be effective in preventing venous thromoembolism (VTE. However, its use remains suboptimal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of quality improvement project on adherence with VTE prophylaxis guidelines and on the incidence of hospital-acquired VTEs in medical patients. Methods : The study was conducted at Saudi Aramco Medical Services Organization from June 2008 to August 2009. Quality improvement strategies included education of physicians, the development of a protocol, and weekly monitoring of compliance with the recommendations for VTE prophylaxis as included in the multidisciplinary rounds. A feedback was provided whenever a deviation from the protocol occurs. Results : During the study period, a total of 560 general internal medicine patients met the criteria for VTE prophylaxis. Of those, 513 (91% patients actually received the recommended VTE prophylaxis. The weekly compliance rate in the initial stage of the intervention was 63% (14 of 22 and increased to an overall rate of 100% (39 of 39 (P = 0.002. Hospital-acquired DVT rate was 0.8 per 1000 discharges in the preintervention period and 0.5 per 1000 discharges in the postintervention period, P = 0.51. However, there was a significant increase in the time-free period of the VTE and we had 11 months with no single DVT. Conclusion : In this study, the use of multiple interventions increased VTE prophylaxis compliance rate.

  19. Pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Naswa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP is an experimental approach to HIV prevention and consists of antiretroviral drugs to be taken before potential HIV exposure in order to reduce the risk of HIV infection and continued during periods of risk. An effective PrEP could provide an additional safety net to sexually active persons at risk, when combined with other prevention strategies. Women represent nearly 60% of adults infected with HIV and PrEP can be a female-controlled prevention method for women who are unable to negotiate condom use. Two antiretroviral nucleoside analog HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor drugs are currently under trial as PrEP drugs, namely tenofovirdisoproxilfumarate (TDF alone and TDF in combination with emricitabine (FTC, to be taken as daily single dose oral drugs. There are 11 ongoing trials of ARV-based prevention in different at risk populations across the world. The iPrex trial showed that daily use of oral TDF/FTC by MSM resulted in 44% reduction in the incidence of HIV. This led to publication of interim guidance by CDC to use of PrEP by health providers for MSM. Few other trials are Bangkok Tenofovir Study, Partners PrEP Study, FEM-PrEP study, and VOICE (MTN-003 study. Future trials are being formulated for intermittent PrEP (iPrEP where drugs are taken before and after sex, "stand-in dose" iPrEP, vaginal or rectal PrEP, etc. There are various issues/concerns with PrEP such as ADRs and resistance to TDF/FTC, adherence to drugs, acceptability, sexual disinhibition, use of PrEP as first line of defense for HIV without other prevention strategies, and cost. The PrEP has a potential to address unmet need in public health if delivered as a part of comprehensive toolkit of prevention services, including risk-reduction, correct and consistent use of condoms, and diagnosis and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

  20. PCP prophylaxis with use of corticosteroids by neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Dearbhla M; Cronin, Simon

    2014-04-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is increasingly reported in patients without HIV. Corticosteroids are a major risk factor, with up to 90% of patients receiving corticosteroid treatment prior to the development of PCP. In view of this, many specialties now prescribe PCP prophylaxis to patients receiving prolonged or high-dose glucocorticoid regimens. Neurologists frequently prescribe corticosteroids but may not be as aware of the risk for PCP. Here, we review the evidence for routine PCP prophylaxis among regular glucocorticoid users and ask what guidance there is on the subject for neurologists.

  1. Management of Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prophylaxis in Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydar, Shahram; Sabetian, Golnar; Khalili, Hosseinali; Fallahi, Javad; Tahami, Mohammad; Ziaian, Bizhan; Abbasi, Hamid Reza; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz; Ghahramani, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PTE) are known as venous thromboembolism (VTE). DVT occurs when a thrombus (a blood clot) forms in deep veins of the body, usually in the lower extremities. It can cause swelling or leg pain, but sometimes may occur with no symptoms. Awareness of DVT is the best way to prevent the VTE. Patients with trauma are at increased risk of DVT and subsequent PE because of coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, DVT prophylaxis is essential but the VTE prophylaxis strategy is controversial for the trauma patients. The risk factors for VTE includes pelvic and lower extremity fractures, and head injury.

  2. [Prophylaxis of RhD isoimmunization: a proposal of management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Lisa Ferreira; Pinto, Graça; Serrano, Fátima; Soares, Clara; Alegria, Ana Maria

    2003-01-01

    Isoimmunisation RhD has an important perinatal morbidity and mortality. Since prophylaxis was introduced in the sixties, the incidence of haemolytic disease of the newborn has decreased. When administred in due time and in the right dosage anti-D immunoglobulin can prevent sensibilization. Nevertheless new cases continue to occur, underlying the need for an urgent improvement of our conduct. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the pathology of RhD isoimmunization and of aspects involved in its prophylaxis.

  3. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This

  4. Fighting antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit using antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Nienke L; Wittekamp, Bastiaan H J; van Duijn, Pleun J; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global and increasing problem that is not counterbalanced by the development of new therapeutic agents. The prevalence of antibiotic resistance is especially high in intensive care units with frequently reported outbreaks of multidrug-resistant organisms. In addition to classical infection prevention protocols and surveillance programs, counterintuitive interventions, such as selective decontamination with antibiotics and antibiotic rotation have been applied and investigated to control the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review provides an overview of selective oropharyngeal and digestive tract decontamination, decolonization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic rotation as strategies to modulate antibiotic resistance in the intensive care unit.

  5. Prophylaxis of Childhood Migraine: Topiramate Versus Propranolol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Tonekaboni SH, Ghazavi A, Fayyazi A, Khajeh A, Taghdiri MM, Abdollah Gorji F, Azargashb E. Prophylaxis of Childhood Migraine: Topiramate Versus Propranolol. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Winter; 7 (1:9-14. ObjectiveHeadache is a common disabling neurological disorder and migraine comprises more than half the causes of recurrent headaches in children. Despite extended prevalence of this type of headache there is lack of evidence about best drug treatment for migraine. So we aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of these drugs on childhood migraine.Materials & MethodsIn the current study, a randomized clinical trial consisting of 78 patients according to 2004 International Headache Association criteria were randomly assigned to two groups that matched by age and sex. One of these two groups was treated with Topiramate, while the other was given Propranolol. After one and four months, the efficiency of these treatments was measured in terms of frequency, severity and duration of migraine attacks.ResultsResults obtained from the data collected showed that of these 78 studied patients, 38 patients received Topiramate treatment (group A and the rest (40 patients; group B was treated with Propranolol. The average age of group A was 8.5± 2.9 years and that of group B was 8.3 ± 2.8 years. No significant difference was observed between these two groups in terms of reduction in frequency, severity and duration of migraine attacks.ConclusionResults showed that both treatments had the same efficiency in healing migraine headaches and there was no significant difference between their treating results. However, further studies are needed to examine medical effects of these two medicines. ReferencesAbu-Arefeh  I,  Russell  G.  Prevalence  of  headache  and migraine in schoolchildren. BMJ 1994 Sep 24; 309 (6957: 765-9.Lipton RB, Silberstein SD, Stewart WF. An update on the epidemiology of migraine. Headache 1994 Jun; 34 (6

  6. Prophylactic Antibiotics for Endoscopy-Associated Peritonitis in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Li, I-Jung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis may develop after endoscopic procedures, and the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether prophylactic antibiotics reduce the incidence of peritonitis in these patients. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic procedures, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, cystoscopy, hysteroscopy, and hysteroscopy-assisted intrauterine device (IUD) implantation/removal, performed in CAPD patients at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, between February 2001 and February 2012. Results Four hundred and thirty-three patients were enrolled, and 125 endoscopies were performed in 45 patients. Eight (6.4%) peritonitis episodes developed after the examination. Antibiotics were used in 26 procedures, and none of the patients had peritonitis (0% vs. 8.1% without antibiotic use; p = 0.20). The peritonitis rate was significantly higher in the non-EGD group than in the EGD group (15.9% [7/44] vs. 1.2% [1/81]; pperitonitis rate compared to that without antibiotic use (0% [0/16] vs. 25% [7/28]; pPeritonitis only occurred if invasive procedures were performed, such as biopsy, polypectomy, or IUD implantation, (noninvasive procedures, 0% [0/20] vs. invasive procedures, 30.4% [7/23]; pperitonitis was noted if antibiotics were used prior to examination with invasive procedures (0% [0/10] vs. 53.8% [7/13] without antibiotic use; pperitonitis (antibiotics, 0% [0/4] vs. no antibiotics, 55.6% [5/9]; p = 0.10). Conclusion Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced endoscopy-associated PD peritonitis in the non-EGD group. Endoscopically assisted invasive procedures, such as biopsy, polypectomy, IUD implantation/removal, and dilatation and curettage (D&C), pose a high risk for peritonitis. Prophylactic antibiotics for peritonitis prevention may be required in colonoscopic procedures and gynecologic procedures

  7. Antibiotics for uncomplicated diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel M; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    Diverticulitis is an inflammatory complication to the very common condition diverticulosis. Uncomplicated diverticulitis has traditionally been treated with antibiotics with reference to the microbiology, extrapolation from trials on complicated intra-abdominal infections and clinical experience....

  8. Resistance-resistant antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Eric; Feng, Xinxin

    2014-12-01

    New antibiotics are needed because drug resistance is increasing while the introduction of new antibiotics is decreasing. We discuss here six possible approaches to develop 'resistance-resistant' antibiotics. First, multitarget inhibitors in which a single compound inhibits more than one target may be easier to develop than conventional combination therapies with two new drugs. Second, inhibiting multiple targets in the same metabolic pathway is expected to be an effective strategy owing to synergy. Third, discovering multiple-target inhibitors should be possible by using sequential virtual screening. Fourth, repurposing existing drugs can lead to combinations of multitarget therapeutics. Fifth, targets need not be proteins. Sixth, inhibiting virulence factor formation and boosting innate immunity may also lead to decreased susceptibility to resistance. Although it is not possible to eliminate resistance, the approaches reviewed here offer several possibilities for reducing the effects of mutations and, in some cases, suggest that sensitivity to existing antibiotics may be restored in otherwise drug-resistant organisms.

  9. Pharmacokinetic interaction between rosuvastatin and olmesartan: a randomized, open-label, 3-period, multiple-dose crossover study in healthy Korean male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hyerang; Son, Hankil; Lee, Donghwan; Chang, HeeChul; Yun, Chohee; Park, Kyungsoo

    2014-08-01

    Rosuvastatin has been widely used in combination with olmesartan for the treatment of dyslipidemia accompanied by hypertension. With no information currently available on the interaction between the 2 drugs, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted to investigate the influence of rosuvastatin on olmesartan and vice versa when the 2 drugs were coadministered. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pharmacokinetic profile of coadministration of the rosuvastatin 20-mg tablet and the olmesartan 40-mg tablet and the associated drug-drug interaction in healthy Korean male volunteers. This was a randomized, open-label, 3-period, multiple-dose crossover study. Eligible subjects were aged 20 to 50 years and within 20% of their ideal body weight. After being randomly assigned to 6 groups of equal number, subjects received each of the following 3 formulations once a day for 7 consecutive days with an 8-day washout period between the formulations: rosuvastatin 20-mg tablet, olmesartan 40-mg tablet, and coadministration of the rosuvastatin 20-mg tablet and the olmesartan 40-mg tablet. Blood samples were collected up to 72 hours after dosing, and pharmacokinetic parameters were determined for rosuvastatin, its active metabolite (N-desmethyl rosuvastatin), and olmesartan. Adverse events were evaluated based on subject interviews and physical examinations. Among the 36 enrolled subjects, 34 completed the study (mean [range] age, 28.6 [23-49] y; mean [range] weight, 66.4 [52.2-78.7] kg). The 90% CIs of the geometric mean ratios for the primary pharmacokinetic parameters for the coadministration of the 2 drugs to the mono-administration of each drug were 85.14% to 96.08% for AUCτ and 81.41% to 97.48% for Css,max for rosuvastatin, and 77.55% to 89.48% for AUCτ and 75.62% to 90.12% for Css,max for N-desmethyl rosuvastatin; those values were 95.61% to 102.57% for AUCτ and 91.73% to 102.98% for Css,max for olmesartan. Dizziness was the most frequently noted adverse drug

  10. Systemic exposure to armodafinil and its tolerability in healthy elderly versus young men: an open-label, multiple-dose, parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mona; Kirby, Mary; Hellriegel, Edward T; Yang, Ronghua; Robertson, Philmore

    2011-02-01

    Armodafinil (Nuvigil(®), Cephalon, Inc., Frazer, PA, USA), the longer-lasting isomer of racemic modafinil, is a nonamphetamine, wakefulness-promoting medication. In patients with excessive sleepiness associated with shift work disorder, treated obstructive sleep apnoea, or narcolepsy, armodafinil has been found to improve wakefulness throughout the shift or day. In addition, while not approved for this indication, armodafinil has been found to improve excessive sleepiness associated with jet-lag disorder. This study evaluated systemic exposure to armodafinil and its two major circulating metabolites, R-modafinil acid and modafinil sulfone, and assessed the tolerability profile of armodafinil in elderly and young subjects. The pharmacokinetics and tolerability of armodafinil were assessed in an open-label, multiple-dose, parallel-group study in two groups (n = 25 in each group) of healthy men (elderly group aged ≥65 years and young group aged 18-45 years) who received armodafinil 50 mg on day 1, 100 mg on day 2 and 150 mg once daily on days 3 through 7. Plasma concentrations of armodafinil and its metabolites were quantified over 72 hours following the last dose on day 7. Pharmacokinetic parameters, including area under the plasma drug concentration-versus-time curve during a dosing interval (AUC(τ)) and maximum observed plasma drug concentration (C(max)), and tolerability were assessed. All 50 subjects enrolled in the study were evaluable for tolerability and 49 were included in the pharmacokinetic analysis. One elderly subject was excluded from the pharmacokinetic analyses because of apparent noncompliance with armodafinil dosing. Systemic exposure following administration of armodafinil, as measured by steady-state AUC(τ) and C(max) values, was approximately 15% greater in elderly subjects compared with young subjects. Geometric mean ratios for AUC(τ) and C(max) in the two groups were 1.14 (95% CI 1.03, 1.25; p = 0.0086) and 1.15 (95% CI 1

  11. Antibiotic alternatives: the substitution of antibiotics in animal husbandry?

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Xie, Shuyu; Wang, Xu; Dai, Menghong; Huang, Lingli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2014-01-01

    It is a common practice for decades to use of sub-therapeutic dose of antibiotics in food-animal feeds to prevent animals from diseases and to improve production performance in modern animal husbandry. In the meantime, concerns over the increasing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to the unreasonable use of antibiotics and an appearance of less novelty antibiotics have prompted efforts to develop so-called alternatives to antibiotics. Whether or not the alternatives could really ...

  12. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  13. Antibiotic Resistance in Acne Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Brandon L; Kornmehl, Heather; Armstrong, April W

    2017-08-01

    What is the evidence for antibiotic resistance in acne, and how does resistance affect treatment? Use of topical and systemic antibiotics for acne is associated with formation of resistance in Propionibacterium acnes and other bacteria, with clinical consequences. Guidelines recommend resistance reduction strategies including avoidance of antibiotic monotherapy, combination treatment with topical modalities, and limiting the duration of oral antibiotic use.

  14. [The history of antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  15. Anti-Viral Prophylaxis Target Product Profile Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-24

    or emerging viral diseases, as medical countermeasures to viral biowarfare threats are limited. • Objective: avian influenza (oseltamavir) • Threshold...to viral biowarfare threats are limited. • Objective: hepatitis A (immune serum globulin) • Threshold: HIV postexposure prophylaxis). Route of...administration: • Objective: modeled from influenza (oseltamavir); • Threshold modeled from hepatitis A, rabies (immune serum globulin, rabies immune

  16. Stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Morten Brøgger; Perner, A; Wetterslev, J;

    2013-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is regarded as standard of care in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, recent randomized, clinical trials (RCTs) and meta-analyses have questioned the rationale and level of evidence for this recommendation. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate...

  17. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  18. Guideline for stress ulcer prophylaxis in the intensive care unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbaek; Lorentzen, Kristian; Clausen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) is commonly used in the intensive care unit (ICU), and is recommended in the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines 2012. The present guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine sums...

  19. Important issues for perioperative systemic antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, Bhanu; van Assen, Sander; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Prevention of surgical site infections is a key issue to patient safety and the success of surgical interventions. Systemic antimicrobial prophylaxis is one important component of a perioperative infection prevention bundle. This review focuses on selected recent developments and

  20. Social prophylaxis: group interaction promotes collective immunity in ant colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line V; Cremer, Sylvia

    2007-01-01

    challenge with the same parasite. This first demonstration of contact immunity in Social Hymenoptera and complementary results from other animal groups and plants suggest its general importance in both antiparasite and antiherbivore defense. In addition to this physiological prophylaxis of adult ants...

  1. Results of a venous thromboembolism prophylaxis program for hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso LF

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Luiz Francisco Cardoso, Daniella Vianna C Krokoscz, Edison Ferreira de Paiva, Ilka Spinola Furtado, Jorge Mattar Jr, Marcia Martiniano de Souza e Sá, Antonio Carlos Onofre de Lira Sírio Libanês Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil Introduction: Venous thromboembolism (VTE is the leading cause of preventable death in hospitalized patients. However, existing prophylaxis guidelines are rarely followed. Objective: The aim of the study was to present and discuss implementation strategies and the results of a VTE prophylaxis program for medical and surgical patients admitted to a large general hospital. Patients and methods: This prospective observational study was conducted to describe the strategy used to implement a VTE prophylaxis program in hospitalized medical and surgical patients and to analyze the results in terms of the risk assessment rate within the first 24 hours after admission, adequacy of the prophylaxis prescription, and prevalence of  VTE in the discharge records before and after program implementation. We used the Mantel–Haenszel chi-square test for the linear trend of the data analysis and set the significance level to P<0.05. Results: With the support of an institutional VTE prophylaxis committee, a multiple-strategy approach was used in the implementation of the protocol, which included continuing education, complete data recording using computerized systems, and continuous auditing of and feedback to the medical staff and multidisciplinary teams. Approximately 90% of patients were evaluated within the first 24 hours after admission, and no significant difference in this percentage was observed among the years analyzed. A progressive increase in adherence to protocol recommendations, from 63.8% in 2010 to 75.0% in 2014 (P<0.001, was noted. The prevalence of symptomatic VTE in the discharge records of patients decreased from 2.03% in 2009 to 1.69% in 2014 (P=0.033. Conclusion: The implementation of a VTE prophylaxis program

  2. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumor surgery (PARITY survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Khaled

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep infection following endoprosthetic limb reconstruction for sarcoma of the long bones is a devastating complication occurring in 15% of sarcoma patients. Optimizing infection protocols and conducting definitive surgical trials are critical to improving outcomes. In this study, the PARITY (Prophylactic Antibiotic Regimens in Tumor Surgery investigators aimed to examine surgeon preferences in antibiotic prophylaxis and perceptions about current evidence, as well as to ascertain interest in resolving uncertainty in the evidence with clinical trials. Methods We used a cross-sectional survey to examine current practice in the prescription of prophylactic antibiotics in Musculoskeletal Tumor Surgery. The survey was approved by our institution’s Ethics Board and emailed to all Active Members of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS and Canadian Orthopaedic Oncology Society (CANOOS. Survey answers were collected using an anonymous online survey tool. Results Of the 96 surgeons who received the questionnaire, 72 responded (75% response rate (% CI: 65.5, 82.5%. While almost all respondents agreed antibiotic regimens were important in reducing the risk of infection, respondents varied considerably in their choices of antibiotic regimens and dosages. Although 73% (95% CI: 61, 82% of respondents prescribe a first generation cephalosporin, 25% favor additional coverage with an aminoglycoside and/or Vancomycin. Of those who prescribe a cephalosporin, 33% prescribe a dosage of one gram for all patients and the reminder prescribe up to 2 grams based on body weight. One in three surgeons (95% CI: 25, 48% believes antibiotics could be discontinued after 24 hours but 40% (95% CI: 30, 53% continue antibiotics until the suction drain is removed. Given the ongoing uncertainty in evidence to guide best practices, 90% (95% CI: 81, 95% of respondents agreed that they would change their practice if a large randomized controlled trial showed

  3. From intermittent antibiotic point prevalence surveys to quality improvement: experience in Scottish hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm William

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2008, the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG was established to coordinate a national antimicrobial stewardship programme. In 2009 SAPG led participation in a European point prevalence survey (PPS of hospital antibiotic use. We describe how SAPG used this baseline PPS as the foundation for implementation of measures for improvement in antibiotic prescribing. Methods In 2009 data for the baseline PPS were collected in accordance with the European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption [ESAC] protocol. This informed the development of two quality prescribing indicators: compliance with antibiotic policy in acute admission units and duration of surgical prophylaxis. From December 2009 clinicians collected these data on a monthly basis. The prescribing indicators were reviewed and further modified in March 2011. Data for the follow up PPS in September 2011 were collected as part of a national PPS of healthcare associated infection and antimicrobial use developed using ECDC protocols. Results In the baseline PPS data were collected in 22 (56% acute hospitals. The frequency of recording the reason for treatment in medical notes was similar in Scotland (75.9% and Europe (75.7%. Compliance with policy (81.0% was also similar to Europe (82.5% but duration of surgical prophylaxis Conclusions The baseline PPS identified priorities for quality improvement. SAPG has demonstrated that implementation of regularly reviewed national prescribing indicators, acceptable to clinicians, implemented through regular systematic measurement can drive improvement in quality of antibiotic use in key clinical areas. However, our data also show that the ESAC PPS method may underestimate the proportion of surgical prophylaxis with duration

  4. Antibiotics for acute bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Fahey, Tom; Smucny, John; Becker, Lorne A

    2017-06-19

    The benefits and risks of antibiotics for acute bronchitis remain unclear despite it being one of the most common illnesses seen in primary care. To assess the effects of antibiotics in improving outcomes and to assess adverse effects of antibiotic therapy for people with a clinical diagnosis of acute bronchitis. We searched CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11 (accessed 13 January 2017), MEDLINE (1966 to January week 1, 2017), Embase (1974 to 13 January 2017), and LILACS (1982 to 13 January 2017). We searched the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov on 5 April 2017. Randomised controlled trials comparing any antibiotic therapy with placebo or no treatment in acute bronchitis or acute productive cough, in people without underlying pulmonary disease. At least two review authors extracted data and assessed trial quality. We did not identify any new trials for inclusion in this 2017 update. We included 17 trials with 5099 participants in the primary analysis. The quality of trials was generally good. At follow-up there was no difference in participants described as being clinically improved between the antibiotic and placebo groups (11 studies with 3841 participants, risk ratio (RR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99 to 1.15). Participants given antibiotics were less likely to have a cough (4 studies with 275 participants, RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49 to 0.85; number needed to treat for an additional beneficial outcome (NNTB) 6) and a night cough (4 studies with 538 participants, RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.83; NNTB 7). Participants given antibiotics had a shorter mean cough duration (7 studies with 2776 participants, mean difference (MD) -0.46 days, 95% CI -0.87 to -0.04). The differences in presence of a productive cough at follow-up and MD of productive cough did not reach statistical significance.Antibiotic-treated participants were more likely to be improved according to clinician's global assessment (6 studies

  5. Antibiotics after rattlesnake envenomation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVecchio, Frank; Klemens, Jane; Welch, Sharon; Rodriguez, Ron

    2002-11-01

    To record the outcome, with regard to infection rate, of patients with rattlesnake bites (RSBs) who do not receive prophylactic antibiotics, a prospective observational study was performed of patients with RSBs treated at our institution during a consecutive 18-month period. The inclusion criteria were RSBs envenomation. Fifty-six consecutive patients (Median age: 32.8 years [range 4-67 years]) were enrolled. One patient was excluded because of presentation 38 h after envenomation and two patients failed to complete the required follow-up. One patient received a dose of antibiotics before transfer. Antibiotics were discontinued upon arrival. Of the total 56 RSB patients, 34 (61%) RSBs involved the upper extremity and 22 (39%) involved the lower extremity. Six patients (11%) applied ice and two (4%) used a tourniquet before evaluation. The mean arrival time was 2.7 h (Range antibiotics from their primary care physicians at 7-10 day follow-up, with no cases (0%) of documented infection. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated in patients with rattlesnake bites.

  6. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saswati eSengupta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observed in natural bacteria of remote places unlikely to be impacted by human intervention. Both antibiotic biosynthetic genes and resistance-conferring genes have been known to evolve billions of years ago, long before clinical use of antibiotics. Hence it appears that antibiotics and antibiotics resistance determinants have some other roles in nature, which often elude our attention because of overemphasis on the therapeutic importance of antibiotics and the crisis imposed by the antibiotic-resistance in pathogens. In the natural milieu, antibiotics are often found to be present in subinhibitory concentrations acting as signalling molecules supporting quorum sensing and biofilm formation. They also play an important role in the production of virulence factors and influence host-parasite interactions (e.g., phagocytosis, adherence to the target cell and so on. The evolutionary and ecological aspects of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistance in the naturally occurring microbial community are little understood. Therefore, the actual role of antibiotics in nature warrants in-depth investigations. Studies on such an intriguing behaviour of the microorganisms promise insight into the intricacies of the microbial physiology and are likely to provide some lead in controlling the emergence and subsequent dissemination of antibiotic resistance. This article highlights some of the recent findings on the role of antibiotics and genes that confer resistance to antibiotics in

  7. [New aspects of antibiotic resistance and possibilities of its prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahová, J; Králiková, K; Krcméry, V

    2001-08-01

    New phenomena of the antibiotic resistance in bacteria have recently appeared. The may hold present explosive development of resistance and prevent its transferability from multiple drug resistant bacteria to still sensitive ones. They may prevent the production of so-called extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae producing resistance virtually to all penicillins and cephalosporins with exception of those antibiotics potentiated by clavulanic acid or sulbactam, the resistance to vancomycin in enterococci and staphylococce, and the resistance of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Factors participating on the development of resistance include: a) transferability of resistance genes among bacteria which explosively change susceptible strains to resistant ones, b) dosage and types of antibiotics which cause the selection pressure to certain species of bacteria, c) level of organization and strict adherence to hygienic and anti-epidemic regimen starting with the entry of patients into the hospital. Analyses are necessary to check whether the patient brings resistant bacteria with a transferable resistance (with ESBLs) into the hospital. Preventive measures would be strictly applied to stop the clonal spread of resistant strains among the patients and/or hospital environment, which occurs if these strains have such opportunity. Last, but not least to be considered is the dosage, composition and rationality of administration of antibacterials, mainly in post-operative prophylaxis in intensive care units, in so-called empirical usage, etc. At the same time, it would be highly unethical to hesitate with application of antibacterials to patients when it is justified, necessary and rational. Hospital antibiotics policy should rationally decide between these alternatives in each application of antibiotics or their combinations.

  8. Tetracycline Antibiotics and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Trudy H

    2016-04-01

    Tetracyclines possess many properties considered ideal for antibiotic drugs, including activity against Gram-positive and -negative pathogens, proven clinical safety, acceptable tolerability, and the availability of intravenous (IV) and oral formulations for most members of the class. As with all antibiotic classes, the antimicrobial activities of tetracyclines are subject to both class-specific and intrinsic antibiotic-resistance mechanisms. Since the discovery of the first tetracyclines more than 60 years ago, ongoing optimization of the core scaffold has produced tetracyclines in clinical use and development that are capable of thwarting many of these resistance mechanisms. New chemistry approaches have enabled the creation of synthetic derivatives with improved in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy, ensuring that the full potential of the class can be explored for use against current and emerging multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, MDR Acinetobacter species, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  9. Clinical practice audit concerning antimicrobial prophylaxis in paediatric neurosurgery: results from a German paediatric oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Katja; Simon, Arne; Graf, Norbert; Schöpe, Jakob; Oertel, Joachim; Linsler, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis (PAP) has been identified as an important target for internal audits, concerning the judicious use of antibiotics. Paediatric oncology patients with brain tumours face an increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI) after neurosurgery and receive routine PAP in this setting. All patients younger than 18 years admitted to the paediatric oncology centre (POC) with a neurosurgical intervention. Systematic audit of routine clinical data is divided in two groups: retrospective (Jan 01, 2012-March 31, 2014) and prospective (April 01, 2014-March 31, 2015) referring to an internal PAP guideline, invented in Jan. 2014). Surveillance of SSI up to 30 days after the operation with standard criteria (Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, USA). In total, 53 neurosurgical operations were analysed in 33 paediatric oncology patients. Twelve patients received more than one operation. The detailed analysis of PAP revealed prophylactic cefuroxim doses about 30 mg/kg instead of 50 mg/kg and no repeated dosing in operations lasting longer than 4 h. In addition, Cefotaxim, which is not indicated as PAP in neurosurgery, was used instead of Cefuroxim (or Ampicillin-Sulbactam) in 23 % of all cases in the retrospective and 18 % of all cases in the prospective audit. PAP for more than 3 doses (>24 h) was administered in 66 % in the retrospective group and in 60 % in the prospective group (p = n.s.). In both groups, no SSI was detected. This first comprehensive audit of PAP in paediatric oncology patients undergoing neurosurgery outlines significant opportunities to improve clinical practice in terms of correct dosing, the correct choice of the antibiotic, a correct timing schedule and a shorter duration of PAP. In addition, our results illustrate in detail the challenges in clinical practice when an evidence-based approach to improve a standard workflow has to be implemented.

  10. Efficacy and safety of fosfomycin-trometamol in the prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy. Prospective randomized comparison with ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lista, F; Redondo, C; Meilán, E; García-Tello, A; Ramón de Fata, F; Angulo, J C

    2014-01-01

    Prostate biopsy is the standardized diagnostic method for prostate cancer. However, although there is not a standardized protocol, there are recommendations in order to reduce the incidence of complications. The objective of the present work is to assess the efficacy and safety of antibiotic prophylaxis in the prostate biopsy by comparing two antibiotic regimes: two doses of fosfomycin-trometamol 3g (FMT) every 48 hours with 10 doses of oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg every 12 hours during 5 days. Randomized prospective study was performed with 671 patients who had undergone to walking transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Patients of group A (n=312) were treated with ciprofloxacin, and patients of group B (n=359) with FMT. Efficacy and tolerability of two prophylactic regimes were compared. Urine culture was carried out at 2 weeks after biopsy. Initially, patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria were not treated with antibiotics; urine culture was repeated after 1 month, persistent bacteriuria was treated according to antibiogram. No differences between groups were found in age (P=.78), cancer presence (P=.9) or number of biopsy cylinders (P=.93). The mean number of cores obtained was 11.3 ± 3.25 (range 6-20). Digestive intolerance was observed for 9 patients (2.9%) of group A and 10 patients (2.8%) in group B. One patient (.3%) of group A showed severe allergic reaction. In total, 167 patients (24.6%) had complications: 16 (2.4%) fever, 47 (6.9%) hemospermia, 81 (11.9%) hematuria, 7 (1%) rectal bleeding and 16 (2.4%) urinary retention. No statistically differences between groups were observed (27.6% vs. 22.6%; P=.17). However, hemospermia was more frequent in group A (9.9% vs. 4.5%; P=.006). Bacteriuria after biopsy was detected in 44 patients (6.6%), being more frequent in group B patients (4.2% vs. 8.6%; P=.02) although a higher number of second treatment cycles were not needed (53.9% vs. 29%; P=.17). The likelihood of resistance to ciprofloxacin in patients

  11. Antibiotics in Animal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Amílcar C.

    The administration of antibiotics to animals to prevent or treat diseases led us to be concerned about the impact of these antibiotics on human health. In fact, animal products could be a potential vehicle to transfer drugs to humans. Using appropri ated mathematical and statistical models, one can predict the kinetic profile of drugs and their metabolites and, consequently, develop preventive procedures regarding drug transmission (i.e., determination of appropriate withdrawal periods). Nevertheless, in the present chapter the mathematical and statistical concepts for data interpretation are strictly given to allow understanding of some basic pharma-cokinetic principles and to illustrate the determination of withdrawal periods

  12. Overdosing on Antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Du, a Beijing resident in her 60s, believes that an antibiotic is a panacea for the maladies of her now 6-year-old grand- daughter Guoguo. Du began to take care of her granddaugh- ter since the child was merely 2 months old, for the gid's parents were busy. She is comfortable with her caretaker duties except when the girl runs high fevers. Then, the anxious grandma will feed the girl antibiotics or take her to a private child clinic nearby for intravenous infusion.

  13. Antibiotics and preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, H L; Ernest, J M

    2001-08-01

    Prematurity is a profound obstetric problem and to date no effective treatment or prevention strategies have been found. Many animal and clinical data exist to link infection and preterm labor, yet clinical trials examining the effect of antibiotic treatment in patients with patterns labor and intact membranes have been conflicting and disappointing. Beyond treatment to reduce neonatal group B streptococcal infection, sexually transmitted infections, symptomatic bacterial vaginosis, and bacteriuria, no clinical data exist at this time to support the routine use of antibiotics in patients with preterm labor and intact membranes.

  14. Recurrent uncomplicated cystitis in women: allowing patients to self-initiate antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    effective as long-term antibiotic therapy. Adverse effects, some of which can be serious, depend on the antibiotic used. The development of resistance among enterobacteria is one argument for limiting the use of antibiotics, in order to preserve their efficacy in serious infections. In practice, the strategy that uses the fewest antibiotics is to treat each episode as soon as the first clinical symptoms appear. Cases in which the frequency of recurrence warrants regular antibiotic prophylaxis are rare. The optimal antibiotic regimen in these cases has not been determined, either in clinical trials or by consensus.

  15. Patient outcome in migraine prophylaxis: the role of psychopharmacological agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Maurizio Pompili1,2, Gianluca Serafini1, Marco Innamorati1, Giulia Serra1, Giovanni Dominici1, Juliana Fortes-Lindau1, Monica Pastina1, Ludovica Telesforo1, David Lester3, Paolo Girardi1, Roberto Tatarelli1, Paolo Martelletti41Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Functions, Suicide Prevention Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Italy; 2McLean Hospital – Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, NJ, USA; 4Department of Medical and Molecular Sciences, 2nd School of Medicine, Sant’Andrea Hospital, “Sapienza” University of Rome, Rome, ItalyIntroduction: Migraine is a serious illness that needs correct treatment for acute attacks and, in addition, a treatment prophylaxis, since patients with migraine suffer during acute attacks and also between attacks.Methods: A systematic review of the most relevant clinical trials of migraine headache and its epidemiology, pathophysiology, comorbidity, and prophylactic treatment (medical and nonmedical was carried out using “Medline” and “PsychINFO” from 1973 to 2009. Approximately 110 trials met our inclusion criteria and were included in the current review.Results: The most effective pharmacological treatment for migraine prophylaxis is propranolol and anticonvulsants such as topiramate, valproic acid, and amitriptyline. Nonmedical treatments such as acupuncture, biofeedback, and melatonin have also been proposed. Peripheral neurostimulation has been suggested for the treatment of chronic daily headache that does not respond to prophylaxis and for the treatment of drug-resistant primary headache. The majority of the pharmacological agents available today have limited efficacy and may cause adverse effects incompatible with long-term use.Limitations: The review was limited by the highly variable and often insufficient reporting of the complex outcome data and by the fact that migraine prophylaxis trials

  16. An investigation on the level of dental senior students knowledge about endocarditis prophylaxis incases with cardiac disease receiving dental treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhraee AH

    2004-02-01

    cardiac"ndiseases, dental procedures requiring endocarditis prophylaxis and antibiotic diets.

  17. Antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems: State of the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review article proposes a simple causal model depicting relationships involved in dissemination of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in agroecosystems and potential effects on human health, functioning of natural ecosystems, and agricultural productivity. Available evidence for each causal ...

  18. Baseline survey of health prophylaxis and management practices on Swiss dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, P; Kohler, S; Reist, M; van den Borne, B; Menéndez González, S; Doherr, M

    2012-09-01

    Health prophylaxis management practices have acquired a major role in the success of dairy herd health programs, however, little is known about the scope and level of implementation on Swiss dairy farms. The main objective of this study was therefore to provide a general overview of the most important preventive measures which are currently being used on these farms. In March 2011, an online survey with 75 questions was sent to 2'285 randomly selected Swiss dairy farmers. Response rate by question ranged from 35 to 53 %. Within this study, answers were compared between dairy farms with a tie-stall (n = 739) and farms with a free-stall (n = 458). Homeopathic treatments were used by 51 % of the dairy farmers and antibiotic dry cow treatments by 94 %. Farmers with a tie-stall tended to carry out more prophylactic treatments against external parasites, vaccinated their cows more frequently against Clostridium chauvoei and Moraxella bovis, and carried out claw trimming more frequently than dairy farmers with a free-stall. A higher proportion of dairy farmers with a free-stall had a written feeding plan, carried out regular feed analysis, wore an apron and rubber gloves during milking, and carried out post milking teat disinfection more frequently than dairy farmers with a tie-stall. The data collected in this survey could assist in improving future dairy health communication campaigns in Switzerland.

  19. The multifaceted roles of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance in nature

    OpenAIRE

    Saswati eSengupta; Madhab Kumar Chattopadhyay; Hans-Peter eGrossart

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are chemotherapeutic agents, which have been a very powerful tool in the clinical management of bacterial diseases since the 1940s. However, benefits offered by these magic bullets have been substantially lost in subsequent days following the widespread emergence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant strains. While it is obvious that excessive and imprudent use of antibiotics significantly contributes to the emergence of resistant strains, antibiotic-resistance is also observe...

  20. Role of Old Antibiotics in the Era of Antibiotic Resistance. Highlighted Nitrofurantoin for the Treatment of Lower Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Jose Munoz-Davila

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant isolates have become a major health problem in recent years, since they are very difficult to treat, leading to an increase in morbidity and mortality. Nitrofurantoin is a broad-spectrum bactericidal antibiotic that, through a complex mode of action which is not completely understood, affects both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Nitrofurantoin has been used successfully for a long time for the prophylaxis and treatment of acute lower urinary tract infections in adults, children and pregnant women, but the increased emergence of antibiotic resistance has made nitrofurantoin a suitable candidate for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant pathogens. Here, we review the mechanism of action, antimicrobial spectrum, pharmacology and safety profile of nitrofurantoin. We also investigate the therapeutic use of nitrofurantoin, including recent data which highlight its role in the management of community urinary tract infection, especially in cases of multidrug-resistant isolates, in which oral active antimicrobials are limited resources nowadays.

  1. Suppression of antibiotic resistance acquisition by combined use of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shingo; Horinouchi, Takaaki; Furusawa, Chikara

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed the effect of combinatorial use of antibiotics with a trade-off relationship of resistance, i.e., resistance acquisition to one drug causes susceptibility to the other drug, and vice versa, on the evolution of antibiotic resistance. We demonstrated that this combinatorial use of antibiotics significantly suppressed the acquisition of resistance.

  2. Antifungal prophylaxis following reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, M; Murashige, N; Tanaka, Y; Narimatsu, H

    2006-12-01

    Reduced-intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) has been developed to be a novel curative option for advanced hematologic diseases. Its minimal toxicity allows for transplantation in patients with advanced age or with organ dysfunction. Young patients without comorbidity can undergo RIST as outpatients. However, fungal infection remains an important complication in RIST. Given the poor prognosis of fungal infection, prophylaxis is critical in its management. The prophylactic strategy is recently changing with the development of RIST. Hospital equipment is important for fungal prophylaxis; however, the median day for the development of fungal infection is day 100, when most RIST patients are followed as outpatients. The focus of fungal management after RIST needs to shift from in-hospital equipment to oral antifungals. Various antifungals have recently been developed and introduced for clinical use. A major change in antifungal management will probably occur within several years.

  3. Prophylaxis of venous thrombosis in patients with spontaneous intracerebral bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Rezoagli

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage (SIH represents a severe clinical event that is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity. Only a minority of SIH patients receive surgical treatment, whereas the majority are treated conservatively. Venous thromboembolism (VTE is one of the most common complications in SIH patients and a potential cause of death. Because of the lack of adequate evidences from the literature, the risk to benefit ratio of pharmacologic prophylaxis of VTE, represented on the one hand by hematoma enlargement and/or rebleeding and on the other hand by an expected reduction of the risk of VTE, remains controversial. Mechanical prophylaxis is a potentially safer alternative, but the efficacy of this approach is uncertain. In the absence of specific clinical guidelines containing clear-cut recommendations, physicians have insufficient tools to assist their therapeutic decisions.

  4. Prophylaxis of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients with diffuse toxic goiter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Gudieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the surgical treatment of DTG includes extirpation of the thyroid gland that can lead to the development of postoperative hypocalcemia, which causes of development are under study. Up to now, there are no clear recommendations for prophylaxis of postoperative hypocalcemia. In this connection, it is actually to carry out additional research to explore the methods of prophylaxis of postoperative hypocalcemia. The study involved 57 patients with diffuse toxic goiter, who had extirpation of the thyroid gland in period from 2010 until 2015. According to results of the performed study, it has been shown that prophylactic administration of preparations of calcium and vitamin D reduces the risk of postoperative hypocalcemia for patients with vitamin D deficiency.

  5. [PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION: PRINCIPLE CHARACTERISTICS, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, VACCINE PROPHYLAXIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopukhov, P D; Briko, N I; Khaldin, A A; Tsapkova, N N; Lupashko, O V

    2016-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are a large and diverse group of viruses. It includes approximately 200 fully described types that have been detected in humans. Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are etiologic agents during various, benign and malignant lesions of mucous membrane and skin epithelium. Very importantly, persistent HPV infection of certain types is a leading cause of carcinoma of uterine cervix, penis, vulva; vagina, anal canal and fauces (including tongue base and tonsils). HPV infection prophylaxis is the best means to control HPV-conditioned diseases, and vaccination, as had been demonstrated, --the most effective method of its prophylaxis. In this paper principle characteristics and clinical manifestations of papillomavirus infection, as well as effectiveness of vaccination against HPV are examined.

  6. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the i

  7. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental a

  8. Antibiotic resistance reservoirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versluis, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    One of the major threats to human health in the 21st century is the emergence of pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to multiple antibiotics, thereby limiting treatment options. An important route through which pathogens become resistant is via acquisition of resistance genes from environmental

  9. Antibiotic resistance in Salmonella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vo, A.T.T.

    2007-01-01

    Immediately after their introduction in the beginning of the fourties of the previous century, the agents used to combat infectious diseases caused by bacteria were regarded with suspicion, but not long thereafter antibiotics had the status of miracle drugs. For decades mankind has lived under the

  10. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gonorrhea Antibiotic Resistance Basic Information Laboratory Information Resources & References Combating the ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to resist ...

  11. Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Mission Critical: Preventing Antibiotic Resistance Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Can you ... spp. So, what can we do to prevent antibiotic resistance in healthcare settings? Patients, healthcare providers, healthcare facility ...

  12. Antibiotics and Pregnancy: What's Safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Pregnancy week by week Is it safe to take antibiotics during pregnancy? Answers from Roger W. Harms, M. ... 2014 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/pregnancy-week-by-week/expert-answers/antibiotics-and-pregnancy/ ...

  13. Bacteriophages as potential new therapeutics to replace or supplement antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutateladze, Mzia; Adamia, Revaz

    2010-12-01

    Over recent decades, a growing body of literature has validated the use of bacteriophages for therapy and prophylaxis in the war against drug-resistant bacteria. Today, much more is known about bacteriophages than in the 1930s when phage therapy first appeared and began to spread to many countries. With rapid dissemination of multi-drug-resistant bacterial pathogens, the interest in alternative remedies to antibiotics, including bacteriophage treatments, is gaining new ground. Based on recent experience and current results of bacteriophage applications against bacterial infections in countries where this alternative therapy is approved, many scientists and companies have come to believe that the use of phages for treating and preventing bacterial diseases will be successful.

  14. Risk of surgical site infection in paediatric herniotomies without any prophylactic antibiotics: A preliminary experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Vaze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different studies underline the use of pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis in clean surgeries like herniotomy and inguinal orchiopexy. But, the meta-analyses do not recommend nor discard the use of prophylactic pre-operative antibiotics. The scarcity of controlled clinical trials in paediatric population further vitiates the matter. This study assessed the difference in the rate of early post-operative wound infection cases in children who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and children who did not receive antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. Materials and Methods: This randomised prospective study was conducted in Paediatric Surgery department of PGIMER Chandigarh. Out of 251 patients, 112 patients were randomised to the case group and 139 were ascribed to the control group. The patients in control group were given a standard regimen of single dose of intravenous antibiotic at the time of induction followed by 3-4 days of oral antibiotic. Case group patients underwent the surgical procedure in similar manner with no antibiotic either at the time of induction or post-operatively. Results: The incidence of surgical site infection in case group was 3.73 % and that in control group was 2.22%. The observed difference in the incidence of surgical site infection was statistically insignificant (P value = 0.7027. The overall infection rate in case and control group was 2.89%. Conclusions: Our preliminary experience suggests that there is no statistically significant difference in the proportion of early post-operative wound infection between the patients who received single dose of pre-operative antibiotics and the patients who received no antibiotics after inguinal herniotomy and orchiopexy. The risk of surgical site infection in paediatric heriotomies does not increase even if the child′s weight is less than his/her expected weight for age.

  15. Posaconazole: Use in the Prophylaxis and Treatment of Fungal Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nina M; Grim, Shellee A; Lynch, Joseph P

    2015-10-01

    Posaconazole, a fluorinated triazole antifungal drug, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for (1) prophylaxis against Aspergillus and Candida infections in immunocompromised patients at high risk for these infections and (2) oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC), including cases refractory to fluconazole and/or itraconazole. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) has approved posaconazole for (1) treatment of aspergillosis, fusariosis, chromoblastomycosis, and coccidioidomycosis in patients who are refractory to or intolerant of other azoles or amphotericin B; (2) first-line therapy for OPC for severe disease or in those unlikely to respond to topical therapy; and (3) prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in high-risk hematologic patients and stem cell transplant recipients. In addition to approved indications, posaconazole has been used with success as salvage therapy for invasive mold infections and endemic mycoses in patients who are refractory to or intolerant of other antifungal agents, and as prophylaxis or salvage therapy in children, for whom indications are more limited owing to a paucity of data. Posaconazole has potent in vitro activity against a broad range of fungi and molds, including Aspergillus, Candida, Cryptococcus, filamentous fungi, and endemic mycoses including coccidioidomycosis, histoplasmosis, and blastomycosis. Importantly, posaconazole is much more active than other azoles against many Mucorales species and the combination of posaconazole with other antifungal agents may be synergistic. Hence, posaconazole is a potential candidate as a single or combination agent for difficult-to-treat fungal infections. Posaconazole has an excellent safety profile; to date, serious side effects are rare, even with prolonged use. However, newer posaconazole formulations achieve higher blood levels and it remains to be seen whether this may lead to an increase in the rate of adverse effects. Currently, posaconazole is used predominantly

  16. Nutrition Reconciliation and Nutrition Prophylaxis: Toward Total Health

    OpenAIRE

    Tuso, Phillip; Beattie, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition by definition may be an abnormality in either under- or overnutrition. Nutrition reconciliation means that all patients have their nutritional status reconciled on admission to and discharge from the hospital. Nutrition reconciliation is defined as the process of maximizing health by helping align an individual’s current diet to the diet prescribed for him or her by the health care team. Nutrition prophylaxis is a proactive intervention to prevent a medical complication.

  17. STRATEGIES OF PROPHYLAXIS AND MANAGEMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dembele, A.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses different strategies of prophylaxis and management of postoperative atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG at different periods after acute myocardial infarction (AMI. It examines the efficacy of early administration of beta-adrenergic blocking agents (metoprolol and amiodarone (in prophylactic doses in the diminution of the risk of postoperative atrial fibrillation in different groups of patients. The article also discerns the effectiveness of digoxin in the management of episodes of postoperative atrial fibrillation.

  18. Terrestrial Rabies and Human Postexposure Prophylaxis, New York, USA

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-03-15

    This podcast describes a 10-year study of the use of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) for rabies in New York State. CDC's Dr. Brett Petersen discusses the prevalence of rabies in the United States and how the study lends support to recent changes in the recommended PEP protocol.  Created: 3/15/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/15/2010.

  19. Current perspectives in HIV post-exposure prophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan B

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Binta Sultan,1,2 Paul Benn,1 Laura Waters1 1Department of Genitourinary Medicine, Mortimer Market Centre, Central and North West London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Centre for Sexual Health and HIV Research, University College London, London, UK Abstract: The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection continues to rise among core groups and efforts to reduce the numbers of new infections are being redoubled. Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP is the use of short-term antiretroviral therapy (ART to reduce the risk of acquisition of HIV infection following exposure. Current guidelines recommend a 28-day course of ART within 36–72 hours of exposure to HIV. As long as individuals continue to be exposed to HIV there will be a role for PEP in the foreseeable future. Nonoccupational PEP, the vast majority of which is for sexual exposure (PEPSE, has a significant role to play in HIV prevention efforts. Awareness of PEP and its availability for both clinicians and those who are eligible to receive it are crucial to ensure that PEP is used to its full potential in any HIV prevention strategy. In this review, we provide current evidence for the use of PEPSE, assessment of the risk of HIV transmission, indications for PEP, drug regimens, and management of patients started on PEP. We summarize national and international guidelines for the use of PEPSE. We explore the place of PEP within the wider strategy of reducing HIV incidence rates in the era of treatment as prevention and pre-exposure prophylaxis. We also consider the implications of recent data from interventional and observational studies demonstrating significant reductions in the risk of HIV transmission within a serodiscordant relationship if the HIV-positive partner is taking effective ART upon PEP guidelines. Keywords: post-exposure prophylaxis, pre-exposure prophylaxis, treatment as prevention, human immunodeficiency virus

  20. Economic considerations of antifungal prophylaxis in patients undergoing surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Adriana Cataldo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Maria Adriana Cataldo, Nicola PetrosilloSecond Infectious Diseases Division, National Institute for Infectious Diseases, “Lazzaro Spallanzani”, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Fungi are a frequent cause of nosocomial infections, with an incidence that has increased significantly in recent years, especially among critically ill patients who require intensive care unit (ICU admission. Among ICU patients, postsurgical patients have a higher risk of Candida infections in the bloodstream. In consideration of the high incidence of fungal infections in these patients, their strong impact on mortality rate, and of the difficulties in Candida diagnosis, some experts suggest the use of antifungal prophylaxis in critically ill surgical patients. A clinical benefit from this strategy has been demonstrated, but the economic impact of the use of antifungal prophylaxis in surgical patients has not been systematically evaluated, and its cost–benefit ratio has not been defined. Whereas the costs associated with treating fungal infections are very high, the cost of antifungal drugs varies from affordable (ie, the older azoles to expensive (ie, echinocandins, polyenes, and the newer azoles. Adverse drug-related effects and the possibly increased incidence of fluconazole resistance and of isolates other than Candida albicans must also be taken into account. From the published studies of antifungal prophylaxis in surgical patients, a likely economic benefit of this strategy could be inferred, but its usefulness and cost–benefits should be evaluated in light of local data, because the available evidence does not permit general recommendations.Keywords: antifungal prophylaxis, cost-effectiveness, economics, surgery, fungal infection 

  1. Acyclovir prophylaxis predisposes to antiviral-resistant recurrent herpetic keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Velzen, Monique; van de Vijver, David A M C; van Loenen, Freek B; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Remeijer, Lies; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2013-11-01

    Long-term acyclovir (ACV) prophylaxis, recommended to prevent recurrent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ocular disorders, may pose a risk for ACV-refractory disease due to ACV resistance. We determined the effect of ACV prophylaxis on the prevalence of corneal ACV-resistant (ACV(R)) HSV-1 and clinical consequences thereof in patients with recurrent HSV-1 keratitis (rHK). Frequencies of ACV(R) viruses were determined in 169 corneal HSV-1 isolates from 78 rHK patients with a history of stromal disease. The isolates' ACV susceptibility profiles were correlated with clinical parameters to identify risk factors predisposing to ACV(R) rHK. Corneal HSV-1 isolates with >28% ACV(R) viruses were defined as ACV(R) isolates. Forty-four isolates (26%) were ACV-resistant. Multivariate analyses identified long-term ACV prophylaxis (≥12 months) (odds ratio [OR] 3.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.32-8.87) and recurrence duration of ≥45 days (OR 2.23; 95% CI, 1.02-4.87), indicative of ACV-refractory disease, as independent risk factors for ACV(R) isolates. Moreover, a corneal ACV(R) isolate was a risk factor for ACV-refractory disease (OR 2.28; 95% CI, 1.06-4.89). The data suggest that long-term ACV prophylaxis predisposes to ACV-refractory disease due to the emergence of corneal ACV(R) HSV-1. ACV-susceptibility testing is warranted during follow-up of rHK patients.

  2. Effects of cranberry juice on pharmacokinetics of beta-lactam antibiotics following oral administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Andrew, Marilee A; Wang, Joanne; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Grady, Richard W; Phillips, Brian; Shen, Danny D; Anderson, Gail D

    2009-07-01

    Cranberry juice consumption is often recommended along with low-dose oral antibiotics for prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Because multiple membrane transporters are involved in the intestinal absorption and renal excretion of beta-lactam antibiotics, we evaluated the potential risk of pharmacokinetic interactions between cranberry juice and the beta-lactams amoxicillin (amoxicilline) and cefaclor. The amoxicillin-cranberry juice interaction was investigated in 18 healthy women who received on four separate occasions a single oral test dose of amoxicillin at 500 mg and 2 g with or without cranberry juice cocktail (8 oz) according to a crossover design. A parallel cefaclor-cranberry juice interaction study was also conducted in which 500 mg cefaclor was administered with or without cranberry juice cocktail (12 oz). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and nonlinear mixed-effects compartmental modeling. We conclude that the concurrent use of cranberry juice has no significant effect on the extent of oral absorption or the renal clearance of amoxicillin and cefaclor. However, delays in the absorption of amoxicillin and cefaclor were observed. These results suggest that the use of cranberry juice at usual quantities as prophylaxis for UTI is not likely to alter the pharmacokinetics of these two oral antibiotics.

  3. Effects of Cranberry Juice on Pharmacokinetics of β-Lactam Antibiotics following Oral Administration▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Andrew, Marilee A.; Wang, Joanne; Salinger, David H.; Vicini, Paolo; Grady, Richard W.; Phillips, Brian; Shen, Danny D.; Anderson, Gail D.

    2009-01-01

    Cranberry juice consumption is often recommended along with low-dose oral antibiotics for prophylaxis for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI). Because multiple membrane transporters are involved in the intestinal absorption and renal excretion of β-lactam antibiotics, we evaluated the potential risk of pharmacokinetic interactions between cranberry juice and the β-lactams amoxicillin (amoxicilline) and cefaclor. The amoxicillin-cranberry juice interaction was investigated in 18 healthy women who received on four separate occasions a single oral test dose of amoxicillin at 500 mg and 2 g with or without cranberry juice cocktail (8 oz) according to a crossover design. A parallel cefaclor-cranberry juice interaction study was also conducted in which 500 mg cefaclor was administered with or without cranberry juice cocktail (12 oz). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and nonlinear mixed-effects compartmental modeling. We conclude that the concurrent use of cranberry juice has no significant effect on the extent of oral absorption or the renal clearance of amoxicillin and cefaclor. However, delays in the absorption of amoxicillin and cefaclor were observed. These results suggest that the use of cranberry juice at usual quantities as prophylaxis for UTI is not likely to alter the pharmacokinetics of these two oral antibiotics. PMID:19398645

  4. Late-onset CMV disease following CMV prophylaxis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnelly, C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most common opportunistic infection after solid-organ transplantation, increasing morbidity and mortality. Three months of oral valganciclovir have been shown to provide effective prophylaxis. Late-onset CMV disease, occurring after the discontinuation of prophylaxis, is now increasingly recognised. AIMS: To investigate the incidence and the time of detection of CMV infections in liver transplant recipients who received CMV prophylaxis. METHODS: Retrospective review of 64 high- and moderate-risk patients with 1 year of follow-up. RESULTS: The incidence of CMV infection was 12.5%, with 4.7% disease. All cases of symptomatic CMV disease were of late-onset. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of CMV infections in this study was low compared with literature reports; however, the late-onset disease is an emerging problem. Detection of late-onset disease may be delayed because of less frequent clinic follow-up visits. Increased regular laboratory monitoring may allow earlier detection at the asymptomatic infection stage.

  5. Medical rota changes and venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in orthopaedic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Iain; George Mackenzie Jardine, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Efficacy of clinical guidelines to improve patient care is highly dependent on the ability of hospital teams to interpret and implement advised standards of care. Trimester and bi-annual rotation changes often see transference and loss of acquired experience and knowledge from wards with ensuing shortfalls in patient safety and care quality. Such shortfalls were noticed in the ability of our unit to adhere to national venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis measures. A prospective quality improvement audit was embarked upon to address this. An initial audit of VTE prophylaxis in 112 patients demonstrated just 71% compliance with suggested measures. Errors were predominantly medical in origin and secondary to poor understanding, interpretation, and knowledge of VTE guidelines. Errors were also noted in nursing and patient compliance to measures. Repeated re-auditing demonstrated increased error (following initial improvement post audit) after periods of medical staff rotation. Through education of junior medical and nursing staff, and of patients, the unit was able to achieve 100% compliance. Rota changes often induce conflict of interest between maintaining adequate services and high levels of patient care or providing suitable and informed induction programmes for new medical staff. Emphasised education of VTE prophylaxis guidelines has now become part of induction of junior medical staff, whilst ward based measures ensure daily compliance. The success of the audit strategy has led to its use throughout other surgical units within the hospital.

  6. Investigating the Antibiotic Resistance Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Michael; Lawson, Amy L.

    1998-01-01

    Seeks to give teachers useful information on the extent of the problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics, the causes of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant organisms