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Sample records for multiple oligomerization states

  1. Molecular basis of coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Barbara; Bjelic, Saša; Honnappa, Srinivas; Jawhari, Hatim; Jaussi, Rolf; Payapilly, Aishwarya; Jowitt, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michel O; Kammerer, Richard A

    2010-11-16

    Coiled coils are extensively and successfully used nowadays to rationally design multistranded structures for applications, including basic research, biotechnology, nanotechnology, materials science, and medicine. The wide range of applications as well as the important functions these structures play in almost all biological processes highlight the need for a detailed understanding of the factors that control coiled-coil folding and oligomerization. Here, we address the important and unresolved question why the presence of particular oligomerization-state determinants within a coiled coil does frequently not correlate with its topology. We found an unexpected, general link between coiled-coil oligomerization-state specificity and trigger sequences, elements that are indispensable for coiled-coil formation. By using the archetype coiled-coil domain of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 as a model system, we show that well-established trimer-specific oligomerization-state determinants switch the peptide's topology from a dimer to a trimer only when inserted into the trigger sequence. We successfully confirmed our results in two other, unrelated coiled-coil dimers, ATF1 and cortexillin-1. We furthermore show that multiple topology determinants can coexist in the same trigger sequence, revealing a delicate balance of the resulting oligomerization state by position-dependent forces. Our experimental results should significantly improve the prediction of the oligomerization state of coiled coils. They therefore should have major implications for the rational design of coiled coils and consequently many applications using these popular oligomerization domains.

  2. Bacterial flagellar capping proteins adopt diverse oligomeric states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postel, Sandra; Deredge, Daniel; Bonsor, Daniel A.; Yu, Xiong; Diederichs, Kay; Helmsing, Saskia; Vromen, Aviv; Friedler, Assaf; Hust, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Beckett, Dorothy; Wintrode, Patrick L.; Sundberg, Eric J. (UV); (Braunschweig); (Maryland-MED); (Konstanz); (Maryland); (Hebrew)

    2016-09-24

    Flagella are crucial for bacterial motility and pathogenesis. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) regulates filament assembly by chaperoning and sorting flagellin (FliC) proteins after they traverse the hollow filament and exit the growing flagellum tip. In the absence of FliD, flagella are not formed, resulting in impaired motility and infectivity. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of FliD fromPseudomonas aeruginosa, the first high-resolution structure of any FliD protein from any bacterium. Using this evidence in combination with a multitude of biophysical and functional analyses, we find thatPseudomonasFliD exhibits unexpected structural similarity to other flagellar proteins at the domain level, adopts a unique hexameric oligomeric state, and depends on flexible determinants for oligomerization. Considering that the flagellin filaments on which FliD oligomers are affixed vary in protofilament number between bacteria, our results suggest that FliD oligomer stoichiometries vary across bacteria to complement their filament assemblies.

  3. Diverse oligomeric states of CEACAM IgV domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsor, Daniel A; Günther, Sebastian; Beadenkopf, Robert; Beckett, Dorothy; Sundberg, Eric J

    2015-11-03

    Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAMs) comprise a large family of cell surface adhesion molecules that bind to themselves and other family members to carry out numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, signaling, differentiation, tumor suppression, and survival. They also play diverse and significant roles in immunity and infection. The formation of CEACAM oligomers is caused predominantly by interactions between their N-terminal IgV domains. Although X-ray crystal structures of CEACAM IgV domain homodimers have been described, how CEACAMs form heterodimers or remain monomers is poorly understood. To address this key aspect of CEACAM function, we determined the crystal structures of IgV domains that form a homodimeric CEACAM6 complex, monomeric CEACAM8, and a heterodimeric CEACAM6-CEACAM8 complex. To confirm and quantify these interactions in solution, we used analytical ultracentrifugation to measure the dimerization constants of CEACAM homodimers and isothermal titration calorimetry to determine the thermodynamic parameters and binding affinities of CEACAM heterodimers. We found the CEACAM6-CEACAM8 heterodimeric state to be substantially favored energetically relative to the CEACAM6 homodimer. Our data provide a molecular basis for the adoption of the diverse oligomeric states known to exist for CEACAMs and suggest ways in which CEACAM6 and CEACAM8 regulate the biological functions of one another, as well as of additional CEACAMs with which they interact, both in cis and in trans.

  4. osFP: a web server for predicting the oligomeric states of fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Saw; Shoombuatong, Watshara; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Preeyanon, Likit; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Currently, monomeric fluorescent proteins (FP) are ideal markers for protein tagging. The prediction of oligomeric states is helpful for enhancing live biomedical imaging. Computational prediction of FP oligomeric states can accelerate the effort of protein engineering efforts of creating monomeric FPs. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first computational model for predicting and analyzing FP oligomerization directly from the amino acid sequence. After data curation, an exhaustive data set consisting of 397 non-redundant FP oligomeric states was compiled from the literature. Results from benchmarking of the protein descriptors revealed that the model built with amino acid composition descriptors was the top performing model with accuracy, sensitivity and specificity in excess of 80% and MCC greater than 0.6 for all three data subsets (e.g. training, tenfold cross-validation and external sets). The model provided insights on the important residues governing the oligomerization of FP. To maximize the benefit of the generated predictive model, it was implemented as a web server under the R programming environment. osFP affords a user-friendly interface that can be used to predict the oligomeric state of FP using the protein sequence. The advantage of osFP is that it is platform-independent meaning that it can be accessed via a web browser on any operating system and device. osFP is freely accessible at http://codes.bio/osfp/ while the source code and data set is provided on GitHub at https://github.com/chaninn/osFP/.Graphical Abstract.

  5. Conformational detection of p53's oligomeric state by FlAsH Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Webber, Tawnya M.; Allen, Andrew C.; Ma, Wai Kit; Molloy, Rhett G.; Kettelkamp, Charisse N.; Dow, Caitlin A.; Gage, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a critical checkpoint in prevention of tumor formation, and the function of p53 is dependent on proper formation of the active tetramer. In vitro studies have shown that p53 binds DNA most efficiently as a tetramer, though inactive p53 is predicted to be monomeric in vivo. We demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to distinguish between oligomeric states of p53, providing a potential tool to explore p53 oligomerization in vivo. The FlAsH tetra-cysteine ...

  6. Implication of the oligomeric state of the N-terminal PTX3 domain in cumulus matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ievoli, Elena; Lindstedt, Ragnar; Inforzato, Antonio; Camaioni, Antonella; Palone, Francesca; Day, Anthony J; Mantovani, Alberto; Salvatori, Giovanni; Salustri, Antonietta

    2011-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) plays a key role in the formation of the hyaluronan-rich matrix of the cumulus oophorus surrounding ovulated eggs that is required for successful fertilization and female fertility. PTX3 is a multimeric protein consisting of eight identical protomers held together by a combination of non-covalent interactions and disulfide bonds. Recent findings suggest that the oligomeric status of PTX3 is important for stabilizing the cumulus matrix. Because the role of PTX3 in the cumulus resides in the unique N-terminal sequence of the protomer, we investigated further this issue by testing the ability of distinct Cys/Ser mutants of recombinant N-terminal region of PTX3 (N(_)PTX3) with different oligomeric arrangement to promote in vitro normal expansion in cumuli from Ptx3-null mice. Here we report that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 is unable to rescue cumulus matrix organization, and that the tetrameric assembly of the protein is the minimal oligomeric state required for accomplishing this function. We have previously demonstrated that PTX3 binds to HCs of IαI and TSG-6, which are essential for cumulus matrix formation and able to interact with hyaluronan. Interestingly, here we show by solid-phase binding experiments that the dimer of the N(_)PTX3 retains the ability to bind to both IαI and TSG-6, suggesting that the octameric structure of PTX3 provides multiple binding sites for each of these ligands. These findings support the hypothesis that PTX3 contributes to cumulus matrix organization by cross-linking HA polymers through interactions with multiple HCs of IαI and/or TSG-6. The N-terminal PTX3 tetrameric oligomerization was recently reported to be also required for recognition and inhibition of FGF2. Given that this growth factor has been detected in the mammalian preovulatory follicle, we wondered whether FGF2 negatively influences cumulus expansion and PTX3 may also serve in vivo to antagonize its activity. We found that a molar excess of FGF2, above

  7. Multicoil2: predicting coiled coils and their oligomerization states from sequence in the twilight zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Trigg

    Full Text Available The alpha-helical coiled coil can adopt a variety of topologies, among the most common of which are parallel and antiparallel dimers and trimers. We present Multicoil2, an algorithm that predicts both the location and oligomerization state (two versus three helices of coiled coils in protein sequences. Multicoil2 combines the pairwise correlations of the previous Multicoil method with the flexibility of Hidden Markov Models (HMMs in a Markov Random Field (MRF. The resulting algorithm integrates sequence features, including pairwise interactions, through multinomial logistic regression to devise an optimized scoring function for distinguishing dimer, trimer and non-coiled-coil oligomerization states; this scoring function is used to produce Markov Random Field potentials that incorporate pairwise correlations localized in sequence. Multicoil2 significantly improves both coiled-coil detection and dimer versus trimer state prediction over the original Multicoil algorithm retrained on a newly-constructed database of coiled-coil sequences. The new database, comprised of 2,105 sequences containing 124,088 residues, includes reliable structural annotations based on experimental data in the literature. Notably, the enhanced performance of Multicoil2 is evident when tested in stringent leave-family-out cross-validation on the new database, reflecting expected performance on challenging new prediction targets that have minimal sequence similarity to known coiled-coil families. The Multicoil2 program and training database are available for download from http://multicoil2.csail.mit.edu.

  8. Conformational detection of p53's oligomeric state by FlAsH Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Tawnya M; Allen, Andrew C; Ma, Wai Kit; Molloy, Rhett G; Kettelkamp, Charisse N; Dow, Caitlin A; Gage, Matthew J

    2009-06-19

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a critical checkpoint in prevention of tumor formation, and the function of p53 is dependent on proper formation of the active tetramer. In vitro studies have shown that p53 binds DNA most efficiently as a tetramer, though inactive p53 is predicted to be monomeric in vivo. We demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to distinguish between oligomeric states of p53, providing a potential tool to explore p53 oligomerization in vivo. The FlAsH tetra-cysteine binding motif has been incorporated along the dimer and tetramer interfaces in the p53 tetramerization domain to create reporters for the dimeric and tetrameric states of p53, though the geometry of the four cysteines is critical for efficient FlAsH binding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that FlAsH binding can be used to monitor tetramer formation in real-time. These results demonstrate the potential for using FlAsH fluorescence to monitor protein-protein interactions in vivo.

  9. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  10. Assessment of Escherichia coli selenophosphate synthetase oligomeric states by analytical ultracentrifugation and small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, I.R.; Faim, F.M.; Oliveira Neto, M.; Thiemann, O.H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP-SC), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Borges, J.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IQSC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Selenium is an essential micronutrient for many organisms and is present in selenium-containing proteins as selenocysteine (Sec) and RNAs as selenouridine. Specific selenium incorporation into selenoproteins and RNAs requires the generation of a biologically active selenium donor compound, selenophosphate, which is produced from the activation of selenide with adenosine 5-triphosphate (ATP) in a reaction catalyzed by Selenophosphate Synthetase (SELD). Therefore, SELD is a key enzyme of the selenium pathway in the cell. The Escherichia coli SELD open reading frame was cloned into pET28a (Novagen) expression vector and the recombinant protein was over expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. In order to purify the protein, we used metal-chelate affinity chromatography followed by a gel filtration step. Analytical Ultracentrifugation (AUC) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) were employed to study the oligomeric states of the soluble protein. The results of AUC revealed dimer-tetramer and tetramer-octamer equilibrium at low concentrations of protein, with dissociation constants of 70 2 and 560 40 M, respectively. Moreover, the SAXS results pointed the oligomeric state of the protein at higher concentrations as predominantly dimeric and the p(r) and the SAXS envelope revealed the SELD as elongated. We also performed initial crystallization trials with protein samples at 7 mg/ml in 96-well sitting-drop crystallization plates at room temperature using a crystallization robot. Needle crystals appeared after some days. X-ray diffraction for these crystals were tested in the MX2 beamline at the Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory (LNLS Campinas). We are now working to improve these crystals in order to obtain suitable crystals for structure determination. (author)

  11. Oligomerization process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1991-03-26

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled. 2 figures.

  12. Moyamoya disease-associated protein mysterin/RNF213 is a novel AAA+ ATPase, which dynamically changes its oligomeric state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morito, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kouki; Hoseki, Jun; Kitamura, Akira; Kotani, Yuri; Kiso, Kazumi; Kinjo, Masataka; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic human cerebrovascular disorder that is characterized by progressive stenosis and abnormal collateral vessels. We recently identified mysterin/RNF213 as its first susceptibility gene, which encodes a 591-kDa protein containing enzymatically active P-loop ATPase and ubiquitin ligase domains and is involved in proper vascular development in zebrafish. Here we demonstrate that mysterin further contains two tandem AAA+ ATPase modules and forms huge ring-shaped oligomeric complex. AAA+ ATPases are known to generally mediate various biophysical and mechanical processes with the characteristic ring-shaped structure. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and biochemical evaluation suggested that mysterin dynamically changes its oligomeric forms through ATP/ADP binding and hydrolysis cycles. Thus, the moyamoya disease-associated gene product is a unique protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and AAA+ ATPase, which possibly contributes to vascular development through mechanical processes in the cell.

  13. Moyamoya disease-associated protein mysterin/RNF213 is a novel AAA+ ATPase, which dynamically changes its oligomeric state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morito, Daisuke; Nishikawa, Kouki; Hoseki, Jun; Kitamura, Akira; Kotani, Yuri; Kiso, Kazumi; Kinjo, Masataka; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic human cerebrovascular disorder that is characterized by progressive stenosis and abnormal collateral vessels. We recently identified mysterin/RNF213 as its first susceptibility gene, which encodes a 591-kDa protein containing enzymatically active P-loop ATPase and ubiquitin ligase domains and is involved in proper vascular development in zebrafish. Here we demonstrate that mysterin further contains two tandem AAA+ ATPase modules and forms huge ring-shaped oligomeric complex. AAA+ ATPases are known to generally mediate various biophysical and mechanical processes with the characteristic ring-shaped structure. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and biochemical evaluation suggested that mysterin dynamically changes its oligomeric forms through ATP/ADP binding and hydrolysis cycles. Thus, the moyamoya disease-associated gene product is a unique protein that functions as ubiquitin ligase and AAA+ ATPase, which possibly contributes to vascular development through mechanical processes in the cell. PMID:24658080

  14. Multiple scroll wave chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maistrenko, Volodymyr; Sudakov, Oleksandr; Osiv, Oleksiy; Maistrenko, Yuri

    2017-06-01

    We report the appearance of three-dimensional (3D) multiheaded chimera states that display cascades of self-organized spatiotemporal patterns of coexisting coherence and incoherence. We demonstrate that the number of incoherent chimera domains can grow additively under appropriate variations of the system parameters generating thereby head-adding cascades of the scroll wave chimeras. The phenomenon is derived for the Kuramoto model of N 3 identical phase oscillators placed in the unit 3D cube with periodic boundary conditions, parameters being the coupling radius r and phase lag α. To obtain the multiheaded chimeras, we perform the so-called `cloning procedure' as follows: choose a sample single-headed 3D chimera state, make appropriate scale transformation, and put some number of copies of them into the unit cube. After that, start numerical simulations with slightly perturbed initial conditions and continue them for a sufficiently long time to confirm or reject the state existence and stability. In this way it is found, that multiple scroll wave chimeras including those with incoherent rolls, Hopf links and trefoil knots admit this sort of multiheaded regeneration. On the other hand, multiple 3D chimeras without spiral rotations, like coherent and incoherent balls, tubes, crosses, and layers appear to be unstable and are destroyed rather fast even for arbitrarily small initial perturbations.

  15. Inside-out signaling promotes dynamic changes in the carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) oligomeric state to control its cell adhesion properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Prerna C; Lee, Hannah S W; Ming, Aaron Y K; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M; Yip, Christopher M; Rocheleau, Jonathan V; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2013-10-11

    Cell-cell contacts are fundamental to multicellular organisms and are subject to exquisite levels of control. The carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1 (CEACAM1) can engage in both cis-homophilic (parallel) oligomerization and trans-homophilic (anti-parallel) binding. In this study, we establish that the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain has a propensity to form cis-dimers via the transmembrane-embedded (432)GXXXG(436) motif and that this basal state is overcome when activated calmodulin binds to the CEACAM1 cytoplasmic domain. Although mutation of the (432)GXXXG(436) motif reduced CEACAM1 oligomerization, it did not affect surface localization of the receptor or influence CEACAM1-dependent cellular invasion by the pathogenic Neisseria. The mutation did, however, have a striking effect on CEACAM1-dependent cellular aggregation, increasing both the kinetics of cell-cell association and the size of cellular aggregates formed. CEACAM1 association with tyrosine kinase c-Src and tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 was not affected by the (432)GXXXG(436) mutation, consistent with their association with the monomeric form of wild type CEACAM1. Collectively, our results establish that a dynamic oligomer-to-monomer shift in surface-expressed CEACAM1 facilitates trans-homophilic binding and downstream effector signaling.

  16. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghim, C; Almaas, E

    2008-06-12

    Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamical role of protein-protein associations. We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch), integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast protein binding-unbinding kinetics, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its intrinsic switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced) state from randomly being induced (uninduced). The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of phenotypically important toggle switches, and nested positive feedback loops in

  17. Epoxy networks reinforced with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: structure and segmental dynamics as studied by solid-state NMR

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Urbanová, Martina; Strachota, Adam

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 2 (2008), s. 372-386 ISSN 0024-9297 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : solid-state NMR * polymer networks * polysilsequioxanes Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.407, year: 2008

  18. OLIGOMERIZATION AND LIQUEFACTION OF ETHYLENE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oligomerize ethylene gas in a packed bed reactor operated at 100-300°C under apressure of 500psi and ... The gas flow was then switched back to N, gas and temperature controller was simultaneously set to the desired reaction temperature. Once the desired .... be considered non-ideal for ethylene oligomerization.

  19. Calcium and magnesium ions modulate the oligomeric state and function of mitochondrial 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in Leishmania parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Mariana A B; Giuseppe, Priscila O; Souza, Tatiana A C B; Castro, Helena; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Oliveira, Paulo S L; Netto, Luis E S; Tomas, Ana M; Murakami, Mario T

    2017-04-28

    Leishmania parasites have evolved a number of strategies to cope with the harsh environmental changes during mammalian infection. One of these mechanisms involves the functional gain that allows mitochondrial 2-Cys peroxiredoxins to act as molecular chaperones when forming decamers. This function is critical for parasite infectivity in mammals, and its activation has been considered to be controlled exclusively by the enzyme redox state under physiological conditions. Herein, we have revealed that magnesium and calcium ions play a major role in modulating the ability of these enzymes to act as molecular chaperones, surpassing the redox effect. These ions are directly involved in mitochondrial metabolism and participate in a novel mechanism to stabilize the decameric form of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins in Leishmania mitochondria. Moreover, we have demonstrated that a constitutively dimeric Prx1m mutant impairs the survival of Leishmania under heat stress, supporting the central role of the chaperone function of Prx1m for Leishmania parasites during the transition from insect to mammalian hosts. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Multiplicities of states od equivalent fermion shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savukinas, A.Yu.; Glembotskij, I.I.

    1980-01-01

    Classification of states of three or four equivalent fermions has been studied, i.e. possible terms and their multiplicities have been determined. For this purpose either the group theory or evident expressions for the fractional-parentage coefficients have been used. In the first approach the formulas obtained by other authors for the multiplicities of terms through the characters of the transformation matrices of bond moments have been used. This approach happens to be more general as compared with the second one, as expressions for the fractional-parentage coefficients in many cases are not known. The multiplicities of separate terms have been determined. It has been shown that the number of terms of any multiplicity becomes constant when l or j is increased [ru

  1. Oligomerization in health and disease

    CERN Document Server

    Giraldo, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    This special volume of Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science focuses on oligomerization in health and disease. Contributions from leading authorities Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field.

  2. Biophysical characterization of GPCR oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Signe

    level, and revealed the existence of several dimerization interfaces, each with specific kinetics. Finally we investigated how a property of the membrane solubilizing GPCRs affected oligomerization. We observed a dramatic decrease in oligomer stability with increasing geometrical membrane curvature. We...

  3. Topology and Oligomerization of Mono- and Oligomeric Proteins Regulate Their Half-Lives in the Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Kundu, Sudip

    2018-06-05

    To find additional structural constraints (besides disordered segments) that regulate protein half-life in the cell, we herein assess the influence of native topology of monomeric and sequestration of oligomeric proteins into multimeric complexes in yeast, human, and mouse. Native topology acts as a molecular marker of globular protein's mechanical resistance and consequently captures their half-life variations on genome scale. Sequestration into multimeric complexes elongates oligomeric protein half-life in the cell, presumably by burying ubiquitinoylation sites and disordered segments required for proteasomal recognition. The latter effect is stronger for proteins associated with multiple complexes and for those binding early during complex self-assembly, including proteins that oligomerize with large proportions of surface buried. After gene duplication, diversification of topology and sequestration into non-identical sets of complexes alter half-lives of paralogous proteins during the course of evolution. Thus, native topology and sequestration into multimeric complexes reflect designing principles of proteins to regulate their half-lives. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantized levitation states of superconducting multiple-ring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, S.B.; Fink, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    The quantized levitation, trapped, and suspension states of a magnetic microsphere held in equilibrium by two fixed superconducting (SC) microrings are calculated by minimizing the free energy of the system. Each state is a discrete function of two independent fluxoid quantum numbers of the rings. When the radii of the SC rings are of the same order as the Ginzburg-Landau coherence length ξ(T), the system exhibits a small set of gravity and temperature-dependent levels. The levels of a weakly magnetized particle are sensitive functions of the gravitational field, indicating potential application as an accelerometer, and for trapping small magnetic particles in outer space or on Earth. The equilibrium states of a SC ring levitated by another SC ring are also calculated. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Oligomerization interface of RAGE receptor revealed by MS-monitored hydrogen deuterium exchange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Sitkiewicz

    Full Text Available Activation of the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE leads to a chronic proinflammatory signal, affecting patients with a variety of diseases. Potentially beneficial modification of RAGE activity requires understanding the signal transduction mechanism at the molecular level. The ligand binding domain is structurally uncoupled from the cytoplasmic domain, suggesting receptor oligomerization is a requirement for receptor activation. In this study, we used hydrogen-deuterium exchange and mass spectrometry to map structural differences between the monomeric and oligomeric forms of RAGE. Our results indicated the presence of a region shielded from exchange in the oligomeric form of RAGE and led to the identification of a new oligomerization interface localized at the linker region between domains C1 and C2. Based on this finding, a model of a RAGE dimer and higher oligomeric state was constructed.

  6. Genetic noise control via protein oligomerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almaas Eivind

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in a cell entails random reaction events occurring over disparate time scales. Thus, molecular noise that often results in phenotypic and population-dynamic consequences sets a fundamental limit to biochemical signaling. While there have been numerous studies correlating the architecture of cellular reaction networks with noise tolerance, only a limited effort has been made to understand the dynamic role of protein-protein interactions. Results We have developed a fully stochastic model for the positive feedback control of a single gene, as well as a pair of genes (toggle switch, integrating quantitative results from previous in vivo and in vitro studies. In particular, we explicitly account for the fast binding-unbinding kinetics among proteins, RNA polymerases, and the promoter/operator sequences of DNA. We find that the overall noise-level is reduced and the frequency content of the noise is dramatically shifted to the physiologically irrelevant high-frequency regime in the presence of protein dimerization. This is independent of the choice of monomer or dimer as transcription factor and persists throughout the multiple model topologies considered. For the toggle switch, we additionally find that the presence of a protein dimer, either homodimer or heterodimer, may significantly reduce its random switching rate. Hence, the dimer promotes the robust function of bistable switches by preventing the uninduced (induced state from randomly being induced (uninduced. Conclusion The specific binding between regulatory proteins provides a buffer that may prevent the propagation of fluctuations in genetic activity. The capacity of the buffer is a non-monotonic function of association-dissociation rates. Since the protein oligomerization per se does not require extra protein components to be expressed, it provides a basis for the rapid control of intrinsic or extrinsic noise. The stabilization of regulatory circuits

  7. Effects of Glycine, Water, Ammonia, and Ammonium Bicarbonate on the Oligomerization of Methionine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Otake, Tsubasa; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2017-06-01

    The abiotic oligomerization of amino acids may have created primordial, protein-like biological catalysts on the early Earth. Previous studies have proposed and evaluated the potential of diagenesis for the amino acid oligomerization, simulating the formation of peptides that include glycine, alanine, and valine, separately. However, whether such conditions can promote the formation of peptides composed of multiple amino acids remains unclear. Furthermore, the chemistry of pore water in sediments should affect the oligomerization and degradation of amino acids and oligomers, but these effects have not been studied extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of water, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, pH, and glycine on the oligomerization and degradation of methionine under high pressure (150 MPa) and high temperature conditions (175 °C) for 96 h. Methionine is more difficult to oligomerize than glycine and methionine dimer was formed in the incubation of dry powder of methionine. Methionine oligomers as long as trimers, as well as methionylglycine and glycylmethionine, were formed under every condition with these additional compounds. Among the compounds tested, the oligomerization reaction rate was accelerated by the presence of water and by an increase in pH. Ammonia also increased the oligomerization rate but consumed methionine by side reactions and resulted in the rapid degradation of methionine and its peptides. Similarly, glycine accelerated the oligomerization rate of methionine and the degradation of methionine, producing water, ammonia, and bicarbonate through its decomposition. With Gly, heterogeneous dimers (methionylglycine and glycylmethionine) were formed in greater amounts than with other additional compounds although smaller amount of these heterogeneous dimers were formed with other additional compounds. These results suggest that accelerated reaction rates induced by water and co-existing reactive compounds promote the oligomerization

  8. Assessing heterogeneity in oligomeric AAA+ machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Tatyana A

    2017-03-01

    ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities (AAA+ ATPases) are molecular motors that use the energy of ATP binding and hydrolysis to remodel their target macromolecules. The majority of these ATPases form ring-shaped hexamers in which the active sites are located at the interfaces between neighboring subunits. Structural changes initiate in an active site and propagate to distant motor parts that interface and reshape the target macromolecules, thereby performing mechanical work. During the functioning cycle, the AAA+ motor transits through multiple distinct states. Ring architecture and placement of the catalytic sites at the intersubunit interfaces allow for a unique level of coordination among subunits of the motor. This in turn results in conformational differences among subunits and overall asymmetry of the motor ring as it functions. To date, a large amount of structural information has been gathered for different AAA+ motors, but even for the most characterized of them only a few structural states are known and the full mechanistic cycle cannot be yet reconstructed. Therefore, the first part of this work will provide a broad overview of what arrangements of AAA+ subunits have been structurally observed focusing on diversity of ATPase oligomeric ensembles and heterogeneity within the ensembles. The second part of this review will concentrate on methods that assess structural and functional heterogeneity among subunits of AAA+ motors, thus bringing us closer to understanding the mechanism of these fascinating molecular motors.

  9. Dicke states in multiple quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, Anna; Manolescu, Andrei

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of the collective optical effects which can occur in groups of three and four quantum dots. We define conditions for stable subradiant (dark) states, rapidly decaying super-radiant states, and spontaneous trapping of excitation. Each quantum dot is treated like a two-level system. The quantum dots are, however, realistic, meaning that they may have different transition energies and dipole moments. The dots interact via a short-range coupling which allows excitation transfer across the dots, but conserves the total population of the system. We calculate the time evolution of single-exciton and biexciton states using the Lindblad equation. In the steady state the individual populations of each dot may have permanent oscillations with frequencies given by the energy separation between the subradiant eigenstates.

  10. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR Q-PAS1 ) and two (PpsR N-Q-PAS1 ) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR ΔHTH ) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR ΔHTH structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that plays an important

  11. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann (Scripps); (Globel Phasing); (UCSD)

    2016-11-09

    ABSTRACT

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (generaMarburgvirusandEbolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

    IMPORTANCEMarburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the

  12. Dimerization and oligomerization of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Ryder, L Rebekka; Steinø, Anne

    2003-01-01

    protein. Using PAGE, urea gradient gel electrophoresis, capillary electrophoresis and MS, we show that dimerization through the SH group can be induced by lowering the pH to 5-6, heating, or under conditions that favour partial unfolding such as urea concentrations above 2.6 m or SDS concentrations above...... that favour partial unfolding or an intramolecular local conformational change that allows oligomerization, resulting in a heterogeneous mixture of oligomers consisting of up to 10 calreticulin monomers. The oligomeric calreticulin was very stable, but oligomerization was partially reversed by addition of 8 m...

  13. Protein dimerization and oligomerization in biology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Jacqueline M

    2012-01-01

    .... However, protein function is so often linked to both homo- and hetero-oligomerization and many heterologous interactions likely evolved from homologous interaction, so this volume also covers many...

  14. Reversible peptide oligomerization over nanoscale gold surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazushige Yokoyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A selective oligomeric formation of amyloid beta 1-40 (Ab1-40 monomers over a nanogold colloidal surface was investigated. An unfolded Ab1-40 monomer is considered to construct a dimer or trimer based oligomeric form with its hydrophobic segment placing outward under an acidic condition. Under a basic condition, a conformation of Ab is expected to take a folded monomeric form with its hydrophilic segment folded inward, avoiding the networking with residual colloidal particles. The most probable oligomeric form constructed over a 20 nm gold colloidal surface within a 25 ℃ to 65 ℃ temperature range is a dimer based unit and that over 30 or 40 nm gold colloidal surface below 15 ℃ is concluded to be a trimer based unit. However, selective oligomerization was not successfully reproduced under the rest of the conditions. A dipole-induced dipole interaction must cause a flexible structural change between folded and unfolded forms.

  15. Oligomeric states of the Shigella translocator protein IpaB provide structural insights into formation of the type III secretion translocon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenson, Nicholas E; Choudhari, Shyamal P; Adam, Philip R; Kramer, Ryan M; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell; Picking, Wendy L; Picking, William D

    2013-01-01

    The Shigella flexneri Type III secretion system (T3SS) senses contact with human intestinal cells and injects effector proteins that promote pathogen entry as the first step in causing life threatening bacillary dysentery (shigellosis). The Shigella Type III secretion apparatus (T3SA) consists of an anchoring basal body, an exposed needle, and a temporally assembled tip complex. Exposure to environmental small molecules recruits IpaB, the first hydrophobic translocator protein, to the maturing tip complex. IpaB then senses contact with a host cell membrane, forming the translocon pore through which effectors are delivered to the host cytoplasm. Within the bacterium, IpaB exists as a heterodimer with its chaperone IpgC; however, IpaB's structural state following secretion is unknown due to difficulties isolating stable protein. We have overcome this by coexpressing the IpaB/IpgC heterodimer and isolating IpaB by incubating the complex in mild detergents. Interestingly, preparation of IpaB with n-octyl-oligo-oxyethylene (OPOE) results in the assembly of discrete oligomers while purification in N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide (LDAO) maintains IpaB as a monomer. In this study, we demonstrate that IpaB tetramers penetrate phospholipid membranes to allow a size-dependent release of small molecules, suggesting the formation of discrete pores. Monomeric IpaB also interacts with liposomes but fails to disrupt them. From these and additional findings, we propose that IpaB can exist as a tetramer having inherent flexibility, which allows it to cooperatively interact with and insert into host cell membranes. This event may then lay the foundation for formation of the Shigella T3SS translocon pore. PMID:23456854

  16. State estimation of chemical engineering systems tending to multiple solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. G. Salau

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A well-evaluated state covariance matrix avoids error propagation due to divergence issues and, thereby, it is crucial for a successful state estimator design. In this paper we investigate the performance of the state covariance matrices used in three unconstrained Extended Kalman Filter (EKF formulations and one constrained EKF formulation (CEKF. As benchmark case studies we have chosen: a a batch chemical reactor with reversible reactions whose system model and measurement are such that multiple states satisfy the equilibrium condition and b a CSTR with exothermic irreversible reactions and cooling jacket energy balance whose nonlinear behavior includes multiple steady-states and limit cycles. The results have shown that CEKF is in general the best choice of EKF formulations (even if they are constrained with an ad hoc clipping strategy which avoids undesired states for such case studies. Contrary to a clipped EKF formulation, CEKF incorporates constraints into an optimization problem, which minimizes the noise in a least square sense preventing a bad noise distribution. It is also shown that, although the Moving Horizon Estimation (MHE provides greater robustness to a poor guess of the initial state, converging in less steps to the actual states, it is not justified for our examples due to the high additional computational effort.

  17. Multiple electron generation in a sea of electronic states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Wayne; Shabaev, Andrew; Efros, Alexander; Hellberg, Carl; Verne, Jacobs

    2009-03-01

    In traditional bulk semiconductor photovoltaics (PVs), each photon may excite a single electron-hole, wasting excess energy beyond the band-gap as heat. In nanocrystals, multiple excitons can be generated from a single photon, enhancing the PV current. Multiple electron generation (MEG) may result from Coulombic interactions of the confined electrons. Previous investigations have been based on incomplete or over-simplified electronic-state representations. We present results of quantum simulations that include hundreds of thousands of configuration states and show how the complex dynamics, even in a closed electronic system, yields a saturated MEG effect on a femtosecond timescale. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Compositional mining of multiple object API protocols through state abstraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ziying; Mao, Xiaoguang; Lei, Yan; Qi, Yuhua; Wang, Rui; Gu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    API protocols specify correct sequences of method invocations. Despite their usefulness, API protocols are often unavailable in practice because writing them is cumbersome and error prone. Multiple object API protocols are more expressive than single object API protocols. However, the huge number of objects of typical object-oriented programs poses a major challenge to the automatic mining of multiple object API protocols: besides maintaining scalability, it is important to capture various object interactions. Current approaches utilize various heuristics to focus on small sets of methods. In this paper, we present a general, scalable, multiple object API protocols mining approach that can capture all object interactions. Our approach uses abstract field values to label object states during the mining process. We first mine single object typestates as finite state automata whose transitions are annotated with states of interacting objects before and after the execution of the corresponding method and then construct multiple object API protocols by composing these annotated single object typestates. We implement our approach for Java and evaluate it through a series of experiments.

  19. Steady State Analysis of Stochastic Systems with Multiple Time Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Sun, C. Y.; Zhang, H. Q.

    In this paper, attention is focused on the steady state analysis of a class of nonlinear dynamic systems with multi-delayed feedbacks driven by multiplicative correlated Gaussian white noises. The Fokker-Planck equations for delayed variables are at first derived by Novikov's theorem. Then, under small delay assumption, the approximate stationary solutions are obtained by the probability density approach. As a special case, the effects of multidelay feedbacks and the correlated additive and multiplicative Gaussian white noises on the response of a bistable system are considered. It is shown that the obtained analytical results are in good agreement with experimental results in Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Biocatalytically Oligomerized Epicatechin with Potent and Specific Anti-proliferative Activity for Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Nagarajan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Catechins, naturally occurring flavonoids derived from wine and green tea, are known to exhibit multiple health benefits. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG is one of the most widely investigated catechins, but its efficacy in cancer therapy is still inconsistent and limited. The poor stability of EGCG has contributed to the disparity in the reported anti-cancer activity and other beneficial properties. Here we report an innovative enzymatic strategy for the oligomerization of catechins (specifically epicatechin that yields stable, water-soluble oligomerized epicatechins with enhanced and highly specific anti-proliferative activity for human breast cancer cells. This one-pot oxidative oligomerization is carried out in ambient conditions using Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP as a catalyst yielding water-soluble oligo(epicatechins. The oligomerized epicatechins obtained exhibit excellent growth inhibitory effects against human breast cancer cells with greater specificity towards growth-inhibiting cancer cells as opposed to normal cells, achieving a high therapeutic differential. Our studies indicate that water-soluble oligomeric epicatechins surpass EGCG in stability, selectivity and efficacy at lower doses.

  1. A fluorimetric readout reporting the kinetics of nucleotide-induced human ribonucleotide reductase oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuan; Lin, Hongyu; Wisitpitthaya, Somsinee; Blessing, William A; Aye, Yimon

    2014-11-24

    Human ribonucleotide reductase (hRNR) is a target of nucleotide chemotherapeutics in clinical use. The nucleotide-induced oligomeric regulation of hRNR subunit α is increasingly being recognized as an innate and drug-relevant mechanism for enzyme activity modulation. In the presence of negative feedback inhibitor dATP and leukemia drug clofarabine nucleotides, hRNR-α assembles into catalytically inert hexameric complexes, whereas nucleotide effectors that govern substrate specificity typically trigger α-dimerization. Currently, both knowledge of and tools to interrogate the oligomeric assembly pathway of RNR in any species in real time are lacking. We therefore developed a fluorimetric assay that reliably reports on oligomeric state changes of α with high sensitivity. The oligomerization-directed fluorescence quenching of hRNR-α, covalently labeled with two fluorophores, allows for direct readout of hRNR dimeric and hexameric states. We applied the newly developed platform to reveal the timescales of α self-assembly, driven by the feedback regulator dATP. This information is currently unavailable, despite the pharmaceutical relevance of hRNR oligomeric regulation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Catalyst-controlled oligomerization for the collective synthesis of polypyrroloindoline natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, Christopher R; Badillo, Joseph J; Lipshultz, Jeffrey M; Comito, Robert J; MacMillan, David W C

    2017-12-01

    In nature, many organisms generate large families of natural product metabolites that have related molecular structures as a means to increase functional diversity and gain an evolutionary advantage against competing systems within the same environment. One pathway commonly employed by living systems to generate these large classes of structurally related families is oligomerization, wherein a series of enzymatically catalysed reactions is employed to generate secondary metabolites by iteratively appending monomers to a growing serial oligomer chain. The polypyrroloindolines are an interesting class of oligomeric natural products that consist of multiple cyclotryptamine subunits. Herein we describe an iterative application of asymmetric copper catalysis towards the synthesis of six distinct oligomeric polypyrroloindoline natural products: hodgkinsine, hodgkinsine B, idiospermuline, quadrigemine H and isopsychotridine B and C. Given the customizable nature of the small-molecule catalysts employed, we demonstrate that this strategy is further amenable to the construction of quadrigemine H-type alkaloids not isolated previously from natural sources.

  3. Reactive bay functionalized perylene monoimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane organic electronic dye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangatia Lodrick Makokha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aggregation-induced quenching is particularly detrimental in perylene diimides, which are characterized by a near-unity fluorescence quantum yield in solution but are far less emissive in the solid state. Previously, perylene diimide has been improved by linking it to the inorganic cage of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes. As a further study on perylene diimidepolyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, we report on a double functionalized molecular structure, which can be used for substitution at the bay area and as a side group in other materials. Typical solution absorption and emission features of the perylene diimide fragment have been observed in this new reactive perylene diimide-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane. Moreover, reduced stacking during aggregation and spherical particles exhibiting solid fluorescence have been obtained. Organic semiconducting material with enhanced solid state photophysical properties, like solid fluorescence is a subject of great interest owing to its possible high-tech applications in optoelectronic devices.

  4. Transient structural distortion of metal-free Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase triggers aberrant oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Smith, Melanie H; Schulz, Eike

    2009-01-01

    remained enigmatic, however, as is the case in other protein-misfolding diseases. Here, we target the critical conformational change that defines the earliest step toward aggregation. Using nuclear spin relaxation dispersion experiments, we identified a short-lived (0.4 ms) and weakly populated (0.......7%) conformation of metal-depleted SOD1 that triggers aberrant oligomerization. This excited state emanates from the folded ground state and is suppressed by metal binding, but is present in both the disulfide-oxidized and disulfide-reduced forms of the protein. Our results pinpoint a perturbed region......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease linked to the misfolding of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). ALS-related defects in SOD1 result in a gain of toxic function that coincides with aberrant oligomerization. The structural events triggering oligomerization have...

  5. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS)-Containing Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayandele, Ebunoluwa; Sarkar, Biswajit; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid materials with superior structural and functional properties can be obtained by incorporating nanofillers into polymer matrices. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) nanoparticles have attracted much attention recently due to their nanometer size, the ease of which these particles can be incorporated into polymeric materials and the unique capability to reinforce polymers. We review here the state of POSS-containing polymer nanocomposites. We discuss the influence of the incorporation of POSS into polymer matrices via chemical cross-linking or physical blending on the structure of nanocomposites, as affected by surface functional groups, and the POSS concentration. PMID:28348318

  6. Wall locking and multiple nonlinear states of magnetic islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, Mikael; Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT

    1994-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of magnetic islands is analysed in configurations with multiple resonant magnetic surfaces. The existence of multiple nonlinear steady states, is discussed. These are shown to be associated with states where the dynamics around the different rational surfaces are coupled or decoupled and in the presence of a wall of finite resistivity may correspond wall-locked or non-wall-locked magnetic islands. For the case of strong wall stabilization the locking is shown to consist of two different phases. During the first phase the locking of the plasma at the different rational surfaces occurs. Only when the outermost resonant magnetic surface has locked to the inner surfaces can the actual wall locking process take place. Consequently, wall locking, of a global mode, involving more than one rational surface, can be prevented by the decoupling of the resonant magnetic surfaces by plasma rotation. Possible implications on tokamak experiments are discussed. (author)

  7. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latifah, E., E-mail: enylatifah@um.ac.id [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics and Natural Philosophy, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, ITS, Surabaya, Indonesia and Physics Department, Malang State University (Indonesia); Purwanto, A. [Laboratory of Theoretical Physics and Natural Philosophy, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember, ITS, Surabaya (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  8. octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes nanocomposites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone) (PPDO)/octamethyl-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (ome-POSS) nanocomposites were fabricated by the simple solution casting method with various ome-POSS loadings. Scanning electron microscopic observations indicate that ome-POSS is well dispersed in the ...

  9. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure: Multiple layers of emitters and multiple initial states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Chen, Y.; Wu, H.; Shirley, D.A.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-01-01

    Recently, angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) has been applied to experimental systems involving multiple layers of emitters and non-s core-level photoemission in an effort to broaden the utility of the technique. Most of the previous systems have been comprised of atomic or molecular overlayers adsorbed onto a single-crystal, metal surface and the photoemission data were taken from an s atomic core-level in the overlayer. For such a system, the acquired ARPEFS data is dominated by the p o final state wave backscattering from the substrate atoms and is well understood. In this study, we investigate ARPEFS as a surface-region structure determination technique when applied to experimental systems comprised of multiple layers of photoemitters and arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission. Understanding the data acquired from multiple layers of photoemitters is useful for studying multilayer interfaces, ''buried'' surfaces, and clean crystals in ultra- high vacuum. The ability to apply ARPEFS to arbitrary initial state core-level photoemission obviously opens up many systems to analysis. Efforts have been ongoing to understand such data in depth. We present clean Cu(111) 3s, 3p, and 3d core-level, normal photoemission data taken on a high resolution soft x-ray beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley, California and clean Ni(111) 3p normal photoemission data taken at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Upton, New York, USA

  10. Solid-state framing camera with multiple time frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K. L.; Stewart, R. E.; Steele, P. T.; Vernon, S. P.; Hsing, W. W.; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-10-07

    A high speed solid-state framing camera has been developed which can operate over a wide range of photon energies. This camera measures the two-dimensional spatial profile of the flux incident on a cadmium selenide semiconductor at multiple times. This multi-frame camera has been tested at 3.1 eV and 4.5 keV. The framing camera currently records two frames with a temporal separation between the frames of 5 ps but this separation can be varied between hundreds of femtoseconds up to nanoseconds and the number of frames can be increased by angularly multiplexing the probe beam onto the cadmium selenide semiconductor.

  11. Oligomerization of a Glucagon-like Peptide 1 Analog: Bridging Experiment and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Tine Maja; Sønderby, Pernille; Ryberg, Line A.

    2015-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) analog, liraglutide, is a GLP-1 agonist and is used in the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. From a pharmaceutical perspective, it is important to know the oligomerization state of liraglutide with respect to stability. Compared to GLP-1...

  12. Multiple-copy state discrimination: Thinking globally, acting locally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, B. L.; Pryde, G. J.; Wiseman, H. M.; Doherty, A. C.; Bartlett, S. D.

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically investigate schemes to discriminate between two nonorthogonal quantum states given multiple copies. We consider a number of state discrimination schemes as applied to nonorthogonal, mixed states of a qubit. In particular, we examine the difference that local and global optimization of local measurements makes to the probability of obtaining an erroneous result, in the regime of finite numbers of copies N, and in the asymptotic limit as N→∞. Five schemes are considered: optimal collective measurements over all copies, locally optimal local measurements in a fixed single-qubit measurement basis, globally optimal fixed local measurements, locally optimal adaptive local measurements, and globally optimal adaptive local measurements. Here an adaptive measurement is one in which the measurement basis can depend on prior measurement results. For each of these measurement schemes we determine the probability of error (for finite N) and the scaling of this error in the asymptotic limit. In the asymptotic limit, it is known analytically (and we verify numerically) that adaptive schemes have no advantage over the optimal fixed local scheme. Here we show moreover that, in this limit, the most naive scheme (locally optimal fixed local measurements) is as good as any noncollective scheme except for states with less than 2% mixture. For finite N, however, the most sophisticated local scheme (globally optimal adaptive local measurements) is better than any other noncollective scheme for any degree of mixture.

  13. Oligomerization and polymerization of the filovirus matrix protein VP40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmins, Joanna; Schoehn, Guy; Kohlhaas, Christine; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Ruigrok, Rob W.H.; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    The matrix protein VP40 from Ebola virus plays an important role in the assembly process of virus particles by interacting with cellular factors, cellular membranes, and the ribonuclearprotein particle complex. Here we show that the N-terminal domain of VP40 folds into a mixture of two different oligomeric states in vitro, namely hexameric and octameric ringlike structures, as detected by gel filtration chromatography, chemical cross-linking, and electron microscopy. Octamer formation depends largely on the interaction with nucleic acids, which in turn confers in vitro SDS resistance. Refolding experiments with a nucleic acid free N-terminal domain preparation reveal a mostly dimeric form of VP40, which is transformed into an SDS resistant octamer upon incubation with E. coli nucleic acids. In addition, we demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of Marburg virus VP40 also folds into ringlike structures, similar to Ebola virus VP40. Interestingly, Marburg virus VP40 rings reveal a high tendency to polymerize into rods composed of stacked rings. These results may suggest distinct roles for different oligomeric forms of VP40 in the filovirus life cycle

  14. Multiple climate and sea ice states on a coupled Aquaplanet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, B.; Ferreira, D.; Marshall, J.

    2010-12-01

    A fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice GCM is used to explore the climates of Earth-like planets with no continents and idealized ocean basin geometries. We find three qualitatively different stable equilibria under identical external forcing: an equable ice-free climate, a cold climate with ice caps extending into mid-latitudes, and a completely ice-covered "Snowball" state. These multiple states persist for millennia with no drift despite a full seasonal cycle and vigorous internal variability of the system on all time scales. The behavior of the coupled system is rationalized through an extension of the Budyko-Sellers model to include explicit ocean heat transport (OHT), and the insulation of the ice-covered sea surface. Sensitivity tests are also conducted with a slab ocean GCM with prescribed OHT. From these we conclude that albedo feedback and ocean circulation both play essential roles in the maintenance of the multiple states. OHT in the coupled system is dominated by a wind-driven subtropical cell carrying between 2 and 3 PW of thermal energy out of the deep tropics, most of which converges in the subtropics to lower mid-latitudes. This convergence pattern (similar to modern Earth) is robust to changes in the ocean basin geometry, and is directly responsible for the stabilization of the large ice cap. OHT also plays an essential but indirect role in the maintenance of the ice-free pole in the warm states, by driving an enhanced poleward atmospheric latent heat flux. The hysteresis loop for transitions between the warm and large ice cap states spans a much smaller range of parameter space (e.g. ±1.8% variations in solar constant) than the transitions in and out of the Snowball. Three qualitatively different climate states for the same external forcing in a coupled GCM: ice-free, large ice cap, and Snowball. SST and sea ice thickness are plotted. Similar results are found in a pure Aquaplanet (lower) and a "RidgeWorld" with a global-scale ocean basin

  15. State Politics and Education: An Examination of Selected Multiple-State Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlingame, Martin; Geske, Terry G.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews the multiple-state case study literature, highlights some findings, discusses several methodological issues, and concludes with suggestions for possible research agendas. Urges students and researchers to be more actively critical of the assumptions and findings of these studies. (Author/IRT)

  16. Inference and learning in sparse systems with multiple states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, A.; Ramezanpour, A.; Zhang, P.; Zecchina, R.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how inference can be performed when data are sampled from the nonergodic phase of systems with multiple attractors. We take as a model system the finite connectivity Hopfield model in the memory phase and suggest a cavity method approach to reconstruct the couplings when the data are separately sampled from few attractor states. We also show how the inference results can be converted into a learning protocol for neural networks in which patterns are presented through weak external fields. The protocol is simple and fully local, and is able to store patterns with a finite overlap with the input patterns without ever reaching a spin-glass phase where all memories are lost.

  17. Multiple states in the late Eocene ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatsen, M. L. J.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Kliphuis, M.; Viebahn, J.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) marks a major step within the Cenozoic climate in going from a greenhouse into an icehouse state, with the formation of a continental-scale Antarctic ice sheet. The roles of steadily decreasing CO2 concentrations versus changes in ocean circulation at the EOT are still debated and the threshold for Antarctic glaciation is obscured by uncertainties in global geometry. Here, a detailed study of the late Eocene ocean circulation is carried out using an ocean general circulation model under two slightly different geography reconstructions of the middle-to-late Eocene (38 Ma). Using the same atmospheric forcing, both geographies give a profoundly different equilibrium ocean circulation state. The underlying reason for this sensitivity is the presence of multiple equilibria characterised by either North or South Pacific deep water formation. A possible shift from a southern towards a northern overturning circulation would result in significant changes in the global heat distribution and consequently make the Southern Hemisphere climate more susceptible for significant cooling and ice sheet formation on Antarctica.

  18. RNAi reduces expression and intracellular retention of mutant cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Posey

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP, a large extracellular glycoprotein expressed in musculoskeletal tissues, cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia. These mutations lead to massive intracellular retention of COMP, chondrocyte death and loss of growth plate chondrocytes that are necessary for linear growth. In contrast, COMP null mice have only minor growth plate abnormalities, normal growth and longevity. This suggests that reducing mutant and wild-type COMP expression in chondrocytes may prevent the toxic cellular phenotype causing the skeletal dysplasias. We tested this hypothesis using RNA interference to reduce steady state levels of COMP mRNA. A panel of shRNAs directed against COMP was tested. One shRNA (3B reduced endogenous and recombinant COMP mRNA dramatically, regardless of expression levels. The activity of the shRNA against COMP mRNA was maintained for up to 10 weeks. We also demonstrate that this treatment reduced ER stress. Moreover, we show that reducing steady state levels of COMP mRNA alleviates intracellular retention of other extracellular matrix proteins associated with the pseudoachondroplasia cellular pathology. These findings are a proof of principle and the foundation for the development of a therapeutic intervention based on reduction of COMP expression.

  19. Polybenzoxazine/Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organic/inorganic hybrid materials from polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS, inorganic nanoparticles and polybenzoxazine (PBZ have received much interesting recently due to their excellent thermal and mechanical properties, flame retardance, low dielectric constant, well-defined inorganic framework at nanosized scale level, and higher performance relative to those of non-hybrid PBZs. This review describes the synthesis, dielectric constants, and thermal, rheological, and mechanical properties of covalently bonded mono- and multifunctionalized benzoxazine POSS hybrids, other functionalized benzoxazine POSS derivatives, and non-covalently (hydrogen bonded benzoxazine POSS composites.

  20. Vegetation engineers marsh morphology through multiple competing stable states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marani, Marco; Da Lio, Cristina; D’Alpaos, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Marshes display impressive biogeomorphic features, such as zonation, a mosaic of extensive vegetation patches of rather uniform composition, exhibiting sharp transitions in the presence of extremely small topographic gradients. Although generally associated with the accretion processes necessary for marshes to keep up with relative sea level rise, competing environmental constraints, and ecologic controls, zonation is still poorly understood in terms of the underlying biogeomorphic mechanisms. Here we find, through observations and modeling interpretation, that zonation is the result of coupled geomorphological–biological dynamics and that it stems from the ability of vegetation to actively engineer the landscape by tuning soil elevation within preferential ranges of optimal adaptation. We find multiple peaks in the frequency distribution of observed topographic elevation and identify them as the signature of biologic controls on geomorphodynamics through competing stable states modulated by the interplay of inorganic and organic deposition. Interestingly, the stable biogeomorphic equilibria correspond to suboptimal rates of biomass production, a result coherent with recent observations. The emerging biogeomorphic structures may display varying degrees of robustness to changes in the rate of sea level rise and sediment availability, with implications for the overall resilience of marsh ecosystems to climatic changes. PMID:23401529

  1. Endocytic pathways mediating oligomeric Aβ42 neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxton Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD is amyloid plaques, composed primarily of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ. Over-production or diminished clearance of the 42 amino acid form of Aβ (Aβ42 in the brain leads to accumulation of soluble Aβ and plaque formation. Soluble oligomeric Aβ (oAβ has recently emerged to be as a likely proximal cause of AD. Results Here we demonstrate that endocytosis is critical in mediating oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. Inhibition of clathrin function either with a pharmacological inhibitor, knock-down of clathrin heavy chain expression, or expression of the dominant-negative mutant of clathrin-assembly protein AP180 did not block oAβ42-induced neurotoxicity or intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. However, inhibition of dynamin and RhoA by expression of dominant negative mutants reduced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation. Pharmacologic inhibition of the dynamin-mediated endocytic pathway by genistein also reduced neurotoxicity. Conclusions These data suggest that dynamin-mediated and RhoA-regulated endocytosis are integral steps for oligomeric Aβ42-induced neurotoxicity and intraneuronal Aβ accumulation.

  2. Modelling the interdependence between the stoichiometry of receptor oligomerization and ligand binding for a coexisting dimer/tetramer receptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, X; Vivó, M; Serra, J; Roche, D; Strange, P G; Giraldo, J

    2009-01-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to exist as oligomers, but the oligomerization state and the effects of this on receptor function are unclear. For some G protein-coupled receptors, in ligand binding assays, different radioligands provide different maximal binding capacities. Here we have developed mathematical models for co-expressed dimeric and tetrameric species of receptors. We have considered models where the dimers and tetramers are in equilibrium and where they do not interconvert and we have also considered the potential influence of the ligands on the degree of oligomerization. By analogy with agonist efficacy, we have considered ligands that promote, inhibit or have no effect on oligomerization. Cell surface receptor expression and the intrinsic capacity of receptors to oligomerize are quantitative parameters of the equations. The models can account for differences in the maximal binding capacities of radioligands in different preparations of receptors and provide a conceptual framework for simulation and data fitting in complex oligomeric receptor situations.

  3. Polymorphism and mesomorphism of oligomeric surfactants: effect of the degree of oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurašin, D; Pustak, A; Habuš, I; Šmit, I; Filipović-Vinceković, N

    2011-12-06

    A series of cationic oligomeric surfactants (quaternary dodecyldimethylammonium ions with two, three, or four chains connected by an ethylene spacer at the headgroup level, abbreviated as dimer, trimer, and tetramer) were synthesized and characterized. The influence of the degree of oligomerization on their polymorphic and mesomorphic properties was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, polarizing optical microscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential scanning calorimetry. All compounds display layered arrangements with interdigitated dodecyl chains. The increase in the degree of oligomerization increases the interlayer distance and decreases the ordering in the solid phase; whereas the dimer sample is fully crystalline with well-developed 3D ordering and the trimer and tetramer crystallize as highly ordered crystal smectic phases. The number of thermal phase transitions and sequence of phases are markedly affected by the number of dodecyl chains. Anhydrous samples exhibit polymorphism and thermotropic mesomorphism of the smectic type, with the exception of the tetramer that displays only transitions at higher temperature associated with decomposition and melting. All hydrated compounds form lyotropic mesophases showing reversible phase transitions upon heating and cooling. The sequence of liquid-crystalline phases for the dimer, typical of concentrated ionic surfactant systems, comprises a hexagonal phase at lower temperatures and a smectic phase at higher temperatures. In contrast, the trimer and tetramer reveal textures of the hexagonal phase. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. Different domains are critical for oligomerization compatibility of different connexins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARTÍNEZ, Agustín D.; MARIPILLÁN, Jaime; ACUÑA, Rodrigo; MINOGUE, Peter J.; BERTHOUD, Viviana M.; BEYER, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization of connexins is a critical step in gap junction channel formation. Some members of the connexin family can oligomerize with other members and form functional heteromeric hemichannels [e.g. Cx43 (connexin 43) and Cx45], but others are incompatible (e.g. Cx43 and Cx26). To find connexin domains important for oligomerization, we constructed chimaeras between Cx43 and Cx26 and studied their ability to oligomerize with wild-type Cx43, Cx45 or Cx26. HeLa cells co-expressing Cx43, Cx45 or Cx26 and individual chimaeric constructs were analysed for interactions between the chimaeras and the wild-type connexins using cell biological (subcellular localization by immunofluorescence), functional (intercellular diffusion of microinjected Lucifer yellow) and biochemical (sedimentation velocity through sucrose gradients) assays. All of the chimaeras containing the third transmembrane domain of Cx43 interacted with wild-type Cx43 on the basis of co-localization, dominant-negative inhibition of intercellular communication, and altered sedimentation velocity. The same chimaeras also interacted with co-expressed Cx45. In contrast, immunofluorescence and intracellular diffusion of tracer suggested that other domains influenced oligomerization compatibility when chimaeras were co-expressed with Cx26. Taken together, these results suggest that amino acids in the third transmembrane domain are critical for oligomerization with Cx43 and Cx45. However, motifs in different domains may determine oligomerization compatibility in members of different connexin subfamilies. PMID:21348854

  5. Generalized Grover's Algorithm for Multiple Phase Inversion States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Tim; Forster, Gary; Tessler, Louis

    2018-02-01

    Grover's algorithm is a quantum search algorithm that proceeds by repeated applications of the Grover operator and the Oracle until the state evolves to one of the target states. In the standard version of the algorithm, the Grover operator inverts the sign on only one state. Here we provide an exact solution to the problem of performing Grover's search where the Grover operator inverts the sign on N states. We show the underlying structure in terms of the eigenspectrum of the generalized Hamiltonian, and derive an appropriate initial state to perform the Grover evolution. This allows us to use the quantum phase estimation algorithm to solve the search problem in this generalized case, completely bypassing the Grover algorithm altogether. We obtain a time complexity of this case of √{D /Mα }, where D is the search space dimension, M is the number of target states, and α ≈1 , which is close to the optimal scaling.

  6. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Kathryn M; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-05-01

    The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a "wreath" with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Domain architecture and oligomerization properties of the paramyxovirus PIV 5 hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ping; Leser, George P; Demeler, Borries; Lamb, Robert A; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2008-09-01

    The mechanism by which the paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein couples receptor binding to activation of virus entry remains to be fully understood, but the HN stalk is thought to play an important role in the process. We have characterized ectodomain constructs of the parainfluenza virus 5 HN to understand better the underlying architecture and oligomerization properties that may influence HN functions. The PIV 5 neuraminidase (NA) domain is monomeric whereas the ectodomain forms a well-defined tetramer. The HN stalk also forms tetramers and higher order oligomers with high alpha-helical content. Together, the data indicate that the globular NA domains form weak intersubunit interactions at the end of the HN stalk tetramer, while stabilizing the stalk and overall oligomeric state of the ectodomain. Electron microscopy of the HN ectodomain reveals flexible arrangements of the NA and stalk domains, which may be important for understanding how these two HN domains impact virus entry.

  8. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity in patients...

  9. Protic Cationic Oligomeric Ionic Liquids of the Urethane Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Stryutsky, A. V.; Klymenko, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Protic oligomeric cationic ionic liquids of the oligo(ether urethane) type are synthesized via the reaction of an isocyanate prepolymer based on oligo(oxy ethylene)glycol with M = 1000 with hexamethylene-diisocyanate followed by blocking of the terminal isocyanate groups with the use of amine...... derivatives of imidazole, pyridine, and 3-methylpyridine and neutralization of heterocycles with ethanesulfonic acid and p-toluenesulfonic acid. The structures and properties of the synthesized oligomeric ionic liquids substantially depend on the structures of the ionic groups. They are amorphous at room...... temperature, but ethanesulfonate imidazolium and pyridinium oligomeric ionic liquids form a low melting crystalline phase. The proton conductivities of the oligomeric ionic liquids are determined by the type of cation in the temperature range 80-120 degrees C under anhydrous conditions and vary within five...

  10. The Efficiency of Quantum Identity Testing of Multiple States

    OpenAIRE

    Kada, Masaru; Nishimura, Harumichi; Yamakami, Tomoyuki

    2008-01-01

    We examine two quantum operations, the Permutation Test and the Circle Test, which test the identity of n quantum states. These operations naturally extend the well-studied Swap Test on two quantum states. We first show the optimality of the Permutation Test for any input size n as well as the optimality of the Circle Test for three input states. In particular, when n=3, we present a semi-classical protocol, incorporated with the Swap Test, which approximates the Circle Test efficiently. Furt...

  11. Probabilistic programmable quantum processors with multiple copies of program states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, Adam; Buzek, Vladimir; Knight, Peter L.

    2005-01-01

    We examine the execution of general U(1) transformations on programmable quantum processors. We show that, with only the minimal assumption of availability of copies of the 1-qubit program state, the apparent advantage of existing schemes proposed by G. Vidal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 047905 (2002)] and M. Hillery et al. [Phys. Rev. A 65, 022301 (2003)] to execute a general U(1) transformation with greater probability using complex program states appears not to hold

  12. Computational multiple steady states for enzymatic esterification of ethanol and oleic acid in an isothermal CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pang-Yen; Chuang, Guo-Syong; Chao, An-Chong; Li, Hsing-Ya

    2005-05-01

    The capacity of complex biochemical reaction networks (consisting of 11 coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations) to show multiple steady states, was investigated. The system involved esterification of ethanol and oleic acid by lipase in an isothermal continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The Deficiency One Algorithm and the Subnetwork Analysis were applied to determine the steady state multiplicity. A set of rate constants and two corresponding steady states are computed. The phenomena of bistability, hysteresis and bifurcation are discussed. Moreover, the capacity of steady state multiplicity is extended to the family of the studied reaction networks.

  13. Multiple Scale Analysis of the Dynamic State Index (DSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A.; Névir, P.

    2016-12-01

    The Dynamic State Index (DSI) is a novel parameter that indicates local deviations of the atmospheric flow field from a stationary, inviscid and adiabatic solution of the primitive equations of fluid mechanics. This is in contrast to classical methods, which often diagnose deviations from temporal or spatial mean states. We show some applications of the DSI to atmospheric flow phenomena on different scales. The DSI is derived from the Energy-Vorticity-Theory (EVT) which is based on two global conserved quantities, the total energy and Ertel's potential enstrophy. Locally, these global quantities lead to the Bernoulli function and the PV building together with the potential temperature the DSI.If the Bernoulli function and the PV are balanced, the DSI vanishes and the basic state is obtained. Deviations from the basic state provide an indication of diabatic and non-stationary weather events. Therefore, the DSI offers a tool to diagnose and even prognose different atmospheric events on different scales.On synoptic scale, the DSI can help to diagnose storms and hurricanes, where also the dipole structure of the DSI plays an important role. In the scope of the collaborative research center "Scaling Cascades in Complex Systems" we show high correlations between the DSI and precipitation on convective scale. Moreover, we compare the results with reduced models and different spatial resolutions.

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Loop Heat Pipes with Multiple Capillary Pumps and Multiple Condensers. Part 1; Stead State Stimulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Triem T.; OConnell, Tamara; Ku, Jentung

    2004-01-01

    Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) have proven themselves as reliable and robust heat transport devices for spacecraft thermal control systems. So far, the LHPs in earth-orbit satellites perform very well as expected. Conventional LHPs usually consist of a single capillary pump for heat acquisition and a single condenser for heat rejection. Multiple pump/multiple condenser LHPs have shown to function very well in ground testing. Nevertheless, the test results of a dual pump/condenser LHP also revealed that the dual LHP behaved in a complicated manner due to the interaction between the pumps and condensers. Thus it is redundant to say that more research is needed before they are ready for 0-g deployment. One research area that perhaps compels immediate attention is the analytical modeling of LHPs, particularly the transient phenomena. Modeling a single pump/single condenser LHP is difficult enough. Only a handful of computer codes are available for both steady state and transient simulations of conventional LHPs. No previous effort was made to develop an analytical model (or even a complete theory) to predict the operational behavior of the multiple pump/multiple condenser LHP systems. The current research project offered a basic theory of the multiple pump/multiple condenser LHP operation. From it, a computer code was developed to predict the LHP saturation temperature in accordance with the system operating and environmental conditions.

  15. A Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Bax and Bak Oligomerization Prevents Genotoxic Cell Death and Promotes Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xin; Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Mergenthaler, Philipp; Zhang, Zhi; Sang, Jing; Daude, Michael; Ehlert, Fabian G R; Diederich, Wibke E; Wong, Eve; Zhu, Weijia; Pogmore, Justin; Nandy, Jyoti P; Satyanarayana, Maragani; Jimmidi, Ravi K; Arya, Prabhat; Leber, Brian; Lin, Jialing; Culmsee, Carsten; Yi, Jing; Andrews, David W

    2017-04-20

    Aberrant apoptosis can lead to acute or chronic degenerative diseases. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) triggered by the oligomerization of the Bcl-2 family proteins Bax/Bak is an irreversible step leading to execution of apoptosis. Here, we describe the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of Bax/Bak oligomerization that prevent MOMP. We demonstrate that these molecules disrupt multiple, but not all, interactions between Bax dimer interfaces thereby interfering with the formation of higher-order oligomers in the MOM, but not recruitment of Bax to the MOM. Small-molecule inhibition of Bax/Bak oligomerization allowed cells to evade apoptotic stimuli and rescued neurons from death after excitotoxicity, demonstrating that oligomerization of Bax is essential for MOMP. Our discovery of small-molecule Bax/Bak inhibitors provides novel tools for the investigation of the mechanisms leading to MOMP and will ultimately facilitate development of compounds inhibiting Bax/Bak in acute and chronic degenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Multiple Scattering Approach to Continuum State with Generally Shaped Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Tenore, Antonio; Benfatto, Maurizio; Natoli, Calogero

    2007-01-01

    We present a new scheme for solving the scattering problem for an arbitrarily shaped potential cell that avoids the well known convergence problems in the angular momentum expansion of the cell shape function. Tests of the method against analytically soluble separable model potentials, with and without shape truncation, have been performed with success. By a judicious choice of the shape of the cells partitioning the whole molecular space and use of empty cells when necessary, we set up a multiple scattering scheme that leads to a straightforward generalization of the same equations in the muffin-tin approximation. For example lmax in the angular momentum expansion can still be chosen according to the rule lmax ∼ kR, where R is the radius of the bounding sphere of the cell and all the matrices appearing in the theory are square matrices

  17. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-ling Cui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group. As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves.

  19. An engineered allosteric switch in leucine-zipper oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L; Plecs, J J; Alber, T

    1996-06-01

    Controversy remains about the role of core side-chain packing in specifying protein structure. To investigate the influence of core packing on the oligomeric structure of a coiled coil, we engineered a GCN4 leucine zipper mutant that switches from two to three strands upon binding the hydrophobic ligands cyclohexane and benzene. In solution these ligands increased the apparent thermal stability and the oligomerization order of the mutant leucine zipper. The crystal structure of the peptide-benzene complex shows a single benzene molecule bound at the engineered site in the core of the trimer. These results indicate that coiled coils are well-suited to function as molecular switches and emphasize that core packing is an important determinant of oligomerization specificity.

  20. Degenerate ground states and multiple bifurcations in a two-dimensional q-state quantum Potts model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan-Wei; Cho, Sam Young; Batchelor, Murray T; Zhou, Huan-Qiang

    2014-06-01

    We numerically investigate the two-dimensional q-state quantum Potts model on the infinite square lattice by using the infinite projected entangled-pair state (iPEPS) algorithm. We show that the quantum fidelity, defined as an overlap measurement between an arbitrary reference state and the iPEPS ground state of the system, can detect q-fold degenerate ground states for the Z_{q} broken-symmetry phase. Accordingly, a multiple bifurcation of the quantum ground-state fidelity is shown to occur as the transverse magnetic field varies from the symmetry phase to the broken-symmetry phase, which means that a multiple-bifurcation point corresponds to a critical point. A (dis)continuous behavior of quantum fidelity at phase transition points characterizes a (dis)continuous phase transition. Similar to the characteristic behavior of the quantum fidelity, the magnetizations, as order parameters, obtained from the degenerate ground states exhibit multiple bifurcation at critical points. Each order parameter is also explicitly demonstrated to transform under the Z_{q} subgroup of the symmetry group of the Hamiltonian. We find that the q-state quantum Potts model on the square lattice undergoes a discontinuous (first-order) phase transition for q=3 and q=4 and a continuous phase transition for q=2 (the two-dimensional quantum transverse Ising model).

  1. Quantum Query Complexity for Searching Multiple Marked States from an Unsorted Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Bin

    2007-01-01

    An important and usual sort of search problems is to find all marked states from an unsorted database with a large number of states. Grover's original quantum search algorithm is for finding single marked state with uncertainty, and it has been generalized to the case of multiple marked states, as well as been modified to find single marked state with certainty. However, the query complexity for finding all multiple marked states has not been addressed. We use a generalized Long's algorithm with high precision to solve such a problem. We calculate the approximate query complexity, which increases with the number of marked states and with the precision that we demand. In the end we introduce an algorithm for the problem on a 'duality computer' and show its advantage over other algorithms.

  2. Hypercoagulable states in patients with multiple myeloma can affect the thalidomide-associated venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Giampaolo P; Ibrahim, Sulfi; Claxton, David; Tricot, Guido J; Fink, Louis M; Zangari, Maurizio

    2009-07-01

    The therapeutic use of thalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma is often complicated by the development of venous thromboembolism. The objective of the present study was to identify hypercoagulable states associated with development of venous thromboembolism in thalidomide-treated multiple myeloma patients. We screened 49 consecutive multiple myeloma patients treated with thalidomide at baseline for hypercoagulability. With a median follow-up of 11 months, 10 of 49 multiple myeloma patients developed a thrombotic episode. Laboratory assays revealed an underlying abnormality in nine of the 10 patients; hypercoagulable screenings were normal in 36 of the 39 patients who did not develop venous thromboembolism (P < 0.0001). Our retrospective study results suggest that the multiple myeloma patients with thromboembolic complications during treatment with thalidomide have a frequent concomitant underlying thrombophilic state.

  3. Increasing atmospheric CO2 overrides the historical legacy of multiple stable biome states in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, Glenn R; Scheiter, Simon; Bond, William J; Higgins, Steven I

    2014-02-01

    The dominant vegetation over much of the global land surface is not predetermined by contemporary climate, but also influenced by past environmental conditions. This confounds attempts to predict current and future biome distributions, because even a perfect model would project multiple possible biomes without knowledge of the historical vegetation state. Here we compare the distribution of tree- and grass-dominated biomes across Africa simulated using a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM). We explicitly evaluate where and under what conditions multiple stable biome states are possible for current and projected future climates. Our simulation results show that multiple stable biomes states are possible for vast areas of tropical and subtropical Africa under current conditions. Widespread loss of the potential for multiple stable biomes states is projected in the 21st Century, driven by increasing atmospheric CO2 . Many sites where currently both tree-dominated and grass-dominated biomes are possible become deterministically tree-dominated. Regions with multiple stable biome states are widespread and require consideration when attempting to predict future vegetation changes. Testing for behaviour characteristic of systems with multiple stable equilibria, such as hysteresis and dependence on historical conditions, and the resulting uncertainty in simulated vegetation, will lead to improved projections of global change impacts. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Addressing Single and Multiple Bad Data in the Modern PMU-based Power System State Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khazraj, Hesam; Silva, Filipe Miguel Faria da; Bak, Claus Leth

    2017-01-01

    utilization in state estimation can detect and identify single and multiple bad data in redundant and critical measurements. To validate simulations, IEEE 30 bus system are implemented in PowerFactory and Matlab is used to solve proposed state estimation using postprocessing of PMUs and mixed methods. Bad...

  5. Multiple-state Feshbach resonances mediated by high-order couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemming, Christopher J.; Krems, Roman V.

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of multistate Feshbach resonances mediated by high-order couplings. Our analysis focuses on a system with one open scattering state and multiple bound states. The scattering state is coupled to one off-resonant bound state and multiple Feshbach resonances are induced by a sequence of indirect couplings between the closed channels. We derive a general recursive expression that can be used to fit the experimental data on multistate Feshbach resonances involving one continuum state and several bound states and present numerical solutions for several model systems. Our results elucidate general features of multistate Feshbach resonances induced by high-order couplings and suggest mechanisms for controlling collisions of ultracold atoms and molecules with external fields

  6. Involvement of C-Terminal Histidines in Soybean PM1 Protein Oligomerization and Cu2+ Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guobao; Liu, Ke; Gao, Yang; Zheng, Yizhi

    2017-06-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are widely distributed among plant species, where they contribute to abiotic stress tolerance. LEA proteins can be classified into seven groups according to conserved sequence motifs. The PM1 protein from soybean, which belongs to the Pfam LEA_1 group, has been shown previously to be at least partially natively unfolded, to bind metal ions and potentially to stabilize proteins and membranes. Here, we investigated the role of the PM1 C-terminal domain and in particular the multiple histidine residues in this half of the protein. We constructed recombinant plasmids expressing full-length PM1 and two truncated forms, PM1-N and PM1-C, which represent the N- and C-terminal halves of the protein, respectively. Immunoblotting and cross-linking experiments showed that full-length PM1 forms oligomers and high molecular weight (HMW) complexes in vitro and in vivo, while PM1-C, but not PM1-N, also formed oligomers and HMW complexes in vitro. When the histidine residues in PM1 and PM1-C were chemically modified, oligomerization was abolished, suggesting that histidines play a key role in this process. Furthermore, we demonstrated that high Cu2+ concentrations promote oligomerization and induce PM1 and PM1-C to form HMW complexes. Therefore, we speculate that PM1 proteins not only maintain ion homeostasis in the cytoplasm, but also potentially stabilize and protect other proteins during abiotic stress by forming a large, oligomeric molecular shield around biological targets. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Crystal structures from the Plasmodium peroxiredoxins: new insights into oligomerization and product binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Dong, Aiping; Pizarro, Juan C; Botchkarsev, Alexei; Min, Jinrong; Wernimont, Amy K; Hills, Tanya; Hui, Raymond; Artz, Jennifer D

    2012-03-19

    Plasmodium falciparum is the protozoan parasite primarily responsible for more than one million malarial deaths, annually, and is developing resistance to current therapies. Throughout its lifespan, the parasite is subjected to oxidative attack, so Plasmodium antioxidant defences are essential for its survival and are targets for disease control. To further understand the molecular aspects of the Plasmodium redox system, we solved 4 structures of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins (Prx). Our study has confirmed PvTrx-Px1 to be a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-sensitive peroxiredoxin. We have identified and characterized the novel toroid octameric oligomer of PyTrx-Px1, which may be attributed to the interplay of several factors including: (1) the orientation of the conserved surface/buried arginine of the NNLA(I/L)GRS-loop; and (2) the C-terminal tail positioning (also associated with the aforementioned conserved loop) which facilitates the intermolecular hydrogen bond between dimers (in an A-C fashion). In addition, a notable feature of the disulfide bonds in some of the Prx crystal structures is discussed. Finally, insight into the latter stages of the peroxiredoxin reaction coordinate is gained. Our structure of PyPrx6 is not only in the sulfinic acid (RSO2H) form, but it is also with glycerol bound in a way (not previously observed) indicative of product binding. The structural characterization of Plasmodium peroxiredoxins provided herein provides insight into their oligomerization and product binding which may facilitate the targeting of these antioxidant defences. Although the structural basis for the octameric oligomerization is further understood, the results yield more questions about the biological implications of the peroxiredoxin oligomerization, as multiple toroid configurations are now known. The crystal structure depicting the product bound active site gives insight into the overoxidation of the active site and allows further characterization of the leaving group

  8. High Content Analysis of Compositional Heterogeneities to Study GPCR Oligomerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walsh, Samuel McEwen

    In this thesis I demonstrate how the natural compositional heterogeneities of synthetic and living cell model systems can be used to quantitate the mechanics of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomerization with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The thesis is structured around three a...

  9. Deterministic integer multiple firing depending on initial state in Wang model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie Yong [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)]. E-mail: yxie@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Xu Jianxue [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Jiang Jun [Institute of Nonlinear Dynamics, MSSV, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2006-12-15

    We investigate numerically dynamical behaviour of the Wang model, which describes the rhythmic activities of thalamic relay neurons. The model neuron exhibits Type I excitability from a global view, but Type II excitability from a local view. There exists a narrow range of bistability, in which a subthreshold oscillation and a suprathreshold firing behaviour coexist. A special firing pattern, integer multiple firing can be found in the certain part of the bistable range. The characteristic feature of such firing pattern is that the histogram of interspike intervals has a multipeaked structure, and the peaks are located at about integer multiples of a basic interspike interval. Since the Wang model is noise-free, the integer multiple firing is a deterministic firing pattern. The existence of bistability leads to the deterministic integer multiple firing depending on the initial state of the model neuron, i.e., the initial values of the state variables.

  10. Deterministic integer multiple firing depending on initial state in Wang model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yong; Xu Jianxue; Jiang Jun

    2006-01-01

    We investigate numerically dynamical behaviour of the Wang model, which describes the rhythmic activities of thalamic relay neurons. The model neuron exhibits Type I excitability from a global view, but Type II excitability from a local view. There exists a narrow range of bistability, in which a subthreshold oscillation and a suprathreshold firing behaviour coexist. A special firing pattern, integer multiple firing can be found in the certain part of the bistable range. The characteristic feature of such firing pattern is that the histogram of interspike intervals has a multipeaked structure, and the peaks are located at about integer multiples of a basic interspike interval. Since the Wang model is noise-free, the integer multiple firing is a deterministic firing pattern. The existence of bistability leads to the deterministic integer multiple firing depending on the initial state of the model neuron, i.e., the initial values of the state variables

  11. Feasibility of a multiple-choice mini mental state examination for chronically critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguélez, Marta; Merlani, Paolo; Gigon, Fabienne; Verdon, Mélanie; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Ricou, Bara

    2014-08-01

    Following treatment in an ICU, up to 70% of chronically critically ill patients present neurocognitive impairment that can have negative effects on their quality of life, daily activities, and return to work. The Mini Mental State Examination is a simple, widely used tool for neurocognitive assessment. Although of interest when evaluating ICU patients, the current version is restricted to patients who are able to speak. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a visual, multiple-choice Mini Mental State Examination for ICU patients who are unable to speak. The multiple-choice Mini Mental State Examination and the standard Mini Mental State Examination were compared across three different speaking populations. The interrater and intrarater reliabilities of the multiple-choice Mini Mental State Examination were tested on both intubated and tracheostomized ICU patients. Mixed 36-bed ICU and neuropsychology department in a university hospital. Twenty-six healthy volunteers, 20 neurological patients, 46 ICU patients able to speak, and 30 intubated or tracheostomized ICU patients. None. Multiple-choice Mini Mental State Examination results correlated satisfactorily with standard Mini Mental State Examination results in all three speaking groups: healthy volunteers: intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.43 (95% CI, -0.18 to 0.62); neurology patients: 0.90 (95% CI, 0.82-0.95); and ICU patients able to speak: 0.86 (95% CI, 0.70-0.92). The interrater and intrarater reliabilities were good (0.95 [0.87-0.98] and 0.94 [0.31-0.99], respectively). In all populations, a Bland-Altman analysis showed systematically higher scores using the multiple-choice Mini Mental State Examination. Administration of the multiple-choice Mini Mental State Examination to ICU patients was straightforward and produced exploitable results comparable to those of the standard Mini Mental State Examination. It should be of interest for the assessment and monitoring of the neurocognitive

  12. Resting‐state connectivity of pre‐motor cortex reflects disability in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig Roman; Soelberg Sørensen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the relationship between motor resting-state connectivity of the dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) and clinical disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Materials and methods A total of 27 patients with relapsing–remitting MS (RR-MS) and 15 patients with secondary...... progressive MS (SP-MS) underwent functional resting-state magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Independent component analysis was used to characterize motor resting-state connectivity. Multiple regression analysis was performed in SPM8...... between the individual expression of motor resting-state connectivity in PMd and EDSS scores including age as covariate. Separate post hoc analyses were performed for patients with RR-MS and SP-MS. Results The EDSS scores ranged from 0 to 7 with a median score of 4.3. Motor resting-state connectivity...

  13. Accelerated Enveloping Distribution Sampling: Enabling Sampling of Multiple End States while Preserving Local Energy Minima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perthold, Jan Walther; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2018-05-17

    Enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) is an efficient approach to calculate multiple free-energy differences from a single molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. However, the construction of an appropriate reference-state Hamiltonian that samples all states efficiently is not straightforward. We propose a novel approach for the construction of the EDS reference-state Hamiltonian, related to a previously described procedure to smoothen energy landscapes. In contrast to previously suggested EDS approaches, our reference-state Hamiltonian preserves local energy minima of the combined end-states. Moreover, we propose an intuitive, robust and efficient parameter optimization scheme to tune EDS Hamiltonian parameters. We demonstrate the proposed method with established and novel test systems and conclude that our approach allows for the automated calculation of multiple free-energy differences from a single simulation. Accelerated EDS promises to be a robust and user-friendly method to compute free-energy differences based on solid statistical mechanics.

  14. Relation between catalyst-assisted transformation and multiple-copy transformation for bipartite pure states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yuan; Duan Runyao; Ying Mingsheng

    2006-01-01

    We show that in some cases, catalyst-assisted entanglement transformation cannot be implemented by multiple-copy transformation for pure states. This fact, together with the result we obtained in R. Y. Duan, Y. Feng, X. Li, and M. S. Ying, Phys. Rev. A 71, 042319 (2005), namely that the latter can be completely implemented by the former, indicates that catalyst-assisted transformation is strictly more powerful than multiple-copy transformation. For the purely probabilistic setting we find, however, these two kinds of transformations are geometrically equivalent in the sense that the sets of pure states that can be converted into a given pure state with maximal probabilities not less than a given value have the same closure, regardless of whether catalyst-assisted transformation or multiple-copy transformation is used

  15. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alexander eDiaz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition—and tools to quantify them—have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ. Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after five minutes eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer’s disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease.

  16. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, B. Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Moens, Sarah; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Migliorati, Filippo; Stoffers, Diederick; Den Braber, Anouk; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Hardstone, Richard; Van't Ent, Dennis; Boomsma, Dorret I.; De Geus, Eco; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition—and tools to quantify them—have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ). Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after 5 min eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer's disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease. PMID:23964225

  17. The effects of oligomerization on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4/6/7 function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davey Megan J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minichromosome maintenance proteins (Mcm 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 are related by sequence and form a variety of complexes that unwind DNA, including Mcm4/6/7. A Mcm4/6/7 trimer forms one half of the Mcm2-7 hexameric ring and can be thought of as the catalytic core of Mcm2-7, the replicative helicase in eukaryotic cells. Oligomeric analysis of Mcm4/6/7 suggests that it forms a hexamer containing two Mcm4/6/7 trimers, however, under certain conditions trimeric Mcm4/6/7 has also been observed. The functional significance of the different Mcm4/6/7 oligomeric states has not been assessed. The results of such an assessment would have implications for studies of both Mcm4/6/7 and Mcm2-7. Results Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mcm4/6/7 reconstituted from individual subunits exists in an equilibrium of oligomeric forms in which smaller oligomers predominate in the absence of ATP. In addition, we found that ATP, which is required for Mcm4/6/7 activity, shifts the equilibrium towards larger oligomers, likely hexamers of Mcm4/6/7. ATPγS and to a lesser extent ADP also shift the equilibrium towards hexamers. Study of Mcm4/6/7 complexes containing mutations that interfere with the formation of inter-subunit ATP sites (arginine finger mutants indicates that full activity of Mcm4/6/7 requires all of its ATP sites, which are formed in a hexamer and not a trimer. In keeping with this observation, Mcm4/6/7 binds DNA as a hexamer. Conclusions The minimal functional unit of Mcm4/6/7 is a hexamer. One of the roles of ATP binding by Mcm4/6/7 may be to stabilize formation of hexamers.

  18. Arc is a flexible modular protein capable of reversible self-oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrum, Craig; Baumann, Anne; Bustad, Helene J.; Flydal, Marte Innselset; Mariaule, Vincent; Alvira, Sara; Cuéllar, Jorge; Haavik, Jan; Soulé, Jonathan; Valpuesta, José Maria; Márquez, José Antonio; Martinez, Aurora; Bramham, Clive R.

    2015-01-01

    The immediate early gene product Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) is posited as a master regulator of long-term synaptic plasticity and memory. However, the physicochemical and structural properties of Arc have not been elucidated. In the present study, we expressed and purified recombinant human Arc (hArc) and performed the first biochemical and biophysical analysis of hArc's structure and stability. Limited proteolysis assays and MS analysis indicate that hArc has two major domains on either side of a central more disordered linker region, consistent with in silico structure predictions. hArc's secondary structure was estimated using CD, and stability was analysed by CD-monitored thermal denaturation and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). Oligomerization states under different conditions were studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and visualized by AFM and EM. Biophysical analyses show that hArc is a modular protein with defined secondary structure and loose tertiary structure. hArc appears to be pyramid-shaped as a monomer and is capable of reversible self-association, forming large soluble oligomers. The N-terminal domain of hArc is highly basic, which may promote interaction with cytoskeletal structures or other polyanionic surfaces, whereas the C-terminal domain is acidic and stabilized by ionic conditions that promote oligomerization. Upon binding of presenilin-1 (PS1) peptide, hArc undergoes a large structural change. A non-synonymous genetic variant of hArc (V231G) showed properties similar to the wild-type (WT) protein. We conclude that hArc is a flexible multi-domain protein that exists in monomeric and oligomeric forms, compatible with a diverse, hub-like role in plasticity-related processes. PMID:25748042

  19. Oligomeric state of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eng, W. S.; Keough, D. T.; Hocková, Dana; Winzor, D. J.; Guddat, L. W.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 135, Apr (2017), s. 6-14 ISSN 0300-9084 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06049S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : enzyme inhibitors * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 3.112, year: 2016

  20. Two Schemes for Generation of Entanglement for Vibronic Collective States of Multiple Trapped Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Wenxing; Li Jiahua; Zheng Anshou

    2007-01-01

    We propose two schemes to prepare entanglement for the vibronic collective states of multiple trapped ions. The first scheme aims to generating multipartite entanglement for vibrational modes of trapped ions, which only requires a single laser beam tuned to the ionic carrier frequency. Our scheme works in the mediated excitation regime, in which the corresponding Rabi frequency is equal to the trap frequency. Beyond their fundamental importance, these states may be of interest for experimental studies on decoherence since the present scheme operates in a fast way. The second scheme aims to preparing the continuous variable multimode maximally Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The distinct advantage is that the operation time is only limited by the available laser intensity, not by the inherent mechanisms such as off-resonant excitations. This makes it promising to obtain entanglement of multiple coherent and squeezing states with desired amplitudes in a reasonable time.

  1. Classification of Multiple Seizure-Like States in Three Different Rodent Models of Epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirgis, Mirna; Serletis, Demitre; Zhang, Jane; Florez, Carlos; Dian, Joshua A; Carlen, Peter L; Bardakjian, Berj L

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a dynamical disease and its effects are evident in over fifty million people worldwide. This study focused on objective classification of the multiple states involved in the brain's epileptiform activity. Four datasets from three different rodent hippocampal preparations were explored, wherein seizure-like-events (SLE) were induced by the perfusion of a low - Mg(2+) /high-K(+) solution or 4-Aminopyridine. Local field potentials were recorded from CA3 pyramidal neurons and interneurons and modeled as Markov processes. Specifically, hidden Markov models (HMM) were used to determine the nature of the states present. Properties of the Hilbert transform were used to construct the feature spaces for HMM training. By sequentially applying the HMM training algorithm, multiple states were identified both in episodes of SLE and nonSLE activity. Specifically, preSLE and postSLE states were differentiated and multiple inner SLE states were identified. This was accomplished using features extracted from the lower frequencies (1-4 Hz, 4-8 Hz) alongside those of both the low- (40-100 Hz) and high-gamma (100-200 Hz) of the recorded electrical activity. The learning paradigm of this HMM-based system eliminates the inherent bias associated with other learning algorithms that depend on predetermined state segmentation and renders it an appropriate candidate for SLE classification.

  2. Nonlinear behavior of multiple-helicity resistive interchange modes near marginally stable states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1991-05-01

    Nonlinear behavior of resistive interchange modes near marginally stable states is theoretically studied under the multiple-helicity condition. Reduced fluid equations in the sheared slab configuration are used in order to treat a local transport problem. With the use of the invariance property of local reduced fluid model equations under a transformation between the modes with different rational surfaces, weakly nonlinear theories for single-helicity modes by Hamaguchi and Nakajima are extended to the multiple-helicity case and applied to the resistive interchange modes. We derive the nonlinear amplitude equations of the multiple-helicity modes, from which the convective transport in the saturated state is obtained. It is shown how the convective transport is enhanced by nonlinear interaction between modes with different rational surfaces compared with the single-helicity case. We confirm that theoretical results are in good agreement with direct numerical simulations. (author)

  3. Using State-Wide Multiple Measures for School Leadership and Management: Costs Incurred vs. Benefits Gained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentschke, Guilbert; Wohlstetter, Priscilla; Hirman, Jennifer; Zeehandelaar, Dara

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine the utility and value of multiple measures of school performance for school leaders and managers. The research was conducted within the context of the state of California through an investigation of how operators, managers and authorisers of autonomous "charter" (publicly financed but privately operated)…

  4. Multiple-state based power control for multi-radio multi-channel wireless mesh networks

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olwal, TO

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-Radio Multi-Channel (MRMC) systems are key to power control problems in wireless mesh networks (WMNs). In this paper, we present asynchronous multiple-state based power control for MRMC WMNs. First, WMN is represented as a set of disjoint...

  5. Relaxation height in energy landscapes : an application to multiple metastable states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirillo, E.N.M.; Nardi, F.R.

    2012-01-01

    The study of systems with multiple (not necessarily degenerate) metastable states presents subtle difficulties from the mathematical point of view related to the variational problem that has to be solved in these cases. We introduce the notion of relaxation height in a general energy landscape and

  6. Multiple steady states detection in a packed-bed reactive distillation column using bifurcation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramzan, Naveed; Faheem, Muhammad; Gani, Rafiqul

    2010-01-01

    A packed reactive distillation column producing ethyl tert-butyl ether from tert-butyl alcohol and ethanol was simulated for detection of multiple steady states using Aspen Plus®. A rate-based approach was used to make the simulation model more realistic. A base-case was first developed and fine...

  7. 77 FR 34211 - Modification of Multiple Compulsory Reporting Points; Continental United States, Alaska and Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 [Docket No. FAA-2012-0130; Airspace Docket No. 12-AWA-2] RIN 2120-AA66 Modification of Multiple Compulsory Reporting Points; Continental United States, Alaska and Hawaii AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final...

  8. Spa47 is an oligomerization-activated type three secretion system (T3SS) ATPase from Shigella flexneri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Jamie L; Jones, Heather B; Kumar, Prashant; Toth, Ronald T; Middaugh, C Russell; Antony, Edwin; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative pathogens often use conserved type three secretion systems (T3SS) for virulence. The Shigella type three secretion apparatus (T3SA) penetrates the host cell membrane and provides a unidirectional conduit for injection of effectors into host cells. The protein Spa47 localizes to the base of the apparatus and is speculated to be an ATPase that provides the energy for T3SA formation and secretion. Here, we developed an expression and purification protocol, producing active Spa47 and providing the first direct evidence that Spa47 is a bona fide ATPase. Additionally, size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation identified multiple oligomeric species of Spa47 with the largest greater than 8 fold more active for ATP hydrolysis than the monomer. An ATPase inactive Spa47 point mutant was then engineered by targeting a conserved Lysine within the predicted Walker A motif of Spa47. Interestingly, the mutant maintained a similar oligomerization pattern as active Spa47, but was unable to restore invasion phenotype when used to complement a spa47 null S. flexneri strain. Together, these results identify Spa47 as a Shigella T3SS ATPase and suggest that its activity is linked to oligomerization, perhaps as a regulatory mechanism as seen in some related pathogens. Additionally, Spa47 catalyzed ATP hydrolysis appears to be essential for host cell invasion, providing a strong platform for additional studies dissecting its role in virulence and providing an attractive target for anti-infective agents. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  9. Iron-induced oligomerization of human FXN81-210 and bacterial CyaY frataxin and the effect of iron chelators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlgren, Eva Christina; Fekry, Mostafa; Wiemann, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    long forms, FXN42-210 and FXN56-210, have been shown to spontaneously form oligomeric particles stabilized by the extended N-terminal sequence. The short variant FXN81-210, on other hand, has only been observed in the monomeric state. However, a highly homologous E. coli frataxin CyaY, which also lacks...

  10. The Human Acid-Sensing Ion Channel ASIC1a: Evidence for a Homotetrameric Assembly State at the Cell Surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Xavier van Bemmelen

    Full Text Available The chicken acid-sensing ion channel ASIC1 has been crystallized as a homotrimer. We address here the oligomeric state of the functional ASIC1 in situ at the cell surface. The oligomeric states of functional ASIC1a and mutants with additional cysteines introduced in the extracellular pore vestibule were resolved on SDS-PAGE. The functional ASIC1 complexes were stabilized at the cell surface of Xenopus laevis oocytes or CHO cells either using the sulfhydryl crosslinker BMOE, or sodium tetrathionate (NaTT. Under these different crosslinking conditions ASIC1a migrates as four distinct oligomeric states that correspond by mass to multiples of a single ASIC1a subunit. The relative importance of each of the four ASIC1a oligomers was critically dependent on the availability of cysteines in the transmembrane domain for crosslinking, consistent with the presence of ASIC1a homo-oligomers. The expression of ASIC1a monomers, trimeric or tetrameric concatemeric cDNA constructs resulted in functional channels. The resulting ASIC1a complexes are resolved as a predominant tetramer over the other oligomeric forms, after stabilization with BMOE or NaTT and SDS-PAGE/western blot analysis. Our data identify a major ASIC1a homotetramer at the surface membrane of the cell expressing functional ASIC1a channel.

  11. Multi-objective optimization of linear multi-state multiple sliding window system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konak, Abdullah; Kulturel-Konak, Sadan; Levitin, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the optimal element sequencing in a linear multi-state multiple sliding window system that consists of n linearly ordered multi-state elements. Each multi-state element can have different states: from complete failure up to perfect functioning. A performance rate is associated with each state. The failure of type i in the system occurs if for any i (1≤i≤I) the cumulative performance of any r i consecutive elements is lower than w i . The element sequence strongly affects the probability of any type of system failure. The sequence that minimizes the probability of certain type of failure can provide high probability of other types of failures. Therefore the optimization problem for the multiple sliding window system is essentially multi-objective. The paper formulates and solves the multi-objective optimization problem for the multiple sliding window systems. A multi-objective Genetic Algorithm is used as the optimization engine. Illustrative examples are presented.

  12. Joint estimation over multiple individuals improves behavioural state inference from animal movement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsen, Ian

    2016-02-08

    State-space models provide a powerful way to scale up inference of movement behaviours from individuals to populations when the inference is made across multiple individuals. Here, I show how a joint estimation approach that assumes individuals share identical movement parameters can lead to improved inference of behavioural states associated with different movement processes. I use simulated movement paths with known behavioural states to compare estimation error between nonhierarchical and joint estimation formulations of an otherwise identical state-space model. Behavioural state estimation error was strongly affected by the degree of similarity between movement patterns characterising the behavioural states, with less error when movements were strongly dissimilar between states. The joint estimation model improved behavioural state estimation relative to the nonhierarchical model for simulated data with heavy-tailed Argos location errors. When applied to Argos telemetry datasets from 10 Weddell seals, the nonhierarchical model estimated highly uncertain behavioural state switching probabilities for most individuals whereas the joint estimation model yielded substantially less uncertainty. The joint estimation model better resolved the behavioural state sequences across all seals. Hierarchical or joint estimation models should be the preferred choice for estimating behavioural states from animal movement data, especially when location data are error-prone.

  13. Advanced topics in control and estimation of state-multiplicative noisy systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gershon, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Topics in Control and Estimation of State-Multiplicative Noisy Systems begins with an introduction and extensive literature survey. The text proceeds to cover solutions of measurement-feedback control and state problems and the formulation of the Bounded Real Lemma for both continuous- and discrete-time systems. The continuous-time reduced-order and stochastic-tracking control problems for delayed systems are then treated. Ideas of nonlinear stability are introduced for infinite-horizon systems, again, in both the continuous- and discrete-time cases. The reader is introduced to six practical examples of noisy state-multiplicative control and filtering associated with various fields of control engineering. The book is rounded out by a three-part appendix containing stochastic tools necessary for a proper appreciation of the text: a basic introduction to nonlinear stochastic differential equations and aspects of switched systems and peak to peak  optimal control and filtering. Advanced Topics in Contr...

  14. Induced oligomerization targets Golgi proteins for degradation in lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Ritika; Bachert, Collin; Linstedt, Adam D

    2015-12-01

    Manganese protects cells against forms of Shiga toxin by down-regulating the cycling Golgi protein GPP130. Down-regulation occurs when Mn binding causes GPP130 to oligomerize and traffic to lysosomes. To determine how GPP130 is redirected to lysosomes, we tested the role of GGA1 and clathrin, which mediate sorting in the canonical Golgi-to-lysosome pathway. GPP130 oligomerization was induced using either Mn or a self-interacting version of the FKBP domain. Inhibition of GGA1 or clathrin specifically blocked GPP130 redistribution, suggesting recognition of the aggregated GPP130 by the GGA1/clathrin-sorting complex. Unexpectedly, however, GPP130's cytoplasmic domain was not required, and redistribution also occurred after removal of GPP130 sequences needed for its normal cycling. Therefore, to test whether aggregate recognition might be a general phenomenon rather than one involving a specific GPP130 determinant, we induced homo-oligomerization of two unrelated Golgi-targeted constructs using the FKBP strategy. These were targeted to the cis- and trans-Golgi, respectively, using domains from mannosidase-1 and galactosyltransferase. Significantly, upon oligomerization, each redistributed to peripheral punctae and was degraded. This occurred in the absence of detectable UPR activation. These findings suggest the unexpected presence of quality control in the Golgi that recognizes aggregated Golgi proteins and targets them for degradation in lysosomes. © 2015 Tewari et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  15. Higgsplosion: Solving the hierarchy problem via rapid decays of heavy states into multiple Higgs bosons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoze, Valentin V.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2018-01-01

    We introduce and discuss two inter-related mechanisms operative in the electroweak sector of the Standard Model at high energies. Higgsplosion, the first mechanism, occurs at some critical energy in the 25 to 103 TeV range, and leads to an exponentially growing decay rate of highly energetic particles into multiple Higgs bosons. We argue that this is a well-controlled non-perturbative phenomenon in the Higgs-sector which involves the final state Higgs multiplicities n in the regime nλ ≫ 1 where λ is the Higgs self-coupling. If this mechanism is realised in nature, the cross-sections for producing ultra-high multiplicities of Higgs bosons are likely to become observable and even dominant in this energy range. At the same time, however, the apparent exponential growth of these cross-sections at even higher energies will be tamed and automatically cut-off by a related Higgspersion mechanism. As a result, and in contrast to previous studies, multi-Higgs production does not violate perturbative unitarity. Building on this approach, we then argue that the effects of Higgsplosion alter quantum corrections from very heavy states to the Higgs boson mass. Above a certain energy, which is much smaller than their masses, these states would rapidly decay into multiple Higgs bosons. The heavy states become unrealised as they decay much faster than they are formed. The loop integrals contributing to the Higgs mass will be cut off not by the masses of the heavy states, but by the characteristic loop momenta where their decay widths become comparable to their masses. Hence, the cut-off scale would be many orders of magnitude lower than the heavy mass scales themselves, thus suppressing their quantum corrections to the Higgs boson mass.

  16. Multiple Climate States of Habitable Exoplanets: The Role of Obliquity and Irradiance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilic, C.; Raible, C. C.; Stocker, T. F.

    2017-01-01

    Stable, steady climate states on an Earth-size planet with no continents are determined as a function of the tilt of the planet’s rotation axis (obliquity) and stellar irradiance. Using a general circulation model of the atmosphere coupled to a slab ocean and a thermodynamic sea ice model, two states, the Aquaplanet and the Cryoplanet, are found for high and low stellar irradiance, respectively. In addition, four stable states with seasonally and perennially open water are discovered if comprehensively exploring a parameter space of obliquity from 0° to 90° and stellar irradiance from 70% to 135% of the present-day solar constant. Within 11% of today’s solar irradiance, we find a rich structure of stable states that extends the area of habitability considerably. For the same set of parameters, different stable states result if simulations are initialized from an aquaplanet or a cryoplanet state. This demonstrates the possibility of multiple equilibria, hysteresis, and potentially rapid climate change in response to small changes in the orbital parameters. The dynamics of the atmosphere of an aquaplanet or a cryoplanet state is investigated for similar values of obliquity and stellar irradiance. The atmospheric circulation substantially differs in the two states owing to the relative strength of the primary drivers of the meridional transport of heat and momentum. At 90° obliquity and present-day solar constant, the atmospheric dynamics of an Aquaplanet state and one with an equatorial ice cover is analyzed.

  17. Multiple Climate States of Habitable Exoplanets: The Role of Obliquity and Irradiance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, C.; Raible, C. C.; Stocker, T. F., E-mail: stocker@climate.unibe.ch [Climate and Environmental Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern (Switzerland)

    2017-08-01

    Stable, steady climate states on an Earth-size planet with no continents are determined as a function of the tilt of the planet’s rotation axis (obliquity) and stellar irradiance. Using a general circulation model of the atmosphere coupled to a slab ocean and a thermodynamic sea ice model, two states, the Aquaplanet and the Cryoplanet, are found for high and low stellar irradiance, respectively. In addition, four stable states with seasonally and perennially open water are discovered if comprehensively exploring a parameter space of obliquity from 0° to 90° and stellar irradiance from 70% to 135% of the present-day solar constant. Within 11% of today’s solar irradiance, we find a rich structure of stable states that extends the area of habitability considerably. For the same set of parameters, different stable states result if simulations are initialized from an aquaplanet or a cryoplanet state. This demonstrates the possibility of multiple equilibria, hysteresis, and potentially rapid climate change in response to small changes in the orbital parameters. The dynamics of the atmosphere of an aquaplanet or a cryoplanet state is investigated for similar values of obliquity and stellar irradiance. The atmospheric circulation substantially differs in the two states owing to the relative strength of the primary drivers of the meridional transport of heat and momentum. At 90° obliquity and present-day solar constant, the atmospheric dynamics of an Aquaplanet state and one with an equatorial ice cover is analyzed.

  18. Both Ca2+ and Zn2+ are essential for S100A12 protein oligomerization and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhtman Alexander

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human S100A12 is a member of the S100 family of EF-hand calcium-modulated proteins that are associated with many diseases including cancer, chronic inflammation and neurological disorders. S100A12 is an important factor in host/parasite defenses and in the inflammatory response. Like several other S100 proteins, it binds zinc and copper in addition to calcium. Mechanisms of zinc regulation have been proposed for a number of S100 proteins e.g. S100B, S100A2, S100A7, S100A8/9. The interaction of S100 proteins with their targets is strongly dependent on cellular microenvironment. Results The aim of the study was to explore the factors that influence S100A12 oligomerization and target interaction. A comprehensive series of biochemical and biophysical experiments indicated that changes in the concentration of calcium and zinc led to changes in the oligomeric state of S100A12. Surface plasmon resonance confirmed that the presence of both calcium and zinc is essential for the interaction of S100A12 with one of its extracellular targets, RAGE – the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products. By using a single-molecule approach we have shown that the presence of zinc in tissue culture medium favors both the oligomerization of exogenous S100A12 protein and its interaction with targets on the cell surface. Conclusion We have shown that oligomerization and target recognition by S100A12 is regulated by both zinc and calcium. Our present work highlighted the potential role of calcium-binding S100 proteins in zinc metabolism and, in particular, the role of S100A12 in the cross talk between zinc and calcium in cell signaling.

  19. Real-Time Radar-Based Tracking and State Estimation of Multiple Non-Conformant Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brandon; Arnett, Timothy; Macmann, Owen; Kumar, Manish

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a novel solution for automated tracking of multiple unknown aircraft is proposed. Many current methods use transponders to self-report state information and augment track identification. While conformant aircraft typically report transponder information to alert surrounding aircraft of its state, vehicles may exist in the airspace that are non-compliant and need to be accurately tracked using alternative methods. In this study, a multi-agent tracking solution is presented that solely utilizes primary surveillance radar data to estimate aircraft state information. Main research challenges include state estimation, track management, data association, and establishing persistent track validity. In an effort to realize these challenges, techniques such as Maximum a Posteriori estimation, Kalman filtering, degree of membership data association, and Nearest Neighbor Spanning Tree clustering are implemented for this application.

  20. Homogeneous Stabilizer by State Feedback for Switched Nonlinear Systems Using Multiple Lyapunov Functions’ Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of global stabilization for a class of switched nonlinear systems using multiple Lyapunov functions (MLFs. The restrictions on nonlinearities are neither linear growth condition nor Lipschitz condition with respect to system states. Based on adding a power integrator technique, we design homogeneous state feedback controllers of all subsystems and a switching law to guarantee that the closed-loop system is globally asymptotically stable. Finally, an example is given to illustrate the validity of the proposed control scheme.

  1. Use of wiener nonlinear MPC to control a CSTR with multiple steady state

    OpenAIRE

    Lusson Cervantes, A.; Agamennoni, O.E.; Figueroa, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a Nonlinear Model Predictive Control based on a Wiener Model with a Piecewise Linear gain is presented. The major advantages of this algorithm is that it retains all the interesting properties of the classical linear MPC and the computations are easy to solve due to the canonical structure of the nonlinear gain. The proposed control scheme is applied to a nonlinear CSTR that presents multiple steady states.

  2. Solid-State Neutron Multiplicity Counting System Using Commercial Off-the-Shelf Semiconductor Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozhdestvenskyy, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-09

    This work iterates on the first demonstration of a solid-state neutron multiplicity counting system developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by using commercial off-the-shelf detectors. The system was demonstrated to determine the mass of a californium-252 neutron source within 20% error requiring only one-hour measurement time with 20 cm2 of active detector area.

  3. The Over-Barrier Resonant States and Multi-Channel Scattering in Multiple Quantum Wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Polupanov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an explicit numerical method for accurate calculation of the scattering matrix and its poles, and apply this method to describe the multi-channel scattering in the multiple quantum-wells structures. The S-matrix is continued analytically to the unphysical region of complex energy values. Results of calculations show that there exist one or more S-matrix poles, corresponding to the over-barrier resonant states critical for the effect of the absolute reflection of holes in the energy range where only the heavy ones may propagate over barriers in a structure. Light- and heavy-hole states are described by the Luttinger Hamiltonian matrix. In contrast to the single quantum-well case, at some parameters of a multiple quantum-wells structure the number of S-matrix poles may exceed that of the absolute reflection peaks, and at different values of parameters the absolute reflection peak corresponds to different resonant states. The imaginary parts of the S-matrix poles and hence the lifetimes of resonant states as well as the widths of resonant peaks of absolute reflection depend drastically on the quantum-well potential depth. In the case of shallow quantum wells there is in fact a long-living over-barrier resonant hole state.

  4. Lithium-Ion Battery Online Rapid State-of-Power Estimation under Multiple Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Xiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to realize a rapid online estimation of the state-of-power (SOP with multiple constraints of a lithium-ion battery. Firstly, based on the improved first-order resistance-capacitance (RC model with one-state hysteresis, a linear state-space battery model is built; then, using the dual extended Kalman filtering (DEKF method, the battery parameters and states, including open-circuit voltage (OCV, are estimated. Secondly, by employing the estimated OCV as the observed value to build the second dual Kalman filters, the battery SOC is estimated. Thirdly, a novel rapid-calculating peak power/SOP method with multiple constraints is proposed in which, according to the bisection judgment method, the battery’s peak state is determined; then, one or two instantaneous peak powers are used to determine the peak power during T seconds. In addition, in the battery operating process, the actual constraint that the battery is under is analyzed specifically. Finally, three simplified versions of the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (SFUDS with inserted pulse experiments are conducted to verify the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed online SOP estimation method.

  5. Jumping magneto-electric states of electrons in semiconductor multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeffer, Pawel; Zawadzki, Wlodek

    2011-01-01

    Orbital and spin electron states in semiconductor multiple quantum wells in the presence of an external magnetic field transverse to the growth direction are considered. Rectangular wells of GaAs/GaAlAs and InAs/AlSb are taken as examples. It is shown that, in addition to magneto-electric states known from one-well systems, there appear magneto-electric states having a much stronger dependence of energies on a magnetic field and exhibiting an interesting anti-crossing behavior. The origin of these states is investigated and it is shown that the strong field dependence of the energies is related to an unusual 'jumping' behavior of their wavefunctions between quantum wells as the field increases. The ways of investigating the jumping states by means of interband magneto-luminescence transitions or intraband cyclotron-like transitions are considered and it is demonstrated that the jumping states can be observed. The spin g factors of electrons in the jumping states are calculated using the real values of the spin–orbit interaction and bands' nonparabolicity for the semiconductors in question. It is demonstrated that the jumping states offer a wide variety of the spin g factors

  6. Resting-state connectivity of pre-motor cortex reflects disability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonowski, A-M; Siebner, H R; Soelberg Sørensen, P; Paulson, O B; Dyrby, T B; Blinkenberg, M; Madsen, K H

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the relationship between motor resting-state connectivity of the dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) and clinical disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 27 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) and 15 patients with secondary progressive MS (SP-MS) underwent functional resting-state magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Independent component analysis was used to characterize motor resting-state connectivity. Multiple regression analysis was performed in SPM8 between the individual expression of motor resting-state connectivity in PMd and EDSS scores including age as covariate. Separate post hoc analyses were performed for patients with RR-MS and SP-MS. The EDSS scores ranged from 0 to 7 with a median score of 4.3. Motor resting-state connectivity of left PMd showed a positive linear relation with clinical disability in patients with MS. This effect was stronger when considering the group of patients with RR-MS alone, whereas patients with SP-MS showed no increase in coupling strength between left PMd and the motor resting-state network with increasing clinical disability. No significant relation between motor resting-state connectivity of the right PMd and clinical disability was detected in MS. The increase in functional coupling between left PMd and the motor resting-state network with increasing clinical disability can be interpreted as adaptive reorganization of the motor system to maintain motor function, which appears to be limited to the relapsing-remitting stage of the disease. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. [Multiple-Victimisation due to Armed Conflict and Emotional Distress in the State of Magdalena, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo-Arias, Adalberto; Sanabria, Adriana R; Ospino, Anyelly; Guerra, Valeria M; Caamaño, Beatriz H

    Emotional distress is common in Colombian armed conflict victims. Multiple-victimisation is associated with an increase in emotional distress than victimisation due a single event. However, the association between poly-victimisation and emotional distress among victims of the armed conflict in Colombia has not been documented. To study the association between multiple-victimisation and emotional distress in victims of armed conflict in the State of Magdalena, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was designed, with a secondary analysis of registration of the Psychosocial Care Program and Victim Integral Health (PAPSIVI) in the State of Magdalena, from 2013 to 2014. The profile formula grouped demographic variables, victimising events, and a set of symptoms of emotional distress (perceived discrimination, depressive and anxiety-stress). Odds ratio (OR, 95%CI) were established as measures of association. A total of 943 people were included, with 67.4% women, and ages between18 and 94 years (mean 47.9±14.2). A total of 109 (11.7%) suffered from multiple victimisation. Multiple victimisation events were associated with more emotional distress, depressive symptoms (OR=1.5; 95%CI, 1.3-1.8), perceived stigma (OR=1.3; 95%CI, 1.1-1.5), and anxiety-stress (OR=1.2; 95%CI 1.0-1.4) than a single event. There is more emotional distress in multiple victimisations than in a single victimisation event during armed conflict in this region of Colombia. Further studies are required on this topic. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Unified thalamic model generates multiple distinct oscillations with state-dependent entrainment by stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoshi Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The thalamus plays a critical role in the genesis of thalamocortical oscillations, yet the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. To understand whether the isolated thalamus can generate multiple distinct oscillations, we developed a biophysical thalamic model to test the hypothesis that generation of and transition between distinct thalamic oscillations can be explained as a function of neuromodulation by acetylcholine (ACh and norepinephrine (NE and afferent synaptic excitation. Indeed, the model exhibited four distinct thalamic rhythms (delta, sleep spindle, alpha and gamma oscillations that span the physiological states corresponding to different arousal levels from deep sleep to focused attention. Our simulation results indicate that generation of these distinct thalamic oscillations is a result of both intrinsic oscillatory cellular properties and specific network connectivity patterns. We then systematically varied the ACh/NE and input levels to generate a complete map of the different oscillatory states and their transitions. Lastly, we applied periodic stimulation to the thalamic network and found that entrainment of thalamic oscillations is highly state-dependent. Our results support the hypothesis that ACh/NE modulation and afferent excitation define thalamic oscillatory states and their response to brain stimulation. Our model proposes a broader and more central role of the thalamus in the genesis of multiple distinct thalamo-cortical rhythms than previously assumed.

  9. The continuous end-state comfort effect: weighted integration of multiple biases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, Oliver; Butz, Martin V

    2012-05-01

    The grasp orientation when grasping an object is frequently aligned in anticipation of the intended rotation of the object (end-state comfort effect). We analyzed grasp orientation selection in a continuous task to determine the mechanisms underlying the end-state comfort effect. Participants had to grasp a box by a circular handle-which allowed for arbitrary grasp orientations-and then had to rotate the box by various angles. Experiments 1 and 2 revealed both that the rotation's direction considerably determined grasp orientations and that end-postures varied considerably. Experiments 3 and 4 further showed that visual stimuli and initial arm postures biased grasp orientations if the intended rotation could be easily achieved. The data show that end-state comfort but also other factors determine grasp orientation selection. A simple mechanism that integrates multiple weighted biases can account for the data.

  10. Memory State Feedback RMPC for Multiple Time-Delayed Uncertain Linear Systems with Input Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the problem of asymptotic stabilization for a class of discrete-time multiple time-delayed uncertain linear systems with input constraints. Then, based on the predictive control principle of receding horizon optimization, a delayed state dependent quadratic function is considered for incorporating MPC problem formulation. By developing a memory state feedback controller, the information of the delayed plant states can be taken into full consideration. The MPC problem is formulated to minimize the upper bound of infinite horizon cost that satisfies the sufficient conditions. Then, based on the Lyapunov-Krasovskii function, a delay-dependent sufficient condition in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI can be derived to design a robust MPC algorithm. Finally, the digital simulation results prove availability of the proposed method.

  11. Oligomerization of G protein-coupled receptors: computational methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selent, J; Kaczor, A A

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has unveiled the complexity of mechanisms involved in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) functioning in which receptor dimerization/oligomerization may play an important role. Although the first high-resolution X-ray structure for a likely functional chemokine receptor dimer has been deposited in the Protein Data Bank, the interactions and mechanisms of dimer formation are not yet fully understood. In this respect, computational methods play a key role for predicting accurate GPCR complexes. This review outlines computational approaches focusing on sequence- and structure-based methodologies as well as discusses their advantages and limitations. Sequence-based approaches that search for possible protein-protein interfaces in GPCR complexes have been applied with success in several studies, but did not yield always consistent results. Structure-based methodologies are a potent complement to sequence-based approaches. For instance, protein-protein docking is a valuable method especially when guided by experimental constraints. Some disadvantages like limited receptor flexibility and non-consideration of the membrane environment have to be taken into account. Molecular dynamics simulation can overcome these drawbacks giving a detailed description of conformational changes in a native-like membrane. Successful prediction of GPCR complexes using computational approaches combined with experimental efforts may help to understand the role of dimeric/oligomeric GPCR complexes for fine-tuning receptor signaling. Moreover, since such GPCR complexes have attracted interest as potential drug target for diverse diseases, unveiling molecular determinants of dimerization/oligomerization can provide important implications for drug discovery.

  12. Predicting hearing thresholds and occupational hearing loss with multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruey-Fen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chen, Shun-Sheng

    2010-10-01

    An objective investigation is needed to verify the existence and severity of hearing impairments resulting from work-related, noise-induced hearing loss in arbitration of medicolegal aspects. We investigated the accuracy of multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses (Mf-ASSRs) between subjects with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) with and without occupational noise exposure. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary referral medical centre. Pure-tone audiometry and Mf-ASSRs were recorded in 88 subjects (34 patients had occupational noise-induced hearing loss [NIHL], 36 patients had SNHL without noise exposure, and 18 volunteers were normal controls). Inter- and intragroup comparisons were made. A predicting equation was derived using multiple linear regression analysis. ASSRs and pure-tone thresholds (PTTs) showed a strong correlation for all subjects (r = .77 ≈ .94). The relationship is demonstrated by the equationThe differences between the ASSR and PTT were significantly higher for the NIHL group than for the subjects with non-noise-induced SNHL (p tool for objectively evaluating hearing thresholds. Predictive value may be lower in subjects with occupational hearing loss. Regardless of carrier frequencies, the severity of hearing loss affects the steady-state response. Moreover, the ASSR may assist in detecting noise-induced injury of the auditory pathway. A multiple linear regression equation to accurately predict thresholds was shown that takes into consideration all effect factors.

  13. Oxygen entry through multiple pathways in T-state human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Masayoshi; Kurisaki, Ikuo; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2013-05-23

    The heme oxygen (O2) binding site of human hemoglobin (HbA) is buried in the interior of the protein, and there is a debate over the O2 entry pathways from solvent to the binding site. As a first step to understand HbA O2 binding process at the atomic level, we detected all significant multiple O2 entry pathways from solvent to the binding site in the α and β subunits of the T-state tetramer HbA by utilizing ensemble molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. By executing 128 independent 8 ns MD trajectories in O2-rich aqueous solvent, we simulated the O2 entry processes and obtained 141 and 425 O2 entry events in the α and β subunits of HbA, respectively. We developed the intrinsic pathway identification by clustering method to achieve a persuasive visualization of the multiple entry pathways including both the shapes and relative importance of each pathway. The rate constants of O2 entry estimated from the MD simulations correspond to the experimentally observed values, suggesting that O2 ligands enter the binding site through multiple pathways. The obtained multiple pathway map can be utilized for future detailed analysis of HbA O2 binding process.

  14. Mechanism of the electrochemical oligomerization of thionaphteneindole: a spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Gabriella; Casalbore Miceli, Giuseppe; Beggiato, Giancarlo; Emmi, Salvatore S.

    1997-10-01

    The UV, visible and NIR spectra recorded during electrolysis of TNI in CH 2Cl 2 have been studied as a function of electrolysis time and of the quantity of charge exchanged. Among the oligomeric species that might be responsible for the behaviour observed, particular attention has been devoted to dimers of TNI characterized by different charges, presence of unpaired electrons, and deprotonation of the amino hydrogens. A sample of these species has been described theoretically by means of the PM3 semiempirical hamiltonian and their spectra have been computed giving results in reasonable agreement with the observed transitions.

  15. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein specific antibodies are pathogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geng, Hui; Nandakumar, Kutty Selva; Pramhed, Anna

    2012-01-01

    -specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). METHODS: B cell immunodominant regions on the COMP molecule were measured with a novel enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using mammalian expressed full-length mouse COMP as well as a panel of recombinant mouse COMP fragments. 18 mAbs specific to COMP were generated......ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a major non-collagenous component of cartilage. Earlier, we developed a new mouse model for rheumatoid arthritis using COMP. This study was undertaken to investigate the epitope specificity and immunopathogenicity of COMP...

  16. Receptor Oligomerization as a Process Modulating Cellular Semiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio; Maggio, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    be another level of quality control that may help maintaining GPCRs rather stable throughout evolution. We propose here receptor oligomerization to be a basic molecular mechanism controlling GPCRs redundancy in many different cell types, and the plasma membrane as the first hierarchical cell structure...... at which selective categorical sensing may occur. Categorical sensing can be seen as the cellular capacity for identifying and ordering complex patterns of mixed signals out of a contextual matrix, i.e., the recognition of meaningful patterns out of ubiquitous signals. In this context, redundancy...

  17. Density of states calculations and multiple-scattering theory for photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, A.

    1994-05-01

    The density of states for a finite or an infinite cluster of scatterers in the case of both, electrons and photons, can be represented in a general form as the sum over all Krein-Friedel contributions of individual scatterers and a contribution due to the presence of multiple scatterers. The latter is given by the sum over all periodic orbits between different scatterers. General three dimensional multiple-scattering theory for electromagnetic waves in the presence of scatterers of arbitrary shape is presented. Vector structure constants are calculated and general rules for obtaining them from known scalar structure constants are given. The KKR equations for photons are explicitly written down. (author). 22 refs., 2 figs

  18. Simultaneous estimation of multiple phases in digital holographic interferometry using state space analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh; Rastogi, Pramod

    2018-05-01

    A new approach is proposed for the multiple phase estimation from a multicomponent exponential phase signal recorded in multi-beam digital holographic interferometry. It is capable of providing multidimensional measurements in a simultaneous manner from a single recording of the exponential phase signal encoding multiple phases. Each phase within a small window around each pixel is appproximated with a first order polynomial function of spatial coordinates. The problem of accurate estimation of polynomial coefficients, and in turn the unwrapped phases, is formulated as a state space analysis wherein the coefficients and signal amplitudes are set as the elements of a state vector. The state estimation is performed using the extended Kalman filter. An amplitude discrimination criterion is utilized in order to unambiguously estimate the coefficients associated with the individual signal components. The performance of proposed method is stable over a wide range of the ratio of signal amplitudes. The pixelwise phase estimation approach of the proposed method allows it to handle the fringe patterns that may contain invalid regions.

  19. Abnormal Multiple Charge Memory States in Exfoliated Few-Layer WSe2 Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mikai; Wang, Yifan; Shepherd, Nathan; Huard, Chad; Zhou, Jiantao; Guo, L J; Lu, Wei; Liang, Xiaogan

    2017-01-24

    To construct reliable nanoelectronic devices based on emerging 2D layered semiconductors, we need to understand the charge-trapping processes in such devices. Additionally, the identified charge-trapping schemes in such layered materials could be further exploited to make multibit (or highly desirable analog-tunable) memory devices. Here, we present a study on the abnormal charge-trapping or memory characteristics of few-layer WSe 2 transistors. This work shows that multiple charge-trapping states with large extrema spacing, long retention time, and analog tunability can be excited in the transistors made from mechanically exfoliated few-layer WSe 2 flakes, whereas they cannot be generated in widely studied few-layer MoS 2 transistors. Such charge-trapping characteristics of WSe 2 transistors are attributed to the exfoliation-induced interlayer deformation on the cleaved surfaces of few-layer WSe 2 flakes, which can spontaneously form ambipolar charge-trapping sites. Our additional results from surface characterization, charge-retention characterization at different temperatures, and density functional theory computation strongly support this explanation. Furthermore, our research also demonstrates that the charge-trapping states excited in multiple transistors can be calibrated into consistent multibit data storage levels. This work advances the understanding of the charge memory mechanisms in layered semiconductors, and the observed charge-trapping states could be further studied for enabling ultralow-cost multibit analog memory devices.

  20. Variations in community exposure to lahar hazards from multiple volcanoes in Washington State (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Angela K.; Wood, Nathan J.; Ewert, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how communities are vulnerable to lahar hazards provides critical input for effective design and implementation of volcano hazard preparedness and mitigation strategies. Past vulnerability assessments have focused largely on hazards posed by a single volcano, even though communities and officials in many parts of the world must plan for and contend with hazards associated with multiple volcanoes. To better understand community vulnerability in regions with multiple volcanic threats, we characterize and compare variations in community exposure to lahar hazards associated with five active volcanoes in Washington State, USA—Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount Adams and Mount St. Helens—each having the potential to generate catastrophic lahars that could strike communities tens of kilometers downstream. We use geospatial datasets that represent various population indicators (e.g., land cover, residents, employees, tourists) along with mapped lahar-hazard boundaries at each volcano to determine the distributions of populations within communities that occupy lahar-prone areas. We estimate that Washington lahar-hazard zones collectively contain 191,555 residents, 108,719 employees, 433 public venues that attract visitors, and 354 dependent-care facilities that house individuals that will need assistance to evacuate. We find that population exposure varies considerably across the State both in type (e.g., residential, tourist, employee) and distribution of people (e.g., urban to rural). We develop composite lahar-exposure indices to identify communities most at-risk and communities throughout the State who share common issues of vulnerability to lahar-hazards. We find that although lahars are a regional hazard that will impact communities in different ways there are commonalities in community exposure across multiple volcanoes. Results will aid emergency managers, local officials, and the public in educating at-risk populations and developing

  1. Dancing multiplicity states supported by a carboxylated group in dicopper structures bonded to O2

    KAUST Repository

    Poater, Albert

    2013-01-29

    The present study pretends to assign the correct multiplicity state to dinuclear copper complexes when interacting with free molecular oxygen. Recently, the formation of a bridge butterfly μ-η2: η2-peroxo dicopper core structure stabilized by the direct interaction of the counterion, a carboxylate group that allows the double bridge linking both metal-centre atoms, was characterized by crystallography. This system was assigned as a diradical singlet with Ms = 0. However, after new calculations it has turned out to be triplet (Ms = 1) despite the stabilization for this latter multiplicity state is not high. Here, the factors that contribute to make this structure display a multiplicity different with respect to the previously expected diradical singlet are described. In the present theoretical study, the roles of the αSp ligand constraints and the counterion are unravelled. On the other hand, the relative stability between the butterfly μ-η2: η2-peroxo structure and the isomeric bis(μ-oxo) species is also on discussion. Despite the relative stabilities of all these either structural or electronic isomeric species are supposed to depend on the computational method, which is a difficulty to reach a definite conclusion about the nature of the active species, all DFT methods using either pure or not pure DFT functionals here reach the same conclusion, favoring the triplet as the ground state for the butterfly μ-η2: η2-peroxo dicopper core structure, and the bis(μ-oxo) species when removing the benzoate counterion. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  2. A New Attribute Control Chart using Multiple Dependent State Repetitive Sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Aldosari, Mansour Sattam; Aslam, Muhammad; Jun, Chi-Hyuck

    2017-01-01

    In this manuscript, a new attribute control chart using multiple dependent state repetitive sampling is designed. The operational procedure and structure of the proposed control chart is given. The required measures to determine the average run length (ARL) for in-control and out-of-control processes are given. Tables of ARLs are reported for various control chart parameters. The proposed control chart is more sensitive in detecting a small shift in the process as compared to the existing attribute control charts. The simulation study shows the efficiency of the proposed chart over the existing charts. An example is given for the illustration purpose.

  3. A New Attribute Control Chart using Multiple Dependent State Repetitive Sampling

    KAUST Repository

    Aldosari, Mansour Sattam

    2017-03-25

    In this manuscript, a new attribute control chart using multiple dependent state repetitive sampling is designed. The operational procedure and structure of the proposed control chart is given. The required measures to determine the average run length (ARL) for in-control and out-of-control processes are given. Tables of ARLs are reported for various control chart parameters. The proposed control chart is more sensitive in detecting a small shift in the process as compared to the existing attribute control charts. The simulation study shows the efficiency of the proposed chart over the existing charts. An example is given for the illustration purpose.

  4. Localized versus itinerant states created by multiple oxygen vacancies in SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Harald O.; Shen, Juan; Valentí, Roser

    2015-02-01

    Oxygen vacancies in strontium titanate surfaces (SrTiO3) have been linked to the presence of a two-dimensional electron gas with unique behavior. We perform a detailed density functional theory study of the lattice and electronic structure of SrTiO3 slabs with multiple oxygen vacancies, with a main focus on two vacancies near a titanium dioxide terminated SrTiO3 surface. We conclude based on total energies that the two vacancies preferably inhabit the first two layers, i.e. they cluster vertically, while in the direction parallel to the surface, the vacancies show a weak tendency towards equal spacing. Analysis of the nonmagnetic electronic structure indicates that oxygen defects in the surface TiO2 layer lead to population of Ti {{t}2g} states and thus itinerancy of the electrons donated by the oxygen vacancy. In contrast, electrons from subsurface oxygen vacancies populate Ti eg states and remain localized on the two Ti ions neighboring the vacancy. We find that both the formation of a bound oxygen-vacancy state composed of hybridized Ti 3eg and 4p states neighboring the oxygen vacancy as well as the elastic deformation after extracting oxygen contribute to the stabilization of the in-gap state.

  5. Zn(2+) site engineering at the oligomeric interface of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard-Nielsen, Kristine; Norregaard, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne

    2002-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters exist as homo-oligomeric proteins. However, the functional implication of this oligomerization remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a Zn(2+) binding site at the predicted dimeric interface...

  6. An integrated probabilistic risk analysis decision support methodology for systems with multiple state variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, P.; Tan, John K.G.; Spencer, David

    1999-01-01

    Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) methods have been proven to be valuable in risk and reliability analysis. However, a weak link seems to exist between methods for analysing risks and those for making rational decisions. The integrated decision support system (IDSS) methodology presented in this paper attempts to address this issue in a practical manner. In consists of three phases: a PRA phase, a risk sensitivity analysis (SA) phase and an optimisation phase, which are implemented through an integrated computer software system. In the risk analysis phase the problem is analysed by the Boolean representation method (BRM), a PRA method that can deal with systems with multiple state variables and feedback loops. In the second phase the results obtained from the BRM are utilised directly to perform importance and risk SA. In the third phase, the problem is formulated as a multiple objective decision making problem in the form of multiple objective reliability optimisation. An industrial example is included. The resultant solutions of a five objective reliability optimisation are presented, on the basis of which rational decision making can be explored

  7. MAK33 antibody light chain amyloid fibrils are similar to oligomeric precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Hora

    Full Text Available Little structural information is available so far on amyloid fibrils consisting of immunoglobulin light chains. It is not understood which features of the primary sequence of the protein result in fibril formation. We report here MAS solid-state NMR studies to identify the structured core of κ-type variable domain light chain fibrils. The core contains residues of the CDR2 and the β-strands D, E, F and G of the native immunoglobulin fold. The assigned core region of the fibril is distinct in comparison to the core identified in a previous solid-state NMR study on AL-09 by Piehl at. al, suggesting that VL fibrils can adopt different topologies. In addition, we investigated a soluble oligomeric intermediate state, previously termed the alternatively folded state (AFS, using NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The NMR oligomer spectra display a high degree of similarity when compared to the fibril spectra, indicating a high structural similarity of the two aggregation states. Based on comparison to the native state NMR chemical shifts, we suggest that fibril formation via domain-swapping seems unlikely. Moreover, we used our results to test the quality of different amyloid prediction algorithms.

  8. A comparative study of symptoms in multiple lacunar state and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Youichi

    1993-01-01

    A multiple lacunar state is considered to cause gait disturbance, pseudobulbar palsy, or silent stroke. In the present study, these symptoms is multiple lacunar state and the incidences of abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated comparatively. Thirty-eight patients (23 males and 15 females; average age 73.6 y.o.) with ischemic cerebral lesions on T 2 weighted images of MRI were studied. In the group with gait disturbance only, the incidences of widening of the ventricular system and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) around the frontal horn were significantly high compared with the group with silent stroke (p<0.01, p<0.005; respectively), and hyperintensity area of the semioval center were demonstrated prominently in the regions perfused by anterior cerebral artery. In the group with pseudobulbar palsy only, the incidences of PVH around the posterior part of the lateral ventricle and hyperintensity area of the basal ganglion region were significantly high as compared with the group with silent stroke (p<0.01, p<0.05; respectively), and hyperintensity area of the semioval center were demonstrated prominently in the regions perfused by middle cerebral artery. (author)

  9. A comparative study of symptoms in multiple lacunar state and MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Youichi (Saint Marianna Univ., Kawasaki (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-10-01

    A multiple lacunar state is considered to cause gait disturbance, pseudobulbar palsy, or silent stroke. In the present study, these symptoms is multiple lacunar state and the incidences of abnormal findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were investigated comparatively. Thirty-eight patients (23 males and 15 females; average age 73.6 y.o.) with ischemic cerebral lesions on T[sub 2] weighted images of MRI were studied. In the group with gait disturbance only, the incidences of widening of the ventricular system and periventricular hyperintensity (PVH) around the frontal horn were significantly high compared with the group with silent stroke (p<0.01, p<0.005; respectively), and hyperintensity area of the semioval center were demonstrated prominently in the regions perfused by anterior cerebral artery. In the group with pseudobulbar palsy only, the incidences of PVH around the posterior part of the lateral ventricle and hyperintensity area of the basal ganglion region were significantly high as compared with the group with silent stroke (p<0.01, p<0.05; respectively), and hyperintensity area of the semioval center were demonstrated prominently in the regions perfused by middle cerebral artery. (author).

  10. Electron pumping of the ground state of 21Ne. Transfers and multiple diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckel, F.; Lombardi, M.

    1978-01-01

    The electron-pumping process of the ground state of 21 Ne has been studied. It is demonstrated how in a neon cell at a pressure of 10 -4 to 10 -2 torr, a high frequency discharge can create a nuclear spin alignment in the fundamental level (I=3/2) when the excited levels are themselves aligned. The nuclear alignment is observed by monitoring the change of the linear polarization of several optical transitions during the magnetic resonance of the fundamental level. Various transfers of the alignments are investigated and a detailed study of the influence of the multiple diffusion is carried out. The multiple diffusion produces a depolarization and a relaxation of the nuclear spin. A theoretical calculation has been made for a two-level system with a J=1 radiative level and a J=0 ground state. Experimentally a relaxation time of the nuclear alignment varying from 37 ms to 240 ms is observed when the neon pressure decreases from 10 -2 to 10 -4 torr [fr

  11. Bayesian state space models for dynamic genetic network construction across multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yulan; Kelemen, Arpad

    2016-08-01

    Construction of gene-gene interaction networks and potential pathways is a challenging and important problem in genomic research for complex diseases while estimating the dynamic changes of the temporal correlations and non-stationarity are the keys in this process. In this paper, we develop dynamic state space models with hierarchical Bayesian settings to tackle this challenge for inferring the dynamic profiles and genetic networks associated with disease treatments. We treat both the stochastic transition matrix and the observation matrix time-variant and include temporal correlation structures in the covariance matrix estimations in the multivariate Bayesian state space models. The unevenly spaced short time courses with unseen time points are treated as hidden state variables. Hierarchical Bayesian approaches with various prior and hyper-prior models with Monte Carlo Markov Chain and Gibbs sampling algorithms are used to estimate the model parameters and the hidden state variables. We apply the proposed Hierarchical Bayesian state space models to multiple tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and kidney) Affymetrix time course data sets following corticosteroid (CS) drug administration. Both simulation and real data analysis results show that the genomic changes over time and gene-gene interaction in response to CS treatment can be well captured by the proposed models. The proposed dynamic Hierarchical Bayesian state space modeling approaches could be expanded and applied to other large scale genomic data, such as next generation sequence (NGS) combined with real time and time varying electronic health record (EHR) for more comprehensive and robust systematic and network based analysis in order to transform big biomedical data into predictions and diagnostics for precision medicine and personalized healthcare with better decision making and patient outcomes.

  12. Multiple Resting-State Networks Are Associated With Tremors and Cognitive Features in Essential Tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Weidong; Chen, Huiyue; Wang, Hansheng; Zhang, Han; Liu, Mengqi; Puneet, Munankami; Lv, Fajin; Cheng, Oumei; Wang, Xuefeng; Lu, Xiurong; Luo, Tianyou

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous clinical features of essential tremor indicate that the dysfunctions of this syndrome are not confined to motor networks, but extend to nonmotor networks. Currently, these neural network dysfunctions in essential tremor remain unclear. In this study, independent component analysis of resting-state functional MRI was used to study these neural network mechanisms. Thirty-five essential tremor patients and 35 matched healthy controls with clinical and neuropsychological tests were included, and eight resting-state networks were identified. After considering the structure and head-motion factors and testing the reliability of the selected resting-state networks, we assessed the functional connectivity changes within or between resting-state networks. Finally, image-behavior correlation analysis was performed. Compared to healthy controls, essential tremor patients displayed increased functional connectivity in the sensorimotor and salience networks and decreased functional connectivity in the cerebellum network. Additionally, increased functional network connectivity was observed between anterior and posterior default mode networks, and a decreased functional network connectivity was noted between the cerebellum network and the sensorimotor and posterior default mode networks. Importantly, the functional connectivity changes within and between these resting-state networks were correlated with the tremor severity and total cognitive scores of essential tremor patients. The findings of this study provide the first evidence that functional connectivity changes within and between multiple resting-state networks are associated with tremors and cognitive features of essential tremor, and this work demonstrates a potential approach for identifying the underlying neural network mechanisms of this syndrome. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Multiple solutions of steady-state Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations with steric effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tai-Chia; Eisenberg, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Experiments measuring currents through single protein channels show unstable currents. Channels switch between ‘open’ or ‘closed’ states in a spontaneous stochastic process called gating. Currents are either (nearly) zero or at a definite level, characteristic of each type of protein, independent of time, once the channel is open. The steady state Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations with steric effects (PNP-steric equations) describe steady current through the open channel quite well, in a wide variety of conditions. Here we study the existence of multiple solutions of steady state PNP-steric equations to see if they themselves, without modification or augmentation, can describe two levels of current. We prove that there are two steady state solutions of PNP-steric equations for (a) three types of ion species (two types of cations and one type of anion) with a positive constant permanent charge, and (b) four types of ion species (two types of cations and their counter-ions) with a constant permanent charge but no sign condition. The excess currents (due to steric effects) associated with these two steady state solutions are derived and expressed as two distinct formulas. Our results indicate that PNP-steric equations may become a useful model to study spontaneous gating of ion channels. Spontaneous gating is thought to involve small structural changes in the channel protein that perhaps produce large changes in the profiles of free energy that determine ion flow. Gating is known to be modulated by external structures. Both can be included in future extensions of our present analysis. (paper)

  14. Motor imagery learning modulates functional connectivity of multiple brain systems in resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning.

  15. Motor Imagery Learning Modulates Functional Connectivity of Multiple Brain Systems in Resting State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Long, Zhiying; Ge, Ruiyang; Xu, Lele; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Learning motor skills involves subsequent modulation of resting-state functional connectivity in the sensory-motor system. This idea was mostly derived from the investigations on motor execution learning which mainly recruits the processing of sensory-motor information. Behavioral evidences demonstrated that motor skills in our daily lives could be learned through imagery procedures. However, it remains unclear whether the modulation of resting-state functional connectivity also exists in the sensory-motor system after motor imagery learning. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a fMRI investigation on motor imagery learning from resting state. Based on previous studies, we identified eight sensory and cognitive resting-state networks (RSNs) corresponding to the brain systems and further explored the functional connectivity of these RSNs through the assessments, connectivity and network strengths before and after the two-week consecutive learning. Two intriguing results were revealed: (1) The sensory RSNs, specifically sensory-motor and lateral visual networks exhibited greater connectivity strengths in precuneus and fusiform gyrus after learning; (2) Decreased network strength induced by learning was proved in the default mode network, a cognitive RSN. Conclusions/Significance These results indicated that resting-state functional connectivity could be modulated by motor imagery learning in multiple brain systems, and such modulation displayed in the sensory-motor, visual and default brain systems may be associated with the establishment of motor schema and the regulation of introspective thought. These findings further revealed the neural substrates underlying motor skill learning and potentially provided new insights into the therapeutic benefits of motor imagery learning. PMID:24465577

  16. DC-SIGN neck domain is a pH-sensor controlling oligomerization: SAXS and hydrodynamic studies of extracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarani, Georges; Thépaut, Michel; Stroebel, David; Ebel, Christine; Vivès, Corinne; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Fieschi, Franck

    2009-08-07

    DC-SIGN is a C-type lectin receptor of dendritic cells and is involved in the early stages of numerous infectious diseases. DC-SIGN is organized into a tetramer enabling multivalent interaction with pathogens. Once formed, the DC-SIGN-pathogen complex can be internalized into compartments of increasing acidity. We have studied the pH dependence of the oligomerization state and conformation of the entire extracellular domain and neck region. We present evidence for equilibrium between the monomeric and tetrameric states of the extracellular domain, which exhibits a marked dependence with respect to both pH and ionic strength. Using solution x-ray scattering we have obtained a molecular envelope of the extracellular domain in which a model has been built. Our results highlight the central role of the neck domain in the pH-sensitive control of the oligomerization state, in the extended conformation of the protein, and in carbohydrate recognition domain organization and presentation. This work opens new insight into the molecular mechanism of ligand release and points to new avenues to block the first step of this important infection pathway.

  17. Adaptive behaviour and multiple equilibrium states in a predator-prey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenov, Alexander; Kelly, Thomas C; Korobeinikov, Andrei; O'Callaghan, Michael J A; Rachinskii, Dmitrii

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that multiple stable equilibrium states are possible in real-life ecological systems. Phenomenological mathematical models which exhibit such properties can be constructed rather straightforwardly. For instance, for a predator-prey system this result can be achieved through the use of non-monotonic functional response for the predator. However, while formal formulation of such a model is not a problem, the biological justification for such functional responses and models is usually inconclusive. In this note, we explore a conjecture that a multitude of equilibrium states can be caused by an adaptation of animal behaviour to changes of environmental conditions. In order to verify this hypothesis, we consider a simple predator-prey model, which is a straightforward extension of the classic Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model. In this model, we made an intuitively transparent assumption that the prey can change a mode of behaviour in response to the pressure of predation, choosing either "safe" of "risky" (or "business as usual") behaviour. In order to avoid a situation where one of the modes gives an absolute advantage, we introduce the concept of the "cost of a policy" into the model. A simple conceptual two-dimensional predator-prey model, which is minimal with this property, and is not relying on odd functional responses, higher dimensionality or behaviour change for the predator, exhibits two stable co-existing equilibrium states with basins of attraction separated by a separatrix of a saddle point. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring resting-state EEG brain oscillatory activity in relation to cognitive functioning in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keune, Philipp M; Hansen, Sascha; Weber, Emily; Zapf, Franziska; Habich, Juliane; Muenssinger, Jana; Wolf, Sebastian; Schönenberg, Michael; Oschmann, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Neurophysiologic monitoring parameters related to cognition in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) are sparse. Previous work reported an association between magnetoencephalographic (MEG) alpha-1 activity and information processing speed. While this remains to be replicated by more available electroencephalographic (EEG) methods, also other established EEG markers, e.g. the slow-wave/fast-wave ratio (theta/beta ratio), remain to be explored in this context. Performance on standard tests addressing information processing speed and attention (Symbol-Digit Modalities Test, SDMT; Test of Attention Performance, TAP) was examined in relation to resting-state EEG alpha-1 and alpha-2 activity and the theta/beta ratio in 25MS patients. Increased global alpha-1 and alpha-2 activity and an increased frontal theta/beta ratio (pronounced slow-wave relative to fast-wave activity) were associated with lower SDMT processing speed. In an exploratory analysis, clinically impaired attention was associated with a significantly increased frontal theta/beta ratio whereas alpha power did not show sensitivity to clinical impairment. EEG global alpha power and the frontal theta/beta ratio were both associated with attention. The theta/beta ratio involved potential clinical sensitivity. Resting-state EEG recordings can be obtained during the routine clinical process. The examined resting-state measures may represent feasible monitoring parameters in MS. This notion should be explored in future intervention studies. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Synaptic transmission block by presynaptic injection of oligomeric amyloid beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Herman; Yu, Eunah; Pigino, Gustavo; Hernandez, Alejandro I.; Kim, Natalia; Moreira, Jorge E.; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinás, Rodolfo R.

    2009-01-01

    Early Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathophysiology is characterized by synaptic changes induced by degradation products of amyloid precursor protein (APP). The exact mechanisms of such modulation are unknown. Here, we report that nanomolar concentrations of intraaxonal oligomeric (o)Aβ42, but not oAβ40 or extracellular oAβ42, acutely inhibited synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse. Further characterization of this phenotype demonstrated that presynaptic calcium currents were unaffected. However, electron microscopy experiments revealed diminished docked synaptic vesicles in oAβ42-microinjected terminals, without affecting clathrin-coated vesicles. The molecular events of this modulation involved casein kinase 2 and the synaptic vesicle rapid endocytosis pathway. These findings open the possibility of a new therapeutic target aimed at ameliorating synaptic dysfunction in AD. PMID:19304802

  20. Fluorescence reporters for Hfq oligomerization and RNA annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting protein-protein, protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions, requiring only nanomolar concentrations of labeled components. Fluorescence anisotropy provides information about the assembly of multi-subunit proteins, while molecular beacons provide a sensitive and quantitative reporter for base pairing between complementary RNAs. Here we present a detailed protocol for labeling Hfq protein with cyanine 3-maleimide and dansyl chloride to study the protein oligomerization and RNA binding by semi-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and fluorescence anisotropy. We also present a detailed protocol for measuring the rate of annealing between a molecular beacon and a target RNA in the presence of Hfq using a stopped-flow spectrometer. PMID:25579597

  1. Electron Microscopy Structural Insights into CPAP Oligomeric Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez-Cabrera, Ana L; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Carton, David

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomal P4.1-associated protein (CPAP) is a cell cycle regulated protein fundamental for centrosome assembly and centriole elongation. In humans, the region between residues 897-1338 of CPAP mediates interactions with other proteins and includes a homodimerization domain. CPAP mutations cause...... into clearly different regular 3D maps (putatively corresponding to dimers and tetramers) and direct observation of individual images representing other complexes of HsCPAP(897-1338) (i.e., putative flexible monomers and higher-order multimers), we report a dynamic oligomeric behavior of this protein, where...... of different oligomers of CPAP, suggesting further insights to understand how this protein works, contributing to the elucidation of control mechanisms for centriole biogenesis....

  2. Depressive state and chronic fatigue in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaishi, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Ichiro; Misu, Tatsuro; Fujihara, Kazuo; Aoki, Masashi

    2015-06-15

    Depression and chronic fatigue are frequently present in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the prevalence rates have not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Thirty-nine consecutive NMO and 75 MS patients were compared using self-rating questionnaires for depressive states, daily activity, and fatigue, as well as serum carnitine levels. A subgroup of patients with low carnitine levels were re-evaluated regarding depression and fatigue after levocarnitine treatment. Depression and fatigue were equally prevalent in MS and NMO and were strongly correlated with one another. Measurement of the serum carnitine levels and the administration of levocarnitine did not appear to be beneficial. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  4. Effects of marine protected areas on overfished fishing stocks with multiple stable states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashina, Nao; Mougi, Akihiko

    2014-01-21

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) have attracted much attention as a tool for sustainable fisheries management, restoring depleted fisheries stocks and maintaining ecosystems. However, even with total exclusion of fishing effort, depleted stocks sometimes show little or no recovery over a long time period. Here, using a mathematical model, we show that multiple stable states may hold the key to understanding the tendency for fisheries stocks to recover because of MPAs. We find that MPAs can have either a positive effect or almost no effect on the recovery of depleted fishing stocks, depending on the fish migration patterns and the fishing policies. MPAs also reinforce ecological resilience, particularly for migratory species. In contrast to previous reports, our results show that MPAs have small or sometimes negative effects on the recovery of sedentary species. Unsuitable MPA planning might result in low effectiveness or even deterioration of the existing condition. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. State dependent arrival in bulk retrial queueing system with immediate Bernoulli feedback, multiple vacations and threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, S. P.; Chandrasekaran, V. M.; Indhira, K.

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyse state dependent arrival in bulk retrial queueing system with immediate Bernoulli feedback, multiple vacations, threshold and constant retrial policy. Primary customers are arriving into the system in bulk with different arrival rates λ a and λ b . If arriving customers find the server is busy then the entire batch will join to orbit. Customer from orbit request service one by one with constant retrial rate γ. On the other hand if an arrival of customers finds the server is idle then customers will be served in batches according to general bulk service rule. After service completion, customers may request service again with probability δ as feedback or leave from the system with probability 1 - δ. In the service completion epoch, if the orbit size is zero then the server leaves for multiple vacations. The server continues the vacation until the orbit size reaches the value ‘N’ (N > b). At the vacation completion, if the orbit size is ‘N’ then the server becomes ready to provide service for customers from the main pool or from the orbit. For the designed queueing model, probability generating function of the queue size at an arbitrary time will be obtained by using supplementary variable technique. Various performance measures will be derived with suitable numerical illustrations.

  6. Alternative stable states generated by ontogenetic niche shift in the presence of multiple resource use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takefumi Nakazawa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that when juveniles and adults use different resources or habitats, alternative stable states (ASS may exist in systems coupled by an ontogenetic niche shift. However, mainly the simplest system, i.e., the one-consumer-two-resource system, has been studied previously, and little is known about the development of ASS existing in more complex systems. Here, I theoretically investigated the development of ASS caused by an ontogenetic niche shift in the presence of multiple resource use. I considered three independent scenarios; (i additional resources, (ii multiple habitats, and (iii interstage resource sharing. The model analyses illustrate that relative balance between the total resource availability in the juvenile and adult habitats is crucial for the development of ASS. This balance is determined by factors such as local habitat productivity, subsidy inputs, colonization area, and foraging mobility. Furthermore, it is also shown that interstage resource sharing generally suppresses ASS. These results suggest that the anthropogenic impacts of habitat modifications (e.g., fragmentation and destruction or interaction modifications (e.g., changes in ontogeny and foraging behavior propagate through space and may cause or prevent regime shifts in the regional community structure.

  7. Multiple neural states of representation in short-term memory? It's a matter of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larocque, Joshua J; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod A; Postle, Bradley R

    2014-01-01

    Short-term memory (STM) refers to the capacity-limited retention of information over a brief period of time, and working memory (WM) refers to the manipulation and use of that information to guide behavior. In recent years it has become apparent that STM and WM interact and overlap with other cognitive processes, including attention (the selection of a subset of information for further processing) and long-term memory (LTM-the encoding and retention of an effectively unlimited amount of information for a much longer period of time). Broadly speaking, there have been two classes of memory models: systems models, which posit distinct stores for STM and LTM (Atkinson and Shiffrin, 1968; Baddeley and Hitch, 1974); and state-based models, which posit a common store with different activation states corresponding to STM and LTM (Cowan, 1995; McElree, 1996; Oberauer, 2002). In this paper, we will focus on state-based accounts of STM. First, we will consider several theoretical models that postulate, based on considerable behavioral evidence, that information in STM can exist in multiple representational states. We will then consider how neural data from recent studies of STM can inform and constrain these theoretical models. In the process we will highlight the inferential advantage of multivariate, information-based analyses of neuroimaging data (fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG)) over conventional activation-based analysis approaches (Postle, in press). We will conclude by addressing lingering questions regarding the fractionation of STM, highlighting differences between the attention to information vs. the retention of information during brief memory delays.

  8. Multiple neural states of representation in short-term memory? It's a matter of attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J Larocque

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Short-term memory (STM refers to the capacity-limited retention of information over a brief period of time, and working memory (WM refers to the manipulation and use of that information to guide behavior. In recent years it has become apparent that STM and WM interact and overlap with other cognitive processes, including attention (the selection of a subset of information for further processing and long-term memory (LTM – the encoding and retention of an effectively unlimited amount of information for a much longer period of time. Broadly speaking, there have been two classes of memory models: systems models, which posit distinct stores for STM and LTM (Atkinson & Shiffrin, 1968; Baddeley & Hitch, 1974; and state-based models, which posit a common store with different activation states corresponding to STM and LTM (Cowan, 1995; McElree, 1996; Oberauer, 2002. In this paper, we will focus on state-based accounts of STM. First, we will consider several theoretical models that postulate, based on considerable behavioral evidence, that information in STM can exist in multiple representational states. We will then consider how neural data from recent studies of STM can inform and constrain these theoretical models. In the process we will highlight the inferential advantage of multivariate, information-based analyses of neuroimaging data (fMRI and EEG over conventional activation-based analysis approaches (Postle, in press. We will conclude by addressing lingering questions regarding the fractionation of STM, highlighting differences between the attention to information vs. the retention of information during brief memory delays.

  9. MxiN Differentially Regulates Monomeric and Oligomeric Species of the Shigella Type Three Secretion System ATPase Spa47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Heather B; Dickenson, Nicholas E

    2018-04-17

    Shigella rely entirely on the action of a single type three secretion system (T3SS) to support cellular invasion of colonic epithelial cells and to circumvent host immune responses. The ATPase Spa47 resides at the base of the Shigella needle-like type three secretion apparatus (T3SA), supporting protein secretion through the apparatus and providing a likely means for native virulence regulation by Shigella and a much needed target for non-antibiotic therapeutics to treat Shigella infections. Here, we show that MxiN is a differential regulator of Spa47 and that its regulatory impact is determined by the oligomeric state of the Spa47 ATPase, with which it interacts. In vitro and in vivo characterization shows that interaction of MxiN with Spa47 requires the six N-terminal residues of Spa47 that are also necessary for stable Spa47 oligomer formation and activation. This interaction with MxiN negatively influences the activity of Spa47 oligomers while upregulating the ATPase activity of monomeric Spa47. Detailed kinetic analyses of monomeric and oligomeric Spa47 in the presence and absence of MxiN uncover additional mechanistic insights into the regulation of Spa47 by MxiN, suggesting that the MxiN/Spa47 species resulting from interaction with monomeric and oligomeric Spa47 are functionally distinct and that both could be involved in Shigella T3SS regulation. Uncovering regulation of Spa47 by MxiN addresses an important gap in the current understanding of how Shigella controls T3SA activity and provides the first description of differential T3SS ATPase regulation by a native T3SS protein.

  10. Thermal Degradation Mechanism of a Thermostable Polyester Stabilized with an Open-Cage Oligomeric Silsesquioxane

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    Yolanda Bautista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A polyester composite was prepared through the polymerization of an unsaturated ester resin with styrene and an open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane with methacrylate groups. The effect of the open-cage oligomeric silsesquioxane on the thermal stability of the thermostable polyester was studied using both thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The results showed that the methacryl oligomeric silsesquioxane improved the thermal stability of the polyester. The decomposition mechanism of the polyester/oligomer silsesquioxane composite was proposed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR analysis of the volatiles.

  11. Fingolimod phosphate attenuates oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity via increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in neurons.

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    Yukiko Doi

    Full Text Available The neurodegenerative processes that underlie Alzheimer's disease are mediated, in part, by soluble oligomeric amyloid β, a neurotoxic protein that inhibits hippocampal long-term potentiation, disrupts synaptic plasticity, and induces the production of reactive oxygen species. Here we show that the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptor (S1PR agonist fingolimod phosphate (FTY720-P-a new oral drug for multiple sclerosis-protects neurons against oligomeric amyloid β-induced neurotoxicity. We confirmed that primary mouse cortical neurons express all of the S1P receptor subtypes and FTY720-P directly affects the neurons. Treatment with FTY720-P enhanced the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in neurons. Moreover, blocking BDNF-TrkB signaling with a BDNF scavenger, TrkB inhibitor, or ERK1/2 inhibitor almost completely ablated these neuroprotective effects. These results suggested that the neuroprotective effects of FTY720-P are mediated by upregulated neuronal BDNF levels. Therefore, FTY720-P may be a promising therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Exact criteria for uniqueness and multiplicity of an nth order chemical reaction via catastrophe theory approach. [Determines boundaries between unique and multiple steady state conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H C; Calo, J M

    1979-01-01

    A simple, generalized technique for the exact determination of the boundaries between regions of unique and of multiple solutions to certain nonlinear equations was developed by applying catastrophe theory to the mapping of implicit and explicit functions. Its application to an nth order reaction in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) yields exact, explicit expressions for the boundaries between regions of single and multiple steady states, expressed in terms of the dimensionless heat transfer coefficient and activation energy. An exact implicit expression for the boundaries between regions of uniqueness and multiplicity was also derived for an nth order reaction in a catalyst particle with an intraparticle concentration gradient and uniform temperature and is fully demonstrated for the first-order reaction. In addition, explicit criteria were developed by assuming the limits on d ln g/d ln q, where g is the effectiveness factor and q the Thiele modulus, proposed by van den Bosch and Luss.

  13. A composite state method for ensemble data assimilation with multiple limited-area models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kretschmer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Limited-area models (LAMs allow high-resolution forecasts to be made for geographic regions of interest when resources are limited. Typically, boundary conditions for these models are provided through one-way boundary coupling from a coarser resolution global model. Here, data assimilation is considered in a situation in which a global model supplies boundary conditions to multiple LAMs. The data assimilation method presented combines information from all of the models to construct a single ‘composite state’, on which data assimilation is subsequently performed. The analysis composite state is then used to form the initial conditions of the global model and all of the LAMs for the next forecast cycle. The method is tested by using numerical experiments with simple, chaotic models. The results of the experiments show that there is a clear forecast benefit to allowing LAM states to influence one another during the analysis. In addition, adding LAM information at analysis time has a strong positive impact on global model forecast performance, even at points not covered by the LAMs.

  14. Multiple-Pulse Operation and Bound States of Solitons in Passive Mode-Locked Fiber Lasers

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    A. Komarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of our research on a multiple-pulse operation of passive mode-locked fiber lasers. The research has been performed on basis of numerical simulation. Multihysteresis dependence of both an intracavity energy and peak intensities of intracavity ultrashort pulses on pump power is found. It is shown that the change of a number of ultrashort pulses in a laser cavity can be realized by hard as well as soft regimes of an excitation and an annihilation of new solitons. Bound steady states of interacting solitons are studied for various mechanisms of nonlinear losses shaping ultrashort pulses. Possibility of coding of information on basis of soliton trains with various bonds between neighboring pulses is discussed. The role of dispersive wave emitted by solitons because of lumped intracavity elements in a formation of powerful soliton wings is analyzed. It is found that such powerful wings result in large bounding energies of interacting solitons in steady states. Various problems of a soliton interaction in passive mode-locked fiber lasers are discussed.

  15. Multiple Multidentate Halogen Bonding in Solution, in the Solid State, and in the (Calculated) Gas Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungbauer, Stefan H; Schindler, Severin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Keller, Sandro; Huber, Stefan M

    2015-09-21

    The binding properties of neutral halogen-bond donors (XB donors) bearing two multidentate Lewis acidic motifs toward halides were investigated. Employing polyfluorinated and polyiodinated terphenyl and quaterphenyl derivatives as anion receptors, we obtained X-ray crystallographic data of the adducts of three structurally related XB donors with tetraalkylammonium chloride, bromide, and iodide. The stability of these XB complexes in solution was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and the results were compared to X-ray analyses as well as to calculated binding patterns in the gas phase. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the gas-phase complexes indicated that the experimentally observed distortion of the XB donors during multiple multidentate binding can be reproduced in 1:1 complexes with halides, whereas adducts with two halides show a symmetric binding pattern in the gas phase that is markedly different from the solid state structures. Overall, this study demonstrates the limitations in the transferability of binding data between solid state, solution, and gas phase in the study of complex multidentate XB donors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Full-potential multiple scattering theory with space-filling cells for bound and continuum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Benfatto, Maurizio; Natoli, Calogero R

    2010-05-12

    We present a rigorous derivation of a real-space full-potential multiple scattering theory (FP-MST) that is free from the drawbacks that up to now have impaired its development (in particular the need to expand cell shape functions in spherical harmonics and rectangular matrices), valid both for continuum and bound states, under conditions for space partitioning that are not excessively restrictive and easily implemented. In this connection we give a new scheme to generate local basis functions for the truncated potential cells that is simple, fast, efficient, valid for any shape of the cell and reduces to the minimum the number of spherical harmonics in the expansion of the scattering wavefunction. The method also avoids the need for saturating 'internal sums' due to the re-expansion of the spherical Hankel functions around another point in space (usually another cell center). Thus this approach provides a straightforward extension of MST in the muffin-tin (MT) approximation, with only one truncation parameter given by the classical relation l(max) = kR(b), where k is the electron wavevector (either in the excited or ground state of the system under consideration) and R(b) is the radius of the bounding sphere of the scattering cell. Moreover, the scattering path operator of the theory can be found in terms of an absolutely convergent procedure in the l(max) --> ∞ limit. Consequently, this feature provides a firm ground for the use of FP-MST as a viable method for electronic structure calculations and makes possible the computation of x-ray spectroscopies, notably photo-electron diffraction, absorption and anomalous scattering among others, with the ease and versatility of the corresponding MT theory. Some numerical applications of the theory are presented, both for continuum and bound states.

  17. Treatment patterns in disease-modifying therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Machaon M; Johnson, Barbara H; Wenten, Madé; Watson, Crystal

    2013-10-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) whose disease activity is inadequately controlled with a platform therapy (interferon beta or glatiramer acetate [GA]) may switch to another platform therapy or escalate therapy to natalizumab or fingolimod, which were approved in the US in 2006 and 2010, respectively. The objective of this study was to describe treatment patterns in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States who were followed for 2 years after initiating a disease-modifying therapy (DMT). A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted to examine treatment patterns of initial DMT use (on initial therapy for 2 years with and without gaps of ≥ 60 days, medication switching, and discontinuation) among patients with MS who initiated a platform therapy (interferon-β or glatiramer acetate) or natalizumab between January 1, 2007, and September 30, 2009; the first DMT claim was the index. Eligible patients were identified in the MarketScan Commercial and Medicare Supplemental databases based on continuous enrollment for 6 months before (preindex period) and 24 months after their index date, with a diagnosis of MS and no claim for a previous DMT in the 6-month preindex period. Demographics at index and clinical characteristics during the preindex period were also analyzed. A total of 6181 MS patients were included, with 5735 (92.8%) starting on platform therapy. Natalizumab initiators were more likely to stay on index therapy (32.3% vs 16.9%, P treatment gaps of ≥ 60 days (44.8% vs 55.3%, P treatment (13.9% vs 19.1%, P = 0.007) and took longer to switch (400.9 days vs 330.7 days, P treatment gaps, and switch less than platform initiators in the 2 years after treatment initiation. Switching between platform therapies is common despite evidence that MS patients on platform therapy may benefit from switching to natalizumab. © 2013 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using Bayesian Belief Networks To Assess Volcano State from Multiple Monitoring Timeseries And Other Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odbert, Henry; Aspinall, Willy

    2013-04-01

    When volcanoes exhibit unrest or become eruptively active, science-based decision support invariably is sought by civil authorities. Evidence available to scientists about a volcano's internal state is usually indirect, secondary or very nebulous.Advancement of volcano monitoring technology in recent decades has increased the variety and resolution of multi-parameter timeseries data recorded at volcanoes. Monitoring timeseries may be interpreted in real time by observatory staff and are often later subjected to further analytic scrutiny by the research community at large. With increasing variety and resolution of data, interpreting these multiple strands of parallel, partial evidence has become increasingly complex. In practice, interpretation of many timeseries involves familiarity with the idiosyncracies of the volcano, the monitoring techniques, the configuration of the recording instrumentation, observations from other datasets, and so on. Assimilation of this knowledge is necessary in order to select and apply the appropriate statistical techniques required to extract the required information. Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) use probability theory to treat and evaluate uncertainties in a rational and auditable scientific manner, but only to the extent warranted by the strength of the available evidence. The concept is a suitable framework for marshalling multiple observations, model results and interpretations - and associated uncertainties - in a methodical manner. The formulation is usually implemented in graphical form and could be developed as a tool for near real-time, ongoing use in a volcano observatory, for example. We explore the application of BBNs in analysing volcanic timeseries, the certainty with which inferences may be drawn, and how they can be updated dynamically. Such approaches provide a route to developing analytical interface(s) between volcano monitoring analyses and probabilistic hazard analysis. We discuss the use of BBNs in hazard

  19. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of duck nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Jin, Hui; Li, Yaqian; Liu, Dejian; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Jiang, Yunbo; Luo, Rui

    2017-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) is an imperative cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor (PRR) and considered as a key member of the NOD-like receptor (NLR) family which plays a critical role in innate immunity through sensing microbial components derived from bacterial peptidoglycan. In the current study, the full-length of duck NOD1 (duNOD1) cDNA from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs) was cloned. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that duNOD1 exhibited a strong evolutionary relationship with chicken and rock pigeon NOD1. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that duNOD1 was widely distributed in various organs, with the highest expression observed in the liver. Furthermore, duNOD1 overexpression induced NF-κB activation in DEFs and the CARD domain is crucial for duNOD1-mediated NF-κB activation. In addition, silencing the duNOD1 decreased the activity of NF-κB in DEFs stimulated by iE-DAP. Overexpression of duNOD1 significantly increased the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and RANTES in DEFs. These findings highlight the crucial role of duNOD1 as an intracellular sensor in duck innate immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of Vif oligomerization and RNA chaperone activity in HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batisse, Julien; Guerrero, Santiago; Bernacchi, Serena; Sleiman, Dona; Gabus, Caroline; Darlix, Jean-Luc; Marquet, Roland; Tisné, Carine; Paillart, Jean-Christophe

    2012-11-01

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif) is essential for the productive infection and dissemination of HIV-1 in non-permissive cells that involve most natural HIV-1 target cells. Vif counteracts the packaging of two cellular cytidine deaminases named APOBEC3G (A3G) and A3F by diverse mechanisms including the recruitment of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex and the proteasomal degradation of A3G/A3F, the inhibition of A3G mRNA translation or by a direct competition mechanism. In addition, Vif appears to be an active partner of the late steps of viral replication by participating in virus assembly and Gag processing, thus regulating the final stage of virion formation notably genomic RNA dimerization and by inhibiting the initiation of reverse transcription. Vif is a small pleiotropic protein with multiple domains, and recent studies highlighted the importance of Vif conformation and flexibility in counteracting A3G and in binding RNA. In this review, we will focus on the oligomerization and RNA chaperone properties of Vif and show that the intrinsic disordered nature of some Vif domains could play an important role in virus assembly and replication. Experimental evidence demonstrating the RNA chaperone activity of Vif will be presented. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  2. Findings of Multiple Myeloma in Afro-Caribbean Patients in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashtami Banavali

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple myeloma (MM is the second most common malignancy in the United States and has a higher incidence in the black and Afro-Caribbean population. There remain limited data on disease presentation and clinical characteristics in this patient group in the United States. The clinical profile of MM in this underrepresented patient group is described here. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at Kings County Hospital, an urban New York City hospital in a majority Afro-Caribbean neighborhood. Data from patients diagnosed with MM from 2000 through 2013 were collected from the institution’s tumor registry. Clinical and demographic characteristics of these patients were then analyzed. Results: Patients with a diagnosis of MM were identified (N = 287. Data were available for 231 patients and of these, 97% self-identified as black. 55% were female, and there was a male-to-female ratio of 1:1.2. The mean age of female patients was 64 years; that of male patients was 63 years. Of the 231 patients, 81% had anemia, 68% had bone lesions, 47% had renal impairment, and 29% had hypercalcemia. Low levels of monoclonal protein were present in 27% of patients and 57% had disease of International Staging System stages I and II. Women had higher BMI than men. Conclusion: The mean age of presentation of MM in Afro-Caribbean patients is similar to that in the standard population; however, unlike the general US population, there was a higher incidence in women; mean BMI of women also was higher than that of male patients. A sizeable percentage of Afro-Caribbean patients with MM presented with low levels of monoclonal protein in the presence of multiorgan involvement and damage, suggesting the need for early and aggressive diagnostic testing.

  3. Proteotyping of laboratory-scale biogas plants reveals multiple steady-states in community composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, F; Heyer, R; Bissinger, T; Kottler, R; Schallert, K; Püttker, S; Behne, A; Rapp, E; Benndorf, D; Reichl, U

    2017-08-01

    Complex microbial communities are the functional core of anaerobic digestion processes taking place in biogas plants (BGP). So far, however, a comprehensive characterization of the microbiomes involved in methane formation is technically challenging. As an alternative, enriched communities from laboratory-scale experiments can be investigated that have a reduced number of organisms and are easier to characterize by state of the art mass spectrometric-based (MS) metaproteomic workflows. Six parallel laboratory digesters were inoculated with sludge from a full-scale BGP to study the development of enriched microbial communities under defined conditions. During the first three month of cultivation, all reactors (R1-R6) were functionally comparable regarding biogas productions (375-625 NL L reactor volume -1 d -1 ), methane yields (50-60%), pH values (7.1-7.3), and volatile fatty acids (VFA, 1 gNH 3 L -1 ) showed an increase to pH 7.5-8.0, accumulation of acetate (>10 mM), and decreasing biogas production (<125 NL L reactor volume -1 d -1 ). Tandem MS (MS/MS)-based proteotyping allowed the identification of taxonomic abundances and biological processes. Although all reactors showed similar performances, proteotyping and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP) fingerprinting revealed significant differences in the composition of individual microbial communities, indicating multiple steady-states. Furthermore, cellulolytic enzymes and cellulosomal proteins of Clostridium thermocellum were identified to be specific markers for the thermophilic reactors (R3, R4). Metaproteins found in R3 indicated hydrogenothrophic methanogenesis, whereas metaproteins of acetoclastic methanogenesis were identified in R4. This suggests not only an individual evolution of microbial communities even for the case that BGPs are started at the same initial conditions under well controlled environmental conditions, but also a high compositional variance of microbiomes under

  4. Multiple streams approach to tobacco control policymaking in a tobacco-growing state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Dadkar, Sumati; Veeranki, Sreenivas P; He, Yi; Barnes, Richard; Glantz, Stanton A

    2014-08-01

    Smokefree policies (SFPs) have diffused throughout the US and worldwide. However, the development of SFPs in the difficult policy environment of tobacco-producing states and economies worldwide has not been well-explored. In 2007, Tennessee, the third largest tobacco producer in the US, enacted the Non-Smoker Protection Act (NSPA). This study utilizes the multiple streams model to provide understanding of why and how this policy was developed by triangulating interviews with key stakeholders and legislative debates with archival documents. In June 2006, the Governor unexpectedly announced support for SFP, which created a window of opportunity for policy change. The Campaign for Healthy and Responsible Tennessee, a health coalition, seized this opportunity and worked with the administration and the Tennessee Restaurant Association to negotiate a comprehensive SFP, however, a weaker bill was used by the legislative leadership to develop the NSPA. Although the Governor and the Tennessee Restaurant Association's support generated an environment for 100% SFP, health groups did not fully capitalize on this environmental change and settled for a weak policy with several exemptions. This study suggests the importance for proponents of policy change to understand changes in their environment and be willing and able to capitalize on these changes.

  5. Free-energy landscape of protein oligomerization from atomistic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barducci, Alessandro; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Prakash, Meher K.; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    In the realm of protein–protein interactions, the assembly process of homooligomers plays a fundamental role because the majority of proteins fall into this category. A comprehensive understanding of this multistep process requires the characterization of the driving molecular interactions and the transient intermediate species. The latter are often short-lived and thus remain elusive to most experimental investigations. Molecular simulations provide a unique tool to shed light onto these complex processes complementing experimental data. Here we combine advanced sampling techniques, such as metadynamics and parallel tempering, to characterize the oligomerization landscape of fibritin foldon domain. This system is an evolutionarily optimized trimerization motif that represents an ideal model for experimental and computational mechanistic studies. Our results are fully consistent with previous experimental nuclear magnetic resonance and kinetic data, but they provide a unique insight into fibritin foldon assembly. In particular, our simulations unveil the role of nonspecific interactions and suggest that an interplay between thermodynamic bias toward native structure and residual conformational disorder may provide a kinetic advantage. PMID:24248370

  6. Exceptionally High Electric Double Layer Capacitances of Oligomeric Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michio; Shimizu, Sunao; Sotoike, Rina; Watanabe, Masayoshi; Iwasa, Yoshihiro; Itoh, Yoshimitsu; Aida, Takuzo

    2017-11-15

    Electric double layer (EDL) capacitors are promising as next-generation energy accumulators if their capacitances and operation voltages are both high. However, only few electrolytes can simultaneously fulfill these two requisites. Here we report that an oligomeric ionic liquid such as IL4 TFSI with four imidazolium ion units in its structure provides a wide electrochemical window of ∼5.0 V, similar to monomeric ionic liquids. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance measurements using Au working electrodes demonstrated that IL4 TFSI exhibits an exceptionally high EDL capacitance of ∼66 μF/cm 2 , which is ∼6 times as high as those of monomeric ionic liquids so far reported. We also found that an EDL-based field effect transistor (FET) using IL4 TFSI as a gate dielectric material and SrTiO 3 as a channel material displays a very sharp transfer curve with an enhanced carrier accumulation capability of ∼64 μF/cm 2 , as determined by Hall-effect measurements.

  7. Preparation of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane based imprinted monolith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Chen, Xiu-Xiu; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2015-12-18

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability. The imprinted monolithic column was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), naproxon (template), 4-vinylpyridine, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, in ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF4). The influence of synthesis parameters on the retention factor and imprinting effect, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest imprinting factor on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was 22, about 10 times higher than that prepared in absence of POSS. The comparisons between MIP monoliths synthesized with POSS and without POSS were made in terms of permeability, column efficiency, surface morphology and pore size distribution. In addition, thermodynamic and Van Deemter analysis were used to evaluate the POSS-based MIP monolith. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Antibodies against alpha-synuclein reduce oligomerization in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Näsström

    Full Text Available Recent research implicates soluble aggregated forms of α-synuclein as neurotoxic species with a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and related disorders. The pathway by which α-synuclein aggregates is believed to follow a step-wise pattern, in which dimers and smaller oligomers are initially formed. Here, we used H4 neuroglioma cells expressing α-synuclein fused to hemi:GFP constructs to study the effects of α-synuclein monoclonal antibodies on the early stages of aggregation, as quantified by Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation assay. Widefield and confocal microscopy revealed that cells treated for 48 h with monoclonal antibodies internalized antibodies to various degrees. C-terminal and oligomer-selective α-synuclein antibodies reduced the extent of α-synuclein dimerization/oligomerization, as indicated by decreased GFP fluorescence signal. Furthermore, ELISA measurements on lysates and conditioned media from antibody treated cells displayed lower α-synuclein levels compared to untreated cells, suggesting increased protein turnover. Taken together, our results propose that extracellular administration of monoclonal antibodies can modify or inhibit early steps in the aggregation process of α-synuclein, thus providing further support for passive immunization against diseases with α-synuclein pathology.

  9. Oligomerization of optineurin and its oxidative stress- or E50K mutation-driven covalent cross-linking: possible relationship with glaucoma pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Gao

    Full Text Available The optineurin gene, OPTN, is one of the causative genes of primary open-angle glaucoma. Although oligomerization of optineurin in cultured cells was previously observed by gel filtration analysis and blue native gel electrophoresis (BNE, little is known about the characteristics of optineurin oligomers. Here, we aimed to analyze the oligomeric state of optineurin and factors affecting oligomerization, such as environmental stimuli or mutations in OPTN. Using BNE or immunoprecipitation followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE, we demonstrated that both endogenous and transfected optineurin exist as oligomers, rather than monomers, in NIH3T3 cells. We also applied an in situ proximity ligation assay to visualize the self-interaction of optineurin in fixed HeLaS3 cells and found that the optineurin oligomers were localized diffusely in the cytoplasm. Optineurin oligomers were usually detected as a single band of a size equal to that of the optineurin monomer upon SDS-PAGE, while an additional protein band of a larger size was observed when cells were treated with H2O2. We showed that larger protein complex is optineurin oligomers by immunoprecipitation and termed it covalent optineurin oligomers. In cells expressing OPTN bearing the most common glaucoma-associated mutation, E50K, covalent oligomers were formed even without H2O2 stimulation. Antioxidants inhibited the formation of E50K-induced covalent oligomers to various degrees. A series of truncated constructs of OPTN was used to reveal that covalent oligomers may be optineurin trimers and that the ubiquitin-binding domain is essential for formation of these trimers. Our results indicated that optineurin trimers may be the basic unit of these oligomers. The oligomeric state can be affected by many factors that induce covalent bonds, such as H2O2 or E50K, as demonstrated here; this provides novel insights into the pathogenicity of E50K. Furthermore

  10. Improving seasonal forecasts of hydroclimatic variables through the state of multiple large-scale climate signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletti, A.; Giuliani, M.; Block, P. J.

    2017-12-01

    Increasingly uncertain hydrologic regimes combined with more frequent and intense extreme events are challenging water systems management worldwide, emphasizing the need of accurate medium- to long-term predictions to timely prompt anticipatory operations. Despite modern forecasts are skillful over short lead time (from hours to days), predictability generally tends to decrease on longer lead times. Global climate teleconnection, such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO), may contribute in extending forecast lead times. However, ENSO teleconnection is well defined in some locations, such as Western USA and Australia, while there is no consensus on how it can be detected and used in other regions, particularly in Europe, Africa, and Asia. In this work, we generalize the Niño Index Phase Analysis (NIPA) framework by contributing the Multi Variate Niño Index Phase Analysis (MV-NIPA), which allows capturing the state of multiple large-scale climate signals (i.e. ENSO, North Atlantic Oscillation, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation, Indian Ocean Dipole) to forecast hydroclimatic variables on a seasonal time scale. Specifically, our approach distinguishes the different phases of the considered climate signals and, for each phase, identifies relevant anomalies in Sea Surface Temperature (SST) that influence the local hydrologic conditions. The potential of the MV-NIPA framework is demonstrated through an application to the Lake Como system, a regulated lake in northern Italy which is mainly operated for flood control and irrigation supply. Numerical results show high correlations between seasonal SST values and one season-ahead precipitation in the Lake Como basin. The skill of the resulting MV-NIPA forecast outperforms the one of ECMWF products. This information represents a valuable contribution to partially anticipate the summer water availability, especially during drought events, ultimately supporting the improvement of the Lake Como

  11. Cost of managing an episode of relapse in multiple sclerosis in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Alexandra J

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to determine the direct medical US cost of managing multiple sclerosis relapses. Methods Direct data analysis and cost modeling were employed to derive typical resource use profiles and costs in 2002 US dollars, from the perspective of a third-party payer responsible for comprehensive health-care. The location and scope of health care services provided over a 90-day period were used to define three levels of relapse management. Hospitalization and resulting subsequent care was defined as high intensity management. A medium level of intervention was defined as either use of the emergency room, an observational unit, or administration of acute treatments, such as intravenous methylprednisolone in an outpatient or home setting. The lowest intensity of care comprised physician office visits and symptom-related medications. Data were obtained from many sources including all payer inpatient, ambulatory and emergency room databases from several states, fee schedules, government reports, and literature. All charges were adjusted using cost-to-charge ratios. Results Average cost per person for high management level was $12,870, based on analysis of 4,634 hospital cases (mean age 48 years, 73% female. Hospital care comprised 71% of that cost. At discharge, 36% required inpatient sub-acute care, rehabilitation or home care. The typical cost per moderate episode was $1,847 and mild episode $243. Conclusions Management strategies leading to a reduction in the frequency and severity of a relapse, less reliance on inpatient care, or increased access to steroid infusions in the home, would have a substantial impact on the economic consequences of managing relapses.

  12. Using Images, Metaphor, and Hypnosis in Integrating Multiple Personality and Dissociative States: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Carrie L.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews literature on hypnosis, imagery, and metaphor as applied to the treatment and integration of those with multiple personality disorder (MPD) and dissociative states. Considers diagnostic criteria of MPD; explores current theories of etiology and treatment; and suggests specific examples of various clinical methods of treatment using…

  13. Oligomerization of optically active N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide in the presence of β-cyclodextrin and the minor role of chirality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut Ritter

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative oligomerization of a chiral mandelamide derivative (N-(4-hydroxyphenylmandelamide, 1 was performed in the presence of horseradish peroxidase, laccase and N,N'-bis(salicylideneethylenediamine-iron(II to obtain chiral oligophenols 2. The low enantioselectivity of the enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was investigated. In addition, the poor influence of cyclodextrin on the enantioselectivity of enzymatic catalyzed asymmetric enantiomer-differentiating oligomerizations was studied.

  14. Structure-properties relationships of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS filled PS nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Schwab

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS additivated polystyrene (PS based nanocomposites were prepared by melt processing and the structure-properties relationships of the POSS-PS systems were compared to those of the neat PS. In order to investigate the effect of these structural parameters on the final properties of the polymer nanocomposites, five different kinds of POSS samples were used, in particular, POSS with different inorganic cage and with different organic pendent groups. The rheological investigation suggests clearly that the POSS acts as a plasticizer and that the processability of the PS was positively modified. The affinity between the POSS samples and the PS matrix was estimated by the calculated theoretical solubility parameters, considering the Hoy’s method and by morphology analysis. Minor difference between the solubility parameter of POSS and the matrix means better compatibility and no aggregation tendency. Furthermore, the POSS loading leads to a decrease of the rigidity, of the glass transition temperature and of the damping factor of the nanocomposite systems. The loading of different POSS molecules with open cage leads to a more pronounced effect on all the investigated properties that the loading of the POSS molecules with closed cage. Moreover, the melt properties are significantly influenced by the type of inorganic framework, by the type of the pendent organic groups and by the interaction between the POSS organic groups and the host matrix, while, the solid state properties appears to be influenced more by the kind of cage.

  15. Hexokinase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: regulation of oligomeric structure by in vivo phosphorylation at serine-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlke, J; Heidrich, K; Naumann, M; Müller, E C; Otto, A; Reuter, R; Kriegel, T

    1998-08-25

    Homodimeric hexokinase 2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to have two sites of phosphorylation: for serine-14 the modification in vivo increases with glucose exhaustion [Kriegel et al. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 148-152], while for serine-157 it occurs in vitro with ATP in the presence of nonphosphorylateable five-carbon analogues of glucose [Heidrich et al. (1997) Biochemistry 36, 1960-1964]. We show now by site-directed mutagenesis and sedimentation analysis that serine-14 phosphorylation affects the oligomeric state of hexokinase, its substitution by glutamate causing complete dissociation; glutamate exchange for serine-157 does not. Phosphorylation of wild-type hexokinase at serine-14 likewise causes dissociation in vitro. In view of the higher glucose affinity of monomeric hexokinase and the high hexokinase concentration in yeast [Womack, F., and Colowick, S. P. (1978) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 191, 742-747; Mayes, E. L., Hoggett, J. G., and Kellett, G. L. (1983) Eur. J. Biochem. 133, 127-134], we speculate that the in vivo phosphorylation at serine-14 as transiently occurring in glucose derepression might provide a mechanism to improve glucose utilization from low level and/or that nuclear localization of the monomer might be involved in the signal transduction whereby glucose causes catabolite repression.

  16. Design of a minimal protein oligomerization domain by a structural approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, P; Meier, M; Lustig, A

    2000-12-01

    Because of the simplicity and regularity of the alpha-helical coiled coil relative to other structural motifs, it can be conveniently used to clarify the molecular interactions responsible for protein folding and stability. Here we describe the de novo design and characterization of a two heptad-repeat peptide stabilized by a complex network of inter- and intrahelical salt bridges. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation show that this peptide is highly alpha-helical and 100% dimeric tinder physiological buffer conditions. Interestingly, the peptide was shown to switch its oligomerization state from a dimer to a trimer upon increasing ionic strength. The correctness of the rational design principles used here is supported by details of the atomic structure of the peptide deduced from X-ray crystallography. The structure of the peptide shows that it is not a molten globule but assumes a unique, native-like conformation. This de novo peptide thus represents an attractive model system for the design of a molecular recognition system.

  17. Morphology and Phase Transitions in Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer Grafted with Isobutyl Substituted Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drazowski, Daniel B; Lee, Andre; Haddad, Timothy S

    2007-01-01

    Two symmetric triblock polystyrene-butadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymers with different styrene content were grafted with varying amounts of isobutyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules...

  18. Morphology and Phase Transitions in Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene Triblock Copolymer Grafted with Isobutyl Substituted Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Drazkowski, Daniel B; Lee, Andre; Haddad, Timothy S

    2006-01-01

    Two symmetric triblock polystyrene-butadiene-polystyrene (SBS) copolymers with different styrene content were grafted with varying amounts of isobutyl-substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules...

  19. Dynamical and technological consequences of multiple isolas of steady states in a catalytic fluidised-bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizon Katarzyna

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Steady-state characteristics of a catalytic fluidised bed reactor and its dynamical consequences are analyzed. The occurrence of an untypical steady-state structure manifesting in a form of multiple isolas is described. A two-phase bubbling bed model is used for a quantitative description of the bed of catalyst. The influence of heat exchange intensity and a fluidisation ratio onto the generation of isolated solution branches is presented for two kinetic schemes. Dynamical consequences of the coexistence of such untypical branches of steady states are presented. The impact of linear growth of the fluidisation ratio and step change of the cooling medium temperature onto the desired product yield is analyzed. The results presented in this study confirm that the identification of a region of the occurrence of multiple isolas is important due to their strong impact both on the process start-up and its control.

  20. Seasonal Variability of Aragonite Saturation State in the North Pacific Ocean Predicted by Multiple Linear Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, T. W.; Park, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    Seasonal variation of aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) in the North Pacific Ocean (NPO) was investigated, using multiple linear regression (MLR) models produced from the PACIFICA (Pacific Ocean interior carbon) dataset. Data within depth ranges of 50-1200m were used to derive MLR models, and three parameters (potential temperature, nitrate, and apparent oxygen utilization (AOU)) were chosen as predictor variables because these parameters are associated with vertical mixing, DIC (dissolved inorganic carbon) removal and release which all affect Ωarag in water column directly or indirectly. The PACIFICA dataset was divided into 5° × 5° grids, and a MLR model was produced in each grid, giving total 145 independent MLR models over the NPO. Mean RMSE (root mean square error) and r2 (coefficient of determination) of all derived MLR models were approximately 0.09 and 0.96, respectively. Then the obtained MLR coefficients for each of predictor variables and an intercept were interpolated over the study area, thereby making possible to allocate MLR coefficients to data-sparse ocean regions. Predictability from the interpolated coefficients was evaluated using Hawaiian time-series data, and as a result mean residual between measured and predicted Ωarag values was approximately 0.08, which is less than the mean RMSE of our MLR models. The interpolated MLR coefficients were combined with seasonal climatology of World Ocean Atlas 2013 (1° × 1°) to produce seasonal Ωarag distributions over various depths. Large seasonal variability in Ωarag was manifested in the mid-latitude Western NPO (24-40°N, 130-180°E) and low-latitude Eastern NPO (0-12°N, 115-150°W). In the Western NPO, seasonal fluctuations of water column stratification appeared to be responsible for the seasonal variation in Ωarag (~ 0.5 at 50 m) because it closely followed temperature variations in a layer of 0-75 m. In contrast, remineralization of organic matter was the main cause for the seasonal

  1. Membrane-mediated oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors and its implications for GPCR function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Gahbauer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The dimerization or even oligomerization of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs causes ongoing, controversial debates about its functional role and the coupled biophysical, biochemical or biomedical implications. A continously growing number of studies hints to a relation between oligomerization and function of GPCRs and strengthens the assumption that receptor assembly plays a key role in the regulation of protein function. Additionally, progress in the structural analysis of GPCR-G protein and GPCR-ligand interactions allows to distinguish between actively functional and non-signalling complexes. Recent findings further suggest that the surrounding membrane, i.e. its lipid composition may modulate the preferred dimerization interface and as a result the abundance of distinct dimeric conformations. In this review, the association of GPCRs and the role of the membrane in oligomerization will be discussed. An overview of the different reported oligomeric interfaces is provided and their capability for signaling discussed. The currently available data is summarized with regard to the formation of GPCR oligomers, their structures and dependency on the membrane microenvironment as well as the coupling of oligomerization to receptor function.

  2. Transient oligomerization of the SARS-CoV N protein--implication for virus ribonucleoprotein packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-ke; Chen, Chia-Min Michael; Chiang, Ming-hui; Hsu, Yen-lan; Huang, Tai-huang

    2013-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. The N protein consists of two structural domains interspersed between intrinsically disordered regions and dimerizes through the C-terminal structural domain (CTD). A key activity of the protein is the ability to oligomerize during capsid formation by utilizing the dimer as a building block, but the structural and mechanistic bases of this activity are not well understood. By disulfide trapping technique we measured the amount of transient oligomers of N protein mutants with strategically located cysteine residues and showed that CTD acts as a primary transient oligomerization domain in solution. The data is consistent with the helical oligomer packing model of N protein observed in crystal. A systematic study of the oligomerization behavior revealed that altering the intermolecular electrostatic repulsion through changes in solution salt concentration or phosphorylation-mimicking mutations affects oligomerization propensity. We propose a biophysical mechanism where electrostatic repulsion acts as a switch to regulate N protein oligomerization.

  3. Transient oligomerization of the SARS-CoV N protein--implication for virus ribonucleoprotein packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-ke Chang

    Full Text Available The nucleocapsid (N phosphoprotein of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV packages the viral genome into a helical ribonucleocapsid and plays a fundamental role during viral self-assembly. The N protein consists of two structural domains interspersed between intrinsically disordered regions and dimerizes through the C-terminal structural domain (CTD. A key activity of the protein is the ability to oligomerize during capsid formation by utilizing the dimer as a building block, but the structural and mechanistic bases of this activity are not well understood. By disulfide trapping technique we measured the amount of transient oligomers of N protein mutants with strategically located cysteine residues and showed that CTD acts as a primary transient oligomerization domain in solution. The data is consistent with the helical oligomer packing model of N protein observed in crystal. A systematic study of the oligomerization behavior revealed that altering the intermolecular electrostatic repulsion through changes in solution salt concentration or phosphorylation-mimicking mutations affects oligomerization propensity. We propose a biophysical mechanism where electrostatic repulsion acts as a switch to regulate N protein oligomerization.

  4. What Factors Influence States' Capacity to Report Children's Health Care Quality Measures? A Multiple-Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anna L; Petersen, Dana M; Burton, Rachel A; Forsberg, Vanessa C; Devers, Kelly J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to describe factors that influence the ability of state Medicaid agencies to report the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) core set of children's health care quality measures (Child Core Set). Methods We conducted a multiple-case study of four high-performing states participating in the Children's Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act (CHIPRA) Quality Demonstration Grant Program: Illinois, Maine, Pennsylvania, and Oregon. Cases were purposively selected for their diverse measurement approaches and used data from 2010 to 2015, including 154 interviews, semiannual grant progress reports, and annual public reports on Child Core Set measures. We followed Yin's multiple-case study methodology to describe how and why each state increased the number of measures reported to CMS. Results All four states increased the number of Child Core Set measures reported to CMS during the grant period. Each took a different approach to reporting, depending on the available technical, organizational, and behavioral inputs in the state. Reporting capacity was influenced by a state's Medicaid data availability, ability to link to other state data systems, past experience with quality measurement, staff time and technical expertise, and demand for the measures. These factors were enhanced by CHIPRA Quality Demonstration grant funding and other federal capacity building activities, as hypothesized in our conceptual framework. These and other states have made progress reporting the Child Core Set since 2010. Conclusion With financial support and investment in state data systems and organizational factors, states can overcome challenges to reporting most of the Child Core Set measures.

  5. Query Processing for Probabilistic State Diagrams Describing Multiple Robot Navigation in an Indoor Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czejdo, Bogdan [ORNL; Bhattacharya, Sambit [North Carolina Fayetteville State University; Ferragut, Erik M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the syntax and semantics of multi-level state diagrams to support probabilistic behavior of cooperating robots. The techniques are presented to analyze these diagrams by querying combined robots behaviors. It is shown how to use state abstraction and transition abstraction to create, verify and process large probabilistic state diagrams.

  6. Expanded functional coupling of subcortical nuclei with the motor resting-state network in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Siebner, Hartwig R; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2013-01-01

    controls underwent a 20-minute resting-state fMRI session at 3 Tesla. Independent component analysis was applied to the fMRI data to identify disease-related changes in motor resting-state connectivity. RESULTS: Patients with MS showed a spatial expansion of motor resting-state connectivity in deep...

  7. Fluorescence excitation involving multiple electron transition states of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.Y.R.; Chen, F.Z.; Hung, T.; Judge, D.L. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The electronic states and electronic structures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the 8-50 eV energy region have been studied extensively both experimentally and theoretically. In the energy region higher than 25 eV there exists many electronic states including multiple electron transition (MET) states which are responsible for producing most of the dissociative photoionization products. The electronic states at energies higher than 50 eV have been mainly determined by Auger spectroscopy, double charge transfer, photofragment spectroscopy and ion-ion coincidence spectroscopy. The absorption and ionization spectra of these molecules at energies higher than 50 eV mainly show a monotonic decrease in cross section values and exhibit structureless features. The decay channels of MET and Rydberg (or superexcited) states include autoionization, ionization, dissociative ionization, predissociation, and dissociation while those of single ion and multiple ion states may involve predissociation. and dissociation processes. The study of fluorescence specifically probes electronically excited species resulting from the above-mentioned decay channels and provides information for understanding the competition among these channels.

  8. Controlling amyloid-beta peptide(1-42) oligomerization and toxicity by fluorinated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Ana M; Cardoso, Isabel; Pereira, M Carmo; Coelho, Manuel A N; Saraiva, Maria João; Möhwald, Helmuth; Brezesinski, Gerald

    2010-09-03

    The amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is a major fibrillar component of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease brains and is related to the pathogenesis of the disease. Soluble oligomers that precede fibril formation have been proposed as the main neurotoxic species that contributes to neurodegeneration and dementia. We hypothesize that oligomerization and cytotoxicity can be repressed by nanoparticles (NPs) that induce conformational changes in Abeta42. We show here that fluorinated and hydrogenated NPs with different abilities to change Abeta42 conformation influence oligomerization as assessed by atomic force microscopy, immunoblot and SDS-PAGE. Fluorinated NPs, which promote an increase in alpha-helical content, exert an antioligomeric effect, whereas hydrogenated analogues do not and lead to aggregation. Cytotoxicity assays confirmed our hypothesis by indicating that the conformational conversion of Abeta42 into an alpha-helical-enriched secondary structure also has antiapoptotic activity, thereby increasing the viability of cells treated with oligomeric species.

  9. N-(1-Pyrenyl Maleimide Induces Bak Oligomerization and Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Jurkat Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Rong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-(1-pyrenyl maleimide (NPM is a fluorescent reagent that is frequently used as a derivatization agent for the detection of thio-containing compounds. NPM has been shown to display a great differential cytotoxicity against hematopoietic cancer cells. In this study, the molecular mechanism by which NPM induces apoptosis was examined. Here, we show that treatment of Jurkat cells with NPM leads to Bak oligomerization, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, and release of cytochrome C from mitochondria to cytosol. Induction of Bak oligomerization appears to play a critical role in NPM-induced apoptosis, as downregulation of Bak by shRNA significantly prevented NPM-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of caspase 8 by Z-IETD-FMK and/or depletion of Bid did not affect NPM-induced oligomerization of Bak. Taken together, these results suggest that NPM-induced apoptosis is mediated through a pathway that is independent of caspase-8 activation.

  10. Zn(2+) site engineering at the oligomeric interface of the dopamine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard-Nielsen, Kristine; Norregaard, Lene; Hastrup, Hanne; Javitch, Jonathan A; Gether, Ulrik

    2002-07-31

    Increasing evidence suggests that Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters exist as homo-oligomeric proteins. However, the functional implication of this oligomerization remains unclear. Here we demonstrate the engineering of a Zn(2+) binding site at the predicted dimeric interface of the dopamine transporter (DAT) corresponding to the external end of transmembrane segment 6. Upon binding to this site, which involves a histidine inserted in position 310 (V310H) and the endogenous Cys306 within the same DAT molecule, Zn(2+) potently inhibits [(3)H]dopamine uptake. These data provide indirect evidence that conformational changes critical for the translocation process may occur at the interface between two transporter molecules in the oligomeric structure.

  11. A simplified approach for evaluating multiple test outcomes and multiple disease states in relation to the exercise thallium-201 stress test in suspected coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, S.G.; Watson, D.D.; Gibson, R.S.; Beller, G.A.; Kaul, S.

    1989-01-01

    This study describes a simplified approach for the interpretation of electrocardiographic and thallium-201 imaging data derived from the same patient during exercise. The 383 patients in this study had also undergone selective coronary arteriography within 3 months of the exercise test. This matrix approach allows for multiple test outcomes (both tests positive, both negative, 1 test positive and 1 negative) and multiple disease states (no coronary artery disease vs 1-vessel vs multivessel coronary artery disease). Because this approach analyzes the results of 2 test outcomes simultaneously rather than serially, it also negates the lack of test independence, if such an effect is present. It is also demonstrated that ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and defects on initial thallium-201 images provide conditionally independent information regarding the presence of coronary artery disease in patients without prior myocardial infarction. In contrast, ST-segment depression on the electrocardiogram and redistribution on the delayed thallium-201 images may not provide totally independent information regarding the presence of exercise-induced ischemia in patients with or without myocardial infarction

  12. Energy Management Strategy Based on Multiple Operating States for a Photovoltaic/Fuel Cell/Energy Storage DC Microgrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a great challenge for DC microgrids with stochastic renewable sources and volatility loads to achieve better operation performance. This study proposes an energy management strategy based on multiple operating states for a DC microgrid, which is comprised of a photovoltaic (PV array, a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC system, and a battery bank. This proposed strategy can share the power properly and keep the bus voltage steady under different operating states (the state of charge (SOC of the battery bank, loading conditions, and PV array output power. In addition, a microgrids test platform is established. In order to verify the effectiveness of the proposed energy management strategy, the strategy is implemented in a hardware system and experimentally tested under different operating states. The experimental results illustrate the good performance of the proposed control strategy for the DC microgrid under different scenarios of power generation and load demand.

  13. Methyl methacrylate oligomerically-modified clay and its poly(methyl methacrylate) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaoxia; Jiang, David D.; Wilkie, Charles A.

    2005-01-01

    A methyl methacrylate oligomerically-modified clay was used to prepare poly(methyl methacrylate) clay nanocomposites by melt blending and the effect of the clay loading level on the modified clay and corresponding nanocomposite was studied. These nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and cone calorimetry. The results show a mixed intercalated/delaminated morphology with good nanodispersion. The compatibility between the methylacrylate-subsituted clay and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are greatly improved compared to other oligomerically-modified clays

  14. 40 CFR 721.3100 - Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a hy-droxyl-al-kyla-mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a hy-droxyl-al-kyla-mine. 721.3100 Section 721.3100 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3100 Oligomeric silicic acid ester compound with a...

  15. A Free Energy Barrier Caused by the Refolding of an Oligomeric Intermediate Controls the Lag Time of Amyloid Formation by hIAPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Arnaldo L; Lomont, Justin P; Tu, Ling-Hsien; Raleigh, Daniel P; Zanni, Martin T

    2017-11-22

    Transiently populated oligomers formed en route to amyloid fibrils may constitute the most toxic aggregates associated with many amyloid-associated diseases. Most nucleation theories used to describe amyloid aggregation predict low oligomer concentrations and do not take into account free energy costs that may be associated with structural rearrangements between the oligomer and fiber states. We have used isotope labeling and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy to spectrally resolve an oligomeric intermediate during the aggregation of the human islet amyloid protein (hIAPP or amylin), the protein associated with type II diabetes. A structural rearrangement includes the F 23 G 24 A 25 I 26 L 27 region of hIAPP, which starts from a random coil structure, evolves into ordered β-sheet oligomers containing at least 5 strands, and then partially disorders in the fibril structure. The supercritical concentration is measured to be between 150 and 250 μM, which is the thermodynamic parameter that sets the free energy of the oligomers. A 3-state kinetic model fits the experimental data, but only if it includes a concentration independent free energy barrier >3 kcal/mol that represents the free energy cost of refolding the oligomeric intermediate into the structure of the amyloid fibril; i.e., "oligomer activation" is required. The barrier creates a transition state in the free energy landscape that slows fibril formation and creates a stable population of oligomers during the lag phase, even at concentrations below the supercritical concentration. Largely missing in current kinetic models is a link between structure and kinetics. Our experiments and modeling provide evidence that protein structural rearrangements during aggregation impact the populations and kinetics of toxic oligomeric species.

  16. Multiple Case Studies of Public Library Systems in New York State: Service Decision-Making Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoai

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the functions and roles of public library systems in New York State and the services they provide for individual libraries and the public. The dissertation further studied the service decision-making processes at three selected New York State cooperative public library systems. Public library systems have played an important…

  17. Simultaneous qubit-loss-free fusion of three multiple W states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meiyu; Hao, Quanzhi; Yan, Fengli; Gao, Ting

    2018-05-01

    Qubit-loss-free fusion for two W states introduced by Li K et al (2016 Phys. Rev. A 94 062315) clearly increases the final size of the obtained W state and greatly reduces the number of fusion steps to achieve a W state of a target size. Motivated by this idea, we propose a qubit-loss-free fusion scheme for fusing three polarization entangled W states simultaneously. The elements of a two-outcome positive-operator valued measurement and the appropriate joint unitary operation for realizing a positive-operator valued measurement measurement are given. As an example, with the assistance of weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities, an optical setup for fusing three W states is proposed. We analyze the success probability of the scheme and the resource cost of the present scheme, as compared to previous work.

  18. Structural basis for TatA oligomerization: an NMR study of Escherichia coli TatA dimeric structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available Many proteins are transported across lipid membranes by protein translocation systems in living cells. The twin-arginine transport (Tat system identified in bacteria and plant chloroplasts is a unique system that transports proteins across membranes in their fully-folded states. Up to date, the detailed molecular mechanism of this process remains largely unclear. The Escherichia coli Tat system consists of three essential transmembrane proteins: TatA, TatB and TatC. Among them, TatB and TatC form a tight complex and function in substrate recognition. The major component TatA contains a single transmembrane helix followed by an amphipathic helix, and is suggested to form the translocation pore via self-oligomerization. Since the TatA oligomer has to accommodate substrate proteins of various sizes and shapes, the process of its assembly stands essential for understanding the translocation mechanism. A structure model of TatA oligomer was recently proposed based on NMR and EPR observations, revealing contacts between the transmembrane helices from adjacent subunits. Herein we report the construction and stabilization of a dimeric TatA, as well as the structure determination by solution NMR spectroscopy. In addition to more extensive inter-subunit contacts between the transmembrane helices, we were also able to observe interactions between neighbouring amphipathic helices. The side-by-side packing of the amphipathic helices extends the solvent-exposed hydrophilic surface of the protein, which might be favourable for interactions with substrate proteins. The dimeric TatA structure offers more detailed information of TatA oligomeric interface and provides new insights on Tat translocation mechanism.

  19. Mechanism for the Excited-State Multiple Proton Transfer Process of Dihydroxyanthraquinone Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiao; Du, Can; Yang, Li; Zhao, Meiyu; Dai, Yumei; Song, Peng

    2017-06-22

    The single and dual cooperated proton transfer dynamic process in the excited state of 1,5-dihydroxyanthraquinone (1,5-DHAQ) was theoretically investigated, taking solvent effects (ethanol) into account. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were simulated, and dual fluorescence exhibited, which is consistent with previous experiments. Analysis of the calculated IR and Raman vibration spectra reveals that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions (O 20 -H 21 ···O 24 and O 22 -H 23 ···O 25 ) are strengthened following the excited proton transfer process. Finally, by constructing the potential energy surfaces of the ground state, first excited singlet state, and triplet state, the mechanism of the intramolecular proton transfer of 1,5-DHAQ can be revealed.

  20. Multiple stable states of a periodically driven electron spin in a quantum dot using circularly polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenev, V. L.

    2011-06-01

    The periodical modulation of circularly polarized light with a frequency close to the electron spin resonance frequency induces a sharp change of the single electron spin orientation. Hyperfine interaction provides a feedback, thus fixing the precession frequency of the electron spin in the external and the Overhauser field near the modulation frequency. The nuclear polarization is bidirectional and the electron-nuclear spin system (ENSS) possesses a few stable states. The same physics underlie the frequency-locking effect for two-color and mode-locked excitations. However, the pulsed excitation with mode-locked laser brings about the multitudes of stable states in ENSS in a quantum dot. The resulting precession frequencies of the electron spin differ in these states by the multiple of the modulation frequency. Under such conditions ENSS represents a digital frequency converter with more than 100 stable channels.

  1. Recovery from an acute relapse is associated with changes in motor resting-state connectivity in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Blinkenberg, Morten; Paulson, Olaf B.

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) of the brain has been successfully used to identify altered functional connectivity in the motor network in multiple sclerosis (MS).1 In clinically stable patients with MS, we recently demonstrated increased coupling between the basal ganglia and the motor...... network.1 Accordingly, rs-fMRI in MS is particularly suited to investigate functional reorganisation of the motor network in the remission phase after a relapse because the resting-state connectivity pattern is not influenced by interindividual differences in motor ability and task performance....... In this prospective rs-fMRI study, we mapped acute changes in resting-state motor connectivity in 12 patients with relapsing forms of MS presenting with an acute relapse involving an upper limb paresis. Previous functional MRI (fMRI) studies have shown that the activation of sensorimotor areas was stronger and more...

  2. Structure of the large terminase from a hyperthermophilic virus reveals a unique mechanism for oligomerization and ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui-Gang; Jenkins, Huw T; Antson, Alfred A; Greive, Sandra J

    2017-12-15

    The crystal structure of the large terminase from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus bacteriophage D6E shows a unique relative orientation of the N-terminal adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and C-terminal nuclease domains. This monomeric 'initiation' state with the two domains 'locked' together is stabilized via a conserved C-terminal arm, which may interact with the portal protein during motor assembly, as predicted for several bacteriophages. Further work supports the formation of an active oligomeric state: (i) AUC data demonstrate the presence of oligomers; (ii) mutational analysis reveals a trans-arginine finger, R158, indispensable for ATP hydrolysis; (iii) the location of this arginine is conserved with the HerA/FtsK ATPase superfamily; (iv) a molecular docking model of the pentamer is compatible with the location of the identified arginine finger. However, this pentameric model is structurally incompatible with the monomeric 'initiation' state and is supported by the observed increase in kcat of ATP hydrolysis, from 7.8 ± 0.1 min-1 to 457.7 ± 9.2 min-1 upon removal of the C-terminal nuclease domain. Taken together, these structural, biophysical and biochemical data suggest a model where transition from the 'initiation' state into a catalytically competent pentameric state, is accompanied by substantial domain rearrangements, triggered by the removal of the C-terminal arm from the ATPase active site. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Influence of oligomeric resins on traction and rolling resistance of silica tire treads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, N.; Pille-Wolf, W.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2016-01-01

    This study concerns the silica-reinforcement of synthetic rubber compounds for passenger tire treads with the objective to gain insight into the beneficial effects of oligomeric resins, derived from natural and synthetic monomers, on the major tire performance factors: rolling resistance and (wet)

  4. Understanding the Influence of oligomeric resins on traction and rolling resistance of silica tire treads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, N.; Pille-Wolf, W.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study concerns the silica reinforcement of styrene–butadiene rubber compounds for passenger car tire treads, with the objective of gaining greater insight into the beneficial effects of oligomeric resins. The major tire performance factors predicted are rolling resistance and (wet) skid

  5. Influence of oligomeric resins on traction and rolling resistance of silica tire treads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleugels, N.; Pille-Wolf, W.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Noordermeer, Jacobus W.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study concerns the silica-reinforcement of synthetic rubber compounds for passenger tire treads with the objective to gain insight into the beneficial effects of oligomeric resins, derived from natural and synthetic monomers, on the major tire performance factors: Rolling Resistance and (Wet)

  6. Cobalt Oxide on N-Doped Carbon for 1-Butene Oligomerization to Produce Linear Octenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dongting [Department; Xu, Zhuoran [Department; Chada, Joseph P. [Department; Carrero, Carlos A. [Department; Rosenfeld, Devon C. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Rogers, Jessica L. [The Dow Chemical Company, 2301 N. Brazosport Boulevard, Freeport, Texas 77541-3257, United States; Hermans, Ive [Department; Huber, George W. [Department

    2017-10-02

    Cobalt oxide supported on N-doped carbon catalysts were investigated for 1-butene oligomerization. The materials were synthesized by treating activated carbon with nitric acid and subsequently with NH3 at 200, 400, 600, and 800 °C, followed by impregnation with cobalt. The 1-butene oligomerization selectivity increased with ammonia treatment temperature of the carbon support. The oligomerization selectivity of cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized at 800 °C (800A-CoOx/N-C) is 2.6 times higher than previously reported cobalt oxide on N-doped carbon synthesized with NH4OH (2A-CoOx/N-C). Over 70% of the butene dimers were linear C8 olefins for all catalysts. The oligomerization selectivity increased with 1-butene conversion. The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis, N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nitrogen content of the catalysts increases with ammonia treatment temperature as confirmed by elemental analysis. The surface content of pyridinic nitrogen with a binding energy of 398.4 ± 0.1 eV increased with ammonia treatment temperature as evidenced by deconvolution of N 1s XPS spectra.

  7. Pro-inflammatory delipidizing cytokines reduce adiponectin secretion from human adipocytes without affecting adiponectin oligomerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Peter J.; van den Pangaart, Petra S.; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.; Boon, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Adiponectin and, especially, its oligomeric complex composition have been suggested to be critical in determining insulin sensitivity. Pro-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the development of insulin resistance in obesity and associated diseases. Therefore, we investigated the effect

  8. Mechanics of the mannitol transporter from Escherichia coli : substrate-probing and oligomeric structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Gertjan

    2006-01-01

    Gertjan Veldhuis bestudeerde de mannitoltransporter van Escherichia coli, EnzymeIImtl (EIImtl), om meer inzicht te krijgen in het bindingsmechanisme en de oligomere toestand van dit membraaneiwit. Hij concludeerde onder andere dat dimeer EIImtl één mannitol bindt, de dimeer zeer stabiel is en dat

  9. RIG-I self-oligomerization is either dispensable or very transient for signal transduction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade Louber

    Full Text Available Effective host defence against viruses depends on the rapid triggering of innate immunity through the induction of a type I interferon (IFN response. To this end, microbe-associated molecular patterns are detected by dedicated receptors. Among them, the RIG-I-like receptors RIG-I and MDA5 activate IFN gene expression upon sensing viral RNA in the cytoplasm. While MDA5 forms long filaments in vitro upon activation, RIG-I is believed to oligomerize after RNA binding in order to transduce a signal. Here, we show that in vitro binding of synthetic RNA mimicking that of Mononegavirales (Ebola, rabies and measles viruses leader sequences to purified RIG-I does not induce RIG-I oligomerization. Furthermore, in cells devoid of endogenous functional RIG-I-like receptors, after activation of exogenous Flag-RIG-I by a 62-mer-5'ppp-dsRNA or by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, a dsRNA analogue, or by measles virus infection, anti-Flag immunoprecipitation and specific elution with Flag peptide indicated a monomeric form of RIG-I. Accordingly, when using the Gaussia Luciferase-Based Protein Complementation Assay (PCA, a more sensitive in cellula assay, no RIG-I oligomerization could be detected upon RNA stimulation. Altogether our data indicate that the need for self-oligomerization of RIG-I for signal transduction is either dispensable or very transient.

  10. High multiplicity states in disordered carbon systems: Ab initio and semiempirical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khavryuchenko, Volodymyr D.; Khavryuchenko, Oleksiy V.; Lisnyak, Vladyslav V.

    2010-01-01

    Stability of non-zero spin projection states for disordered carbon clusters of low symmetry were examined using semiempirical and ab initio methods. The study proves previous results of V.D. Khavryuchenko, Y.A. Tarasenko, V.V. Strelko, O.V. Khavryuchenko, V.V. Lisnyak, Int. J. Mod. Phys. B 21 (2007) 4507, obtained for the large polyaromatic hydrocarbons clusters and shows that the phenomenon is intrinsic for carbon-rich systems and independent of their symmetries. The electronic properties of the carbon clusters may alter from insulating to semiconducting upon change of C/H ratio and stabilization of non-zero spin projection states. A partial collectivization of the electrons is observed in deeply carbonized carbon clusters in higher S z states.

  11. A Kolmogorov-type competition model with multiple coexistence states and its applications to plant competition for sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Winfried; Nevai, Andrew L.

    2008-12-01

    It is demonstrated that a Kolmogorov-type competition model featuring species allocation and gain functions can possess multiple coexistence statesE Two examples are constructed: one in which the two competing species possess rectangular allocation functions but distinct gain functions, and the other in which one species has a rectangular allocation function, the second species has a bi-rectangular allocation function, and the two species share a common gain function. In both examples, it is shown that the species nullclines may intersect multiple times within the interior of the first quadrant, thus creating both locally stable and unstable equilibrium points. These results have important applications in the study of plant competition for sunlight, in which the allocation functions describe the vertical placement of leaves for two competing species, and the gain functions represent rates of photosynthesis performed by leaves at different heights when shaded by overlying leaves belonging to either species.

  12. Transmission Coefficients for Chemical Reactions with Multiple States: Role of Quantum Decoherence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    de la Lande, A.; Řezáč, Jan; Lévy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 11 (2011), s. 3883-3894 ISSN 0002-7863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : decoherence * transition state theory * nonadiabatic reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 9.907, year: 2011

  13. Impacts of multiple stresses on water demand and supply across the southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge Sun; Steven G. McNulty; Jennifer A. Moore Myers; Erika C. Cohen

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of long-term impacts of projected changes in climate, population, and land use and land cover on regional water resource is critical to the sustainable development of the southeastern United States. The objective of this study was to fully budget annual water availability for water supply (precipitation ) evapotranspiration + groundwater supply + return flow...

  14. Crop Yield Simulations Using Multiple Regional Climate Models in the Southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, D.; Kafatos, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, J.; Walko, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural productivity (described by crop yield) is strongly dependent on climate conditions determined by meteorological parameters (e.g., temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation). California is the largest producer of agricultural products in the United States, but crops in associated arid and semi-arid regions live near their physiological limits (e.g., in hot summer conditions with little precipitation). Thus, accurate climate data are essential in assessing the impact of climate variability on agricultural productivity in the Southwestern United States and other arid regions. To address this issue, we produced simulated climate datasets and used them as input for the crop production model. For climate data, we employed two different regional climate models (WRF and OLAM) using a fine-resolution (8km) grid. Performances of the two different models are evaluated in a fine-resolution regional climate hindcast experiment for 10 years from 2001 to 2010 by comparing them to the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) dataset. Based on this comparison, multi-model ensembles with variable weighting are used to alleviate model bias and improve the accuracy of crop model productivity over large geographic regions (county and state). Finally, by using a specific crop-yield simulation model (APSIM) in conjunction with meteorological forcings from the multi-regional climate model ensemble, we demonstrate the degree to which maize yields are sensitive to the regional climate in the Southwestern United States.

  15. Storage of multiple single-photon pulses emitted from a quantum dot in a solid-state quantum memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian-Shun; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Wang, Yi-Tao; Li, Yu-Long; Liu, Xiao; Hua, Yi-Lin; Zou, Yang; Wang, Shuang; He, De-Yong; Chen, Geng; Sun, Yong-Nan; Yu, Ying; Li, Mi-Feng; Zha, Guo-Wei; Ni, Hai-Qiao; Niu, Zhi-Chuan; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-01-01

    Quantum repeaters are critical components for distributing entanglement over long distances in presence of unavoidable optical losses during transmission. Stimulated by the Duan–Lukin–Cirac–Zoller protocol, many improved quantum repeater protocols based on quantum memories have been proposed, which commonly focus on the entanglement-distribution rate. Among these protocols, the elimination of multiple photons (or multiple photon-pairs) and the use of multimode quantum memory are demonstrated to have the ability to greatly improve the entanglement-distribution rate. Here, we demonstrate the storage of deterministic single photons emitted from a quantum dot in a polarization-maintaining solid-state quantum memory; in addition, multi-temporal-mode memory with 1, 20 and 100 narrow single-photon pulses is also demonstrated. Multi-photons are eliminated, and only one photon at most is contained in each pulse. Moreover, the solid-state properties of both sub-systems make this configuration more stable and easier to be scalable. Our work will be helpful in the construction of efficient quantum repeaters based on all-solid-state devices. PMID:26468996

  16. Concentration-dependent oligomerization of cross-linked complexes between ferredoxin and ferredoxin–NADP+ reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Kubota-Kawai, Hisako; Lee, Young-Ho; Muraki, Norifumi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Cross-linked complexes of ferredoxin (Fd) and Fd–NADP + reductase form oligomers. •In the crystal structures, Fd- and FNR moieties swap across the molecules. •The complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization at sub-milimolar order. -- Abstract: Ferredoxin–NADP + reductase (FNR) forms a 1:1 complex with ferredoxin (Fd), and catalyzes the electron transfer between Fd and NADP + . In our previous study, we prepared a series of site-specifically cross-linked complexes of Fd and FNR, which showed diverse electron transfer properties. Here, we show that X-ray crystal structures of the two different Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes form oligomers by swapping Fd and FNR moieties across the molecules; one complex is a dimer from, and the other is a successive multimeric form. In order to verify whether these oligomeric structures are formed only in crystal, we investigated the possibility of the oligomerization of these complexes in solution. The mean values of the particle size of these cross-linked complexes were shown to increase with the rise of protein concentration at sub-milimolar order, whereas the size of dissociable wild-type Fd:FNR complex was unchanged as analyzed by dynamic light scattering measurement. The oligomerization products were detected by SDS–PAGE after chemical cross-linking of these complexes at the sub-milimolar concentrations. The extent and concentration-dependent profile of the oligomerizaion were differentiated between the two cross-linked complexes. These results show that these Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization, possibly through swapping of Fd and FNR moieties also in solution. These findings lead to the possibility that some native multi-domain proteins may present similar phenomenon in vivo

  17. Natural abundant solid state NMR studies in designed tripeptides for differentiation of multiple conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, S; Chatterjee, Bhaswati; Raghothama, S

    2009-10-01

    Solid state NMR (SSNMR) experiments on heteronuclei in natural abundance are described for three synthetically designed tripeptides Piv-(L)Pro-(L)Pro-(L)Phe-OMe (1), Piv-(D)Pro-(L)Pro-(L)Phe-OMe (2), and Piv-(D)Pro-(L)Pro-(L)Phe-NHMe (3). These peptides exist in different conformation as shown by solution state NMR and single crystal X-ray analysis (Chatterjee et al., Chem Eur J 2008, 14, 6192). In this study, SSNMR has been used to probe the conformations of these peptides in their powder form. The (13)C spectrum of peptide (1) showed doubling of resonances corresponding to cis/cis form, unlike in solution where the similar doubling is attributed to cis/trans form. This has been confirmed by the chemical shift differences of C(beta) and C(gamma) carbon of Proline in peptide (1) both in solution and SSNMR. Peptide (2) and (3) provided single set of resonances which represented all trans form across the di-Proline segment. The results are in agreement with the X-ray analysis. Solid state (15)N resonances, especially from Proline residues provided additional information, which is normally not observable in solution state NMR. (1)H chemical shifts are also obtained from a two-dimensional heteronuclear correlation experiment between (1)H--(13)C. The results confirm the utility of NMR as a useful tool for identifying different conformers in peptides in the solid state. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 851-860, 2009.

  18. Multiplicity fluctuations in hadronic final states from the decay of the Z0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Agasi, E.; Alekseev, G.D.; Algeri, A.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S.J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andreazza, A.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Apsimon, R.J.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barate, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barker, G.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Barrio, J.A.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M.J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beeston, C.J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bilenky, M.S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bocci, V.; Bogolubov, P.N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgeaud, P.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Bosworth, S.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K.D.; Brenner, R.A.; Briand, H.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R.C.A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J.A.M.A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A.J.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Cerrito, L.; Chabaud, V.; Chan, A.; Charpentier, P.; Chaussard, L.; Chauveau, J.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chrin, J.T.M.; Clara, M.P.; Collins, P.; Conteras, J.L.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Daum, A.; Dauncey, P.D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; Da Silva, W.; Defoix, C.; Delikaris, D.; Delorme, S.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Beer, M.; De Boeck, H.; De Boer, W.; Clercq, C. de; Fez Laso, M.D.M. de; Groot, N. de; La Vaissiere, C. de; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Eek, L.O.; Eerola, P.A.M.; Ehret, R.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fearnley, T.A.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T.A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K.A.J.; Fousset, J.L.; Francon, S.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D.C.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Galeazzi, G.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, E.N.; Gerber, J.P.; Giacomelli, P.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Golovatyuk, V.M.; Gomez y Cadenas, J.J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorski, M.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Gross, E.

    1992-01-01

    An analysis of the fluctuations in the phase space distribution of hadrons produced in the decay of 78829 Z 0 has been carried out, using the method of factorial moments. The high statistics collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP during 1990 allowed studies of the event sample both globally and in intervals of p t and multiplicity, and for different jet topologies and for single jets. A large contribution to the factorial moments of the one-dimensional data on rapidity with respect to the event axis comes from hard gluons. Details of factorial moments in two and tree dimensions are presented. Influences of resonance decays have been studied by Monte Carlo simulation: one-dimensional factorial moments at low p t , and two-, three-dimensional analyses are affected. Parton shower models describe the data reasonably well. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion with multiple hidden states for remaining useful life prediction of rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Fangfang; Tsui, Kwok-Leung

    2017-09-01

    Brownian motion with adaptive drift has attracted much attention in prognostics because its first hitting time is highly relevant to remaining useful life prediction and it follows the inverse Gaussian distribution. Besides linear degradation modeling, nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion has been developed to model nonlinear degradation. Moreover, the first hitting time distribution of the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion has been approximated by time-space transformation. In the previous studies, the drift coefficient is the only hidden state used in state space modeling of the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion. Besides the drift coefficient, parameters of a nonlinear function used in the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion should be treated as additional hidden states of state space modeling to make the nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion more flexible. In this paper, a prognostic method based on nonlinear-drifted Brownian motion with multiple hidden states is proposed and then it is applied to predict remaining useful life of rechargeable batteries. 26 sets of rechargeable battery degradation samples are analyzed to validate the effectiveness of the proposed prognostic method. Moreover, some comparisons with a standard particle filter based prognostic method, a spherical cubature particle filter based prognostic method and two classic Bayesian prognostic methods are conducted to highlight the superiority of the proposed prognostic method. Results show that the proposed prognostic method has lower average prediction errors than the particle filter based prognostic methods and the classic Bayesian prognostic methods for battery remaining useful life prediction.

  20. The metallic state in neutral radical conductors: dimensionality, pressure and multiple orbital effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Di; Winter, Stephen M; Mailman, Aaron; Wong, Joanne W L; Yong, Wenjun; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Jia, Yating; Tse, John S; Desgreniers, Serge; Secco, Richard A; Julian, Stephen R; Jin, Changqing; Mito, Masaki; Ohishi, Yasuo; Oakley, Richard T

    2015-11-11

    Pressure-induced changes in the solid-state structures and transport properties of three oxobenzene-bridged bisdithiazolyl radicals 2 (R = H, F, Ph) over the range 0-15 GPa are described. All three materials experience compression of their π-stacked architecture, be it (i) 1D ABABAB π-stack (R = Ph), (ii) quasi-1D slipped π-stack (R = H), or (iii) 2D brick-wall π-stack (R = F). While R = H undergoes two structural phase transitions, neither of R = F, Ph display any phase change. All three radicals order as spin-canted antiferromagnets, but spin-canted ordering is lost at pressures pressure, and the thermal activation energy for conduction Eact is eliminated at pressures ranging from ∼3 GPa for R = F to ∼12 GPa for R = Ph, heralding formation of a highly correlated (or bad) metallic state. For R = F, H the pressure-induced Mott insulator to metal conversion has been tracked by measurements of optical conductivity at ambient temperature and electrical resistivity at low temperature. For R = F compression to 6.2 GPa leads to a quasiquadratic temperature dependence of the resistivity over the range 5-300 K, consistent with formation of a 2D Fermi liquid state. DFT band structure calculations suggest that the ease of metallization of these radicals can be ascribed to their multiorbital character. Mixing and overlap of SOMO- and LUMO-based bands affords an increased kinetic energy stabilization of the metallic state relative to a single SOMO-based band system.

  1. Tattoo-associated nontuberculous mycobacterial skin infections--multiple states, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Permanent tattoos have become increasingly common, with 21% of adults in the United States reporting having at least one tattoo. On rare occasions, outbreaks of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) skin infections have been reported after tattooing. In January 2012, public health officials in New York received reports of Mycobacterium chelonae skin infections in 14 New York residents who received tattoos during September-December 2011. All infections were associated with use of the same nationally distributed, prediluted gray ink manufactured by company A. CDC disseminated an Epi-X public health alert to identify additional tattoo-associated NTM skin infections; previously identified cases were reported from three states (Washington, Iowa, and Colorado). Public health investigations by CDC, state and local health departments, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found NTM contamination in tattoo inks used in two of five identified clusters. All infected persons were exposed to one of four different brands of ink. NTM contamination of inks can occur during the manufacturing process as a result of using contaminated ingredients or poor manufacturing practices, or when inks are diluted with nonsterile water by tattoo artists. No specific FDA regulatory requirement explicitly provides that tattoo inks must be sterile. However, CDC recommends that ink manufacturers ensure ink is sterile and that tattoo artists avoid contamination of ink through dilution with nonsterile water. Consumers also should be aware of the health risks associated with getting an intradermal tattoo.

  2. Ultrafast preparation of a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-based ionic liquid hybrid monolith via photoinitiated polymerization, and its application to capillary electrochromatography of aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingyu; Lei, Xiaoyun; Deng, Lijun; Li, Minsheng; Yao, Sicong; Wu, Xiaoping

    2018-06-06

    An ionic liquid hybrid monolithic capillary column was prepared within 7 min via photoinitiated free-radical polymerization of an ionic liquid monomer (1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide); VBIMNTF 2 ) and a methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) acting as a cross-linker. The effects of composition of prepolymerization solution and initiation time on the porous structure and electroosmotic flow (EOF) of monolithic column were investigated. The hybrid monolith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and FTIR. Owing to the introduction of a rigid nanosized POSS silica core and ionic liquids with multiple interaction sites, the monolithic column has a well-defined 3D skeleton morphology, good mechanical stability, and a stable anodic electroosmotic flow. The hybrid monolithic stationary phase was applied to the capillary electrochromatographic separation of various alkylbenzenes, phenols, anilines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The column efficiency is highest (98,000 plates/m) in case of alkylbenzenes. Mixed-mode retention mechanisms including hydrophobic interactions, π-π stacking, electrostatic interaction and electrophoretic mobility can be observed. This indicates the potential of this material in terms of efficient separation of analytes of different structural type. Graphical Abstract Preparation of a mixed-mode ionic liquid hybrid monolithic column via photoinitiated polymerization of methacryl substituted polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS-MA) and 1-butyl-3-vinylimidazolium-bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (VBIMNTF 2 ) ionic liquid for use in capillary electrochromatography.

  3. Coexistence of Multiple Nonlinear States in a Tristable Passive Kerr Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miles Anderson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Passive Kerr cavities driven by coherent laser fields display a rich landscape of nonlinear physics, including bistability, pattern formation, and localized dissipative structures (solitons. Their conceptual simplicity has for several decades offered an unprecedented window into nonlinear cavity dynamics, providing insights into numerous systems and applications ranging from all-optical memory devices to microresonator frequency combs. Yet despite the decades of study, a recent theoretical work has surprisingly alluded to an entirely new and unexplored paradigm in the regime where nonlinearly tilted cavity resonances overlap with one another [T. Hansson and S. Wabnitz, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 32, 1259 (2015JOBPDE0740-322410.1364/JOSAB.32.001259]. We use synchronously driven fiber ring resonators to experimentally access this regime and observe the rise of new nonlinear dissipative states. Specifically, we observe, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the stable coexistence of temporal Kerr cavity solitons and extended modulation instability (Turing patterns, and perform real-time measurements that unveil the dynamics of the ensuing nonlinear structure. When operating in the regime of continuous wave tristability, we further observe the coexistence of two distinct cavity soliton states, one of which can be identified as a “super” cavity soliton, as predicted by Hansson and Wabnitz. Our experimental findings are in excellent agreement with theoretical analyses and numerical simulations of the infinite-dimensional Ikeda map that governs the cavity dynamics. The results from our work reveal that experimental systems can support complex combinations of distinct nonlinear states, and they could have practical implications to future microresonator-based frequency comb sources.

  4. Coexistence of Multiple Nonlinear States in a Tristable Passive Kerr Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Miles; Wang, Yadong; Leo, François; Coen, Stéphane; Erkintalo, Miro; Murdoch, Stuart G.

    2017-07-01

    Passive Kerr cavities driven by coherent laser fields display a rich landscape of nonlinear physics, including bistability, pattern formation, and localized dissipative structures (solitons). Their conceptual simplicity has for several decades offered an unprecedented window into nonlinear cavity dynamics, providing insights into numerous systems and applications ranging from all-optical memory devices to microresonator frequency combs. Yet despite the decades of study, a recent theoretical work has surprisingly alluded to an entirely new and unexplored paradigm in the regime where nonlinearly tilted cavity resonances overlap with one another [T. Hansson and S. Wabnitz, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 32, 1259 (2015), 10.1364/JOSAB.32.001259]. We use synchronously driven fiber ring resonators to experimentally access this regime and observe the rise of new nonlinear dissipative states. Specifically, we observe, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the stable coexistence of temporal Kerr cavity solitons and extended modulation instability (Turing) patterns, and perform real-time measurements that unveil the dynamics of the ensuing nonlinear structure. When operating in the regime of continuous wave tristability, we further observe the coexistence of two distinct cavity soliton states, one of which can be identified as a "super" cavity soliton, as predicted by Hansson and Wabnitz. Our experimental findings are in excellent agreement with theoretical analyses and numerical simulations of the infinite-dimensional Ikeda map that governs the cavity dynamics. The results from our work reveal that experimental systems can support complex combinations of distinct nonlinear states, and they could have practical implications to future microresonator-based frequency comb sources.

  5. Anxiety state affects information processing speed in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goretti, Benedetta; Viterbo, R G; Portaccio, E; Niccolai, C; Hakiki, B; Piscolla, E; Iaffaldano, P; Trojano, M; Amato, M P

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of anxiety on the cognitive performance of a clinical sample of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS patients. One hundred ninety patients (140 females) were included in the study and assessed through the beck depression inventory, the state-trait anxiety inventory and the Rao's brief repeatable battery which assesses cognitive domains most frequently impaired in MS. As for neuropsychological performance, a total of 76 (40%) subjects fulfilled our criterion for cognitive impairment. Tests most frequently failed by cognitive impairment (CI) patients were those assessing complex attention and information processing speed [Simbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT), Paced Auditory Serial Auditory Test (PASAT) 3 and 2] and verbal memory. In the univariate analysis, state anxiety was related to failure on the SDMT (p = 0.042), and marginally, to failure on the PASAT-3 (p = 0.068), and to the presence of CI (p = 0.082). Moderate/severe depression was detected in 38 (20%) patients and fatigue in 109 (57%). Higher depression scores were related to impairment on the ST (OR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10; p = 0.029).

  6. Real Time Robot Soccer Game Event Detection Using Finite State Machines with Multiple Fuzzy Logic Probability Evaluators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmer P. Dadios

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new algorithm for real time event detection using Finite State Machines with multiple Fuzzy Logic Probability Evaluators (FLPEs. A machine referee for a robot soccer game is developed and is used as the platform to test the proposed algorithm. A novel technique to detect collisions and other events in microrobot soccer game under inaccurate and insufficient information is presented. The robots' collision is used to determine goalkeeper charging and goal score events which are crucial for the machine referee's decisions. The Main State Machine (MSM handles the schedule of event activation. The FLPE calculates the probabilities of the true occurrence of the events. Final decisions about the occurrences of events are evaluated and compared through threshold crisp probability values. The outputs of FLPEs can be combined to calculate the probability of an event composed of subevents. Using multiple fuzzy logic system, the FLPE utilizes minimal number of rules and can be tuned individually. Experimental results show the accuracy and robustness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. Habitability of waterworlds: runaway greenhouses, atmospheric expansion, and multiple climate states of pure water atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin

    2015-05-01

    There are four different stable climate states for pure water atmospheres, as might exist on so-called "waterworlds." I map these as a function of solar constant for planets ranging in size from Mars-sized to 10 Earth-mass. The states are as follows: globally ice covered (Ts ⪅ 245 K), cold and damp (270 ⪅ Ts ⪅ 290 K), hot and moist (350 ⪅ Ts ⪅ 550 K), and very hot and dry (Tsx2A86;900 K). No stable climate exists for 290 ⪅ T s ⪅ 350 K or 550 ⪅ Ts ⪅ 900 K. The union of hot moist and cold damp climates describes the liquid water habitable zone, the width and location of which depends on planet mass. At each solar constant, two or three different climate states are stable. This is a consequence of strong nonlinearities in both thermal emission and the net absorption of sunlight. Across the range of planet sizes, I account for the atmospheres expanding to high altitudes as they warm. The emitting and absorbing surfaces (optical depth of unity) move to high altitude, making their area larger than the planet surface, so more thermal radiation is emitted and more sunlight absorbed (the former dominates). The atmospheres of small planets expand more due to weaker gravity; the effective runaway greenhouse threshold is about 35 W m(-2) higher for Mars, 10 W m(-2) higher for Earth or Venus, but only a few W m(-2) higher for a 10 Earth-mass planet. There is an underlying (expansion-neglected) trend of increasing runaway greenhouse threshold with planetary size (40 W m(-2) higher for a 10 Earth-mass planet than for Mars). Summing these opposing trends means that Venus-sized (or slightly smaller) planets are most susceptible to a runaway greenhouse. The habitable zone for pure water atmospheres is very narrow, with an insolation range of 0.07 times the solar constant. A wider habitable zone requires background gas and greenhouse gas: N2 and CO2 on Earth, which are biologically controlled. Thus, habitability depends on inhabitance.

  8. Development of Biodegradable Poly(citrate)-Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes Hybrid Elastomers with High Mechanical Properties and Osteogenic Differentiation Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhang; Yu, Meng; Chen, Xiaofeng; Ma, Peter X; Lei, Bo

    2016-02-10

    Biodegradable elastomeric biomaterials have attracted much attention in tissue engineering due to their biomimetic viscoelastic behavior and biocompatibility. However, the low mechanical stability at hydrated state, fast biodegradation in vivo, and poor osteogenic activity greatly limited bioelastomers applications in bone tissue regeneration. Herein, we develop a series of poly(octanediol citrate)-polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POC-POSS) hybrids with highly tunable elastomeric behavior (hydrated state) and biodegradation and osteoblasts biocompatibility through a facile one-pot thermal polymerization strategy. POC-POSS hybrids show significantly improved stiffness and ductility in either dry or hydrated conditions, as well as good antibiodegradation ability (20-50% weight loss in 3 months). POC-POSS hybrids exhibit significantly enhanced osteogenic differentiation through upregulating alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium deposition, and expression of osteogenic markers (ALPL, BGLAP, and Runx2). The high mechanical stability at hydrated state and enhanced osteogenic activity make POC-POSS hybrid elastomers promising as scaffolds and nanoscale vehicles for bone tissue regeneration and drug delivery. This study may also provide a new strategy (controlling the stiffness under hydrated condition) to design advanced hybrid biomaterials with high mechanical properties under physiological condition for tissue regeneration applications.

  9. Multimodal Nonlinear Optical Imaging for Sensitive Detection of Multiple Pharmaceutical Solid-State Forms and Surface Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Dunja; Saarinen, Jukka; Rojalin, Tatu; Antikainen, Osmo; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Laaksonen, Timo; Peltonen, Leena; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-11-07

    Two nonlinear imaging modalities, coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and sum-frequency generation (SFG), were successfully combined for sensitive multimodal imaging of multiple solid-state forms and their changes on drug tablet surfaces. Two imaging approaches were used and compared: (i) hyperspectral CARS combined with principal component analysis (PCA) and SFG imaging and (ii) simultaneous narrowband CARS and SFG imaging. Three different solid-state forms of indomethacin-the crystalline gamma and alpha forms, as well as the amorphous form-were clearly distinguished using both approaches. Simultaneous narrowband CARS and SFG imaging was faster, but hyperspectral CARS and SFG imaging has the potential to be applied to a wider variety of more complex samples. These methodologies were further used to follow crystallization of indomethacin on tablet surfaces under two storage conditions: 30 °C/23% RH and 30 °C/75% RH. Imaging with (sub)micron resolution showed that the approach allowed detection of very early stage surface crystallization. The surfaces progressively crystallized to predominantly (but not exclusively) the gamma form at lower humidity and the alpha form at higher humidity. Overall, this study suggests that multimodal nonlinear imaging is a highly sensitive, solid-state (and chemically) specific, rapid, and versatile imaging technique for understanding and hence controlling (surface) solid-state forms and their complex changes in pharmaceuticals.

  10. Landau levels and shallow donor states in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells at megagauss magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zybert, M.; Marchewka, M.; Sheregii, E. M.; Rickel, D. G.; Betts, J. B.; Balakirev, F. F.; Gordon, M.; Stier, A. V.; Mielke, C. H.; Pfeffer, P.; Zawadzki, W.

    2017-03-01

    Landau levels and shallow donor states in multiple GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (MQWs) are investigated by means of the cyclotron resonance at megagauss magnetic fields. Measurements of magneto-optical transitions were performed in pulsed fields up to 140 T and temperatures from 6-300 K. The 14 ×14 P.p band model for GaAs is used to interpret free-electron transitions in a magnetic field. Temperature behavior of the observed resonant structure indicates, in addition to the free-electron Landau states, contributions of magnetodonor states in the GaAs wells and possibly in the AlGaAs barriers. The magnetodonor energies are calculated using a variational procedure suitable for high magnetic fields and accounting for conduction band nonparabolicity in GaAs. It is shown that the above states, including their spin splitting, allow one to interpret the observed magneto-optical transitions in MQWs in the middle infrared region. Our experimental and theoretical results at very high magnetic fields are consistent with the picture used previously for GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs at lower magnetic fields.

  11. Photoisomers of Azobenzene Star with a Flat Core: Theoretical Insights into Multiple States from DFT and MD Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Markus; Saphiannikova, Marina; Santer, Svetlana; Guskova, Olga

    2017-09-21

    This study focuses on comparing physical properties of photoisomers of an azobenzene star with benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide core. Three azobenzene arms of the molecule undergo a reversible trans-cis isomerization upon UV-vis light illumination giving rise to multiple states from the planar all-trans one, via two mixed states to the kinked all-cis isomer. Employing density functional theory, we characterize the structural and photophysical properties of each state indicating a role the planar core plays in the coupling between azobenzene chromophores. To characterize the light-triggered switching of solvophilicity/solvophobicity of the star, the difference in solvation free energy is calculated for the transfer of an azobenzene star from its gas phase to implicit or explicit solvents. For the latter case, classical all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions of azobenzene star are performed employing the polymer consistent force field to shed light on the thermodynamics of explicit hydration as a function of the isomerization state and on the structuring of water around the star. From the analysis of two contributions to the free energy of hydration, the nonpolar van der Waals and the electrostatic terms, it is concluded that isomerization specificity largely determines the polarity of the molecule and the solute-solvent electrostatic interactions. This convertible hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity together with readjustable occupied volume and the surface area accessible to water, affects the self-assembly/disassembly of the azobenzene star with a flat core triggered by light.

  12. The state of multiple sclerosis: current insight into the patient/health care provider relationship, treatment challenges, and satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tintoré M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mar Tintoré,1 Maggie Alexander,2 Kathleen Costello,3 Martin Duddy,4 David E Jones,5 Nancy Law,6 Gilmore O’Neill,7 Antonio Uccelli,8 Robert Weissert,9 Sibyl Wray10 1Multiple Sclerosis Centre of Catalonia, Hospital Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain; 2European Multiple Sclerosis Platform, Brussels, Belgium; 3National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Denver, CO, USA; 4Royal Victoria Infirmary, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK; 5Department of Neurology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 6Nancy Law Consulting LLC, Parker, CO, USA; 7Biogen, Cambridge, MA, USA; 8Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Research, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; 9Department of Neurology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; 10Hope Neurology Multiple Sclerosis Center, Knoxville, TN, USA Background: Managing multiple sclerosis (MS treatment presents challenges for both patients and health care professionals. Effective communication between patients with MS and their neurologist is important for improving clinical outcomes and quality of life. Methods: A closed-ended online market research survey was used to assess the current state of MS care from the perspective of both patients with MS (≥18 years of age and neurologists who treat MS from Europe and the US and to gain insight into perceptions of treatment expectations/goals, treatment decisions, treatment challenges, communication, and satisfaction with care, based on current clinical practice. Results: A total of 900 neurologists and 982 patients completed the survey, of whom 46% self-identified as having remitting-relapsing MS, 29% secondary progressive MS, and 11% primary progressive MS. Overall, patients felt satisfied with their disease-modifying therapy (DMT; satisfaction related to comfort in speaking with their neurologist and participation in their DMT decision-making process. Patients who self-identified as having relapsing-remitting MS were more likely to be very satisfied with their treatment

  13. Outcomes of Multiple Listing for Adult Heart Transplantation in the United States: Analysis of OPTN Data From 2000 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Raymond C; Dardas, Todd; Clerkin, Kevin J; Restaino, Susan; Schulze, P Christian; Mancini, Donna M

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to assess the association of multiple listing with waitlist outcomes and post-heart transplant (HT) survival. HT candidates in the United States may register at multiple centers. Not all candidates have the resources and mobility needed for multiple listing; thus this policy may advantage wealthier and less sick patients. We identified 33,928 adult candidates for a first single-organ HT between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2013 in the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network database. We identified 679 multiple-listed (ML) candidates (2.0%) who were younger (median age, 53 years [interquartile range (IQR): 43 to 60 years] vs. 55 years [IQR: 45 to 61 years]; p < 0.0001), more often white (76.4% vs. 70.7%; p = 0.0010) and privately insured (65.5% vs. 56.3%; p < 0.0001), and lived in zip codes with higher median incomes (US$90,153 [IQR: US$25,471 to US$253,831] vs. US$68,986 [IQR: US$19,471 to US$219,702]; p = 0.0015). Likelihood of ML increased with the primary center's median waiting time. ML candidates had lower initial priority (39.0% 1A or 1B vs. 55.1%; p < 0.0001) and predicted 90-day waitlist mortality (2.9% [IQR: 2.3% to 4.7%] vs. 3.6% [IQR: 2.3% to 6.0]%; p < 0.0001), but were frequently upgraded at secondary centers (58.2% 1A/1B; p < 0.0001 vs. ML primary listing). ML candidates had a higher HT rate (74.4% vs. 70.2%; p = 0.0196) and lower waitlist mortality (8.1% vs. 12.2%; p = 0.0011). Compared with a propensity-matched cohort, the relative ML HT rate was 3.02 (95% confidence interval: 2.59 to 3.52; p < 0.0001). There were no post-HT survival differences. Multiple listing is a rational response to organ shortage but may advantage patients with the means to participate rather than the most medically needy. The multiple-listing policy should be overturned. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Computational rationalization for the observed ground-state multiplicities of fluorinated acylnitrenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Matthew P; Jenks, William S

    2014-10-03

    Computational methods are used to investigate the mechanism by which fluorination of acetylnitrene reduces the stabilization of the singlet configuration. ΔEST is made more positive (favoring the triplet state) by 1.9, 1.3, and 0.7 kcal/mol by the addition of the first, second, and third fluorine, respectively, at the CR-CC(2,3)/6-311(3df,2p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Smaller effects observed with substitution of β-fluorines in propanoylnitrene derivatives and examination of molecular geometries and orbitals demonstrate that the effect is due to inductive electron withdrawal by the fluorines, rather than hyperconjugation.

  15. Steady state flow analysis of two-phase natural circulation in multiple parallel channel loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhusare, V.H.; Bagul, R.K.; Joshi, J.B.; Nayak, A.K.; Kannan, Umasankari; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Vijayan, P.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid circulation velocity increases with increasing superficial gas velocity. • Total two-phase pressure drop decreases with increasing superficial gas velocity. • Channels with larger driving force have maximum circulation velocities. • Good agreement between experimental and model predictions. - Abstract: In this work, steady state flow analysis has been carried out experimentally in order to estimate the liquid circulation velocities and two-phase pressure drop in air–water multichannel circulating loop. Experiments were performed in 15 channel circulating loop. Single phase and two-phase pressure drops in the channels have been measured experimentally and have been compared with theoretical model of Joshi et al. (1990). Experimental measurements show good agreement with model.

  16. DNA structure modulates the oligomerization properties of the AAV initiator protein Rep68.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mansilla-Soto

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Rep68 is a multifunctional protein of the adeno-associated virus (AAV, a parvovirus that is mostly known for its promise as a gene therapy vector. In addition to its role as initiator in viral DNA replication, Rep68 is essential for site-specific integration of the AAV genome into human chromosome 19. Rep68 is a member of the superfamily 3 (SF3 helicases, along with the well-studied initiator proteins simian virus 40 large T antigen (SV40-LTag and bovine papillomavirus (BPV E1. Structurally, SF3 helicases share two domains, a DNA origin interaction domain (OID and an AAA(+ motor domain. The AAA(+ motor domain is also a structural feature of cellular initiators and it functions as a platform for initiator oligomerization. Here, we studied Rep68 oligomerization in vitro in the presence of different DNA substrates using a variety of biophysical techniques and cryo-EM. We found that a dsDNA region of the AAV origin promotes the formation of a complex containing five Rep68 subunits. Interestingly, non-specific ssDNA promotes the formation of a double-ring Rep68, a known structure formed by the LTag and E1 initiator proteins. The Rep68 ring symmetry is 8-fold, thus differing from the hexameric rings formed by the other SF3 helicases. However, similiar to LTag and E1, Rep68 rings are oriented head-to-head, suggesting that DNA unwinding by the complex proceeds bidirectionally. This novel Rep68 quaternary structure requires both the DNA binding and AAA(+ domains, indicating cooperativity between these regions during oligomerization in vitro. Our study clearly demonstrates that Rep68 can oligomerize through two distinct oligomerization pathways, which depend on both the DNA structure and cooperativity of Rep68 domains. These findings provide insight into the dynamics and oligomeric adaptability of Rep68 and serve as a step towards understanding the role of this multifunctional protein during AAV DNA replication and site-specific integration.

  17. Band width and multiple-angle valence-state mapping of diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.; Sutherland, D.G.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The band width may be considered the single most important parameter characterizing the electronic structure of a solid. The ratio of band width and Coulomb repulsion determines how correlated or delocalized an electron system is. Some of the most interesting solids straddle the boundary between localized and delocalized, e.g. the high-temperature superconductors. The bulk of the band calculations available today is based on local density functional (DF) theory. Even though the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues from that theory do not represent the outcome of a band-mapping experiment, they are remarkably similar to the bands mapped via photoemission. Strictly speaking, one should use an excited state calculation that takes the solid`s many-body screening response to the hole created in photoemission into account. Diamond is a useful prototype semiconductor because of its low atomic number and large band width, which has made it a long-time favorite for testing band theory. Yet, the two experimental values of the band width of diamond have error bars of {+-}1 eV and differ by 3.2 eV. To obtain an accurate valence band width for diamond, the authors use a band-mapping method that collects momentum distributions instead of the usual energy distributions. This method has undergone extensive experimental and theoretical tests in determining the band width of lithium fluoride. An efficient, imaging photoelectron spectrometer is coupled with a state-of-the-art undulator beam line at the Advanced Light Source to allow collection of a large number of data sets. Since it takes only a few seconds to take a picture of the photoelectrons emitted into a 84{degrees} cone, the authors can use photon energies as high as 350 eV where the cross section for photoemission from the valence band is already quite low, but the emitted photoelectrons behave free-electron-like. This make its much easier to locate the origin of the inter-band transitions in momentum space.

  18. Band width and multiple-angle valence-state mapping of diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, I.; Terminello, L.J.; Sutherland, D.G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The band width may be considered the single most important parameter characterizing the electronic structure of a solid. The ratio of band width and Coulomb repulsion determines how correlated or delocalized an electron system is. Some of the most interesting solids straddle the boundary between localized and delocalized, e.g. the high-temperature superconductors. The bulk of the band calculations available today is based on local density functional (DF) theory. Even though the Kohn-Sham eigenvalues from that theory do not represent the outcome of a band-mapping experiment, they are remarkably similar to the bands mapped via photoemission. Strictly speaking, one should use an excited state calculation that takes the solid's many-body screening response to the hole created in photoemission into account. Diamond is a useful prototype semiconductor because of its low atomic number and large band width, which has made it a long-time favorite for testing band theory. Yet, the two experimental values of the band width of diamond have error bars of ±1 eV and differ by 3.2 eV. To obtain an accurate valence band width for diamond, the authors use a band-mapping method that collects momentum distributions instead of the usual energy distributions. This method has undergone extensive experimental and theoretical tests in determining the band width of lithium fluoride. An efficient, imaging photoelectron spectrometer is coupled with a state-of-the-art undulator beam line at the Advanced Light Source to allow collection of a large number of data sets. Since it takes only a few seconds to take a picture of the photoelectrons emitted into a 84 degrees cone, the authors can use photon energies as high as 350 eV where the cross section for photoemission from the valence band is already quite low, but the emitted photoelectrons behave free-electron-like. This make its much easier to locate the origin of the inter-band transitions in momentum space

  19. Perceived discrimination and psychotic experiences across multiple ethnic groups in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hans; Yang, Lawrence H; Anglin, Deidre M; DeVylder, Jordan E

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived discrimination and psychotic experiences (PE) using validated measures of discrimination and a racially/ethnically diverse population-level sample. Data were drawn from two population-level surveys (The National Latino and Asian American Survey and The National Survey of American Life), which were analyzed together using survey weights and stratification variables. The analytic sample (N=8990) consisted of Latino, Asian, African-American, and Afro-Caribbean adults living in the United States. Separate unadjusted and adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were used, first to examine the crude bivariate relationship between perceived discrimination and PE, and second to examine the relationship adjusting for demographic variables. Adjusted logistic regression models were also used to examine the relationships between perceived discrimination and specific sub-types of PE (auditory and visual hallucinatory experiences, and delusional ideation). When compared to individuals who did not report any discrimination, those who reported the highest levels of discrimination were significantly more likely to report both 12-month PE (Adjusted OR=4.590, pPerceived discrimination is associated with the increased probability of reporting psychotic experiences in a linear Fashion in the US general population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Utilizing multiple state variables to improve the dynamic range of analog switching in a memristor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, YeonJoo; Kim, Sungho; Lu, Wei D.

    2015-01-01

    Memristors and memristive systems have been extensively studied for data storage and computing applications such as neuromorphic systems. To act as synapses in neuromorphic systems, the memristor needs to exhibit analog resistive switching (RS) behavior with incremental conductance change. In this study, we show that the dynamic range of the analog RS behavior can be significantly enhanced in a tantalum-oxide-based memristor. By controlling different state variables enabled by different physical effects during the RS process, the gradual filament expansion stage can be selectively enhanced without strongly affecting the abrupt filament length growth stage. Detailed physics-based modeling further verified the observed experimental effects and revealed the roles of oxygen vacancy drift and diffusion processes, and how the diffusion process can be selectively enhanced during the filament expansion stage. These findings lead to more desirable and reliable memristor behaviors for analog computing applications. Additionally, the ability to selectively control different internal physical processes demonstrated in the current study provides guidance for continued device optimization of memristor devices in general

  1. A Search for Higgs Bosons in Final States with Multiple Tau Leptons at the DØ Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, Louise [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-01

    Two searches for the production of Higgs bosons decaying into τ and μ leptons, using data collected with the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collider, are presented. A search for the pair production of doubly charged Higgs bosons in the process q$\\bar{q}$ → H++H--, where H ±± decays to ττ , μμ or τμ lepton pairs, with an integrated luminosity of up to L = 7:0 fb-1, is presented. No signi cant excess of data over the expected SM background is observed and the results are used to set 95% C.L. limits on the pair production cross section of doubly charged Higgs bosons in the range 90 < MH±± < 200 GeV. A second search for the production of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the nal state ττμ +X is presented, using an integrated luminosity of L = 8:6 fb-1. Again no signi cant excess of data is observed over the background expectation and 95% C.L. limits are set on the observed cross section relative to the Standard Model prediction, in the range 100 < MH < 200 GeV.

  2. Genomic epidemiology reveals multiple introductions of Zika virus into the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubaugh, Nathan D.; Ladner, Jason T.; Kraemer, Moritz U. G.; Dudas, Gytis; Tan, Amanda L.; Gangavarapu, Karthik; Wiley, Michael R.; White, Stephen; Thézé, Julien; Magnani, Diogo M.; Prieto, Karla; Reyes, Daniel; Bingham, Andrea M.; Paul, Lauren M.; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Oliveira, Glenn; Pronty, Darryl; Barcellona, Carolyn M.; Metsky, Hayden C.; Baniecki, Mary Lynn; Barnes, Kayla G.; Chak, Bridget; Freije, Catherine A.; Gladden-Young, Adrianne; Gnirke, Andreas; Luo, Cynthia; Macinnis, Bronwyn; Matranga, Christian B.; Park, Daniel J.; Qu, James; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Tomkins-Tinch, Christopher; West, Kendra L.; Winnicki, Sarah M.; Wohl, Shirlee; Yozwiak, Nathan L.; Quick, Joshua; Fauver, Joseph R.; Khan, Kamran; Brent, Shannon E.; Reiner, Robert C.; Lichtenberger, Paola N.; Ricciardi, Michael J.; Bailey, Varian K.; Watkins, David I.; Cone, Marshall R.; Kopp, Edgar W.; Hogan, Kelly N.; Cannons, Andrew C.; Jean, Reynald; Monaghan, Andrew J.; Garry, Robert F.; Loman, Nicholas J.; Faria, Nuno R.; Porcelli, Mario C.; Vasquez, Chalmers; Nagle, Elyse R.; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Stanek, Danielle; Rambaut, Andrew; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Sabeti, Pardis C.; Gillis, Leah D.; Michael, Scott F.; Bedford, Trevor; Pybus, Oliver G.; Isern, Sharon; Palacios, Gustavo; Andersen, Kristian G.

    2017-06-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is causing an unprecedented epidemic linked to severe congenital abnormalities. In July 2016, mosquito-borne ZIKV transmission was reported in the continental United States; since then, hundreds of locally acquired infections have been reported in Florida. To gain insights into the timing, source, and likely route(s) of ZIKV introduction, we tracked the virus from its first detection in Florida by sequencing ZIKV genomes from infected patients and Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. We show that at least 4 introductions, but potentially as many as 40, contributed to the outbreak in Florida and that local transmission is likely to have started in the spring of 2016—several months before its initial detection. By analysing surveillance and genetic data, we show that ZIKV moved among transmission zones in Miami. Our analyses show that most introductions were linked to the Caribbean, a finding corroborated by the high incidence rates and traffic volumes from the region into the Miami area. Our study provides an understanding of how ZIKV initiates transmission in new regions.

  3. Monitoring multiple species: Estimating state variables and exploring the efficacy of a monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattfeldt, S.D.; Bailey, L.L.; Grant, E.H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring programs have the potential to identify population declines and differentiate among the possible cause(s) of these declines. Recent criticisms regarding the design of monitoring programs have highlighted a failure to clearly state objectives and to address detectability and spatial sampling issues. Here, we incorporate these criticisms to design an efficient monitoring program whose goals are to determine environmental factors which influence the current distribution and measure change in distributions over time for a suite of amphibians. In designing the study we (1) specified a priori factors that may relate to occupancy, extinction, and colonization probabilities and (2) used the data collected (incorporating detectability) to address our scientific questions and adjust our sampling protocols. Our results highlight the role of wetland hydroperiod and other local covariates in the probability of amphibian occupancy. There was a change in overall occupancy probabilities for most species over the first three years of monitoring. Most colonization and extinction estimates were constant over time (years) and space (among wetlands), with one notable exception: local extinction probabilities for Rana clamitans were lower for wetlands with longer hydroperiods. We used information from the target system to generate scenarios of population change and gauge the ability of the current sampling to meet monitoring goals. Our results highlight the limitations of the current sampling design, emphasizing the need for long-term efforts, with periodic re-evaluation of the program in a framework that can inform management decisions.

  4. Screening of drugs inhibiting in vitro oligomerization of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase with a mutation causing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itsuki Anzai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dominant mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1 gene have been shown to cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SOD1-ALS. A major pathological hallmark of this disease is abnormal accumulation of mutant SOD1 oligomers in the affected spinal motor neurons. While no effective therapeutics for SOD1-ALS is currently available, SOD1 oligomerization will be a good target for developing cures of this disease. Recently, we have reproduced the formation of SOD1 oligomers abnormally cross-linked via disulfide bonds in a test tube. Using our in vitro model of SOD1 oligomerization, therefore, we screened 640 FDA-approved drugs for inhibiting the oligomerization of SOD1 proteins, and three effective classes of chemical compounds were identified. Those hit compounds will provide valuable information on the chemical structures for developing a novel drug candidate suppressing the abnormal oligomerization of mutant SOD1 and possibly curing the disease.

  5. Hydration effect on the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong-Liang, Li; Huai-Zhi, Li; Yong, Ma; Guang-Ping, Zhang; Chuan-Kui, Wang

    2010-01-01

    A first-principles computational method based on the hybrid density functional theory is developed to simulate the electronic transport properties of oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecular junctions with H 2 O molecules accumulated in the vicinity as recently reported by Na et al. [Nanotechnology 18 424001 (2007)]. The numerical results show that the hydrogen bonds between the oxygen atoms of the oligomeric phenylene ethynylene molecule and H 2 O molecules result in the localisation of the molecular orbitals and lead to the lower transition peaks. The H 2 O molecular chains accumulated in the vicinity of the molecular junction can not only change the electronic structure of the molecular junctions, but also open additional electronic transport pathways. The obvious influence of H 2 O molecules on the electronic structure of the molecular junction and its electronic transport properties is thus demonstrated. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  6. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , the glucagon receptor, and the receptors for parathyroid hormone (PTHR1 and PTHR2). The dysregulation of several family B1 receptors is involved in diseases, such as diabetes, chronic inflammation, and osteoporosis which underlines the pathophysiological importance of this GPCR subfamily. In spite of this......, investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades...

  7. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Correlations between Resting-State Oscillations in Multiple-Frequency Bands and Big Five Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Iizuka, Kunio; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Sakaki, Kohei; Nozawa, Takayuki; Yokota, Susumu; Magistro, Daniele; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the association between human personality traits and resting-state brain activity has gained interest in neuroimaging studies. However, it remains unclear if Big Five personality traits are represented in frequency bands (~0.25 Hz) of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity. Based on earlier neurophysiological studies, we investigated the correlation between the five personality traits assessed by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI), and the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF) at four distinct frequency bands (slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz), slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz), slow-3 (0.073-0.198 Hz) and slow-2 (0.198-0.25 Hz)). We enrolled 835 young subjects and calculated the correlations of resting-state fMRI signals using a multiple regression analysis. We found a significant and consistent correlation between fALFF and the personality trait of extraversion at all frequency bands. Furthermore, significant correlations were detected in distinct brain regions for each frequency band. This finding supports the frequency-specific spatial representations of personality traits as previously suggested. In conclusion, our data highlight an association between human personality traits and fALFF at four distinct frequency bands.

  8. A Comprehensive Analysis of the Correlations between Resting-State Oscillations in Multiple-Frequency Bands and Big Five Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeyuki Ikeda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the association between human personality traits and resting-state brain activity has gained interest in neuroimaging studies. However, it remains unclear if Big Five personality traits are represented in frequency bands (~0.25 Hz of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI activity. Based on earlier neurophysiological studies, we investigated the correlation between the five personality traits assessed by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI, and the fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (fALFF at four distinct frequency bands (slow-5 (0.01–0.027 Hz, slow-4 (0.027–0.073 Hz, slow-3 (0.073–0.198 Hz and slow-2 (0.198–0.25 Hz. We enrolled 835 young subjects and calculated the correlations of resting-state fMRI signals using a multiple regression analysis. We found a significant and consistent correlation between fALFF and the personality trait of extraversion at all frequency bands. Furthermore, significant correlations were detected in distinct brain regions for each frequency band. This finding supports the frequency-specific spatial representations of personality traits as previously suggested. In conclusion, our data highlight an association between human personality traits and fALFF at four distinct frequency bands.

  9. Association between resting-state brain network topological organization and creative ability: Evidence from a multiple linear regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Bingqing; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Aiying; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Li, Junchao; Cai, Yuxuan; Gao, Mengxia; Gao, Zhenni; Chang, Song; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have indicated a tight linkage between resting-state functional connectivity of the human brain and creative ability. This study aimed to further investigate the association between the topological organization of resting-state brain networks and creativity. Therefore, we acquired resting-state fMRI data from 22 high-creativity participants and 22 low-creativity participants (as determined by their Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking scores). We then constructed functional brain networks for each participant and assessed group differences in network topological properties before exploring the relationships between respective network topological properties and creative ability. We identified an optimized organization of intrinsic brain networks in both groups. However, compared with low-creativity participants, high-creativity participants exhibited increased global efficiency and substantially decreased path length, suggesting increased efficiency of information transmission across brain networks in creative individuals. Using a multiple linear regression model, we further demonstrated that regional functional integration properties (i.e., the betweenness centrality and global efficiency) of brain networks, particularly the default mode network (DMN) and sensorimotor network (SMN), significantly predicted the individual differences in creative ability. Furthermore, the associations between network regional properties and creative performance were creativity-level dependent, where the difference in the resource control component may be important in explaining individual difference in creative performance. These findings provide novel insights into the neural substrate of creativity and may facilitate objective identification of creative ability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Anesthetic propofol attenuates the isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid protein (Aβ are the hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. The inhalation anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to induce caspase activation and increase Aβ accumulation. In addition, recent studies suggest that isoflurane may directly promote the formation of cytotoxic soluble Aβ oligomers, which are thought to be the key pathological species in AD. In contrast, propofol, the most commonly used intravenous anesthetic, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. We therefore set out to compare the effects of isoflurane and propofol alone and in combination on caspase-3 activation and Aβ oligomerization in vitro and in vivo. Naïve and stably-transfected H4 human neuroglioma cells that express human amyloid precursor protein, the precursor for Aβ; neonatal mice; and conditioned cell culture media containing secreted human Aβ40 or Aβ42 were treated with isoflurane and/or propofol. Here we show for the first time that propofol can attenuate isoflurane-induced caspase-3 activation in cultured cells and in the brain tissues of neonatal mice. Furthermore, propofol-mediated caspase inhibition occurred when there were elevated levels of Aβ. Finally, isoflurane alone induces Aβ42, but not Aβ40, oligomerization, and propofol can inhibit the isoflurane-mediated oligomerization of Aβ42. These data suggest that propofol may mitigate the caspase-3 activation by attenuating the isoflurane-induced Aβ42 oligomerization. Our findings provide novel insights into the possible mechanisms of isoflurane-induced neurotoxicity that may aid in the development of strategies to minimize potential adverse effects associated with the administration of anesthetics to patients.

  11. Characterization and ageing study of poly(lactic acid) films plasticized with oligomeric lactic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Burgos, Nuria; Martino, Verónica P.; Jiménez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was melt-blended with a bio-based oligomeric lactic acid (OLA) plasticizer at different concentrations between 15 wt% and 25 wt% in order to enhance PLA ductility and to get a fully biodegradable material with potential application in films manufacturing. OLA was an efficient plasticizer for PLA, as it caused a significant decrease on glass transition temperature (Tg) while improving considerably ductile properties. Only one Tg value was observed in all cases and no ap...

  12. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic li...

  13. An Investigation of Chemical Landscapes in Aqueous Electrosprays by Tracking Oligomerization of Isoprene

    KAUST Repository

    Junior, Adair Gallo

    2017-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESIMS) is widely used to characterize neutral and ionic species in solvents. Typically, electrical, thermal, and pneumatic potentials are applied to create electrosprays from which charged ionic species are ejected for downstream analysis by mass spectrometry. Most recently, ESIMS has been exploited to investigate ambient proton transfer reactions at air-water interfaces in real time. We assessed the validity of these experiments via complementary laboratory experiments. Specifically, we characterized the products of two reaction scenarios via ESIMS and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR): (i) emulsions of pH-adjusted water and isoprene (C5H8) that were mechanically agitated, and (ii) electrosprays of pH-adjusted water that were collided with gas-phase isoprene. Our experiments unambiguously demonstrate that, while isoprene does not oligomerize in emulsions, it does undergo protonation and oligomerization in electrosprays, both with and without pH-adjusted water, confirming that C-C bonds form along myriad high-energy pathways during electrospray ionization. We also compared our experimental results with some quantum mechanics simulations of isoprene molecules interacting with hydronium at different hydration levels (gas versus liquid phase). In agreement with our experiments, the kinetic barriers to protonation and oligomerization of isoprene were inaccessible under ambient conditions. Rather, the gas-phase chemistries during electrospray ionization drove the oligomerization of isoprene. Therefore, we consider that ESIMS could induce artifacts in interfacial reactions. These findings warrant a reassessment of previous reports on tracking chemistries under ambient conditions at liquid-vapor interfaces via ESIMS. Further, we took some high-speed images of electrosprays where it was possible to observe the main characteristics of the phenomena, i.e. Taylor cone, charge separation, and Coulomb fission. Finally, we took

  14. Glycerol-Induced Aggregation of the Oligomeric L-Asparaginase II from E. coli Monitored with ATR-FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koba Adeishvili

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In this paper attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been employed for the study of the structural composition of aggregates of the oligomeric L-asparaginase II from E.coli formed in the presence of glycerol after the induction of refolding of the protein. Apart from the perfect coincidence of the secondary structure composition of EcA2 as determined by FTIR and crystallography [1], it has also been shown that secondary structure of protein in asparaginase deposits is similar to that of the native conformation: 20.7% extended, 22.3% disordered, 31.4% helix and 25.6% turn/bend/β sheet. Certain structural similarities in the range of experimental error was observed for all three protein deposits presented in this paper, indicating a common structural basis for the composition of this types of aggregates. It is concluded that in the constitution of such precipitates, a partially folded (molten globule like state(s is involved, and its stabilisation is a key factor leading to the aggregation. The results presented in this paper might serve to be a good explanation and an excellent basis for the fundamental theory of protein (oligomers precipitation by osmotic substances.

  15. Stability of human interferon-beta 1: oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 is inactive but is reactivated by monomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, J; Yamazaki, S; Kawaguchi, K; Kimura, S; Shimizu, H

    1989-10-05

    Human interferon-beta 1 is extremely stable is a low ionic strength solution of pH 2 such as 10 mM HCl at 37 degrees C. However, the presence of 0.15 M NaCl led to a remarkable loss of antiviral activity. The molecular-sieve high-performance liquid chromatography revealed that, whereas completely active human interferon-beta 1 eluted as a 25 kDa species (monomeric form), the inactivated preparation eluted primarily as a 90 kDa species (oligomeric form). The specific activity (units per mg protein) of the oligomeric form was approx. 10% of that of the monomeric form. This observation shows that oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 is apparently in an inactive form. When the oligomeric eluate was resolved by polyacrylamide gel containing sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), it appeared to be monomeric under non-reducing conditions. Monomerization of the oligomeric human interferon-beta 1 by treatment with 1% SDS, fully regenerated its antiviral activity. These results suggest that the inactivation of the human interferon-beta 1 preparation was caused by its oligomerization via hydrophobic interactions without the formation of intermolecular disulphide bonds. These oligomers can be dissociated by SDS to restore biological activity.

  16. Effect Of Oligomeric Enteral Nutrition On Symptoms Of Acute Radiation Enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubinsky, P.

    2008-01-01

    Radiotherapy of abdominal and pelvic tumours is frequently associated with acute radiation enteritis. Predominant symptoms include diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. There are very few effective interventions available for this condition. Enteral oligomeric nutrition has been used in bowel diseases with functional failure similar to radiation enteritis. The aim of presented work was to observe occurrence of symptoms of radiation enteritis in patients undergoing abdominal or pelvic radiotherapy. Apart from diet and pharmacological therapy, oral oligomeric enteral nutrition (Peptisorb Powder Nutricia) at the dose of 1000 - 2000 ml per day was administered for minimum of 4 days. Planned period of administration was 14 days and longer. Symptoms of radiation enteritis were evaluated at the beginning and in the end of administration. Prevalence of all evaluated symptoms of radiation enteritis was decreased and difference was statistically significant for diarrhea, watery stools, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. The use of evaluated oligomeric nutritional support might, in conjunction with pharmacotherapy and diet, alleviate symptoms of acute radiation enteritis and maintain nutritional status of patients. (author)

  17. Chemical activation of bituminous coal for hampering oligomerization of organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Sorial, George A

    2011-12-15

    Activated carbons prepared by KOH activation of bituminous coal were studied for hampering oligomerization of phenolic compounds on its surface. A total of 24 activated carbons with different microporosity and BET surface area were created. The effect of the different variables of the activation process (KOH/bituminous coal ratio, heating temperature, activation time, and flow rate of nitrogen gas) on critical carbon parameters was analyzed. The impact of activated carbon on oligomerization was examined by conducting isotherm experiments at a neutral pH on Carbon(exp) produced with optimal characteristics and granular activated carbon (GAC) F400 for phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-ethylphenol. These isotherms were collected under anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) and oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) conditions. The single solute adsorption of phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-ethylphenol on Carbon(exp) showed no obvious differences between oxic and anoxic environment, which indicated that the Carbon(exp) sample is very effective in hampering the oligomerization of phenolic compounds under oxic conditions. On the other hand, F400, which have lower micropore percentage and BET surface area, significant increases in the adsorptive capacity had been observed when molecular oxygen was present. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Homologous ELISA for detection of oligomeric human TNF: properties of the assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petyovka, N; Lyach, L; Voitenok, N N

    1995-10-26

    In order to quantify oligomeric human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), we have developed a sensitive homologous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Hm-ELISA) using the same monoclonal antibody (MoAb) for both solid and liquid phase. Different anti-TNF MoAb have been compared in terms of their efficacy in the Hm-ELISA, affinity, neutralization capacity and epitope specificity. The data suggest, that effectiveness in the Hm-ELISA may represent a novel characteristic of MoAb. Of the MoAbs tested, 5 N was capable of recognizing oligomeric TNF in the Hm-ELISA with a detection limit of 15 pg/ml. Furthermore, using Hm-ELISA against human TNF, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and lymphotoxin, we have demonstrated that these cytokines are oligomeric in physiological solutions, but are converted into monomeric forms in the presence of the non-ionic detergent Tween 20. High salt buffer was employed to abrogate a nonspecific false positive reaction in the Hm-ELISA found in nearly half of the plasma samples obtained from healthy subjects. Finally, a good correlation between the Hm-ELISA and the L929 bioassay was observed for natural and recombinant TNF measured in human plasma.

  19. Catalytic oligomerization of terminal alkynes promoted by organo-f-complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, T.; Haskel, A.; Eisen, M.S.

    1995-01-01

    Organoactinides of the type Cp* 2 AcMe 2 (Cp*=C 5 Me 5 ; Ac=Th, U) are active catalyst precursors for the oligomerization of terminal alkynes HC triple-bond CR (R=alkyl, aryl, SiMe 3 ). The regioselectivity and the extent of oligomerization strongly depend on the alkyne substituent R, whereas the catalytic reactivity is similar for 1 and 2. In the presence of one of these organoactinides, for example, HCCSiMe 3 regioselectively oligomerizes to the head-to-tail dimer 3 (5%) and the trimer 4 (95%). 1 and 2 react with the terminal alkynes, releasing methane, to the corresponding bisacetylide complexes which are active species and in the catalytic reactions. The bisacetylide complex (η 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) 2 U(CCPh) 2 was identified by proton NMR spectroscopy. Subsequent insertion of alkyne molecules in the actinide-carbon σ-bonds leads to the formation of actinide-alkenyl complexes. The turnover limiting step is the release of the organic oligomer from the actinide-organyl complex. A species of the latter has been spectroscopically characterized in the trimerization reaction of HCCSiMe 3 . In this poster, the catalytic reactivity of the actinide alkyls 1 and 2 with various mono-substituted alkynes as well as the spectroscopic characterization of the key organometallic intermediate complexes in the catalytic cycle and a detailed mechanistic discussion are given

  20. The role of oligomerization and cooperative regulation in protein function: the case of tryptophan synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Qaiser Fatmi

    Full Text Available The oligomerization/co-localization of protein complexes and their cooperative regulation in protein function is a key feature in many biological systems. The synergistic regulation in different subunits often enhances the functional properties of the multi-enzyme complex. The present study used molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics simulations to study the effects of allostery, oligomerization and intermediate channeling on enhancing the protein function of tryptophan synthase (TRPS. TRPS uses a set of α/β-dimeric units to catalyze the last two steps of L-tryptophan biosynthesis, and the rate is remarkably slower in the isolated monomers. Our work shows that without their binding partner, the isolated monomers are stable and more rigid. The substrates can form fairly stable interactions with the protein in both forms when the protein reaches the final ligand-bound conformations. Our simulations also revealed that the α/β-dimeric unit stabilizes the substrate-protein conformation in the ligand binding process, which lowers the conformation transition barrier and helps the protein conformations shift from an open/inactive form to a closed/active form. Brownian dynamics simulations with a coarse-grained model illustrate how protein conformations affect substrate channeling. The results highlight the complex roles of protein oligomerization and the fine balance between rigidity and dynamics in protein function.

  1. Physiological relevance of plant 2-Cys peroxiredoxin overoxidation level and oligomerization status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerveau, Delphine; Ouahrani, Djelloul; Marok, Mohamed Amine; Blanchard, Laurence; Rey, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins are ubiquitous thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases presumed to display, upon environmental constraints, a chaperone function resulting from a redox-dependent conformational switch. In this work, using biochemical and genetic approaches, we aimed to unravel the factors regulating the redox status and the conformation of the plastidial 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys PRX) in plants. In Arabidopsis, we show that in optimal growth conditions, the overoxidation level mainly depends on the availability of thioredoxin-related electron donors, but not on sulfiredoxin, the enzyme reducing the 2-Cys PRX overoxidized form. We also observed that upon various physiological temperature, osmotic and light stress conditions, the overoxidation level and oligomerization status of 2-Cys PRX can moderately vary depending on the constraint type. Further, no major change was noticed regarding protein conformation in water-stressed Arabidopsis, barley and potato plants, whereas species-dependent up- and down-variations in overoxidation were observed. In contrast, both 2-Cys PRX overoxidation and oligomerization were strongly induced during a severe oxidative stress generated by methyl viologen. From these data, revealing that the oligomerization status of plant 2-Cys PRX does not exhibit important variation and is not tightly linked to the protein redox status upon physiologically relevant environmental constraints, the possible in planta functions of 2-Cys PRX are discussed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Simulation of the photodynamics of azobenzene on its first excited state: Comparison of full multiple spawning and surface hopping treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toniolo, A.; Ciminelli, C.; Persico, M.; Martinez, T.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the cis→trans and trans→cis photoisomerization of azobenzene after n→π* excitation using the full multiple spawning (FMS) method for nonadiabatic wave-packet dynamics with potential-energy surfaces and couplings determined 'on the fly' from a reparametrized multiconfigurational semiempirical method. We compare the FMS results with a previous direct dynamics treatment using the same potential-energy surfaces and couplings, but with the nonadiabatic dynamics modeled using a semiclassical surface hopping (SH) method. We concentrate on the dynamical effects that determine the photoisomerization quantum yields, namely, the rate of radiationless electronic relaxation and the character of motion along the reaction coordinate. The quantal and semiclassical results are in good general agreement, confirming our previous analysis of the photodynamics. The SH method slightly overestimates the rate of excited state decay, leading in this case to lower quantum yields

  3. The Prevalence of Multiple-Choice Testing in Registered Nurse Licensure-Qualifying Nursing Education Programs in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkhead, Susan; Kelman, Glenda; Zittel, Barbara; Jatulis, Linnea

    The aim of this study was to describe nurse educators' use of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) in testing in registered nurse licensure-qualifying nursing education programs in New York State. This study was a descriptive correlational analysis of data obtained from surveying 1,559 nurse educators; 297 educators from 61 institutions responded (response rate [RR] = 19 percent), yielding a final cohort of 200. MCQs were reported to comprise a mean of 81 percent of questions on a typical test. Baccalaureate program respondents were equally likely to use MCQs as associate degree program respondents (p > .05) but were more likely to report using other methods of assessing student achievement to construct course grades (p < .01). Both groups reported little use of alternate format-type questions. Respondent educators reported substantial reliance upon the use of MCQs, corroborating the limited data quantifying the prevalence of use of MCQ tests in licensure-qualifying nursing education programs.

  4. Multiple neural states of representation in short-term memory? It’s a matter of attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRocque, Joshua J.; Lewis-Peacock, Jarrod A.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2014-01-01

    Short-term memory (STM) refers to the capacity-limited retention of information over a brief period of time, and working memory (WM) refers to the manipulation and use of that information to guide behavior. In recent years it has become apparent that STM and WM interact and overlap with other cognitive processes, including attention (the selection of a subset of information for further processing) and long-term memory (LTM—the encoding and retention of an effectively unlimited amount of information for a much longer period of time). Broadly speaking, there have been two classes of memory models: systems models, which posit distinct stores for STM and LTM (Atkinson and Shiffrin, 1968; Baddeley and Hitch, 1974); and state-based models, which posit a common store with different activation states corresponding to STM and LTM (Cowan, 1995; McElree, 1996; Oberauer, 2002). In this paper, we will focus on state-based accounts of STM. First, we will consider several theoretical models that postulate, based on considerable behavioral evidence, that information in STM can exist in multiple representational states. We will then consider how neural data from recent studies of STM can inform and constrain these theoretical models. In the process we will highlight the inferential advantage of multivariate, information-based analyses of neuroimaging data (fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG)) over conventional activation-based analysis approaches (Postle, in press). We will conclude by addressing lingering questions regarding the fractionation of STM, highlighting differences between the attention to information vs. the retention of information during brief memory delays. PMID:24478671

  5. Autosomal dominant precocious osteoarthropathy due to a mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene: further expansion of the phenotypic variations of COMP defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Hiroyuki [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sanyudo Hospital, 6-1-219 Chuou, Yonezawa, Yamagata 992-0045 (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Department of Radiology, Nasu Chuou Hospital, Tochigi (Japan); Watanabe, Sobei; Sasaki, Akira; Sano, Tokuhisa [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tohoku Kohsei-Nenkin Hospital, Miyagi (Japan); Mabuchi, Akihiko; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Ikegawa, Shiro [Laboratory for Bone and Joint Diseases, SNP Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Ohashi, Hirofumi [Division of Medical Genetics, Saitama Children' s Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We report on a Japanese family of four generations with an autosomal dominant precocious osteoarthropathy. The cardinal clinical manifestations of affected individuals were painful weight-bearing large joints, which started in late childhood or adolescence. The radiological hallmarks included coxa plana, mild epiphyseal dysplasia of the knee, and round talar domes with tibiotalar slant in childhood, which evolved into degenerative joint diseases in adulthood. The disease phenotype was cosegregated with a mutation of the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) gene in the family members, who underwent molecular evaluation. COMP mutations have been reported in a mild form of multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED), Ribbing type, as well as allied disorders with more severe manifestations, such as MED Fairbank type and pseudoachondroplasia. Unlike previously reported cases with the Ribbing type, the present patients did not have short stature or brachydactyly. This report expands further the phenotypic variations of COMP defects. (orig.)

  6. Chaotic sedimentation of particle pairs in a vertical channel at low Reynolds number: Multiple states and routes to chaos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjus, Romuald; Guillou, Sylvain; Ezersky, Alexander; Angilella, Jean-Régis

    2016-12-01

    The sedimentation of a pair of rigid circular particles in a two-dimensional vertical channel containing a Newtonian fluid is investigated numerically, for terminal particle Reynolds numbers (ReT) ranging from 1 to 10, and for a confinement ratio equal to 4. While it is widely admitted that sufficiently inertial pairs should sediment by performing a regular DKT oscillation (Drafting-Kissing-Tumbling), the present analysis shows in contrast that a chaotic regime can also exist for such particles, leading to a much slower sedimentation velocity. It consists of a nearly horizontal pair, corresponding to a maximum effective blockage ratio, and performing a quasiperiodic transition to chaos while increasing the particle weight. For less inertial regimes, the classical oblique doublet structure and its complex behavior (multiple stable states and hysteresis, period-doubling cascade and chaotic attractor) are recovered, in agreement with previous work [Aidun, C. K. and Ding, E.-J., "Dynamics of particle sedimentation in a vertical channel: Period-doubling bifurcation and chaotic state," Phys. Fluids 15, 1612 (2003)]. As a consequence of these various behaviors, the link between the terminal Reynolds number and the non-dimensional driving force is complex: it contains several branches displaying hysteresis as well as various bifurcations. For the range of Reynolds number considered here, a global bifurcation diagram is given.

  7. The effectiveness of cognitive- behavior therapy on illness representations of multiple-sclerosis and improving their emotional states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Hazhir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Illness representations (based on Leventhal's model are associated with chronic illness outcomes. It has been suggested that targeting these cognitive components improves illness outcomes. Multiple sclerosis is a common disorder between neural and immune systems that creates physical and psychological consequences. There are few pre psychological trails on these patients. The aim of this study was to determine effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy on altering illness representations and improving emotional states of the patients.Methods: By using a randomized controlled trial design, among 52 selected patients, 35 volunteers randomly were allocated into intervention and control groups. An extensive interventional cognitive behavior therapy based package was conducted to intervention group in 10 weekly sessions. The control group stayed in waiting list and participated in 5 group meeting sessions. (IPQR and (DASS-42 psychological scales were administered, Leven and T statistical tests were applied for dat analysis.Results: The results showed positive changes in four illness representation components of patients including illness (identity, consequences, coherence and personal control. Associated improvement occurred in depression, anxiety, stress and emotional representations.Conclusion: Mooney and Padeskey's theoretically based cognitive-behavior therapy, is effective on illness representations modification and improving emotional states of the patients. The findings are less similar to Goodman's trial on Systemic Lupus Erythematosus patients and more similar to Petrie's trail on cardiac patients.

  8. Connecting the Dots: State Health Department Approaches to Addressing Shared Risk and Protective Factors Across Multiple Forms of Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Natalie; Myers, Lindsey; Kuehl, Tomei; Bauman, Alice; Hertz, Marci

    2018-01-01

    Violence takes many forms, including intimate partner violence, sexual violence, child abuse and neglect, bullying, suicidal behavior, and elder abuse and neglect. These forms of violence are interconnected and often share the same root causes. They can also co-occur together in families and communities and can happen at the same time or at different stages of life. Often, due to a variety of factors, separate, “siloed” approaches are used to address each form of violence. However, understanding and implementing approaches that prevent and address the overlapping root causes of violence (risk factors) and promote factors that increase the resilience of people and communities (protective factors) can help practitioners more effectively and efficiently use limited resources to prevent multiple forms of violence and save lives. This article presents approaches used by 2 state health departments, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, to integrate a shared risk and protective factor approach into their violence prevention work and identifies key lessons learned that may serve to inform crosscutting violence prevention efforts in other states. PMID:29189502

  9. Connecting the Dots: State Health Department Approaches to Addressing Shared Risk and Protective Factors Across Multiple Forms of Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Natalie; Myers, Lindsey; Kuehl, Tomei; Bauman, Alice; Hertz, Marci

    Violence takes many forms, including intimate partner violence, sexual violence, child abuse and neglect, bullying, suicidal behavior, and elder abuse and neglect. These forms of violence are interconnected and often share the same root causes. They can also co-occur together in families and communities and can happen at the same time or at different stages of life. Often, due to a variety of factors, separate, "siloed" approaches are used to address each form of violence. However, understanding and implementing approaches that prevent and address the overlapping root causes of violence (risk factors) and promote factors that increase the resilience of people and communities (protective factors) can help practitioners more effectively and efficiently use limited resources to prevent multiple forms of violence and save lives. This article presents approaches used by 2 state health departments, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, to integrate a shared risk and protective factor approach into their violence prevention work and identifies key lessons learned that may serve to inform crosscutting violence prevention efforts in other states.

  10. Thrombin generation correlates with disease duration in multiple sclerosis (MS): Novel insights into the MS-associated prothrombotic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Martin Em; O'Connell, Karen; Allen, Seamus; Egan, Karl; Szklanna, Paulina B; McGuigan, Christopher; Ní Áinle, Fionnuala; Maguire, Patricia B

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin is well recognised for its role in the coagulation cascade but it also plays a role in inflammation, with enhanced thrombin generation observed in several inflammatory disorders. Although patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have a higher incidence of thrombotic disease, thrombin generation has not been studied to date. The aim of this study was to characterise calibrated automated thrombography parameters in patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS) in comparison to healthy controls (HCs). Calibrated automated thrombography was performed on platelet poor plasma from 15 patients with RRMS, 15 with PPMS and 19 HCs. We found that patients with RRMS generate thrombin at a significantly faster rate than the less inflammatory subtype, PPMS or HCs. In addition, the speed of thrombin generation was significantly correlated with time from clinical diagnosis in both subtypes. However, in RRMS the rate of thrombin generation was increased with increased time from clinical diagnosis, while in PPMS the rate of thrombin generation decreased with increased time from clinical diagnosis. These data likely reflect the differential active proinflammatory states in each MS subtype and provide novel mechanistic insights into the clinically relevant prothrombotic state observed in these patients.

  11. Interplay of histidine residues of the Alzheimer’s disease Aβ peptide governs its Zn-induced oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kechko, Olga I.; Pastore, Annalisa; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational changes of Aβ peptide result in its transformation from native monomeric state to the toxic soluble dimers, oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Interactions of zinc ions with Aβ are mediated by the N-terminal Aβ1-16 domain and appear to play a key role in AD progression. There is a range of results indicating that these interactions trigger the Aβ plaque formation. We have determined structure and functional characteristics of the metal binding domains derived from several Aβ variants and found that their zinc-induced oligomerization is governed by conformational changes in the minimal zinc binding site 6HDSGYEVHH14. The residue H6 and segment 11EVHH14, which are part of this site are crucial for formation of the two zinc-mediated interaction interfaces in Aβ. These structural determinants can be considered as promising targets for rational design of the AD-modifying drugs aimed at blocking pathological Aβ aggregation.

  12. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-06-01

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  13. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Mu-Jie, E-mail: mjhuang@chem.utoronto.ca; Kapral, Raymond, E-mail: rkapral@chem.utoronto.ca [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2015-06-28

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments.

  14. A catalytic oligomeric motor that walks along a filament track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Most biological motors in the cell execute chemically powered conformational changes as they walk on biopolymer filaments in order to carry out directed transport functions. Synthetic motors that operate in a similar manner are being studied since they have the potential to perform similar tasks in a variety of applications. In this paper, a synthetic nanomotor that moves along a filament track, without invoking motor conformational changes, is constructed and its properties are studied in detail. The motor is an oligomer comprising three linked beads with specific binding properties. The filament track is a stiff polymer chain, also described by a linear chain of linked coarse-grained molecular groups modeled as beads. Reactions on the filament that are catalyzed by a motor bead and use fuel in the environment, in conjunction within the binding affinities of the motor beads to the filament beads, lead to directed motion. The system operates out of equilibrium due to the state of the filament and supply of fuel. The motor, filament, and surrounding medium are all described at microscopic level that permits a full analysis of the motor motion. A stochastic model that captures the main trends seen in the simulations is also presented. The results of this study point to some of the key features that could be used to construct nanomotors that undergo biased walks powered by chemical reactions on filaments

  15. Production and Characterization of α-Galactosidase by a Multiple Mutant of Aspergillus niger in Solid-State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Siddique Awan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Galactosidase is applied in the sugar industry to enhance sugar recovery from sugar beet syrup and to improve nutritional value of the soymilk. In the present investigation, the influence of process variables on the production of this important enzyme has been explored in a newly isolated multiple mutant strain of Aspergillus niger in solid-state fermentation (SSF. Defined fermentation parameters include substrate type (pure lactose and by-products of rice and flour mills as prime substrates, nitrogen source, incubation time, initial pH of the medium and incubation temperature. Extracellular α-galactosidase reached the value of 135.4 IU/g of dry substrate (IU/g after 96 h of fermentation. Supplementation with 2 g of glucose and 3 g of corn steep liquor significantly increased the enzyme production, and maximum value of product yield (318 IU/g by the mutant strain was significantly higher than that reported by the wild type (this work, or other A. niger mutants, recombinants and yeasts reported in literature as producers of elevated levels of α-galactosidase. Among three α-galactosidases, one possessing high subunit molecular mass proteins (99 and 100 kDa has been characterized in both wild and mutant organisms. Thermal properties of the purified enzymes indicate that the mutation decreased the values of activation energy for the formation of enzyme-substrate (ES complex, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy demand for substrate binding, and transition state stabilization. A thermodynamic study of irreversible inactivation of enzymes suggests that the mutant–derived enzyme is more thermostable than the native enzyme, which is attributable to amino acids involved in active catalysis. Because of these properties, the mutant organism is a novel organism and may be exploited for bulk production of thermostable α-galactosidase for the above industrial and nutritional applications.

  16. N-Glycosylation instead of cholesterol mediates oligomerization and apical sorting of GPI-APs in FRT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imjeti, Naga Salaija; Lebreton, Stéphanie; Paladino, Simona; de la Fuente, Erwin; Gonzalez, Alfonso; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2011-12-01

    Sorting of glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol--anchored proteins (GPI-APs) in polarized epithelial cells is not fully understood. Oligomerization in the Golgi complex has emerged as the crucial event driving apical segregation of GPI-APs in two different kind of epithelial cells, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Fisher rat thyroid (FRT) cells, but whether the mechanism is conserved is unknown. In MDCK cells cholesterol promotes GPI-AP oligomerization, as well as apical sorting of GPI-APs. Here we show that FRT cells lack this cholesterol-driven oligomerization as apical sorting mechanism. In these cells both apical and basolateral GPI-APs display restricted diffusion in the Golgi likely due to a cholesterol-enriched membrane environment. It is striking that N-glycosylation is the critical event for oligomerization and apical sorting of GPI-APs in FRT cells but not in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that at least two mechanisms exist to determine oligomerization in the Golgi leading to apical sorting of GPI-APs. One depends on cholesterol, and the other depends on N-glycosylation and is insensitive to cholesterol addition or depletion.

  17. Obesity-related mortality in France, Italy, and the United States: a comparison using multiple cause-of-death analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Magali; Désesquelles, Aline; Egidi, Viviana; Demuru, Elena; Frova, Luisa; Meslé, France; Pappagallo, Marilena

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the reporting of obesity on death certificates in three countries (France, Italy, and the United States) with different levels of prevalence, and we examine which causes are frequently associated with obesity. We use cause-of-death data for all deaths at ages 50-89 in 2010-2011. Since obesity may not be the underlying cause (UC) of death, we compute age- and sex-standardized death rates considering all mentions of obesity (multiple causes or MC). We use cluster analyses to identify patterns of cause-of-death combinations. Obesity is selected as UC in no more than 20% of the deaths with a mention of obesity. Mortality levels, whether measured from the UC or the MC, are weakly related to levels of prevalence. Patterns of cause-of-death combinations are similar across the countries. In addition to strong links with cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, we identify several less familiar associations. Considering all mentions on the deaths certificates reduces the underestimation of obesity-related mortality based on the UC only. It also enables us to describe the various mortality patterns involving obesity.

  18. Location Study of Solar Thermal Power Plant in the State of Pernambuco Using Geoprocessing Technologies and Multiple-Criteria Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Wilma B. Azevêdo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar Thermal Technology for the generation of electricity in large scale has been a reality in the world since the 1980s, when the first large-sized solar plants in the United States were introduced. Brazil presents great potential for the development of large-scale projects, although it is noted that the main barriers for the insertion of this technology in Brazilian market are the lack of incentives and goals and associated costs. In a way to contribute to the insertion of solar thermal technology in Brazil, this paper presents a macro-spatial approach, based on the use of Multiple-Criteria Decision Analysis and Geoprocessing, for the location of solar thermal power plants. The applied methodology for Pernambuco, located in the Northeast Region of Brazil, considered the implantation of parabolic trough solar power plant of 80 MW, operating only in solar mode, without heat storage. Based on performed analysis, it was confirmed that Pernambuco presents great potential for the installation of solar power plants, especially in the backlands of Pernambuco. Performed validations in the model demonstrate that the methodology attended the objective once the consistence between the assigned weights to the thematic layers, individually, and the final Map of site suitability were evidenced.

  19. Elucidation of amyloid beta-protein oligomerization mechanisms: discrete molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanc, B; Betnel, M; Cruz, L; Bitan, G; Teplow, D B

    2010-03-31

    Oligomers of amyloid beta-protein (Abeta) play a central role in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Of the two predominant Abeta alloforms, Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42), Abeta(1-42) is more strongly implicated in the disease. We elucidated the structural characteristics of oligomers of Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) and their Arctic mutants, [E22G]Abeta(1-40) and [E22G]Abeta(1-42). We simulated oligomer formation using discrete molecular dynamics (DMD) with a four-bead protein model, backbone hydrogen bonding, and residue-specific interactions due to effective hydropathy and charge. For all four peptides under study, we derived the characteristic oligomer size distributions that were in agreement with prior experimental findings. Unlike Abeta(1-40), Abeta(1-42) had a high propensity to form paranuclei (pentameric or hexameric) structures that could self-associate into higher-order oligomers. Neither of the Arctic mutants formed higher-order oligomers, but [E22G]Abeta(1-40) formed paranuclei with a similar propensity to that of Abeta(1-42). Whereas the best agreement with the experimental data was obtained when the charged residues were modeled as solely hydrophilic, further assembly from spherical oligomers into elongated protofibrils was induced by nonzero electrostatic interactions among the charged residues. Structural analysis revealed that the C-terminal region played a dominant role in Abeta(1-42) oligomer formation whereas Abeta(1-40) oligomerization was primarily driven by intermolecular interactions among the central hydrophobic regions. The N-terminal region A2-F4 played a prominent role in Abeta(1-40) oligomerization but did not contribute to the oligomerization of Abeta(1-42) or the Arctic mutants. The oligomer structure of both Arctic peptides resembled Abeta(1-42) more than Abeta(1-40), consistent with their potentially more toxic nature.

  20. Single-molecule diffusometry reveals the nucleotide-dependent oligomerization pathways of Nicotiana tabacum Rubisco activase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quan; Serban, Andrew J.; Wachter, Rebekka M.; Moerner, W. E.

    2018-03-01

    Oligomerization plays an important role in the function of many proteins, but a quantitative picture of the oligomer distribution has been difficult to obtain using existing techniques. Here we describe a method that combines sub-stoichiometric labeling and recently developed single-molecule diffusometry to measure the size distribution of oligomers under equilibrium conditions in solution, one molecule at a time. We use this technique to characterize the oligomerization behavior of Nicotiana tabacum (Nt) Rubisco activase (Nt-Rca), a chaperone-like AAA-plus ATPase essential in regulating carbon fixation during photosynthesis. We directly observed monomers, dimers, and a tetramer/hexamer mixture and extracted their fractional abundance as a function of protein concentration. We show that the oligomerization pathway of Nt-Rca is nucleotide dependent: ATPγS binding strongly promotes tetramer/hexamer formation from dimers and results in a preferred tetramer/hexamer population for concentrations in the 1-10 μM range. Furthermore, we directly observed dynamic assembly and disassembly processes of single complexes in real time and from there estimated the rate of subunit exchange to be ˜0.1 s-1 with ATPγS. On the other hand, ADP binding destabilizes Rca complexes by enhancing the rate of subunit exchange by >2 fold. These observations provide a quantitative starting point to elucidate the structure-function relations of Nt-Rca complexes. We envision the method to fill a critical gap in defining and quantifying protein assembly pathways in the small-oligomer regime.

  1. Oligomerization of hydrophobin SC3 in solution : From soluble state to self-assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoqin; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna F.; Kruif, Cornelis G. de; Robillard, George T.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophobin SC3 is a protein with special self-association properties that differ depending on whether it is in solution, on an air/water interface or on a solid surface. Its self-association on an air/water interface and solid surface have been extensively characterized. The current study focuses

  2. Phosphorylation and oligomerization states of native pig brain HSP90 studied by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnier, C.; Lafitte, D.; Jorgensen, T.J.

    2001-01-01

    HSP90 purified from pig brain. The two protein isoforms were clearly distinguished by ESI-MS, the alpha isoform being approximately six times more abundant than the beta isoform. ESI-MS in combination with lambda phosphatase treatment provided direct evidence of the existence of four phosphorylated...

  3. Calmodulin overexpression does not alter Cav1.2 function or oligomerization state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Felix; Tolia, Alexandra; Arant, Ryan; Kim, Eun Young; Isacoff, Ehud; Minor, Daniel L

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between calmodulin (CaM) and voltage-gated calcium channels (Ca(v)s) are crucial for Ca(v) activity-dependent feedback modulation. We recently reported an X-ray structure that shows two Ca(2+)/CaM molecules bound to the Ca(v)1.2 C terminal tail, one at the PreIQ region and one at the IQ domain. Surprisingly, the asymmetric unit of the crystal showed a dimer in which Ca(2+)/CaM bridged two PreIQ helixes to form a 4:2 Ca(2+)/CaM:Ca(v) C-terminal tail assembly. Contrary to previous proposals based on a similar crystallographic dimer, extensive biochemical analysis together with subunit counting experiments of full-length channels in live cell membranes failed to find evidence for multimers that would be compatible with the 4:2 crossbridged complex. Here, we examine this possibility further. We find that CaM over-expression has no functional effect on Ca(v)1.2 inactivation or on the stoichiometry of full-length Ca(v)1.2. These data provide further support for the monomeric Ca(v)1.2 stoichiometry. Analysis of the electrostatic surfaces of the 2:1 Ca(2+)/CaM:Ca(V) C-terminal tail assembly reveals notable patches of electronegativity. These could influence various forms of channel modulation by interacting with positively charged elements from other intracellular channel domains.

  4. Measurements of the aerosol chemical composition and mixing state in the Po Valley using multiple spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decesari, S.; Allan, J.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Williams, B. J.; Paglione, M.; Facchini, M. C.; O'Dowd, C.; Harrison, R. M.; Gietl, J. K.; Coe, H.; Giulianelli, L.; Gobbi, G. P.; Lanconelli, C.; Carbone, C.; Worsnop, D.; Lambe, A. T.; Ahern, A. T.; Moretti, F.; Tagliavini, E.; Elste, T.; Gilge, S.; Zhang, Y.; Dall'Osto, M.

    2014-11-01

    The use of co-located multiple spectroscopic techniques can provide detailed information on the atmospheric processes regulating aerosol chemical composition and mixing state. So far, field campaigns heavily equipped with aerosol mass spectrometers have been carried out mainly in large conurbations and in areas directly affected by their outflow, whereas lesser efforts have been dedicated to continental areas characterised by a less dense urbanisation. We present here the results obtained at a background site in the Po Valley, Italy, in summer 2009. For the first time in Europe, six state-of-the-art spectrometric techniques were used in parallel: aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS), two aerosol mass spectrometers (high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer - HR-ToF-AMS and soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer - SP-AMS), thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (TAG), chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (CIMS) and (offline) proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that, under high-pressure conditions, atmospheric stratification at night and early morning hours led to the accumulation of aerosols produced by anthropogenic sources distributed over the Po Valley plain. Such aerosols include primary components such as black carbon (BC), secondary semivolatile compounds such as ammonium nitrate and amines and a class of monocarboxylic acids which correspond to the AMS cooking organic aerosol (COA) already identified in urban areas. In daytime, the entrainment of aged air masses in the mixing layer is responsible for the accumulation of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and also for the recycling of non-volatile primary species such as black carbon. According to organic aerosol source apportionment, anthropogenic aerosols accumulating in the lower layers overnight accounted for 38% of organic aerosol mass on average, another 21% was accounted for by aerosols recirculated in

  5. Polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane monolayer as a nanoporous interlayer for preparation of low-k dielectric films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y-L; Liu, C-S; Cho, C-I; Hwu, M-J

    2007-01-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsequioxane (POSS) monomer was fixed to a silicon surface by reacting octakis(glycidyldimethylsiloxy)octasilsesquioxane (OG-POSS) with the OH-terminated silicon surface in the presence of tin (II) chloride. The POSS cage layer then served as a nanoporous interlayer to reduce the dielectric constants of polyimide films on silicon surfaces. The chemical structure and surface morphology of OG-POSS modified silicon surfaces were characterized with XPS. With the introduction of a POSS nanopored interlayer, the dielectric constants of polyimide films were reduced

  6. Thermo-mechanical characterization of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane/polystyrene composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Ignazio; Bottino, Francesco A.; Cicala, Gianluca; Cozzo, Giulia; Latteri, Alberta; Recca, Antonino

    2014-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of a monochlorophenyl, hepta isobutyl Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane/Polystyrene (ph,hib-POSS/PS) composite were studied and compared with those of pristine polymer. ph,hib-POSS/PS system was prepared by solubilization and precipitation of Polystyrene (PS) in the presence of POSS. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was performed to check the distribution of the filler in the polymer matrix. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was carried out to measure viscoelastic properties of solid samples. Degradations were carried out into a thermobalance and the obtained thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric (DTG) curves were discussed and interpreted

  7. Single Site Silica Supported Tetramethyl Niobium by the SOMC Strategy: Synthesis, Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship in Ethylene Oligomerization Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali

    2017-06-06

    Silica supported Tetramethyl niobium complex [(≡SiO)NbMe4] 2 has been isolated by surface alkylation of [(≡SiO-)NbCl3Me] 1 with dimethyl zinc in pentane. 1 can be easily synthesized by grafting of NbCl3Me2 on to the surface of partially dehydroxylated silica by the SOMC strategy. Precise structural analysis was carried out by the FTIR, advance solid state NMR, elemental analysis and mass balance techniques (gas quantification after treating 2 with degassed water) . Complex 1 was found to be active in the ethylene oligomerization to produce up to C30, whereas to our surprise complex 2 selectively dimerizes ethylene into 1-butene in the absence of a co-catalyst at the same conversion levels.

  8. (Pressure + volume + temperature) properties for binary oligomeric solutions of poly(ethylene glycol mono-4-octylphenyl ether) with 1-octanol or acetophenone at pressures up to 50 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.-J.; Ku, T.-J.; Lin Homu

    2009-01-01

    Densities were measured with a high-pressure densitometer for two binary oligomeric systems of poly(ethylene glycol mono-4-octylphenyl ether) (PEGOPE) with 1-octanol or acetophenone at temperatures from 298.15 K to 348.15 K and pressures up to 50 MPa. While the excess volumes are negative in (acetophenone + PEGOPE) over the entire composition range, those are found to change from positive to negative with increasing mole fraction of the solvent in (1-octanol + PEGOPE). The pressure-effect on the liquid densities can be represented accurately by the Tait equation. Moreover, an empirical equation with two characteristic parameters correlates well the PVT data over the entire experimental conditions for each binary system. The experimental specific volumes were also correlated with the Flory-Orwoll-Vrij (FOV) and the Schotte equations of state to within the experimental uncertainty.

  9. Single Site Silica Supported Tetramethyl Niobium by the SOMC Strategy: Synthesis, Characterization and Structure-Activity Relationship in Ethylene Oligomerization Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Hamieh, Ali Imad Ali; Dey, Raju; Nekoueishahraki, Bijan; Samantaray, Manoja; Chen, Yin; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Silica supported Tetramethyl niobium complex [(≡SiO)NbMe4] 2 has been isolated by surface alkylation of [(≡SiO-)NbCl3Me] 1 with dimethyl zinc in pentane. 1 can be easily synthesized by grafting of NbCl3Me2 on to the surface of partially dehydroxylated silica by the SOMC strategy. Precise structural analysis was carried out by the FTIR, advance solid state NMR, elemental analysis and mass balance techniques (gas quantification after treating 2 with degassed water) . Complex 1 was found to be active in the ethylene oligomerization to produce up to C30, whereas to our surprise complex 2 selectively dimerizes ethylene into 1-butene in the absence of a co-catalyst at the same conversion levels.

  10. Functional cortical changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis at amplitude configuration: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-11-01

    showed high degrees of sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing patients with RRMS from HCs. The EDSS score showed a significant negative Pearson correlation with the beta value of the caudate head (r=-0.474, P=0.047. Conclusion: RRMS is associated with disturbances in spontaneous regional brain activity in specific areas, and these specific abnormalities may provide important information about the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment in RRMS. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, receiver operating characteristic, functional magnetic resonance imaging, blood oxygen level dependent, resting state

  11. Multicore Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with Oligomeric Micelles: Characterization and Potential for the Extraction of Contaminants over a Wide Polarity Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naous, Mohamed; García-Gómez, Diego; López-Jiménez, Francisco José; Bouanani, Farida; Lunar, María Loreto; Rubio, Soledad

    2017-01-17

    Oligomeric micelles from sodium undecylenate (oSUD) were chemisorbed to magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) through a single-step synthetic route involving the simultaneous nanoparticle formation and functionalization in an aqueous medium. The resulting spherical nanoparticles (MNPs-oSUD) consisted of a concatenation of iron oxide cores, with an average size of 7.7 nm, bound by oSUD micelles (particle average diameter of ca. 200 nm). Micellar coverage was ∼50% of the MNP-oSUD (by weight) and offered multiple retention mechanisms (e.g., dispersion, hydrogen bonding, polar, and ionic) for solute solubilization while keeping it intact during analyte elution. The high density of micelles and variety of interactions provided by this sorbent rendered it highly efficient for the extraction of aromatic amines in a wide polarity range (log K ow values from -0.80 to 4.05) from textiles, urine, and wastewater. Extraction took 5 min, no cleanup or evaporation of the extracts was needed and the method, based on LC-MS/MS quantitation, proved matrix-independent. Recoveries for 17 aromatic amines in samples were in the range of 93%-123% while those with negative log K ow values were in the range of 69%-87%. Detection limits for aromatic amines in textiles (0.007-2 mg kg -1 ) were well below the limits legislated by the European Union (EU) (30 mg kg -1 ) and those in urine and wastewater (0.004-1.5 μg L -1 ) were at the level usually found in real-world applications. All the analyzed samples were positive in aromatic amines. The easy synthesis and excellent extraction properties of MNPs-oSUD anticipate their high potential not only for multiresidue analysis but also in other fields such as water remediation.

  12. Protic ionic liquids based on the dimeric and oligomeric anions: [(AcO)xH(x-1)]-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K M; Izgorodina, E I; Forsyth, M; MacFarlane, D R; Seddon, K R

    2008-05-28

    We describe a fluidity and conductivity study as a function of composition in N-methylpyrrolidine-acetic acid mixtures. The simple 1 : 1 acid-base mixture appears to form an ionic liquid, but its degree of ionicity is quite low and such liquids are better thought of as poorly dissociated mixtures of acid and base. The composition consisting of 3 moles acetic acid and 1 mole N-methylpyrrolidine is shown to form the highest ionicity mixture in this binary due to the presence of oligomeric anionic species [(AcO)(x)H(x-1)](-) stabilised by hydrogen bonds. These oligomeric species, being weaker bases than the acetate anion, shift the proton transfer equilibrium towards formation of ionic species, thus generating a higher degree of ionicity than is present at the 1 : 1 composition. A Walden plot analysis, thermogravimetric behaviour and proton NMR data, as well as ab initio calculations of the oligomeric species, all support this conclusion.

  13. Palm Swamp Wetland Ecosystems of the Upper Amazon: Characterizing their Distribution and Inundation State Using Multiple Resolution Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podest, E.; McDonald, K. C.; Schröder, R.; Pinto, N.; Zimmermann, R.; Horna, V.

    2011-12-01

    Palm swamp wetlands are prevalent in the Amazon basin, including extensive regions in northern Peru. These ecosystems are characterized by constant surface inundation and moderate seasonal water level variation. The combination of constantly saturated soils, giving rise to low oxygen conditions, and warm temperatures year-round can lead to considerable methane release to the atmosphere. Because of the widespread occurrence and expected sensitivity of these ecosystems to climate change, knowledge of their spatial extent and inundation state is crucial for assessing the associated land-atmosphere carbon exchange. Precise spatio-temporal information on palm swamps is difficult to gather because of their remoteness and difficult accessibility. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing is an effective tool for characterizing these ecosystems since it is sensitive to surface water and vegetation structure and allows monitoring large inaccessible areas on a temporal basis regardless of atmospheric conditions or solar illumination. We are developing a remote sensing methodology using multiple resolution microwave remote sensing data to determine palm swamp distribution and inundation state over focus regions in the Amazon basin in northern Peru. For this purpose, two types of multi-temporal microwave data are used: 1) high-resolution (100 m) data from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) to derive maps of palm swamp extent and inundation from dual-polarization fine-beam and multi-temporal HH-polarized ScanSAR, and 2) coarse resolution (25 km) combined active and passive microwave data from QuikSCAT and AMSR-E to derive inundated area fraction on a weekly basis. We compare information content and accuracy of the coarse resolution products to the PALSAR-based datasets to ensure information harmonization. The synergistic combination of high and low resolution datasets will allow for characterization of palm swamps and

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine use and nutrient intake among individuals with multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masullo, Laura; Papas, Mia A; Cotugna, Nancy; Baker, Sandra; Mahoney, Lauren; Trabulsi, Jillian

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) often use complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). However, specific CAM therapies used within this population have not been thoroughly described, particularly the use of supplements, herbal remedies, and dietary modifications. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the prevalence of specific types of CAM used by adults with MS in the United States. Participants included adults who were diagnosed with MS at least 1 year prior to study enrollment. CAM use was measured using the CAM Supplement of the National Health Interview Survey, and nutrient intake was assessed using an Automated Self-Administered 24-h Recall. This study found that a majority (77 %, n = 27) of the sample used CAM within the past 12 months, the most prevalent type being vitamins/minerals (88.9 %, n = 24), nonvitamin, nonmineral, natural products (NP) (44.4 %, n = 12), relaxation techniques (33.3 %, n = 9), and special diets (29.6 %, n = 8). Regarding diet, median percent calories from fat (37 %) and saturated fat (12 %) were higher than current recommendations, while dietary fiber intake met only 87 % of the adequate intake. Participants following the Paleo (7.4 %, n = 2) diet did not meet the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) for vitamins D and E, while those on the Swank diet (7.4 %, n = 2) were below the EAR for vitamins C, A, E, and folate. The results support previous findings that CAM therapies are commonly used by individuals with MS. Inadequate intakes of certain vitamins and minerals by those following the Swank and Paleo diet suggest these diets may be too restrictive, thus further research is warranted.

  15. The state of multiple sclerosis: current insight into the patient/health care provider relationship, treatment challenges, and satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Mar; Alexander, Maggie; Costello, Kathleen; Duddy, Martin; Jones, David E; Law, Nancy; O’Neill, Gilmore; Uccelli, Antonio; Weissert, Robert; Wray, Sibyl

    2017-01-01

    Background Managing multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment presents challenges for both patients and health care professionals. Effective communication between patients with MS and their neurologist is important for improving clinical outcomes and quality of life. Methods A closed-ended online market research survey was used to assess the current state of MS care from the perspective of both patients with MS (≥18 years of age) and neurologists who treat MS from Europe and the US and to gain insight into perceptions of treatment expectations/goals, treatment decisions, treatment challenges, communication, and satisfaction with care, based on current clinical practice. Results A total of 900 neurologists and 982 patients completed the survey, of whom 46% self-identified as having remitting-relapsing MS, 29% secondary progressive MS, and 11% primary progressive MS. Overall, patients felt satisfied with their disease-modifying therapy (DMT); satisfaction related to comfort in speaking with their neurologist and participation in their DMT decision-making process. Patients who self-identified as having relapsing-remitting MS were more likely to be very satisfied with their treatment. Top challenges identified by patients in managing their DMT were cost, side effects/tolerability of treatment, and uncertainty if treatment was working. Half of the patients reported skipping doses, but only 68% told their health care provider that they did so. Conclusion Several important differences in perception were identified between patients and neurologists concerning treatment selection, satisfaction, expectations, goals, and comfort discussing symptoms, as well as treatment challenges and skipped doses. The study results emphasize that patient/neurologist communication and patient input into the treatment decision-making process likely influence patient satisfaction with treatment. PMID:28053511

  16. The state of multiple sclerosis: current insight into the patient/health care provider relationship, treatment challenges, and satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintoré, Mar; Alexander, Maggie; Costello, Kathleen; Duddy, Martin; Jones, David E; Law, Nancy; O'Neill, Gilmore; Uccelli, Antonio; Weissert, Robert; Wray, Sibyl

    2017-01-01

    Managing multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment presents challenges for both patients and health care professionals. Effective communication between patients with MS and their neurologist is important for improving clinical outcomes and quality of life. A closed-ended online market research survey was used to assess the current state of MS care from the perspective of both patients with MS (≥18 years of age) and neurologists who treat MS from Europe and the US and to gain insight into perceptions of treatment expectations/goals, treatment decisions, treatment challenges, communication, and satisfaction with care, based on current clinical practice. A total of 900 neurologists and 982 patients completed the survey, of whom 46% self-identified as having remitting-relapsing MS, 29% secondary progressive MS, and 11% primary progressive MS. Overall, patients felt satisfied with their disease-modifying therapy (DMT); satisfaction related to comfort in speaking with their neurologist and participation in their DMT decision-making process. Patients who self-identified as having relapsing-remitting MS were more likely to be very satisfied with their treatment. Top challenges identified by patients in managing their DMT were cost, side effects/tolerability of treatment, and uncertainty if treatment was working. Half of the patients reported skipping doses, but only 68% told their health care provider that they did so. Several important differences in perception were identified between patients and neurologists concerning treatment selection, satisfaction, expectations, goals, and comfort discussing symptoms, as well as treatment challenges and skipped doses. The study results emphasize that patient/neurologist communication and patient input into the treatment decision-making process likely influence patient satisfaction with treatment.

  17. Evolution of Subaerial Coastal Fluvial Delta Island Topography into Multiple Stable States Under Influence of Vegetation and Stochastic Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, K. B.; Smith, B. C.; O'Connor, M.; Mohrig, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Coastal fluvial delta morphodynamics are prominently controlled by external fluvial sediment and water supplies; however, internal sediment-water-vegetation feedbacks are now being proposed as potentially equally significant in organizing and maintaining the progradation and aggradation of such systems. The time scales of fluvial and climate influences on these feedbacks, and of their responses, are also open questions. Historical remote sensing study of the Wax Lake Delta model system (Louisiana, USA) revealed trends in the evolution of the subaerial island surfaces from a non-systematic arrangement of elevations to a discrete set of levees and intra-island platforms with distinct vegetation types, designated as high marsh, low marsh, and mudflat habitat. We propose that this elevation zonation is consistent with multiple stable state theory, e.g. as applied to tidal salt marsh systems but not previously to deltas. According to zonally-distributed sediment core analyses, differentiation of island elevations was not due to organic matter accumulation as in salt marshes, but rather by differential mineral sediment accumulation with some organic contributions. Mineral sediment accumulation rates suggested that elevation growth was accelerating or holding steady over time, at least to date in this young delta, in contrast to theory suggesting rates should slow as elevation increases above mean water level. Hydrological analysis of island flooding suggested a prominent role of stochastic local storm events in raising island water levels and supplying mineral sediment to the subaerial island surfaces at short time scales; over longer time scales, the relative influences of local storms and inland/regional floods on the coupled sediment-water-vegetation system of the subaerial delta island surfaces remain the subject of ongoing study. These results help provide an empirical foundation for the next generation of coupled sediment-water-vegetation modeling and theory.

  18. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Transcription Factor BlcR Is Regulated via Oligomerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yi; Fiscus, Valena; Meng, Wuyi; Zheng, Zhida; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Fuqua, Clay; Chen, Lingling (IMCB-Singapore); (Indiana)

    2012-02-08

    The Agrobacterium tumefaciens BlcR is a member of the emerging isocitrate lyase transcription regulators that negatively regulates metabolism of {gamma}-butyrolactone, and its repressing function is relieved by succinate semialdehyde (SSA). Our crystal structure showed that BlcR folded into the DNA- and SSA-binding domains and dimerized via the DNA-binding domains. Mutational analysis identified residues, including Phe{sup 147}, that are important for SSA association; BlcR{sup F147A} existed as tetramer. Two BlcR dimers bound to target DNA and in a cooperative manner, and the distance between the two BlcR-binding sequences in DNA was critical for BlcR-DNA association. Tetrameric BlcR{sup F147A} retained DNA binding activity, and importantly, this activity was not affected by the distance separating the BlcR-binding sequences in DNA. SSA did not dissociate tetrameric BlcR{sup F147A} or BlcR{sup F147A}-DNA. As well as in the SSA-binding site, Phe{sup 147} is located in a structurally flexible loop that may be involved in BlcR oligomerization. We propose that SSA regulates BlcR DNA-binding function via oligomerization.

  19. An Asymmetric Deuterium Labeling Strategy to Identify Interprotomer and Intraprotomer NOEs in Oligomeric Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jasanoff, Alan

    1998-01-01

    A major difficulty in determining the structure of an oligomeric protein by NMR is the problem of distinguishing inter- from intraprotomer NOEs. In order to address this issue in studies of the 27 kD compact trimeric domain of the MHC class II-associated invariant chain, we compared the 13C NOESY-HSQC spectrum of a uniformly 13C-labeled trimer with the spectrum of the same trimer labeled with 13C in only one protomer, and with deuterium in the other two protomers. The spectrum of the unmixed trimer included both inter- and intraprotomer NOEs while the spectrum of the mixed trimer included only intraprotomer peaks. NOEs clearly absent from the spectrum of the mixed trimer could be confidently assigned to interprotomer interactions. Asymmetrically labeled trimers were isolated by refolding a 13C-labeled shorter form of the protein with a 2H-labeled longer form, chromatographically purifying trimers with only one short chain, and then processing with trypsin to yield only protomers with the desired N- and C-termini. In contrast to earlier studies, in which statistical mixtures of differently labeled protomers were analyzed, our procedure generated only a well-defined 1:2 oligomer, and no other mixed oligomers were present. This increased the maximum possible concentration of NMR-active protomers and thus the sensitivity of the experiments. Related methods should be applicable to many oligomeric proteins, particularly those with slow protomer exchange rates

  20. Direct Evidence of Intrinsic Blue Fluorescence from Oligomeric Interfaces of Human Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Arpan; Bhowmik, Soumitra; Singh, Amit K; Kodgire, Prashant; Das, Apurba K; Mukherjee, Tushar Kanti

    2017-10-10

    The molecular origin behind the concentration-dependent intrinsic blue fluorescence of human serum albumin (HSA) is not known yet. This unusual blue fluorescence is believed to be a characteristic feature of amyloid-like fibrils of protein/peptide and originates due to the delocalization of peptide bond electrons through the extended hydrogen bond networks of cross-β-sheet structure. Herein, by combining the results of spectroscopy, size exclusion chromatography, native gel electrophoresis, and confocal microscopy, we have shown that the intrinsic blue fluorescence of HSA exclusively originates from oligomeric interfaces devoid of any amyloid-like fibrillar structure. Our study suggests that this low energy fluorescence band is not due to any particular residue/sequence, but rather it is a common feature of self-assembled peptide bonds. The present findings of intrinsic blue fluorescence from oligomeric interfaces pave the way for future applications of this unique visual phenomenon for early stage detection of various protein aggregation related human diseases.

  1. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chung-ke [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tzong-Huah [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chemical Biology and Molecular Biophysics Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Institute of Biochemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chu-Ya [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Liao, Yu-heng [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tai-huang, E-mail: bmthh@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse, E-mail: jthuang@chem.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  2. Oligomerization of glycine and alanine catalyzed by iron oxides: implications for prebiotic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanker, Uma; Bhushan, Brij; Bhattacharjee, G; Kamaluddin

    2012-02-01

    Iron oxide minerals are probable constituents of the sediments present in geothermal regions of the primitive earth. They might have adsorbed different organic monomers (amino acids, nucleotides etc.) and catalyzed polymerization processes leading to the formation of the first living cell. In the present work we tested the catalytic activity of three forms of iron oxides (Goethite, Akaganeite and Hematite) in the intermolecular condensation of each of the amino acids glycine and L-alanine. The effect of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide on the oligomerization has also been studied. Oligomerization studies were performed for 35 days at three different temperatures 50, 90 and 120°C without applying drying/wetting cycling. The products formed were characterized by HPLC and ESI-MS techniques. All three forms of iron oxides catalyzed peptide bond formation (23.2% of gly2 and 10.65% of ala2). The reaction was monitored every 7 days. Formation of peptides was observed to start after 7 days at 50°C. Maximum yield of peptides was found after 35 days at 90°C. Reaction at 120°C favors formation of diketopiperazine derivatives. It is also important to note that after 35 days of reaction, goethite produced dimer and trimer with the highest yield among the oxides tested. We suggest that the activity of goethite could probably be due to its high surface area and surface acidity.

  3. Phosphate and HEPES buffers potently affect the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garvey, Megan; Tepper, Katharina; Haupt, Caroline; Knuepfer, Uwe; Klement, Karolin; Meinhardt, Jessica; Horn, Uwe; Balbach, Jochen; Faendrich, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Sodium phosphate buffer accelerated Aβ(1-40) nucleation relative to HEPES. → Aβ(1-40) fibrils formed in the two buffers show only minor structural differences. → NMR revealed that Aβ(1-40) histidine residues mediate buffer dependent changes. -- Abstract: The oligomerization of Aβ peptide into amyloid fibrils is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Due to its biological relevance, phosphate is the most commonly used buffer system for studying the formation of Aβ and other amyloid fibrils. Investigation into the characteristics and formation of amyloid fibrils frequently relies upon material formed in vitro, predominantly in phosphate buffers. Herein, we examine the effects on the fibrillation and oligomerization mechanism of Aβ peptide that occur due solely to the influence of phosphate buffer. We reveal that significant differences in amyloid fibrillation are observed due to fibrillation being initiated in phosphate or HEPES buffer (at physiological pH and temperature). Except for the differing buffer ions, all experimental parameters were kept constant. Fibril formation was assessed using fluorescently monitored kinetic studies, microscopy, X-ray fiber diffraction and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Based on this set up, we herein reveal profound effects on the mechanism and speed of Aβ fibrillation. The three histidine residues at positions 6, 13 and 14 of Aβ(1-40) are instrumental in these mechanistic changes. We conclude that buffer plays a more significant role in fibril formation than has been generally acknowledged.

  4. Catalysis of the Oligomerization of O-Phospho-Serine, Aspartic Acid, or Glutamic Acid by Cationic Micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Christof; Hill, Aubrey R., Jr.; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of relatively concentrated aqueous solutions of 0-phospho-serine (50 mM), aspartic acid (100 mM) or glutamic acid (100 mM) with carbonyldiimidazole leads to the formation of an activated intermediate that oligomerizes efficiently. When the concentration of amino acid is reduced tenfold, few long oligomers can be detected. Positively-charged cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide micelles concentrate the negatively-charged activated intermediates of the amino acids at their surfaces and catalyze efficient oligomerization even from dilute solutions.

  5. Catalytic Oligomerization of Terminal Alkynes by Lanthanide Carbyls (η5-C5Me5)2LnCH(SiMe3)2 (Ln = Y, La, Ce)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeres, H.J.; Teuben, J.H.

    1991-01-01

    Lanthanide and group 3 carbyls Cp*2LnCH(SiMe3)2 (1, Ln = Y; 2, Ln = La; 3, Ln = Ce) are active catalyst precursors for the oligomerization of terminal alkynes HC≡CR (R = alkyl, aryl, SiMe3). The regioselectivity and the extent of oligomerization depend strongly on the lanthanide applied as well as

  6. Technology-Aided Leisure and Communication Opportunities for Two Post-Coma Persons Emerged from a Minimally Conscious State and Affected by Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; De Tommaso, Marina; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed technology-aided programs for helping two post-coma persons, who had emerged from a minimally conscious state and were affected by multiple disabilities, to (a) engage with leisure stimuli and request caregiver's procedures, (b) send out and listen to text messages for communication with distant partners, and (c) combine…

  7. Phase diagrams, thermodynamic properties and sound velocities derived from a multiple Einstein method using vibrational densities of states : an application to MgO–SiO2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Michael H G; Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer; van den Berg, Arie P.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper, we showed a technique that simplifies Kieffer’s lattice vibrational method by representing the vibrational density of states with multiple Einstein frequencies. Here, we show that this technique can be applied to construct a thermodynamic database that accurately represents

  8. Post-coma persons emerging from a minimally conscious state with multiple disabilities make technology-aided phone contacts with relevant partners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Oliva, D.; Campodonico, F.; D'Amico, F.; Buonocunto, F.; Sacco, V.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Post-coma individuals emerging from a minimally conscious state with multiple disabilities may enjoy contact with relevant partners (e.g., family members and friends), but may not have easy access to them. These two single-case studies assessed whether those individuals could make contact with

  9. Multiple tobacco product use among adults in the United States: cigarettes, cigars, electronic cigarettes, hookah, smokeless tobacco, and snus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youn O; Hebert, Christine J; Nonnemaker, James M; Kim, Annice E

    2014-05-01

    Noncigarette tobacco products are increasingly popular. Researchers need to understand multiple tobacco product use to assess the effects of these products on population health. We estimate national prevalence and examine risk factors for multiple product use. We calculated prevalence estimates of current use patterns involving cigarettes, cigars, electronic cigarettes, hookah, smokeless tobacco, and snus using data from the 2012 RTI National Adult Tobacco Survey (N=3627), a random-digit-dial telephone survey of adults aged 18 and over. Associations between use patterns (exclusive single product and multiple products) and demographic characteristics were examined using Pearson chi-square tests and logistic regression. 32.1% of adults currently use 1 or more tobacco products; 14.9% use cigarettes exclusively, and 6.6% use one noncigarette product exclusively, 6.9% use cigarettes with another product (dual use), 1.3% use two noncigarette products, and 2.4% use three or more products (polytobacco use). Smokers who are young adult, male, never married, reside in the West, and made prior quit attempts were at risk for multiple product use. Over 10% of U.S. adults use multiple tobacco products. A better understanding of multiple product use involving combustible products, like cigars and hookah, is needed. Multiple product use may be associated with past quit attempts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chaperonin of Group I: Oligomeric Spectrum and Biochemical and Biological Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vilasi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaperonins play various physiological roles and can also be pathogenic. Elucidation of their structure, e.g., oligomeric status and post-translational modifications (PTM, is necessary to understand their functions and mechanisms of action in health and disease. Group I chaperonins form tetradecamers with two stacked heptameric rings. The tetradecamer is considered the typical functional complex for folding of client polypeptides. However, other forms such as the monomer and oligomers with smaller number of subunits than the classical tetradecamer, also occur in cells. The properties and functions of the monomer and oligomers, and their roles in chaperonin-associated diseases are still incompletely understood. Chaperonin I in eukaryotes occurs in various locations, not just the mitochondrion, which is its canonical place of residence and function. Eukaryotic Chaperonin I, namely Hsp60 (designated HSP60 or HSPD1 in humans has, indeed, been found in the cytosol; the plasma-cell membrane; on the outer surface of cells; in the intercellular space; in biological liquids such as lymph, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid; and in secretions, for instance saliva and urine. Hsp60 has also been found in cell-derived vesicles such as exosomes. The functions of Hsp60 in all these non-canonical locales are still poorly characterized and one of the questions not yet answered is in what form, i.e., monomer or oligomer, is the chaperonin present in these non-canonical locations. In view of the steady increase in interest on chaperonopathies over the last several years, we have studied human HSP60 to determine its role in various diseases, its locations in cells and tissues and migrations in the body, and its post-translational modifications that might have an impact on its location and function. We also carried out experiments to characterize the oligomeric status of extramitochondrial of HSP60 in solution. Here, we provide an overview of our results, focusing on

  11. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Bartel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21 which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs. Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2 within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21-positive leukemia.

  12. 78 FR 65561 - D-Glucopyranose, oligomeric, decyl octyl glycosides; Exemption from the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... metabolize D-glucopyranose, oligomeric, C 10 -C 16 -alkyl glycosides to water-soluble substances... polyoxyethylene polymers and fatty acids; carriers such as clay and diatomaceous earth; thickeners such as... exposure through drinking water and in residential settings, but does not include occupational exposure...

  13. Regulation of complement by cartilage oligomeric matrix protein allows for a novel molecular diagnostic principle in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Happonen, Kaisa E; Saxne, Tore; Aspberg, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage, where it catalyzes collagen fibrillogenesis. Elevated amounts of COMP are found in serum during increased turnover of cartilage associated with active joint disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthr...

  14. Kinetics in Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Promiscuous Oligomerizing Receptors Can Be Determined by Receptor Specificity : Apoptosis Induction by TRAIL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szegezdi, Eva; van der Sloot, Almer M.; Mahalingam, Devalingam; O'Leary, Lynda; Cool, Robbert H.; Munoz, Ines G.; Montoya, Guillermo; Quax, Wim J.; de Jong, Steven; Samali, Afshin; Serrano, Luis

    Here we show by computer modeling that kinetics and outcome of signal transduction in case of hetero-oligomerizing receptors of a promiscuous ligand largely depend on the relative amounts of its receptors. Promiscuous ligands can trigger the formation of nonproductive receptor complexes, which slows

  15. Orally administrated cinnamon extract reduces β-amyloid oligomerization and corrects cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Frydman-Marom

    Full Text Available An increasing body of evidence indicates that accumulation of soluble oligomeric assemblies of β-amyloid polypeptide (Aβ play a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Specifically, 56 kDa oligomeric species were shown to be correlated with impaired cognitive function in AD model mice. Several reports have documented the inhibition of Aβ plaque formation by compounds from natural sources. Yet, evidence for the ability of common edible elements to modulate Aβ oligomerization remains an unmet challenge. Here we identify a natural substance, based on cinnamon extract (CEppt, which markedly inhibits the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers and prevents the toxicity of Aβ on neuronal PC12 cells. When administered to an AD fly model, CEppt rectified their reduced longevity, fully recovered their locomotion defects and totally abolished tetrameric species of Aβ in their brain. Furthermore, oral administration of CEppt to an aggressive AD transgenic mice model led to marked decrease in 56 kDa Aβ oligomers, reduction of plaques and improvement in cognitive behavior. Our results present a novel prophylactic approach for inhibition of toxic oligomeric Aβ species formation in AD through the utilization of a compound that is currently in use in human diet.

  16. Styrene oligomerization as a molecular probe reaction for zeolite acidity: a UV-Vis spectroscopy and DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurmans, I.L.C.; Pidko, E.A.; Groot, de J.M.; Stavitski, E.; Santen, van R.A.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2010-01-01

    A series of H-ZSM-5 crystallites with different framework Si/Al ratios was studied by analyzing the kinetics and reaction mechanism of the oligomerization of 4-fluorostyrene as molecular probe reaction for Brønsted acidity. The formation of carbocationic species was followed by UV-Vis spectroscopy.

  17. Immobilization of isolated FI catalyst on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-functionalized silica for the synthesis of weakly entangled polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yang, Huaqin; Zhang, Jingjing; Mu, Jingshan; Gong, Dirong; Wang, Xiaodong

    2016-09-25

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) were adsorbed on methylaluminoxane-activated silica for the immobilization of fluorinated bis(phenoxyimine)Ti complexes (FI catalyst). These POSSs have been characterized as horizontal spacers isolating the active sites and hindering the chain overlap in polymerization. The heterogeneous catalyst exhibits considerable activity in the synthesis of weakly entangled polyethylene.

  18. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke; Joseph J. Battista

    2001-01-01

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives

  19. Human α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor as a novel target of oligomeric α-synuclein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking is associated with a decreased incidence of Parkinson disease (PD through unknown mechanisms. Interestingly, a decrease in the numbers of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α4β2-nAChRs in PD patients suggests an α4β2-nAChR-mediated cholinergic deficit in PD. Although oligomeric forms of α-synuclein have been recognized to be toxic and involved in the pathogenesis of PD, their direct effects on nAChR-mediated cholinergic signaling remains undefined. Here, we report for the first time that oligomeric α-synuclein selectively inhibits human α4β2-nAChR-mediated currents in a dose-dependent, non-competitive and use-independent manner. We show that pre-loading cells with guanyl-5'-yl thiophosphate fails to prevent this inhibition, suggesting that the α-synuclein-induced inhibition of α4β2-nAChR function is not mediated by nAChR internalization. By using a pharmacological approach and cultures expressing transfected human nAChRs, we have shown a clear effect of oligomeric α-synuclein on α4β2-nAChRs, but not on α4β4- or α7-nAChRs, suggesting nAChR subunit selectivity of oligomeric α-synuclein-induced inhibition. In addition, by combining the size exclusion chromatography and atomic force microscopy (AFM analyses, we find that only large (>4 nm oligomeric α-synuclein aggregates (but not monomeric, small oligomeric or fibrillar α-synuclein aggregates exhibit the inhibitory effect on human α4β2-nAChRs. Collectively, we have provided direct evidence that α4β2-nAChR is a sensitive target to mediate oligomeric α-synuclein-induced modulation of cholinergic signaling, and our data imply that therapeutic strategies targeted toward α4β2-nAChRs may have potential for developing new treatments for PD.

  20. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds and improvement of visual adaptation to the dark (ID 680) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claims in relation to oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds and improvement of visual adaptation to the dark. The scientific substantiation is based on the information provided by the Member States in the consolidated list of Article 13 health claims and references that EFSA...... has received from Member States or directly from stakeholders. The food constituent that is the subject of the health claim is oligomeric procyanidins (OPCs) from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds. The Panel considers that OPCs from grape (Vitis vinifera L.) seeds are sufficiently characterised....... The claimed effect is “ocular system: OPCs play an important role in the structure and physiological functions of cornea, OPCs protect the cornea and improve visual adaptation to low luminances”. The target population is assumed to be the general population. In the context of the proposed wordings...

  1. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: relation to growth and disease activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnhart, Birgitte; Juul, Anders; Nielsen, Susan

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been identified as a prognostic marker of progressive joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. In this population based study we evaluated associations between plasma concentrations of COMP, disease activity, and growth velocity...... in patients with recent-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). COMP levels in JIA and healthy children were compared with those in healthy adults. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1), which has been associated with COMP expression and growth velocity, were studied in parallel. METHODS......: 87 patients with JIA entered the study, including oligoarticular JIA (n = 34), enthesitis-related arthritis (n = 8), polyarticular rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive JIA (n = 2), polyarticular RF-negative JIA (n = 27), systemic JIA (n = 6), and undifferentiated JIA (n = 10). Plasma levels of COMP were...

  2. Hedgehog Buckyball: A High-Symmetry Complete Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report UV-MALDI-TOF MS evidence of a fullerene-like silsesquioxane, a high-symmetry polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS or SSO formulated as R60-Si60O90 or T60 (T = RSiO1.5. The T60 preparation can be performed using a normal hydrolytic condensation of [(3-methacryloxypropyl]trimethoxysilane (MPMS as an example. Theoretically, four 3sp3 hybrid orbitals (each containing an unpaired electron of a Si atom are generated before the bond formation. Then it bonds to another four atom electrons using the four generated hybrid orbitals which produced a stable configuration. This fullerene-like silsesquioxane should exhibit much more functionality, activity and selectivity and is easier to assemble than the double bonds in a fullerene.

  3. Multifunctional Mesoporous Ionic Gels and Scaffolds Derived from Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Hong; Lee, Albert S; Lee, Jong-Chan; Hong, Soon Man; Hwang, Seung Sang; Koo, Chong Min

    2017-02-01

    A new methodology for fabrication of inorganic-organic hybrid ionogels and scaffolds is developed through facile cross-linking and solution extraction of a newly developed ionic polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane with inorganic core. Through design of various cationic tertiary amines, as well as cross-linkable functional groups on each arm of the inorganic core, high-performance ionogels are fabricated with excellent electrochemical stability and unique ion conduction behavior, giving superior lithium ion battery performance. Moreover, through solvent extraction of the liquid components, hybrid scaffolds with well-defined, interconnected mesopores are utilized as heterogeneous catalysts for the CO 2 -catalyzed cycloaddition of epoxides. Excellent catalytic performance, as well as highly efficient recyclability are observed when compared to other previous literature materials.

  4. Efficient light-emitting devices based on platinum-complexes-anchored polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xiaohui

    2010-08-24

    The synthesis, photophysical, and electrochemical characterization of macromolecules, consisting of an emissive platinum complex and carbazole moieties covalently attached to a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) core, is reported. Organic light-emitting devices based on these POSS materials exhibit a peak external quantum efficiency of ca. 8%, which is significantly higher than that of the analogous devices with a physical blend of the platinum complexes and a polymer matrix, and they represent noticeable improvement in the device efficiency of solution-processable phosphorescent excimer devices. Furthermore, the ratio of monomer and excimer/aggregate electroluminescent emission intensity, as well as the device efficiency, increases as the platinum complex moiety presence on the POSS macromolecules decreases. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  5. Flow cytometry evidence of human granulocytes interaction with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes: effect of nanoparticle charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renò, Filippo; Rizzi, Manuela; Pittarella, Pamela; Carniato, Fabio; Olivero, Francesco; Marchese, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) entering the human body are immediately confronted with the innate part of human immune system. In particular, monocyte and neutrophil granulocytes readily clear particles by phagocytosis, even if in the case of NPs the uptake mechanism may be classified as macropinocytosis. Among engineered nanoparticles, in the last years, siliceous materials have emerged as promising materials for several applications ranging from catalysis to biomedical. The polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are nanodimensional, easily synthesizable molecular compounds and POSS-based systems are promising carriers for biological molecules. In this work, the ability of human granulocytes to uptake positively and negatively charged POSS was measured using a simple flow cytometry analysis based on cell size modifications. The data obtained showed that after a 30 min exposure only positive NPs were uptaken by human granulocyte using both macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated mechanisms as demonstrated by uptake inhibition mediated by amiloride and chlorpromazine. (paper)

  6. Assembly of the intrinsic factor domains and oligomerization of the protein in the presence of cobalamin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars

    2004-01-01

    oligomerized. A mixture of two fragments IF(30) + IF(20) and Cbl produced a firm complex, IF(30+20).Cbl, which could not associate to dimers. In contrast to IF(30+20).Cbl, the saturated full-length monomers IF(50).Cbl dimerized with K(d) approximately 1 microM. We suggest a two-domain organization of the full......-length protein, where two distant units, IF(30) and IF(20), can be assembled only by Cbl. They are connected by a protease-sensitive link, whose native structure is likely to be important for dimerization. However, linkage between two domains is not compulsory for Cbl binding. Advantages of the two...

  7. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Zhengliang L.; Zhou, Hui; Ethen, Cheryl M.; Reinhold, Vernon N.

    2016-01-01

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and "3H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. - Graphical abstract: Proposed mechanism for how core-fucose prohibits the tetramerization of the 1918 pandemic viral neuraminidase. Only the cross section of the stalk region with two N-linked glycans are depicted for clarity. (A) Carbohydrate–carbohydrate interaction on non-fucosylated monomer allows tetramerization. (B) Core-fucosylation disrupts the interaction and prevents the tetramerization. - Highlights: • Expressed 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase has inactive and active forms. • The inactive form contains high level of core-6 fucose, while the active form lacks such modification. • Core fucose could interfere the oligomerization of the neuraminidase and thus its activation. • This discovery may explain why

  8. Structural adaptation of the subunit interface of oligomeric thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugini, Elisa; Tronelli, Daniele; Bossa, Francesco; Pascarella, Stefano

    2009-04-01

    Enzymes from thermophilic and, particularly, from hyperthermophilic organisms are surprisingly stable. Understanding of the molecular origin of protein thermostability and thermoactivity attracted the interest of many scientist both for the perspective comprehension of the principles of protein structure and for the possible biotechnological applications through application of protein engineering. Comparative studies at sequence and structure levels were aimed at detecting significant differences of structural parameters related to protein stability between thermophilic and hyperhermophilic structures and their mesophilic homologs. Comparative studies were useful in the identification of a few recurrent themes which the evolution utilized in different combinations in different protein families. These studies were mostly carried out at the monomer level. However, maintenance of a proper quaternary structure is an essential prerequisite for a functional macromolecule. At the environmental temperatures experienced typically by hyper- and thermophiles, the subunit interactions mediated by the interface must be sufficiently stable. Our analysis was therefore aimed at the identification of the molecular strategies adopted by evolution to enhance interface thermostability of oligomeric enzymes. The variation of several structural properties related to protein stability were tested at the subunit interfaces of thermophilic and hyperthermophilic oligomers. The differences of the interface structural features observed between the hyperthermophilic and thermophilic enzymes were compared with the differences of the same properties calculated from pairwise comparisons of oligomeric mesophilic proteins contained in a reference dataset. The significance of the observed differences of structural properties was measured by a t-test. Ion pairs and hydrogen bonds do not vary significantly while hydrophobic contact area increases specially in hyperthermophilic interfaces. Interface

  9. Core-6 fucose and the oligomerization of the 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhengliang L., E-mail: Leon.wu@bio-techne.com [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Zhou, Hui [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States); Ethen, Cheryl M. [Bio-Techne Inc., 614 McKinley Place NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413 (United States); Reinhold, Vernon N., E-mail: Vernon.Reinhold@unh.edu [Gregg Hall, UNH Glycomics Center, University of New Hampshire (United States)

    2016-04-29

    The 1918 H1N1 influenza virus was responsible for one of the most deadly pandemics in human history. Yet to date, the structure component responsible for its virulence is still a mystery. In order to search for such a component, the neuraminidase (NA) antigen of the virus was expressed, which led to the discovery of an active form (tetramer) and an inactive form (dimer and monomer) of the protein due to different glycosylation. In this report, the N-glycans from both forms were released and characterized by mass spectrometry. It was found that the glycans from the active form had 26% core-6 fucosylated, while the glycans from the inactive form had 82% core-6 fucosylated. Even more surprisingly, the stalk region of the active form was almost completely devoid of core-6-linked fucose. These findings were further supported by the results obtained from in vitro incorporation of azido fucose and {sup 3}H-labeled fucose using core-6 fucosyltransferase, FUT8. In addition, the incorporation of fucose did not change the enzymatic activity of the active form, implying that core-6 fucose is not directly involved in the enzymatic activity. It is postulated that core-6 fucose prohibits the oligomerization and subsequent activation of the enzyme. - Graphical abstract: Proposed mechanism for how core-fucose prohibits the tetramerization of the 1918 pandemic viral neuraminidase. Only the cross section of the stalk region with two N-linked glycans are depicted for clarity. (A) Carbohydrate–carbohydrate interaction on non-fucosylated monomer allows tetramerization. (B) Core-fucosylation disrupts the interaction and prevents the tetramerization. - Highlights: • Expressed 1918 pandemic influenza viral neuraminidase has inactive and active forms. • The inactive form contains high level of core-6 fucose, while the active form lacks such modification. • Core fucose could interfere the oligomerization of the neuraminidase and thus its activation. • This discovery may explain

  10. Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of Iron Sulfur (FeS)m- (m = 2-8) Cluster Anions: Coexisting Multiple Spin States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shi; Bernstein, Elliot R

    2017-10-05

    Iron sulfur cluster anions (FeS) m - (m = 2-8) are studied by photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) at 3.492 eV (355 nm) and 4.661 eV (266 nm) photon energies, and by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The most probable structures and ground state spin multiplicities for (FeS) m - (m = 2-8) clusters are tentatively assigned through a comparison of their theoretical and experiment first vertical detachment energy (VDE) values. Many spin states lie within 0.5 eV of the ground spin state for the larger (FeS) m - (m ≥ 4) clusters. Theoretical VDEs of these low lying spin states are in good agreement with the experimental VDE values. Therefore, multiple spin states of each of these iron sulfur cluster anions probably coexist under the current experimental conditions. Such available multiple spin states must be considered when evaluating the properties and behavior of these iron sulfur clusters in real chemical and biological systems. The experimental first VDEs of (FeS) m - (m = 1-8) clusters are observed to change with the cluster size (number m). The first VDE trends noted can be related to the different properties of the highest singly occupied molecular orbitals (NBO, HSOMOs) of each cluster anion. The changing nature of the NBO/HSOMO of these (FeS) m - (m = 1-8) clusters from a p orbital on S, to a d orbital on Fe, and to an Fe-Fe bonding orbital is probably responsible for the observed increasing trend for their first VDEs with respect to m.

  11. Energy independent scaling of the ridge and final state description of high multiplicity p +p collisions at √{s }=7 and 13 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debojit

    2018-02-01

    An energy independent scaling of the near-side ridge yield at a given multiplicity has been observed by the ATLAS and the CMS collaborations in p +p collisions at √{s }=7 and 13 TeV. Such a striking feature of the data can be successfully explained by approaches based on initial state momentum space correlation generated due to gluon saturation. In this paper, we try to examine if such a scaling is also an inherent feature of the approaches that employ strong final state interaction in p +p collisions. We find that hydrodynamical modeling of p +p collisions using EPOS 3 shows a violation of such scaling. The current study can, therefore, provide important new insights on the origin of long-range azimuthal correlations in high multiplicity p +p collisions at the LHC energies.

  12. Preparation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger entangled states with multiple superconducting quantum-interference device qubits or atoms in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chuiping; Han Siyuan

    2004-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entangled states of multiple superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID) qubits by the use of a microwave cavity. The scheme operates essentially by creating a single photon through an auxiliary SQUID built in the cavity and performing a joint multiqubit phase shift with assistance of the cavity photon. It is shown that entanglement can be generated using this method, deterministic and independent of the number of SQUID qubits. In addition, we show that the present method can be applied to preparing many atoms in a GHZ entangled state, with tolerance to energy relaxation during the operation

  13. Enhanced population of high-l states due to the interplay between multiple scattering and dynamical screening in ion-solid collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, C.O. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6373 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Arbo, D.G. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6373 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, C.C. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Burgdoerfer, J. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6373 (United States); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of Technology, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Gervais, B. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche Ions Lasers, Laboratoire Mixte, CEA-CNRS-ISMRA, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Lamour, E. [Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche Ions Lasers, Laboratoire Mixte, CEA-CNRS-ISMRA, BP 5133, 14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Groupe de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 75-88, Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 75251 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Vernhet, D.; Rozet, J.P. [Groupe de Physique des Solides, CNRS UMR 75-88, Universites Paris 6 et Paris 7, 75251 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2000-02-28

    We present a study of the sub-shell populations of 13.6 MeV/u Ar{sup 17+} ions after transmission through thin carbon foils. We show that the combined effect of the wake field induced by the ion in the solid and multiple collisions leads to a strongly enhanced population of high angular momentum states. These results explain new experimental data for absolute total line emission intensities. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  14. Search for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state using large track multiplicity with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Böhm, Jan; Chudoba, Jiří; Havránek, Miroslav; Hejbal, Jiří; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lysák, Roman; Lokajíček, Miloš; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Myška, Miroslav; Němeček, Stanislav; Růžička, Pavel; Schovancová, Jaroslava; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek; Tic, Tomáš; Vrba, Václav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 7 (2013), "072001-1"-"072001-22" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13009 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : tracks * multiplicity * final state * dimuon * same sign * black hole * mass * gravitation * model * ATLAS * CERN LHC Coll * background Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 4.864, year: 2013

  15. An Intramolecular Salt Bridge in Bacillus thuringiensis Cry4Ba Toxin Is Involved in the Stability of Helix α-3, Which Is Needed for Oligomerization and Insecticidal Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Sabino; Gómez, Isabel; Sánchez, Jorge; García-Gómez, Blanca-Ines; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2017-10-15

    Bacillus thuringiensis three-domain Cry toxins kill insects by forming pores in the apical membrane of larval midgut cells. Oligomerization of the toxin is an important step for pore formation. Domain I helix α-3 participates in toxin oligomerization. Here we identify an intramolecular salt bridge within helix α-3 of Cry4Ba (D111-K115) that is conserved in many members of the family of three-domain Cry toxins. Single point mutations such as D111K or K115D resulted in proteins severely affected in toxicity. These mutants were also altered in oligomerization, and the mutant K115D was more sensitive to protease digestion. The double point mutant with reversed charges, D111K-K115D, recovered both oligomerization and toxicity, suggesting that this salt bridge is highly important for conservation of the structure of helix α-3 and necessary to promote the correct oligomerization of the toxin. IMPORTANCE Domain I has been shown to be involved in oligomerization through helix α-3 in different Cry toxins, and mutations affecting oligomerization also elicit changes in toxicity. The three-dimensional structure of the Cry4Ba toxin reveals an intramolecular salt bridge in helix α-3 of domain I. Mutations that disrupt this salt bridge resulted in changes in Cry4Ba oligomerization and toxicity, while a double point reciprocal mutation that restored the salt bridge resulted in recovery of toxin oligomerization and toxicity. These data highlight the role of oligomer formation as a key step in Cry4Ba toxicity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Numerical analysis of Markov-perfect equilibria with multiple stable steady states : A duopoly application with innovative firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dawid, H.; Keoula, M.Y.; Kort, Peter

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical method for the characterization of Markov-perfect equilibria of symmetric differential games exhibiting coexisting stable steady states. The method relying on the calculation of ‘local value functions’ through collocation in overlapping parts of the state space, is

  17. State-dependent errors in a land surface model across biomes inferred from eddy covariance observations on multiple timescales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, T.; Brender, P.; Ciais, P.; Piao, S.; Mahecha, M.D.; Chevallier, F.; Reichstein, M.; Ottle, C.; Maignan, F.; Arain, A.; Bohrer, G.; Cescatti, A.; Kiely, G.; Law, B.E.; Lutz, M.; Montagnani, L.; Moors, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of state-dependent model biases in land surface models can highlight model deficiencies, and provide new insights into model development. In this study, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are used to estimate the state-dependent biases of a land surface model (ORCHIDEE: ORganising

  18. Live cell imaging unveils multiple domain requirements for in vivo dimerization of the glucocorticoid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Diego M; Ogara, M Florencia; Stortz, Martín

    2014-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are essential for life, but are also implicated in disease pathogenesis and may produce unwanted effects when given in high doses. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) transcriptional activity and clinical outcome have been linked to its oligomerization state. Although a point mutation wi...

  19. Improving the efficiency of single and multiple teleportation protocols based on the direct use of partially entangled states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortes, Raphael; Rigolin, Gustavo, E-mail: rigolin@ifi.unicamp.br

    2013-09-15

    We push the limits of the direct use of partially pure entangled states to perform quantum teleportation by presenting several protocols in many different scenarios that achieve the optimal efficiency possible. We review and put in a single formalism the three major strategies known to date that allow one to use partially entangled states for direct quantum teleportation (no distillation strategies permitted) and compare their efficiencies in real world implementations. We show how one can improve the efficiency of many direct teleportation protocols by combining these techniques. We then develop new teleportation protocols employing multipartite partially entangled states. The three techniques are also used here in order to achieve the highest efficiency possible. Finally, we prove the upper bound for the optimal success rate for protocols based on partially entangled Bell states and show that some of the protocols here developed achieve such a bound. -- Highlights: •Optimal direct teleportation protocols using directly partially entangled states. •We put in a single formalism all strategies of direct teleportation. •We extend these techniques for multipartite partially entangle states. •We give upper bounds for the optimal efficiency of these protocols.

  20. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of the smallest polyene, trans 1,3-butadiene. II. Ab initio multiple spawning simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, William J; Mori, Toshifumi; Schuurman, Michael S; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Schalk, Oliver; Stolow, Albert; Martínez, Todd J

    2018-04-28

    The excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of the smallest polyene, trans 1,3-butadiene (BD), has long been the subject of controversy due to its strong coupling, ultrafast time scales and the difficulties that theory faces in describing the relevant electronic states in a balanced fashion. Here we apply Ab Initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) using state-averaged complete active space multistate second order perturbation theory [SA-3-CAS(4/4)-MSPT2] which describes both static and dynamic electron correlation effects, providing a balanced description of both the initially prepared bright 1 1 B u (ππ*) state and non-adiabatically coupled dark 2 1 A g state of BD. Importantly, AIMS allows for on-the-fly calculations of experimental observables. We validate our approach by directly simulating the time resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy results presented in Paper I [A. E. Boguslavskiy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148, 164302 (2018)], demonstrating excellent agreement with experiment. Our simulations reveal that the initial excitation to the 1 1 B u state rapidly evolves via wavepacket dynamics that follow both bright- and dark-state pathways as well as mixtures of these. In order to test the sensitivity of the AIMS results to the relative ordering of states, we considered two hypothetical scenarios biased toward either the bright 1 B u or the dark 2 1 A g state. In contrast with AIMS/SA-3-CAS(4/4)-MSPT2 simulations, neither of these scenarios yields favorable agreement with experiment. Thus, we conclude that the excited state non-adiabatic dynamics in BD involves both of these ultrafast pathways.

  1. Excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of the smallest polyene, trans 1,3-butadiene. II. Ab initio multiple spawning simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, William J.; Mori, Toshifumi; Schuurman, Michael S.; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E.; Schalk, Oliver; Stolow, Albert; Martínez, Todd J.

    2018-04-01

    The excited state non-adiabatic dynamics of the smallest polyene, trans 1,3-butadiene (BD), has long been the subject of controversy due to its strong coupling, ultrafast time scales and the difficulties that theory faces in describing the relevant electronic states in a balanced fashion. Here we apply Ab Initio Multiple Spawning (AIMS) using state-averaged complete active space multistate second order perturbation theory [SA-3-CAS(4/4)-MSPT2] which describes both static and dynamic electron correlation effects, providing a balanced description of both the initially prepared bright 11Bu (ππ*) state and non-adiabatically coupled dark 21Ag state of BD. Importantly, AIMS allows for on-the-fly calculations of experimental observables. We validate our approach by directly simulating the time resolved photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy results presented in Paper I [A. E. Boguslavskiy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 148, 164302 (2018)], demonstrating excellent agreement with experiment. Our simulations reveal that the initial excitation to the 11Bu state rapidly evolves via wavepacket dynamics that follow both bright- and dark-state pathways as well as mixtures of these. In order to test the sensitivity of the AIMS results to the relative ordering of states, we considered two hypothetical scenarios biased toward either the bright 1Bu or the dark 21Ag state. In contrast with AIMS/SA-3-CAS(4/4)-MSPT2 simulations, neither of these scenarios yields favorable agreement with experiment. Thus, we conclude that the excited state non-adiabatic dynamics in BD involves both of these ultrafast pathways.

  2. Cross-cultural generality and specificity in self-regulation: avoidance personal goals and multiple aspects of well-being in the United States and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Andrew J; Sedikides, Constantine; Murayama, Kou; Tanaka, Ayumi; Thrash, Todd M; Mapes, Rachel R

    2012-10-01

    The authors examined avoidance personal goals as concurrent (Study 1) and longitudinal (Study 2) predictors of multiple aspects of well-being in the United States and Japan. In both studies, participants adopted more avoidance personal goals in Japan relative to the United States. Both studies also demonstrated that avoidance personal goals were significant negative predictors of the most relevant aspects of well-being in each culture. Specifically, avoidance personal goals were negative predictors of intrapersonal and eudaimonic well-being in the United States and were negative predictors of interpersonal and eudaimonic well-being in Japan. The findings clarify and extend puzzling findings from prior empirical work in this area, and raise provocative possibilities about the nature of avoidance goal pursuit.

  3. Computational Study of the Effect of Confinement within Microporous Structures on the Activity and Selectivity of Metallocene Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization

    KAUST Repository

    Toulhoat, Hervé; Lontsi Fomena, Mireille; de Bruin, Theodorus

    2011-01-01

    The effect of confinement within some zeolitic structures on the activity and selectivity of metallocene catalysts for the ethylene oligomerization has been investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC). The following zeolite

  4. Reliability improvement of a-Si:H thin film transistors on plastic substrate with saturation in deep state after multiple bending cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.H.; Chen, P.-G.; Hsu, C.-C.

    2013-01-01

    For flexible electronic applications, the disordered bonds of a-Si:H may generate a redistribution of trapped states with mechanical strain. During mechanical strain, the deep states are redistributed in a Gaussian distribution and are dissimilar to ordinary acceptor-like deep states, which manifest with exponential distributions. The redistributed deep states may saturate with multiple mechanical bending cycles, and it would improve the reliability with drain current stress of a-Si:H TFTs (thin film transistors) on flexible substrates. We conclude that it is possible to produce low-cost and highly uniform active-matrix organic light emitting diodes systems for use in flexible display applications using a-Si:H TFTs array backplanes. - Highlights: • The stress stability of a-Si:H TFTs (thin-film transistors) was improved after bending cycles. • The saturated deep states after bending were confirmed. • The simulation and extracted gap state density of a-Si:H TFT under strain was calculated

  5. The influence of final state interaction on two-particle correlations in multiple production of particles and resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lednicky, R.; Lyuboshitz, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    The structure of pair correlations of interacting particles moving with nearby velocities is analysed. A general formalism of the two-particle space-time density matrix, taking into account the space-time coherence of the production process, is developed. The influence of strong final state interaction on two-particle correlations in the case of the production of a system resonance + particle is investigated in detail. It is shown that in the limit of small distances between the resonance and particle production points the effect of final state interaction is enhanced due to logarithmic singularity of the triangle diagram. Numerical estimates indicate that, in this limit, the effect of strong final state interaction becomes important even for two-pion correlations. (author)

  6. Gas energy meter for inferential determination of thermophysical properties of a gas mixture at multiple states of the gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Thomas B [San Antonio, TX; Kelner, Eric [San Antonio, TX; Owen, Thomas E [Helotes, TX

    2008-07-08

    A gas energy meter that acquires the data and performs the processing for an inferential determination of one or more gas properties, such as heating value, molecular weight, or density. The meter has a sensor module that acquires temperature, pressure, CO2, and speed of sound data. Data is acquired at two different states of the gas, which eliminates the need to determine the concentration of nitrogen in the gas. A processing module receives this data and uses it to perform a "two-state" inferential algorithm.

  7. Oligomeric rare-earth metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, Simon; Zimmermann, Sina; Brühmann, Matthias; Meyer, Eva; Rustige, Christian; Wolberg, Marike; Daub, Kathrin; Bell, Thomas; Meyer, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.meyer@uni-koeln.de

    2014-11-15

    Comproportionation reactions of rare-earth metal trihalides (RX{sub 3}) with the respective rare-earth metals (R) and transition metals (T) led to the formation of 22 oligomeric R cluster halides encapsulating T, in 19 cases for the first time. The structures of these compounds were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and are composed of trimers ((T{sub 3}R{sub 11})X{sub 15}-type, P6{sub 3}/m), tetramers ((T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 28}(R{sub 4}) (P-43m), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 20} (P4{sub 2}/nnm), (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 24}(RX{sub 3}){sub 4} (I4{sub 1}/a) and (T{sub 4}R{sub 16})X{sub 23} (C2/m) types of structure) and pentamers ((Ru{sub 5}La{sub 14}){sub 2}Br{sub 39}, Cc) of (TR{sub r}){sub n} (n=2–5) clusters. These oligomers are further enveloped by inner (X{sup i}) as well as outer (X{sup a}) halido ligands, which possess diverse functionalities and interconnect like oligomers through i–i, i–a and/or a–i bridges. The general features of the crystal structures for these new compounds are discussed and compared to literature entries as well as different structure types with oligomeric T centered R clusters. Dimers and tetramers originating from the aggregation of (TR{sub 6}) octahedra via common edges are more frequent than trimers and pentamers, in which the (TR{sub r}) clusters share common faces. - Graphical abstract: Rare earth-metal cluster complexes with endohedral transition metal atoms (TR{sub 6}) may connect via common edges or faces to form dimers, trimers, tetramers and pentamers of which the tetramers are the most prolific. Packing effects and electron counts play an important role. - Highlights: • Rare-earth metal cluster complexes encapsulate transition metal atoms. • Oligomers are built via connection of octahedral clusters via common edges or faces. • Dimers through pentamers with closed structures are known. • Tetramers including a tetrahedron of endohedral atoms are the most prolific.

  8. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551–560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed

  9. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egorov, V. V., E-mail: vlaegur@omrb.pnpi.spb.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Gorshkov, A. N. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation); Murugova, T. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Vasin, A. V. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation); Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Konstantinov Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kiselev, O. I. [Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, Research Institute of Influenza (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551–560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  10. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Est-Y29: a novel oligomeric β-lactamase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, SeungBum; Joo, Sangbum; Yoon, Sangyoung; Kim, Sungsoo; Moon, Jongkook; Ryu, Yeonwoo; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, T. Doohun

    2009-01-01

    Est-Y29, a novel oligomeric class C β-lactamase from a metagenomic library, was crystallized in space group I4 1 and diffraction data were collected to 1.49 Å resolution. β-Lactam antibiotics such as penicillins and cephalosporins have a four-atom ring as a common element in their structure. The β-lactamases, which catalyze the inactivation of these antibiotics, are of great interest because of their high incidence in pathogenic bacteria. A novel oligomeric class C β-lactamase (Est-Y29) from a metagenomic library was expressed, purified and crystallized. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal 6×His tag and purified to homogeneity. EstY-29 was crystallized and X-ray intensity data were collected to 1.49 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation

  11. Characterization of oligomerization of a peptide from the ebola virus glycoprotein by small-angle neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, V. V.; Gorshkov, A. N.; Murugova, T. N.; Vasin, A. V.; Lebedev, D. V.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Kiselev, O. I.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies showed that model peptides QNALVCGLRQ (G33) and QNALVCGLRG (G31) corresponding to region 551-560 of the GP protein of the Sudan Ebola virus are prone to oligomerization in solution. Both peptides can form amyloid-like fibrills. The G33 peptide forms fibrils within one day of incubation, whereas the fibrillogenesis of the G31 peptide is observed only after incubation for several months. The possible role of the observed processes in the pathogenesis and the possibility of applying a combination of the TEM and SANS techniques to search for new compounds that are able to influence the protein oligomerization are discussed.

  12. Fluctuations between multiple EF-G-induced chimeric tRNA states during translocation on the ribosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adio, Sarah; Senyushkina, Tamara; Peske, Frank; Fischer, Niels; Wintermeyer, Wolfgang; Rodnina, Marina V.

    2015-06-01

    The coupled translocation of transfer RNA and messenger RNA through the ribosome entails large-scale structural rearrangements, including step-wise movements of the tRNAs. Recent structural work has visualized intermediates of translocation induced by elongation factor G (EF-G) with tRNAs trapped in chimeric states with respect to 30S and 50S ribosomal subunits. The functional role of the chimeric states is not known. Here we follow the formation of translocation intermediates by single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Using EF-G mutants, a non-hydrolysable GTP analogue, and fusidic acid, we interfere with either translocation or EF-G release from the ribosome and identify several rapidly interconverting chimeric tRNA states on the reaction pathway. EF-G engagement prevents backward transitions early in translocation and increases the fraction of ribosomes that rapidly fluctuate between hybrid, chimeric and posttranslocation states. Thus, the engagement of EF-G alters the energetics of translocation towards a flat energy landscape, thereby promoting forward tRNA movement.

  13. Computational Study of the Effect of Confinement within Microporous Structures on the Activity and Selectivity of Metallocene Catalysts for Ethylene Oligomerization

    KAUST Repository

    Toulhoat, Hervé

    2011-03-02

    The effect of confinement within some zeolitic structures on the activity and selectivity of metallocene catalysts for the ethylene oligomerization has been investigated using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations (GCMC). The following zeolite (host) frameworks displaying different pore sizes, have been studied as solid hosts: mazzite (MAZ), AIPO-8 (AET), UTD-1F (DON), faujasite (FAU), and VPI-5 (VFI). Intermediates and transition states involved in the ethylene trimerization reaction catalyzed by a Ti-based catalyst [(η5-C5H4CMe2C6H 5)TiCl3/MAO] have been used as sorbates (guests). We have demonstrated linear correlations with slope aH,j between the adsorption enthalpy and the molecular volume Vm of the sorbates, each holding for a given microporous host below a host-specific threshold V mmax,j. Beyond this maximal molecular volume, the adsorption vanishes due to steric exclusion. aH,j increases, and Vmmax,j decreases with decreasing host pore size, in line with the confinement concept. We moreover showed that, in the limit of vanishing loading (Henry regime), the enthalpies and entropies of adsorption in a given host are linearly correlated. We have defined a host-specific confinement compensation temperature a j, which refers to a temperature where the stabilizing adsorption enthalpic interactions are canceled out against the loss in entropy. However, calculated aj are much larger than the operating temperatures. With a setup microkinetic model, we predict that the activity and selectivity of the confined Ti-catalyst in ethylene oligomerization can be significantly altered with respect to homogeneous phase conditions, since the adsorption free energies of transition states and intermediates also become functions of aH,j and Vm. We have applied this theory to predict the optimum host pore size to get maximum α-octene production, instead of α-hexene, which is primarily produced in the homogeneous phase. We also predict a significantly increased activity for

  14. Development, validation and evaluation of an analytical method for the determination of monomeric and oligomeric procyanidins in apple extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Wendy J; Voorspoels, Stefan; Jacobs, Griet; Aaby, Kjersti; Meisland, Ane; Garcia-Villalba, Rocio; Tomas-Barberan, Francisco; Piskula, Mariusz K; Mawson, Deborah; Vovk, Irena; Needs, Paul W; Kroon, Paul A

    2017-04-28

    There is a lack of data for individual oligomeric procyanidins in apples and apple extracts. Our aim was to develop, validate and evaluate an analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols in apple extracts. To achieve this, we prepared two types of flavanol extracts from freeze-dried apples; one was an epicatechin-rich extract containing ∼30% (w/w) monomeric (-)-epicatechin which also contained oligomeric procyanidins (Extract A), the second was an oligomeric procyanidin-rich extract depleted of epicatechin (Extract B). The parameters considered for method optimisation were HPLC columns and conditions, sample heating, mass of extract and dilution volumes. The performance characteristics considered for method validation included standard linearity, method sensitivity, precision and trueness. Eight laboratories participated in the method evaluation. Chromatographic separation of the analytes was best achieved utilizing a Hilic column with a binary mobile phase consisting of acidic acetonitrile and acidic aqueous methanol. The final method showed linearity for epicatechin in the range 5-100μg/mL with a correlation co-efficient >0.999. Intra-day and inter-day precision of the analytes ranged from 2 to 6% and 2 to 13% respectively. Up to dp3, trueness of the method was >95% but decreased with increasing dp. Within laboratory precision showed RSD values <5 and 10% for monomers and oligomers, respectively. Between laboratory precision was 4 and 15% (Extract A) and 7 and 30% (Extract B) for monomers and oligomers, respectively. An analytical method for the separation, identification and quantification of procyanidins in an apple extract was developed, validated and assessed. The results of the inter-laboratory evaluation indicate that the method is reliable and reproducible. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of an octaimidazolium-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes ionic liquid by an ion-exchange reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jinglin; Ma, Depeng; Sun, Xingrong; Feng, Shengyu; Zhang, Changqiao

    2013-04-07

    Preparation of POSS-min-DS, an octaimidazolium-based polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) room temperature ionic liquid, by an ion-exchange reaction between POSS and sodium dodecyl sulfate was reported. Octaimidazolium-based POSS was synthesized with more than 98% yield within 3 h. POSS-min-DS and octaimidazolium-based POSS were confirmed by (1)H, (13)C, and (29)Si NMR, FT-IR and elemental analysis.

  16. A Review of the State-of-the-Art on Combining Multiple NDT Techniques in Terms of Precise Fault Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Khaira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present industrial scenario demands optimum quality, feasible processing time and enhanced machine availability to cope-up with continuously increasing customer expectations. To achieve this target, it is mandatory to ensure the optimum performance and higher availability of machinery. Therefore, the present work begins with, review of the research work of different researchers, which includes the applied combinations from year 2000-2016 proceed with discussion on the parameters being checked before making combination of NDT and finally, covers the maintenance performance parameters for quantifying improvement in performance after combining NDT. The result indicates that very few researches uses combination of NDT’s, in areas like aeronautical, compressors etc., and most of the works done in composites to be tested without using any decision making technique.  The researchers and practitioners can use the outcome of this work as a guideline for combining multiple NDT technique to achieve precise fault prediction and forecasting of upcoming failures.

  17. Oligomeric adiponectin forms and their complexes in the blood of healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Alexander E; Filatov, Vladimir L; Kolosova, Olga V; Katrukha, Ivan A; Mironova, Ekaterina V; Zhuravleva, Natalya S; Nagibin, Oleg A; Kara, Andrei N; Bereznikova, Anastasiya V; Katrukha, Alexey G

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin (Adn) is a protein that circulates in the blood in several oligomeric forms, namely low-, medium-, and high-molecular-weight forms. Adn may serve as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The aims of this work were (1) to produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to different Adn oligomeric forms, (2) to design immunoassays suitable for measuring the Adn forms present in human blood, and (3) to investigate the changes in Adn forms that occur in patients with T2DM. Gel filtration, fluoroimmunoassays, and Western blotting were utilized as major techniques in this study. MAbs recognizing various oligomeric forms of Adn were obtained. Complexes between Adn and complement component C1q and between the low molecular weight form of Adn and albumin were described in human blood. A decrease in the total Adn and Adn-albumin complex levels in the blood of patients with T2DM and no difference in the levels of the Adn-C1q complex in comparison with healthy volunteers were demonstrated. An Adn94-Adn63 fluoroimmunoassay was selected as the technique that most accurately measured the mass ratio of Adn oligomers in blood samples, and an Adn214-Adn27 assay that measured the low-molecular-weight form of Adn only.

  18. Detection of Amyloid Beta (Aβ) Oligomeric Composition Using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jasmine S.-H.; Whitehead, Shawn N.; Yeung, Ken K.-C.

    2018-02-01

    The use of MALDI MS as a fast and direct method to detect the Aβ oligomers of different masses is examined in this paper. Experimental results suggest that Aβ oligomers are ionized and detected as singly charged ions, and thus, the resulting mass spectrum directly reports the oligomer size distribution. Validation experiments were performed to verify the MS data against artifacts. Mass spectra collected from modified Aβ peptides with different propensities for aggregation were compared. Generally, the relative intensities of multimers were higher from samples where oligomerization was expected to be more favorable, and vice versa. MALDI MS was also able to detect the differences in oligomeric composition before and after the incubation/oligomerization step. Such differences in sample composition were also independently confirmed with an in vitro Aβ toxicity study on primary rat cortical neurons. An additional validation was accomplished through removal of oligomers from the sample using molecular weight cutoff filters; the resulting MS data correctly reflected the removal at the expected cutoff points. The results collectively validated the ability of MALDI MS to assess the monomeric/multimeric composition of Aβ samples. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  19. The Pseudo signal peptide of the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2A prevents receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Anke; Rutz, Claudia; Kreuchwig, Annika; Krause, Gerd; Wiesner, Burkhard; Schülein, Ralf

    2012-08-03

    N-terminal signal peptides mediate the interaction of native proteins with the translocon complex of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and are cleaved off during early protein biogenesis. The corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 2a (CRF(2(a))R) possesses an N-terminal pseudo signal peptide, which represents a so far unique domain within the large protein family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In contrast to a conventional signal peptide, the pseudo signal peptide remains uncleaved and consequently forms a hydrophobic extension at the N terminus of the receptor. The functional consequence of the presence of the pseudo signal peptide is not understood. Here, we have analyzed the significance of this domain for receptor dimerization/oligomerization in detail. To this end, we took the CRF(2(a))R and the homologous corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF(1)R) possessing a conventional cleaved signal peptide and conducted signal peptide exchange experiments. Using single cell and single molecule imaging methods (fluorescence resonance energy transfer and fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy, respectively) as well as biochemical experiments, we obtained two novel findings; we could show that (i) the CRF(2(a))R is expressed exclusively as a monomer, and (ii) the presence of the pseudo signal peptide prevents its oligomerization. Thus, we have identified a novel functional domain within the GPCR protein family, which plays a role in receptor oligomerization and which may be useful to study the functional significance of this process in general.

  20. Search for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state using large track multiplicity with the ATLAS detector

    OpenAIRE

    Aad Georges; others

    2013-01-01

    Artículo escrito por un elevado número de autores, solo se referencian el que aparece en primer lugar, el nombre del grupo de colaboración, si le hubiere, y los autores pertenecientes a la UAM A search is presented for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state in proton–proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. Using a high track multiplicity ...

  1. Description and characteristics of 81 patients attending the Reference Center for Multiple Sclerosis of the coastal region of the state of São Paulo-Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Fiore, Ana Patricia Perez

    2005-09-01

    To register multiple sclerosis (MS) patients residing in the coastal region of the State of São Paulo (CEREM Litoral Paulista). Individual interviews with identified cases of MS. 81 individuals with diagnosis of MS agreed to come for registration (62 females [76.5%], 19 males [23.5%]). 65% of all patients were residents of the city of Santos. The mean age of these patients was 43 years (14 to 74 years), and the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was Litoral Paulista for prescription of immunomodulators. There is a clear need to identify other cases in the region and to allow other forms of treatment to be put into practice.

  2. Effect of localization states on the electroluminescence spectral width of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Wei [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083, China and School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Chongqing University of Arts and Sciences, Chongqing 402160 (China); Zhao, De Gang, E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn; Jiang, De Sheng; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zong Shun; Zhu, Jian Jun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Dan Mei [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Jian Ping; Zhang, Shu Ming; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2015-11-15

    The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated. With increasing In content in InGaN well layers, the peak energy redshifts, the emission intensity reduces and the inhomogeneous broadening of the luminescence band increases. In addition, it is found that the EL spectra shrink with increasing injection current at low excitation condition, which may be ascribed to both Coulomb screening of polarization field and carrier transferring from shallower localization states to the deeper ones, while at high currents the state-filling effect in all localization states may become significant and lead to a broadening of EL spectra. However, surprisingly, for the MQW sample with much higher In content, the EL spectral bandwidth can be almost unchanged with increasing current at the high current range, since a large number of carriers may be captured by the nonradiative recombination centers distributed outside the localized potential traps and the state-filling effect in the localization states is suppressed.

  3. Effect of localization states on the electroluminescence spectral width of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, De Gang; Jiang, De Sheng; Chen, Ping; Liu, Zong Shun; Zhu, Jian Jun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Dan Mei; Liu, Jian Ping; Zhang, Shu Ming; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) spectra of blue–green light emitting InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) structures grown via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition are investigated. With increasing In content in InGaN well layers, the peak energy redshifts, the emission intensity reduces and the inhomogeneous broadening of the luminescence band increases. In addition, it is found that the EL spectra shrink with increasing injection current at low excitation condition, which may be ascribed to both Coulomb screening of polarization field and carrier transferring from shallower localization states to the deeper ones, while at high currents the state-filling effect in all localization states may become significant and lead to a broadening of EL spectra. However, surprisingly, for the MQW sample with much higher In content, the EL spectral bandwidth can be almost unchanged with increasing current at the high current range, since a large number of carriers may be captured by the nonradiative recombination centers distributed outside the localized potential traps and the state-filling effect in the localization states is suppressed

  4. Statistical Strategy for Inventorying and Monitoring the Ecosystem Resources of the State of Jalisco at Multiple Scales and Resolution Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin M. Reich; Hans T. Schreuder

    2006-01-01

    The sampling strategy involving both statistical and in-place inventory information is presented for the natural resources project of the Green Belt area (Centuron Verde) in the Mexican state of Jalisco. The sampling designs used were a grid based ground sample of a 90x90 m plot and a two-stage stratified sample of 30 x 30 m plots. The data collected were used to...

  5. Willingness to pay for improved respiratory and cardiovascular health: a multiple-format, stated-preference approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, F R; Banzhaf, M R; Desvousges, W H

    2000-06-01

    This study uses stated-preference (SP) analysis to measure willingness to pay (WTP) to reduce acute episodes of respiratory and cardiovascular ill health. The SP survey employs a modified version of the health state descriptions used in the Quality of Well Being (QWB) Index. The four health state attributes are symptom, episode duration, activity restrictions and cost. Preferences are elicited using two different SP formats: graded-pair and discrete-choice. The different formats cause subjects to focus on different evaluation strategies. Combining two elicitation formats yields more valid and robust estimates than using only one approach. Estimates of indirect utility function parameters are obtained using advanced panel econometrics for each format separately and jointly. Socio-economic differences in health preferences are modelled by allowing the marginal utility of money relative to health attributes to vary across respondents. Because the joint model captures the combined preference information provided by both elicitation formats, these model estimates are used to calculate WTP. The results demonstrate the feasibility of estimating meaningful WTP values for policy-relevant respiratory and cardiac symptoms, even from subjects who never have personally experienced these conditions. Furthermore, because WTP estimates are for individual components of health improvements, estimates can be aggregated in various ways depending upon policy needs. Thus, using generic health attributes facilitates transferring WTP estimates for benefit-cost analysis of a variety of potential health interventions. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Photoinduced dynamics of a cyanine dye: parallel pathways of non-radiative deactivation involving multiple excited-state twisted transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyayula, Srigokul; Nuñez, Vicente; Espinoza, Eli M; Larsen, Jillian M; Bao, Duoduo; Shi, Dewen; Mac, Jenny T; Anvari, Bahman; Vullev, Valentine I

    2015-04-01

    Cyanine dyes are broadly used for fluorescence imaging and other photonic applications. 3,3'-Diethylthiacyanine (THIA) is a cyanine dye composed of two identical aromatic heterocyclic moieties linked with a single methine, -CH 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 1111111111111111111111111111111111 1111111111111111111111111111111111 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 0000000000000000000000000000000000 . The torsional degrees of freedom around the methine bonds provide routes for non-radiative decay, responsible for the inherently low fluorescence quantum yields. Using transient absorption spectroscopy, we determined that upon photoexcitation, the excited state relaxes along two parallel pathways producing three excited-state transients that undergo internal conversion to the ground state. The media viscosity impedes the molecular modes of ring rotation and preferentially affects one of the pathways of non-radiative decay, exerting a dominant effect on the emission

  7. Coatings of molecularly imprinted polymers based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Li; Zhou, Jin; Zhang, Li-Shun; Huang, Yan-Ping; Liu, Zhao-Sheng

    2016-05-15

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was successfully applied, for the first time, to prepare imprinted monolithic coating for capillary electrochromatography. The imprinted monolithic coating was synthesized with a mixture of PSS-(1-Propylmethacrylate)-heptaisobutyl substituted (MA 0702), S-amlodipine (template), methacrylic acid (functional monomer), and 2-methacrylamidopropyl methacrylate (crosslinker), in a porogenic mixture of toluene-isooctane. The influence of synthesis parameters on the imprinting effect and separation performance, including the amount of MA 0702, the ratio of template to monomer, and the ratio of monomer to crosslinker, was investigated. The greatest resolution for enantiomers separation on the imprinted monolithic column prepared with MA 0702 was up to 22.3, about 2 times higher than that prepared in absence of the POSS. Column efficiency on the POSS-based MIP coatings was beyond 30,000 plate m(-1). The comparisons between MIP coating synthesized with the POSS and without the POSS were made in terms of selectivity, column efficiency, and resolution. POSS-based MIP capillaries with naproxen or zopiclone was also prepared and separation of enantiomers can be achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dielectric properties of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)-based nanocomposites at 77k

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Ming-Jen; Gorzkowski, Edward; McAllister, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop dielectric nanocomposites for high energy density applications at liquid nitrogen temperature by utilizing a unique nano-material polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). A POSS molecule is consisted of a silica cage core with 8 silicon and 12 oxygen atoms and organic functional groups attached to the corners of the cage. In this study, we utilize POSS for the fabrication of nanocomposites both as a silica nanoparticle filler to enhance the breakdown strength and as a surfactant for effective dispersion of high permittivity ceramic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix. The matrix materials selected for the study are polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The ceramic nanoparticles are barium strontium titanate (BST 50/50) and strontium titanate. The dielectric properties of the solution-cast nanocomposites films were correlated to the composition and processing conditions. We determined that the addition of POSS did not provide enhanced dielectric performance in PVDF- and PMMA-based materials at either room temperature or 77K. In addition, we found that the dielectric breakdown strength of PMMA is lower at 77K than at room temperature, contradicting literature data.

  9. Ion Channel Conformation and Oligomerization Assessment by Site-Directed Spin Labeling and Pulsed-EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliotas, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are multimeric integral membrane proteins that respond to increased lipid bilayer tension by opening their nonselective pores to release solutes and relieve increased cytoplasmic pressure. These systems undergo major conformational changes during gating and the elucidation of their mechanism requires a deep understanding of the interplay between lipids and proteins. Lipids are responsible for transmitting lateral tension to MS channels and therefore play a key role in obtaining a molecular-detail model for mechanosensation. Site-directed spin labeling combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a powerful spectroscopic tool in the study of proteins. The main bottleneck for its use relates to challenges associated with successful isolation of the protein of interest, introduction of paramagnetic labels on desired sites, and access to specialized instrumentation and expertise. The design of sophisticated experiments, which combine a variety of existing EPR methodologies to address a diversity of specific questions, require knowledge of the limitations and strengths, characteristic of each particular EPR method. This chapter is using the MS ion channels as paradigms and focuses on the application of different EPR techniques to ion channels, in order to investigate oligomerization, conformation, and the effect of lipids on their regulation. The methodology we followed, from the initial strategic selection of mutants and sample preparation, including protein purification, spin labeling, reconstitution into lipid mimics to the complete set-up of the pulsed-EPR experiments, is described in detail. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Crystal structure of the Haemophilus influenzae Hap adhesin reveals an intercellular oligomerization mechanism for bacterial aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guoyu; Spahich, Nicole; Kenjale, Roma; Waksman, Gabriel; St Geme, Joseph W

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms are complex microbial communities that are common in nature and are being recognized increasingly as an important determinant of bacterial virulence. However, the structural determinants of bacterial aggregation and eventual biofilm formation have been poorly defined. In Gram-negative bacteria, a major subgroup of extracellular proteins called self-associating autotransporters (SAATs) can mediate cell–cell adhesion and facilitate biofilm formation. In this study, we used the Haemophilus influenzae Hap autotransporter as a prototype SAAT to understand how bacteria associate with each other. The crystal structure of the H. influenzae HapS passenger domain (harbouring the SAAT domain) was determined to 2.2 Å by X-ray crystallography, revealing an unprecedented intercellular oligomerization mechanism for cell–cell interaction. The C-terminal SAAT domain folds into a triangular-prism-like structure that can mediate Hap–Hap dimerization and higher degrees of multimerization through its F1–F2 edge and F2 face. The intercellular multimerization can give rise to massive buried surfaces that are required for overcoming the repulsive force between cells, leading to bacterial cell–cell interaction and formation of complex microcolonies. PMID:21841773

  11. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is activated by double-stranded DNA-induced oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Chaton, Catherine T; Shelton, Catherine L; Diao, Jiasheng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Kao, C Cheng; Herr, Andrew B; Li, Pingwei

    2013-12-12

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor mediating innate antimicrobial immunity. It catalyzes the synthesis of a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, 2',5' cGAMP, that binds to STING and mediates the activation of TBK1 and IRF-3. Activated IRF-3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to an 18 bp dsDNA revealed that cGAS interacts with dsDNA through two binding sites, forming a 2:2 complex. Enzyme assays and IFN-β reporter assays of cGAS mutants demonstrated that interactions at both DNA binding sites are essential for cGAS activation. Mutagenesis and DNA binding studies showed that the two sites bind dsDNA cooperatively and that site B plays a critical role in DNA binding. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to dsDNA and 2',5' cGAMP provided insight into the catalytic mechanism of cGAS. These results demonstrated that cGAS is activated by dsDNA-induced oligomerization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Photo-polymerization of photocurable resins containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane methacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Ho-May; Wu, Shi-Yin; Chang, Feng-Chih; Yen, Ying-Chieh

    2011-01-01

    Photocurable resins, bisphenol A propoxylate glycerolate diacrylate (BPA-PGDA, containing two hydroxyl) and bisphenol A propoxylate diacrylate (BPA-PDA), with fixed photoinitiator (Irgacure 907) concentration and various contents of methacrylisobutyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MI-POSS) were prepared and characterized by FTIR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope and differential photocalorimetry. The MI-POSS molecules form crystals or aggregated particles in the cured resin matrix. The BPA-PGDA series photocurable resins show higher viscosity and lower photo-polymerization reactivity than the BPA-PDA series resins. The photo-polymerization rate and conversion of BPA-PGDA series are improved with increasing MI-POSS content. On the contrary, the photo-polymerization behavior of BPA-PDA series photocurable resins remains nearly unchanged by the addition of MI-POSS. Hydrogen-bonding interaction between the hydroxyl of BPA-PGDA and the siloxane of MI-POSS tends to attract and concentrate these acrylate double bonds around MI-POSS particles and thus enhances the photo-polymerization rate and conversion.

  13. Hydroxychloroquine induces inhibition of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydroxychloroquine on the level of collagen type II and oligomeric matrix protein COMP expression in chondrocytes of knee osteoarthritis. The rate of growth in cartilage cells was analyzed using MTT assay whereas the Col-2 and COMP expression levels were detected by RT-PCR and Western blotting analyses. For the determination of MMP-13 expression, ELISA test was used. The results revealed no significant change in the rate of cartilage cell proliferation in hydroxychloroquine-treated compared to untreated cells. Hydroxychloro-quine treatment exhibited concentration- and time-dependent effect on the inhibition of collagen type II and COMP expression in chondrocytes. However, its treatment caused a significant enhancement in the expression levels of MMP-13 compared to the untreated cells. Therefore, hydroxychloro-quine promotes expression of MMP-13 and reduces collagen type II and COMP expression levels in chondrocytes without any significant change in the growth of cells.

  14. Formation of semisolid, oligomerized aqueous SOA: lab simulations of cloud processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Lelia N; Baril, Molly J; Sedehi, Nahzaneen; Galloway, Melissa M; De Haan, David O; Schill, Gregory P; Tolbert, Margaret A

    2014-02-18

    Glyoxal, methylglyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and hydroxyacetone form N-containing and oligomeric compounds during simulated cloud processing with small amines. Using a novel hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analysis (HTDMA) system that allows varied humidification times, the hygroscopic growth (HG) of each of the resulting products of simulated cloud processing was measured. Continuous water uptake (gradual deliquescence) was observed beginning at ∼ 40% RH for all aldehyde-methylamine products. Particles containing ionic reaction products of either glyoxal or glycine were most hygroscopic, with HG between 1.16 and 1.20 at 80% RH. Longer humidification times (up to 20 min) produced an increase in growth factors for glyoxal-methylamine (19% by vol) and methylglyoxal-methylamine (8% by vol) aerosol, indicating that unusually long equilibration times can be required for HTDMA measurements of such particles. Glyoxal- and methylglyoxal-methylamine aerosol particles shattered in Raman microscopy impact-flow experiments, revealing that the particles were semisolid. Similar experiments on glycolaldehyde- and hydroxyacetone-methylamine aerosol found that the aerosol particles were liquid when dried for glyoxal > glycolaldehyde = hydroxyacetone, likely caused by the speed of oligomer formation in each system.

  15. Transparent cellulose/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanocomposites with enhanced UV-shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ye; Zhang, Jinming; He, Jiasong; Zhang, Jun

    2016-08-20

    The solubility of eight types of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) derivatives in an ionic liquid 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AmimCl) and the dispersion of POSS in cellulose matrix were examined. Only a special POSS containing both aminophenyl and nitrophenyl groups (POSS-AN, NH2:NO2=2:6) was selected to prepare nanocomposites, because of its good solubility in AmimCl and high stability during the preparation process. POSS-AN nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed in a cellulose matrix with a size of 30-40nm, and so the resultant cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films were transparent. The mechanical properties of the films achieved a maximum tensile strength of 190MPa after addition of 2wt% POSS-AN. Interestingly, all of the cellulose/POSS-AN films exhibited high UV-absorbing capability. For the 15wt% cellulose/POSS-AN film, the transmittance of UVA (315-400nm) and UVB (280-315nm) was only 9.1% and nearly 0, respectively. The UV aging and shielding experiments showed that the transparent cellulose/POSS-AN nanocomposite films possessed anti-UV aging and UV shielding properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Construction of porous cationic frameworks by crosslinking polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane units with N-heterocyclic linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guojian; Zhou, Yu; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jing; Xue, Shuang; Liu, Yangqing; Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    In fields of materials science and chemistry, ionic-type porous materials attract increasing attention due to significant ion-exchanging capacity for accessing diversified applications. Facing the fact that porous cationic materials with robust and stable frameworks are very rare, novel tactics that can create new type members are highly desired. Here we report the first family of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) based porous cationic frameworks (PCIF-n) with enriched poly(ionic liquid)-like cationic structures, tunable mesoporosities, high surface areas (up to 1,025 m2 g-1) and large pore volumes (up to 0.90 cm3 g-1). Our strategy is designing the new rigid POSS unit of octakis(chloromethyl)silsesquioxane and reacting it with the rigid N-heterocyclic cross-linkers (typically 4,4‧-bipyridine) for preparing the desired porous cationic frameworks. The PCIF-n materials possess large surface area, hydrophobic and special anion-exchanging property, and thus are used as the supports for loading guest species PMo10V2O405- the resultant hybrid behaves as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for aerobic oxidation of benzene and H2O2-mediated oxidation of cyclohexane.

  17. IntraGolgi distribution of the Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, Eliza; Oka, Toshihiko; Ericsson, Maria; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Krieger, Monty

    2006-01-01

    The Conserved Oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is an eight-subunit (Cog1-8) peripheral Golgi protein involved in membrane trafficking and glycoconjugate synthesis. COG appears to participate in retrograde vesicular transport and is required to maintain normal Golgi structure and function. COG mutations interfere with normal transport, distribution, and/or stability of Golgi proteins associated with glycoconjugate synthesis and trafficking, and lead to failure of spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, misdirected migration of gonadal distal tip cells in Caenorhabditis elegans, and type II congenital disorders of glycosylation in humans. The mechanism by which COG influences Golgi structure and function is unclear. Immunogold electron microscopy was used to visualize the intraGolgi distribution of a functional, hemagglutinin epitope-labeled COG subunit, Cog1-HA, that complements the Cog1-deficiency in Cog1-null Chinese hamster ovary cells. COG was found to be localized primarily on or in close proximity to the tips and rims of the Golgi's cisternae and their associated vesicles and on vesicles and vesiculo-tubular structures seen on both the cis and trans-Golgi Network faces of the cisternal stacks, in some cases on COPI containing vesicles. These findings support the proposal that COG is directly involved in controlling vesicular retrograde transport of Golgi resident proteins throughout the Golgi apparatus

  18. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS)–poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrids as injectable biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engstrand, Johanna; López, Alejandro; Engqvist, Håkan; Persson, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues with the currently available injectable biomaterials for hard tissue replacement is the mismatch between their mechanical properties and those of the surrounding bone. Hybrid bone cements that combine the benefits of tough polymeric and bioactive ceramic materials could become a good alternative. In this work, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) was copolymerized with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to form injectable in situ cross-linkable hybrid cements. The hybrids were characterized in terms of their mechanical, rheological, handling and in vitro bioactive properties. The results indicated that hybridization improves the mechanical and bioactive properties of POSS and PEG. The Young moduli of the hybrids were lower than those of commercial cements and more similar to those of cancellous bone. Furthermore, the strength of the hybrids was similar to that of commercial cements. Calcium deficient hydroxyapatite grew on the surface of the hybrids after 28 days in PBS, indicating bioactivity. The study showed that PEG–POSS-based hybrid materials are a promising alternative to commercial bone cements. (paper)

  19. Optimization of oligomeric enzyme activity in ionic liquids using Rhodotorula glutinis yeast phenylalanine ammonia lyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Christiaan C; Sponagle, Brandon J D; Arivalagan, Pugazhendhi; D'Cunha, Godwin B

    2017-01-01

    Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (E.C.4.3.1.24, PAL) activity of Rhodotorula glutinis yeast has been demonstrated in four commonly used ionic liquids. PAL forward reaction was carried out in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium methyl sulfate ([BMIM][MeSO 4 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF 4 ]), 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium lactate ([BMIM][lactate]). Our experiments have revealed that PAL is catalytically active in ionic liquids and the enzyme activity in ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) is comparable to that obtained in aqueous buffer medium. Different conditions were optimized for maximal PAL forward activity including time of incubation (30.0min) L -phenylalanine substrate concentration (30.0mM), nature of buffer (50.0mM Tris-HCl), pH (9.0), temperature (37°C), and speed of agitation (100 rev min -1 ). Under these optimized conditions, about 83% conversion of substrate to product was obtained for the PAL forward reaction that was determined using UV spectroscopy at 290nm. PAL reverse reaction in ([BMIM][PF 6 ]) was determined spectrophotometrically at 520nm; and about 59% substrate conversion was obtained. This data provides further knowledge in enzyme biocatalysis in non-aqueous media, and may be of importance when studying the function of other oligomeric/multimeric proteins and enzymes in ionic liquids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation of Alpha-synuclein Demonstrates its Oligomerization with Dopaminergic Phenotype in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waijiao Cai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein (αSyn is encoded by the first causal gene identified in Parkinson's disease (PD and is the main component of Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of PD. aSyn-based animal models have contributed to our understanding of PD pathophysiology and to the development of therapeutics. Overexpression of human wildtype αSyn by viral vectors in rodents recapitulates the loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra, another defining pathological feature of the disease. The development of a rat model exhibiting bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC of αSyn by recombinant adeno-associated virus facilitates detection of the toxic αSyn oligomers species. We report here neurochemical, neuropathological and behavioral characterization of BiFC of αSyn in mice. Overexpression and oligomerization of αSyn through BiFC is detected by conjugated fluorescence. Reduced striatal dopamine and loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons are accompanied neuroinflammation and abnormal motor activities. Our mouse model may provide a valuable tool to study the role of αSyn in PD and to explore therapeutic approaches. Keywords: Parkinson's disease, Alpha-synuclein, Mouse model, Oligomers, Neuroinflammation

  1. In-situ photocrosslinkable nanohybrid elastomer based on polybutadiene/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirmohammadi, Seyed Amin, E-mail: mirmohammadi.sa@gmail.com [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nekoomanesh-Haghighi, Mehdi, E-mail: m.nekoomanesh@ippi.ac.ir [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadian Gezaz, Somayyeh [Department of Chemical Engineering, Payame Noor University (PNU), P. O. Box: 19395-3697, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahri-Laleh, Naeimeh [Department of Polymerization Engineering, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Atai, Mohammad [Department of Polymer Science, Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute (IPPI), P. O. Box: 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyl functionalized nano-sized POSS or ethyleneglycol as diol monomers was incorporated to hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPBD) chain in the presence of fumaryl chloride as extender. Blue light photocrosslinking system based on camphorquinone (photoinitiator) and dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (accelerator) was applied to cure these two synthesized fumarate based macromers. Self-crosslinkability of unsaturated macromers and also crosslinking in presence of a reactive diluent were investigated in absence and presence of 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, respectively. Finally, photocured samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, equilibrium swelling study, TGA, DMTA, AFM and cell culture. The results showed that incorporation of POSS nanoparticle into the polymer matrix with a perfect distribution and dispersion can enhance thermal stability, mechanical and biocompatibility properties which can prove a good potential of this in-situ photocrosslinkable nanohybrid in medical applications. - Highlights: • Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane was incorporated to HTPBD by fumaryl chloride as extender. • A reactive diluent was used to improve photocrosslinking process of the unsaturated nanohybrid elastomers. • Nanohybrids showed enhanced properties such as thermal stability, mechanical and biocompatibility. • Improved properties were obtained for photocured samples in presence of reactive diluent.

  2. Complex structure of the fission yeast SREBP-SCAP binding domains reveals an oligomeric organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Shao, Wei; Li, Jingxian; Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2016-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors are master regulators of cellular lipid homeostasis in mammals and oxygen-responsive regulators of hypoxic adaptation in fungi. SREBP C-terminus binds to the WD40 domain of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which confers sterol regulation by controlling the ER-to-Golgi transport of the SREBP-SCAP complex and access to the activating proteases in the Golgi. Here, we biochemically and structurally show that the carboxyl terminal domains (CTD) of Sre1 and Scp1, the fission yeast SREBP and SCAP, form a functional 4:4 oligomer and Sre1-CTD forms a dimer of dimers. The crystal structure of Sre1-CTD at 3.5 Å and cryo-EM structure of the complex at 5.4 Å together with in vitro biochemical evidence elucidate three distinct regions in Sre1-CTD required for Scp1 binding, Sre1-CTD dimerization and tetrameric formation. Finally, these structurally identified domains are validated in a cellular context, demonstrating that the proper 4:4 oligomeric complex formation is required for Sre1 activation.

  3. Sedimentation Velocity Analysis of Large Oligomeric Chromatin Complexes Using Interference Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Ryan A; Hansen, Jeffrey C

    2015-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity experiments measure the transport of molecules in solution under centrifugal force. Here, we describe a method for monitoring the sedimentation of very large biological molecular assemblies using the interference optical systems of the analytical ultracentrifuge. The mass, partial-specific volume, and shape of macromolecules in solution affect their sedimentation rates as reflected in the sedimentation coefficient. The sedimentation coefficient is obtained by measuring the solute concentration as a function of radial distance during centrifugation. Monitoring the concentration can be accomplished using interference optics, absorbance optics, or the fluorescence detection system, each with inherent advantages. The interference optical system captures data much faster than these other optical systems, allowing for sedimentation velocity analysis of extremely large macromolecular complexes that sediment rapidly at very low rotor speeds. Supramolecular oligomeric complexes produced by self-association of 12-mer chromatin fibers are used to illustrate the advantages of the interference optics. Using interference optics, we show that chromatin fibers self-associate at physiological divalent salt concentrations to form structures that sediment between 10,000 and 350,000S. The method for characterizing chromatin oligomers described in this chapter will be generally useful for characterization of any biological structures that are too large to be studied by the absorbance optical system. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of redox environment on the oligomerization of higher molecular weight adiponectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez Martha

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adiponectin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone with insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory actions. The assembly of trimeric, hexameric, and higher molecular weight (HMW species of adiponectin is a topic of significant interest because physiological actions of adiponectin are oligomer-specific. In addition, adiponectin assembly is an example of oxidative oligomerization of multi-subunit protein complexes in endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Results We previously reported that trimers assemble into HMW adiponectin via intermediates stabilized by disulfide bonds, and complete oxidation of available cysteines locks adiponectin in hexameric conformation. In this study, we examined the effects of redox environment on the rate of oligomer formation and the distribution of oligomers. Reassembly of adiponectin under oxidizing conditions accelerated disulfide bonding but favored formation of hexamers over the HMW species. Increased ratios of HMW to hexameric adiponectin could be achieved rapidly under oxidizing conditions by promoting disulfide rearrangement. Conclusions Based upon these observations, we propose oxidative assembly of multi-subunit adiponectin complexes in a defined and stable redox environment is favored under oxidizing conditions coupled with high rates of disulfide rearrangement.

  5. Reversible unfolding of infectious prion assemblies reveals the existence of an oligomeric elementary brick.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique Igel-Egalon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian prions, the pathogens that cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, propagate by self-perpetuating the structural information stored in the abnormally folded, aggregated conformer (PrPSc of the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC. To date, no structural model related to prion assembly organization satisfactorily describes how strain-specified structural information is encoded and by which mechanism this information is transferred to PrPC. To achieve progress on this issue, we correlated the PrPSc quaternary structural transition from three distinct prion strains during unfolding and refolding with their templating activity. We reveal the existence of a mesoscopic organization in PrPSc through the packing of a highly stable oligomeric elementary subunit (suPrP, in which the strain structural determinant (SSD is encoded. Once kinetically trapped, this elementary subunit reversibly loses all replicative information. We demonstrate that acquisition of the templating interface and infectivity requires structural rearrangement of suPrP, in concert with its condensation. The existence of such an elementary brick scales down the SSD support to a small oligomer and provide a basis of reflexion for prion templating process and propagation.

  6. Safety profile of dalfampridine extended release in multiple sclerosis: 5-year postmarketing experience in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jara M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Michele Jara, Thomas Aquilina, Peter Aupperle, Adrian L Rabinowicz Acorda Therapeutics, Inc., Ardsley, NY, USA Background: Dalfampridine extended release tablets (dalfampridine-ER; prolonged-, modified, or sustained-release fampridine outside the US, 10 mg twice daily, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA in January 2010 to improve walking in people with multiple sclerosis, as determined by an increase in walking speed. Objective: To provide a descriptive analysis of reported adverse events (AEs for commercially available dalfampridine-ER from March 2010 through March 31, 2015. Methods: Five-year postmarketing data for dalfampridine-ER were available from the exposure of approximately 107,000 patients in the US (103,700 patient-years. Commonly reported AEs (≥2% of all reported AEs and serious AEs were determined. The incidence of reported seizures was determined and the events were further investigated. Results: Among the 107,000 patients exposed to dalfampridine-ER (70% female; mean age 52.1, the most common AEs were dizziness (3.7%, insomnia (3.2%, balance disorder (3%, fall (2.4%, headache (2.4%, nausea (2.1%, and urinary tract infection (2%. Other common AEs were drug ineffectiveness (5.8%, gait disturbance (4.6%, and inappropriate dosing (3.1%. Serious AEs included rare anaphylactic reactions (five cases and drug hypersensitivity reactions (eight cases. A total of 657 seizure cases were reported (6.3/1,000 patient-years; of these, 324 were medically confirmed (3.1/1,000 patient-years. Incidence of reported seizures was stable over time. Duration of treatment prior to a seizure ranged from a single dose to >4 years; 12% of the seizures occurred within a week of starting treatment. Conclusion: The 5-year US postmarketing safety data of dalfampridine-ER is consistent with the safety profile observed in clinical trials. Incidence of reported seizures remained stable over time. Since commercial availability in March 2010, a

  7. Optical transitions involving unconfined energy states in In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs multiple quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, G.; Dobbelaere, W.; Huang, D.; Morkoc, H.

    1989-01-01

    Optical transitions with energies higher than that of the GaAs band gap in highly strained In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs multiple--quantum-well structures have been observed in photoreflectance spectra. In some samples as many as seven such structures were present. We identify them as transitions between the unconfined electron states and the confined heavy-hole states. For energies below the GaAs signal, intense transitions corresponding to such unconfined electron subbands were also observed. The intensity of the transitions involving unconfined electron subbands decreases with increasing well width, but is weakly dependent on the mole fraction x. The transmission coefficients are calculated in order to locate the positions of the unconfined electron subband energies. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental data and the theoretical calculation

  8. JNIH-ABCC Life Span Study, Hiroshima 1950-59. Multiple causes of death stated in medical certificates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Morihiro; Jablon, S

    1962-08-22

    The applicability to the JNIH-ABCC Life Span Study of secondary causes shown in Hiroshima death certificates is discussed. The analysis is based on 5526 death certificates reported among members of Selection I and II of the Life Span Study sample. Secondary causes appear to be of only limited usefulness to the Life Span Study. Factors such as age, sex, exposure status, which may influence the frequency of entry of secondary causes in medical certificates are analyzed. Age is the only factor which shows a significant relationship and this may be interpreted as resulting from the fact that chronic diseases with multiple illnesses are most prevalent among persons at older ages. The number of secondary causes in the present study is too small to delineate in detail the pattern of complications or contributory causes. However, 9 cases of malignant neoplasms were entered only as complications and were missed in the primary tabulation, representing only about one percent of all malignancies. Secondary causes shown in the death certificates and associated causes found at postmortem examination seem not to be comparably distributed, thus raising a serious problem as to the applicability of the former to the Life Span Study. Both the magnitude and accuracy of entry of the secondary causes are influenced greatly by the ease with which illnesses may be detected clinically. 9 references, 12 tables.

  9. Diversionary Foreign Policy in Authoritarian States: The Use of Multiple Diversionary Strategies by Saddam Hussein during the Gulf War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilic B. Kanat

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The diversionary theory of war has been considered one of the most contested theories that link domestic and external conflicts. Thus far scholarship in this field has focused on one-time single diversionary attacks, which led to the temporary deflection of attention from domestic problems to external ones. This study intends to bring revisions to the assumptions in the center of diversionary theory and demonstrate these through a well-known but underutilized case. This article intends to show that leaders have not one single option but rather a repertoire of different foreign policy actions in their possession to divert the attention of domestic public. In addition to the use of force, leaders can also use the threat to use force and other less violent means to create a rally round the flag effect. Secondly, this study will show that, unlike the presumptions of the previous studies, leaders can use multiple different diversionary strategies within a short period of time if the initial diversionary action does not create intended outcomes and if they are still willing to use externalization to boost his approval rating and divert public attention from present problems. These two contributions to the theory will be demonstrated in the case of Saddam Hussein’s attacks to Kuwait and Israel during the first Gulf War.

  10. State of the art imaging of multiple myeloma: Comparative review of FDG PET/CT imaging in various clinical settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesguich, Charles, E-mail: charles.mesguich@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Fardanesh, Reza; Tanenbaum, Lawrence [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Chari, Ajai; Jagannath, Sundar [Department of Medicine Division of Hematology and Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States); Kostakoglu, Lale, E-mail: lale.kostakoglu@mssm.edu [Department of Radiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Metabolic changes on FDG PET/CT offer an earlier response evaluation than MRI. • PET/CT is less sensitive than MRI for diffuse bone marrow involvement. • PET/CT is a highly sensitive modality to determine extra-medullary disease. • Red marrow expansion: false positive findings on both FDG PET/CT and MRI. • Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI. - Abstract: 18-Flurodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography with computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) have higher sensitivity and specificity than whole-body X-ray (WBXR) survey in evaluating disease extent in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Both modalities are now recommended by the Durie–Salmon Plus classification although the emphasis is more on MRI than PET/CT. The presence of extra-medullary disease (EMD) as evaluated by PET/CT imaging, initial SUV{sub max} and number of focal lesions (FL) are deemed to be strong prognostic parameters at staging. MRI remains the most sensitive technique for the detection of diffuse bone marrow involvement in both the pre and post-therapy setting. Compression fractures are best characterized with MRI signal changes, for determining vertebroplasty candidates. While PET/CT allows for earlier and more specific evaluation of therapeutic efficacy compared to MRI, when signal abnormalities persist years after treatment. PET/CT interpretation, however, can be challenging in the vertebral column and pelvis as well as in cases with post-therapy changes. Hence, a reading approach combining the high sensitivity of MRI and superior specificity of FDG PET/CT would be preferred to increase the diagnostic accuracy. In summary, the established management methods in MM, mainly relying on biological tumor parameters should be complemented with functional imaging data, both at staging and restaging for optimal management of MM.

  11. Multiple acquisition of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments using one receiver: Application to microcrystalline and membrane protein preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POE allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this perspective, we describe the first generation of POE, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes.

  12. Biomedical Ph.D. students enrolled in two elite universities in the United kingdom and the United States report adopting multiple learning relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Matthew W; Lazarus, Benjamin M; Perron, Gabriel G; Hanage, William P; Chapman, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    The ability to form multiple learning relationships is a key element of the doctoral learning environment in the biomedical sciences. Of these relationships, that between student and supervisor has long been viewed as key. There are, however, limited data to describe the student perspective on what makes this relationship valuable. In the present study, we discuss the findings of semi-structured interviews with biomedical Ph.D. students from the United Kingdom and the United States to: i) determine if the learning relationships identified in an Australian biomedical Ph.D. cohort are also important in a larger international student cohort; and ii) improve our understanding of student perceptions of value in their supervisory relationships. 32 students from two research intensive universities, one in the United Kingdom (n = 17), and one in the United States (n = 15) were recruited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Verbatim transcripts were transcribed, validated and analysed using a Miles and Huberman method for thematic analysis. Students reported that relationships with other Ph.D. students, post-doctoral scientists and supervisors were all essential to their learning. Effective supervisory relationships were perceived as the primary source of high-level project guidance, intellectual support and confidence. Relationships with fellow students were viewed as essential for the provision of empathetic emotional support. Technical learning was facilitated, almost exclusively, by relationships with postdoctoral staff. These data make two important contributions to the scholarship of doctoral education in the biomedical sciences. Firstly, they provide further evidence for the importance of multiple learning relationships in the biomedical doctorate. Secondly, they clarify the form of a 'valued' supervisory relationship from a student perspective. We conclude that biomedical doctoral programs should be designed to contain a minimum level of formalised

  13. Biomedical Ph.D. students enrolled in two elite universities in the United kingdom and the United States report adopting multiple learning relationships.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Kemp

    Full Text Available The ability to form multiple learning relationships is a key element of the doctoral learning environment in the biomedical sciences. Of these relationships, that between student and supervisor has long been viewed as key. There are, however, limited data to describe the student perspective on what makes this relationship valuable. In the present study, we discuss the findings of semi-structured interviews with biomedical Ph.D. students from the United Kingdom and the United States to: i determine if the learning relationships identified in an Australian biomedical Ph.D. cohort are also important in a larger international student cohort; and ii improve our understanding of student perceptions of value in their supervisory relationships.32 students from two research intensive universities, one in the United Kingdom (n = 17, and one in the United States (n = 15 were recruited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Verbatim transcripts were transcribed, validated and analysed using a Miles and Huberman method for thematic analysis.Students reported that relationships with other Ph.D. students, post-doctoral scientists and supervisors were all essential to their learning. Effective supervisory relationships were perceived as the primary source of high-level project guidance, intellectual support and confidence. Relationships with fellow students were viewed as essential for the provision of empathetic emotional support. Technical learning was facilitated, almost exclusively, by relationships with postdoctoral staff.These data make two important contributions to the scholarship of doctoral education in the biomedical sciences. Firstly, they provide further evidence for the importance of multiple learning relationships in the biomedical doctorate. Secondly, they clarify the form of a 'valued' supervisory relationship from a student perspective. We conclude that biomedical doctoral programs should be designed to contain a minimum level

  14. FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; Rhett McLaren; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz; Joseph J. Battista

    2003-03-26

    The Pennsylvania State University, utilizing funds furnished by the U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Power Program, investigated the installation of a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The study was performed using a team that included personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. The activities included assessing potential feedstocks at the University Park campus and surrounding region with an emphasis on biomass materials, collecting and analyzing potential feedstocks, assessing agglomeration, deposition, and corrosion tendencies, identifying the optimum location for the boiler system through an internal site selection process, performing a three circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler design and a 15-year boiler plant transition plan, determining the costs associated with installing the boiler system, developing a preliminary test program, determining the associated costs for the test program, and exploring potential emissions credits when using the biomass CFB boiler.

  15. Landau levels and shallow donor states in GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells at mega-gauss magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zybert, M. [Univ. of Rzeszow, Pigonia (Poland); Marchweka, M. [Univ. of Rzeszow, Pigonia (Poland); Sheregii, E. M. [Center for Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, University of Rzeszow; Rickel, Dwight Gene [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Betts, Jonathan Bobby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Balakirev, Fedor Fedorovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gordon, Michael Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stier, Andreas V. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mielke, Charles H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pfeffer, P. [Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), Warsaw (Poland); Zawadski, W. [Polish Academy of Sciences (PAS), Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-03-06

    Landau levels and shallow donor states in multiple GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells (MQWs) are investigated by means of the cyclotron resonance at mega-gauss magnetic fields. Measurements of magneto-optical transitions were performed in pulsed fields up to 140 T and temperatures from 6 to 300 K. The 14 x 14 P.p band model for GaAs is used to interpret free-electron transitions in a magnetic field. Temperature behavior of the observed resonant structure indicates, in addition to the free-electron Landau states, contributions of magneto-donor states in the GaAs wells and possibly in the AlGaAs barriers. The magneto-donor energies are calculated using a variational procedure suitable for high magnetic fields and accounting for conduction band nonparabolicity in GaAs. It is shown that the above states, including their spin splitting, allow one to interpret the observed mengeto-optical transitions in MQWs in the middle infrared region. Our experimental and theoretical results at very high magnetic fields are consistent with the picture used previously for GaAs/AlGaAs MQWs at lower magnetic fields.

  16. Evaluation of clinical state of patients with acute leukemia, multiple myeloma and malignant lymphoma by means of in vitro T1 and T2 measurements in serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, M.; Urbaniak-Kujda, D.; Burczak, K.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic relaxation times T1 and T2 in vitro study has been performed in the human sera of patients with haematological malignant diseases to monitor their clinical state. Two hundred studies were performed in 20 healthy volunteers and in 180 patients with different malignancies, mostly: acute leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, multiple myeloma. Determinations were performed in active phase of disease and in remission. Measurements were carried out on spectrometer Minispect PC 20B (Bruker; 20 MHz) in 27 C. Additionally, serum proteins of all patients were examined, including total protein content, serum electrophoresis and measurement of Ig classes. Remarkable increase of T1 values in active phase of the disease was found (compared to healthy volunteers) in all malignancies, except multiple myeloma. It was associated with the severeness of the illness, not with diagnose. During remission T1 values did not differ significantly from those of healthy persons. All sera of patients with multiple myeloma in active phase of the disease showed strongly reduced values of T1, associated with the high level of pathological proteins. In 45 patients the measurements were repeated up to 4 times before and during chemotherapy. During treatment resulting in remission, mean T1 values progressively decreased (from 1560 ms to 1394 ms) except of those patients with multiple myeloma. In persons non-responding to therapy these mean values were prolonged (from 1474 ms to 1620 ms) during therapy. In patients with multiple myeloma we noted the reverse changes of mean T1 values in comparison with other malignancies: those responding to the treatment revealed prolonged T1 (from 1165 to 1303 ms) while in those non-responding were decreased (from 1184 ms to 1158 ms). Statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the T1 and total protein content, percentage of gamma-globulin, especially of IgG class. Moreover, a remarkable positive correlation of T1

  17. On the capacity of multiple access and broadcast fading Channels with full channel state information at low power regime

    KAUST Repository

    Rezki, Zouheir

    2013-07-01

    We study the throughput capacity region of the Gaussian multi-access (MAC) fading channel with perfect channel state information (CSI) at the receiver and at the transmitters (CSI-TR), at low power regime. We show that it has a multidimensional rectangle structure and thus is simply characterized by single user capacity points. More specifically, we show that at low power regime, the boundary surface of the capacity region shrinks to a single point corresponding to the sum-rate maximizer and that the coordinates of this point coincide with single user capacity bounds. Using the duality of Gaussian MAC and broadcast channels (BC), we provide a simple characterization of the BC capacity region at low power regime. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Multiple proton decays of 6Be, 8C, 8B(IAS) and excited states in 10C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Recent technical advances have allowed for high-order correlation experiments to be done. We have primarily focused on experiments in which the final channels are composed of only alphas and protons. Four cases we have studied are: 6Be, 10C*, 8C, and 8B*(IAS) via 3, 4, 5, and 3-particle correlation measurements, respectively. While the first case had been studied before, our work presents very high statistics in the full Jacobi coordinates (the coordinates needed to describe 3-body decay.) Our study of 10C excited states provides isolatable examples of: correlated 2p decay, from one state, and the decay of another which is unusually highly correlated, a ``ménage a quatre.'' 8C decay presents the only case of sequential 3-body 2p decay steps (i.e. 2p-2p.) The intermediate in this 2-step process is the first example (6Be) mentioned above. Unlike the well-studied second step (6Be decay), the first step in this 2p-2p process provides another example of correlated 2p emission. The decay of 8B(IAS), the isobaric analog of 8C, also decays overwhelmingly by 2p emission, in this case to 6Li(IAS). This IAS-to-IAS 2p decay is one for which decay to the potential 1p intermediates is energetically allowed but isospin forbidden. This represents an expansion, over that originally envisioned by Goldanski, of the conceivable nuclear territory for 2p decay.

  19. Functional and structural studies of the disulfide isomerase DsbC from the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa reveals a redox-dependent oligomeric modulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Clelton A; Toledo, Marcelo A S; Trivella, Daniela B B; Beloti, Lilian L; Schneider, Dilaine R S; Saraiva, Antonio M; Crucello, Aline; Azzoni, Adriano R; Souza, Alessandra A; Aparicio, Ricardo; Souza, Anete P

    2012-10-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a Gram-negative bacterium that grows as a biofilm inside the xylem vessels of susceptible plants and causes several economically relevant crop diseases. In the present study, we report the functional and low-resolution structural characterization of the X. fastidiosa disulfide isomerase DsbC (XfDsbC). DsbC is part of the disulfide bond reduction/isomerization pathway in the bacterial periplasm and plays an important role in oxidative protein folding. In the present study, we demonstrate the presence of XfDsbC during different stages of X. fastidiosa biofilm development. XfDsbC was not detected during X. fastidiosa planktonic growth; however, after administering a sublethal copper shock, we observed an overexpression of XfDsbC that also occurred during planktonic growth. These results suggest that X. fastidiosa can use XfDsbC in vivo under oxidative stress conditions similar to those induced by copper. In addition, using dynamic light scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering, we observed that the oligomeric state of XfDsbC in vitro may be dependent on the redox environment. Under reducing conditions, XfDsbC is present as a dimer, whereas a putative tetrameric form was observed under nonreducing conditions. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the overexpression of XfDsbC during biofilm formation and provide the first structural model of a bacterial disulfide isomerase in solution. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  20. Type IX Collagen Gene Mutations Can Result in Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia That Is Associated With Osteochondritis Dissecans and a Mild Myopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, Gail C.; Marcus-Soekarman, Dominique; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Verrips, Aad; Taylor, Jacqueline A.; Briggs, Michael D.

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous disease that is characterized by mild short stature and early onset osteoarthritis. Autosomal dominant forms are caused by mutations in the genes that encode type IX collagen, cartilage oligomeric matrix

  1. Type IX collagen gene mutations can result in multiple epiphyseal dysplasia that is associated with osteochondritis dissecans and a mild myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, G.C.; Marcus-Soekarman, D.; Stolte-Dijkstra, I.; Verrips, A.; Taylor, J.A.; Briggs, M.D.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) is a clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous disease that is characterized by mild short stature and early onset osteoarthritis. Autosomal dominant forms are caused by mutations in the genes that encode type IX collagen, cartilage oligomeric matrix

  2. Multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its interaction with DnaA boxes in the initiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meera J; Bhatia, Lavesh; Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2017-09-01

    DnaA protein is the initiator of genomic DNA replication in prokaryotes. It binds to specific DNA sequences in the origin of DNA replication and unwinds small AT-rich sequences downstream for the assembly of the replisome. The mechanism of activation of DnaA that enables it to bind and organize the origin DNA and leads to replication initiation remains unclear. In this study, we have developed double-labeled fluorescent DnaA probes to analyze conformational states of DnaA protein upon binding DNA, nucleotide, and Soj sporulation protein using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Our studies demonstrate that DnaA protein undergoes large conformational changes upon binding to substrates and there are multiple distinct conformational states that enable it to initiate DNA replication. DnaA protein adopted a relaxed conformation by expanding ~15Å upon binding ATP and DNA to form the ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. Hydrolysis of bound ATP to ADP led to a contraction of DnaA within the complex. The relaxed conformation of DnaA is likely required for the formation of the multi-protein ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. In the initiation of sporulation, Soj binding to DnaA prevented relaxation of its conformation. Soj·ADP appeared to block the activation of DnaA, suggesting a mechanism for Soj·ADP in switching initiation of DNA replication to sporulation. Our studies demonstrate that multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its binding to DNA in the initiation of DNA replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple critical points and liquid-liquid equilibria from the van der Waals like equations of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemenko, Sergey; Lozovsky, Taras; Mazur, Victor

    2008-01-01

    The principal aim of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the phase diagram of water via the van der Waals like equations of state (EoSs) which are considered as superpositions of repulsive and attractive forces. We test more extensively the modified van der Waals EoS (MVDW) proposed by Skibinski et al (2004 Phys. Rev. E 69 061206) and refine this model by introducing instead of the classical van der Waals repulsive term a very accurate hard sphere EoS over the entire stable and metastable regions (Liu 2006 Preprint cond-mat/0605392). It was detected that the simplest form of MVDW EoS displays a complex phase behavior, including three critical points, and identifies four fluid phases (gas, low density liquid (LDL), high density liquid (HDL), and very high density liquid (VHDL)). Moreover the experimentally observed (Mallamace et al 2007 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 104 18387) anomalous behavior of the density of water in the deeply supercooled region (a density minimum) is reproduced by the MWDW EoS. An improvement of the repulsive part does not change the topological picture of the phase behavior of water in the wide range of thermodynamic variables. The new parameters set for second and third critical points are recognized by thorough analysis of experimental data for the loci of thermodynamic response function extrema

  4. On the capacity of multiple access and broadcast fading channels with full channel state information at low SNR

    KAUST Repository

    Rezki, Zouheir

    2014-01-01

    We study the throughput capacity region of the Gaussian multi-access (MAC) fading channel with perfect channel state information (CSI) at the receiver and at the transmitters, at low power regime. We show that it has a multidimensional rectangle structure and thus is simply characterized by single user capacity points.More specifically, we show that at low power regime, the boundary surface of the capacity region shrinks to a single point corresponding to the sum rate maximizer and that the coordinates of this point coincide with single user capacity bounds. Inspired from this result, we propose an on-off scheme, compute its achievable rate, and show that this scheme achieves single user capacity bounds of the MAC channel for a wide class of fading channels at asymptotically low power regime. We argue that this class of fading encompasses all known wireless channels for which the capacity region of the MAC channel has even a simpler expression in terms of users\\' average power constraints only. Using the duality of Gaussian MAC and broadcast channels (BC), we deduce a simple characterization of the BC capacity region at low power regime and show that for a class of fading channels (including Rayleigh fading), time-sharing is asymptotically optimal. © 2014 IEEE.

  5. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-28

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  6. Bioactivity and properties of a dental adhesive functionalized with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) and bioactive glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Marta; Hohlfeld, Lisa; Thanh, Loan Tao; Biehl, Ralf; Lühmann, Nicole; Mohn, Dirk; Wiegand, Annette

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to analyze the effect of infiltrating a commercial adhesive with nanosized bioactive glass (BG-Bi) particles or methacryl-functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) on material properties and bioactivity. An acetone-based dental adhesive (Solobond Plus adhesive, VOCO GmbH, Cuxhaven, Germany) was infiltrated with nanosized bioactive glass particles (0.1 or 1wt%), or with monofunctional or multifunctional POSS particles (10 or 20wt%). Unfilled adhesive served as control. Dispersion and hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles were studied by dynamic light scattering. Set specimens were immersed for 28days in artificial saliva at 37°C, and surfaces were mapped for the formation of calcium phospate (Ca/P) precipitates (scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Viscosity (rheometry) and the structural characteristic of the networks were studied, such as degree of conversion (FTIR spectroscopy), sol fraction and water sorption. POSS particles showed a good dispersion of the particles for both types of particles being smaller than 3nm, while the bioactive glass particles had a strong tendency to agglomerate. All nanoparticles induced the formation of Ca/P precipitates. The viscosity of the adhesive was not or only slightly increased by POSS particle addition but strongly increased by the bioactive glass particles. The degree of conversion, water sorption and sol fraction showed a maintained or improved network structure and properties when filled with BG-Bi and multifunctional POSS, however, less polymerization was found when loading a monofunctional POSS. Multifunctional POSS may be incorporated into dental adhesives to provide a bioactive potential without changing material properties adversely. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances matrix assembly during chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S; Chen, Faye H

    2012-04-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention.

  8. Binding and Oligomerization of Modified and Native Bt Toxins in Resistant and Susceptible Pink Bollworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josue Ocelotl

    Full Text Available Insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are used extensively in sprays and transgenic crops for pest control, but their efficacy is reduced when pests evolve resistance. Better understanding of the mode of action of Bt toxins and the mechanisms of insect resistance is needed to enhance the durability of these important alternatives to conventional insecticides. Mode of action models agree that binding of Bt toxins to midgut proteins such as cadherin is essential for toxicity, but some details remain unresolved, such as the role of toxin oligomers. In this study, we evaluated how Bt toxin Cry1Ac and its genetically engineered counterpart Cry1AcMod interact with brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV from resistant and susceptible larvae of Pectinophora gossypiella (pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton. Compared with Cry1Ac, Cry1AcMod lacks 56 amino acids at the amino-terminus including helix α-1; previous work showed that Cry1AcMod formed oligomers in vitro without cadherin and killed P. gossypiella larvae harboring cadherin mutations linked with >1000-fold resistance to Cry1Ac. Here we found that resistance to Cry1Ac was associated with reduced oligomer formation and insertion. In contrast, Cry1AcMod formed oligomers in BBMV from resistant larvae. These results confirm the role of cadherin in oligomerization of Cry1Ac in susceptible larvae and imply that forming oligomers without cadherin promotes toxicity of Cry1AcMod against resistant P. gossypiella larvae that have cadherin mutations.

  9. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang WG

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weiguo Wang,1,* Xiang Sun,1,* Li Huang,2,* Yu Gao,1 Jinghao Ban,1 Lijuan Shen,1 Jihua Chen1 1Department of Prosthodontics, 2Department of General Dentistry and Emergency, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS, have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group] and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups] were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials

  10. Morphological evolution in dewetting polystyrene/polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane thin film bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rituparna; Karabiyik, Ufuk; Swift, Michael C; Hottle, John R; Esker, Alan R

    2008-05-06

    Morphological evolution in dewetting thin film bilayers of polystyrene (PS) and a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), trisilanolphenyl-POSS (TPP), was studied as a function of annealing temperature and annealing time. The results demonstrate unique dewetting morphologies in PS/TPP bilayers at elevated temperatures that are significantly different from those typically observed in dewetting polymer/polymer bilayers. During temperature ramp studies by optical microscopy (OM) in the reflection mode, PS/TPP bilayers form cracks with a weak optical contrast at approximately 130 degrees C. The crack formation is attributed to tensile stresses within the upper TPP layer. The weak optical contrast of the cracks observed in the bilayers for annealing temperatures below approximately 160 degrees C is consistent with the cracking and dewetting of only the upper TPP layer from the underlying PS layer. The optical contrast of the morphological features is significantly enhanced at annealing temperatures of >160 degrees C. This observation suggests dewetting of both the upper TPP and the lower PS layers that results in the exposure of the silicon substrate. Upon annealing the PS/TPP bilayers at 200 degrees C in a temperature jump experiment, the upper TPP layer undergoes instantaneous cracking as observed by OM. These cracks in the upper TPP layer serve as nucleation sites for rapid dewetting and aggregation of the TPP layer, as revealed by OM and atomic force microscopy (AFM). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that dewetting of the lower PS layer ensued for annealing times >5 min and progressed up to 90 min. For annealing times >90 min, OM, AFM, and XPS results revealed complete dewetting of both the layers with the formation of TPP encapsulated PS droplets.

  11. Endohedral complexes of Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) cages with transition metal dihydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiqiao; Corn, John; Hagelberg, Frank, E-mail: hagelber@etsu.edu

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: • Comparative studies of POSS cages with endohedral metal dihydrides. • Exothermic inclusion was found for the T{sub 10} cage with MH{sub 2}, M = Ti, Ru, Os, Pt. • Within this group of metal atoms, the only exothermic MH{sub 4}@T{sub m} unit is that with M = Os. • Enhanced hydrogen atom density, as compared to free MH{sub 4}, was found in the cage. • No exothermic solutions were identified for MH{sub 6}@T{sub 10}. - Abstract: Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS) cages are investigated in terms of their potential to enclose small metal hydrides, with the objective of defining conditions that maximize the number of encapsulated hydrogen atoms. Systems of the form MH{sub 2n}@T{sub m}, where n = 1–3, m = 8, 10, and M comprises metal atom species of the groups IV, VI, VIII, X, and XII, are studied by methods of ab initio and density functional theory (DFT). The resulting composites are categorized with respect to their structural and energetic features. For MH{sub 2}@T{sub 8}, it is found in all cases considered that including MH{sub 2} into the POSS cage is an endothermic process. For MH{sub 2}@T{sub 10} and M = Ti, Ru, Os, Pt, inclusion of the MH{sub 2} guest into the cage turns out to be exothermic, and also leaves the cage intact. For MH{sub 4}@T{sub m}, this behavior is only observed for one system, OsH{sub 4}@T{sub 10}.

  12. Biophysical investigation of type A PutAs reveals a conserved core oligomeric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Singh, Harkewal [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Pemberton, Travis A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Luo, Min [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Dhatwalia, Richa [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Tanner, John J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA

    2017-08-01

    Many enzymes form homooligomers, yet the functional significance of self-association is seldom obvious. Herein, we examine the connection between oligomerization and catalytic function for proline utilization A (PutA) enzymes. PutAs are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both reactions of proline catabolism. Type A PutAs are the smallest members of the family, possessing a minimal domain architecture consisting of N-terminal proline dehydrogenase and C-terminal l-glutamate-γ-semialdehyde dehydrogenase modules. Type A PutAs form domain-swapped dimers, and in one case (Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA), two of the dimers assemble into a ring-shaped tetramer. Whereas the dimer has a clear role in substrate channeling, the functional significance of the tetramer is unknown. To address this question, we performed structural studies of four-type A PutAs from two clades of the PutA tree. The crystal structure of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus PutA covalently inactivated by N-propargylglycine revealed a fold and substrate-channeling tunnel similar to other PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that Bdellovibrio PutA is dimeric in solution, in contrast to the prediction from crystal packing of a stable tetrameric assembly. SAXS studies of two other type A PutAs from separate clades also suggested that the dimer predominates in solution. To assess whether the tetramer of B. japonicum PutA is necessary for catalytic function, a hot spot disruption mutant that cleanly produces dimeric protein was generated. The dimeric variant exhibited kinetic parameters similar to the wild-type enzyme. These results implicate the domain-swapped dimer as the core structural and functional unit of type A PutAs.

  13. Oligomerization of Bacillus subtilis DesR is required for fine tuning regulation of membrane fluidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najle, Sebastián R; Inda, María E; de Mendoza, Diego; Cybulski, Larisa E

    2009-10-01

    The DesK-DesR two-component system regulates the order of membrane lipids in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis by controlling the expression of the des gene coding for the delta 5-acyl-lipid desaturase. To activate des transcription, the membrane-bound histidine kinase DesK phosphorylates the response regulator DesR. This covalent modification of the regulatory domain of dimeric DesR promotes, in a cooperative fashion, the hierarchical occupation of two adjacent, non-identical, DesR-P binding sites, so that there is a shift in the equilibrium toward the tetrameric active form of the response regulator. However, the mechanism of regulation of DesR activity by phosphorylation and oligomerization is not well understood. We employed deletion analysis and reporter fusions to study the role of the N-terminal domain on DesR activity. In addition, electromobility shift assays were used to analyze the binding capacity of the transcription factor to deletion mutants of the des promoter. We show that DesR lacking the N-terminal domain is still able to bind to the des promoter. We also demonstrate that if the RA site is moved closer to the -35 region of Pdes, the adjacent site RB is dispensable for activation. Our results indicate that the unphosphorylated regulatory domain of DesR obstructs the access of the recognition helix of DesR to its DNA target. In addition, we present evidence showing that RB is physiologically relevant to control the activation of the des gene when the levels of DesR-P reach a critical threshold.

  14. Structural fingerprints and their evolution during oligomeric vs. oligomer-free amyloid fibril growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Joseph; Hill, Shannon E.; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Ciesla, Marissa; Robeel, Rhonda; Persichilli, Christopher; Raynes, Rachel; Westerheide, Sandy; Muschol, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Deposits of fibrils formed by disease-specific proteins are the molecular hallmark of such diverse human disorders as Alzheimer's disease, type II diabetes, or rheumatoid arthritis. Amyloid fibril formation by structurally and functionally unrelated proteins exhibits many generic characteristics, most prominently the cross β-sheet structure of their mature fibrils. At the same time, amyloid formation tends to proceed along one of two separate assembly pathways yielding either stiff monomeric filaments or globular oligomers and curvilinear protofibrils. Given the focus on oligomers as major toxic species, the very existence of an oligomer-free assembly pathway is significant. Little is known, though, about the structure of the various intermediates emerging along different pathways and whether the pathways converge towards a common or distinct fibril structures. Using infrared spectroscopy we probed the structural evolution of intermediates and late-stage fibrils formed during in vitro lysozyme amyloid assembly along an oligomeric and oligomer-free pathway. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed that both pathways produced amyloid-specific β-sheet peaks, but at pathway-specific wavenumbers. We further found that the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin T responded to all intermediates along either pathway. The relative amplitudes of thioflavin T fluorescence responses displayed pathway-specific differences and could be utilized for monitoring the structural evolution of intermediates. Pathway-specific structural features obtained from infrared spectroscopy and Thioflavin T responses were identical for fibrils grown at highly acidic or at physiological pH values and showed no discernible effects of protein hydrolysis. Our results suggest that late-stage fibrils formed along either pathway are amyloidogenic in nature, but have distinguishable structural fingerprints. These pathway-specific fingerprints emerge during the earliest aggregation events and persist throughout the

  15. Association of Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain Receptors with Peptic Ulcer and Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadian Amiri, Rajeeh; Tehrani, Mohsen; Taghizadeh, Shirin; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad; Fakheri, Hafez; Ajami, Abolghasem

    2016-10-01

    Host innate immunity can affect the clinical outcomes of Helicobacter pylori infection, including gastritis, gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-1 and -2 are two molecules of innate immunity which are involved in the host defense against H. pylori. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of the expression level of NOD1 and NOD2 on the susceptibility to gastric cancer as well as peptic ulcer in individuals with H. pylori infection. The gene expression levels of these molecules were compared in three groups of non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) as a control group (n=52); peptic ulcer disease (PUD), (n=53); and gastric cancer (GC), (n=39). Relative expression levels of NOD1 in patients with GC were higher than those of NUD and PUD (p<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). Similarly in case of NOD1, PUD group showed higher level of expression than NUD group (p<0.01). However, there was no significant difference between H. pylori -positive and -negative patients in NUD, PUD, or GC groups. Moreover, the expression levels of NOD2 showed no significant difference among NUD, PUD, or GC groups, while among H. pylori-positive patients, it was higher in GC group than NUD  and PUD groups (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). In addition, positive correlation coefficients were attained between NOD1 and NOD2 expressions in patients with NUD (R2 Linear=0.349, p<0.001), PUD (R2 Linear=0.695, p<0.001), and GC (R2 Linear=0.385, p<0.001). Collectively, the results suggest that the chronic activation of NOD1 and NOD2 receptors might play a role in the development of gastric cancer.

  16. Composite polymer electrolyte containing ionic liquid and functionalized polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes for anhydrous PEM applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subianto, Surya; Mistry, Mayur K; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Dutta, Naba K; Knott, Robert

    2009-06-01

    A new type of supported liquid membrane was made by combining an ionic liquid (IL) with a Nafion membrane reinforced with multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSSs) using a layer-by-layer strategy for anhydrous proton-exchange membrane (PEM) application. The POSS was functionalized by direct sulfonation, and the sulfonated POSS (S-POSS) was incorporated into Nafion 117 membranes by the infiltration method. The resultant hybrid membrane shows strong ionic interaction between the Nafion matrix and the multifunctional POSS, resulting in increased glass transition temperature and thermal stability at very low loadings of S-POSS (1%). The presence of S-POSS has also improved the proton conductivity especially at low humidities, where it shows a marked increase due to its confinement in the ionic domains and promotes water uptake by capillary condensation. In order to achieve anhydrous conductivity, the IL 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (BMI-BTSI) was incorporated into these membranes to provide proton conduction in the absence of water. Although the incorporation of an IL shows a plasticizing effect on the Nafion membrane, the S-POSS composite membrane with an IL shows a higher modulus at high temperatures compared to Nafion 117 and a Nafion-IL membrane, with significantly higher proton conductivity (5 mS/cm at 150 degrees C with 20% IL). This shows the ability of the multifunctional POSS and IL to work symbiotically to achieve the desirable proton conductivity and mechanical properties of such membranes by enhancing the ionic interaction within the material.

  17. CARTILAGE OLIGOMERIC MATRIX PROTEIN ENHANCES MATRIX ASSEMBLY DURING CHONDROGENESIS OF HUMAN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem-Smith, Hana; Calderon, Raul; Song, Yingjie; Tuan, Rocky S.; Chen, Faye H.

    2011-01-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein/thrombospondin-5 (COMP/TSP5) is an abundant cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that interacts with major cartilage ECM components, including aggrecan and collagens. To test our hypothesis that COMP/TSP5 functions in the assembly of the ECM during cartilage morphogenesis, we have employed mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro as a model to examine the effects of COMP over-expression on neo-cartilage formation. Human bone marrow-derived MSCs were transfected with either full-length COMP cDNA or control plasmid, followed by chondrogenic induction in three-dimensional pellet or alginate-hydrogel culture. MSC chondrogenesis and ECM production was estimated based on quantitation of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) accumulation, immunohistochemistry of the presence and distribution of cartilage ECM proteins, and real-time RT-PCR analyis of mRNA expression of cartilage markers. Our results showed that COMP over-expression resulted in increased total sGAG content during the early phase of MSC chondrogenesis, and increased immuno-detectable levels of aggrecan and collagen type II in the ECM of COMP-transfected pellet and alginate cultures, indicating more abundant cartilaginous matrix. COMP transfection did not significantly increase the transcript levels of the early chondrogenic marker, Sox9, or aggrecan, suggesting that enhancement of MSC cartilage ECM was effected at post-transcriptional levels. These findings strongly suggest that COMP functions in mesenchymal chondrogenesis by enhancing cartilage ECM organization and assembly. The action of COMP is most likely mediated not via direct changes in cartilage matrix gene expression but via interactions of COMP with other cartilage ECM proteins, such as aggrecan and collagens, that result in enhanced assembly and retention. PMID:22095699

  18. High-Performance Oligomeric Catholytes for Effective Macromolecular Separation in Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Koen H; Robinson, Sophia G; Braten, Miles N; Sevov, Christo S; Helms, Brett A; Sigman, Matthew S; Minteer, Shelley D; Sanford, Melanie S

    2018-02-28

    Nonaqueous redox flow batteries (NRFBs) represent an attractive technology for energy storage from intermittent renewable sources. In these batteries, electrical energy is stored in and extracted from electrolyte solutions of redox-active molecules (termed catholytes and anolytes) that are passed through an electrochemical flow cell. To avoid battery self-discharge, the anolyte and catholyte solutions must be separated by a membrane in the flow cell. This membrane prevents crossover of the redox active molecules, while simultaneously allowing facile transport of charge-balancing ions. A key unmet challenge for the field is the design of redox-active molecule/membrane pairs that enable effective electrolyte separation while maintaining optimal battery properties. Herein, we demonstrate the development of oligomeric catholytes based on tris(dialkylamino)cyclopropenium (CP) salts that are specifically tailored for pairing with size-exclusion membranes composed of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs). Systematic studies were conducted to evaluate the impact of oligomer size/structure on properties that are crucial for flow battery performance, including cycling stability, charge capacity, solubility, electron transfer kinetics, and crossover rates. These studies have led to the identification of a CP-derived tetramer in which these properties are all comparable, or significantly improved, relative to the monomeric counterpart. Finally, a proof-of-concept flow battery is demonstrated by pairing this tetrameric catholyte with a PIM membrane. After 6 days of cycling, no crossover is detected, demonstrating the promise of this approach. These studies provide a template for the future design of other redox-active oligomers for this application.

  19. Size dependent deactivation of the excited state of DHICA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauden, Magdalena; Pezzella, Alessandro; Panzella, Lucia

    2008-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment mainly responsible for the protection of skin and eyes from UV damage. 5,6- dihydroxyindole- 2 carboxylic acid (DHICA) is a key melanin building block. We have investigated the excited state dynamics of DHICA as well as its derivatives and oligomeric units using...

  20. State- or trait-like individual differences in dream recall: Preliminary findings from a within-subjects study of multiple nap REM sleep awakenings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena eScarpelli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We examined the question whether the role of EEG oscillations in predicting presence/absence of dream recall (DR is explained by state- or trait-like factors. Six healthy subjects were awakened from REM sleep in a within-subjects design with multiple naps, until a recall (REC and a non-recall (NREC condition were obtained. Naps were scheduled in the early afternoon and were separated by one week. Topographical EEG data of the 5-min of REM sleep preceding each awakening were analyzed by power spectral analysis [Fast Fourier Transform (FFT] and by a method to detect oscillatory activity [Better OSCillations (BOSC].Both analyses show that REC is associated to higher frontal theta activity (5-7 Hz and theta oscillations (6.06 Hz compared to NREC condition, but only the second comparison reached significance. Our pilot study provides support to the notion that sleep and wakefulness share similar EEG correlates of encoding in episodic memories, and supports the state-like hypothesis: dream recall may depend on the physiological state related to the sleep stage from which the subject is awakened rather than on a stable individual EEG pattern.

  1. The cysteines of the extracellular loop are crucial for trafficking of human organic cation transporter 2 to the plasma membrane and are involved in oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brast, Sabine; Grabner, Alexander; Sucic, Sonja; Sitte, Harald H; Hermann, Edwin; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Schlatter, Eberhard; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2012-03-01

    Human organic cation transporter 2 (hOCT2) is involved in transport of many endogenous and exogenous organic cations, mainly in kidney and brain cells. Because the quaternary structure of transmembrane proteins plays an essential role for their cellular trafficking and function, we investigated whether hOCT2 forms oligomeric complexes, and if so, which part of the transporter is involved in the oligomerization. A yeast 2-hybrid mating-based split-ubiquitin system (mbSUS), fluorescence resonance energy transfer, Western blot analysis, cross-linking experiments, immunofluorescence, and uptake measurements of the fluorescent organic cation 4-(4-(dimethylamino)styryl)-N-methylpyridinium were applied to human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells transfected with hOCT2 and partly also to freshly isolated human proximal tubules. The role of cysteines for oligomerization and trafficking of the transporter to the plasma membranes was investigated in cysteine mutants of hOCT2. hOCT2 formed oligomers both in the HEK293 expression system and in native human kidneys. The cysteines of the large extracellular loop are important to enable correct folding, oligomeric assembly, and plasma membrane insertion of hOCT2. Mutation of the first and the last cysteines of the loop at positions 51 and 143 abolished oligomer formation. Thus, the cysteines of the extracellular loop are important for correct trafficking of the transporter to the plasma membrane and for its oligomerization.

  2. Search for Microscopic Black Holes in a Like-sign Dimuon Final State using large Track Multiplicity with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmadov, Faig; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Backus Mayes, John; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Sarah; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Bittner, Bernhard; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blocki, Jacek; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Boddy, Christopher Richard; Boehler, Michael; Boek, Jennifer; Boek, Thorsten Tobias; Boelaert, Nele; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bogouch, Andrei; Bohm, Christian; Bohm, Jan; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bolnet, Nayanka Myriam; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Bordoni, Stefania; Borer, Claudia; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borri, Marcello; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boterenbrood, Hendrik; Bouchami, Jihene; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boutouil, Sara; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Bracinik, Juraj; Branchini, Paolo; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Brelier, Bertrand; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Broggi, Francesco; Bromberg, Carl; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Gareth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Brunet, Sylvie; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Bucci, Francesca; Buchanan, James; Buchholz, Peter; Buckingham, Ryan; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Budick, Burton; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bulekov, Oleg; Bundock, Aaron Colin; Bunse, Moritz; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burgess, Thomas; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Buszello, Claus-Peter; Butler, Bart; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Byszewski, Marcin; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Calkins, Robert; Caloba, Luiz; Caloi, Rita; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Canale, Vincenzo; Canelli, Florencia; Canepa, Anadi; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Antony; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Caso, Carlo; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Cataldi, Gabriella; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Cattani, Giordano; Caughron, Seth; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chan, Kevin; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Chapman, John Wehrley; Charlton, Dave; Chavda, Vikash; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Yujiao; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiefari, Giovanni; Childers, John Taylor; Chilingarov, Alexandre; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choudalakis, Georgios; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christidi, Ilektra-Athanasia; Christov, Asen; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chu, Ming-Lee; Chudoba, Jiri; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Ciftci, Rena; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirilli, Manuela; Cirkovic, Predrag; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Citterio, Mauro; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Clemens, Jean-Claude; Clement, Benoit; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coelli, Simone; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Coggeshall, James; Colas, Jacques; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collins-Tooth, Christopher; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Colon, German; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Conidi, Maria Chiara; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cooper-Smith, Neil; Copic, Katherine; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Courneyea, Lorraine; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cristinziani, Markus; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuciuc, Constantin-Mihai; Cuenca Almenar, Cristóbal; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; Czyczula, Zofia; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; D'Orazio, Alessia; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Damiani, Daniel; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darlea, Georgiana Lavinia; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davignon, Olivier; Davison, Adam; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; de Graat, Julien; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De La Taille, Christophe; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; De Zorzi, Guido; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dechenaux, Benjamin; Dedovich, Dmitri; Degenhardt, James; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delemontex, Thomas; Deliot, Frederic; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Demirkoz, Bilge; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; DeWilde, Burton; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Dhullipudi, Ramasudhakar; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Dietzsch, Thorsten; Diglio, Sara; Dindar Yagci, Kamile; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dionisi, Carlo; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Do Valle Wemans, André; Doan, Thi Kieu Oanh; Dobos, Daniel; Dobson, Ellie; Dodd, Jeremy; Doglioni, Caterina; Doherty, Tom; Dohmae, Takeshi; Doi, Yoshikuni; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dos Anjos, Andre; Dotti, Andrea; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Dris, Manolis; Dubbert, Jörg; Dube, Sourabh; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Dudziak, Fanny; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Dwuznik, Michal; Ebke, Johannes; Edson, William; Edwards, Clive; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Eisenhandler, Eric; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Ellis, Katherine; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Engelmann, Roderich; Engl, Albert; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Eriksson, Daniel; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Ernwein, Jean; Errede, Deborah; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Espinal Curull, Xavier; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienne, Francois; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evangelakou, Despoina; Evans, Hal; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Fatholahzadeh, Baharak; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Fehling-Kaschek, Mirjam; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernando, Waruna; Ferrag, Samir; Ferrando, James; Ferrara, Valentina; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flechl, Martin; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Florez Bustos, Andres Carlos; Flowerdew, Michael; Fonseca Martin, Teresa; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fortin, Dominique; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Franchino, Silvia; Francis, David; Franklin, Melissa; Franz, Sebastien; Fraternali, Marco; Fratina, Sasa; French, Sky; Friedrich, Conrad; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadfort, Thomas; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallo, Valentina Santina; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Gellerstedt, Karl; Gemme, Claudia; Gemmell, Alistair; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghodbane, Nabil; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gianotti, Fabiola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gillman, Tony; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giordano, Raffaele; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giovannini, Paola; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giunta, Michele; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glazov, Alexandre; Glonti, George; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godfrey, Jennifer; Godlewski, Jan; Goeringer, Christian; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gomez Fajardo, Luz Stella; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez Silva, Laura; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goodson, Jeremiah Jet; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorfine, Grant; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Gough Eschrich, Ivo; Gouighri, Mohamed; Goujdami, Driss; Goulette, Marc Phillippe; Goussiou, Anna; Goy, Corinne; Gozpinar, Serdar; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Francesco; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Gray, Julia Ann; Graziani, Enrico; Grebenyuk, Oleg; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grigalashvili, Nugzar; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grishkevich, Yaroslav; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Groth-Jensen, Jacob; Grout, Zara Jane; Grybel, Kai; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guicheney, Christophe; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Gunther, Jaroslav; Guo, Jun; Gupta, Shaun; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guttman, Nir; Gutzwiller, Olivier; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haefner, Petra; Hageboeck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamilton, Samuel; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Handel, Carsten; Hanke, Paul; Hansen, John Renner; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hansson, Per; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harper, Devin; Harrington, Robert; Harris, Orin; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Harvey, Alex; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauschild, Michael; Hauser, Reiner; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heimel, Bertha; Heinemann, Beate; Heisterkamp, Simon; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Heller, Claudio; Heller, Matthieu; Heller, Ryan Edward; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Hensel, Carsten; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Medina Hernandez, Carlos; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillert, Sonja; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoffman, Julia; Hoffmann, Dirk; Hofmann, Julia Isabell; Hohlfeld, Marc; Holmgren, Sven-Olof; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huettmann, Antje; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Hurwitz, Martina; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Idarraga, John; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Inamaru, Yuki; Ince, Tayfun; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ivashin, Anton; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, John; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansen, Hendrik; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jared, Richard; Jarlskog, Göran; Jeanty, Laura; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jen-La Plante, Imai; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Jha, Manoj Kumar; Ji, Haoshuang; Ji, Weina; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jimenez Belenguer, Marcos; Jin, Shan; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Joffe, David; Johansson, Erik; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jungst, Ralph Markus; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kadlecik, Peter; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalinin, Sergey; Kama, Sami; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneda, Michiru; Kaneti, Steven; Kanno, Takayuki; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kasieczka, Gregor; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kaushik, Venkatesh; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Kazarinov, Makhail; Keeler, Richard; Keener, Paul; Kehoe, Robert; Keil, Markus; Keller, John; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Kessoku, Kohei; Keung, Justin; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchenko, Dmitri; Khodinov, Alexander; Khomich, Andrei; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khoriauli, Gia; Khoroshilov, Andrey; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Dong Won; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Robert Steven Beaufoy; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kitamura, Takumi; Kittelmann, Thomas; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klinkby, Esben; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Klok, Peter; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koenig, Sebastian; Koevesarki, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohn, Fabian; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Koll, James; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Korotkov, Vladislav; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Sergey; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kral, Vlastimil; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Nina; Krieger, Peter; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Kruker, Tobias; Krumnack, Nils; Krumshteyn, Zinovii; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunkle, Joshua; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurata, Masakazu; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kurumida, Rie; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwee, Regina; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rotonda, Laura; Labarga, Luis; Lablak, Said; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Laier, Heiko; Laisne, Emmanuel; Lambourne, Luke; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, Clemens; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Larner, Aimee; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavorini, Vincenzo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Laycock, Paul; Le, Bao Tran; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Hurng-Chun; Lee, Jason; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legendre, Marie; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmacher, Marc; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Lendermann, Victor; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatiana; Lenzen, Georg; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leonhardt, Kathrin; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lessard, Jean-Raphael; Lester, Christopher; Lester, Christopher Michael; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Lewis, Adrian; Lewis, George; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Bo; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Shu; Li, Xuefei; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Limper, Maaike; Lin, Simon; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Livermore, Sarah; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loddenkoetter, Thomas; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Loh, Chang Wei; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Lombardo, Vincenzo Paolo; Long, Robin Eamonn; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Losty, Michael; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lowe, Andrew; Lu, Feng; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Ludwig, Dörthe; Ludwig, Inga; Ludwig, Jens; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lund, Esben; Lundberg, Johan; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lungwitz, Matthias; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Mackeprang, Rasmus; Madar, Romain; Madaras, Ronald; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeno, Mayuko; Maeno, Tadashi; Magnoni, Luca; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Mahmoud, Sara; Mahout, Gilles; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Mal, Prolay; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany Andreina; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchand, Jean-Francois; Marchese, Fabrizio; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marques, Carlos; Marroquim, Fernando; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Jean-Pierre; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Homero; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Matsunaga, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Takashi; Mättig, Peter; Mättig, Stefan; Mattmann, Johannes; Mattravers, Carly; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mazzanti, Marcello; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; Mclaughlan, Tom; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Meade, Andrew; Mechnich, Joerg; Mechtel, Markus; Medinnis, Mike; Meehan, Samuel; Meera-Lebbai, Razzak; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melachrinos, Constantinos; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mendoza Navas, Luis; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Meric, Nicolas; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Merritt, Hayes; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer, Joerg; Michal, Sebastien; Middleton, Robin; Migas, Sylwia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Miller, David; Mills, Bill; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Milstein, Dmitry; Minaenko, Andrey; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mirabelli, Giovanni; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Mitsui, Shingo; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Moeller, Victoria; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Molfetas, Angelos; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Morange, Nicolas; Morel, Julien; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Morii, Masahiro; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Moser, Hans-Guenther; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Klemens; Mueller, Thibaut; Mueller, Timo; Muenstermann, Daniel; Munwes, Yonathan; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Mussche, Ido; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagel, Martin; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Nanava, Gizo; Napier, Austin; Narayan, Rohin; Nash, Michael; Nattermann, Till; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Negri, Andrea; Negri, Guido; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nelson, Andrew; Nelson, Timothy Knight; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neusiedl, Andrea; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newcomer, Mitchel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Thi Hong, Van; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolics, Katalin; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novakova, Jana; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nuncio-Quiroz, Adriana-Elizabeth; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakes, Louise Beth; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Odier, Jerome; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohshima, Takayoshi; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olchevski, Alexander; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira, Miguel Alfonso; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olivito, Dominick; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ottersbach, John; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Simon; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Pahl, Christoph; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Palmer, Jody; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panikashvili, Natalia; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Papadelis, Aras; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pashapour, Shabnaz; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Passeri, Antonio; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Patricelli, Sergio; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedraza Morales, Maria Isabel; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penson, Alexander; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Cavalcanti, Tiago; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perez Reale, Valeria; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrino, Roberto; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Jorgen; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Petteni, Michele; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Piec, Sebastian Marcin; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinder, Alex; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pizio, Caterina; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Poddar, Sahill; Podlyski, Fabrice; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Pohl, Martin; Polesello, Giacomo; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pomeroy, Daniel; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Portell Bueso, Xavier; Pospelov, Guennady; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Prabhu, Robindra; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Pravahan, Rishiraj; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Joe; Price, Lawrence; Prieur, Damien; Primavera, Margherita; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Prudent, Xavier; Przybycien, Mariusz; Przysiezniak, Helenka; Psoroulas, Serena; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Pylypchenko, Yuriy; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Quilty, Donnchadha; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radloff, Peter; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rammes, Marcus; Randle-Conde, Aidan Sean; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rao, Kanury; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Tobias Christian; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Reinsch, Andreas; Reisinger, Ingo; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Zhongliang; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Resende, Bernardo; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Rios, Ryan Randy; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rivoltella, Giancesare; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Rocha de Lima, Jose Guilherme; Roda, Chiara; Roda Dos Santos, Denis; Rodrigues, Luis; Roe, Adam; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romeo, Gaston; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Anthony; Rose, Matthew; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rumyantsev, Leonid; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ruzicka, Pavel; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Saddique, Asif; Sadeh, Iftach; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvachua Ferrando, Belén; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Tanya; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sarri, Francesca; Sartisohn, Georg; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sasao, Noboru; Satsounkevitch, Igor; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Savard, Pierre; Savinov, Vladimir; Savu, Dan Octavian; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, David; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaelicke, Andreas; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R. Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Scherzer, Max; Schiavi, Carlo; Schieck, Jochen; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Christopher; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schram, Malachi; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schroer, Nicolai; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwegler, Philipp; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Schwoerer, Maud; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scott, Bill; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekula, Stephen; Selbach, Karoline Elfriede; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Sellers, Graham; Seman, Michal; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shank, James; Shao, Qi Tao; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Sherwood, Peter; Shimizu, Shima; Shimojima, Makoto; Shin, Taeksu; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shochet, Mel; Short, Daniel; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silbert, Ohad; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Daniel; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simoniello, Rosa; Simonyan, Margar; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sipica, Valentin; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sircar, Anirvan; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinnari, Louise Anastasia; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skovpen, Kirill; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Kenway; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snow, Joel; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Sodomka, Jaromir; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solfaroli Camillocci, Elena; Solodkov, Alexander; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopko, Vit; Sopko, Bruno; Sosebee, Mark; Soualah, Rachik; Soueid, Paul; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; Spurlock, Barry; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanek, Robert; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Staude, Arnold; Stavina, Pavel; Steele, Genevieve; Steinbach, Peter; Steinberg, Peter; Stekl, Ivan; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stern, Sebastian; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoerig, Kathrin; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Stumer, Iuliu; Stupak, John; Sturm, Philipp; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Subramania, Halasya Siva; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Yu; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takahashi, Yuta; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tamsett, Matthew; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shuji; Tanasijczuk, Andres Jorge; Tani, Kazutoshi; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Christopher; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Therhaag, Jan; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thoma, Sascha; Thomas, Juergen; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Peter; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thong, Wai Meng; Thun, Rudolf; Tian, Feng; Tibbetts, Mark James; Tic, Tomáš; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Toggerson, Brokk; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Tonoyan, Arshak; Topilin, Nikolai; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Tran, Huong Lan; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Triplett, Nathan; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsung, Jieh-Wen; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tua, Alan; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuggle, Joseph; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turk Cakir, Ilkay; Turra, Ruggero; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Uchida, Kirika; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Urbaniec, Dustin; Urquijo, Phillip; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Vahsen, Sven; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Berg, Richard; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van der Ster, Daniel; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vankov, Peter; Vannucci, Francois; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vassilakopoulos, Vassilios; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloso, Filipe; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Virzi, Joseph; Vitells, Ofer; Viti, Michele; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Adrian; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; Volpini, Giovanni; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vu Anh, Tuan; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wagner, Peter; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walch, Shannon; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wall, Richard; Waller, Peter; Walsh, Brian; Wang, Chiho; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watanabe, Ippei; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Anthony; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weigell, Philipp; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wendland, Dennis; Weng, Zhili; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Werth, Michael; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Whittington, Denver; Wicke, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wijeratne, Peter Alexander; Wildauer, Andreas; Wildt, Martin Andre; Wilhelm, Ivan; Wilkens, Henric George; Will, Jonas Zacharias; Williams, Eric; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, William; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, John; Wilson, Alan; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winkelmann, Stefan; Winklmeier, Frank; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittig, Tobias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wong, Wei-Cheng; Wooden, Gemma; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Michael; Wrona, Bozydar; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wulf, Evan; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xiao, Meng; Xu, Chao; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamamura, Taiki; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Un-Ki; Yang, Yi; Yang, Zhaoyu; Yanush, Serguei; Yao, Liwen; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yilmaz, Metin; Yoosoofmiya, Reza; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yurkewicz, Adam; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zaytsev, Alexander; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zevi della Porta, Giovanni; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimin, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Robert; Zimmermann, Simone; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Ziolkowski, Michael; Zitoun, Robert; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zutshi, Vishnu; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2013-10-01

    A search for microscopic black holes in a like-sign dimuon final state in proton−proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV is presented. The data were collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{-1}$. Using a high track multiplicity requirement, 0.6 $\\pm$ 0.2 background events are predicted from Standard Model processes and none are observed. This result is interpreted in the context of low-scale gravity models and 95% CL lower limits on microscopic black hole masses are set at 3.7 TeV through 5.9 TeV depending on the model assumptions.

  3. Study on TVD parameters sensitivity of a crankshaft using multiple scale and state space method considering quadratic and cubic non-linearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Talebitooti

    Full Text Available In this paper the effect of quadratic and cubic non-linearities of the system consisting of the crankshaft and torsional vibration damper (TVD is taken into account. TVD consists of non-linear elastomer material used for controlling the torsional vibration of crankshaft. The method of multiple scales is used to solve the governing equations of the system. Meanwhile, the frequency response of the system for both harmonic and sub-harmonic resonances is extracted. In addition, the effects of detuning parameters and other dimensionless parameters for a case of harmonic resonance are investigated. Moreover, the external forces including both inertia and gas forces are simultaneously applied into the model. Finally, in order to study the effectiveness of the parameters, the dimensionless governing equations of the system are solved, considering the state space method. Then, the effects of the torsional damper as well as all corresponding parameters of the system are discussed.

  4. Ab initio multiple spawning on laser-dressed states: a study of 1,3-cyclohexadiene photoisomerization via light-induced conical intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehee; Tao, Hongli; Martinez, Todd J.; Bucksbaum, Phil

    2015-08-01

    We extend the ab initio multiple spawning method to include both field-free and field-induced nonadiabatic transitions. We apply this method to describe ultrafast pump-probe experiments of the photoinduced ring-opening of gas phase 1,3-cyclohexadiene. In the absence of a control field, nonadiabatic transitions mediated by a conical intersection (CoIn) lead to rapid ground state recovery with both 1,3-cyclohexadiene and ring-opened hexatriene products. However, application of a control field within the first 200 fs after photoexcitation results in suppression of the hexatriene product. We demonstrate that this is a consequence of population dumping prior to reaching the CoIn and further interpret this in terms of light-induced CoIns created by the control field.

  5. Improving the Reliability of Optimised Link State Routing in a Smart Grid Neighbour Area Network based Wireless Mesh Network Using Multiple Metrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakubu Tsado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Reliable communication is the backbone of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI. Within the AMI, the neighbourhood area network (NAN transports a multitude of traffic, each with unique requirements. In order to deliver an acceptable level of reliability and latency, the underlying network, such as the wireless mesh network(WMN, must provide or guarantee the quality-of-service (QoS level required by the respective application traffic. Existing WMN routing protocols, such as optimised link state routing (OLSR, typically utilise a single metric and do not consider the requirements of individual traffic; hence, packets are delivered on a best-effort basis. This paper presents a QoS-aware WMN routing technique that employs multiple metrics in OLSR optimal path selection for AMI applications. The problems arising from this approach are non deterministic polynomial time (NP-complete in nature, which were solved through the combined use of the analytical hierarchy process (AHP algorithm and pruning techniques. For smart meters transmitting Internet Protocol (IP packets of varying sizes at different intervals, the proposed technique considers the constraints of NAN and the applications’ traffic characteristics. The technique was developed by combining multiple OLSR path selection metrics with the AHP algorithminns-2. Compared with the conventional link metric in OLSR, the results show improvements of about 23% and 45% in latency and Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR, respectively, in a 25-node grid NAN.

  6. The Impact of Multiple Concussions on Emotional Distress, Post-Concussive Symptoms, and Neurocognitive Functioning in Active Duty United States Marines Independent of Combat Exposure or Emotional Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathan, Corinna E.; Bleiberg, Joseph; Tsao, Jack W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Controversy exists as to whether the lingering effects of concussion on emotional, physical, and cognitive symptoms is because of the effects of brain trauma or purely to emotional factors such as post-traumatic stress disorder or depression. This study examines the independent effects of concussion on persistent symptoms. The Defense Automated Neurobehavioral Assessment, a clinical decision support tool, was used to assess neurobehavioral functioning in 646 United States Marines, all of whom were fit for duty. Marines were assessed for concussion history, post-concussive symptoms, emotional distress, neurocognitive functioning, and deployment history. Results showed that a recent concussion or ever having experienced a concussion was associated with an increase in emotional distress, but not with persistent post-concussive symptoms (PPCS) or neurocognitive functioning. Having had multiple lifetime concussions, however, was associated with greater emotional distress, PPCS, and reduced neurocognitive functioning that needs attention and rapid discrimination, but not for memory-based tasks. These results are independent of deployment history, combat exposure, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Results supported earlier findings that a previous concussion is not generally associated with post-concussive symptoms independent of covariates. In contrast with other studies that failed to find a unique contribution for concussion to PPCS, however, evidence of recent and multiple concussion was seen across a range of emotional distress, post-concussive symptoms, and neurocognitive functioning in this study population. Results are discussed in terms of implications for assessing concussion on return from combat. PMID:25003552

  7. Synthesis and characterization of polyhedral oligomeric titanized silsesquioxane: A new biocompatible cage like molecule for biomedical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahyaei, Hossein [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohseni, Mohsen, E-mail: mmohseni@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering and Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghanbari, Hossein [Department of Medical Nanotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Messori, Massimo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria ‘Enzo Ferrari’, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    Organic–inorganic hybrid materials have shown improved properties to be used as biocompatible coating in biomedical applications. Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) containing coatings are among hybrid materials showing promising properties for these applications. In this work an open cage POSS has been reacted with a titanium alkoxide to end cap the POSS molecule with titanium atom to obtain a so called polyhedral oligomeric metalized silsesquioxane (POMS). The synthesized POMS was characterized by FTIR, RAMAN and UV–visible spectroscopy as well as {sup 29}Si NMR and matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) techniques. Appearance of peaks at 920 cm{sup −1} in FTIR and 491 cm{sup −1} and 1083 cm{sup −1} in Raman spectra confirmed Si–O–Ti linkage formation. It was also demonstrated that POMS was in a monomeric form. To evaluate the biocompatibility of hybrids films, pristine POSS and synthesized POMS were used in synthesis of a polycarbonate urethane polymer. Results revealed that POMS containing hybrid, not only had notable thermal and mechanical stability compared to POSS containing one, as demonstrated by DSC and DMTA analysis, they also showed controlled surface properties in such a manner that hydrophobicity and biocompatibility were both reachable to give rise to improved cell viability in presence of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and MRC-5 cells. - Highlight: • Polyhedral Oligomeric Metalized Silsesquioxane (POMS) based on titanium was synthesized. • POMS can improve mechanical properties of polyurethane. • POMS increases hydrophobicity of polyurethane. • POMS is a unique nanocage to enhance biocompatibility of polyurethane.

  8. In situ oligomerization of 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate intercalated into Zn{sub 2}Al layered double hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tronto, Jairo, E-mail: jairotronto@ufv.br [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Campus de Rio Parsanaíba, Rodovia BR 354 km 310, Cx. Postal 22, CEP, 38.810-000 Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Pinto, Frederico G.; Costa, Liovando M. da [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnológicas, Campus de Rio Parsanaíba, Rodovia BR 354 km 310, Cx. Postal 22, CEP, 38.810-000 Rio Paranaíba, MG (Brazil); Leroux, Fabrice; Dubois, Marc [Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, BP 80026, F-6317 Clermont-Ferrand (France); Valim, João B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Química, Av. dos Bandeirantes 3900, CEP 14.040-901, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    A layered double hydroxide (LDH) with cation composition Zn{sub 2}Al was intercalated with 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate (3-TA) monomers. To achieve in situ polymerization and/or oligomerization of the intercalated monomers, soft thermal treatments were carried out, and subsequent hybrid LDH materials were analyzed by means of several characterization techniques using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), {sup 13}C CP–MAS nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), electron spin resonance (EPR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP–OES), and elemental analysis. PXRD analysis suggested that the intercalated monomers formed a bilayer. Thermal treatment of the hybrid LDH assembly above 120 °C provokes partially the breakdown of the layered structure, generating the phase zincite. EPR results indicated that vicinal monomers (oligomerization) were bound to each other after hydrothermal or thermal treatment, leading to a polaron response characteristic of electron conductivity localized on a restricted number of thiophene-based monomer segments. Localized unpaired electrons exist in the material and interact with the {sup 27}Al nuclei of the LDH layers by superhyperfine coupling. These unpaired electrons also interact with the surface of ZnO (O{sup 2−} vacancies), formed during the thermal treatments. - Graphical abstract: We synthesized a layered double hydroxide (LDH) with cation composition Zn{sub 2}Al, intercalated with 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate (3-TA) monomers, by coprecipitation at constant pH. We thermally treated the material, to achieve in situ polymerization and/or oligomerization of the intercalated monomers. - Highlights: • A Zn{sub 2}Al–LDH was intercalated with 2-(thiophen-3-yl)acetate monomers. • To achieve in situ oligomerization of the monomers, thermal treatments were made.

  9. A New Star-shaped Carbazole Derivative with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane Core: Crystal Structure and Unique Photoluminescence Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zixuan; Yu, Tianzhi; Zhao, Yuling; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Guoyun; Li, Jianfeng; Chai, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    A new inorganic–organic hybrid material based on polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) capped with carbazolyl substituents, octakis[3-(carbazol-9-yl)propyldimethylsiloxy]-silsesquioxane (POSS-8Cz), was successfully synthesized and characterized. The X-ray crystal structure of POSS-8Cz were described. The photophysical properties of POSS-8Cz were investigated by using UV–vis,photoluminescence spectroscopic analysis. The hybrid material exhibits blue emission in the solution and the solid film.The morphology and thermal stablity properties were measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and TG-DTA analysis.

  10. Oligomerization of adenosin-5´-O-ylmethylphosphonate, an isopolar AMP analogue: Evaluation of the route to short oligoadenylates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pressová, Martina; Buděšínský, Miloš; Kóšiová, Ivana; Kopecký, V. Jr.; Cvačka, Josef; Kašička, Václav; Šimák, Ondřej; Točík, Zdeněk; Rosenberg, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 3 (2010), s. 277-289 ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06077; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061; GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA ČR GA203/09/0820; GA ČR GA202/09/0193 Grant - others:EMIL-FW6(XE) 503569 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : spontaneous oligomerization * oligoadenylates * phosphonate linkage Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.572, year: 2010

  11. Kinetic Analysis for Macrocyclizations Involving Anionic Template at the Transition State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Martí-Centelles

    2012-01-01

    competitive oligomerization/polymerization processes yielding undesired oligomeric/polymeric byproducts. The effect of anions has also been included in the kinetic models, as they can act as catalytic templates in the transition state reducing and stabilizing the transition state. The corresponding differential equation systems for each kinetic model can be solved numerically. Through a comprehensive analysis of these results, it is possible to obtain a better understanding of the different parameters that are involved in the macrocyclization reaction mechanism and to develop strategies for the optimization of the desired processes.

  12. Predicting success of oligomerized pool engineering (OPEN for zinc finger target site sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin Mathew J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Precise and efficient methods for gene targeting are critical for detailed functional analysis of genomes and regulatory networks and for potentially improving the efficacy and safety of gene therapies. Oligomerized Pool ENgineering (OPEN is a recently developed method for engineering C2H2 zinc finger proteins (ZFPs designed to bind specific DNA sequences with high affinity and specificity in vivo. Because generation of ZFPs using OPEN requires considerable effort, a computational method for identifying the sites in any given gene that are most likely to be successfully targeted by this method is desirable. Results Analysis of the base composition of experimentally validated ZFP target sites identified important constraints on the DNA sequence space that can be effectively targeted using OPEN. Using alternate encodings to represent ZFP target sites, we implemented Naïve Bayes and Support Vector Machine classifiers capable of distinguishing "active" targets, i.e., ZFP binding sites that can be targeted with a high rate of success, from those that are "inactive" or poor targets for ZFPs generated using current OPEN technologies. When evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation on a dataset of 135 experimentally validated ZFP target sites, the best Naïve Bayes classifier, designated ZiFOpT, achieved overall accuracy of 87% and specificity+ of 90%, with an ROC AUC of 0.89. When challenged with a completely independent test set of 140 newly validated ZFP target sites, ZiFOpT performance was comparable in terms of overall accuracy (88% and specificity+ (92%, but with reduced ROC AUC (0.77. Users can rank potentially active ZFP target sites using a confidence score derived from the posterior probability returned by ZiFOpT. Conclusion ZiFOpT, a machine learning classifier trained to identify DNA sequences amenable for targeting by OPEN-generated zinc finger arrays, can guide users to target sites that are most likely to function

  13. The neuroprotective effects of milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 against oligomeric amyloid β toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Endong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphatidylserine receptor is a key molecule that mediates the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8 is a phosphatidylserine receptor that is expressed on various macrophage lineage cells, including microglia in the central nervous system (CNS. Targeted clearance of degenerated neurons by microglia is essential to maintain healthy neural networks. We previously showed that the CX3C chemokine fractalkine is secreted from degenerated neurons and accelerates microglial clearance of neuronal debris via inducing the release of MFG-E8. However, the mechanisms by which microglia produce MFG-E8 and the precise functions of MFG-E8 are unknown. Methods The release of MFG-E8 from microglia treated with conditioned medium from neurons exposed to neurotoxic substances, glutamate or oligomeric amyloid β (oAβ was measured by ELISA. The neuroprotective effects of MFG-E8 and MFG-E8 − induced microglial phagocytosis of oAβ were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The effects of MFG-E8 on the production of the anti-oxidative enzyme hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 were determined by ELISA and immunocytochemisty. Results MFG-E8 was induced in microglia treated with conditioned medium from neurons that had been exposed to neurotoxicants, glutamate or oAβ. MFG-E8 significantly attenuated oAβ-induced neuronal cell death in a primary neuron − microglia coculture system. Microglial phagocytosis of oAβ was accelerated by MFG-E8 treatment due to increased CD47 expression in the absence of neurotoxic molecule production, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and glutamate. MFG-E8 − treated microglia induced nuclear factor E(2 − related factor 2 (Nrf2 − mediated HO-1 production, which also contributed to neuroprotection. Conclusions These results suggest that microglia release MFG-E8 in response to signals from degenerated neurons and that MFG-E8 protects oAβ-induced neuronal cell death

  14. Simplifying the complex 1H NMR spectra of fluorine-substituted benzamides by spin system filtering and spin-state selection: multiple-quantum-single-quantum correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baishya, Bikash; Reddy, G N Manjunatha; Prabhu, Uday Ramesh; Row, T N Guru; Suryaprakash, N

    2008-10-23

    The proton NMR spectra of fluorine-substituted benzamides are very complex (Figure 1) due to severe overlap of (1)H resonances from the two aromatic rings, in addition to several short and long-range scalar couplings experienced by each proton. With no detectable scalar couplings between the inter-ring spins, the (1)H NMR spectra can be construed as an overlap of spectra from two independent phenyl rings. In the present study we demonstrate that it is possible to separate the individual spectrum for each aromatic ring by spin system filtering employing the multiple-quantum-single-quantum correlation methodology. Furthermore, the two spin states of fluorine are utilized to simplify the spectrum corresponding to each phenyl ring by the spin-state selection. The demonstrated technique reduces spectral complexity by a factor of 4, in addition to permitting the determination of long-range couplings of less than 0.2 Hz and the relative signs of heteronuclear couplings. The technique also aids the judicious choice of the spin-selective double-quantum-single-quantum J-resolved experiment to determine the long-range homonuclear couplings of smaller magnitudes.

  15. Search for black holes and other new phenomena in high-multiplicity final states in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 13TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

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