WorldWideScience

Sample records for multiple nerve stimulation

  1. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  2. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. Methods : A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60, or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60 for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. Results: The median (range number of skin punctures were 2 (2-4 in group US and 3 (2-5 in group NS (P =0.27. Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5% of group US and four patients (6.67% of group NS (P > =0.35. Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Conclusion: Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine.

  3. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Alok; Sharma, DK; Sibi, Maj. E; Datta, Barun; Gogoi, Biraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS) or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. Methods: A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60), or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60) for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. Results: The median (range) number of skin punctures were 2 (2–4) in group US and 3 (2–5) in group NS (P =0.27). Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5%) of group US and four patients (6.67%) of group NS (P > =0.35). Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Conclusion: Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine. PMID:25624532

  4. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  5. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  6. Radial plus musculocutaneous nerve stimulation for axillary block is inferior to triple nerve stimulation with 2% mepivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Jaime; Taboada, Manuel; Oliveira, Juan; Ulloa, Beatriz; Bascuas, Begoña; Alvarez, Julián

    2008-06-01

    To compare the extent of sensory and motor block with two different nerve stimulation techniques in axillary blocks. Prospective, randomized, investigator-blinded study. Ambulatory surgery unit of a university hospital. 60 ASA physical status I, II, and III patients undergoing surgery at or below the elbow. Patients receiving axillary block were randomized into two nerve stimulation groups with either radial plus musculocutaneous or triple nerve stimulation (radial, median, and musculocutaneous nerves). Thirty milliliters of plain 2% mepivacaine was given to all patients either in a single or fractionated dosing for radial or for radial and median nerves, according to group assignment. Five milliliters of plain 1% mepivacaine for the musculocutaneous nerve was given to all patients. Blocks were assessed at 10, 20, and 30 minutes. Rates of supplementation given as a result of insufficient surgical anesthesia were also noted. Statistically significantly higher rates of anesthesia at the cutaneous distributions of median and medial cutaneous of the arm nerves with multiple nerve stimulation at 30 minutes were found as compared with radial plus musculocutaneous nerve stimulation. The rate of supplementation was lower with multiple nerve stimulation. Radial plus musculocutaneous nerve stimulation showed lower efficacy of axillary block than did triple nerve stimulation when using 2% mepivacaine.

  7. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Treating Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Evidence-based Guideline for PATIENTS and their FAMILIES VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION FOR TREATING EPILEPSY This information sheet is provided to help you understand how vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) may help treat epilepsy. The American ...

  8. Vagus nerve stimulation regulates hemostasis in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czura, Christopher J; Schultz, Arthur; Kaipel, Martin; Khadem, Anna; Huston, Jared M; Pavlov, Valentin A; Redl, Heinz; Tracey, Kevin J

    2010-06-01

    The central nervous system regulates peripheral immune responses via the vagus nerve, the primary neural component of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses proinflammatory cytokine release in response to endotoxin, I/R injury, and hypovolemic shock and protects against lethal hypotension. To determine the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on coagulation pathways, anesthetized pigs were subjected to partial ear resection before and after electrical vagus nerve stimulation. We observed that electrical vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased bleeding time (pre-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 1033 +/- 210 s versus post-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 585 +/- 111 s; P vagus nerve stimulation = 48.4 +/- 6.8 mL versus post-electrical vagus nerve stimulation = 26.3 +/- 6.7 mL; P vagus nerve stimulation was independent of changes in heart rate or blood pressure and correlated with increased thrombin/antithrombin III complex generation in shed blood. These data indicate that electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve attenuates peripheral hemorrhage in a porcine model of soft tissue injury and that this protective effect is associated with increased coagulation factor activity.

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Albu-Soda, Ahmed; Aziz, Qasim

    2016-11-02

    The diverse array of end organ innervations of the vagus nerve, coupled with increased basic science evidence, has led to vagus nerve stimulation becoming a management option in a number of clinical disorders. This review discusses methods of electrically stimulating the vagus nerve and its current and potential clinical uses.

  10. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Pin; Ay, Ilknur; de Morais, Andreia Lopes; Qin, Tao; Zheng, Yi; Sadeghian, Homa; Oka, Fumiaki; Simon, Bruce; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk

    2016-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation has recently been reported to improve symptoms of migraine. Cortical spreading depression is the electrophysiological event underlying migraine aura and is a trigger for headache. We tested whether vagus nerve stimulation inhibits cortical spreading depression to explain its antimigraine effect. Unilateral vagus nerve stimulation was delivered either noninvasively through the skin or directly by electrodes placed around the nerve. Systemic physiology was monitored throughout the study. Both noninvasive transcutaneous and invasive direct vagus nerve stimulations significantly suppressed spreading depression susceptibility in the occipital cortex in rats. The electrical stimulation threshold to evoke a spreading depression was elevated by more than 2-fold, the frequency of spreading depressions during continuous topical 1 M KCl was reduced by ∼40%, and propagation speed of spreading depression was reduced by ∼15%. This effect developed within 30 minutes after vagus nerve stimulation and persisted for more than 3 hours. Noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation was as efficacious as direct invasive vagus nerve stimulation, and the efficacy did not differ between the ipsilateral and contralateral hemispheres. Our findings provide a potential mechanism by which vagus nerve stimulation may be efficacious in migraine and suggest that susceptibility to spreading depression is a suitable platform to optimize its efficacy.

  11. VAGUS NERVE STIMULATION REGULATES HEMOSTASIS IN SWINE

    OpenAIRE

    Czura, Christopher J.; Schultz, Arthur; Kaipel, Martin; Khadem, Anna; Huston, Jared M.; Pavlov, Valentin A; Redl, Heinz; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    The central nervous system regulates peripheral immune responses via the vagus nerve, the primary neural component of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine release in response to endotoxin, I/R injury, and hypovolemic shock and protects against lethal hypotension. To determine the effect of vagus nerve stimulation on coagulation pathways, anesthetized pigs were subjected to partial ear resection before and aft...

  12. Electrical Stimulation to Promote Peripheral Nerve Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willand, Michael P; Nguyen, May-Anh; Borschel, Gregory H; Gordon, Tessa

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerve injury afflicts individuals from all walks of life. Despite the peripheral nervous system's intrinsic ability to regenerate, many patients experience incomplete functional recovery. Surgical repair aims to expedite this recovery process in the most thorough manner possible. However, full recovery is still rarely seen especially when nerve injury is compounded with polytrauma where surgical repair is delayed. Pharmaceutical strategies supplementary to nerve microsurgery have been investigated but surgery remains the only viable option. Brief low-frequency electrical stimulation of the proximal nerve stump after primary repair has been widely investigated. This article aims to review the currently known biological basis for the regenerative effects of acute brief low-frequency electrical stimulation on axonal regeneration and outline the recent clinical applications of the electrical stimulation protocol to demonstrate the significant translational potential of this modality for repairing peripheral nerve injuries. The review concludes with a discussion of emerging new advancements in this exciting area of research. The current literature indicates the imminent clinical applicability of acute brief low-frequency electrical stimulation after surgical repair to effectively promote axonal regeneration as the stimulation has yielded promising evidence to maximize functional recovery in diverse types of peripheral nerve injuries. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Modulation of brain dead induced inflammation by vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeger, S; Bergstraesser, C; Selhorst, J; Fontana, J; Birck, R; Waldherr, R; Beck, G; Sticht, C; Seelen, M A; van Son, W J; Leuvenink, H; Ploeg, R; Schnuelle, P; Yard, B A

    2010-03-01

    Because the vagus nerve is implicated in control of inflammation, we investigated if brain death (BD) causes impairment of the parasympathetic nervous system, thereby contributing to inflammation. BD was induced in rats. Anaesthetised ventilated rats (NBD) served as control. Heart rate variability (HRV) was assessed by ECG. The vagus nerve was electrically stimulated (BD + STIM) during BD. Intestine, kidney, heart and liver were recovered after 6 hours. Affymetrix chip-analysis was performed on intestinal RNA. Quantitative PCR was performed on all organs. Serum was collected to assess TNFalpha concentrations. Renal transplantations were performed to address the influence of vagus nerve stimulation on graft outcome. HRV was significantly lower in BD animals. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibited the increase in serum TNFalpha concentrations and resulted in down-regulation of a multiplicity of pro-inflammatory genes in intestinal tissue. In renal tissue vagal stimulation significantly decreased the expression of E-selectin, IL1beta and ITGA6. Renal function was significantly better in recipients that received a graft from a BD + STIM donor. Our study demonstrates impairment of the parasympathetic nervous system during BD and inhibition of serum TNFalpha through vagal stimulation. Vagus nerve stimulation variably affected gene expression in donor organs and improved renal function in recipients.

  14. Heart rate control via vagus nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschman, Hendrik P.; Storm, Corstiaan J.; Duncker, Dirk J.; Verdouw, Pieter D.; Aa, van der Hans E.; Kemp, van der Peter

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: There is ample and well-established evidence that direct electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve can change heart rate in animals and humans. Since tachyarrhythmias cannot always be controlled through medication, we sought, in this pilot study, to elucidate whether a clinical implantab

  15. Vagal nerve stimulation therapy: what is being stimulated?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Kember

    Full Text Available Vagal nerve stimulation in cardiac therapy involves delivering electrical current to the vagal sympathetic complex in patients experiencing heart failure. The therapy has shown promise but the mechanisms by which any benefit accrues is not understood. In this paper we model the response to increased levels of stimulation of individual components of the vagal sympathetic complex as a differential activation of each component in the control of heart rate. The model provides insight beyond what is available in the animal experiment in as much as allowing the simultaneous assessment of neuronal activity throughout the cardiac neural axis. The results indicate that there is sensitivity of the neural network to low level subthreshold stimulation. This leads us to propose that the chronic effects of vagal nerve stimulation therapy lie within the indirect pathways that target intrinsic cardiac local circuit neurons because they have the capacity for plasticity.

  16. 21 CFR 868.2775 - Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. 868.2775... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2775 Electrical peripheral nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An electrical peripheral nerve stimulator (neuromuscular blockade monitor)...

  17. Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Massiello, Alex; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    Research on the therapeutic modulation of cardiac autonomic tone by electrical stimulation has yielded encouraging early clinical results. Vagus nerve stimulation has reduced the rates of morbidity and sudden death from heart failure, but therapeutic vagus nerve stimulation is limited by side effects of hypotension and bradycardia. Sympathetic nerve stimulation that has been implemented in the experiment may exacerbate the sympathetic-dominated autonomic imbalance. In contrast, concurrent sti...

  18. Cardiac Autonomic Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Massiello, Alex; Karimov, Jamshid H.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2013-01-01

    Research on the therapeutic modulation of cardiac autonomic tone by electrical stimulation has yielded encouraging early clinical results. Vagus nerve stimulation has reduced the rates of morbidity and sudden death from heart failure, but therapeutic vagus nerve stimulation is limited by side effects of hypotension and bradycardia. Sympathetic nerve stimulation that has been implemented in the experiment may exacerbate the sympathetic-dominated autonomic imbalance. In contrast, concurrent sti...

  19. Facial nerve stimulation after cochlear implantation: our experience

    OpenAIRE

    BERRETTINI, S.; De Vito, A.; Bruschini, L.; PASSETTI, S.; Forli, F.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Post-implantation facial nerve stimulation is one of the best known and most frequent complications of the cochlear implant procedure. Some conditions, such as otosclerosis and cochlear malformations, as well as high stimulation levels that may be necessary in patients with long auditory deprivation, expose patients to a higher risk of developing post-implant facial nerve stimulation. Facial nerve stimulation can frequently be resolved with minimal changes in speech processor fitting ...

  20. Tumors Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranial nerve palsy could be one of the presenting features of underlying benign or malignant tumors of the head and neck. The tumor can involve the cranial nerves by local compression, direct infiltration or by paraneoplastic process. Cranial nerve involvement depends on the anatomical course of the cranial nerve and the site of the tumor. Patients may present with single or multiple cranial nerve palsies. Multiple cranial nerve involvement could be sequential or discrete, unilateral or bilateral, painless or painful. The presentation could be acute, subacute or recurrent. Anatomic localization is the first step in the evaluation of these patients. The lesion could be in the brain stem, meninges, base of skull, extracranial or systemic disease itself. We present 3 cases of underlying neoplasms presenting as cranial nerve palsies: a case of glomus tumor presenting as cochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus and hypoglossal nerve palsies, clivus tumor presenting as abducens nerve palsy, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting as oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal and abducens nerve palsies due to paraneoplastic involvement. History and physical examination, imaging, autoantibodies and biopsy if feasible are useful for the diagnosis. Management outcomes depend on the treatment of the underlying tumor.

  1. Ulnar nerve stimulation at the palm in diagnosing distal ulnar nerve entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, A S

    2005-01-01

    Distal entrapment of the ulnar nerve at the wrist and hand (Guyon's syndrome) is a relatively uncommon condition. It may present with a confusing permutation of sensory and motor symptoms, depending on which branches of the ulnar nerve are involved Electrodiagnostic test procedures are often helpful in sorting out this quandary. Electrophysiologic studies that include electrical stimulation of the nerve at the palm, in addition to stimulation of the ulnar nerve at other locations, are useful in demonstrating the focal nerve conduction abnormality that is involved in the entrapment. Sensory and motor recordings from palmar stimulation of the ulnar nerve are not technically difficult procedures, and can be performed routinely.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation for partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Rigby, Alexandra; Weston, Jennifer; Marson, Anthony G

    2015-04-03

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neuromodulatory treatment that is used as an adjunctive therapy for treating people with medically refractory epilepsy. VNS consists of chronic intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, delivered by a programmable pulse generator. The majority of people given a diagnosis of epilepsy have a good prognosis, and their seizures will be controlled by treatment with a single antiepileptic drug (AED), but up to 20%-30% of patients will develop drug-resistant epilepsy, often requiring treatment with combinations of AEDs. The aim of this systematic review was to overview the current evidence for the efficacy and tolerability of vagus nerve stimulation when used as an adjunctive treatment for people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. This is an updated version of a Cochrane review published in Issue 7, 2010. To determine:(1) The effects on seizures of VNS compared to controls e.g. high-level stimulation compared to low-level stimulation (presumed sub-therapeutic dose); and(2) The adverse effect profile of VNS compared to controls e.g. high-level stimulation compared to low-level stimulation. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialised Register (23 February 2015), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 23 February 2015), MEDLINE (1946 to 23 February 2015), SCOPUS (1823 to 23 February 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov (23 February 2015) and ICTRP (23 February 2015). No language restrictions were imposed. The following study designs were eligible for inclusion: randomised, double-blind, parallel or crossover studies, controlled trials of VNS as add-on treatment comparing high and low stimulation paradigms (including three different stimulation paradigms - duty cycle: rapid, mid and slow) and VNS stimulation versus no stimulation or a different intervention. Eligible participants were adults or children with drug-resistant partial seizures not eligible for surgery or who failed

  3. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and b...

  4. Investigation of assumptions underlying current safety guidelines on EM-induced nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Esra; Vogiatzis Oikonomidis, Ioannis; Iacono, Maria Ida; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Kainz, Wolfgang; Kuster, Niels

    2016-06-01

    An intricate network of a variety of nerves is embedded within the complex anatomy of the human body. Although nerves are shielded from unwanted excitation, they can still be stimulated by external electromagnetic sources that induce strongly non-uniform field distributions. Current exposure safety standards designed to limit unwanted nerve stimulation are based on a series of explicit and implicit assumptions and simplifications. This paper demonstrates the applicability of functionalized anatomical phantoms with integrated coupled electromagnetic and neuronal dynamics solvers for investigating the impact of magnetic resonance exposure on nerve excitation within the full complexity of the human anatomy. The impact of neuronal dynamics models, temperature and local hot-spots, nerve trajectory and potential smoothing, anatomical inhomogeneity, and pulse duration on nerve stimulation was evaluated. As a result, multiple assumptions underlying current safety standards are questioned. It is demonstrated that coupled EM-neuronal dynamics modeling involving realistic anatomies is valuable to establish conservative safety criteria.

  5. Electromyographic evaluation of functional electrical stimulation to injured oculomotor nerve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Yang; Shiting Li; Youqiang Meng; Ningxi Zhu; Xuhui Wang; Liang Wan; Wenchuan Zhang; Jun Zhong; Shugan Zhu; Massimiliano Visocchi

    2011-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation delivered early after injury to the proximal nerve stump has been proposed as a therapeutic approach for enhancing the speed and specificity of axonal regeneration following nerve injury. In this study, the injured oculomotor nerve was stimulated functionally by an implantable electrode. Electromyographic monitoring of the motor unit potential of the inferior oblique muscle was conducted for 12 weeks in two injury groups, one with and one without electric stimulation. The results revealed that, at 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks after functional electric stimulation of the injured oculomotor nerve, motor unit potentials significantly increased, such that amplitude was longer and spike duration gradually shortened. These findings indicate that the injured oculomotor nerve has the potential for regeneration and repair, but this ability is not sufficient for full functional recovery to occur. Importantly, the current results indicated that recovery and regeneration of the injured oculomotor nerve can be promoted with functional electrical stimulation.

  6. Sciatic nerve block performed with nerve stimulation technique in an amputee a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiring, C.; Kristensen, Billy

    2008-01-01

    We present a case of a sciatic nerve block performed with the nerve stimulation technique. This technique is normally not used in amputees because detection of a motor response to an electrical stimulation is impossible. In our patient the stimulation provoked a phantom sensation of movement...

  7. The Multiple Silicone Tube Device, “Tubes within a Tube,” for Multiplication in Nerve Reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Johansson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple nerve branches were created during the regeneration procedure after a nerve injury and such multiple branches are suggested to be used to control, for example, prosthesis with many degrees of freedom. Transected rat sciatic nerve stumps were inserted into a nine mm long silicone tube, which contained four, five mm long, smaller tubes, thus leaving a five mm gap for regenerating nerve fibers. Six weeks later, several new nerve structures were formed not only in the four smaller tubes, but also in the spaces in-between. The 7–9 new continuous nerve structures, which were isolated as individual free nerves after removal of the tubes, were delineated by a perineurium and contained both myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers as well as blood vessels. Stimulation of the proximal nerve elicited contractions in distal muscles. Thin metal electrodes, inserted initially into the smaller tubes in some experiments, became embedded in the new nerve structures and when stimulated contractions of the distal muscles were observed. The “tubes within a tube” technique, creating multiple new nerves from a single “mother” nerve, can be used to record multiple signals for prosthetic device control or as sources for supply of multiple denervated targets.

  8. Bladder emptying by intermittent electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Joseph W.; Wenzel, Brian J.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Grill, Warren M.

    2006-03-01

    Persons with a suprasacral spinal cord injury cannot empty their bladder voluntarily. Bladder emptying can be restored by intermittent electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve roots (SR) to cause bladder contraction. However, this therapy requires sensory nerve transection to prevent dyssynergic contraction of the external urethral sphincter (EUS). Stimulation of the compound pudendal nerve trunk (PN) activates spinal micturition circuitry, leading to a reflex bladder contraction without a reflex EUS contraction. The present study determined if PN stimulation could produce bladder emptying without nerve transection in cats anesthetized with α-chloralose. With all nerves intact, intermittent PN stimulation emptied the bladder (64 ± 14% of initial volume, n = 37 across six cats) more effectively than either distention-evoked micturition (40 ± 19%, p stimulation (25 ± 23%, p nerves innervating the urethral sphincter, intermittent SR stimulation voided 79 ± 17% (n = 12 across three cats), comparable to clinical results obtained with SR stimulation. Voiding via intermittent PN stimulation did not increase after neurotomy (p > 0.10), indicating that PN stimulation was not limited by bladder-sphincter dyssynergia. Intermittent PN stimulation holds promise for restoring bladder emptying following spinal injury without requiring nerve transection.

  9. Magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves in dogs : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, Iris; Polis, Ingeborgh E.; Nijs, Jozef X.; Struys, Michel M.; Bhatti, Sofie F.; Van Ham, Luc M.

    2008-01-01

    A model for magnetic stimulation of the radial and sciatic nerves in dogs was evaluated. Onset-latencies and peak-to-peak amplitudes of magnetic and electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve were compared, and the effect of the direction of the current in the magnetic coil on onset-latencies and p

  10. Overview of the clinical applications of vagus nerve stimulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, J.P.; Beems, T.

    2010-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become an established therapy for difficult-to-treat epilepsy during the past 20 years. The vagus nerve provides a unique entrance to the brain. Electrical stimulation of this structure in the cervical region allows direct modulative access to subcortical brain area

  11. Overview of the Clinical Applications of Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekwilder, J.P.; Beems, T.

    2010-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become an established therapy for difficult-to-treat epilepsy during the past 20 years. The vagus nerve provides a unique entrance to the brain. Electrical stimulation of this structure in the cervical region allows direct modulative access to subcortical brain area

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy: A review of central mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Krahl, Scott E.; Clark, Kevin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a previous paper, the anatomy and physiology of the vagus nerve was discussed in an attempt to explain which vagus nerve fibers and branches are affected by clinically relevant electrical stimulation. This companion paper presents some of vagus nerve stimulation's putative central nervous system mechanisms of action by summarizing known anatomical projections of vagal afferents and their effects on brain biogenic amine pathways and seizure expression.

  13. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue. PMID:25368644

  14. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Long; Lin, Jinhuang; Lin, Junming; Kui, Guoju; Zhang, Jianhua; Yu, Yigang

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of traumatic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain explosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β concentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue.

  15. Muscle potentials evoked by magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve in unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, I.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Van Ham, L. M. L.

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic stimulation of the sciatic nerve and subsequent recording of the muscle-evoked potential (MEP) was performed in eight dogs and three cats with unilateral sciatic nerve dysfunction. Localisation of the lesion in the sciatic nerve was based on the history, clinical neurological examination an

  16. Vagus Nerve and Vagus Nerve Stimulation, a Comprehensive Review: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve (VN), the "great wondering protector" of the body, comprises an intricate neuro-endocrine-immune network that maintains homeostasis. With reciprocal neural connections to multiple brain regions, the VN serves as a control center that integrates interoceptive information and responds with appropriate adaptive modulatory feedbacks. While most VN fibers are unmyelinated C-fibers from the visceral organs, myelinated A- and B-fiber play an important role in somatic sensory, motor, and parasympathetic innervation. VN fibers are primarily cholinergic but other noncholinergic nonadrenergic neurotransmitters are also involved. VN has four vagal nuclei that provide critical controls to the cardiovascular, respiratory, and alimentary systems. Latest studies revealed that VN is also involved in inflammation, mood, and pain regulation, all of which can be potentially modulated by vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). With a broad vagal neural network, VNS may exert a neuromodulatory effect to activate certain innate "protective" pathways for restoring health.

  17. Vagus Nerve and Vagus Nerve Stimulation, a Comprehensive Review: Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-03-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently undergoing multiple trials to explore its potential for various clinical disorders. To date, VNS has been approved for the treatment of refractory epilepsy and depression. It exerts antiepileptic or antiepileptogenic effect possibly through neuromodulation of certain monoamine pathways. Beyond epilepsy, VNS is also under investigation for the treatment of inflammation, asthma, and pain. VNS influences the production of inflammatory cytokines to dampen the inflammatory response. It triggers the systemic release of catecholamines that alleviates the asthma attack. VNS induces antinociception by modulating multiple pain-associated structures in the brain and spinal cord affecting peripheral/central nociception, opioid response, inflammation process, autonomic activity, and pain-related behavior. Progression in VNS clinical efficacy over time suggests an underlying disease-modifying neuromodulation, which is an emerging field in neurology. With multiple potential clinical applications, further development of VNS is encouraging.

  18. Effects of short and prolonged transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on heart rate variability in healthy subjects

    OpenAIRE

    De Couck, Marijke; Cserjesi, Renata; Caers, Ralf; Zijlstra, W.-P.; Widjaja, Devy; Wolf, Nicole; Luminet, Olivier; Ellrich, Jens; Gidron, Yori

    2017-01-01

    The vagus nerve is strategically located in the body, and has multiple homeostatic and health-promoting effects. Low vagal activity predicts onset and progression of diseases. These are the reasons to activate this nerve. This study examined the effects of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on a main index of vagal activity, namely heart rate variability (HRV). In Study 1, we compared short (10 min) left versus right ear t-VNS versus sham (no stimulation) in a within-subjects expe...

  19. Whisking recovery after automated mechanical stimulation during facial nerve regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiss, I.J.; Knox, C.J.; Malo, J.S.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hadlock, T.A.; Heaton, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Recovery from facial nerve transection is typically poor, but daily mechanical stimulation of the face in rats has been reported to remarkably enhance functional recovery after facial nerve transection and suture repair. This phenomenon needs additional investigation because of its import

  20. Stimulation of the human auditory nerve with optical radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Andrew; Winkler, Piotr; Mierzwinski, Jozef; Beuth, Wojciech; Izzo Matic, Agnella; Siedlecki, Zygmunt; Teudt, Ingo; Maier, Hannes; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2009-02-01

    A novel, spatially selective method to stimulate cranial nerves has been proposed: contact free stimulation with optical radiation. The radiation source is an infrared pulsed laser. The Case Report is the first report ever that shows that optical stimulation of the auditory nerve is possible in the human. The ethical approach to conduct any measurements or tests in humans requires efficacy and safety studies in animals, which have been conducted in gerbils. This report represents the first step in a translational research project to initiate a paradigm shift in neural interfaces. A patient was selected who required surgical removal of a large meningioma angiomatum WHO I by a planned transcochlear approach. Prior to cochlear ablation by drilling and subsequent tumor resection, the cochlear nerve was stimulated with a pulsed infrared laser at low radiation energies. Stimulation with optical radiation evoked compound action potentials from the human auditory nerve. Stimulation of the auditory nerve with infrared laser pulses is possible in the human inner ear. The finding is an important step for translating results from animal experiments to human and furthers the development of a novel interface that uses optical radiation to stimulate neurons. Additional measurements are required to optimize the stimulation parameters.

  1. Vagal nerve stimulation in tuberous sclerosis complex patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, D; Penniello, M J; Berquen, P; Delangre, T; Billard, C; Murphy, J V

    2001-09-01

    This is an open-label, retrospective, multicenter study to determine the outcome of intermittent stimulation of the left vagal nerve in children with tuberous sclerosis complex and medically refractory epilepsy. The records of all children treated with vagal nerve stimulation were reviewed in five pediatric epilepsy centers to locate those with tuberous sclerosis complex who had been treated with vagal nerve stimulation for at least 6 months. These patients were compared with (1) a series of patients obtained from the literature, (2) 10 similar control patients with epilepsy obtained from a registry of patients receiving vagal nerve stimulation, and (3) four published series of tuberous sclerosis complex patients whose epilepsy was surgically managed. Ten tuberous sclerosis complex patients with medically refractory epilepsy treated with vagal nerve stimulation were found. Nine experienced at least a 50% reduction in seizure frequency, and half had a 90% or greater reduction in seizure frequency. No adverse events were encountered. Comparison with published and registry patients revealed improved seizure control in the tuberous sclerosis complex patients. Comparison with the group undergoing seizure surgery demonstrated improved outcomes after surgery. Vagal nerve stimulation appears to be an effective and well-tolerated adjunctive therapy in patients with tuberous sclerosis complex and seizures refractory to medical therapy. Resective surgery has a better prospect for improved seizure control.

  2. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  3. Neuroprotection trek--the next generation: neuromodulation I. Techniques--deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Russell J.

    2003-01-01

    Neuromodulation denotes controlled electrical stimulation of the central or peripheral nervous system. The three forms of neuromodulation described in this paper-deep brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation-were chosen primarily for their demonstrated or potential clinical usefulness. Deep brain stimulation is a completely implanted technique for improving movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by very focal electrical stimulation of the brain-a technique that employs well-established hardware (electrode and pulse generator/battery). Vagus nerve stimulation is similar to deep brain stimulation in being well-established (for the treatment of refractory epilepsy), completely implanted, and having hardware that can be considered standard at the present time. Vagus nerve stimulation differs from deep brain stimulation, however, in that afferent stimulation of the vagus nerve results in diffuse effects on many regions throughout the brain. Although use of deep brain stimulation for applications beyond movement disorders will no doubt involve placing the stimulating electrode(s) in regions other than the thalamus, subthalamus, or globus pallidus, the use of vagus nerve stimulation for applications beyond epilepsy-for example, depression and eating disorders-is unlikely to require altering the hardware significantly (although stimulation protocols may differ). Transcranial magnetic stimulation is an example of an external or non-implanted, intermittent (at least given the current state of the hardware) stimulation technique, the clinical value of which for neuromodulation and neuroprotection remains to be determined.

  4. Irritation induced bladder overactivity is suppressed by tibial nerve stimulation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Changfeng; Chen, Mang; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the effects of tibial nerve stimulation on bladder overactivity induced by acetic acid irritation. Cystometry was performed in 10 α-chloralose anesthetized female cats by infusing saline or acetic acid through a urethral catheter that was secured by a ligature around the urethra. Intravesical infusion of 0.25% acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder and induce bladder overactivity. Multiple cystometrograms were done before, during and after tibial nerve stimulation to determine the inhibitory effect on the micturition reflex. Infusion of 0.25% acetic acid irritated the bladder, induced bladder overactivity and significantly decreased bladder capacity to about 20% of control capacity measured during saline infusion. Tibial nerve stimulation at low (5 Hz) or high (30 Hz) frequency significantly increased bladder capacity to about 40% of saline control capacity when it was applied during acetic acid infusion cystometrogram. Bladder contraction amplitude was smaller during acetic acid irritation than during saline distention due to significantly smaller bladder capacity. Tibial nerve stimulation at 5 Hz increased bladder capacity and bladder contraction amplitude. Activation of somatic afferents in the tibial nerve of cats can partially reverse the bladder overactivity induced by intravesical administration of a chemical irritant that activates C-fiber afferent nerves. These data are consistent with clinical studies showing that tibial nerve neuromodulation is effective treatment for overactive bladder symptoms. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Motor neuron activation in peripheral nerves using infrared neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, E. J.; Tyler, D. J.

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Localized activation of peripheral axons may improve selectivity of peripheral nerve interfaces. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) employs localized delivery to activate neural tissue. This study investigated INS to determine whether localized delivery limited functionality in larger mammalian nerves. Approach. The rabbit sciatic nerve was stimulated extraneurally with 1875 nm wavelength infrared light, electrical stimulation, or a combination of both. Infrared-sensitive regions (ISR) of the nerve surface and electromyogram (EMG) recruitment of the Medial Gastrocnemius, Lateral Gastrocnemius, Soleus, and Tibialis Anterior were the primary output measures. Stimulation applied included infrared-only, electrical-only, and combined infrared and electrical. Main results. 81% of nerves tested were sensitive to INS, with 1.7 ± 0.5 ISR detected per nerve. INS was selective to a single muscle within 81% of identified ISR. Activation energy threshold did not change significantly with stimulus power, but motor activation decreased significantly when radiant power was decreased. Maximum INS levels typically recruited up to 2-9% of any muscle. Combined infrared and electrical stimulation differed significantly from electrical recruitment in 7% of cases. Significance. The observed selectivity of INS indicates that it may be useful in augmenting rehabilitation, but significant challenges remain in increasing sensitivity and response magnitude to improve the functionality of INS.

  6. Model-based analysis and design of nerve cuff electrodes for restoring bladder function by selective stimulation of the pudendal nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Alexander R.; Grill, Warren M.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve (PN) is being developed as a means to restore bladder function in persons with spinal cord injury. A single nerve cuff electrode placed on the proximal PN trunk may enable selective stimulation of distinct fascicles to maintain continence or evoke micturition. The objective of this study was to design a nerve cuff that enabled selective stimulation of the PN. Approach. We evaluated the performance of both flat interface nerve electrode (FINE) cuff and round cuff designs, with a range of FINE cuff heights and number of contacts, as well as multiple contact orientations. This analysis was performed using a computational model, in which the nerve and fascicle cross-sectional positions from five human PN trunks were systematically reshaped within the nerve cuff. These cross-sections were used to create finite element models, with electric potentials calculated and applied to a cable model of a myelinated axon to evaluate stimulation selectivity for different PN targets. Subsequently, the model was coupled to a genetic algorithm (GA) to identify solutions that used multiple contact activation to maximize selectivity and minimize total stimulation voltage. Main results. Simulations did not identify any significant differences in selectivity between FINE and round cuffs, although the latter required smaller stimulation voltages for target activation due to preserved localization of targeted fascicle groups. Further, it was found that a ten contact nerve cuff generated sufficient selectivity for all PN targets, with the degree of selectivity dependent on the relative position of the target within the nerve. The GA identified solutions that increased fitness by 0.7-45.5% over single contact activation by decreasing stimulation of non-targeted fascicles. Significance. This study suggests that using an optimal nerve cuff design and multiple contact activation could enable selective stimulation of the human PN trunk for

  7. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for spasticity: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tenorio, E; Serrano-Muñoz, D; Avendaño-Coy, J; Gómez-Soriano, J

    2016-07-26

    Although transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has traditionally been used to treat pain, some studies have observed decreased spasticity after use of this technique. However, its use in clinical practice is still limited. Our purpose was twofold: to determine whether TENS is effective for treating spasticity or associated symptoms in patients with neurological involvement, and to determine which stimulation parameters exert the greatest effect on variables associated with spasticity. Two independent reviewers used PubMed, PEDro, and Cochrane databases to search for randomised clinical trials addressing TENS and spasticity published before 12 May 2015, and selected the articles that met the inclusion criteria. Of the initial 96 articles, 86 were excluded. The remaining 10 articles present results from 207 patients with a cerebrovascular accident, 84 with multiple sclerosis, and 39 with spinal cord lesions. In light of our results, we recommend TENS as a treatment for spasticity due to its low cost, ease of use, and absence of adverse reactions. However, the great variability in the types of stimulation used in the studies, and the differences in parameters and variables, make it difficult to assess and compare any results that might objectively determine the effectiveness of this technique and show how to optimise parameters. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Side effects of vagus nerve stimulation during physical exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, D.M.; de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine; Vosman, I.; Driesse, M.J.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a treatment option in the case of refractory epilepsy. However, several side effects have been reported, including dyspnea, coughing and bradycardias [JCA 2010: 22;213-222]. Although some patients experience hardly any side effects from the stimulation

  9. Carbon nanomaterials for nerve tissue stimulation and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraczek-Szczypta, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology offers new perspectives in the field of innovative medicine, especially for reparation and regeneration of irreversibly damaged or diseased nerve tissues due to lack of effective self-repair mechanisms in the peripheral and central nervous systems (PNS and CNS, respectively) of the human body. Carbon nanomaterials, due to their unique physical, chemical and biological properties, are currently considered as promising candidates for applications in regenerative medicine. This chapter discusses the potential applications of various carbon nanomaterials including carbon nanotubes, nanofibers and graphene for regeneration and stimulation of nerve tissue, as well as in drug delivery systems for nerve disease therapy. © 2013.

  10. Stimulating parameters and de-synchronization in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.-L.; Chen, Z.-Y.; Ma, J.; Feng, W.-J.

    2008-02-01

    The influence of the stimulation parameters on the de-synchronization of small world Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural network is numerically investigated in the vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy. The simulation shows that synchronization evolves into de-synchronization when a part of neurons (about 10 percent) is stimulated with a pulse current signal. The network de-synchronization appears to be sensitive to the stimulation parameters. For the case of the same stimulation intensity, those weakly coupled networks reach de-synchronization more easily than strongly coupled networks. There exist an optimal stimulation interval and period of continuous stimulation time when other stimulation parameters remain invariable.

  11. Stimulating parameters and de-synchronization in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y-L; Ma, J; Feng, W-J [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Lanzhou University of Technology, 287 Langongping Road, Lanzhou 730050 (China); Chen, Z-Y [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)], E-mail: hyperchaos@163.com, E-mail: liyl20031@126.com, E-mail: chen_zhao_yang@yahoo.com

    2008-02-15

    The influence of the stimulation parameters on the de-synchronization of small world Hindmarsh-Rose (H-R) neural network is numerically investigated in the vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy. The simulation shows that synchronization evolves into de-synchronization when a part of neurons (about 10 percent) is stimulated with a pulse current signal. The network de-synchronization appears to be sensitive to the stimulation parameters. For the case of the same stimulation intensity, those weakly coupled networks reach de-synchronization more easily than strongly coupled networks. There exist an optimal stimulation interval and period of continuous stimulation time when other stimulation parameters remain invariable.

  12. Peripheral Nerve Regeneration Strategies: Electrically Stimulating Polymer Based Nerve Growth Conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew; Shelke, Namdev B.; Manoukian, Ohan S.; Yu, Xiaojun; McCullough, Louise D.; Kumbar, Sangamesh G.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of large peripheral nerve damages ranges from the use of an autologous nerve graft to a synthetic nerve growth conduit. Biological grafts, in spite of many merits, show several limitations in terms of availability and donor site morbidity, and outcomes are suboptimal due to fascicle mismatch, scarring, and fibrosis. Tissue engineered nerve graft substitutes utilize polymeric conduits in conjunction with cues both chemical and physical, cells alone and or in combination. The chemical and physical cues delivered through polymeric conduits play an important role and drive tissue regeneration. Electrical stimulation (ES) has been applied toward the repair and regeneration of various tissues such as muscle, tendon, nerve, and articular tissue both in laboratory and clinical settings. The underlying mechanisms that regulate cellular activities such as cell adhesion, proliferation, cell migration, protein production, and tissue regeneration following ES is not fully understood. Polymeric constructs that can carry the electrical stimulation along the length of the scaffold have been developed and characterized for possible nerve regeneration applications. We discuss the use of electrically conductive polymers and associated cell interaction, biocompatibility, tissue regeneration, and recent basic research for nerve regeneration. In conclusion, a multifunctional combinatorial device comprised of biomaterial, structural, functional, cellular, and molecular aspects may be the best way forward for effective peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27278739

  13. Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Constipation: Suboptimal Outcome and Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Lundby, Lilli; Buntzen, Steen;

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is an emerging treatment for patients with severe constipation. There has been no substantial report to date on suboptimal outcomes and complications. We report our experience of more than 6 years by focusing on incidents and the management of reportable events.......Sacral nerve stimulation is an emerging treatment for patients with severe constipation. There has been no substantial report to date on suboptimal outcomes and complications. We report our experience of more than 6 years by focusing on incidents and the management of reportable events....

  14. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  15. Nerve stimulator-guided sciatic-femoral nerve block in raptors undergoing surgical treatment of pododermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, Dario; Noviello, Emilio; Adami, Chiara

    2015-07-01

    To describe the nerve stimulator-guided sciatic-femoral nerve block in raptors undergoing surgical treatment of pododermatitis. Prospective clinical trial. Five captive raptors (Falco peregrinus) aged 6.7 ± 1.3 years. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. The sciatic-femoral nerve block was performed with 2% lidocaine (0.05 mL kg(-1) per nerve) as the sole intra-operative analgesic treatment. Intraoperative physiological variables were recorded every 10 minutes from endotracheal intubation until the end of anaesthesia. Assessment of intraoperative nociception was based on changes in physiological variables above baseline values, while evaluation of postoperative pain relied on species-specific behavioural indicators. The sciatic-femoral nerve block was feasible in raptors and the motor responses following electrical stimulation of both nerves were consistent with those reported in mammalian species. During surgery no rescue analgesia was required. The anaesthesia plane was stable and cardiorespiratory variables did not increase significantly in response to surgical stimulation. Iatrogenic complications, namely nerve damage and local anaesthetic toxicity, did not occur. Recovery was smooth and uneventful. The duration (mean ± SD) of the analgesic effect provided by the nerve block was 130 ± 20 minutes. The sciatic-femoral nerve block as described in dogs and rabbits can be performed in raptors as well. Further clinical trials with a control groups are required to better investigate the analgesic efficacy and the safety of this technique in raptors. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  16. A model of auditory nerve responses to electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    to neutralize the charge induced during the cathodic phase. Single-neuron recordings in cat auditory nerve using monophasic electrical stimulation show, however, that both phases in isolation can generate an AP. The site of AP generation differs for both phases, being more central for the anodic phase and more...... perception of CI listeners, a model needs to incorporate the correct responsiveness of the AN to anodic and cathodic polarity. Previous models of electrical stimulation have been developed based on AN responses to symmetric biphasic stimulation or to monophasic cathodic stimulation. These models, however......, fail to correctly predict responses to anodic stimulation. This study presents a model that simulates AN responses to anodic and cathodic stimulation. The main goal was to account for the data obtained with monophasic electrical stimulation in cat AN. The model is based on an exponential integrate...

  17. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayce, Jonathan M; Wells, Jonathon D; Malphrus, Jonathan D; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B; Konrad, Peter E; Jansen, E Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients ([Formula: see text]) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and [Formula: see text]. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at [Formula: see text] and a [Formula: see text] safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans.

  18. TRANSCUTANEOUS ELECTRICAL NERVE-STIMULATION (TENS) IN RAYNAUDS-PHENOMENON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MULDER, P; DOMPELING, EC; VANSLOCHTERENVANDERBOOR, JC; KUIPERS, WD; SMIT, AJ

    1991-01-01

    Transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TENS) has been described as resulting in vasodilatation. The effect of 2 Hz TENS of the right hand during forty-five minutes on skin temperature and plethysmography of the third digit of both hands and feet and on transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcpO2) of the right h

  19. Acute Vagal Nerve Stimulation Lowers α2 Adrenoceptor Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Landau, Anne M.; Dyve, Suzan; Jakobsen, Steen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) emerged as an anti-epileptic therapy, and more recently as a potential antidepressant intervention. OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that salutary effects of VNS are mediated, at least in part, by augmentation of the inhibitory effects of cortical mo...

  20. Pudendal nerve stimulation induces urethral contraction and relaxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. le Feber (Joost); E. van Asselt (Els)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractIn this study we measured urethral pressure changes in response to efferent pudendal nerve stimulation in rats. All other neural pathways to the urethra were transected, and the urethra was continuously perfused. We found fast twitch-like contractions, super

  1. Study of nerve fibers nature reinforcing duodenal contractions by electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveshnikov D.S.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the article is to investigate the mechanism of increased reactions by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic nerve. Materials and methods: Experiments on dogs have shown that stimulant reactions during blockade of a-adrenergic by phentolamine and (3-adrenergic receptors with propranolol were completely eliminated by lizer-gol —the blocker of 5-HT12-receptors. Results: Infusion of lizergol did not influence on duodenal motor activity and the function of the vagus nerve. Conclusion: Effector neuron is found out to be serotonergic and its action is provided by 5-HT1 2 receptors

  2. Electrical stimulation accelerates nerve regeneration and functional recovery in delayed peripheral nerve injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghui; Zhang, Yongguang; Lu, Lei; Hu, Xueyu; Luo, Zhuojing

    2013-12-01

    The present study aims to investigate the potential of brief electrical stimulation (ES; 3 V, 20 Hz, 20 min) in improving functional recovery in delayed nerve injury repair (DNIR). The sciatic nerve of Sprague Dawley rats was transected, and the repair of nerve injury was delayed for different time durations (2, 4, 12 and 24 weeks). Brief depolarizing ES was applied to the proximal nerve stump when the transected nerve stumps were bridged with a hollow nerve conduit (5 mm in length) after delayed periods. We found that the diameter and number of regenerated axons, the thickness of myelin sheath, as well as the number of Fluoro-Gold retrograde-labeled motoneurons and sensory neurons were significantly increased by ES, suggesting that brief ES to proximal nerve stumps is capable of promoting nerve regeneration in DNIR with different delayed durations, with the longest duration of 24 weeks. In addition, the amplitude of compound muscle action potential (gastrocnemius muscle) and nerve conduction velocity were also enhanced, and gastrocnemius muscle atrophy was partially reversed by brief ES, indicating that brief ES to proximal nerve stump was able to improve functional recovery in DNIR. Furthermore, brief ES was capable of increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the spinal cord in DNIR, suggesting that BDNF-mediated neurotrophin signaling might be one of the contributing factors to the beneficial effect of brief ES on DNIR. In conclusion, the present findings indicate the potential of using brief ES as a useful method to improve functional recovery for delayed repair of peripheral nerve lesions. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Electrical stimulation of nerve cells using conductive nanofibrous scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-11-01

    Fabrication of scaffolds with suitable chemical, mechanical, and electrical properties is critical for the success of nerve tissue engineering. Electrical stimulation was directly applied to electrospun conductive nanofibrous scaffolds to enhance the nerve regeneration process. In the present study, electrospun conductive nanofibers were prepared by mixing 10 and 15 wt% doped polyaniline (PANI) with poly (epsilon-caprolactone)/gelatin (PG) (70:30) solution (PANI/PG) by electrospinning. The fiber diameter, pore size, hydrophilicity, tensile properties, conductivity, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of nanofibers were determined, and the in vitro biodegradability of the different nanofibrous scaffolds was also evaluated. Nanofibrous scaffolds containing 15% PANI was found to exhibit the most balanced properties to meet all the required specifications for electrical stimulation for its enhanced conductivity and is used for in vitro culture and electrical stimulation of nerve stem cells. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay and scanning electron microscopy results showed that conductive nanofibrous scaffolds are suitable substrates for the attachment and proliferation of nerve stem cells. Electrical stimulation through conductive nanofibrous PANI/PG scaffolds showed enhanced cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth compared to the PANI/PG scaffolds that were not subjected to electrical stimulation.

  4. Anatomically based lower limb nerve model for electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Tanya K

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is a technique that aims to rehabilitate or restore functionality of skeletal muscles using external electrical stimulation. Despite the success achieved within the field of FES, there are still a number of questions that remain unanswered. One way of providing input to the answers is through the use of computational models. Methods This paper describes the development of an anatomically based computer model of the motor neurons in the lower limb of the human leg and shows how it can be used to simulate electrical signal propagation from the beginning of the sciatic nerve to a skeletal muscle. One-dimensional cubic Hermite finite elements were used to represent the major portions of the lower limb nerves. These elements were fit to data that had been digitised using images from the Visible Man project. Nerves smaller than approximately 1 mm could not be seen in the images, and thus a tree-branching algorithm was used to connect the ends of the fitted nerve model to the respective skeletal muscle. To simulate electrical propagation, a previously published mammalian nerve model was implemented and solved on the anatomically based nerve mesh using a finite difference method. The grid points for the finite difference method were derived from the fitted finite element mesh. By adjusting the tree-branching algorithm, it is possible to represent different levels of motor-unit recruitment. Results To illustrate the process of a propagating nerve stimulus to a muscle in detail, the above method was applied to the nerve tree that connects to the human semitendinosus muscle. A conduction velocity of 89.8 m/s was obtained for a 15 μm diameter nerve fibre. This signal was successfully propagated down the motor neurons to a selected group of motor units in the muscle. Conclusion An anatomically and physiologically based model of the posterior motor neurons in the human lower limb was developed. This

  5. Non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation in healthy humans reduces sympathetic nerve activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Clancy, JA; Mary, DA; Witte, KK; Greenwood, JP; Deuchars, SA; Deuchars, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is currently used to treat refractory epilepsy and is being investigated as a potential therapy for a range of conditions, including heart failure, tinnitus, obesity and Alzheimer's disease. However, the invasive nature and expense limits the use of VNS in patient populations and hinders the exploration of the mechanisms involved. Objective: We investigated a non-invasive method of VNS through electrical stimulation of the auricular branch of the vagu...

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy: indications, programing, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takamichi

    2015-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) provides palliation of seizure reduction for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. VNS is indicated for symptomatic localization-related epilepsy with multiple and bilateral independent foci, symptomatic generalized epilepsy with diffuse epileptogenic abnormalities, refractory idiopathic generalized epilepsy, failed intracranial epilepsy surgery, and other several reasons of contraindications to epilepsy surgery. Programing of the parameters is a principal part in VNS. Output current and duty cycle should be adjusted to higher settings particularly when a patient does not respond to the initial setting, since the pivotal randomized trials performed in the United States demonstrated high stimulation made better responses in seizure frequency. These trials revealed that a ≥ 50% seizure reduction occurred in 36.8% of patients at 1 year, in 43.2% at 2 years, and in 42.7% at 3 years in 440 patients. Safety of VNS was also confirmed because side effects including hoarseness, throat discomfort, cough, paresthesia, and headache improved progressively during the period of 3 years. The largest retrospective study with 436 patients demonstrated the mean seizure reduction of 55.8% in nearly 5 years, and also found 75.5% at 10 years in 65 consecutive patients. The intermediate analysis report of the Japan VNS Registry showed that 60% of 164 cases got a ≥ 50% seizure reduction in 12 months. In addition to seizure reduction, VNS has positive effects in mood and improves energy level, memory difficulties, social aspects, and fear of seizures. VNS is an effective and safe option for patients who are not suitable candidates for intracranial epilepsy surgery.

  7. An autopsy case of vagus nerve stimulation following acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Mayumi; Unuma, Kana; Fujii, Yusuke; Noritake, Kanako; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    Acupuncture is one of the most popular oriental medical techniques in China, Korea and Japan. This technique is also popular as alternative therapy in the Western World. Serious adverse events are rare following acupuncture, and fatal cases have been rarely reported. A male in his late forties died right after acupuncture treatment. A medico-legal autopsy disclosed severe haemorrhaging around the right vagus nerve in the neck. Other organs and laboratory data showed no significant findings. Thus, it was determined that the man could have died from severe vagal bradycardia and/or arrhythmia resulting from vagus nerve stimulation following acupuncture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a death due to vagus nerve injury after acupuncture.

  8. Peripheral nerve stimulation for treatment of postherpetic neuralgia: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott C. Palmer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuromodulation techniques have been successfully used for a varietyof neuropathic pain conditions. Th e aim of this paper is to presenta case of the successful use of a subcutaneously placed peripheralnerve stimulator for treatment of intractable postherpetic neuralgia(PHN. A 57-year old man presented with a two-year history of leftthoracic pain that developed aft er a vesicular rash. Focal neuropathic pain had not responded to treatment with multiple analgesic medications and steroid injections. Th e patient had significant relief following implantation of a peripheral nerve stimulator. Th is case represents a contribution to the small but growing body of evidence indicating that peripheral nerve stimulation may be an effective option for treatment of PHN not responsive to less invasive modalities.

  9. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Affects Pain Perception in Depressed Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Borckardt

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous research suggests that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS affects pain perception in epilepsy patients, with acute VNS decreasing pain thresholds and chronic VNS treatment increasing pain thresholds. However, no studies have investigated the effects of VNS on pain perception in chronically depressed adults, nor have controlled, systematic investigations been published on the differential effects of certain VNS device parameters on pain perception.

  10. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation boosts associative memory in older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Heidi I L; Riphagen, Joost M; Razat, Chantalle M; Wiese, Svenja; Sack, Alexander T

    2015-05-01

    Direct vagus nerve stimulation (dVNS) is known to improve mood, epilepsy, and memory. Memory improvements have been observed in Alzheimer's disease patients after long-term stimulation. The potential of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a noninvasive alternative to dVNS, to alter memory performance remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the effect of a single-session tVNS on associative memory performance in healthy older individuals. To investigate this, we performed a single-blind sham-controlled randomized crossover pilot study in healthy older individuals (n = 30, 50% female). During the stimulation or sham condition, participants performed an associative face-name memory task. tVNS enhanced the number of hits of the memory task, compared with the sham condition. This effect was specific to the experimental task. Participants reported few side effects. We conclude that tVNS is a promising neuromodulatory technique to improve associative memory performance in older individuals, even after a single session. More research is necessary to investigate its underlying neural mechanisms, the impact of varying stimulation parameters, and its applicability in patients with cognitive decline.

  11. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  12. In vivo Photonic Stimulation of Sciatic Nerve with a 1470 nm Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Dautrebande

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Photonic stimulation is a new modality of nerve stimulation, which could overcome some of the electrical stimulation limitations. In this paper, we present the results of photonic stimulation of rodent sciatic nerve with a 1470 nm laser. Muscle activation was observed with radiant exposure of 0.084 J/cm2.

  13. Modeling auditory-nerve responses to electrical stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    Cochlear implants (CI) directly stimulate the auditory nerve (AN), bypassing the mechano-electrical transduction in the inner ear. Trains of biphasic, charge balanced pulses (anodic and cathodic) are used as stimuli to avoid damage of the tissue. The pulses of either polarity are capable of produ......Cochlear implants (CI) directly stimulate the auditory nerve (AN), bypassing the mechano-electrical transduction in the inner ear. Trains of biphasic, charge balanced pulses (anodic and cathodic) are used as stimuli to avoid damage of the tissue. The pulses of either polarity are capable......μs, which is large enough to affect the temporal coding of sounds and hence, potentially, the communication abilities of the CI listener. In the present study, two recently proposed models of electric stimulation of the AN [1,2] were considered in terms of their efficacy to predict the spike timing...... for anodic and cathodic stimulation of the AN of cat [3]. The models’ responses to the electrical pulses of various shapes [4,5,6] were also analyzed. It was found that, while the models can account for the firing rates in response to various biphasic pulse shapes, they fail to correctly describe the timing...

  14. Acceleration of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration through Asymmetrically Porous Nerve Guide Conduit Applied with Biological/Physical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Rae; Oh, Se Heang; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Sufficient functional restoration of damaged peripheral nerves is a big clinical challenge. In this study, a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with selective permeability was prepared by rolling an asymmetrically porous polycaprolactone/Pluronic F127 membrane fabricated using a novel immersion precipitation method. Dual stimulation (nerve growth factor [NGF] as a biological stimulus and low-intensity pulse ultrasound [US] as a physical stimulus) was adapted to enhance nerve regeneration through an NGC. The animal study revealed that each stimulation (NGF or US) has a positive effect to promote the peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGC, however, the US-stimulated NGC group allowed more accelerated nerve regeneration compared with the NGF-stimulated group. The NGC group that received dual stimulation (NGF and US) showed more effective nerve regeneration behavior than the groups that received a single stimulation (NGF or US). The asymmetrically porous NGC with dual NGF and US stimulation may be a promising strategy for the clinical treatment of delayed and insufficient functional recovery of a peripheral nerve. PMID:23859225

  15. Acceleration of peripheral nerve regeneration through asymmetrically porous nerve guide conduit applied with biological/physical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Rae; Oh, Se Heang; Kwon, Gu Birm; Namgung, Uk; Song, Kyu Sang; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lee, Jin Ho

    2013-12-01

    Sufficient functional restoration of damaged peripheral nerves is a big clinical challenge. In this study, a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with selective permeability was prepared by rolling an asymmetrically porous polycaprolactone/Pluronic F127 membrane fabricated using a novel immersion precipitation method. Dual stimulation (nerve growth factor [NGF] as a biological stimulus and low-intensity pulse ultrasound [US] as a physical stimulus) was adapted to enhance nerve regeneration through an NGC. The animal study revealed that each stimulation (NGF or US) has a positive effect to promote the peripheral nerve regeneration through the NGC, however, the US-stimulated NGC group allowed more accelerated nerve regeneration compared with the NGF-stimulated group. The NGC group that received dual stimulation (NGF and US) showed more effective nerve regeneration behavior than the groups that received a single stimulation (NGF or US). The asymmetrically porous NGC with dual NGF and US stimulation may be a promising strategy for the clinical treatment of delayed and insufficient functional recovery of a peripheral nerve.

  16. Differential activation of nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olree Kenneth S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier observations in our lab had indicated that large, time-varying magnetic fields could elicit action potentials that travel in only one direction in at least some of the myelinated axons in peripheral nerves. The objective of this study was to collect quantitative evidence for magnetically induced unidirectional action potentials in peripheral nerves of human subjects. A magnetic coil was maneuvered to a location on the upper arm where physical effects consistent with the creation of unidirectional action potentials were observed. Electromyographic (EMG and somatosensory evoked potential (SEP recordings were then made from a total of 20 subjects during stimulation with the magnetic coil. Results The relative amplitudes of the EMG and SEP signals changed oppositely when the current direction in the magnetic coil was reversed. This effect was consistent with current direction in the coil relative to the arm for all subjects. Conclusion A differential evocation of motor and sensory fibers was demonstrated and indicates that it may be possible to induce unidirectional action potentials in myelinated peripheral nerve fibers with magnetic stimulation.

  17. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy in partial epilepsy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Mariangela; Zavanone, Chiara; Dupont, Sophie; Restivo, Domenico A; Pavone, Antonino

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent, unprovoked epileptic seizures. The majority of people given a diagnosis of epilepsy have a good prognosis, but 20-30 % will develop drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a neuromodulatory treatment that is used as an adjunctive therapy for treating people with medically refractory epilepsy. It consists of chronic intermittent electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, delivered by a programmable pulse generator (Neuro-Cybernetic Prosthesis). In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration approved VNS as adjunctive treatment for medically refractory partial-onset seizures in adults and adolescents. This article reviews the literature from 1988 to nowadays. We discuss thoroughly the anatomy and physiology of vagus nerve and the potential mechanisms of actions and clinical applications involved in VNS therapy, as well as the management, safety, tolerability and effectiveness of VNS therapy. VNS for partial seizures appears to be an effective and well tolerated treatment in adult and pediatric patients. People noted improvements in feelings of well-being, alertness, memory and thinking skills, as well as mood. The adverse effect profile is substantially different from the adverse effect profile associated with antiepileptic drugs, making VNS a potential alternative for patients with difficulty tolerating antiepileptic drug adverse effects. Despite the passing years and the advent of promising neuromodulation technologies, VNS remains an efficacy treatment for people with medically refractory epilepsy. Past and ongoing investigations in other indications have provided signals of the therapeutic potential in a wide variety of conditions.

  18. Cardiac responses of vagus nerve stimulation: Intraoperative bradycardia and subsequent chronic stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardesch, J.J.; Buschman, H.P.J.; Burgh, van der P.H.; Wagener-Schimmel, L.J.; Aa, van der H.E.; Hageman, G.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Few adverse events on heart rate have been reported with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for refractory epilepsy. We describe three cases with intraoperative bradycardia during device testing. PATIENTS AND METHODS: At our hospital 111 patients have received a VNS system. Intraoperative dev

  19. Cardiac responses of vagus nerve stimulation: Intraoperative bradycardia and subsequent chronic stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardesch, J.J.; Buschman, H.P.J.; van der Burgh, P.H.; Wagener-Schimmel, L.J.; van der Aa, H.E.; Hageman, G.

    OBJECTIVES: Few adverse events on heart rate have been reported with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for refractory epilepsy. We describe three cases with intraoperative bradycardia during device testing. PATIENTS AND METHODS: At our hospital 111 patients have received a VNS system. Intraoperative

  20. Transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation using perineal vibration: a novel method for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønksen, Jens; Ohl, Dana A; Bonde, Birthe;

    2007-01-01

    We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence.......We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence....

  1. Temporal pattern of stimulation modulates reflex bladder activation by pudendal nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Meredith J; Grill, Warren M

    2016-11-01

    Reflex bladder activation and inhibition by electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve (PN) afferents is a promising approach to restore control of bladder function in persons with lower urinary tract dysfunction caused by disease or injury. The objective of this work was to determine whether bladder activation evoked by pudendal afferent stimulation was dependent on the temporal pattern of stimulation, and whether specific temporal patterns of stimulation produced larger bladder contractions than constant frequency stimulation. The mean and maximum contraction pressures evoked by different temporal patterns of stimulation of the dorsal genital branch of the pudendal nerve were measured under isovolumetric conditions in α-chloralose anesthetized cats. A computational model of the spinal neural network mediating the pudendo-vesical reflex was used to understand the mechanisms of different bladder responses to patterned stimulation. The pattern of stimulation significantly affected the magnitude of evoked bladder contractions; several temporal patterns were as effective as regular stimulation, but no pattern evoked larger bladder contractions. Random patterns and patterns with pauses, burst-like activity, or high frequency components evoked significantly smaller bladder contractions, supporting the use of regular frequency stimulation in the development of neural prosthetic approaches for bladder control. These results reveal that the bladder response to pudendal afferent stimulation is dependent on the pattern, as well as the frequency, of stimulation. The computational model revealed that the effects of patterned pudendal afferent stimulation were determined by the dynamic properties of excitatory and inhibitory interneurons in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:882-887, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. MRI of optic nerve lesion in multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Koichi; Uehara, Masako; Ashikaga, Ryuuichirou; Inoue, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu; Nakao, Yuzou; Miyakoshi, Keizou (Kinki Univ., Osakasayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    We evaluated the ability of MRI using short TI inversion recovery (STIR) to detect optic nerve lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS). Eleven patients with MS were studied with MRI at 0.5 T. STIR images revealed high signal lesions in all of 14 nerves in 11 patients with previous and recurrent attack of optic neuritis. In addition, two of seven asymptomatic nerves also showed high intensity on STIR images. The high signal lesions on STIR images seemed to reflect demyelination in the nerves with some attacks and to show occult lesions in the nerves without any attack. STIR method was concluded to be a potentially useful procedure in detection of optic nerve lesions in MS. (author).

  3. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  4. Peripheral nerve stimulation for the treatment of neuropathic craniofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, K V

    2007-01-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain in the region of head and face presents a challenging problem for pain specialists. In particular, those patients who do not respond to conventional treatment modalities usually continue to suffer from pain due to lack of reliable medical and surgical approaches. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) has been used for treatment of neuropathic pain for many decades, but only recently it has been systematically applied to the craniofacial region. Here we summarize published experience with PNS in treatment of craniofacial pain and discuss some technical details of the craniofacial PNS procedure.

  5. Multiple Reflex Pathways Contribute to Bladder Activation by Intraurethral Stimulation in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Meredith J; Swan, Brandon D; Danziger, Zachary C; Amundsen, Cindy L; Grill, Warren M

    2017-08-08

    To measure the urodynamic effects of electrical co-stimulation of 2 individual sites in the proximal and distal urethra in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). This work was motivated by preclinical findings that selective co-stimulation of the cranial urethral sensory nerve and the dorsal genital nerve, which innervate the proximal and distal portions of the urethra, respectively, increased reflex bladder activation and voiding efficiency. Electrical co-stimulation of urethral afferents was conducted in persons with chronic SCI during urodynamics. The effects of different frequencies of intraurethral stimulation at multiple urethral locations on bladder pressure and pelvic floor electromyographic activity were measured. Electromyographic activity indicated that multiple reflex pathways were recruited through stimulation that contributed to bladder activation. The size of reflex bladder contractions evoked by stimulation was dependent on stimulation location or reflex activated and stimulation frequency. Pudendal nerve afferents are a promising target to restore lost bladder control, as stimulation with different frequencies may be used to treat urinary incontinence and increase continent volumes or to generate stimulation-evoked bladder contractions for on-demand voiding. This work identified that co-stimulation of multiple afferent reflex pathways can enhance activation of spinal circuits and may enable improved bladder emptying in SCI when stimulation of a single pathway is not sufficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Jak/Stat Signaling Stimulates Zebrafish Optic Nerve Regeneration and Overcomes the Inhibitory Actions of Socs3 and Sfpq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaeidi, Fairouz; Bemben, Michael A.; Zhao, Xiao-Feng

    2014-01-01

    The regenerative failure of mammalian optic axons is partly mediated by Socs3-dependent inhibition of Jak/Stat signaling (Smith et al., 2009, 2011). Whether Jak/Stat signaling is part of the normal regenerative response observed in animals that exhibit an intrinsic capacity for optic nerve regeneration, such as zebrafish, remains unknown. Nor is it known whether the repression of regenerative inhibitors, such as Socs3, contributes to the robust regenerative response of zebrafish to optic nerve damage. Here we report that Jak/Stat signaling stimulates optic nerve regeneration in zebrafish. We found that IL-6 family cytokines, acting via Gp130-coupled receptors, stimulate Jak/Stat3 signaling in retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury. Among these cytokines, we found that CNTF, IL-11, and Clcf1/Crlf1a can stimulate optic axon regrowth. Surprisingly, optic nerve injury stimulated the expression of Socs3 and Sfpq (splicing factor, proline/glutamine rich) that attenuate optic nerve regeneration. These proteins were induced in a Jak/Stat-dependent manner, stimulated each other's expression and suppressed the expression of regeneration-associated genes. In vivo, the injury-dependent induction of Socs3 and Sfpq inhibits optic nerve regeneration but does not block it. We identified a robust induction of multiple cytokine genes in zebrafish retinal ganglion cells that may contribute to their ability to overcome these inhibitory factors. These studies not only identified mechanisms underlying optic nerve regeneration in fish but also suggest new molecular targets for enhancing optic nerve regeneration in mammals. PMID:24523552

  7. Vagus Nerve and Vagus Nerve Stimulation, a Comprehensive Review: Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2016-02-01

    The development of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) began in the 19th century. Although it did not work well initially, it introduced the idea that led to many VNS-related animal studies for seizure control. In the 1990s, with the success of several early clinical trials, VNS was approved for the treatment of refractory epilepsy, and later for the refractory depression. To date, several novel electrical stimulating devices are being developed. New invasive devices are designed to automate the seizure control and for use in heart failure. Non-invasive transcutaneous devices, which stimulate auricular VN or carotid VN, are also undergoing clinical trials for treatment of epilepsy, pain, headache, and others. Noninvasive VNS (nVNS) exhibits greater safety profiles and seems similarly effective to their invasive counterpart. In this review, we discuss the history and development of VNS, as well as recent progress in invasive and nVNS.

  8. A systematic review investigating the relationship between efficacy and stimulation parameters when using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation after knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Beckwée

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of postoperative knee arthroplasty pain and to relate these results to the stimulation parameters used. Data Sources: PubMed, Pedro and Web of Knowledge were systematically screened for studies investigating effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on postoperative knee arthroplasty pain. Review Methods: Studies were screened for their methodological and therapeutical quality. We appraised the influence of the stimulation settings used and indicated whether or not a neurophysiological and/or mechanistic rationale was given for these stimulation settings. Results: A total of 5 articles met the inclusion criteria. In total, 347 patients were investigated. The number of patients who received some form of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation was 117, and 54 patients received sham transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation. Pain was the primary outcome in all studies. The stimulation settings used in the studies (n = 2 that reported significant effects differed from the others as they implemented a submaximal stimulation intensity. Stimulation parameters were heterogeneous, and only one study provided a rationale for them. Conclusion: This review reveals that an effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation might have been missed due to low methodological and therapeutical quality. Justifying the choice of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation parameters may improve therapeutical quality.

  9. Hemiplegic peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Okuma

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man experienced double vision around January, 2010, followed by weakness of his left upper and lower extremities. Articulation disorders and loss of hearing in his left ear developed, and he was admitted to our hospital on February 14, 2010. Physical examination was normal, and neurological examination showed clear consciousness with no impairment of cognitive function, but with articulation disorders. Olfactory sensation was reduced. Left ptosis and left gaze palsy, complete left facial palsy, perceptive deafness of the left ear, and muscle weakness of the left trapezius muscle were observed. Paresis in the left upper and lower extremities was graded 4/5 through manual muscle testing. Sensory system evaluation revealed complete left-side palsy, including the face. Deep tendon reflexes were slightly diminished equally on both sides; no pathologic reflex was seen. No abnormality of the brain parenchyma, cerebral nerves or cervicothoracolumbar region was found on brain magnetic resonance imaging. On electroencephalogram, alpha waves in the main frequency band of 8 to 9 Hz were recorded, indicating normal findings. Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT scan showed reduced blood flow in the right inner frontal lobe and both occipital lobes. Nerve biopsy (left sural nerve showed reduction of nerve density by 30%, with demyelination. The patient also showed manifestations of multiple cranial nerve disorder, i.e., of the trigeminal nerve, glossopharyngeal nerve, vagus nerve, and hypoglossal nerve. Whole-body examination was negative. Finally, based on ischemic brain SPECT images, spinal fluid findings and nerve biopsy results, peripheral neuropathy accompanied with multiple cranial nerve palsy was diagnosed.

  10. 21 CFR 882.5830 - Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator... Implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic nerve stimulator. (a) Identification. An implanted diaphragmatic/phrenic... spinal cord injury, or chronic lung disease. The stimulator consists of an implanted receiver...

  11. 21 CFR 882.5870 - Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain....5870 Implanted peripheral nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted peripheral... the stimulating pulses across the patient's skin to the implanted receiver. (b) Classification....

  12. Post-stimulation block of frog sciatic nerve by high-frequency (kHz) biphasic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Xiao, Zhiying; Wang, Jicheng; Shen, Bing; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2017-04-01

    This study determined if high-frequency biphasic stimulation can induce nerve conduction block that persists after the stimulation is terminated, i.e., post-stimulation block. The frog sciatic nerve-muscle preparation was used in the study. Muscle contraction force induced by low-frequency (0.5 Hz) nerve stimulation was recorded to indicate the occurrence and recovery of nerve block induced by the high-frequency (5 or 10 kHz) biphasic stimulation. Nerve block was observed during high-frequency stimulation and after termination of the stimulation. The recovery from post-stimulation block occurred in two distinct phases. During the first phase, the complete block induced during high-frequency stimulation was maintained. The average maximal duration for the first phase was 107 ± 50 s. During the second phase, the block gradually or abruptly reversed. The duration of both first and second phases was dependent on stimulation intensity and duration but not frequency. Stimulation of higher intensity (1.4-2 times block threshold) and longer duration (5 min) produced the longest period (249 ± 58 s) for a complete recovery. Post-stimulation block can be induced by high-frequency biphasic stimulation, which is important for future investigations of the blocking mechanisms and for optimizing the stimulation parameters or protocols in clinical applications.

  13. Early experiences with tachycardia-triggered vagus nerve stimulation using the AspireSR stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tahry, Riëm; Hirsch, Martin; Van Rijckevorsel, Kenou; Santos, Susana Ferrao; de Tourtchaninoff, Marianne; Rooijakkers, Herbert; Coenen, Volker; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Many epilepsy patients treated with vagus nerve stimulation additionally use an "on-demand" function, triggering an extra stimulation to terminate a seizure or diminish its severity. Nevertheless, a substantial number of patients are not able to actively trigger stimulations by use of a magnet, due to the absence of an aura or inability for voluntary actions in the early phase of a seizure. To address this need, a novel implantable pulse generator, the AspireSR VNS system, was developed to provide automated ictal stimulation triggered by a seizure-detecting algorithm. We report our experience with three patients in assessing the functionality of ictal stimulation, illustrating the detection system in practice. Detection of ictal tachycardia and variable additional detections of physiological tachycardia depended on the individual seizure-detecting algorithm settings.

  14. Extracellular stimulation of nerve cells with electric current spikes induced by voltage steps

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A new stimulation paradigm is presented for the stimulation of nerve cells by extracellular electric currents. In the new paradigm stimulation is achieved with the current spike induced by a voltage step whenever the voltage step is applied to a live biological tissue. By experimental evidence and theoretical arguments, it is shown that this spike is well suited for the stimulation of nerve cells. Stimulation of the human tongue is used for proof of principle. Charge injection thresholds are ...

  15. Vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan M.R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS represents one of the main surgical options for the treatment of the refractory epilepsy in pediatric and adult patients. There are several mechanism involved in vagal nerve stimulation which could influence the pathophysiology of seizures like neuromodulation of the thalamic and subthalamic nuclei involved in seizure initiation and the modulation of the neurotransmitters pattern norepinefrin, GABA, and serotonin. The VNS system is composed of the implanted components (the generator, the lead with the electrodes attached and the programming system components (programming wand and handheld computer. The authors present their experience with 81 patients diagnosed with refractory epilepsy, investigated, selected and implanted with vagal neurostimulators between December 2012 and January 2015 in Neurosurgery Clinic, "Bagdasar-Arseni" Emergency Hospital. The surgical technique and the potential pitfalls are described in detail. There were 20 children (24,7% and 61 (75,3% adults in this series. There was no death in this series and no intraoperative incidence. One patient presented dysphagia postoperatively which completely remitted after two months of follow-up. The outcome in term of seizure frequency and severity was better for patients under 30 years compared with patients older than 30 years. VNS represents now a safe, quick and efficient surgical procedure with a minimum period of hospitalization and a short recovery period. The good results on long term improve the quality of life of the patients and facilitate the social and professional reinsertion

  16. A Method for Functional Quantification of the Reflex Effect of Human Peripheral Nerve Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Zehr, E. P.; Komiyama, Tomoyushi; Stein, R B

    2000-01-01

    E.P. Zehr, KOMIYAMA, T. and R.B. Stein. A Method for Functional Quantification of the Reflex Effect of Human Peripheral Nerve Stimulation. Adv. Exerc. Sports Physiol., Vol.6, No.1 pp25-32, 2000. We have developed simple method that accounts for the overrall function of reflex effects occurring in the surface electrimyogran (EMG) after human nerve stimulation. This method involves the subtraction of pre-stimulus EMG levels from EMG modulation curves obtained after human peripheral nerve stimul...

  17. Electrical nerve stimulation to promote micturition in spinal cord injury patients: A review of current attempts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian; Chew, Daniel J; Biers, Suzanne; Thiruchelvam, Nikesh

    2016-03-01

    In this review, we focus on the current attempts of electrical nerve stimulation for micturition in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. A literature search was performed through PubMed using "spinal cord injury," "electrical nerve stimulation AND bladder," "sacral anterior root stimulation/stimulator" and "Brindley stimulator" from January 1975 to January 2014. Twenty studies were selected for this review. Electrical nerve stimulation is a clinical option for promoting micturition in SCI patients. Well-designed, randomized and controlled studies are essential for further investigation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Prolonged electrical stimulation causes no damage to sacral nerve roots in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Peng; Yang, Xiaohong; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zheng, Weidong; Tan, Yunbing

    2014-06-15

    Previous studies have shown that, anode block electrical stimulation of the sacral nerve root can produce physiological urination and reconstruct urinary bladder function in rabbits. However, whether long-term anode block electrical stimulation causes damage to the sacral nerve root remains unclear, and needs further investigation. In this study, a complete spinal cord injury model was established in New Zealand white rabbits through T9-10 segment transection. Rabbits were given continuous electrical stimulation for a short period and then chronic stimulation for a longer period. Results showed that compared with normal rabbits, the structure of nerve cells in the anterior sacral nerve roots was unchanged in spinal cord injury rabbits after electrical stimulation. There was no significant difference in the expression of apoptosis-related proteins such as Bax, Caspase-3, and Bcl-2. Experimental findings indicate that neurons in the rabbit sacral nerve roots tolerate electrical stimulation, even after long-term anode block electrical stimulation.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in optic nerve lesions with multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shigeyuki; Hirayama, Keizo; Kakisu, Yonetsugu; Adachi, Emiko (Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-12-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the optic nerve was performed in 10 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) using short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) pulse sequences, and the results were compared with the visual evoked potentials (VEP). The 10 patients had optic neuritis in the chronic or remitting phase together with additional symptoms or signs allowing a diagnosis of clinically definite or probable MS. Sixteen optic nerves were clinically affected and 4 were unaffected. MRI was performed using a 0.5 tesla supeconducting unit, and multiple continuous 5 mm coronal and axial STIR images were obtained. A lesion was judged to be present if a focal or diffuse area of increased signal intensity was detectd in the optic nerve. In VEP, a delay in peak latency or no P 100 component was judged to be abnormal. With regard to the clinically affected optic nerves, MRI revealed a region of increased signal intensity in 14/16 (88%) and the VEP was abnormal in 16/16 (100%). In the clinically unaffected optic nerves, MRI revealed an increased signal intensity in 2/4 (50%). One of these nerves had an abnormal VEP and the other had a VEP latency at the upper limit of normal. The VEP was abnormal in 1/4 (25%). In the clinically affected optic nerves, the degree of loss of visual acuity was not associated with the longitudinal extent of the lesions shown by MRI. The mean length was 17.5 mm in optic nerves with a slight disturbance of visual acuity and 15.0 mm in nerves with severe visual loss. MRI using STIR pulse sequences was found to be almost as sensitive as VEP in detecting both clinically affected and unaffected optic nerve lesions in patients with MS, and was useful in visualizing the location or size of the lesions. (author).

  20. Electrical nerve stimulation as an aid to the placement of a brachial plexus block : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Most local anaesthetic blocks are placed blindly, based on a sound knowledge of anatomy. Very often the relationship between the site of deposition of local anaesthetic and the nerve to be blocked is unknown. Large motor neurons may be stimulated with the aid of an electrical current. By observing for muscle twitches, through electrical stimulation of the nerve, a needle can be positioned extremely close to the nerve. The accuracy of local anaesthetic blocks can be improved by this technique. By using the lowest possible current a needle could be positioned within 2-5mm of a nerve. The correct duration of stimulation ensures that stimulation of sensory nerves does not occur. The use of electrical nerve stimulation in veterinary medicine is a novel technique that requires further evaluation.

  1. Electrical stimulation of anal sphincter or pudendal nerve improves anal sphincter pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaser, Margot S; Salcedo, Levilester; Wang, Guangjian; Zaszczurynski, Paul; Cruz, Michelle A; Butler, Robert S; Jiang, Hai-Hong; Zutshi, Massarat

    2012-12-01

    Stimulation of the pudendal nerve or the anal sphincter could provide therapeutic options for fecal incontinence with little involvement of other organs. The goal of this project was to assess the effects of pudendal nerve and anal sphincter stimulation on bladder and anal pressures. Ten virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated to control (n = 2), perianal stimulation (n = 4), and pudendal nerve stimulation (n = 4) groups. A monopolar electrode was hooked to the pudendal nerve or placed on the anal sphincter. Aballoon catheter was inserted into the anus to measure anal pressure, and a catheter was inserted into the bladder via the urethra to measure bladder pressure. Bladder and anal pressures were measured with different electrical stimulation parameters and different timing of electrical stimulation relative to spontaneous anal sphincter contractions. Increasing stimulation current had the most dramatic effect on both anal and bladder pressures. An immediate increase in anal pressure was observed when stimulating either the anal sphincter or the pudendal nerve at stimulation values of 1 mA or 2 mA. No increase in anal pressure was observed for lower current values. Bladder pressure increased at high current during anal sphincter stimulation, but not as much as during pudendal nerve stimulation. Increased bladder pressure during anal sphincter stimulation was due to contraction of the abdominal muscles. Electrical stimulation caused an increase in anal pressures with bladder involvement only at high current. These initial results suggest that electrical stimulation can increase anal sphincter pressure, enhancing continence control.

  2. Novel High-Frequency Peripheral Nerve Stimulator Treatment of Refractory Postherpetic Neuralgia: A Brief Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Imanuel R; Chen, Jeffrey L; Hiller, David; Souzdalnitski, Dmitri; Sheean, Geoffrey; Wallace, Mark; Barba, David

    2015-08-01

    The study aims to describe an ultrasound (US)-guided peripheral nerve stimulation implant technique and describe the effect of high-frequency peripheral nerve stimulation on refractory postherpetic neuralgia. Following a cadaver pilot trial using US and confirmatory fluoroscopic guidance, a 52-year-old man with refractory left supraorbital neuralgia underwent combined US and fluoroscopic-guided supraorbital peripheral nerve stimulator trial. The patient was subsequently implanted with a percutaneous lead over the left supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve utilizing a high-frequency stimulation paradigm. At 9 months follow-up, the pain intensity had declined from a weekly average of 8/10 to 1/10 on the pain visual analog scale (VAS). After implant, both nerve conduction and blink reflex studies were performed, which demonstrated herpetic nerve damage and frequency-specific peripheral nerve stimulation effects. The patient preferred analgesia in the supraorbital nerve distribution accomplished with high-frequency paresthesia-free stimulation (HFS) at an amplitude of 6.2 mA, a frequency of 100-1200 Hz, and a pulse width of 130 μsec, to paresthesia-mediated pain relief associated with low-frequency stimulation. We report the implant of a supraorbital peripheral nerve stimulating electrode that utilizes a high-frequency program resulting in sustained suppression of intractable postherpetic neuralgia. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Endoscopic laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felisati, Giovanni; Gardella, Elena; Schiavo, Paolo; Saibene, Alberto Maria; Pipolo, Carlotta; Bertazzoli, Manuela; Chiesa, Valentina; Maccari, Alberto; Franzini, Angelo; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2014-01-01

    In 30% of patients with epilepsy seizure control cannot be achieved with medications. When medical therapy is not effective, and epilepsy surgery cannot be performed, vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation is a therapeutic option. Laryngeal patterns in vagus nerve stimulation have not been extensively studied yet. The objective was to evaluate laryngeal patterns in a cohort of patients affected by drug-resistant epilepsy after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. 14 consecutive patients underwent a systematic otolaryngologic examination between 6 months and 5 years after implantation and activation of a vagus nerve stimulation therapy device. All patients underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation, which was recorded on a portable device allowing a convenient slow-motion analysis of laryngeal patterns. All recordings were blindly evaluated by two of the authors. We observed three different laryngeal patterns. Four patients showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and during vagus nerve stimulation; seven showed left vocal cord palsy at the baseline and left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation; and three patients showed a symmetric pattern at the baseline and constant left vocal cord adduction during vagus nerve stimulation. These laryngeal findings are here described for the first time in the literature and can be only partially explained by existing knowledge of laryngeal muscles and vagus nerve physiology. This might represent a new starting point for studies concerning laryngeal physiology and phonation, while the vagus nerve stimulation therapy could act as a new and ethical experimental model for human laryngeal physiology.

  4. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation.

  6. [Electrical failure with nerve stimulation: cases report and check list for prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, O; Feugeas, J-L; Capdevila, X; Manelli, J-C

    2007-03-01

    Functionality of the nerve stimulator and integrity of the electrical circuit should be verified and confirmed before performing peripheral nerve blockade. The clinical cases reported here demonstrate that electrical disconnection or malfunction during nerve localization can unpredictably occur and a checklist is described to prevent the unknown electrical circuit failure.

  7. Sensing and stimulation of the vagus nerve for artificial cardiac control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordelman, Simone Cornelia Maria Anna

    2012-01-01

    This thesis focuses on sensing cardiovascular signals from the vagus nerve and electrically stimulating the vagus nerve for cardiovascular effects. Sensing cardiovascular signals was attempted on both spontaneous and evoked neural activity. A cardiac-modulated vagus nerve activity pattern was found

  8. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) enhances response selection during action cascading processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Verkuil, Bart; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-06-01

    The ever-changing environment we are living in requires us to apply different action control strategies in order to fulfill a task goal. Indeed, when confronted with multiple response options it is fundamental to prioritize and cascade different actions. So far, very little is known about the neuromodulation of action cascading. In this study we assessed the causal role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic and noradrenergic system in modulating the efficiency of action cascading by applying transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a new non-invasive and safe method to stimulate the vagus nerve and to increase GABA and norepinephrine concentrations in the brain. A single-blind, sham-controlled, between-group design was used to assess the effect of on-line (i.e., stimulation overlapping with the critical task) tVNS in healthy young volunteers (n=30)-on a stop-change paradigm. Results showed that active, as compared to sham stimulation, enhanced response selection functions during action cascading and led to faster responses when two actions were executed in succession. These findings provide evidence for the important role of the GABA-ergic and noradrenergic system in modulating performance in action cascading.

  9. Deqi Sensations of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Auricular Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deqi sensation, a psychophysical response characterized by a spectrum of different needling sensations, is essential for Chinese acupuncture clinical efficacy. Previous research works have investigated the component of Deqi response upon acupuncture on acupoints on the trunk and limbs. However, the characteristics of Deqi sensations of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS on auricular points are seldom reported. In this study, we investigated the individual components of Deqi during TENS on auricular concha area and the superior scapha using quantitative measurements in the healthy subjects and depression patients. The most striking characteristics of Deqi sensations upon TENS on auricular points were tingling, numbness, and fullness. The frequencies of pressure, warmness, heaviness, and soreness were relatively lower. The dull pain and coolness are rare. The characteristics of Deqi were similar for the TENS on concha and on the superior scapha.

  10. Deqi sensations of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on auricular points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Fang, Jiliang; Zhao, Qing; Fan, Yangyang; Liu, Jun; Hong, Yang; Wang, Honghong; Ma, Yunyao; Xu, Chunhua; Shi, Shan; Kong, Jian; Rong, Peijing

    2013-01-01

    Deqi sensation, a psychophysical response characterized by a spectrum of different needling sensations, is essential for Chinese acupuncture clinical efficacy. Previous research works have investigated the component of Deqi response upon acupuncture on acupoints on the trunk and limbs. However, the characteristics of Deqi sensations of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on auricular points are seldom reported. In this study, we investigated the individual components of Deqi during TENS on auricular concha area and the superior scapha using quantitative measurements in the healthy subjects and depression patients. The most striking characteristics of Deqi sensations upon TENS on auricular points were tingling, numbness, and fullness. The frequencies of pressure, warmness, heaviness, and soreness were relatively lower. The dull pain and coolness are rare. The characteristics of Deqi were similar for the TENS on concha and on the superior scapha.

  11. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation modulates visceral pain-related affective memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Cao, Bing; Yan, Ni; Liu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Tung, Vivian Oi Vian; Li, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Within a biopsychosocial model of pain, pain is seen as a conscious experience modulated by mental, emotional and sensory mechanisms. Recently, using a rodent visceral pain assay that combines the colorectal distension (CRD) model with the conditioned place avoidance (CPA) paradigms, we measured a learned behavior that directly reflects the affective component of visceral pain, and showed that perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) activation is critical for memory processing involved in long-term visceral affective state and prediction of aversive stimuli by contextual cue. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become an established therapy for treatment-resistant epilepsy. VNS has also been shown to enhance memory performance in rats and humans. High-intensity VNS (400 μA) immediately following conditional training significantly increases the CRD-induced CPA scores, and enhanced the pain affective memory retention. In contrast, VNS (400 μA) had no effect on CPA induced by non-nociceptive aversive stimulus (U69,593). Low-intensity VNS (40 μA) had no effect on CRD-induced CPA. Electrophysiological recording showed that VNS (400 μA) had no effect on basal and CRD-induced ACC neuronal firing. Further, VNS did not alter CRD-induced visceral pain responses suggesting high intensity VNS facilitates visceral pain aversive memory independent of sensory discriminative aspects of visceral pain processing. The findings that vagus nerve stimulation facilities visceral pain-related affective memory underscore the importance of memory in visceral pain perception, and support the theory that postprandial factors may act on vagal afferents to modulate ongoing nature of visceral pain-induced affective disorder observed in the clinic, such as irritable bowel syndrome. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Trigeminal nerve stimulation: A new way of treatment of refractory seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zare

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Refractory epilepsy is a significant problem in clinical practice. Sometimes, multiple antiepileptic drugs are required to control the attacks. To avoid various complications ensuring from these drugs, new methods of treatment such as vagus nerve stimulation (VNS have been recommended. Trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS is a new method under evaluation. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether this method is effective or not. Materials and Methods: Percutaneous simulation of supraorbital branches of the trigeminal nerve by an electrical device was planned in 18 patients over a six-month period. Participants who fulfilled the research criteria were selected randomly from epileptic patients referred to the clinic. (November 2011-December 2012. T-test was used for data analysis. Results: Only eight of 18 patients stayed in the study during all 6 months. A 47.9% reduction in daily seizure frequency was seen in this group (P = 0.022. Other subjects left the study earlier. In this group, seizure frequency increased by 10.6% (P = 0.82. Conclusions: The mechanism of the antiepileptic effects of TNS is not yet clear. In animal studies, it is suggested that the trigeminal nucleus and its projection to nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS and the locus ceruleus, are involved in seizure modulation.Although in comparison with seizure frequency prior to the study there was significant seizure reduction, according to the usual criteria for VNS i.e. 50% seizure frequency reduction, the effect of TNS per se may not yet be adequate for treatment of seizures. Trigeminal nerve stimulation may be an effective "adjuvant" method for treatment of intractable seizure.

  14. 21 CFR 882.5890 - Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... pain relief. 882.5890 Section 882.5890 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Devices § 882.5890 Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. A transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator for pain relief is a device used to apply an electrical current...

  15. A steering electrode array for selective stimulation of sacral nerve roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, F.J.O.; Mendes, P.; Bartek, M.; Mimoun, B.A.Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this work a cylindrical electrode array to be used for electrical stimulation of sacral nerve roots is studied in respect to its ability to achieve selective stimulation of various spatial regions of the nerve bundle. Simulation results achieved on a simplified model consisting of 6 electrodes ev

  16. 42 CFR 414.232 - Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... nerve stimulators (TENS). 414.232 Section 414.232 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Special payment rules for transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulators (TENS). (a) General payment rule. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, payment for TENS is made on a purchase basis...

  17. A steering electrode array for selective stimulation of sacral nerve roots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, F.J.O.; Mendes, P.; Bartek, M.; Mimoun, B.A.Z.

    2011-01-01

    In this work a cylindrical electrode array to be used for electrical stimulation of sacral nerve roots is studied in respect to its ability to achieve selective stimulation of various spatial regions of the nerve bundle. Simulation results achieved on a simplified model consisting of 6 electrodes

  18. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation on parafascicular nucleus neuronal activities in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yizhe Meng; Jinju Jiao

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vagal nerve fibers have many projections to the central nervous system. The anti-epileptic effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) are associated with the thalamus, insular cortex, and other brain regions.OBJECTIVE: To validate the inhibitory effects of vagus nerve stimulation on firing activities of parafascicular nucleus (Pf) neurons in rats. DESIGN, TIME, AND SETTING: The experiment was performed in the Electrophysiological Laboratory of Department of Neurobiology, Liaoning Medical University between September 2006 and September 2007 with multiple-factor self-controlled design.MATERIALS: Twenty-two healthy adult male Sprague Dawley rats were obtained for this experiment. Main instruments: A320R constant electrical stimulation was made by United States World Precision Instruments, Spike2 Biological Signal Processing Systems was provided by British CED Company.METHODS: Under general anesthesia, the left cervical vagus nerve of rats was separated by approximately 1.0 cm. A stimulation electrode was deployed on the vagus nerve, with various settings for VNS parameters.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Firing rates of Pf before and after various VNS parameters were measured according to effect (R) ≥ 20%: excited effect, R ≤ -20%: inhibited effect, -20% < R < 20%: no effect. ② Firing rates of excited Pf neurons after various VNS parameters were measured.RESULTS: ① One rat died prior to recording, another was recorded in the wrong brain location, but the remaining 20 rats were included in the final analysis. ② A total of 221 Pf neurons in healthy rats were recorded. The spontaneous firing rats were (6.70 ± 0.56) Hz and varied between 0.34-52.5 Hz. The spontaneous firing rates were significantly increased in 146 neurons (66.1%), increasing from (5.36 ± 0.59) Hz to (8.22 ± 0.81) Hz (P < 0.01). A total of 40 (18.1%) neurons did not respond, and 35 (15.8%) neurons were inhibited. ③ The excitation rates of Pf neurons did not increase with increasing

  19. Effects of short and prolonged transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation on heart rate variability in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Couck, M; Cserjesi, R; Caers, R; Zijlstra, W P; Widjaja, D; Wolf, N; Luminet, O; Ellrich, J; Gidron, Y

    2017-03-01

    The vagus nerve is strategically located in the body, and has multiple homeostatic and health-promoting effects. Low vagal activity predicts onset and progression of diseases. These are the reasons to activate this nerve. This study examined the effects of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on a main index of vagal activity, namely heart rate variability (HRV). In Study 1, we compared short (10min) left versus right ear t-VNS versus sham (no stimulation) in a within-subjects experimental design. Results revealed significant increases in only one HRV parameter (standard deviation of the RR intervals (SDNN)) following right-ear t-VNS. Study 2 examined the prolonged effects of t-VNS (1h) in the right ear. Compared to baseline, right-t-VNS significantly increased the LF and LF/HF components of HRV, and SDNN in women, but not in men. These results show limited effects of t-VNS on HRV, and are discussed in light of neuroanatomical and statistical considerations and future directions are proposed.

  20. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation: A Promising Method for Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yu; Kong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) on the auricular branch of the vagus nerve has been receiving attention due to its therapeutic potential for neuropsychiatric disorders. Although the mechanism of tVNS is not yet completely understood, studies have demonstrated the potential role of vagal afferent nerve stimulation in the regulation of mood and visceral state associated with social communication. In addition, a growing body of evidence shows that tVNS can activate the brain region...

  1. Epidermal Laser Stimulation of Action Potentials in the Frog Sciatic Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Laser Stimulation of Action Potentials in the Frog Sciatic Nerve Nichole M. Jindra Robert J. Thomas Human Effectiveness Directorate Directed...in the Frog Sciatic Nerve 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62202F 6. AUTHOR(S) .Nichole M. Jindra, Robert J. Thomas, Douglas N...Alan Rice 14. ABSTRACT Measurements of laser stimulated action potentials in the sciatic nerve of leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were made using

  2. Nerve cuff electrode using embedded magnets and its application to hypoglossal nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jungmin; Hye Wee, Jee; Hoan Park, Jeong; Park, Pona; Kim, Jeong-Whun; Kim, Sung June

    2016-12-01

    Objective. A novel nerve cuff electrode with embedded magnets was fabricated and developed. In this study, a pair of magnets was fully embedded and encapsulated in a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) substrate to utilize magnetic force in order to replace the conventional installing techniques of cuff electrodes. In vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the magnet-embedded nerve cuff electrode (MENCE). Lastly, several issues pertaining to the MENCE such as the cuff-to-nerve diameter ratio, the force of the magnets, and possible concerns were discussed in the discussion section. Approach. Electrochemical impedance spectrum and cyclic voltammetry assessments were conducted to measure the impedance and charge storage capacity of the cathodal phase (CSCc). The MENCE was installed onto the hypoglossal nerve (HN) of a rabbit and the movement of the genioglossus was recorded through C-arm fluoroscopy while the HN was stimulated by a pulsed current. Main results. The measured impedance was 0.638 ∠ -67.8° kΩ at 1 kHz and 5.27 ∠ -82.1° kΩ at 100 Hz. The average values of access resistance and cut-off frequency were 0.145 kΩ and 3.98 kHz, respectively. The CSCc of the electrode was measured as 1.69 mC cm-2 at the scan rate of 1 mV s-1. The movement of the genioglossus contraction was observed under a pulsed current with an amplitude level of 0.106 mA, a rate of 0.635 kHz, and a duration of 0.375 ms applied through the MENCE. Significance. A few methods to close and secure cuff electrodes have been researched, but they are associated with several drawbacks. To overcome these, we used magnetic force as a closing method of the cuff electrode. The MENCE can be precisely installed on a target nerve without any surgical techniques such as suturing or molding. Furthermore, it is convenient to remove the installed MENCE because it requires little force to detach one magnet from the other, enabling repeatable installation and removal. We

  3. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is modulated by high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takenobu; Sakuma, Kenji; Nomura, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    Cortical excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent input. We investigated the influence of peripheral mixed nerve stimulation on the excitability of the motor cortex. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles were evaluated using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation (150 Hz, 30 min) over the right median nerve at the wrist. The MEP amplitude and SICI of the APB muscle decreased transiently 0-10 min after the intervention, whereas the ICF did not change. High-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation reduced the excitability of the motor cortex. The decrement in the SICI, which reflects the function of GABA(A)ergic inhibitory interneurons, might compensate for the reduced motor cortical excitability after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

  4. Improvement of physical performance by transcutaneous nerve stimulation in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaada, B

    1984-01-01

    The present pilot study tested the exercise response to transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS) of 21 volunteers, who were well-trained competitive athletes. In 62 experiments (n) they received low-frequency TNS (2 Hz) for 30-45 min prior to either a road or track race, swimming race, bicycle ergometer exercise, isometric muscular endurance test, or dynamometer hand grip test. Improvement in performance compared with a corresponding number of control tests, without TNS or with placebo stimulation in the same subjects, was almost regularly observed in running, swimming and ergometer cycling, although with great individual variations. The average improvement was 4.3 sec (2.2%) in 1.000 m road racing (n = 9); 2.3 sec (1.8%) in 800 m track racing (n = 5); 0.9 sec (1.4%) in 100 m swimming (n = 12); 1.3 sec (0.8%) in 200 m swimming (n = 6); and 2.5 sec (0.9%) in 400 m swimming (n = 3). In a bicycle ergometer test with stepwise, progressive exercise to muscular fatigue, the maximal capacity was increased by 9% (n = 4). Local isometric muscle endurance of the elbow flexors (n = 7) and hand grip strengths (n = 11) were not significantly altered. Possible mechanisms involved in the response to TNS are discussed.

  5. Coordinated, multi-joint, fatigue-resistant feline stance produced with intrafascicular hind limb nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normann, R. A.; Dowden, B. R.; Frankel, M. A.; Wilder, A. M.; Hiatt, S. D.; Ledbetter, N. M.; Warren, D. A.; Clark, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The production of graceful skeletal movements requires coordinated activation of multiple muscles that produce torques around multiple joints. The work described herein is focused on one such movement, stance, that requires coordinated activation of extensor muscles acting around the hip, knee and ankle joints. The forces evoked in these muscles by external stimulation all have a complex dependence on muscle length and shortening velocities, and some of these muscles are biarticular. In order to recreate sit-to-stand maneuvers in the anesthetized feline, we excited the hind limb musculature using intrafascicular multielectrode stimulation (IFMS) of the muscular branch of the sciatic nerve, the femoral nerve and the main branch of the sciatic nerve. Stimulation was achieved with either acutely or chronically implanted Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (USEAs) via subsets of electrodes (1) that activated motor units in the extensor muscles of the hip, knee and ankle joints, (2) that were able to evoke large extension forces and (3) that manifested minimal coactivation of the targeted motor units. Three hind limb force-generation strategies were investigated, including sequential activation of independent motor units to increase force, and interleaved or simultaneous IFMS of three sets of six or more USEA electrodes that excited the hip, knee and ankle extensors. All force-generation strategies evoked stance, but the interleaved IFMS strategy also reduced muscle fatigue produced by repeated sit-to-stand maneuvers compared with fatigue produced by simultaneous activation of different motor neuron pools. These results demonstrate the use of interleaved IFMS as a means to recreate coordinated, fatigue-resistant multi-joint muscle forces in the unilateral hind limb. This muscle activation paradigm could provide a promising neuroprosthetic approach for the restoration of sit-to-stand transitions in individuals who are paralyzed by spinal cord injury, stroke or disease.

  6. The effects of general anaesthesia on nerve-motor response characteristics (rheobase and chronaxie) to peripheral nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, B C

    2014-04-01

    Using a simple surface nerve stimulation system, I examined the effects of general anaesthesia on rheobase (the minimum current required to stimulate nerve activity) and chronaxie (the minimum time for a stimulus twice the rheobase to elicit nerve activity). Nerve stimulation was used to elicit a motor response from the ulnar nerve at varying pulse widths before and after induction of general anaesthesia. Mean (SD) rheobase before and after general anaesthesia was 0.91 (0.37) mA (95% CI 0.77-1.04 mA) and 1.11 (0.53) mA (95% CI 0.92-1.30 mA), respectively. Mean (SD) chronaxie measured before and after general anaesthesia was 0.32 (0.17) ms (95% CI 0.26-0.38 ms) and 0.29 (0.13) ms (95% CI 0.24-0.33 ms), respectively. Under anaesthesia, rheobase values increased by an average of 20% (p = 0.05), but chronaxie values did not change significantly (p = 0.39). These results suggest that threshold currents used for motor response from nerve stimulation under general anaesthesia might be higher than those used in awake patients.

  7. Tinnitus suppression by electric stimulation of the auditory nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Erica Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant (CI has been observed to suppress tinnitus, but parameters of an effective electric stimulus remain unexplored. Here we used CI research processors to systematically vary pulse rate, electrode place, and current amplitude of electric stimuli, and measure their effects on tinnitus loudness and stimulus loudness as a function of stimulus duration. Thirteen tinnitus subjects who used CIs were tested, with 9 (70% being Responders who achieved greater than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to at least one stimulation condition and the remaining 4 (30% being Non-Responders who had less than 30% tinnitus loudness reduction in response to any stimulus condition tested. Despite large individual variability, several interesting observations were made between stimulation parameters, tinnitus characteristics, and tinnitus suppression. If a subject’s tinnitus was suppressed by one stimulus, then it was more likely to be suppressed by another stimulus. If the tinnitus contained a pulsating component, then it would be more likely suppressed by a given combination of stimulus parameters than tinnitus without these components. There was also a disassociation between the subjects’ clinical speech processor and our research processor in terms of their effectiveness in tinnitus suppression. Finally, an interesting dichotomy was observed between loudness adaptation to electric stimuli and their effects on tinnitus loudness, with the Responders exhibiting higher degrees of loudness adaptation than the Non-Responders. Although the mechanisms underlying these observations remain to be resolved, their clinical implications are clear. When using a CI to manage tinnitus, the clinical processor that is optimized for speech perception needs to be customized for optimal tinnitus suppression.

  8. Transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder increases rectal motor activity in children: a randomized controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Iben; Hagstrøm, Søren; Siggaard, Charlotte

    Transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder increases rectal motor activity in children: a randomized controlled study......Transcutaneus electrical nerve stimulation for overactive bladder increases rectal motor activity in children: a randomized controlled study...

  9. Transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation using perineal vibration: a novel method for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønksen, Jens; Ohl, Dana A; Bonde, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence....

  10. A novel implantable vagus nerve stimulation system (ADNS-300) for combined stimulation and recording of the vagus nerve: Pilot trial at Ghent University Hospital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Tahry, R.; Raedt, R.; Mollet, L.; de Herdt, V.; Wyckuys, T.; Van Dycke, A.; Meurs, A.; Dewaele, F.; van Roost, D.; Doguet, P.; Delbeke, J.; Wadman, W.; Vonck, K.; Boon, P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an established treatment for refractory epilepsy. The ADNS-300 is a new system for VNS that includes a rechargeable stimulus generator and an electrode for combined stimulation and recording. In this feasibility study, three patients were implanted with ADNS

  11. Peripheral nerve field stimulation for trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain, and persistent idiopathic facial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johann; Sandi-Gahun, Sahr; Schackert, Gabriele; Juratli, Tareq A

    2016-04-01

    Peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) is a promising modality for treatment of intractable facial pain. However, evidence is sparse. We are therefore presenting our experience with this technique in a small patient cohort. Records of 10 patients (five men, five women) with intractable facial pain who underwent implantation of one or several subcutaneous electrodes for trigeminal nerve field stimulation were retrospectively analyzed. Patients' data, including pain location, etiology, duration, previous treatments, long-term effects and complications, were evaluated. Four patients suffered from recurrent classical trigeminal neuralgia, one had classical trigeminal neuralgia and was medically unfit for microvascular decompression. Two patients suffered from trigeminal neuropathy attributed to multiple sclerosis, one from post-herpetic neuropathy, one from trigeminal neuropathy following radiation therapy and one from persistent idiopathic facial pain. Average patient age was 74.2 years (range 57-87), and average symptom duration was 10.6 years (range 2-17). Eight patients proceeded to implantation after successful trial. Average follow-up after implantation was 11.3 months (range 5-28). Using the visual analog scale, average pain intensity was 9.3 (range 7-10) preoperatively and 0.75 (range 0-3) postoperatively. Six patients reported absence of pain with stimulation; two had only slight constant pain without attacks. PNFS may be an effective treatment for refractory facial pain and yields high patient satisfaction. © International Headache Society 2015.

  12. Optimizing nerve cuff stimulation of targeted regions through use of genetic algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Natalie; Tyler, Dustin

    2011-01-01

    A nerve cuff electrode is a viable technology for use in a neuroprostheses system to restore loss of function due to neurological injury. The Flat Interface Nerve Electrode (FINE) is a nerve cuff that gently reshapes the nerve to bring the axons closer to the stimulating contacts. The overall goal of this work is to optimize nerve cuff stimulation in upper extremity nerves. Recently, highly efficient and accurate linear models of neuronal activation have been developed in our lab. Using the fast calculations from the newly developed linear activation method, nerve stimulation parameters such as current pulse width and pulse amplitude at many electrode contacts can be explored by employing optimization algorithms. Finite element nerve models with high density electrodes were constructed based on upper extremity cadaveric nerve cross sections. An objective function was developed to target specific groups of nerve fascicles and minimize overlap amongst these groups. By changing the objective function and using a genetic search algorithm, stimulation parameters can be optimized for many contacts.

  13. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for fibromyalgia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark I; Claydon, Leica S; Herbison, G Peter; Jones, Gareth; Paley, Carole A

    2017-10-09

    Fibromyalgia is characterised by persistent, widespread pain; sleep problems; and fatigue. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is the delivery of pulsed electrical currents across the intact surface of the skin to stimulate peripheral nerves and is used extensively to manage painful conditions. TENS is inexpensive, safe, and can be self-administered. TENS reduces pain during movement in some people so it may be a useful adjunct to assist participation in exercise and activities of daily living. To date, there has been only one systematic review in 2012 which included TENS, amongst other treatments, for fibromyalgia, and the authors concluded that TENS was not effective. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of TENS alone or added to usual care (including exercise) compared with placebo (sham) TENS; no treatment; exercise alone; or other treatment including medication, electroacupuncture, warmth therapy, or hydrotherapy for fibromyalgia in adults. We searched the following electronic databases up to 18 January 2017: CENTRAL (CRSO); MEDLINE (Ovid); Embase (Ovid); CINAHL (EBSCO); PsycINFO (Ovid); LILACS; PEDRO; Web of Science (ISI); AMED (Ovid); and SPORTDiscus (EBSCO). We also searched three trial registries. There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-randomised trials of TENS treatment for pain associated with fibromyalgia in adults. We included cross-over and parallel-group trial designs. We included studies that evaluated TENS administered using non-invasive techniques at intensities that produced perceptible TENS sensations during stimulation at either the site of pain or over nerve bundles proximal (or near) to the site of pain. We included TENS administered as a sole treatment or TENS in combination with other treatments, and TENS given as a single treatment or as a course of treatments. Two review authors independently determined study eligibility by assessing each record and

  14. Surgical access for electrical stimulation of the pudendal and dorsal genital nerves in the overactive bladder: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: The anatomy of the pudendal nerve and its nerve branches, especially the dorsal nerve of the penis and clitoris (dorsal genital nerves), and the clinical application of electrical stimulation of these nerves in patients with overactive bladder syndrome and detrusor overactivity are

  15. Electrical stimulation of dog pudendal nerve regulates the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-he Ju

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pudendal nerve plays an important role in urine storage and voiding. Our hypothesis is that a neuroprosthetic device placed in the pudendal nerve trunk can modulate bladder function after suprasacral spinal cord injury. We had confirmed the inhibitory pudendal-to-bladder reflex by stimulating either the branch or the trunk of the pudendal nerve. This study explored the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex in beagle dogs, with intact or injured spinal cord, by electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk. The optimal stimulation frequency was approximately 15-25 Hz. This excitatory effect was dependent to some extent on the bladder volume. We conclude that stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk is a promising method to modulate bladder function.

  16. Electrical stimulation of dog pudendal nerve regulates the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yan-He; Liao, Li-Min

    2016-04-01

    Pudendal nerve plays an important role in urine storage and voiding. Our hypothesis is that a neuroprosthetic device placed in the pudendal nerve trunk can modulate bladder function after suprasacral spinal cord injury. We had confirmed the inhibitory pudendal-to-bladder reflex by stimulating either the branch or the trunk of the pudendal nerve. This study explored the excitatory pudendal-to-bladder reflex in beagle dogs, with intact or injured spinal cord, by electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk. The optimal stimulation frequency was approximately 15-25 Hz. This excitatory effect was dependent to some extent on the bladder volume. We conclude that stimulation of the pudendal nerve trunk is a promising method to modulate bladder function.

  17. Transcutaneous vagus and trigeminal nerve stimulation for neuropsychiatric disorders: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Shiozawa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS and transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS. All techniques have shown preliminary promising results, although the results are mixed. Method: We performed a systematic review of the Medline and Embase databases, with no constraint to dates, through June 2013. The keywords were [(1 trigeminal nerve stimulation OR (2 cranial nerve OR (3 trigemin* OR (4 transcutaneous VNS OR (5 transcutaneous cranial nerve stimulation] and (6 mental disorders. Results: We included four preclinical and clinical five studies on TNS. All clinical data were based on open-label studies with small samples, which diminished the external validity of the results, thus reflecting the modest impact of TNS in current clinical practice. Of the tVNS clinical trials, three assessed physiological features in healthy volunteers, and one examined patients with epilepsy. Conclusion: TNS and tVNS improve treatment of particular neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression.

  18. Optimization of epilepsy treatment with vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthman, Basim; Bewernitz, Michael; Liu, Chang-Chia; Ghacibeh, Georges

    2007-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disorders that affects close to 50 million people worldwide. Antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs), the main stay of epilepsy treatment, control seizures in two thirds of patients only. Other therapies include the ketogenic diet, ablative surgery, hormonal treatments and neurostimulation. While other approaches to stimulation of the brain are currently in the experimental phase vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been approved by the FDA since July 1997 for the adjunctive treatment of intractable partial onset epilepsy with and without secondary generalization in patients twelve years of age or older. The safety and efficacy of VNS have been proven and duplicated in two subsequent double-blinded controlled studies after two pilot studies demonstrated the feasibility of VNS in man. Long term observational studies confirmed the safety of VNS and that its effectiveness is sustained over time. While AEDs influence seizure thresholds via blockade or modulation of ionic channels, inhibit excitatory neurotransmitters or enhance inhibitory neurotransmitters the exact mechanism of action of VNS is not known. Neuroimaging studies revealed that VNS increases blood flow in certain regions of the brain such as the thalamus. Chemical lesions in the rat brains showed that norepinephrine is an important link in the anticonvulsant effect of VNS. Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from patients before and after treatment with VNS showed modest decreases in excitatory neurotransmitters. Although Hammond et al. reported no effect of VNS on scalp EEG by visual analysis and Salinsky et al. found no effect of VNS on scalp EEG by spectral analysis, Kuba et al. suggested that VNS reduces interictal epileptiform activity. Further, nonlinear dynamical analysis of the electroencephalogram in the rat and man have reportedly shown predictable changes (decrease in the short term Lyapunov exponent STLmax and T-index) more than an hour prior to the

  19. Ultrasound-stimulated peripheral nerve regeneration within asymmetrically porous PLGA/Pluronic F127 nerve guide conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Chul; Oh, Se Heang; Seo, Tae Beom; Namgung, Uk; Kim, Jin Man; Lee, Jin Ho

    2010-08-01

    Recently, we developed a novel method to fabricate a nerve guide conduit (NGC) with asymmetrical pore structure and hydrophilicity using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and Pluronic F127 by a modified immersion precipitation method. From the animal study using a rat model (sciatic nerve defect of rat), we recognized that the unique PLGA/Pluronic F127 tube provided good environments for nerve regeneration. In this study, we applied low-intensity pulsed ultrasound as a simple and noninvasive stimulus at the PLGA/F127 NGC-implanted site transcutaneously in rats to investigate the feasibility of ultrasound for the enhanced nerve regeneration through the tube. The nerve regeneration behaviors within the ultrasound-stimulated PLGA/Pluronic F127 NGCs were compared with the NGCs without the ultrasound treatment as well as normal nerve by histological and immunohistochemical observations. It was observed that the PLGA/Pluronic F127 tube-implanted group applied with the ultrasound had more rapid nerve regeneration behavior (approximately 0.71 mm/day) than the tube-implanted group without the ultrasound treatment (approximately 0.48 mm/day). The ultrasound-treated tube group also showed greater neural tissue area as well as larger axon diameter and thicker myelin sheath than the tube group without the ultrasound treatment, indicating better nerve regeneration. The better nerve regeneration behavior in the our NGC/ultrasound system may be caused by the synergistic effect of the asymmetrically porous PLGA/Pluronic F127 tube with unique properties (selective permeability, hydrophilicity, and structural stability, which can provide good environment for nerve regeneration) and physical stimulus (stimulation of the Schwann cells and activation of the neurotrophic factors).

  20. Ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block analgesia after total knee arthroplasty: a multicenter randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Postoperative analgesia is crucial for early functional excise after total knee arthroplasty. To investigate the clinical efficacy of ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. METHODS: 46 patients with ASA grade I-III who underwent total knee arthroplasty received postoperative analgesia from October 2012 to January 2013. In 22 patients, ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block were performed for analgesia (CFNB group; in 24 patients, epidural analgesia was done (PCEA group. The analgesic effects, side effects, articular recovery and complications were compared between two groups. RESULTS: At 6 h and 12 h after surgery, the knee pain score (VAS score during functional tests after active exercise and after passive excise in CFNB were significantly reduced when compared with PCEA group. The amount of parecoxib used in CFNB patients was significantly reduced when compared with PCEA group. At 48 h after surgery, the muscle strength grade in CFNB group was significantly higher, and the time to ambulatory activity was shorter than those in PCEA group. The incidence of nausea and vomiting in CFNB patients was significantly reduced when compared with PCEA group. CONCLUSION: Ultrasound and nerve stimulator guided continuous femoral nerve block provide better analgesia at 6 h and 12 h, demonstrated by RVAS and PVAS. The amount of parecoxib also reduces, the incidence of nausea and vomiting decreased, the influence on muscle strength is compromised and patients can perform ambulatory activity under this condition.

  1. Electrical stimulation does not enhance nerve regeneration if delayed after sciatic nerve injury: the role of fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate and enhance nerve regeneration in sensory and motor neurons after injury, but there is little evidence that focuses on the varying degrees of fibrosis in the delayed repair of peripheral nerve tissue. In this study, a rat model of sciatic nerve transection injury was repaired with a biodegradable conduit at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month and 2 months after injury, when the rats were divided into two subgroups. In the experimental group, rats were treated with electrical stimuli of frequency of 20 Hz, pulse width 100 ms and direct current voltage of 3 V; while rats in the control group received no electrical stimulation after the conduit operation. Histological results showed that stained collagen fibers comprised less than 20% of the total operated area in the two groups after delayed repair at both 1 day and 1 week but after longer delays, the collagen fiber area increased with the time after injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that the expression level of transforming growth factor β (an indicator of tissue fibrosis decreased at both 1 day and 1 week after delayed repair but increased at both 1 and 2 months after delayed repair. These findings indicate that if the biodegradable conduit repair combined with electrical stimulation is delayed, it results in a poor outcome following sciatic nerve injury. One month after injury, tissue degeneration and distal fibrosis are apparent and are probably the main reason why electrical stimulation fails to promote nerve regeneration after delayed repair.

  2. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheimer, C; Carlsson, C A; Vedin, A; Wilhelmsson, C

    1986-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the treatment of chronic stable severe angina pectoris. In a short-term study the effect of TENS was studied in 10 male patients with angina pectoris (functional class III and IV). All patients had previously been stabilized on long-term maximal oral treatment. The effects of the treatment were measured by means of repeated bicycle ergometer tests. All patients had an increased working capacity (16-85%), decreased ST segment depression and reduced recovery time during TENS. No adverse effects were observed. A long-term study of TENS on similarly selected patients showed beneficial effects in terms of pain reduction, reduced frequency of anginal attacks, increased physical activity and increased working capacity during bicycle ergometer tests. An invasive study was carried out with respect to systemic and coronary hemodynamics and myocardial metabolism during pacing provoked myocardial ischemia in 13 patients. The results showed that TENS led to an increased tolerance to pacing, improved lactate metabolism, less pronounced ST segment depression. A drop in systolic blood pressure during TENS treatment at identical pacing rates indicated a decreased afterload. An increased coronary flow to ischemic areas in the myocardium was supported by the fact that the rate pressure product during anginal pain increased during TENS.

  3. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy in reduction of orofacial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Igor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Patients with craniomandibular disorders suffer from hypertonic, fatigued and painful masticatory muscles. This condition can lead to limitation of mandibular jaw movements. All of these symptoms and signs are included in myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS has been used for treatment of these patients. Objective. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of TENS therapy on chronic pain reduction in patients with the muscular dysfunction symptom. Methods. In order to evaluate the effect of TENS therapy before and after the treatment, Craniomandibular Index (Helkimo was used. Pain intensity was measured by VAS. Patients had TENS treatment over two-week period. BURST TENS modality was used. Current intensity was individually adjusted. Results. Two patients did not respond to TENS therapy. Complete pain reduction was recorded in 8 patients, while pain reduction was not significantly different after TENS therapy in 10 patients. Conclusion. TENS therapy was confirmed as therapeutic procedure in orofacial muscle relaxation and pain reduction.

  4. Innervation of the Human Cavum Conchae and Auditory Canal: Anatomical Basis for Transcutaneous Auricular Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, P.; López, M.; Larraya, I.; Chamorro, J.; Cobo, J. L.; Ordóñez, S.

    2017-01-01

    The innocuous transcutaneous stimulation of nerves supplying the outer ear has been demonstrated to be as effective as the invasive direct stimulation of the vagus nerve for the treatment of some neurological and nonneurological disturbances. Thus, the precise knowledge of external ear innervation is of maximal interest for the design of transcutaneous auricular nerve stimulation devices. We analyzed eleven outer ears, and the innervation was assessed by Masson's trichrome staining, immunohistochemistry, or immunofluorescence (neurofilaments, S100 protein, and myelin-basic protein). In both the cavum conchae and the auditory canal, nerve profiles were identified between the cartilage and the skin and out of the cartilage. The density of nerves and of myelinated nerve fibers was higher out of the cartilage and in the auditory canal with respect to the cavum conchae. Moreover, the nerves were more numerous in the superior and posterior-inferior than in the anterior-inferior segments of the auditory canal. The present study established a precise nerve map of the human cavum conchae and the cartilaginous segment of the auditory canal demonstrating regional differences in the pattern of innervation of the human outer ear. These results may provide additional neuroanatomical basis for the accurate design of auricular transcutaneous nerve stimulation devices.

  5. The inhibitory effects of pudendal nerve stimulation on bladder overactivity in spinal cord injury dogs: is early stimulation necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoqing; Liao, Limin; Dong, Qian; Ju, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    To determine the inhibitory effects of pudendal nerve stimulation (5 Hz) on bladder overactivity at early and late stages of spinal cord injury in dogs. The study was performed in eight dogs with chronic spinal cord transection at the T9-T10 level. Group 1 (four dogs) underwent electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve one month after spinal cord transection. Group 2 (four dogs) underwent stimulation six months after spinal cord transection. The bladders were removed for histological examination of fibrosis after the stimulation. The bladder capacity and the compliance were significantly increased (p stimulation in group 1, but not in group 2. The nonvoiding contractions were inhibited in both groups by electrical stimulation. Collagen fiber was increased, while elastic fiber was significantly decreased (p stimulation can increase the bladder capacity and compliance only during the early period before the bladder wall becomes fibrosit and can inhibit the nonvoiding contraction during two stages. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  6. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation: Retrospective Assessment of Cardiac Safety in a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Michael Kreuzer; Michael eLandgrebe; Oliver eHusser; Markus eResch; Martin eSchecklmann; Florian eGeisreiter; Poeppl, Timm B.; Sarah Julia Prasser; Goeran eHajak; Berthold eLangguth

    2012-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Vagus nerve stimulation has been successfully used as a treatment strategy for epilepsy and affective disorders for years. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS) is a new non-invasive method to stimulate the vagus nerve, which has been shown to modulate neuronal activity in distinct brain areas. OBJECTIVES: Here we report effects of tVNS on cardiac function from a pilot study, which was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and safety of tVNS for the treatment of c...

  7. Electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy improve the recovery of injured sciatic nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhao; Wei He; Yingze Zhang; Dehu Tian; Hongfang Zhao; Kunlun Yu; Jiangbo Bai

    2013-01-01

    Drug treatment, electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy have been shown to promote the repair and regeneration of the peripheral nerves at the injured site. This study prepared a Mackin-non’s model of rat sciatic nerve compression. Electric stimulation was given immediately after neurolysis, and decimeter wave radiation was performed at 1 and 12 weeks post-operation. Histo-logical observation revealed that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy could improve the local blood circulation of repaired sites, al eviate hypoxia of compressed nerves, and lessen adhesion of compressed nerves, thereby decreasing the formation of new entrapments and enhancing compressed nerve regeneration through an improved microenvironment for rege-neration. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave could promote the expression of S-100 protein. Motor nerve conduction velocity and amplitude, the number and diameter of myelinated nerve fibers, and sciatic functional index were significantly increased in the treated rats. These results verified that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy contributed to the regeneration and the recovery of the functions in the compressed nerves.

  8. Electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy improve the recovery of injured sciatic nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; He, Wei; Zhang, Yingze; Tian, Dehu; Zhao, Hongfang; Yu, Kunlun; Bai, Jiangbo

    2013-07-25

    Drug treatment, electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy have been shown to promote the repair and regeneration of the peripheral nerves at the injured site. This study prepared a Mackinnon's model of rat sciatic nerve compression. Electric stimulation was given immediately after neurolysis, and decimeter wave radiation was performed at 1 and 12 weeks post-operation. Histological observation revealed that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy could improve the local blood circulation of repaired sites, alleviate hypoxia of compressed nerves, and lessen adhesion of compressed nerves, thereby decreasing the formation of new entrapments and enhancing compressed nerve regeneration through an improved microenvironment for regeneration. Immunohistochemical staining results revealed that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave could promote the expression of S-100 protein. Motor nerve conduction velocity and amplitude, the number and diameter of myelinated nerve fibers, and sciatic functional index were significantly increased in the treated rats. These results verified that intraoperative electric stimulation and decimeter wave therapy contributed to the regeneration and the recovery of the functions in the compressed nerves.

  9. Sacral nerve stimulation increases activation of the primary somatosensory cortex by anal canal stimulation in an experimental model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, K M

    2011-08-01

    Sacral and posterior tibial nerve stimulation may be used to treat faecal incontinence; however, the mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether sensory activation of the cerebral cortex by anal canal stimulation was increased by peripheral neuromodulation.

  10. Recovery characteristics of the electrically stimulated auditory nerve in deafened guinea pigs : Relation to neuronal status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B.; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    Successful cochlear implant performance requires adequate responsiveness of the auditory nerve to prolonged pulsatile electrical stimulation. Degeneration of the auditory nerve as a result of severe hair cell loss could considerably compromise this ability. The main objective of this study was to ch

  11. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t...

  12. Use of ultrasound to facilitate femoral nerve block with stimulating catheter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Min; XU Ting; HAN Wen-yong; WANG Xue-dong; JIA Dong-lin; GUO Xiang-yang

    2011-01-01

    Background The adjunction of ultrasound to nerve stimulation has been proven to improve single-injection peripheral nerve block quality. However, few reports have been published determining whether ultrasound can facilitate continuous nerve blocks. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the addition of ultrasound to nerve stimulation facilitates femoral nerve blocks with a stimulating catheter.Methods In this prospective randomized study, patients receiving continuous femoral nerve blocks for total knee replacement were randomly assigned to either the ultrasound guidance combined with stimulating catheter group (USNS group; n=60) or the stimulating catheter alone group (NS group; n=60). The primary end point was the procedure time (defined as the time from first needle contact with the skin until correct catheter placement). The numbers of needle passes and catheter insertions, onset and quality of femoral nerve blocks, postoperative pain score, and early knee function were also recorded.Results The procedure time was significantly less in the USNS group than in the NS group (9.0 (6.0-22.8) minutes vs.13.5 (6.0-35.9) minutes, P=0.024). The numbers of needle passes and catheter insertions were also significantly less in the USNS group. A greater complete block rate was achieved at 30 minutes in the USNS group (63.3% vs. 38.3%;P=0.010). The postoperative pain score, the number of patients who required bolus local anesthetic and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia, and knee flexion on the second postoperative day were not significantly different between the two groups of patients.Conclusions Ultrasound-assisted placement of a stimulating catheter for femoral nerve blocks decreases the time necessary to perform the block compared with just the nerve-stimulating technique. In addition, a more complete blockade is achieved using the ultrasound-assisted technique.

  13. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation as neuromodulative treatment of chronic pelvic pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balken, M.R. van; Vandoninck, V.; Messelink, B.J.; Vergunst, H.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Debruyne, F.M.J.; Bemelmans, B.L.H.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: Neuromodulative therapies have been used with moderate success in patients with chronic pelvic pain. Intermittent Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) is a new, minimally invasive treatment option, which has shown to significantly decrease accompanying pain complaints in patients wi

  14. Minimal invasive electrode implantation for conditional stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve in neurogenic detrusor overactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, F.M.J.; Heesakkers, J.P.F.A.; Rijkhoff, N.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Experimental. OBJECTIVES: Electrical stimulation of the dorsal genital nerves (DGN) suppresses involuntary detrusor contractions (IDCs) in patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (DO). The feasibility of minimal invasive electrode implantation near the DGN and the effectiveness

  15. Relief of fecal incontinence by sacral nerve stimulation linked to focal brain activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Lilli; Møller, Arne; Buntzen, Steen

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that sacral nerve stimulation affects afferent vagal projections to the central nervous system associated with frontal cortex activation in patients with fecal incontinence....

  16. Left phrenic nerve anatomy relative to the coronary venous system: Implications for phrenic nerve stimulation during cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Julianne H; Goff, Ryan P; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively characterize anatomy of the human phrenic nerve in relation to the coronary venous system, to reduce undesired phrenic nerve stimulation during left-sided lead implantations. We obtained CT scans while injecting contrast into coronary veins of 15 perfusion-fixed human heart-lung blocs. A radiopaque wire was glued to the phrenic nerve under CT, then we created three-dimensional models of anatomy and measured anatomical parameters. The left phrenic nerve typically coursed over the basal region of the anterior interventricular vein, mid region of left marginal veins, and apical region of inferior and middle cardiac veins. There was large variation associated with the average angle between nerve and veins. Average angle across all coronary sinus tributaries was fairly consistent (101.3°-111.1°). The phrenic nerve coursed closest to the middle cardiac vein and left marginal veins. The phrenic nerve overlapped a left marginal vein in >50% of specimens.

  17. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation induced parotid stimulation on salivary flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasulu Pattipati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the duration of stimulation over the parotid salivary flow following the use of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS in different age groups. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in three different age groups. Under group A individuals from 21 to 35 years of age, group B 36-50 years and group C above 51 years were considered. In each group 30 subjects were taken of whom 15 were males and 15 were females. The placement of pads was approximated bilaterally over the parotid glands. The working parameters of TENS unit were fixed at 50 Hz and the unit was in normal mode. Results: Subjects belonging to group B were showing statistically significant increases in the duration of stimulated parotid salivary flow following the use of TENS. Conclusion: TENS can be considered as a non-pharmacological alternative to improve salivation for longer period in xerostomia patients.

  18. Successful removal and reimplant of vagal nerve stimulator device after 10 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Giulioni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted vagal nerve stimulators is growing and the need for removal or revision of the devices will become even more frequent. A significant concern about Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS therapy is the presence of the spiral stimulating electrodes, wrapped around the nerve, once treatment is considered ineffective or is no longer desired. Our purpose is to demonstrate the feasibility of complete removal and replacement of the vagal nerve stimulator electrodes using microsurgical technique even after a long period, without damaging the nerve. We attempted removal and replacement of spiral stimulating electrodes from a patient who received a 10-year long VNS therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy. Our results indicate that the spiral electrodes may be safely removed from the vagus nerve, even after several years. The reversibility of lead implantation may enhance the attractiveness of VNS therapy. Furthermore, with a correct microsurgical technique, it is possible to respect the normal anatomy and functionality of vagal nerve and to reimplant a new VNS system with all its components, maintaining the same therapeutic efficacy after many years.

  19. Early cortical biomarkers of longitudinal transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation treatment success in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Jiliang; Egorova, Natalia; Rong, Peijing; Liu, Jun; Hong, Yang; Fan, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Honghong; Yu, Yutian; Ma, Yunyao; Xu, Chunhua; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhao, Jingjun; Luo, Man; Bing ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a non-invasive method of brain stimulation through the auricular branch of the vagus nerve, has shown promising results in treating major depressive disorder (MDD) in several pilot studies. However, the neural mechanism by which the effect on depression might be achieved has not been fully investigated, with only a few neuroimaging studies demonstrating tVNS-induced changes in the brains of healthy volunteers. Identifying specific neural pathways...

  20. Electrical stimulation promotes regeneration of defective peripheral nerves after delayed repair intervals lasting under one month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chungui; Kou, Yuhui; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Yin, Xiaofeng; Deng, Jiuxu; Chen, Bo; Jiang, Baoguo

    2014-01-01

    Electrical stimulation (ES) has been proven to be an effective means of enhancing the speed and accuracy of nerve regeneration. However, these results were recorded when the procedure was performed almost immediately after nerve injury. In clinical settings, most patients cannot be treated immediately. Some patients with serious trauma or contaminated wounds need to wait for nerve repair surgery. Delays in nerve repair have been shown to be associated with poorer results than immediate surgery. It is not clear whether electrical stimulation still has any effect on nerve regeneration after enough time has elapsed. A delayed nerve repair model in which the rats received delayed nerve repair after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months was designed. At each point in time, the nerve stumps of half the rats were bridged with an absorbable conduit and the rats were given 1 h of weak electrical stimulation. The other half was not treated. In order to analyze the morphological and molecular differences among these groups, 6 ES rats and 6 sham ES rats per point in time were killed 5 days after surgery. The other rats in each group were allowed to recover for 6 weeks before the final functional test and tissue observation. The amounts of myelinated fibers in the distal nerve stumps decreased as the delay in repair increased for both ES rats and sham ES rats. In the 1-day-delay and 1-week-delay groups, there were more fibers in ES rats than in sham ES rats. And the compound muscle action potential (CMAP) and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) results were better for ES rats in these two groups. In order to analyze the mechanisms underlying these differences, Masson staining was performed on the distal nerves and quantitative PCR on the spinal cords. Results showed that, after delays in repair of 1 month and 2 months, there was more collagen tissue hyperplasia in the distal nerve in all rats. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and trkB expression levels in the

  1. Electrical stimulation promotes regeneration of defective peripheral nerves after delayed repair intervals lasting under one month.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chungui Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Electrical stimulation (ES has been proven to be an effective means of enhancing the speed and accuracy of nerve regeneration. However, these results were recorded when the procedure was performed almost immediately after nerve injury. In clinical settings, most patients cannot be treated immediately. Some patients with serious trauma or contaminated wounds need to wait for nerve repair surgery. Delays in nerve repair have been shown to be associated with poorer results than immediate surgery. It is not clear whether electrical stimulation still has any effect on nerve regeneration after enough time has elapsed. METHODS: A delayed nerve repair model in which the rats received delayed nerve repair after 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 2 months was designed. At each point in time, the nerve stumps of half the rats were bridged with an absorbable conduit and the rats were given 1 h of weak electrical stimulation. The other half was not treated. In order to analyze the morphological and molecular differences among these groups, 6 ES rats and 6 sham ES rats per point in time were killed 5 days after surgery. The other rats in each group were allowed to recover for 6 weeks before the final functional test and tissue observation. RESULTS: The amounts of myelinated fibers in the distal nerve stumps decreased as the delay in repair increased for both ES rats and sham ES rats. In the 1-day-delay and 1-week-delay groups, there were more fibers in ES rats than in sham ES rats. And the compound muscle action potential (CMAP and motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV results were better for ES rats in these two groups. In order to analyze the mechanisms underlying these differences, Masson staining was performed on the distal nerves and quantitative PCR on the spinal cords. Results showed that, after delays in repair of 1 month and 2 months, there was more collagen tissue hyperplasia in the distal nerve in all rats. The brain-derived neurotrophic

  2. A conduction block in sciatic nerves can be detected by magnetic motor root stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Konoma, Yuko; Fujii, Kengo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Terao, Yasuo; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2013-08-15

    Useful diagnostic techniques for the acute phase of sciatic nerve palsy, an entrapment neuropathy, are not well established. The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the diagnostic utility of magnetic sacral motor root stimulation for sciatic nerve palsy. We analyzed the peripheral nerves innervating the abductor hallucis muscle using both electrical stimulations at the ankle and knee and magnetic stimulations at the neuro-foramina and conus medullaris levels in a patient with sciatic nerve palsy at the level of the piriformis muscle due to gluteal compression related to alcohol consumption. On the fourth day after onset, magnetic sacral motor root stimulation using a MATS coil (the MATS coil stimulation method) clearly revealed a conduction block between the knee and the sacral neuro-foramina. Two weeks after onset, needle electromyography supported the existence of the focal lesion. The MATS coil stimulation method clearly revealed a conduction block in the sciatic nerve and is therefore a useful diagnostic tool for the abnormal neurophysiological findings associated with sciatic nerve palsy even at the acute phase.

  3. A micro-scale printable nanoclip for electrical stimulation and recording in small nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissandrello, Charles A.; Gillis, Winthrop F.; Shen, Jun; Pearre, Ben W.; Vitale, Flavia; Pasquali, Matteo; Holinski, Bradley J.; Chew, Daniel J.; White, Alice E.; Gardner, Timothy J.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. The vision of bioelectronic medicine is to treat disease by modulating the signaling of visceral nerves near various end organs. In small animal models, the nerves of interest can have small diameters and limited surgical access. New high-resolution methods for building nerve interfaces are desirable. In this study, we present a novel nerve interface and demonstrate its use for stimulation and recording in small nerves. Approach. We design and fabricate micro-scale electrode-laden nanoclips capable of interfacing with nerves as small as 50 µm in diameter. The nanoclips are fabricated using a direct laser writing technique with a resolution of 200 nm. The resolution of the printing process allows for incorporation of a number of innovations such as trapdoors to secure the device to the nerve, and quick-release mounts that facilitate keyhole surgery, obviating the need for forceps. The nanoclip can be built around various electrode materials; here we use carbon nanotube fibers for minimally invasive tethering. Main results. We present data from stimulation-evoked responses of the tracheal syringeal (hypoglossal) nerve of the zebra finch, as well as quantification of nerve functionality at various time points post implant, demonstrating that the nanoclip is compatible with healthy nerve activity over sub-chronic timescales. Significance. Our nerve interface addresses key challenges in interfacing with small nerves in the peripheral nervous system. Its small size, ability to remain on the nerve over sub-chronic timescales, and ease of implantation, make it a promising tool for future use in the treatment of disease.

  4. Impulse magnetic stimulation facilitates synaptic regeneration in rats following sciatic nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergey A. Zhivolupov; Miroslav M. Odinak; Nariman A. Rashidov; Ludmila S. Onischenko; Igor N. Samartsev; Anton A. Jurin

    2012-01-01

    The current studies describing magnetic stimulation for treatment of nervous system diseases mainly focus on transcranial magnetic stimulation and rarely focus on spinal cord magnetic stimula-tion. Spinal cord magnetic stimulation has been confirmed to promote neural plasticity after injuries of spinal cord, brain and peripheral nerve. To evaluate the effects of impulse magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord on peripheral nerve regneration, we compressed a 3 mm segment located in the middle third of the hip using a sterilized artery forceps to induce ischemia. Then, all animals un-derwent impulse magnetic stimulation of the lumbar portion of spinal crod and spinal nerve roots daily for 1 month. Electron microscopy results showed that in and below the injuryed segment, the inflammation and demyelination of neural tissue were alleviated, apoptotic cells were reduced, and injured Schwann cells and myelin fibers were repaired. These findings suggest that high-frequency impulse magnetic stimulation of spinal cord and corresponding spinal nerve roots promotes synaptic regeneration following sciatic nerve injury.

  5. Model study of combined electrical and near-infrared neural stimulation on the bullfrog sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Mengxian; Mou, Zongxia

    2017-07-01

    This paper implemented a model study of combined electrical and near-infrared (808 nm) neural stimulation (NINS) on the bullfrog sciatic nerve. The model includes a COMSOL model to calculate the electric-field distribution of the surrounding area of the nerve, a Monte Carlo model to simulate light transport and absorption in the bullfrog sciatic nerve during NINS, and a NEURON model to simulate the neural electrophysiology changes under electrical stimulus and laser irradiation. The optical thermal effect is considered the main mechanism during NINS. Therefore, thermal change during laser irradiation was calculated by the Monte Carlo method, and the temperature distribution was then transferred to the NEURON model to stimulate the sciatic nerve. The effects on thermal response by adjusting the laser spot size, energy of the beam, and the absorption coefficient of the nerve are analyzed. The effect of the ambient temperature on the electrical stimulation or laser stimulation and the interaction between laser irradiation and electrical stimulation are also studied. The results indicate that the needed stimulus threshold for neural activation or inhibition is reduced by laser irradiation. Additionally, the needed laser energy for blocking the action potential is reduced by electrical stimulus. Both electrical and laser stimulation are affected by the ambient temperature. These results provide references for subsequent animal experiments and could be of great help to future basic and applied studies of infrared neural stimulation (INS).

  6. Release of relaxin-like gonad-stimulating substance from starfish radial nerves by lonomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2013-07-01

    In starfish, the peptide hormone gonad-stimulating substance (GSS) secreted from nervous tissue stimulates oocyte maturation to induce 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde) production by ovarian follicle cells. Recently, GSS was purified from radial nerves of the starfish Asterina pectinifera and identified as a relaxin-like peptide. This study examines the mechanism of GSS secretion from radial nerves. When radial nerves isolated from A. pectinifera were incubated in artificial seawater containing ionomycin as a calcium ionophore, GSS release increased in a dose-dependent manner; 50% activity of GSS release was obtained with approximately 10 µM ionomycin. Another calcium ionophore, A23187, also stimulated GSS release from radial nerves. In contrast, membrane permeable cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP analogs failed to induce GSS release. These results suggest that GSS secretion is induced by intracellular Ca(2+) as a second messenger.

  7. Regenerated Sciatic Nerve Axons Stimulated through a Chronically Implanted Macro-Sieve Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEwan, Matthew R.; Zellmer, Erik R.; Wheeler, Jesse J.; Burton, Harold; Moran, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Sieve electrodes provide a chronic interface for stimulating peripheral nerve axons. Yet, successful utilization requires robust axonal regeneration through the implanted electrode. The present study determined the effect of large transit zones in enhancing axonal regeneration and revealed an intimate neural interface with an implanted sieve electrode. Fabrication of the polyimide sieve electrodes employed sacrificial photolithography. The manufactured macro-sieve electrode (MSE) contained nine large transit zones with areas of ~0.285 mm2 surrounded by eight Pt-Ir metallized electrode sites. Prior to implantation, saline, or glial derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) was injected into nerve guidance silicone-conduits with or without a MSE. The MSE assembly or a nerve guidance conduit was implanted between transected ends of the sciatic nerve in adult male Lewis rats. At 3 months post-operation, fiber counts were similar through both implant types. Likewise, stimulation of nerves regenerated through a MSE or an open silicone conduit evoked comparable muscle forces. These results showed that nerve regeneration was comparable through MSE transit zones and an open conduit. GDNF had a minimal positive effect on the quality and morphology of fibers regenerating through the MSE; thus, the MSE may reduce reliance on GDNF to augment axonal regeneration. Selective stimulation of several individual muscles was achieved through monopolar stimulation of individual electrodes sites suggesting that the MSE might be an optimal platform for functional neuromuscular stimulation. PMID:28008303

  8. Semiconditional electrical stimulation of pudendal nerve afferents stimulation to manage neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Hee; Kim, Jung Moon; Im, Hyung Tae; Lee, Kye-Wook; Kim, Sung Hoon; Hur, Dong Min

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of semiconditional electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve afferents for the neurogenic detrusor overactivity in patients with spinal cord injury. Forty patients (36 males, 4 males) with spinal cord injury who had urinary incontinence and frequency, as well as felt bladder contraction with bladder filling sense or autonomic dysreflexic symptom participated in this study. Patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity were subdivided into complete injury and incomplete injury groups by ASIA classification and subdivided into tetraplegia and paraplegia groups by neurologic level of injury. Bladder function, such as bladder volumes infused to the bladder until the first occurrence of neurogenic detrusor overactivity (V(ini)) and the last contraction suppressed by electrical stimulation (V(max)) was measured by water cystometry (CMG) and compared with the results of each subgroup. Among the 40 subjects, 35 patients showed neurogenic detrusor overactivity in the CMG study. Among these 35 patients, detrusor overactivity was suppressed effectively by pudendal nerve afferent electrical stimulation in 32 patients. The infusion volume until the occurrence of the first reflex contraction (V(ini)) was 99.4±80.3 ml. The volume of saline infused to the bladder until the last contraction suppressed by semiconditional pudendal nerve stimulation (V(max)) was 274.3±93.2 ml, which was significantly greater than V(ini). In patients with good response to the pudendal nerve afferent stimulation, the bladder volume significantly increased by stimulation in all the patients. In this study, semiconditional electrical stimulation on the dorsal penile afferent nerve could effectively inhibit neurogenic detrusor overactivity and increase bladder volume in patients with spinal cord injury.

  9. Circulatory effects of electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerves in man: A physiological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, C.

    1979-01-01

    The aims of this investigation were 1) to study the time course of the reflex circulatory changes evoked by carotid sinus nerves (CSN) stimulation in unsedated man (chapters IV - VII), and 2) to establish the optimal frequency of CSN stimulation for the relief of angina pectoris (chapters VIII and I

  10. Intra-SA-nodal pacemaker shifts induced by autonomic nerve stimulation in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, J M

    1975-10-01

    Pacemaker shifts in the canine heart were inferred during stimulation of thoracic cardiac nerves and following norepinephrine from changes in the initial site of activation of bipolar electrodes sutured over the rostral, middle, and caudal regions of the sinus node, over the internodal pathways, and His bundle. During control periods, pacemaker activity was localized within the sinoatrial (SA) node 87% of the time, with the middle electrode most frequently showing initial activation. Stimulation of the right-sympathetic nerves enhanced sinus node pacemaker dominance, shifting it rostrally within the node. Right-vagal stimulation shifted the pacemaker caudally within the SA node, to nonnodal sites, and to the lower atrioventricular node and His bundle. Left-sympathetic stimulation shifted the pacemaker caudally within the sinus node and enhanced pacemaker activity in the vicinity of the internodal pathway electrodes and His bundle. Dispersion of pacemaker activity was particularly apparent during stimulation of the ventrolateral cervical cardiac nerve. Stimulation of the left-vagal nerves produced effects similar to those of the left-sympathetic nerves. Norepinephrine enhanced pacemaker activity particularly in the rostral region of the sinus node. Slight shifts in pacemaker activity within the sinus node produced changes in pattern of atrial excitation.

  11. Presacral abscess as a rare complication of sacral nerve stimulator implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumber, A; Ayyar, S; Varia, H; Pettit, S

    2017-03-01

    A 50-year-old man with intractable anal pain attributed to proctalgia fugax underwent insertion of a sacral nerve stimulator via the right S3 vertebral foramen for pain control with good symptomatic relief. Thirteen months later, he presented with signs of sepsis. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large presacral abscess. MRI demonstrated increased enhancement along the pathway of the stimulator electrode, indicating that the abscess was caused by infection introduced at the time of sacral nerve stimulator placement. The patient was treated with broad spectrum antibiotics, and the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode were removed. Attempts were made to drain the abscess transrectally using minimally invasive techniques but these were unsuccessful and CT guided transperineal drainage was then performed. Despite this, the presacral abscess progressed, developing enlarging gas locules and extending to the pelvic brim to involve the aortic bifurcation, causing hydronephrosis and radiological signs of impending sacral osteomyelitis. MRI showed communication between the rectum and abscess resulting from transrectal drainage. In view of the progressive presacral sepsis, a laparotomy was performed with drainage of the abscess, closure of the upper rectum and formation of a defunctioning end sigmoid colostomy. Following this, the presacral infection resolved. Presacral abscess formation secondary to an infected sacral nerve stimulator electrode has not been reported previously. Our experience suggests that in a similar situation, the optimal management is to perform laparotomy with drainage of the presacral abscess together with simultaneous removal of the sacral nerve stimulator and electrode.

  12. Is the vagus nerve stimulation a way to decrease body weight in humans?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugajski, Andrzej; Gil, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and its complications constitute an important health problem in growing number of people. Behavioral and pharmacological treatment is not much effective and surgical treatment carries too many threats. Promising method to be used is pharmacological or electric manipulation of vagus nerves. Regulation of food intake and energy utilization is a complex process regulated by centers in hypothalamus and brainstem which are receiving information from the peripheral via afferent neural pathways and sending peripherally adequate instructions by efferent neural pathways. In these signals conduction an important role plays vagus nerve. Additionally central nervous system stays under influence of endocrine, paracrine and neuroendocrine signals taking part in these regulations, functioning directly onto the centre or on the afferent neural endings. 80-90% fibers of vagus nerve are afferent fibers, so their action is mainly afferent, but possible contribution of the efferent fibers cannot be excluded. Efferent stimulation induces motility and secretion in the intestinal tract. Afferent unmyelinated C-type fibres of the vagus nerve are more sensitive and easily electrically stimulated. Information from vagus nerve is transmitted to nucleus tractus solitarius, which has projections to nucleus arcuate of the medio-basal hypothalamus, involved in the control of feeding behavior. It is suggested, that interaction onto the vagus nerve (stimulation or blocking) can be an alternative for other ways of obesity treatment. Through the manipulation of the vagus nerve activity the goal is achieved by influence on central nervous system regulating the energy homeostasis.

  13. Effect of low-frequency pulse percutaneous electric stimulation on peripheral nerve injuries at different sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinwu Wang; Liye Chen; Qi Li; Weifeng Ni; Min Zhang; Shangchun Guo; Bingfang Zeng

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The postoperative recovery of nerve function in patients with peripheral nerve injury is always an important problem to solve after treatment. The electric stimulation induced electromagnetic field can nourish nerve, postpone muscular atrophy, and help the postoperative neuromuscular function.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of low-frequency pulse percutaneous electric stimulation on the functional recovery of postoperative patients with peripheral nerve injury, and quantitatively evaluate the results of electromyogram (EMG) examination before and after treatment.DESIGN: A retrospective case analysis.SETTING: The Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University.PARTICIPANTS: Nineteen postoperative inpatients with peripheral nerve injury were selected from the Department of Orthopaedics, the Sixth People's Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University from June 2005 to January 2006, including 13 males and 6 females aged 24-62 years with an average of 36 years old.There were 3 cases of brachial plexus nerve injury, 3 of median nerve injury, 7 of radial nerve injury, 3 of ulnar nerve injury and 3 of common peroneal nerve injury, and all the patients received probing nerve fiber restoration. Their main preoperative manifestations were dennervation, pain in limbs, motor and sensory disturbances. All the 19 patients were informed with the therapeutic program and items for evaluation.METHODS : ① Low-frequency pulse percutaneous electric stimulation apparatus: The patients were given electric stimulation with the TERESA cantata instrument (TERESA-0, Shanghai Teresa Health Technology, Co.,Ltd.). The patients were stimulated with symmetric square waves of 1-111 Hz, and the intensity was 1.2-5.0 mA, and it was gradually adjusted according to the recovered conditions of neural regeneration following the principle that the intensity was strong enough and the patients felt no obvious upset. They were treated for 4-24 weeks, 10-30 minutes

  14. Pudendal but not tibial nerve stimulation inhibits bladder contractions induced by stimulation of pontine micturition center in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Timothy D; Ferroni, Matthew C; Kadow, Brian T; Slater, Richard C; Zhang, Zhaocun; Chang, Victor; Lamm, Vladimir; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2016-02-15

    This study examined the possibility that pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) inhibits the excitatory pathway from the pontine micturition center (PMC) to the urinary bladder. In decerebrate cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, electrical stimulation of the PMC (40 Hz frequency, 0.2-ms pulse width, 10-25 s duration) using a microelectrode induced bladder contractions >20 cmH2O amplitude when the bladder was filled to 60-70% capacity. PNS or TNS (5 Hz, 0.2 ms) at two and four times the threshold (2T and 4T) to induce anal or toe twitch was applied to inhibit the PMC stimulation-induced bladder contractions. Propranolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, was administered intravenously (1 mg/kg i.v.) to determine the role of sympathetic pathways in PNS/TNS inhibition. PNS at both 2T and 4T significantly (P contractions induced by PMC stimulation, while TNS at 4T facilitated the bladder contractions. Propranolol completely eliminated PNS inhibition and TNS facilitation. This study indicates that PNS, but not TNS, inhibits PMC stimulation-induced bladder contractions via a β-adrenergic mechanism that may occur in the detrusor muscle as a result of reflex activity in lumbar sympathetic nerves. Neither PNS nor TNS activated a central inhibitory pathway with synaptic connections to the sacral parasympathetic neurons that innervate the bladder. Understanding the site of action involved in bladder neuromodulation is important for developing new therapies for bladder disorders.

  15. Development of an Implantable Pudendal Nerve Stimulator To Restore Bladder Function in Humans After SCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    stimulator, including both software and hardware. 3. University of Pittsburgh has tested the first prototype of the stimulator in animal studies. Additional...was tested in animal studies using the newly developed stimulation cuff electrode (described below) to determine the electrode impedance and the...has also designed and tested methods to make the cuff electrodes for animal studies. Methods of manufacturing nerve cuff electrodes were evaluated

  16. The effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C; Choi, J B; Lee, Y-S; Chang, H-S; Shin, C S; Kim, S; Han, D W

    2015-04-01

    Posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy is common because full neck extension is required during the procedure. We evaluated the effect of intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on postoperative neck pain in patients undergoing total thyroidectomy under general anaesthesia. One hundred patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups; 50 patients received transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle and 50 patients acted as controls. Postoperative posterior neck pain and anterior wound pain were evaluated using an 11-point numerical rating scale at 30 min, 6 h, 24 h and 48 h following surgery. The numerical rating scale for posterior neck pain was significantly lower in the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation group compared with the control group at all time points (p pain at any time point. No adverse effects related to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation were observed. We conclude that intra-operative transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation applied to the trapezius muscle reduced posterior neck pain following thyroidectomy.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation on traumatic brain injur y

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Zhou; Jinhuang Lin; Junming Lin; Guoju Kui; Jianhua Zhang; Yigang Yu

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that vagus nerve stimulation can improve the prognosis of trau-matic brain injury. The aim of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of vagus nerve stimulation in rabbits with brain explosive injury. Rabbits with brain ex-plosive injury received continuous stimulation (10 V, 5 Hz, 5 ms, 20 minutes) of the right cervical vagus nerve. Tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1βand interleukin-10 concentrations were detected in serum and brain tissues, and water content in brain tissues was measured. Results showed that vagus nerve stimulation could reduce the degree of brain edema, decrease tumor necrosis factor-αand interleukin-1βconcentrations, and increase interleukin-10 concentration after brain explosive injury in rabbits. These data suggest that vagus nerve stimulation may exert neuroprotective effects against explosive injury via regulating the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1βand interleukin-10 in the serum and brain tissue.

  18. Modulation of Brain Dead Induced Inflammation by Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeger, S.; Bergstraesser, C.; Selhorst, J.; Fontana, J.; Birck, R.; Waldherr, R.; Beck, G.; Sticht, C.; Seelen, M. A.; van Son, W. J.; Leuvenink, H.; Ploeg, R.; Schnuelle, P.; Yard, B. A.

    Because the vagus nerve is implicated in control of inflammation, we investigated if brain death (BD) causes impairment of the parasympathetic nervous system, thereby contributing to inflammation. BD was induced in rats. Anaesthetised ventilated rats (NBD) served as control. Heart rate variability

  19. Modulation of Brain Dead Induced Inflammation by Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeger, S.; Bergstraesser, C.; Selhorst, J.; Fontana, J.; Birck, R.; Waldherr, R.; Beck, G.; Sticht, C.; Seelen, M. A.; van Son, W. J.; Leuvenink, H.; Ploeg, R.; Schnuelle, P.; Yard, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    Because the vagus nerve is implicated in control of inflammation, we investigated if brain death (BD) causes impairment of the parasympathetic nervous system, thereby contributing to inflammation. BD was induced in rats. Anaesthetised ventilated rats (NBD) served as control. Heart rate variability (

  20. Heart Rate Changes in Response to Mechanical Pressure Stimulation of Skeletal Muscles Are Mediated by Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Harumi

    2017-01-01

    Stimulation of mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles such as contraction and stretch elicits reflexive autonomic nervous system changes which impact cardiovascular control. There are pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles. Mechanical pressure stimulation of skeletal muscles can induce reflex changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure, although the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. We examined the contribution of cardiac autonomic nerves to HR responses induced by mechanical pressure stimulation (30 s, ~10 N/cm2) of calf muscles in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were artificially ventilated and kept warm using a heating pad and lamp, and respiration and core body temperature were maintained within physiological ranges. Mechanical stimulation was applied using a stimulation probe 6 mm in diameter with a flat surface. Cardiac sympathetic and vagus nerves were blocked to test the contribution of the autonomic nerves. For sympathetic nerve block, bilateral stellate ganglia, and cervical sympathetic nerves were surgically sectioned, and for vagus nerve block, the nerve was bilaterally severed. In addition, mass discharges of cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve were electrophysiologically recorded. Mechanical stimulation increased or decreased HR in autonomic nerve-intact rats (range: −56 to +10 bpm), and the responses were negatively correlated with pre-stimulus HR (r = −0.65, p = 0.001). Stimulation-induced HR responses were markedly attenuated by blocking the cardiac sympathetic nerve (range: −9 to +3 bpm, p mechanical stimulation increased, or decreased the frequency of sympathetic nerve activity in parallel with HR (r = 0.77, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, the changes in sympathetic nerve activity were negatively correlated with its tonic level (r = −0.62, p = 0.0066). These results suggest that cardiac sympathetic nerve activity regulates HR responses to muscle mechanical pressure stimulation and the direction of HR

  1. In vitro electrophoresis and in vivo electrophysiology of peripheral nerve using DC field stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madison, Roger D.; Robinson, Grant A.; Krarup, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the movement of molecules within tissue that occurs naturally by endogenous electric fields, we examined the possibility of using a low-voltage DC field to move charged substances in rodent peripheral nerve in vitro. NEW METHOD: Labeled sugar- and protein-based markers were...... applied to a rodent peroneal nerve and then a 5-10 V/cm field was used to move the molecules within the extra- and intraneural compartments. Physiological and anatomical nerve properties were also assessed using the same stimulation in vivo. RESULTS: We demonstrate in vitro that charged and labeled...... compounds are capable of moving in a DC field along a nerve, and that the same field applied in vivo changes the excitability of the nerve, but without damage. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that low-voltage electrophoresis could be used to move charged molecules, perhaps therapeutically, safely along...

  2. Motor unit recruitment when neuromuscular electrical stimulation is applied over a nerve trunk compared with a muscle belly: triceps surae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. J. Bergquist; J. M. Clair; D. F. Collins

    2011-01-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can be delivered over a nerve trunk or muscle belly and can generate contractions by activating motor (peripheral pathway) and sensory (central pathway) axons...

  3. The "vagal ansa": a source of complication in vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Chittur Viswanathan; Kestle, John R W; Connolly, Mary B

    2015-05-01

    A 16-year-old boy underwent vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant multifocal epilepsy. During intraoperative system diagnostics, vigorous contraction of the ipsilateral sternomastoid muscle was observed. On re-exploration, a thin nerve fiber passing from the vagus to the sternomastoid was found hooked up in the upper electrode. Detailed inspection revealed an abnormal course of the superior root of the ansa cervicalis, which descended down as a single nerve trunk with the vagus and separated to join the inferior root. The authors discuss the variation in the course of the ansa cervicalis and how this could be a reason for postoperative neck muscle contractions.

  4. Near-infrared signals associated with electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Sergio; Chen, Debbie K.; Martin, Jeffrey M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Bergethon, Peter R.

    2009-02-01

    We report our studies on the optical signals measured non-invasively on electrically stimulated peripheral nerves. The stimulation consists of the delivery of 0.1 ms current pulses, below the threshold for triggering any visible motion, to a peripheral nerve in human subjects (we have studied the sural nerve and the median nerve). In response to electrical stimulation, we observe an optical signal that peaks at about 100 ms post-stimulus, on a much longer time scale than the few milliseconds duration of the electrical response, or sensory nerve action potential (SNAP). While the 100 ms optical signal we measured is not a direct optical signature of neural activation, it is nevertheless indicative of a mediated response to neural activation. We argue that this may provide information useful for understanding the origin of the fast optical signal (also on a 100 ms time scale) that has been measured non-invasively in the brain in response to cerebral activation. Furthermore, the optical response to peripheral nerve activation may be developed into a diagnostic tool for peripheral neuropathies, as suggested by the delayed optical signals (average peak time: 230 ms) measured in patients with diabetic neuropathy with respect to normal subjects (average peak time: 160 ms).

  5. Influence of Different Geometric Representations of the Volume Conductor on Nerve Activation during Electrical Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gómez-Tames

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Volume conductor models with different geometric representations, such as the parallel layer model (PM, the cylindrical layer model (CM, or the anatomically based model (AM, have been employed during the implementation of bioelectrical models for electrical stimulation (FES. Evaluating their strengths and limitations to predict nerve activation is fundamental to achieve a good trade-off between accuracy and computation time. However, there are no studies aimed at clarifying the following questions. (1 Does the nerve activation differ between CM and PM? (2 How well do CM and PM approximate an AM? (3 What is the effect of the presence of blood vessels and nerve trunk on nerve activation prediction? Therefore, in this study, we addressed these questions by comparing nerve activation between CM, PM, and AM models by FES. The activation threshold was used to evaluate the models under different configurations of superficial electrodes (size and distance, nerve depths, and stimulation sites. Additionally, the influences of the sciatic nerve, femoral artery, and femoral vein were inspected for a human thigh. The results showed that the CM and PM had a high error rate, but the variation of the activation threshold followed the same tendency for electrode size and interelectrode distance variation as AM.

  6. [ELECTRIC STIMULATION OF VAGUS NERVE MODULATES A PROPAGATION OF OXYGEN EPILEPSY IN RABBITS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhilyaev, S Yu; Moskvin, A N; Platonova, T F; Demchenko, I T

    2015-11-01

    The activation of autonomic afferents (achieved through the vagus nerve (VN) electrical stimulation) on CNS O2 toxicity and cardiovascular function was investigated. In conscious rabbits at 5 ATA 02, prodromal signs of CNS O2 toxicity and convulsion latency were determined with and without vagus nerve (VN) stimulation. EEG, ECG and respiration were also recorded. In rabbits at 5 ATA, sympathetic overdrive and specific patterns on the EEG (synchronization of slow-waves), ECG (tachycardia) and respiration (respiratory minute volume increase) preceded motor convulsions. Vagus nerve stimulation increased parasympathetic component of autonomic drive and significantly delayed prodromal signs of oxygen toxicity and convulsion latency. Autonomic afferent input to the brain is a novel target for preventing CNS toxicity in HBO2.

  7. Peripheral nerve field stimulation for pruritus relief in a patient with notalgia paraesthetica.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ricciardo, Bernadette

    2012-02-01

    This case study is presented to exemplify the application of peripheral nerve field stimulation in the treatment of recalcitrant notalgia paraesthetica. The patient was a 60-year-old woman with severe and disabling notalgia paraesthetica. The itch persisted despite the use of several medications - topical and oral. Following a successful trial of peripheral nerve field stimulation with a temporary electrode, two subcutaneous electrodes were inserted into the affected area with a battery implanted subcutaneously in her right buttock. The patient was reviewed at 5 months post implantation. She reported a greater than 85% improvement in her itch. She also reported a major improvement in her quality of life, with particular improvement in her ability to sleep through the night. This case illustrates the possible utilization of peripheral nerve field stimulation in the treatment of notalgia paraesthetica, which is a common yet poorly understood and treated condition. Replication and controlled studies are required to determine the general applicability of this approach.

  8. Management of overactive bladder review: the role of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elita Wibisono

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a common condition that is experienced by around 455 million people (11% of the world population and associated with significant impact in patients’ quality of life. The first line treatments of OAB are conservative treatment and anti-muscarinic medication. For the refractory OAB patients, the treatment options available are surgical therapy, electrical stimulation, and botulinum toxin injection. Among them, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS is a minimally invasive option that aims to stimulate sacral nerve plexus, a group of nerve that is responsible for regulation of bladder function. After its approval by food and drug administration (FDA in 2007, PTNS revealed considerable promise in OAB management. In this review, several non-comparative and comparative studies comparing PTNS with sham procedure, anti-muscarinic therapy, and multimodal therapy combining PTNS and anti-muscarinic had supportive data to this consideration.

  9. Interaction of myenteric neurons and extrinsic nerves in the intestinal inhibitory response induced by mesenteric nerve stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasato,Teruhiro

    1991-04-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the mesenteric nerve stimulation (MNS on the twitch contraction induced by field stimulation were investigated regarding the relationship between myenteric neurons and extrinsic cholinergic nerves in the guinea-pig mesenteric nerve-ileal preparation. The twitch contraction was inhibited after MNS. The inhibition of the twitch contraction after MNS was induced twice, just after MNS (1st inhibition and 2-3 min later (2nd inhibition (type I, or once, just after MNS (1st inhibition (type II, in recovery course of twitch contraction for 6-8 min. The 1st inhibition was slightly decreased by guanethidine and hexamethonium. The inhibitory response (1st inhibition in both types I and II was recovered to the control level by pretreatment with naloxone (recovered twitch contraction, but the late inhibitory response (2nd inhibition was markedly observed after 2-3 min in types I and II. Either the 1st or the 2nd inhibition was not altered by capsaicin, desensitization to calcitonin gene-related polypeptide (CGRP, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP, somatostatin, or galanin. The recovered twitch contraction in types I and II was decreased by CGRP-desensitization, or capsaicin. These results suggest that the first inhibitory response was induced by enteric opioid neurons connected with extrinsic cholinergic nerves, but the 2nd inhibition was induced by unknown substances other than CGRP, VIP, somatostatin, and galanin. The twitch contraction may partly be induced by endogenous neurokinin-like substances. And, some CGRP containing neurons, which connect with extrinsic cholinergic nerves, probably activate the intrinsic excitatory neurons.

  10. Application of conductive polymers, scaffolds and electrical stimulation for nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Morshed, Mohammad; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein; Kiani, Sahar; Al-Deyab, Salem S; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2011-04-01

    Among the numerous attempts to integrate tissue engineering concepts into strategies to repair nearly all parts of the body, neuronal repair stands out. This is partially due to the complexity of the nervous anatomical system, its functioning and the inefficiency of conventional repair approaches, which are based on single components of either biomaterials or cells alone. Electrical stimulation has been shown to enhance the nerve regeneration process and this consequently makes the use of electrically conductive polymers very attractive for the construction of scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. In this review, by taking into consideration the electrical properties of nerve cells and the effect of electrical stimulation on nerve cells, we discuss the most commonly utilized conductive polymers, polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PANI), along with their design and modifications, thus making them suitable scaffolds for nerve tissue engineering. Other electrospun, composite, conductive scaffolds, such as PANI/gelatin and PPy/poly(ε-caprolactone), with or without electrical stimulation, are also discussed. Different procedures of electrical stimulation which have been used in tissue engineering, with examples on their specific applications in tissue engineering, are also discussed.

  11. A microcontroller-based implantable nerve stimulator used for rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Hong; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Yan; Ren, Chaoshi

    2005-01-01

    A microcontroller-based stimulator that can be flexible programmed after it has been implanted into a rat was studied. Programmability enables implanted stimulators to generate customized, complex protocols for experiments. After implantation, a coded light pulse train that contains information of specific identification will unlock a certain stimulator. If a command that changing the parameters is received, the microcontroller will update its flash memory after it affirms the commands. The whole size of it is only 1.6 cubic centimeters, and it can work for a month. The devices have been successfully used in animal behavior experiments, especially on rats.

  12. Efferents and afferents in an intact muscle nerve: background activity and effects of sural nerve stimulation in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessou, P; Joffroy, M; Pagès, B

    1981-11-01

    1. The background activity was observed in gamma and alpha efferent fibres and in group I and II fibres innervating the muscle gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis. The reflex effects of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve stimulations on the muscle efferents were analysed together with their consequences upon the afferents of the same muscle. The observations were made in the decerebrated cat without opening the neural loops between the muscle and the spinal cord.2. The multi-unit discharges of each category of fibres were obtained, on line, by an original electronic device (Joffroy, 1975, 1980) that sorted the action potentials from the whole electrical activity of a small branch of gastrocnemius lateralis or medialis nerve according to the direction and velocity of propagation of the potentials.3. The small nerve may be regarded as a representative sample of different functional groups of fibres conducting faster than 12 m.sec(-1) and supplying gastrocnemius muscles.4. Some gamma efferents were always tonically firing except when a transient flaccid state developed. Usually the alpha efferents were silent, probably because the muscle was fixed close to the minimal physiological length.5. Separate and selective stimulations of Abeta, Adelta and C fibres of ipsilateral and contralateral sural nerve showed that each group could induce the excitation of gamma neurones. The reciprocal inhibition period of alpha efferents during a flexor reflex was only once accompanied by a small decrease in gamma-firing.6. The reflex increase of over-all frequency of gamma efferents resulted from an increased firing rate of tonic gamma neurones and from the recruitment of gamma neurones previously silent. When the gamma efferents in the small nerve naturally occurred in two subgroups, the slower-conducting subgroup (mainly composed of tonic gamma axons) was activated before the faster-conducting subgroup (mostly composed by gamma axons with no background discharge). Some rare

  13. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinha, Takashi; Krishna, Pasala

    2015-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  14. Ramsay Hunt syndrome and zoster laryngitis with multiple cranial nerve involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Shinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by varicella zoster virus infection affecting the geniculate ganglion of the facial nerve. It typically presents with vesicles in the external auditory canal associated with auricular pain and peripheral facial nerve paralysis. Although vestibulocochlear nerve is frequently co-involved during the course of Ramsay Hunt syndrome, multiple lower cranial nerve involvement has rarely been described in the literature. In addition, laryngitis due to varicella zoster virus is a diagnostic challenge due to its unfamiliarity among clinicians. We report a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with laryngitis involving multiple lower cranial nerves.

  15. Cilnidipine suppresses cardiac sympathetic nerve activation induced-electical stimulation in canine blood-perfused papillary muscle preparation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kazuyuki Daitoku; Kazuhiko Seya; Shigeru Motomura

    1999-01-01

    ...) and the NE release in the same preparation. When the intracardiac sympathetic nerves were electricaly stimulated by the field stimulation through silver electrode which was attached to the base of PM, the DT and NE release were voltage...

  16. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation for treating neurologic bladder in women: a randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Eftekhar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Overactive bladder (OAB is a disabling disorder. Treatment of cases with OAB includes behavioral, pharmacological, surgical interventions and peripheral electrical stimulation. The goal of this study was to determine effects of posterior tibial nerve stimulation on sexual function and pelvic disorders in women with Overactive bladder (OAB. Fifty women were randomly assigned to PTNS (posterior tibial nerve stimulation plus tolterodine or tolterodine alone treatment. Tolterodine group received 4 mg tolterodine daily for three months while the other group received this treatment plus percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation for 12 consequence weeks. Two in PTNS group and 8 in the control group withdrew from the study. Age, education level, and occupation status were not significantly different between two groups. Mean total FSFI and its subscales were not significantly different before and after treatment between two groups. Urine leakage associated with a feeling of urgency and loss of stool or gas from the rectum beyond patient's control became significantly different after treatment between two groups. Posterior tibial nerve stimulation could help urinary problems in women with a neurologic bladder.

  17. A Study on Duration of Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Therapy on Whole Saliva Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Neha; Reddy, Sreedevi; Nagarajappa, Anil Kumar; Kakkad, Ankur

    2015-06-01

    Saliva is a complex fluid, whose important role is to maintain the well being of oral cavity. Salivary gland hypofunction or hyposalivation is the condition of having reduced saliva production which leads to the subjective complaint of oral dryness termed xerostomia.(7) Management of xerostomia includes palliative therapy using topical agents or systemic therapy. Electrostimulation to produce saliva was studied in the past and showed moderate promise but never became part of mainstream therapy. Hence, this study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on whole salivary flow rate in healthy adults and to evaluate how long this effect of TENS lasts on salivary flow. One hundred healthy adult subjects were divided into five age groups with each group containing 20 subjects equally divided into males and females in each group. Unstimulated saliva was collected using a graduated test tube fitted with funnel and quantity was measured. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation unit was activated and stimulated saliva was collected. Saliva was again collected 30 minutes and 24 hours post stimulation. The mean unstimulated whole saliva flow rate for all subjects (n = 100) was 2.60 ml/5 min. During stimulation, it increased to 3.60 ± 0.39 ml/5 min. There was 38.46% increase in salivary flow. Ninety six out of 100 responded positively to TENS therapy. Salivary flow remained increased 30 minutes and 24 hours post stimulation with the values being 3.23 ± 0.41 ml/5 min and 2.69 ± 0.39 ml/5 min respectively. Repeated measures One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test showed that the difference between these values were statistically significant. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy was effective for stimulation of whole saliva in normal, healthy subjects and its effect retained till 30 minutes and a little up to 24 hours. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation may work best synergistically with other

  18. Blood pressure control with selective vagal nerve stimulation and minimal side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, Dennis T. T.; Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Cota, Oscar; Espinosa, Nayeli; Boeser, Fabian; Herrera, Taliana C.; Stieglitz, Thomas; Zentner, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Hypertension is the largest threat to patient health and a burden to health care systems. Despite various options, 30% of patients do not respond sufficiently to medical treatment. Mechanoreceptors in the aortic arch relay blood pressure (BP) levels through vagal nerve (VN) fibers to the brainstem and trigger the baroreflex, lowering the BP. Selective electrical stimulation of these nerve fibers reduced BP in rats. However, there is no technique described to localize and stimulate these fibers inside the VN without inadvertent stimulation of non-baroreceptive fibers causing side effects like bradycardia and bradypnea. Approach. We present a novel method for selective VN stimulation to reduce BP without the aforementioned side effects. Baroreceptor compound activity of rat VN (n = 5) was localized using a multichannel cuff electrode, true tripolar recording and a coherent averaging algorithm triggered by BP or electrocardiogram. Main results. Tripolar stimulation over electrodes near the barofibers reduced the BP without triggering significant bradycardia and bradypnea. The BP drop was adjusted to 60% of the initial value by varying the stimulation pulse width and duration, and lasted up to five times longer than the stimulation. Significance. The presented method is robust to impedance changes, independent of the electrode's relative position, does not compromise the nerve and can run on implantable, ultra-low power signal processors.

  19. High Frequency Stimulation of the Pelvic Nerve Inhibits Urinary Voiding in Anesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Crook

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Urge Urinary Incontinence: “a sudden and uncontrollable desire to void which is impossible to defer” is extremely common and considered the most bothersome of lower urinary tract conditions. Current treatments rely on pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurotoxicological approaches to manage the disorder, by reducing the excitability of the bladder muscle. However, some patients remain refractory to treatment. An alternative approach would be to temporarily suppress activity of the micturition control circuitry at the time of need i.e., urgency. In this study we investigated, in a rat model, the utility of high frequency pelvic nerve stimulation to produce a rapid onset, reversible suppression of voiding. In urethane-anesthetized rats periodic voiding was induced by continuous infusion of saline into the bladder whilst recording bladder pressure and electrical activity from the external urethral sphincter (EUS. High frequency (1–3 kHz, sinusoidal pelvic nerve stimulation initiated at the onset of the sharp rise in bladder pressure signaling an imminent void aborted the detrusor contraction. Urine output was suppressed and tone in the EUS increased. Stimulating the right or left nerve was equally effective. The effect was rapid in onset, reversible, and reproducible and evoked only minimal “off target” side effects on blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, uterine pressure, or rectal pressure. Transient contraction of abdominal wall was observed in some animals. Stimulation applied during the filling phase evoked a small, transient rise in bladder pressure and increased tonic activity in the EUS, but no urine output. Suppression of micturition persisted after section of the contralateral pelvic nerve or after ligation of the nerve distal to the electrode cuff on the ipsilateral side. We conclude that high frequency pelvic nerve stimulation initiated at the onset of an imminent void provides a potential means to control urinary

  20. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) in pharmacoresistant epilepsies: a proof of concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, Hermann; Kreiselmeyer, Gernot; Kerling, Frank; Kurzbuch, Katrin; Rauch, Christophe; Heers, Marcel; Kasper, Burkhard S; Hammen, Thilo; Rzonsa, Martina; Pauli, Elisabeth; Ellrich, Jens; Graf, Wolfgang; Hopfengärtner, Rüdiger

    2012-07-01

    To elucidate, in a pilot-study, whether noninvasive transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) is a safe and tolerable alternative treatment option in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. t-VNS was applied to 10 patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsies. Stimulation via the auricular branch of the vagus nerve of the left tragus was delivered three times per day for 9 months. Subjective documentation of stimulation effects was obtained from patients' seizure diaries. For a more reliable assessment of seizure frequency, we carried out prolonged outpatient video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring. In addition, computerized testing of cognitive, affective, and emotional functions was performed. Three patients aborted the study. Of the remaining seven patients, an overall reduction of seizure frequency was observed in five patients after 9 months of t-VNS. The noninvasive t-VNS stimulation is a safe and well-tolerated method for relatively long periods, and might be an alternative treatment option for patients with epilepsy.

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation: Surgical technique of implantation and revision and related morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Flavio; Zicca, Anna; Barba, Carmen; Guerrini, Renzo; Genitori, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    Indications for vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy include focal, multifocal epilepsy, drop attacks (tonic/atonic seizures), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)-related multifocal epilepsy, and unsuccessful resective surgery. Surgical outcome is about 50-60% for seizures control, and may also improve mood, cognition, and memory. On this basis, VNS has also been proposed for the treatment of major depression and Alzheimer's' disease. The vagus nerve stimulator must be implanted with blunt technique on the left side to avoid cardiac side effects through the classic approach for anterior cervical discectomy. The actual device is composed of a wire with three helical contacts (two active contacts, one anchoring) and a one-pin battery. VNS is usually started 2 weeks after implantation with recommended settings of stimulation (1.0-2.0 mA; 500 μs pulse width; 20-30 Hz; 30 s ON, 5 min OFF). The complications of VNS therapy are early (related to surgery) and late (related to the device and to stimulation of the vagus nerve). Early complications include the following: intraoperative bradycardia and asystole during lead impedance testing, peritracheal hematoma, infections (3-8%), and vagus nerve injury followed by hoarseness, dyspnea, and dysphagia because of left vocal cord paralysis. Delayed morbidity due to the device includes late infections or problems in wound healing; other more rare events are due to late injury of the nerve. Late complications due to nerve stimulation include delayed arrhythmias, laryngopharyngeal dysfunction (hoarseness, dyspnea, and coughing), obstructive sleep apnea, stimulation of phrenic nerve, tonsillar pain mimicking glossopharyngeal neuralgia, and vocal cord damage during prolonged endotracheal intubation. The laryngopharyngeal dysfunction occurs in about 66% of patients and is usually transitory and due to the stimulation of the inferior (recurrent) laryngeal nerve. A true late paralysis of the left vocal cord

  2. Assessing the Firing Properties of the Electrically Stimulated Auditory Nerve Using a Convolution Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, Stefan B; Ramekers, Dyan; Nagelkerke, Marjolijn M B; Schwarz, Konrad E; Spitzer, Philipp; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko; Versnel, Huib

    2016-01-01

    The electrically evoked compound action potential (eCAP) is a routinely performed measure of the auditory nerve in cochlear implant users. Using a convolution model of the eCAP, additional information about the neural firing properties can be obtained, which may provide relevant information about the health of the auditory nerve. In this study, guinea pigs with various degrees of nerve degeneration were used to directly relate firing properties to nerve histology. The same convolution model was applied on human eCAPs to examine similarities and ultimately to examine its clinical applicability. For most eCAPs, the estimated nerve firing probability was bimodal and could be parameterised by two Gaussian distributions with an average latency difference of 0.4 ms. The ratio of the scaling factors of the late and early component increased with neural degeneration in the guinea pig. This ratio decreased with stimulation intensity in humans. The latency of the early component decreased with neural degeneration in the guinea pig. Indirectly, this was observed in humans as well, assuming that the cochlear base exhibits more neural degeneration than the apex. Differences between guinea pigs and humans were observed, among other parameters, in the width of the early component: very robust in guinea pig, and dependent on stimulation intensity and cochlear region in humans. We conclude that the deconvolution of the eCAP is a valuable addition to existing analyses, in particular as it reveals two separate firing components in the auditory nerve.

  3. Electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composite for nerve regeneration: electricity-stimulated neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ze; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Wang, Zhaoxu; Roberge, Christophe; Shi, Guixin; Roche, Phillippe; Li, Jiangming; Dao, Lê H

    2007-01-01

    Normal and electrically stimulated PC12 cell cultures and the implantation of nerve guidance channels were performed to evaluate newly developed electrically conductive biodegradable polymer composites. Polypyrrole (PPy) doped by butane sulfonic acid showed a significantly higher number of viable cells compared with PPy doped by polystyrenesulfonate after a 6-day culture. The PC12 cells were left to proliferate for 6 days, and the PPy-coated membranes, showing less initial cell adherence, recorded the same proliferation rate as did the noncoated membranes. Direct current electricity at various intensities was applied to the PC12 cell-cultured conductive membranes. After 7 days, the greatest number of neurites appeared on the membranes with a current intensity approximating 1.7-8.4 microA/cm. Nerve guidance channels made of conductive biodegradable composite were implanted into rats to replace 8 mm of sciatic nerve. The implants were harvested after 2 months and analyzed with immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. The regenerated nerve tissue displayed myelinated axons and Schwann cells that were similar to those in the native nerve. Electrical stimulation applied through the electrically conductive biodegradable polymers therefore enhanced neurite outgrowth in a current-dependent fashion. The conductive polymers also supported sciatic nerve regeneration in rats.

  4. Fascicular nerve stimulation and recording using a novel double-aisle regenerative electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Martínez, I.; Righi, M.; Santos, D.; Cutrone, A.; Bossi, S.; D'Amico, S.; Del Valle, J.; Micera, S.; Navarro, X.

    2017-08-01

    Objective. As artificial prostheses become more refined, they are most often used as a therapeutic option for hand amputation. By contrast to extra- or intraneural interfaces, regenerative nerve electrodes are designed to enable electrical interfaces with regrowing axonal bundles of injured nerves, aiming to achieve high selectivity for recording and stimulation. However, most of the developed designs pose an obstacle to the regrowth mechanisms due to low transparency and cause impairment to the nerve regeneration. Approach. Here we present the double-aisle electrode, a new type of highly transparent, non-obstructive regenerative electrode. Using a double-side thin-film polyimide planar multi-contact electrode, two nerve fascicles can regenerate without physical impairment through two electrically isolated aisles. Main results. We show that this electrode can be used to selectively record and stimulate fascicles, acutely as well as chronically, and allow regeneration in nerve gaps of several millimeters without impairment. Significance. This multi-aisle regenerative electrode may be suitable for neuroprosthetic applications, such as prostheses, for the restoration of hand function after amputation or severe nerve injuries.

  5. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) does not increase prosocial behavior in Cyberball

    OpenAIRE

    Sellaro, Roberta; Steenbergen, Laura; Verkuil, Bart; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that individuals experience vicarious social pain (i.e., ostracism). It has been proposed that observing ostracism increases activity in the insula and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), two key brain regions activated by directly experiencing ostracism. Here, we assessed the causal role of the insula and PFC in modulating neural activity in these areas by applying transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS), a new non-invasive and safe method to stimulate the vagus ...

  6. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) does not increase prosocial behavior in Cyberball

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta eSellaro; Laura eSteenbergen; Bart eVerkuil; Marinus eVan IJzendoorn; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that individuals experience vicarious social pain (i.e., ostracism). It has been proposed that observing ostracism increases activity in the insula and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), two key brain regions activated by directly experiencing ostracism. Here, we assessed the causal role of the insula and PFC in modulating neural activity in these areas by applying transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a new non-invasive and safe method to stimulate the vagus ...

  7. Pulsed 808-nm infrared laser stimulation of the auditory nerve in guinea pig cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Nan; Wu, Xiao Y; Wang, Xing; Mou, Zong X; Wang, Man Q; Gu, Xin; Zheng, Xiao L; Hou, Wen S

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed near-infrared radiation has been proposed as an alternative stimulus for auditory nerve stimulation and could be potentially used in the design of cochlear implant. Although the infrared with high absorption coefficient of water (i.e., wavelength ranged from 1.8 to 2.2 μm) has been widely investigated, the lymph in the cochlea absorbs most of the infrared energies, and only a small part can arrive at the target auditory nerves. The present study is aimed to test whether the short-wavelength near-infrared irradiation with lower absorption coefficients can penetrate the lymph fluid to stimulate the auditory nerves. An 808-nm near-infrared laser was chosen to stimulate the auditory nerve in the guinea pig cochlea. The infrared pulse was delivered by an optical fiber that was surgically inserted near the round window membrane and oriented toward the spiral ganglion cells in the basal turn of the cochlea. The 2-Hz infrared pulses were used to stimulate the cochlea before and after the deafness with different pulse durations (100-1,000 μs). Optically evoked compound action potentials (oCAPs) were recorded during the infrared radiation. We successfully recorded oCAPs from both normal hearing animals and deafened animals. The oCAP amplitude increased with the infrared radiation energy. The preliminary experiment suggests that the near-infrared with lower absorption coefficients can effectively pass through the lymph filled in the cochlea and stimulate the auditory nerve. Further studies will optimize the deafness animal model and determine the optimal stimulation parameters.

  8. Inhibition of the triceps surae stretch reflex by stimulation of the deep peroneal nerve in persons with spastic stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Peter H.; Ladouceur, Michel; Sinkjaer, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Inhibition of the triceps surae stretch reflex by stimulation of the deep peroneal nerve in persons with spastic stroke. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2000;81:1016-24. Objective: To reduce the triceps surae stretch reflex by electrical stimulation of the deep peroneal nerve. Design: Intervention study. Sett

  9. Excitatory and inhibitory effects of prolactin release activated by nerve stimulation in rat anterior pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Li-Zhi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of studies showed the presence of substantial amount of nerve fibers and their close relationship with the anterior pituitary gland cells. Our previous studies have suggested that aside from the classical theory of humoral regulation, the rat anterior pituitary has direct neural regulation on adrenocorticotropic hormone release. In rat anterior pituitary, typical synapses are found on every type of the hormone-secreting cells, many on lactotrophs. The present study was aimed at investigating the physiological significance of this synaptic relationship on prolactin release. Methods The anterior pituitary of rat was sliced and stimulated with electrical field in a self-designed perfusion chamber. The perfusate was continuously collected in aliquots and measured by radioimmunoassay for prolactin levels. After statistic analysis, differences of prolactin concentrations within and between groups were outlined. Results The results showed that stimulation at frequency of 2 Hz caused a quick enhancement of prolactin release, when stimulated at 10 Hz, prolactin release was found to be inhibited which came slower and lasted longer. The effect of nerve stimulation on prolactin release is diphasic and frequency dependent. Conclusions The present in vitro study offers the first physiological evidence that stimulation of nerve fibers can affect prolactin release in rat anterior pituitary. Low frequency stimulation enhances prolactin release and high frequency mainly inhibits it.

  10. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation: A Promising Method for Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu; Kong, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) on the auricular branch of the vagus nerve has been receiving attention due to its therapeutic potential for neuropsychiatric disorders. Although the mechanism of tVNS is not yet completely understood, studies have demonstrated the potential role of vagal afferent nerve stimulation in the regulation of mood and visceral state associated with social communication. In addition, a growing body of evidence shows that tVNS can activate the brain regions associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), trigger neuroimmune modulation and produce treatment effects for comorbid disorders of ASD such as epilepsy and depression. We thus hypothesize that tVNS may be a promising treatment for ASD, not only for comorbid epilepsy and depression, but also for the core symptoms of ASD. The goal of this manuscript is to summarize the findings and rationales for applying tVNS to treat ASD and propose potential parameters for tVNS treatment of ASD.

  11. Automatic stance-swing phase detection from accelerometer data for peroneal nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Antoon Th.M.; Bloemhof, Fedde; Boom, Herman B.K.

    1990-01-01

    The development of implantable peroneal nerve stimulators has increased interest in sensors which can detect the different phases of walking (stance and swing). Accelerometers with a potential for implantation are studied as detectors for the swing phase of walking to replace footswitches. Theoretic

  12. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition and behaviour in aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E.J A; van Someren, E.W J; Bouma, J.M.; van der Berg, M

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improved cognition and behaviour in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rationale underlying these studies was that TENS could activate, e.g. the septo-hippocampal region and the hypothalamus through direct and indirect

  13. The influence of sacral nerve stimulation on gastrointestinal motor function in patients with fecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, M; Thomsen, F G; Sørensen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is a well-established treatment for fecal incontinence of various etiologies. However, the mechanism of action remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine whether SNS affects gastric emptying, small intestinal transit or colonic transit times....

  14. Randomized controlled trial of surface peroneal nerve stimulation for motor relearning in lower limb hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheffler, L.R.; Taylor, P.N.; Gunzler, D.D.; Buurke, Jaap; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Chae, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the motor relearning effect of a surface peroneal nerve stimulator (PNS) versus usual care on lower limb motor impairment, activity limitation, and quality of life among chronic stroke survivors. Design: Single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Setting: Teaching hospital of

  15. Electrical behavior of myenteric neurons induced by mesenteric nerve stimulation in the guinea pig ileum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaki,Miyako

    1990-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of mesenteric nerve (MN stimulation on the electrophysiological behavior of myenteric neurons in the guinea pig ileum were investigated with intracellular recording techniques in the myenteric flaps innervated with mesenteric nerves. MN stimulation at 0.11-6 Hz evoked fast excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs in 6 myenteric neurons (2 Type 2/AH, 3 NS and 1 Type 1/S cells and rarely evoked antidromic soma spike potentials in 3 myenteric neurons. Fast EPSPs were abolished by hexamethonium. Slow EPSPs evoked by MN stimulation (Takaki and Nakayama (1988 Brain Res., 442, 351-353 were also obtained in 5 Type 2/AH neurons and were irreversibly abolished by superfusion with capsaicin 10 microM. It is, therefore, likely that fast EPSPs mediated by nicotinic cholinergic receptors are due to stimulation of the vagus nerve and slow EPSPs are mediated by a release of substance P at axosomatic synapses due to antidromic activation of the capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves.

  16. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on memory in elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijpen, M.W.; Swaab, D.F.; Sergeant, J.A.; Dijk, K.R.A.; Scherder, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was shown to have a positive effect on memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Moreover, the reported effects appeared to be more beneficial in early stages of Alzheimer's disease compared to later stage intervention. Based

  17. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on cognition and behaviour in aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherder, E.J A; van Someren, E.W J; Bouma, J.M.; van der Berg, M

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improved cognition and behaviour in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The rationale underlying these studies was that TENS could activate, e.g. the septo-hippocampal region and the hypothalamus through direct and indirect

  18. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on memory in elderly with mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijpen, MW; Swaab, DF; Sergeant, JA; van Dijk, KRA; Scherder, EJA

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was shown to have a positive effect on memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Moreover, the reported effects appeared to be more beneficial in early stages of Alzheimer's disease compared to later stage intervention. Based

  19. Vagus nerve stimulation in patients with catastrophic childhood epilepsy, a 2-year follow-up study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majoie, H.J.; Berfelo, M.W.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Renier, W.O.; Kessels, A.G.H.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To establish the long-term efficacy and tolerability of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in children with a Lennox-like syndrome. METHOD: This study was a longitudinal observational prospective cohort analysis. Baseline: 6 months. Follow-up: 24 months. Screening (baseline and every 6 months):

  20. Multigrid solution of the potential field in modeling electrical nerve stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, R.; Hoekema, Rudi; Venner, Cornelis H.; Struijk, J.J.; Struijk, Johannes J.; Holsheimer, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, multilevel techniques are introduced as a fast numerical method to compute 3-D potential field in nerve stimulation configurations. It is shown that with these techniques the computing time is reduced significantly compared to conventional methods. Consequently, these techniques

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation inhibits activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during endotoxemia in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. van Westerloo; I.A. Giebelen; J.C.M. Meijers; J. Daalhuisen; A.F. de Vos; M. Levi; T. van der Poll

    2006-01-01

    Background: Sepsis and endotoxemia are associated with concurrent activation of inflammation and the hemostatic mechanism, which both contribute to organ dysfunction and death. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been found to inhibit tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release during endotox

  2. High-reliability microcontroller nerve stimulator for assistance in regional anaesthesia procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Carlos A; Quevedo, Antonio A F

    2017-07-01

    In the last decades, the use of nerve stimulators to aid in regional anaesthesia has been shown to benefit the patient since it allows a better location of the nerve plexus, leading to correct positioning of the needle through which the anaesthetic is applied. However, most of the nerve stimulators available in the market for this purpose do not have the minimum recommended features for a good stimulator, and this can lead to risks to the patient. Thus, this study aims to develop an equipment, using embedded electronics, which meets all the characteristics, for a successful blockade. The system is made of modules for generation and overall control of the current pulse and the patient and user interfaces. The results show that the designed system fits into required specifications for a good and reliable nerve stimulator. Linearity proved satisfactory, ensuring accuracy in electrical current amplitude for a wide range of body impedances. Field tests have proven very successful. The anaesthesiologist that used the system reported that, in all cases, plexus blocking was achieved with higher quality, faster anaesthetic diffusion and without needed of an additional dose when compared with same procedure without the use of the device.

  3. Modulation of heart rate by temporally patterned vagus nerve stimulation in the anesthetized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Paul B; Liu, Haoran; Hincapie, Juan G; Ruble, Stephen B; Hamann, Jason J; Grill, Warren M

    2016-02-01

    Despite current knowledge of the myriad physiological effects of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in various mammalian species (including humans), the impact of varying stimulation parameters on nerve recruitment and physiological responses is not well understood. We investigated nerve recruitment, cardiovascular responses, and skeletal muscle responses to different temporal patterns of VNS across 39 combinations of stimulation amplitude, frequency, and number of pulses per burst. Anesthetized dogs were implanted with stimulating and recording cuff electrodes around the cervical vagus nerve, whereas laryngeal electromyogram (EMG) and heart rate were recorded. In seven of eight dogs, VNS-evoked bradycardia (defined as ≥10% decrease in heart rate) was achieved by applying stimuli at amplitudes equal to or greater than the threshold for activating slow B-fibers. Temporally patterned VNS (minimum 5 pulses per burst) was sufficient to elicit bradycardia while reducing the concomitant activation of laryngeal muscles by more than 50%. Temporal patterns of VNS can be used to modulate heart rate while minimizing laryngeal motor fiber activation, and this is a novel approach to reduce the side effects produced by VNS.

  4. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Reduces Cocaine Seeking and Alters Plasticity in the Extinction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Jessica E.; DeLeon, Jaime; Nickel, Emily; Kroener, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Drugs of abuse cause changes in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and associated regions that impair inhibitory control over drug-seeking. Breaking the contingencies between drug-associated cues and the delivery of the reward during extinction learning reduces rates of relapse. Here we used vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to induce targeted synaptic…

  5. Randomized controlled trial of surface peroneal nerve stimulation for motor relearning in lower limb hemiparesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheffler, L.R.; Taylor, P.N.; Gunzler, D.D.; Buurke, J.H.; IJzerman, M.J.; Chae, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the motor relearning effect of a surface peroneal nerve stimulator (PNS) versus usual care on lower limb motor impairment, activity limitation, and quality of life among chronic stroke survivors. Design: Single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Setting: Teaching hospital of

  6. Reference values and clinical application of magnetic peripheral nerve stimulation in cats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Soens, Iris; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Bhatti, Sofie F. M.; Van Ham, Luc M. L.

    Magnetic stimulation of radial (RN) and sciatic (SN) nerves was performed bilaterally in 40 healthy cats. Reference values for onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) were obtained and compared with values of electric motor evoked potentials (EMEPs) in

  7. Assessment of a two-channel implantable peroneal nerve stimulator post-stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, A.I.R.

    2010-01-01

    Thesis outline and aims: to progress towards evidence based application of PNS to improve lower extremity function, the aim of the present thesis is to evaluate an implantable two-channel peroneal nerve stimulator versus conventional splinting as a treatment option for chronic stroke patients with a

  8. The effect of vagus nerve stimulation on cardiorespiratory parameters during rest and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, D.M.; de Vos, Cecilia Cecilia Clementine; Vosman, I.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been successfully applied to reduce seizure frequency in numerous patients with epilepsy. However, various side effects, including dyspnea and bradycardia have been reported, that appear exercise related in some patients. This pilot study aims to obtain

  9. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on memory in elderly with mild cognitive impairment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijpen, M.W.; Swaab, D.F.; Sergeant, J.A.; Dijk, K.R.A.; Scherder, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    In previous studies, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was shown to have a positive effect on memory in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Moreover, the reported effects appeared to be more beneficial in early stages of Alzheimer's disease compared to later stage intervention. Based

  10. Pudendal nerve latency time in normal women via intravaginal stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo A. Cavalcanti

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION & OBJECTIVES: Studies of motor conduction for the efferent functional assessment of the pudendal nerve in women with pelvic dysfunctions have been conducted through researching distal motor latency times. The transrectal approach has been the classic approach for this electrophysiological examination. The objective of the present study is to verify the viability of the transvaginal approach in performing the exam, to establish normal values for this method and to analyze the influence of age, stature and parity in the latency value of normal women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 23 volunteers without genitourinary pathologies participated in this study. In each, pudendal motor latency was investigated through the transvaginal approach, which was chosen due to patient’s higher tolerance levels. RESULTS: The motor response represented by registering the M-wave was obtained in all volunteers on the right side (100% and in 13 volunteers on the left side (56.5%. The mean motor latency obtained in the right and left was respectively: 1.99 ± 0.41 and 1.92 ± 0.48 milliseconds (ms. There was no difference between the sides (p = 0.66. Latency did not correlate with age, stature or obstetric history. The results obtained in the present study were in agreement with those found by other researchers using the transrectal approach. CONCLUSION: The vaginal approach represents an alternative for pudendal nerve distal motor latency time, with similar results to those achieved through the transrectal approach. Normative values obtained herein might serve as a comparative basis for subsequent physiopathological studies.

  11. Interlimb Reflexes Induced by Electrical Stimulation of Cutaneous Nerves after Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jane E; Godfrey, Sharlene; Thomas, Christine K

    2016-01-01

    Whether interlimb reflexes emerge only after a severe insult to the human spinal cord is controversial. Here the aim was to examine interlimb reflexes at rest in participants with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI, n = 17) and able-bodied control participants (n = 5). Cutaneous reflexes were evoked by delivering up to 30 trains of stimuli to either the superficial peroneal nerve on the dorsum of the foot or the radial nerve at the wrist (5 pulses, 300 Hz, approximately every 30 s). Participants were instructed to relax the test muscles prior to the delivery of the stimuli. Electromyographic activity was recorded bilaterally in proximal and distal arm and leg muscles. Superficial peroneal nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in ipsilateral and contralateral arm and contralateral leg muscles of SCI and control participants. Radial nerve stimulation evoked interlimb reflexes in the ipsilateral leg and contralateral arm muscles of control and SCI participants but only contralateral leg muscles of control participants. Interlimb reflexes evoked by superficial peroneal nerve stimulation were longer in latency and duration, and larger in magnitude in SCI participants. Interlimb reflex properties were similar for both SCI and control groups for radial nerve stimulation. Ascending interlimb reflexes tended to occur with a higher incidence in participants with SCI, while descending interlimb reflexes occurred with a higher incidence in able-bodied participants. However, the overall incidence of interlimb reflexes in SCI and neurologically intact participants was similar which suggests that the neural circuitry underlying these reflexes does not necessarily develop after central nervous system injury.

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation: state of the art of stimulation and recording strategies to address autonomic function neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, David; Andreu, David; Bonnet, Stéphane; Carrault, Guy; Couderc, Pascal; Hagège, Albert; Henry, Christine; Hernandez, Alfredo; Karam, Nicole; Le Rolle, Virginie; Mabo, Philippe; Maciejasz, Paweł; Malbert, Charles-Henri; Marijon, Eloi; Maubert, Sandrine; Picq, Chloé; Rossel, Olivier; Bonnet, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Neural signals along the vagus nerve (VN) drive many somatic and autonomic functions. The clinical interest of VN stimulation (VNS) is thus potentially huge and has already been demonstrated in epilepsy. However, side effects are often elicited, in addition to the targeted neuromodulation. Approach. This review examines the state of the art of VNS applied to two emerging modulations of autonomic function: heart failure and obesity, especially morbid obesity. Main results. We report that VNS may benefit from improved stimulation delivery using very advanced technologies. However, most of the results from fundamental animal studies still need to be demonstrated in humans.

  13. Multiple Variations of the Nerves of Gluteal Region and their Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad AM

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of variations of nerves of gluteal region is important for clinicians administering intramuscular injections, for orthopedic surgeons dealing with the hip surgeries and possibly for physiotherapists managing the painful conditions and paralysis of this region. We report multiple variations of the nerves of gluteal region through this article. In the current case, the sciatic nerve was absent. The common peroneal and tibial nerves arose from sacral plexus and reached the gluteal region through greater sciatic foramen above and below piriformis respectively. The common peroneal nerve gave a muscular branch to the gluteus maximus. The inferior gluteal nerve and posterior cutaneous nerve of the thigh arose from a common trunk. The common trunk was formed by three roots. Upper and middle roots arose from sacral plexus and entered gluteal region through greater sciatic foramen respectively above and below piriformis. The lower root arose from the pudendal nerve and joined the common trunk. We discuss the clinical implications of the variations.

  14. Nerve biopsy findings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy: 78% of findings support clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Shuang; Sun, A-Ping; Chen, Lu; Dong, Rong-Fang; Zhong, Yan-Feng; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1) on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, electrophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not confirmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies confirmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14). Nerve biopsy pathological diagnosis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  15. Nerve biopsy findings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy: 78% of findings support clinical diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-shuang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy (n = 6, perineuritis (n = 2, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2 or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1 on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, electrophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not confirmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies confirmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14. Nerve biopsy pathological diagnosis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  16. Nerve biopsy ifndings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy:78% of ifndings support clinical diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-shuang Zhang; A-ping Sun; Lu Chen; Rong-fang Dong; Yan-feng Zhong; Jun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysi-ological and nerve biopsy ifndings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neurop-athy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inlfammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1) on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, elec-trophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inlfamma-tory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not conifrmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies conifrmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14). Nerve biopsy pathological diagno-sis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy.

  17. Sacral nerve stimulation in patients after rectal resection--preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Brigitte; Rosen, Harald R; Zaglmaier, Wolfgang; Klug, Reinhold; Beer, Bernhard; Novi, Gabriele; Schiessel, Rudolf

    2008-05-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation is a widely accepted therapeutic option for neurogenic fecal incontinence. More recently, case reports showed a positive effect of sacral nerve stimulation in patients with fecal incontinence following low anterior resection. The purpose of this study was to gain more information for this selected indication for sacral nerve stimulation through a nationwide survey. In the period 2002 to 2005, three Austrian departments reported data of patients who underwent SNS for fecal incontinence following rectal resection. Data were available of seven patients (two female, five male) with a median age of 57 years (min 42; max 79). Six patients had undergone rectal resection as a treatment for low rectal cancer. One patient had undergone rectal resection for Crohn's disease, one patient subtotal colectomy and ileorectostomy for slow colon transit constipation. Test stimulation was performed in the foramen S3 unilaterally over a median period of 14 days (2-21 days). Seven patients reported a marked reduction of episodes of incontinence during the observation period and received a permanent stimulation system. After a median follow-up of 32 months (17-46), five patients reported a marked improvement of their continence situation. Despite a nationwide survey experiences with SNS as a treatment for fecal incontinence following rectal resection is still limited. Our observations show an improvement of the continence function following SNS. However, the promising results of our series as well as others need further research and more clinical data by a larger number of patients in a prospective trial.

  18. Effect of electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve on insulinemia and glycemia in Acomys cahirinus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, E; Jeanrenaud, B

    1988-08-01

    To investigate the parasympathetic regulation of the endocrine pancreas in spiny mice (Acomys cahirinus), unilateral electrical stimulations of the left cervical vagus nerve were performed in these animals and their controls, the albino mice. Plasma insulin and glucose levels were measured before and after the stimulation. The stimulation parameters were: 2-2.5 V, 14 Hz, 1 msec for the albino mice and 3 V, 14 Hz, 1 msec or 15-20 V, 20 Hz, 1 msec for the spiny mice. Already 2 min after the start of the stimulation, the acomys as well as the albino mice showed a significant increase in plasma insulin levels which was accompanied by a weak but significant increase in glycemia. However, the total insulin output in the acomys mice was half than that of the albino mice. Carbachol administration had no effect on insulin secretion in the acomys mice, while it increased that of the controls. Atropine pretreatment failed to abolish the insulin release elicited by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve in the acomys mice, while it abolished it in the albino ones. It is proposed that the vagus-nerve mediated insulin release that is present in the acomys mice is exerted, not via muscarinic receptors as in controls, but possibly via other neurotransmitter(s).

  19. Occipital nerve stimulation for refractory occipital pain after occipitocervical fusion: expanding indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Kazem; Capelle, Hans-Holger; Kinfe, Thomas M; Krauss, Joachim K

    2008-01-01

    Occipital nerve stimulation is being used for various pain syndromes. Here, we expand its use for the treatment of refractory occipital pain after occipitocervical fusion. We describe a case of occipital neuralgia in a 60-year-old man following posterior occipitocervical fusion. The maximum pain intensity was rated 9/10 on the visual analogue scale (VAS). Since pain proved to be refractory to analgetic medication, two quadripolar electrodes (Resume II, Medtronic) were implanted in the occipital region to stimulate the occipital nerve bilaterally. The patient experienced a dramatic response during test stimulation for 10 days with externalized electrodes, and a pacemaker (Synergy, Medtronic) was connected to the electrodes. While on chronic stimulation (bipolar 6 V, 210 mus, 130 Hz) improvement of pain was maintained, reflected by a decrease in the VAS score to 1/10 at 12 months of follow-up. Occipital nerve stimulation for medical refractory occipital neuralgia after occipitocervical fusion is an effective method expanding the indications for its use. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation on cortical excitability in epileptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Meglio, M; Colicchio, G; Barba, C; Papacci, F; Tonali, P A

    2004-06-22

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used as adjunctive treatment for medically refractory epilepsy, but little is known about its mechanisms of action. The effects of VNS on the excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the motor cortex were evaluated in five patients with epilepsy using single- and paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Patients were examined with the stimulator on and off. VNS determined a selective and pronounced increase in the inhibition produced by paired-pulse TMS with no effects on the excitability by single-pulse TMS.

  1. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP-amp...... ischemia to the rat tail, an additional fall of the PP-amp was seen after 15-20 min of HFS at both low (20 Hz) and high (143 Hz) stimulation frequencies. In conclusion, ischemia and cooling result in an impaired ability to transmit high frequency impulses.......In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP...

  2. Serratus muscle stimulation effectively treats notalgia paresthetica caused by long thoracic nerve dysfunction: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barad Meredith

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, notalgia paresthetica (NP is a poorly-understood condition diagnosed on the basis of pruritus, pain, or both, in the area medial to the scapula and lateral to the thoracic spine. It has been proposed that NP is caused by degenerative changes to the T2-T6 vertebrae, genetic disposition, or nerve entrapment of the posterior rami of spinal nerves arising at T2-T6. Despite considerable research, the etiology of NP remains unclear, and a multitude of different treatment modalities have correspondingly met with varying degrees of success. Here we demonstrate that NP can be caused by long thoracic nerve injury leading to serratus anterior dysfunction, and that electrical muscle stimulation (EMS of the serratus anterior can successfully and conservatively treat NP. In four cases of NP with known injury to the long thoracic nerve we performed transcutaneous EMS to the serratus anterior in an area far lateral to the site of pain and pruritus, resulting in significant and rapid pain relief. These findings are the first to identify long thoracic nerve injury as a cause for notalgia paresthetica and electrical muscle stimulation of the serratus anterior as a possible treatment, and we discuss the implications of these findings on better diagnosing and treating notalgia paresthetica.

  3. [Role of nerve stimulation at Erb point in early diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rui-Di; Fu, Bin; Li, Cheng; Kuang, Guang-Tao; Luo, Xiao-Qing; Jiang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    To study the role of proximal nerve stimulation at Erb point in the early diagnosis of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) in children. Thirty-two children who were diagnosed with GBS between October 2013 and December 2014 received neurophysiological examination. Thirty healthy children were used as controls. Compound muscle action potentials and distal motor latency of the median and ulnar nerves were determined and analyzed after nerve stimulation at the wrist, elbow, and Erb point in the two groups. Moreover, F-wave latency of the median nerve and H-reflex latency of the tibial nerve were measured and analyzed in the two groups. The F-wave and H-reflex latencies were significantly longer in the patient group than in the control group (P0.05). The nerve stimulation at Erb point holds promise as a routine examination for the early diagnosis of GBS.

  4. Giant early components of somatosensory evoked potentials to tibial nerve stimulation in cortical myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura; Saracino, Antonio; Franciotti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Enlarged cortical components of somatosensory evoked potentials (giant SEPs) recorded by electroencephalography (EEG) and abnormal somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) recorded by magnetoencephalography (MEG) are observed in the majority of patients with cortical myoclonus (CM). Studies on simultaneous recordings of SEPs and SEFs showed that generator mechanism of giant SEPs involves both primary sensory and motor cortices. However the generator sources of giant SEPs have not been fully understood as only one report describes clearly giant SEPs following lower limb stimulation. In our study we performed a combined EEG-MEG recording on responses elicited by electric median and tibial nerve stimulation in a patient who developed consequently to methyl bromide intoxication CM with giant SEPs to median and tibial nerve stimuli. SEPs wave shapes were identified on the basis of polarity-latency components (e.g. P15-N20-P25) as defined by earlier studies and guidelines. At EEG recording, the SEP giant component did not appear in the latency range of the first cortical component for median nerve SEP (N20), but appeared instead in the range of the P37 tibial nerve SEP, which is currently identified as the first cortical component elicited by tibial nerve stimuli. Our MEG and EEG SEPs recordings also showed that components in the latency range of P37 were preceded by other cortical components. These findings suggest that lower limb P37 does not correspond to upper limb N20. MEG results confirmed that giant SEFs are the second component from both tibial (N43m-P43m) and median (N27m-P27m) nerve stimulation. MEG dipolar sources of these giant components were located in the primary sensory and motor area.

  5. Posttetanic count revisited: are measurements more reliable using the TOF-Watch accelerographic peripheral nerve stimulator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert D; Brockwell, Russell C; Moreno, Michael C; Adkins, Shannon L

    2004-02-01

    Measurement of profound neuromuscular block using posttetanic count is among the most subjective measurements made in clinical anesthesia. The TOF-Watch accelerographic peripheral nerve stimulator provides objective measurements of neuromuscular block that may improve our ability to quantitate intense blockade. The TOF-Watch and Digi Stim III peripheral nerve stimulators were used to monitor onset and early recovery of neuromuscular response induced by rocuronium 0.6 mg/kg i.v. in 30 patients anesthetized with general anesthesia. After induction, train-of-four count (when present) was measured at one-min intervals. Subsequently, posttetanic count was measured at three-min intervals until the first response to train-of-four stimulation reappeared. Posttetanic count and train-of-four count measurements were determined to be consistently unreliable throughout the study in seven (23%) patients with the TOF-Watch stimulator and three (10%) patients with the Digi Stim III stimulator (p = NS). Among stimulators yielding reliable measurements, decreases in train-of-four count to 0/4 were noted earlier with the Digi Stim III monitor (median = 2 min) as compared with the TOF-Watch device (median = 4 min) (p Digi Stim III stimulator (p < 0.05). Both monitors were similar in their ability to predict return to TOFC = 1 as a function of PTC measurements. The TOF-Watch monitor is easy to apply even in inexperienced hands. However, the device yielded erroneous data in 23% of patients.

  6. Muscarinic contribution to the acute cortical effects of vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Justin A.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve (VNS) has been used to treat more than 60,000 patients with drug-resistant epilepsy and is under investigation as a treatment for several other neurological disorders and conditions. Among these, VNS increases memory performance and enhances recovery of motor and cognitive function in animal models of traumatic brain injury. Recent research indicates that pairing brief VNS with tones multiple-times a day for several weeks induces long-term, input specific cortical plasticity, which can be used to re-normalize the pathological cortical reorganization and eliminate a behavioral correlate of chronic tinnitus in noise exposed rats. Despite the therapeutic potential, the mechanisms of action of VNS remain speculative. In chapter 2 of this dissertation, the acute effects of VNS on cortical synchrony, excitability, and temporal processing are examined. In anesthetized rats implanted with multi-electrode arrays, VNS increased and decorrelated spontaneous multi-unit activity, and suppressed entrainment to repetitive noise burst stimulation at 6 to 8 Hz, but not after systemic administration of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine. Chapter 3 focuses on VNS-tone pairing induced cortical plasticity. Pairing VNS with a tone one hundred times in anesthetized rats resulted in frequency specific plasticity in 31% of the auditory cortex sites. Half of these sites exhibited a frequency specific increase in firing rate and half exhibited a frequency specific decrease. Muscarinic receptor blockade with scopolamine almost entirely prevented the frequency specific increases, but not decreases. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate the capacity for VNS to not only acutely influence cortical synchrony, and excitability, but to also influence temporal and spectral tuning via muscarinic receptor activation. These results strengthen the hypothesis that acetylcholine and muscarinic receptors are involved in the mechanisms of action of VNS and

  7. Transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation modulates cardiac vagal tone and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, C; Brock, B; Aziz, Q; Møller, H J; Pfeiffer Jensen, M; Drewes, A M; Farmer, A D

    2016-12-12

    The vagus nerve is a central component of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathways. We sought to evaluate the effect of bilateral transcutaneous cervical vagal nerve stimulation (t-VNS) on validated parameters of autonomic tone and cytokines in 20 healthy subjects. 24 hours after t-VNS, there was an increase in cardiac vagal tone and a reduction in tumor necrosis factor-α in comparison to baseline. No change was seen in blood pressure, cardiac sympathetic index or other cytokines. These preliminary data suggest that t-VNS exerts an autonomic and a subtle antitumor necrosis factor-α effect, which warrants further evaluation in larger controlled studies.

  8. TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) for labour pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Richard

    2012-05-01

    Because TENS is applied inconsistently and not always in line with optimal TENS application theory, this may explain why TENS for labour pain appears to be effective in some individuals and not in others. This article reviews TENS theory, advises upon optimal TENS application for labour pain and discusses some of the limitations of TENS research on labour pain. TENS application for labour pain may include TENS applied to either side of the lower spine, set to 200 mus pulse duration and 100 pulses per second. As pain increases, TENS intensity should be increased and as pain decreases, TENS intensity should be reduced to maintain a strong but pain free intensity of stimulation. This application may particularly reduce back pain during labour.

  9. 44 Cases of Peripheral Facial Paralysis Treated by the SXDZ-100 Nerve and Muscle Stimulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jin-sheng; CUI Cheng-bin; GAO Xin-yan; ZHU Bing; RONG Pei-jing

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To observe the clinical effects of the Hua Tuo Manual Acupuncture Therapeutic Stimulator for peripheral facial paralysis.Methods:87 patients with peripheral facial paralysis were divided randomly into the SXDZ-100 Nerve and Muscle Stimulator treatment group (44 cases) and the G6805 Electric Stimulator control group (43 cases).The acupoints selected for both the two groups were local points as well as distal points as Hegu (LI 4), Waiguan (TE 5), Sanyinjiao (SP 6), Taichong (LR 3).Effectiveness was compared between the two groups.Results:Both groups had a total effective rate of 100%.But the cure rate was 90.9% in the treatment group, and 73.0% in the control group, indicating a significant difference (P<0.05).No side effects were found in either of the two groups.Conclusion:The SXDZ-100 stimulator is more effective than the G6805 electroacupuncture stimulator for treatment of peripheral facial paralysis.

  10. High and low frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation inhibits nociceptive responses induced by CO2 laser stimulation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tommaso, Marina; Fiore, Pietro; Camporeale, Alfonso; Guido, Marco; Libro, Giuseppe; Losito, Luciana; Megna, Marisa; Puca, Francomichele; Megna, Gianfranco

    2003-05-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) on CO(2) laser evoked potentials (LEPs) in 16 normal subjects. The volar side of the forearm was stimulated by 10 Hz TENS in eight subjects and by 100 Hz TENS in the remainder; the skin of the forearm was stimulated by CO(2) laser and the LEPs were recorded in basal conditions and soon after and 15 min after TENS. Both low and high frequency TENS significantly reduced the subjective rating of heat stimuli and the LEPs amplitude, although high frequency TENS appeared more efficacious. TENS seemed to exert a mild inhibition of the perception and processing of pain induced by laser Adelta fibres activation; the implications of these effects in the clinical employment of TENS remain to be clarified.

  11. Effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation in bruxism associated with masticatory muscle pain - A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajpurohit Bharat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effectiveness of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS and microcurrent electrical nerve stimulation (MENS on masticatory muscles pain bruxism patient. Materials and Methods : A total of 60 subjects with the clinical diagnosis of bruxism were randomly allocated to two study groups. Group A received TENS (50 Hz, pulse width 0.5 mSec, intensity 0-60 mA for 20 minutes for a period of seven days and Group B received MENS (0.5 Hz, intensity 1,000 μA for 20 minutes for a period of seven days. The outcome measures were assessed in term of Visual Analog Scale (VAS and digital pressometer of 2 Kgf. Results : The study showed significant change in intensity of pain as per VAS score ( P ≤ 0.0001 and tenderness as per digital pressometer ( P ≤ 0.0001. Conclusion : MENS could be used as an effective pain-relieving adjunct to TENS in the treatment of masticatory muscle pain due to bruxism.

  12. Comparison of skin sensory thresholds using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jong Ho

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to compare the sensory thresholds of healthy subjects using pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Subjects] Ninety healthy adult subjects were randomly assigned to pre-programmed or single-frequency stimulation groups, each consisting of 45 participants. [Methods] Sensory thresholds were measured in the participants' forearms using von Frey filaments before and after pre-programmed or single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and the result in values were analyzed. [Results] Significant increases in sensory threshold after stimulation were observed in both groups. However, there were no significant differences between the two groups in sensory thresholds after stimulation or in the magnitude of threshold increases following stimulation. [Conclusion] Our results show that there are no differences between sensory threshold increases induced by pre-programmed and single-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.

  13. A review of studies on the therapeutic effect of vagus nerve stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vagus nerve widely innervates in the human body, and it has diverse physiological functions. Many new physiological functions are gradually found. Studies on its action mechanism have been gradually deepened. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been used for treatment of epilepsy and depression in clinic. OBJECTIVE: To retrospectively investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of VNS. RETRIEVE STRATEGY: A computer-based online research in Pubmed with the key words of "vagus nerve stimulation" published between February 1990 and October 2006 in English were systemically reviewed. Totally 583 articles were collected and primarily selected. Inclusive criteria: the mechanism of therapeutic effects of VNS-related literatures. Exclusive criteria: repetitive study. LITERATURE EVALUATION: According to inclusive criteria, of the 57 articles, which met the inclusive criteria, 42 were associated with the therapeutic function of VNS, and 15 with the mechanism of these related functions. DATA SYNTHESIS: Vagus nerve has special nerve innervation and wide projection with extensive physiological effects. Till now, VNS has been used in the therapy of epilepsy and depression, and exact clinical effects have been obtained. Further studies have discovered other functions of VNS, such as the effect on the memory powcr, cognition, and perception to pain. Thus, the studies about VNS become diverse. Just because of the special physiological functions of vagus nerve, VNS can bring some adverse reactions such as foreign body sensation, hoarseness, trigeminal neuralgia, etc. The mechanism of therapeutic function of VNS is still under exploration. CONCLUSION: As a mature surgical technique, VNS has been widely used in the therapy of epilepsy, depression, inflammation, analgesia, relieving itching, etc. Although the mechanism is still unclear, it brings obvious clinical effects.

  14. Electrical stimulation combined with exercise increase axonal regeneration after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio-Pinilla, Elena; Udina, Esther; Jaramillo, Jessica; Navarro, Xavier

    2009-09-01

    Although injured peripheral axons are able to regenerate, functional recovery is usually poor after nerve transection. In this study we aim to elucidate the role of neuronal activity, induced by nerve electrical stimulation and by exercise, in promoting axonal regeneration and modulating plasticity in the spinal cord after nerve injury. Four groups of adult rats were subjected to sciatic nerve transection and suture repair. Two groups received electrical stimulation (3 V, 0.1 ms at 20 Hz) for 1 h, immediately after injury (ESa) or during 4 weeks (1 h daily; ESc). A third group (ES+TR) received 1 h electrical stimulation and was submitted to treadmill running during 4 weeks (5 m/min, 2 h daily). A fourth group performed only exercise (TR), whereas an untreated group served as control (C). Nerve conduction, H reflex and algesimetry tests were performed at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after surgery, to assess muscle reinnervation and changes in excitability of spinal cord circuitry. Histological analysis was made at the end of the follow-up. Groups that received acute ES and/or were forced to exercise in the treadmill showed higher levels of muscle reinnervation and increased numbers of regenerated myelinated axons when compared to control animals or animals that received chronic ES. Combining ESa with treadmill training significantly improved muscle reinnervation during the initial phase. The facilitation of the monosynaptic H reflex in the injured limb was reduced in all treated groups, suggesting that the maintenance of activity helps to prevent the development of hyperreflexia.

  15. Recovery characteristics of the electrically stimulated auditory nerve in deafened guinea pigs: relation to neuronal status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramekers, Dyan; Versnel, Huib; Strahl, Stefan B; Klis, Sjaak F L; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-03-01

    Successful cochlear implant performance requires adequate responsiveness of the auditory nerve to prolonged pulsatile electrical stimulation. Degeneration of the auditory nerve as a result of severe hair cell loss could considerably compromise this ability. The main objective of this study was to characterize the recovery of the electrically stimulated auditory nerve, as well as to evaluate possible changes caused by deafness-induced degeneration. To this end we studied temporal responsiveness of the auditory nerve in a guinea pig model of sensorineural hearing loss. Using masker-probe and pulse train paradigms we compared electrically evoked compound action potentials (eCAPs) in normal-hearing animals with those in animals with moderate (two weeks after ototoxic treatment) and severe (six weeks after ototoxic treatment) loss of spiral ganglion cells (SGCs). Masker-probe interval and pulse train inter-pulse interval was varied from 0.3 to 16 ms. Whereas recovery assessed with masker-probe was roughly similar for normal-hearing and both groups of deafened animals, it was considerably faster for six weeks deaf animals (τ ≈ 1.2 ms) than for two weeks deaf or normal-hearing animals (τ ≈ 3-4 ms) when 100-ms pulse trains were applied. Latency increased with decreasing inter-pulse intervals, and this was more pronounced with pulse trains than with masker-probe stimulation. With high frequency pulse train stimulation eCAP amplitudes were modulated for deafened animals, meaning that amplitudes for odd pulse numbers were larger than for even pulses. The relative refractory period (τ) and the modulation depth of the eCAP amplitude for pulse trains, as well as the latency increase for both paradigms significantly correlated with quantified measures of auditory nerve degeneration (size and packing density of SGCs). In addition to these findings, separate masker-probe recovery functions for the eCAP N1 and N2 peaks displayed a robust non-monotonic or shoulder

  16. The release of acetylcholine from the spinal cord of the cat by antidromic stimulation of motor nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, M; Rudomin, P

    1966-11-01

    1. ACh was measured in the effluent from the perfused lumbosacral cord of the cat with or without stimulation of the central ends of the cut left sciatic and femoral nerves after section of the left dorsal roots.2. In about 30% of the preparations ACh was obtained in the samples collected at rest (average 3.3 ng/min); the amount of ACh release was increased 1.3-9 times by stimulation of the peripheral nerves. The average amount of ACh collected during stimulation of the peripheral nerves at 5/sec was 6.9 ng/min. Antidromic motor nerve impulses responsible for the ACh release were likely to be only those in alpha motor fibres.3. There was a depression in ACh release/stimulus as the stimulus frequency was increased more than 10/sec. Such changes in ACh release with various stimulus frequencies were correlated with depression in the response of Renshaw cells to excitation through motor-axon collaterals.4. Amounts of ACh release during stimulation of the peripheral nerves at 5/sec were significantly increased for 1 or 2 min after a short tetanic stimulation of the nerves.5. Intravenous injection of dihydro-beta-erythroidine did not reduce the amount of ACh release produced by stimulation of the peripheral nerves.6. It is concluded that antidromic impulses in alpha motor fibres liberate ACh from the presynaptic terminals at the central synapses on Renshaw cells.

  17. Gait phase detection from sciatic nerve recordings in functional electrical stimulation systems for foot drop correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jun-Uk; Song, Kang-Il; Han, Sungmin; Lee, Soo Hyun; Kang, Ji Yoon; Hwang, Dosik; Suh, Jun-Kyo Francis; Choi, Kuiwon; Youn, Inchan

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous afferent activities recorded by a nerve cuff electrode have been used to detect the stance phase in a functional electrical stimulation system for foot drop correction. However, the implantation procedure was difficult, as the cuff electrode had to be located on the distal branches of a multi-fascicular nerve to exclude muscle afferent and efferent activities. This paper proposes a new gait phase detection scheme that can be applied to a proximal nerve root that includes cutaneous afferent fibers as well as muscle afferent and efferent fibers. To test the feasibility of this scheme, electroneurogram (ENG) signals were measured from the rat sciatic nerve during treadmill walking at several speeds, and the signal properties of the sciatic nerve were analyzed for a comparison with kinematic data from the ankle joint. On the basis of these experiments, a wavelet packet transform was tested to define a feature vector from the sciatic ENG signals according to the gait phases. We also propose a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) classifier and investigate whether it could be used successfully to discriminate feature vectors into the stance and swing phases. In spite of no significant differences in the rectified bin-integrated values between the stance and swing phases, the sciatic ENG signals could be reliably classified using the proposed wavelet packet transform and GMM classification methods.

  18. Brief transvertebral electrical stimulation of the spinal cord improves the specificity of femoral nerve reinnervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Colin K; Singh, Bhagat; Martinez, Jose A; Zochodne, Douglas W; Midha, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    Functional outcomes are generally poor following peripheral nerve injury (PNI). The reason is multifactorial but includes the misdirection of regenerating axons to inappropriate end organs. It has been shown that brief electrical stimulation (Estim) of nerves has the potential to improve the accuracy and rate of peripheral axon regeneration. The present study explores a novel percutaneous transvertebral approach to Estim, which was tested in the mouse femoral nerve model. Inspired by the protocol of Gordon and colleagues (ie, 20 Hz, for 1 hour), we applied Estim to the cervicothoracic spinal cord (SC-Estim) to remotely activate lumbar motor neurons following transection and repair of the femoral nerve. Fluorescent dyes were applied to the distal nerve to label reinnervating cells. Sections of nerve were taken to quantify the numbers of reinnervating axons as well as to stain for a known femoral axon guidance molecule-polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). In comparison to sham treatment, SC-Estim led to significantly greater expression of PSA-NCAM as well as improved the specificity of motor reinnervation. Interestingly, although SC-Estim did not alter the number of early reinnervating (ie, pioneer) axons, there was a reduction in the number of retrogradely labeled neurons at 2 weeks postrepair. However, by 6 weeks postrepair, there was no difference in the number of neurons that had reinnervated the femoral nerve. The present findings support the development of SC-Estim as a novel approach to enhance the specificity of reinnervation and potentially improve functional outcomes following PNI.

  19. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation on cognitive functioning in rats with cerebral ischemia reperfusion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ai-Fen; Zhao, Feng-bo; Wang, Jing; Lu, Yi-Fan; Tian, Jian; Zhao, Yin; Gao, Yan; Hu, Xia-jun; LIU, XIAO-YAN; Tan, Jie; Tian, Yun-li; Shi, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has become the most common non-pharmacological treatment for intractable drug-resistant epilepsy. However, the contribution of VNS to neurological rehabilitation following stroke has not been thoroughly examined. Therefore, we investigated the specific role of acute VNS in the recovery of cognitive functioning and the possible mechanisms involved using a cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury model in rats. Methods The I/R-related injury was modele...

  20. Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) and Rehabilitation in the Treatment of TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    traumatic brain injury ( TBI ). The main limitation to these earlier results is that VNS treatment was initiated at either 2 hr or 24 hr after TBI ...the potential utility of VNS as a clinical treatment for human TBI . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vagus nerve stimulation, recovery of function, brain injury ... TBI induced by Controlled Cortical Impact. A brain injury was induced over the left hemisphere at the following coordinates: Epicenter: Midpoint

  1. Rates and Predictors of Seizure Freedom With Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Intractable Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Englot, Dario J.; Rolston, John D.; Wright, Clinton W.; Hassnain, Kevin H.; Chang, Edward F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuromodulation-based treatments have become increasingly important in epilepsy treatment. Most patients with epilepsy treated with neuromodulation do not achieve complete seizure freedom, and, therefore, previous studies of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy have focused instead on reduction of seizure frequency as a measure of treatment response. OBJECTIVE: To elucidate rates and predictors of seizure freedom with VNS. METHODS: We examined 5554 patients from the VNS therapy P...

  2. Treatment of Idiopathic Chronic Orchialgia with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS):A Preliminary Result

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Unilateral or bilateral testicular pain lasting more than 3 months is called as chronic orchialgia. Aproximately 25-50% of chronic orchialgia is idiopatic origin. This study aimed the effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) therapy due to Idiopathic Chronic Orchialgia (ICO). Methods: Five patients were included into this study with ICO that diagnosed with physical examination, urine analyses, urinary system x-ray film, and scrotal doppler ultrasound. Me...

  3. Effect of stimulation of afferent renal nerves on plasma levels of vasopressin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caverson, M.M.; Ciriello, J.

    1987-04-01

    Experiments were done in ..cap alpha..-chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated cats with vagus, cervical sympathetic, aortic depressor, and carotid sinus nerves cut bilaterally to investigate the effect of afferent renal nerve (ARN) stimulation on circulating levels of vasopressin (AVP). Electrical stimulation of ARN elicited a pressor response that had two components, a primary (1/sup 0/) component locked in time with the stimulus and a secondary (2/sup 0/) component that had a long onset latency and that outlasted the stimulation period. The 1/sup 0/ and 2/sup 0/ components of the pressor response were largest at stimulation frequencies of 30 and 40 Hz, respectively. Autonomic blockage with hexamethonium bromide and atropine methylbromide abolished the 1/sup 0/ component. Administration of the vasopressin V/sub 1/-vascular receptor antagonist d(CH/sub 2/)/sub 5/ VAVP during autonomic blockade abolished the 2/sup 0/C component. Plasma concentrations of AVP measured by radioimmunoassay increased from control levels of 5.2 +/- 0.9 to 53.6 +/- 18.6 pg/ml during a 5-min period of stimulation of ARN. Plasma AVP levels measured 20-40 min after simulation were not significantly different from control values. These data demonstrate that sensory information originating in the kidney alters the release of vasopressin from the neurohypophysis and suggest that ARN are an important component of the neural circuitry involved in homeostatic mechanisms controlling arterial pressure.

  4. Use of Sacral Nerve Stimulation for the Treatment of Overlapping Constipation and Fecal Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreepati, Gouri; James-Stevenson, Toyia

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 51 Final Diagnosis: Fecal incontinence Symptoms: Constipation • fecal incontinence Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Sacral nerve stimulator Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Fecal incontinence and constipation are common gastrointestinal complaints, but rarely occur concurrently. Management of these seemingly paradoxical processes is challenging, as treatment of one symptom may exacerbate the other. Case Report: A 51-year-old female with lifelong neurogenic bladder secondary to spina bifida occulta presented with progressive symptoms of daily urge fecal incontinence as well as hard bowel movements associated with straining and a sensation of incomplete evacuation requiring manual disimpaction. Pelvic floor testing showed poor ability to squeeze the anal sphincter, which indicated sphincter weakness as a major contributor to her fecal incontinence symptoms. Additionally, on defecography she was unable to widen her posterior anorectal angle or relax the anal sphincter during defecation consistent with dyssynergic defecation. A sacral nerve stimulator was placed for management of her fecal incontinence. Interestingly, her constipation also dramatically improved with sacral neuromodulation. Conclusions: This unique case highlights the emerging role of sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of complex pelvic floor dysfunction with improvement in symptoms beyond fecal incontinence in a patient with dyssynergic-type constipation. PMID:28265107

  5. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  6. Secretion of Growth Hormone in Response to Muscle Sensory Nerve Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindeland, Richard E.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.; Gosselink, K. L.; Grossman, E. J.; Sawchenko, P. E.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is stimulated by aerobic and resistive exercise and inhibited by exposure to actual or simulated (bedrest, hindlimb suspension) microgravity. Moreover, hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) and preproGRF mRNA are markedly decreased in spaceflight rats. These observations suggest that reduced sensory input from inactive muscles may contribute to the reduced secretion of GH seen in "0 G". Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of muscle sensory nerve stimulation on secretion of GH. Fed male Wistar rats (304 +/- 23 g) were anesthetized (pentobarbital) and the right peroneal (Pe), tibial (T), and sural (S) nerves were cut. Electrical stimulation of the distal (D) or proximal (P) ends of the nerves was implemented for 15 min. to mimic the EMG activity patterns of ankle extensor muscles of a rat walking 1.5 mph. The rats were bled by cardiac puncture and their anterior pituitaries collected. Pituitary and plasma bioactive (BGH) and immunoactive (IGH) GH were measured by bioassay and RIA.

  7. Flight behavior of the rhinoceros beetle Trypoxylus dichotomus during electrical nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Lavine, Laura Corley; Emlen, Douglas J; Park, Hoon Cheol; Kim, Min Jun

    2012-09-01

    Neuronal stimulation is an intricate part of understanding insect flight behavior and control insect itself. In this study, we investigated the effects of electrical pulses applied to the brain and basalar muscle of the rhinoceros beetle (Trypoxylus dichotomus). To understand specific neuronal stimulation mechanisms, responses and flight behavior of the beetle, four electrodes were implanted into the two optic lobes, the brain's central complex and the ventral nerve cord in the posterior pronotum. We demonstrated flight initiation, turning and cessation by stimulating the brain. The change undergone by the wing flapping in response to the electrical signal was analyzed from a sequence of images captured by a high-speed camera. Here, we provide evidence to distinguish the important differences between neuronal and muscular flight stimulations in beetles. We found that in the neural potential stimulation, both the hind wing and the elytron were suppressed. Interestingly, the beetle stopped flying whenever a stimulus potential was applied between the pronotum and one side of the optic lobe, or between the ventral nerve cord in the posterior pronotum and the central complex. In-depth experimentation demonstrated the effective of neural stimulation over muscle stimulation for flight control. During electrical stimulation of the optic lobes, the beetle performed unstable flight, resulting in alternating left and right turns. By applying the electrical signal into both the optic lobes and the central complex of the brain, we could precisely control the direction of the beetle flight. This work provides an insight into insect flight behavior for future development of insect-micro air vehicle.

  8. Modeling binaural responses in the auditory brainstem to electric stimulation of the auditory nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yoojin; Delgutte, Bertrand; Colburn, H Steven

    2015-02-01

    Bilateral cochlear implants (CIs) provide improvements in sound localization and speech perception in noise over unilateral CIs. However, the benefits arise mainly from the perception of interaural level differences, while bilateral CI listeners' sensitivity to interaural time difference (ITD) is poorer than normal. To help understand this limitation, a set of ITD-sensitive neural models was developed to study binaural responses to electric stimulation. Our working hypothesis was that central auditory processing is normal with bilateral CIs so that the abnormality in the response to electric stimulation at the level of the auditory nerve fibers (ANFs) is the source of the limited ITD sensitivity. A descriptive model of ANF response to both acoustic and electric stimulation was implemented and used to drive a simplified biophysical model of neurons in the medial superior olive (MSO). The model's ITD sensitivity was found to depend strongly on the specific configurations of membrane and synaptic parameters for different stimulation rates. Specifically, stronger excitatory synaptic inputs and faster membrane responses were required for the model neurons to be ITD-sensitive at high stimulation rates, whereas weaker excitatory synaptic input and slower membrane responses were necessary at low stimulation rates, for both electric and acoustic stimulation. This finding raises the possibility of frequency-dependent differences in neural mechanisms of binaural processing; limitations in ITD sensitivity with bilateral CIs may be due to a mismatch between stimulation rate and cell parameters in ITD-sensitive neurons.

  9. Ultrasound-guided bilateral continuous sciatic nerve blocks with stimulating catheters for postoperative pain relief after bilateral lower limb amputations*.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Scheuer, M.; Müller, A.; Garderniers, J.; Gielen, M.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The performance of continuous bilateral sciatic nerve blocks under ultrasonographic control using stimulating catheters is described in a 4-year-old child with VACTERL syndrome. Ultrasound showed an abnormal vascular and nerve supply to the lower limbs. The use of ultrasound guidance made successful

  10. Pulsed electrical stimulation protects neurons in the dorsal root and anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Bao-An; Zi, Jin-Hua; Wu, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Cun-Hua; Chen, Yun-Zhen

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on peripheral nerve injury have focused on repair at the site of injury, but very few have examined the effects of repair strategies on the more proximal neuronal cell bodies. In this study, an approximately 10-mm-long nerve segment from the ischial tuberosity in the rat was transected and its proximal and distal ends were inverted and sutured. The spinal cord was subjected to pulsed electrical stimulation at T10 and L3, at a current of 6.5 mA and a stimulation frequency of 15 Hz, 15 minutes per session, twice a day for 56 days. After pulsed electrical stimulation, the number of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and anterior horn was increased in rats with sciatic nerve injury. The number of myelinated nerve fibers was increased in the sciatic nerve. The ultrastructure of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion and spinal cord was noticeably improved. Conduction velocity of the sciatic nerve was also increased. These results show that pulsed electrical stimulation protects sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia as well as motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord after peripheral nerve injury, and that it promotes the regeneration of peripheral nerve fibers.

  11. Pressure changes under the ischial tuberosities during gluteal neuromuscular stimulation in spinal cord injury: a comparison of sacral nerve root stimulation with surface functional electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang Qin; Ferguson-Pell, Martin

    2015-04-01

    To compare the magnitude of interface pressure changes during gluteal maximus contraction by stimulating sacral nerve roots with surface electrical stimulations in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Pilot interventional study. Spinal injury research laboratory. Adults (N=18) with suprasacral complete SCI. Sacral nerve root stimulation (SNRS) via a functional magnetic stimulator (FMS) or a sacral anterior root stimulator (SARS) implant; and surface functional electrical stimulation (FES). Interface pressure under the ischial tuberosity (IT) defined as peak pressure, gradient at peak pressure, and average pressure. With optimal FMS, a 29% average reduction of IT peak pressure was achieved during FMS (mean ± SD: 160.1±24.3mmHg at rest vs 114.7±18.0mmHg during FMS, t5=6.3, P=.002). A 30% average reduction of peak pressure during stimulation via an SARS implant (143.2±31.7mmHg at rest vs 98.5±21.5mmHg during SARS, t5=4.4, P=.007) and a 22% average decrease of IT peak pressure during FES stimulation (153.7±34.8mmHg at rest vs 120.5±26.1mmHg during FES, t5=5.3, P=.003) were obtained. In 4 participants who completed both the FMS and FES studies, the percentage of peak pressure reduction with FMS was slightly greater than with FES (mean difference, 7.8%; 95% confidence interval, 1.6%-14.0; P=.04). SNRS or surface FES can induce sufficient gluteus maximus contraction and significantly reduce ischial pressure. SNRS via an SARS implant may be more convenient and efficient for frequently activating the gluteus maximus. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve protects against cerebral ischemic injury through an anti-infammatory mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-xian Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation exerts protective effects against ischemic brain injury; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia was established using the occlusion method, and the right vagus nerve was given electrical stimulation (constant current of 0.5 mA; pulse width, 0.5 ms; frequency, 20 Hz; duration, 30 seconds; every 5 minutes for a total of 60 minutes 30 minutes, 12 hours, and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after surgery. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve substantially reduced infarct volume, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-and interleukin- 6 in rats with focal cerebral ischemia. The experimental findings indicate that the neuroprotective effect of vagus nerve stimulation following cerebral ischemia may be associated with the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor- and interleukin-6 expression.

  13. The Anticonvulsant Effect of Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation is Associated with Balancing the Autonomic Dysfunction in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aims to investigate whether the anticonvulsant effect of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation is associated with balancing the autonomic dysfunction in rats.

  14. electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve protects against cerebral ischemic injury through an anti-inlfammatory mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-xian Xiang; Wen-xin Wang; Zhe Xue; Lei Zhu; Sheng-bao Wang; Zheng-hui Sun

    2015-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation exerts protective effects against ischemic brain injury; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia was established using the occlusion method, and the right vagus nerve was given electrical stimula-tion (constant current of 0.5 mA; pulse width, 0.5 ms; frequency, 20 Hz; duration, 30 seconds; every 5 minutes for a total of 60 minutes) 30 minutes, 12 hours, and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after surgery. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve substantially reduced infarct volume, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α and in-terleukin-6 in rats with focal cerebral ischemia. The experimental findings indicate that the neuroprotective effect of vagus nerve stimulation following cerebral ischemia may be associated with the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 expression.

  15. Treatment of Idiopathic Chronic Orchialgia with Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS:A Preliminary Result

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Unilateral or bilateral testicular pain lasting more than 3 months is called as chronic orchialgia. Aproximately 25-50% of chronic orchialgia is idiopatic origin. This study aimed the effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS therapy due to Idiopathic Chronic Orchialgia (ICO. Methods: Five patients were included into this study with ICO that diagnosed with physical examination, urine analyses, urinary system x-ray film, and scrotal doppler ultrasound. Medical history revealed that multiple conservative therapy attempts failed to alleviate the pain. Two of the patients had right sided ICO. Traditional TENS device is placed to the most painful points. TENS applied 3 times in a week with duration 30 minutes for 4 weeks. Before and after TENS application, patients were evaluated by using Visual Analog Scale (VAS at first and third months. Results: Median age of patients was 26.20±2.38 (22-30. Mean VAS value was 6.52 ± 0.89 before the procedure. After 1 month VAS value was 3.82 ± 0.83 (p0.05. None of the patients needed any analgesics after during the one month. No complications, hyperemia or hypoesthesia of the scrotal or penile skin, occurred after the procedure. Conclusion: TENS reduces pain by increasing endorphin release in the spinal cord dorsal horn. TENS is very effective method for first 1 month in patients with ICO but its effect reduces by the time. There is no standard therapeutic protocol for idiopathic chronic orchialgia. Therefore TENS may be an alternative for patients who do not benefit from medical therapy and do not want invasive procedures. Short-term use of TENS and low number of the patients are the limitations of this study. Randomized, placebo-controlled, and longer follow-up period studies are needed to better assess the efficacy of TENS for ICO.

  16. [Multiple erythema migrans and facial nerve paralysis: clinical manifestations of early disseminated Lyme borreliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S A; Baran, A M; Boettcher, C; Kieseier, B C; Reifenberger, J

    2014-04-01

    Lyme borreliosis is a common vector-borne disease in Europe. The infection follows different stages with a broad variability of clinical symptoms and manifestations in different organs. A 49-year-old man presented with flu-like symptoms, facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythematous macular on his trunk and extremities. We diagnosed Lyme disease (stage II) with facial nerve paralysis and multiple erythema migrans. Intravenous ceftriaxone led to complete healing of hissymptoms within 2 weeks.

  17. Nerve biopsy findings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy: 78% of findings support clinical diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ying-shuang Zhang; A-ping Sun; Lu Chen; Rong-fang Dong; Yan-feng Zhong; Jun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner synd...

  18. A new association – multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Preda, Veronica; Sywak, Mark; Learoyd, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Key Clinical Message We report a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1) and an aggressive malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) arising from a ganglioneuroma of the adrenal gland. Patients with MEN-1 require careful consideration of other tumor associations, including MPNST, as it can portend a poor prognosis. MEN-1 and MPNST have not been reported. We report a patient with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN-1) and an aggressive malignant peripheral nerve she...

  19. Nerve Stimulator Guided Axillary Block in Painless Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Alimohammadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Given the high prevalence of upper extremity fractures and increasing need to perform painless reduction in the emergency departments, the use of analgesic methods with fewer complications and more satisfaction appears to be essential. The aim of this study is comparison the nerve stimulator guided axillary block (NSAB with intravenous sedation in induction of analgesia for painless reduction of distal radius fractures. Methods: In the present randomized clinical trial, 60 patients (18-70 years of age suffered from distal radius fractures, were divided into two equal groups. One group received axillary nerve block by nerve stimulator guidance and the other procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA using midazolam/fentanyl. Onset of analgesia, duration of analgesic effect, total procedure time and pain scores were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS and the outcomes were compared. Chi-squared and student t test were performed to evaluate differences between two groups. Results: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups (83.3% male. The mean age of patients was 31 ±0.7 years. While the onset of analgesia was significantly longer in the NSAB group, the mean total time of procedure was shorter than PSA (p<0.001. The NSAB group needed a shorter post-operative observation time (P<0.001. Both groups experienced equal pain relief before, during and after procedure (p>0.05. Conclusion: It seems that shorter post-operative monitoring time and consequently lesser total time of procedure, make nerve stimulator guided axillary block as an appropriate alternative for procedural sedation and analgesia in painless reduction of distal radius fractures in emergency department. 

  20. Optimal Vagus Nerve Stimulation Frequency for Suppression of Spike-and-Wave Seizures in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianhang; Harreby, Kristian R; Sevcencu, Cristian; Jensen, Winnie

    2016-06-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used as an adjunctive therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy and results in a 50% seizure reduction in up to 50% of treated patients. The VNS frequency used in the clinic today is in the range of 10-30 Hz. The evidence for choosing the stimulation frequency is limited, and little knowledge is available on the effect of other VNS frequencies. Deep brain, trigeminal nerve, or spinal cord stimulation studies have suggested the use of stimulation frequencies above 80 Hz for seizure control. Therefore, our objective for the present study was to investigate if VNS using frequencies higher than those currently used in the clinic could be more effective in attenuating seizures. Spike-and-wave (SW) discharges were induced in 11 rats, which then were subjected to VNS sessions applied at the frequencies of 10, 30, 80, 130, and 180 Hz combined with control intervals without stimulation. The anticonvulsive effect of VNS was evaluated by comparing the normalized mean power (nMP) and frequency (nMSF) of the SW discharges derived from intracortical recordings collected during the stimulation and control intervals. Compared with the control intervals, all the tested VNS frequencies significantly reduced the nMP (in the range of 9-21%). However, we found that 130 and 180 Hz VNS induced a 50% larger attenuation of seizures than that achieved by 30 Hz VNS. In addition, we found that 80, 130, and 180 Hz VNS induced a significant reduction of the nMSF, that is by 5, 7, and 8%, respectively. These results suggest that a VNS stimulation frequency in the range of 130-180 Hz may be more effective in inhibiting seizures than the 30 Hz VNS applied in the clinic today.

  1. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS does not increase prosocial behavior in Cyberball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eSellaro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Emerging research suggests that individuals experience vicarious social pain (i.e., ostracism. It has been proposed that observing ostracism increases activity in the insula and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, two key brain regions activated by directly experiencing ostracism. Here, we assessed the causal role of the insula and PFC in modulating neural activity in these areas by applying transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS, a new non-invasive and safe method to stimulate the vagus nerve which has been shown to activate the insula and PFC. A single-blind, sham-controlled, within-subjects design was used to assess the effect of on-line (i.e., stimulation overlapping with the critical task tVNS in healthy young volunteers (n=24 on prosocial Cyberball, a virtual ball-tossing game designed to measure prosocial compensation of ostracism. Active tVNS did not increase prosocial helping behavior toward an ostracized person, as compared to sham (placebo stimulation. Corroborated by Bayesian inference, we conclude that tVNS does not modulate reactions to vicarious ostracism, as indexed by performance in a Cyberball game.

  2. Transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS) does not increase prosocial behavior in Cyberball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellaro, Roberta; Steenbergen, Laura; Verkuil, Bart; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Colzato, Lorenza S

    2015-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that individuals experience vicarious social pain (i.e., ostracism). It has been proposed that observing ostracism increases activity in the insula and in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), two key brain regions activated by directly experiencing ostracism. Here, we assessed the causal role of the insula and PFC in modulating neural activity in these areas by applying transcutaneous Vagus Nerve Stimulation (tVNS), a new non-invasive and safe method to stimulate the vagus nerve that has been shown to activate the insula and PFC. A single-blind, sham-controlled, within-subjects design was used to assess the effect of on-line (i.e., stimulation overlapping with the critical task) tVNS in healthy young volunteers (n = 24) on the prosocial Cyberball game, a virtual ball-tossing game designed to measure prosocial compensation of ostracism. Active tVNS did not increase prosocial helping behavior toward an ostracized person, as compared to sham (placebo) stimulation. Corroborated by Bayesian inference, we conclude that tVNS does not modulate reactions to vicarious ostracism, as indexed by performance in a Cyberball game.

  3. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on spasticity in patients with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potisk, K P; Gregoric, M; Vodovnik, L

    1995-09-01

    The effect of afferent cutaneous electrical stimulation on the spasticity of leg muscles was studied in 20 patients with chronic hemiplegia after stroke. Stimulation electrodes were placed over the sural nerve of the affected limb. The standard method of cutaneous stimulation, TENS with impulse frequency of 100 Hz, was applied. The tonus of the leg muscles was measured by means of an electrohydraulic measuring brace. The EMG stretch reflex activity of the tibialis anterior and triceps surae muscles was detected by surface electrodes and recorded simultaneously with the measured biomechanical parameters. In 18 out of 20 patients, a mild but statistically significant decrease in resistive torques at all frequencies of passive ankle movements was recorded following 20 min of TENS application. The decrease in resistive torque was often (but not always) accompanied by a decrease in reflex EMG activity. This effect of TENS persisted up to 45 min after the end of TENS. The results of the study support the hypothesis that TENS applied to the sural nerve may induce short-term post-stimulation inhibitory effects on the abnormally enhanced stretch reflex activity in spasticity of cerebral origin.

  4. A microcontroller system for investigating the catch effect: functional electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, D J; Taylor, P N; Chappell, P H; Wood, D E

    2006-06-01

    Correction of drop foot in hemiplegic gait is achieved by electrical stimulation of the common peroneal nerve with a series of pulses at a fixed frequency. However, during normal gait, the electromyographic signals from the tibialis anterior muscle indicate that muscle force is not constant but varies during the swing phase. The application of double pulses for the correction of drop foot may enhance the gait by generating greater torque at the ankle and thereby increase the efficiency of the stimulation with reduced fatigue. A flexible controller has been designed around the Odstock Drop Foot Stimulator to deliver different profiles of pulses implementing doublets and optimum series. A peripheral interface controller (PIC) microcontroller with some external circuits has been designed and tested to accommodate six profiles. Preliminary results of the measurements from a normal subject seated in a multi-moment chair (an isometric torque measurement device) indicate that profiles containing doublets and optimum spaced pulses look favourable for clinical use.

  5. Unusual presentation of multiple nerve entrapment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cubital tunnel syndrome is the most common form of ulnar nerve entrapment and the second most common entrapment neuropathy of the upper extremity after carpal tunnel syndrome. However, bilateral compressive ulnar neuropathy is a rare condition. Electro diagnostic studies are a valid and reliable means of confirming the diagnosis.

  6. Central-peripheral neural network interactions evoked by vagus nerve stimulation: functional consequences on control of cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, Jeffrey L; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Nier, Heath A; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Using vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), we sought to determine the contribution of vagal afferents to efferent control of cardiac function. In anesthetized dogs, the right and left cervical vagosympathetic trunks were stimulated in the intact state, following ipsilateral or contralateral vagus nerve transection (VNTx), and then following bilateral VNTx. Stimulations were performed at currents from 0.25 to 4.0 mA, frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz, and a 500-μs pulse width. Right or left VNS evoked significantly greater current- and frequency-dependent suppression of chronotropic, inotropic, and lusitropic function subsequent to sequential VNTx. Bradycardia threshold was defined as the current first required for a 5% decrease in heart rate. The threshold for the right vs. left vagus-induced bradycardia in the intact state (2.91 ± 0.18 and 3.47 ± 0.20 mA, respectively) decreased significantly with right VNTx (1.69 ± 0.17 mA for right and 3.04 ± 0.27 mA for left) and decreased further following bilateral VNTx (1.29 ± 0.16 mA for right and 1.74 ± 0.19 mA for left). Similar effects were observed following left VNTx. The thresholds for afferent-mediated effects on cardiac parameters were 0.62 ± 0.04 and 0.65 ± 0.06 mA with right and left VNS, respectively, and were reflected primarily as augmentation. Afferent-mediated tachycardias were maintained following β-blockade but were eliminated by VNTx. The increased effectiveness and decrease in bradycardia threshold with sequential VNTx suggest that 1) vagal afferents inhibit centrally mediated parasympathetic efferent outflow and 2) the ipsilateral and contralateral vagi exert a substantial buffering capacity. The intact threshold reflects the interaction between multiple levels of the cardiac neural hierarchy.

  7. Monitoring peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS by label-free stimulated Raman scattering imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Yang, Wenlong; Mordes, Daniel A.; Wang, Jin-Yuan; Salameh, Johnny S.; Mok, Joanie; Chew, Jeannie; Sharma, Aarti; Leno-Duran, Ester; Suzuki-Uematsu, Satomi; Suzuki, Naoki; Han, Steve S.; Lu, Fa-Ke; Ji, Minbiao; Zhang, Rosanna; Liu, Yue; Strominger, Jack; Shneider, Neil A.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Xie, X. Sunney; Eggan, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    The study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and potential interventions would be facilitated if motor axon degeneration could be more readily visualized. Here we demonstrate that stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy could be used to sensitively monitor peripheral nerve degeneration in ALS mouse models and ALS autopsy materials. Three-dimensional imaging of pre-symptomatic SOD1 mouse models and data processing by a correlation-based algorithm revealed that significant degeneration of peripheral nerves could be detected coincidentally with the earliest detectable signs of muscle denervation and preceded physiologically measurable motor function decline. We also found that peripheral degeneration was an early event in FUS as well as C9ORF72 repeat expansion models of ALS, and that serial imaging allowed long-term observation of disease progression and drug effects in living animals. Our study demonstrates that SRS imaging is a sensitive and quantitative means of measuring disease progression, greatly facilitating future studies of disease mechanisms and candidate therapeutics.

  8. Effects of electrode geometry and combination on nerve fibre selectivity in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsheimer, J; Struijk, J J; Tas, N R

    1995-09-01

    The differential effects of the geometry of a rostrocaudal array of electrode contacts on dorsal column fibre and dorsal root fibre activation in spinal cord stimulation are analysed theoretically. 3-D models of the mid-cervical and mid-thoracic vertebral areas are used for the computation of stimulation induced field potentials, whereas a cable model of myelinated nerve fibre is used for the calculation of the excitation thresholds of large dorsal column and dorsal root fibres. The size and spacing of 2-D rectangular electrode contacts are varied while mono-, bi- and tripolar stimulation are applied. The model predicts that the highest preferential stimulation of dorsal root fibres is obtained in monopolar stimulation with a large cathode, whereas dorsal column fibre preference is highest in tripolar stimulation with small contacts and small contact spacings. Fibre type preference is most sensitive to variations of rostrocaudal contact size and least sensitive to variations of lateral contact size. Dorsal root fibre preference is increased and sensitivity to lead geometry is reduced as the distance from contacts to spinal cord is increased.

  9. Vasopressin content in the cerebrospinal fluid and fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles in rats after the afferent vagus nerve fibres stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlowska-Majdak, M.; Traczyk, W.Z. [Akademia Medyczna, Lodz (Poland). Katedra Fizjologii

    1996-12-31

    Experiments were carried out on male rats in urethane anaesthesia. Cerebroventricular system was perfused with McIlwain-Rodniht`s solution from lateral ventricles to cerebellomedullary cistern. Both vagus nerves were cut and the central ends of the nerves were electrically stimulated during the collection of the third 30-min portion of perfusing fluid. Vasopressin (AVP) was determined by radioimmunoassay in samples of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) (the first portion) and in five successive samples of the perfusing fluid. AVP concentration in the CSF was several times greater than in the fluid perfusing cerebral ventricles. Alternate electrical stimulation of both vagus nerves did not change considerably the release of AVP into the fluid perfusing the cerebral ventricles in rat, although a certain upward tendency could be observed. It seems that only AVP raised in circulating blood and not in CSF, after vagus nerves stimulation may act on the central nervous structures. (author). 37 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab.

  10. Transcutaneous auricular vagal nerve stimulation (taVNS) might be a mechanism behind the analgesic effects of auricular acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usichenko, Taras; Hacker, Henriette; Lotze, Martin

    2017-08-02

    Randomized clinical trials (RCT) demonstrated that auricular acupuncture (AA) is effective in treatment of acute and chronic pain, although the mechanisms behind AA are not elucidated. The data concerning the localization of AA points, which are commonly used to treat pain, were extracted from the meta-analysis of 17 RCTs and evaluated using the anatomical map of auricular afferent nerve supply. Fifteen out of 20 specific AA points, used in the treatment of pain, are situated in areas innervated mostly by the auricular branch of the vagal nerve (ABVN), whereas sham stimulation was applied at the helix of the auricle, innervated by cervical nerves. Considering the clinical data relating to the anatomy of neural pathways and experimental findings of the mechanisms of transcutaneous auricular vagal nerve stimulation, the analgesic effects of AA may be explained by stimulation of ABVN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intractable episodic bradycardia resulting from progressive lead traction in an epileptic child with a vagus nerve stimulator: a delayed complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron J; Kuperman, Rachel A; Auguste, Kurtis I; Sun, Peter P

    2012-04-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used as palliation for adult and pediatric patients with intractable epilepsy who are not candidates for curative resection. Although the treatment is generally safe, complications can occur intraoperatively, perioperatively, and in a delayed time frame. In the literature, there are 2 reports of pediatric patients with implanted VNS units who had refractory bradycardia that resolved after the stimulation was turned off. The authors report the case of a 13-year-old boy with a history of vagus nerve stimulator placement at 2 years of age, who developed intractable episodic bradycardia that persisted despite the cessation of VNS and whose imaging results suggested vagus nerve tethering by the leads. He was subsequently taken to the operating room for exploration, where it was confirmed that the stimulator lead was exerting traction on the vagus nerve, which was displaced from the carotid sheath. After the vagus nerve was untethered and the leads were replaced, the bradycardia eventually resolved with continual effective VNS therapy. When placing a VNS unit in a very young child, accommodations must be made for years of expected growth. Delayed intractable bradycardia can result from a vagus nerve under traction by tethered stimulator leads.

  12. Effect of somatic nerve stimulation on the kidney in intact, vagotomized and carotid sinus-denervated rats.

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    Davis, G; Johns, E J

    1991-01-01

    1. The influence of cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptors on the renal nerve-dependent functional responses of the kidney to electrical stimulation of somatic afferent nerves was studied in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized rats. 2. Electrical stimulation of the left brachial nerve plexus at 3 Hz, 0.2 ms and 15 V in the intact animals increased blood pressure by 22%, and while renal perfusion pressure was maintained at pre-stimulus levels, renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate decreased by 14 and 22% respectively. At the same time urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretion decreased by 36, 42 and 27% respectively. In animals subjected to acute renal nerve section these renal functional responses could not be elicited. 3. Following bilateral vagotomy the systemic and renal haemodynamic responses to brachial nerve stimulation were similar to the intact group. However, urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretions decreased by 50, 59 and 47% respectively, responses which were significantly greater than in the intact group. 4. In a group of rats in which the carotid sinus nerves had been sectioned, stimulation of the brachial plexus caused reductions of renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate of the same magnitude as in the intact group; however, urine flow rate and absolute and fractional sodium excretion fell by 51, 60 and 48%, respectively, which were significantly larger than in the intact group. 5. These results demonstrate that the afferent nerve information arising from muscle joints and skin and carried via the brachial plexus caused reflex renal nerve-dependent reductions in renal haemodynamics and an antidiuresis and antinatriuresis. The cardiopulmonary and carotid sinus baroreceptors exert a tonic inhibitory action on these reflex renal responses insofar as they appeared to attenuate the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to somatic afferent nerve stimulation.

  13. Unilateral occipital nerve stimulation for bilateral occipital neuralgia: a case report and literature review

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    Liu A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aijun Liu, Yongcheng Jiao, Huijun Ji, Zhiwen Zhang Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Objectives: The aim of this study is to present a case of successful relief of bilateral occipital neuralgia (ON using unilateral occipital nerve stimulation (ONS and to discuss the possible underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods: We present the case of a 59-year-old female patient with severe bilateral ON treated with unilateral ONS. We systematically reviewed previous studies of ONS for ON, discussing the possible mechanisms of ONS in the relief of ON. Results: The patient reported complete pain relief after consistent unilateral ONS during the follow-up period. The underlying mechanisms may be linked to the relationship between pain and several brain regions, including the pons, midbrain, and periaqueductal gray. Conclusion: ONS is an effective and safe option for treating ON. Future studies will be required to clarify the mechanisms by which unilateral occipital stimulation provided relief for bilateral neuralgia in this case. Keywords: occipital neuralgia, neuromodulation, peripheral nerve stimulation

  14. Early cortical biomarkers of longitudinal transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation treatment success in depression.

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    Fang, Jiliang; Egorova, Natalia; Rong, Peijing; Liu, Jun; Hong, Yang; Fan, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaoling; Wang, Honghong; Yu, Yutian; Ma, Yunyao; Xu, Chunhua; Li, Shaoyuan; Zhao, Jingjun; Luo, Man; Zhu, Bing; Kong, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (tVNS), a non-invasive method of brain stimulation through the auricular branch of the vagus nerve, has shown promising results in treating major depressive disorder (MDD) in several pilot studies. However, the neural mechanism by which the effect on depression might be achieved has not been fully investigated, with only a few neuroimaging studies demonstrating tVNS-induced changes in the brains of healthy volunteers. Identifying specific neural pathways, which are influenced by tVNS compared with sham in depressed individuals, as well as determining neurobiomarkers of tVNS treatment success are needed to advance the application of tVNS for MDD. In order to address these questions, we measured fMRI brain activity of thirty-eight depressed patients assigned to undergo tVNS (n = 17) or sham (n = 21) treatment for 4 weeks, during the first stimulation session. The results showed significant fMRI signal increases in the left anterior insula, revealed by a direct comparison of tVNS and sham stimulation. Importantly, the insula activation level during the first stimulation session in the tVNS group was significantly associated with the clinical improvement at the end of the four-week treatment, as indicated by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score. Our findings suggest that anterior insula fMRI activity could serve as a potential cortical biomarker and an early predictor of tVNS longitudinal treatment success.

  15. Alternating Current Stimulation for Vision Restoration after Optic Nerve Damage: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schittkowski, Michael P.; Antal, Andrea; Ambrus, Géza Gergely; Paulus, Walter; Dannhauer, Moritz; Michalik, Romualda; Mante, Alf; Bola, Michal; Lux, Anke; Kropf, Siegfried; Brandt, Stephan A.; Sabel, Bernhard A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vision loss after optic neuropathy is considered irreversible. Here, repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) was applied in partially blind patients with the goal of activating their residual vision. Methods We conducted a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial in an ambulatory setting with daily application of rtACS (n = 45) or sham-stimulation (n = 37) for 50 min for a duration of 10 week days. A volunteer sample of patients with optic nerve damage (mean age 59.1 yrs) was recruited. The primary outcome measure for efficacy was super-threshold visual fields with 48 hrs after the last treatment day and at 2-months follow-up. Secondary outcome measures were near-threshold visual fields, reaction time, visual acuity, and resting-state EEGs to assess changes in brain physiology. Results The rtACS-treated group had a mean improvement in visual field of 24.0% which was significantly greater than after sham-stimulation (2.5%). This improvement persisted for at least 2 months in terms of both within- and between-group comparisons. Secondary analyses revealed improvements of near-threshold visual fields in the central 5° and increased thresholds in static perimetry after rtACS and improved reaction times, but visual acuity did not change compared to shams. Visual field improvement induced by rtACS was associated with EEG power-spectra and coherence alterations in visual cortical networks which are interpreted as signs of neuromodulation. Current flow simulation indicates current in the frontal cortex, eye, and optic nerve and in the subcortical but not in the cortical regions. Conclusion rtACS treatment is a safe and effective means to partially restore vision after optic nerve damage probably by modulating brain plasticity. This class 1 evidence suggests that visual fields can be improved in a clinically meaningful way. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01280877 PMID:27355577

  16. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation attenuates systemic inflammation and improves survival in a rat heatstroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Kazuma; Matsumoto, Naoya; Imamura, Yukio; Muroya, Takashi; Yamada, Tomoki; Nakagawa, Junichiro; Shimazaki, Junya; Ogura, Hiroshi; Kuwagata, Yasuyuki; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed to gain insights into novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of heatstroke. The central nervous system regulates peripheral immune responses via the vagus nerve, the primary neural component of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reportedly suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokine release in several models of inflammatory disease. Here, we evaluated whether electrical VNS attenuates severe heatstroke, which induces a systemic inflammatory response. Anesthetized rats were subjected to heat stress (41.5°C for 30 minutes) with/without electrical VNS. In the VNS-treated group, the cervical vagus nerve was stimulated with constant voltage (10 V, 2 ms, 5 Hz) for 20 minutes immediately after completion of heat stress. Sham-operated animals underwent the same procedure without stimulation under a normothermic condition. Seven-day mortality improved significantly in the VNS-treated group versus control group. Electrical VNS significantly suppressed induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in the serum 6 hours after heat stress. Simultaneously, the increase of soluble thrombomodulin and E-selectin following heat stress was also suppressed by VNS treatment, suggesting its protective effect on endothelium. Immunohistochemical analysis using tissue preparations obtained 6 hours after heat stress revealed that VNS treatment attenuated infiltration of inflammatory (CD11b-positive) cells in lung and spleen. Interestingly, most cells with increased CD11b positivity in response to heat stress did not express α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in the spleen. These data indicate that electrical VNS modulated cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway abnormalities induced by heat stress, and this protective effect was associated with improved mortality. These findings may provide a novel therapeutic strategy to combat severe heatstroke in the critical care

  17. Inflammatory stimulation preserves physiological properties of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve injury

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    Henrike eStutzki

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Axonal injury in the optic nerve is associated with retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration and irreversible loss of vision. However, inflammatory stimulation (IS by intravitreal injection of Pam3Cys transforms RGCs into an active regenerative state enabling these neurons to survive injury and to regenerate axons into the injured optic nerve. Although morphological changes have been well studied, the functional correlates of RGCs transformed either into a de- or regenerating state at a sub-cellular level remain unclear. In the current study, we investigated the signal propagation in single intraretinal axons as well as characteristic activity features of RGCs in a naive, a degenerative or a regenerative state in ex vivo retinae one week after either optic nerve cut alone (ONC or additional inflammatory stimulation (ONC+IS. Recordings of single RGCs using high-density microelectrode arrays demonstrate that the mean intraretinal axonal conduction velocity significantly decreased within the first week after ONC. In contrast, when ONC was accompanied by regenerative Pam3Cys treatment the mean intraretinal velocity was undistinguishable from control RGCs, indicating a protective effect on the proximal axon. Spontaneous RGC activity decreased for the two most numerous RGC types (ON- and OFF-sustained cells within one post-operative week, but did not significantly increase in RGCs after inflammatory stimulation. The analysis of light-induced activity revealed that RGCs in ONC animals respond on average later and with fewer spikes than control RGCs. IS significantly improved the responsiveness of the two studied RGC types.These results show that the transformation into a regenerative state by IS preserves, at least transiently, the physiological functional properties of injured RGCs.

  18. Hybrid electro-optical stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve induces force generation in the plantarflexor muscles

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    Duke, Austin R.; Peterson, Erik; Mackanos, Mark A.; Atkinson, James; Tyler, Dustin; Jansen, E. Duco

    2012-12-01

    Objective. Optical methods of neural activation are becoming important tools for the study and treatment of neurological disorders. Infrared nerve stimulation (INS) is an optical technique exhibiting spatially precise activation in the native neural system. While this technique shows great promise, the risk of thermal damage may limit some applications. Combining INS with traditional electrical stimulation, a method known as hybrid electro-optical stimulation, reduces the laser power requirements and mitigates the risk of thermal damage while maintaining spatial selectivity. Here we investigate the capability of inducing force generation in the rat hind limb through hybrid stimulation of the sciatic nerve. Approach. Hybrid stimulation was achieved by combining an optically transparent nerve cuff for electrical stimulation and a diode laser coupled to an optical fiber for infrared stimulation. Force generation in the rat plantarflexor muscles was measured in response to hybrid stimulation with 1 s bursts of pulses at 15 and 20 Hz and with a burst frequency of 0.5 Hz. Main results. Forces were found to increase with successive stimulus trains, ultimately reaching a plateau by the 20th train. Hybrid evoked forces decayed at a rate similar to the rate of thermal diffusion in tissue. Preconditioning the nerve with an optical stimulus resulted in an increase in the force response to both electrical and hybrid stimulation. Histological evaluation showed no signs of thermally induced morphological changes following hybrid stimulation. Our results indicate that an increase in baseline temperature is a likely contributor to hybrid force generation. Significance. Extraneural INS of peripheral nerves at physiologically relevant repetition rates is possible using hybrid electro-optical stimulation.

  19. The combined effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and stretching on muscle hardness and pressure pain threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasuno, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hisayoshi; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Yokoi, Yuka; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Ogoma, Yoshiro; Abe, Koji

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to clarify the immediate effects of a combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching protocol. [Subjects] Fifteen healthy young males volunteered to participate in this study. The inclusion criterion was a straight leg raising range of motion of less than 70 degrees. [Methods] Subjects performed two protocols: 1) stretching (S group) of the medial hamstrings, and 2) tanscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (100 Hz) with stretching (TS group). The TS group included a 20-minute electrical stimulation period followed by 10 minutes of stretching. The S group performed 10 minutes of stretching. Muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion were analyzed to evaluate the effects. The data were collected before transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (T1), before stretching (T2), immediately after stretching (T3), and 10 minutes after stretching (T4). [Results] Combined transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and stretching had significantly beneficial effects on muscle hardness, pressure pain threshold, and straight leg raising range of motion at T2, T3, and T4 compared with T1. [Conclusion] These results support the belief that transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation combined with stretching is effective in reducing pain and decreasing muscle hardness, thus increasing range of motion.

  20. Electrical stimulation at distinct peripheral sites in spinal nerve injured rats leads to different afferent activation profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Chung, Chih-Yang; Wacnik, Paul W; Carteret, Alene F; McKelvy, Alvin D; Meyer, Richard A; Raja, Srinivasa N; Guan, Yun

    2011-11-07

    The neurophysiological basis by which neuromodulatory techniques lead to relief of neuropathic pain remains unclear. We investigated whether electrical stimulation at different peripheral sites induces unique profiles of A-fiber afferent activation in nerve-injured rats. At 4-6weeks after subjecting rats to L5 spinal nerve injury (SNL) or sham operation, we recorded the orthodromic compound action potential (AP) at the ipsilateral L4 dorsal root in response to (1) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS, a patch electrode placed on the dorsum of the foot), (2) subcutaneous electrical stimulation (SQS, electrode inserted subcutaneously along the dorsum of the foot), (3) peroneal nerve stimulation (PNS, electrode placed longitudinally abutting the nerve), and (4) sciatic nerve stimulation (SNS). The area under the Aα/β compound AP was measured as a function of the bipolar, constant-current stimulus intensity (0.02-6.0 mA, 0.2 ms). In both nerve-injured and sham-operated groups, the stimulus-response (S-R) functions of the Aα/β compound APs differed substantially with the stimulation site; SNS having the lowest threshold and largest compound AP waveform, followed by PNS, SQS, and TENS. The S-R function to PNS was shifted to the right in the SNL group, compared to that in the sham-operated group. The Aα/β-threshold to PNS was higher in the SNL group than in the sham-operated group. The S-R functions and Aα/β-thresholds to TENS and SQS were comparable between the two groups. Electrical stimulation of different peripheral targets induced distinctive profiles of A-fiber afferent activation, suggesting that the neuronal substrates for the various forms of peripheral neuromodulatory therapies may differ. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Topography of synchronization of somatosensory evoked potentials elicited by stimulation of the sciatic nerve in rat

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    Xuefeng eQu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Traditionally, the topography of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs is generated based on amplitude and latency. However, this operation focuses on the physical morphology and field potential-power, so it suffers from difficulties in performing identification in an objective manner. In this study, measurement of the synchronization of SEPs is proposed as a method to explore brain functional networks as well as the plasticity after peripheral nerve injury. Method: SEPs elicited by unilateral sciatic nerve stimulation in twelve adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats in the normal group were compared with SEPs evoked after unilateral sciatic nerve hemisection in four peripheral nerve injured SD rats. The characterization of synchronized networks from SEPs was conducted using equal-time correlation, correlation matrix analysis, and comparison to randomized surrogate data. Eigenvalues of the correlation matrix were used to identify the clusters of functionally synchronized neuronal activity, and the participation index (PI was calculated to indicate the involvement of each channel in the cluster. The PI value at the knee point of the PI histogram was used as a threshold to demarcate the cortical boundary. Results: Ten out of the twelve normal rats showed only one synchronized brain network. The remaining two normal rats showed one strong and one weak network. In the peripheral nerve injured group, only one synchronized brain network was found in each rat. In the normal group, all network shapes appear regular and the network is largely contained in the posterior cortex. In the injured group, the network shapes appear irregular, the network extends anteriorly and posteriorly, and the network area is significantly larger. There are considerable individual variations in the shape and location of the network after peripheral nerve injury. Conclusion: The proposed method can detect functional brain networks. Compared to the results of the

  2. Neuralgia associated with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy in a patient initially diagnosed with temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omolehinwa, Temitope T; Musbah, Thamer; Desai, Bhavik; O'Malley, Bert W; Stoopler, Eric T

    2015-03-01

    Head and neck neoplasms may be difficult to detect because of wide-ranging symptoms and the presence of overlapping anatomic structures in the region. This case report describes a patient with chronic otalgia and temporomandibular disorder, who developed sudden-onset neuralgia while receiving transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy. Further diagnostic evaluation revealed a skull base tumor consistent with adenoid cystic carcinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of TENS-associated neuralgia leading to a diagnosis of primary intracranial adenoid cystic carcinoma.

  3. Vagus nerve stimulation for generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ accompanying seizures with impaired consciousness

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    Ryosuke Hanaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+ is characterized by childhood-onset epilepsy syndrome. It involves febrile seizures and a variety of afebrile epileptic seizure types within the same pedigree with autosomal-dominant inheritance. Approximately 10% of individuals with GEFS+ harbor SCN1A, a gene mutation in one of the voltage-gated sodium channel subunits. Considerably less common are focal epilepsies including focal seizures with impaired consciousness. We report vagus nerve stimulation (VNS in a 6-year-old girl with GEFS+ who exhibited drug-resistant generalized tonic-clonic seizures and focal seizures with impaired consciousness.

  4. Percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation for treatment of shoulder pain after spinal cord injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehech, Daniela; Mejia, Melvin; Nemunaitis, Gregory A; Chae, John; Wilson, Richard D

    2017-03-17

    This describes the first person with spinal cord injury (SCI) treated with percutaneous peripheral nerve stimulation for chronic shoulder pain. From baseline to one-week after treatment, the subject's worst pain in the last week, rated on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (BPI-SF3), decreased by 44%. Pain interference decreased and remained below baseline 12 weeks after the end of treatment. There was an associated improvement in the mental component of quality of life. This case demonstrates the feasibility of treating shoulder pain in patients with SCI with percutaneous PNS. To demonstrate efficacy further studies are required.

  5. Vagus nerve stimulator in patients with epilepsy: indications and recommendations for use

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    Vera C Terra

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy comprises a set of neurologic and systemic disorders characterized by recurrent spontaneous seizures, and is the most frequent chronic neurologic disorder. In patients with medically refractory epilepsy, therapeutic options are limited to ablative brain surgery, trials of experimental antiepileptic drugs, or palliative surgery. Vagal nerve stimulation is an available palliative procedure of which the mechanism of action is not understood, but with established efficacy for medically refractory epilepsy and low incidence of side-effects. In this paper we discuss the recommendations for VNS use as suggested by the Brazilian League of Epilepsy and the Scientific Department of Epilepsy of the Brazilian Academy of Neurology Committee of Neuromodulation.

  6. Cameo surface recording in complete denture fabrication using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Dheeraj; Nanda, Aditi; Kaur, Harsimran; Verma, Mahesh; Jain, Chandan

    2017-08-01

    Severe bone loss in patients with complete edentulism poses a treatment challenge. In fabricating a denture, the stability of the prosthesis must be enhanced by recording the cameo surface within the confines of the physiological position of the cheek and tongue muscles (the neutral zone) and by shaping it accordingly. The treatment of a patient with a completely edentulous maxillary arch and severe maxillary anterior bone loss is described. The cameo surface was recorded within the physiological limits during the fabrication of a complete denture by using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Femoral versus Multiple Nerve Blocks for Analgesia after Total Knee Arthroplasty

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    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Sevi, Roger; Stav, Michael Yohay; Powell, Devorah; Dor, Yanai; Dudkiewicz, Mickey; Bayadse, Fuaz; Sternberg, Ahud; Soudry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background The PROSPECT (Procedure-Specific Postoperative Pain Management) Group recommended a single injection femoral nerve block in 2008 as a guideline for analgesia after total knee arthroplasty. Other authors have recommended the addition of sciatic and obturator nerve blocks. The lateral femoral cutaneous nerve is also involved in pain syndrome following total knee arthroplasty. We hypothesized that preoperative blocking of all four nerves would offer superior analgesia to femoral nerve block alone. Methods This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, and observer-blinded clinical study. A total of 107 patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: a femoral nerve block group, a multiple nerve block group, and a control group. All patients were treated postoperatively using patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with morphine. Pain intensity at rest, during flexion and extension, and morphine consumption were compared between groups over three days. Results A total of 90 patients completed the study protocol. Patients who received multiple nerve blocks experienced superior analgesia and had reduced morphine consumption during the postoperative period compared to the other two groups. Pain intensity during flexion was significantly lower in the “blocks” groups versus the control group. Morphine consumption was significantly higher in the control group. Conclusions Pain relief after total knee arthroplasty immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day was significantly superior in patients who received multiple blocks preoperatively, with morphine consumption significantly lower during this period. A preoperative femoral nerve block alone produced partial and insufficient analgesia immediately after surgery and on the first postoperative day. (Clinical trial registration number (NIH): NCT01303120) PMID:28178436

  8. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of spinal cord injury neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbrink, Cecilia

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the short-term effects of high- and low-frequency (HF and LF, respectively) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). A total of 24 patients participated in the study. According to the protocol, half of the patients were assigned to HF (80 Hz) and half to LF (burst of 2 Hz) TENS. Patients were instructed to treat themselves three times daily for 2 weeks. After a 2-week wash-out period, patients switched stimulation frequencies and repeated the procedure. Results were calculated on an intent-to-treat basis. No differences between the two modes of stimulation were found. On a group level, no effects on pain intensity ratings or ratings of mood, coping with pain, life satisfaction, sleep quality, or psychosocial consequences of pain were seen. However, 29% of the patients reported a favorable effect from HF and 38% from LF stimulation on a 5-point global pain-relief scale. Six of the patients (25%) were, at their request, prescribed TENS stimulators for further treatment at the end of the study. In conclusion, TENS merits consideration as a com plementary treatment in patients with SCI and neuropathic pain.

  9. Biclustering EEG data from epileptic patients treated with vagus nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busygin, Stanislav; Boyko, Nikita; Pardalos, Panos M.; Bewernitz, Michael; Ghacibeh, Georges

    2007-11-01

    We present a pilot study of an application of consistent biclustering to analyze scalp EEG data obtained from epileptic patients undergoing treatment with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS). The ultimate goal of this study is to develop a physiologic marker for optimal VNS parameters (e.g. output current, signal frequency, etc.) using measures of scalp EEG signals. A time series of STLmax values was computed for each scalp EEG channel recorded from two epileptic patients and used as a feature of the two datasets. The averaged samples from stimulation periods were then separated from averaged samples from non-stimulation periods by feature selection performed within the consistent biclustering routine. The obtained biclustering results allow us to assume that signals from certain parts of the brain consistently change their characteristics when VNS is switched on and could provide a basis for desirable VNS stimulation parameters. A physiologic marker of optimal VNS effect could greatly reduce the cost, time, and risk of calibrating VNS stimulation parameters in newly implanted patients compared to the current method of clinical response.

  10. Influence of peripheral nerve stimulation on the responses in small hand muscles to transcranial magnetic cortex stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, M; Schmid, U D; Hess, C W; Schmid, J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of afferent median nerve stimulation on the responses of small hand muscles (CMAPs) to cortical stimulation (CortStim) was investigated by applying short stimulus trains to the median nerve at the wrist and slightly suprathreshold magnetic stimuli to the scalp. Train stimulus frequency (TSF), train stimulus intensity (TSI), and train onset (TO) in relation to the CortStim were varied. Amplitudes and latencies of CMAPs were compared with those obtained by CortStim alone. When applying short trains of 10 msec duration, of 300/sec-400/sec TSF, and of threshold or supramaximal intensity for motor fibers, both facilitatory and inhibitory effects on the responses to CortStim were achieved depending on the timing of the train onset. With a TO of 8-10 msec before CortStim, mean amplitudes of CMAPs were enhanced 3-10 times; mean amplitudes reached up to 20 times the baseline values when the TO was greater than 45 msec before CortStim. With a TO of 15-35 msec before CortStim, amplitudes were diminished below control values. No systematic changes in latency were noted with TO of 8-10 msec, but when the TO was 45-60 msec before CortStim the latencies of CMAPs were 1.5-3 msec shorter than baseline latencies. With afferent stimuli that were subthreshold for motor fibers facilitation only occurred when the TO was about 45 msec before CortStim. The differences were statistically significant (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Test). This biphasic pattern of facilitation and inhibition probably reflects spinal and supraspinal reflex phenomena mediated by spindle receptor and various cutaneous afferents.

  11. Sodium-calcium exchanger and multiple sodium channel isoforms in intra-epidermal nerve terminals

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    Gasser Andreas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nociception requires transduction and impulse electrogenesis in nerve fibers which innervate the body surface, including the skin. However, the molecular substrates for transduction and action potential initiation in nociceptors are incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the expression and distribution of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX and voltage-gated sodium channel isoforms in intra-epidermal free nerve terminals. Results Small diameter DRG neurons exhibited robust NCX2, but not NCX1 or NCX3 immunolabeling, and virtually all PGP 9.5-positive intra-epidermal free nerve terminals displayed NCX2 immunoreactivity. Sodium channel NaV1.1 was not detectable in free nerve endings. In contrast, the majority of nerve terminals displayed detectable levels of expression of NaV1.6, NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9. Sodium channel immunoreactivity in the free nerve endings extended from the dermal boundary to the terminal tip. A similar pattern of NCX and sodium channel immunolabeling was observed in DRG neurons in vitro. Conclusions NCX2, as well as NaV1.6, NaV1.7, NaV1.8 and NaV1.9, are present in most intra-epidermal free nerve endings. The presence of NCX2, together with multiple sodium channel isoforms, in free nerve endings may have important functional implications.

  12. Supramaximal stimulation during intraoperative facial nerve monitoring as a simple parameter to predict early functional outcome after parotidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamelle, Elisabeth; Bernat, Isabelle; Pichon, Soizic; Granger, Benjamin; Sain-Oulhen, Charlotte; Lamas, Georges; Tankéré, Frédéric

    2013-07-01

    A supramaximal stimulation at 2 mA during intraoperative electromyographic (EMG) facial nerve monitoring appears to be a simple and effective parameter to predict immediate postoperative injury. To assess the role of systematic intraoperative facial nerve monitoring in predicting the early functional outcomes obtained after parotidectomy. Data were collected from patients who underwent parotidectomy. Intraoperative EMG monitoring of the facial nerve was performed by registering two parameters, event intensity (>100 μV) and amplitude of response after a supramaximal stimulation at 2 mA, at the beginning and end of gland removal. Early postoperative clinical functional facial nerve disorder was assessed at day 2. Overall, 50 patients were included and an early facial dysfunction was detected in 27 cases (54%). The maximal response amplitude after supramaximal stimulation at the trunk of the facial nerve was higher in patients with normal facial function compared with those with poor outcomes at the end of surgery (p stimulation thresholds, were indicative of a nerve conduction block and were significantly lower in the patient group with a poor outcome compared with the group with a normal facial outcome (p < 0.02).

  13. Unilateral occipital nerve stimulation for bilateral occipital neuralgia: a case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aijun; Jiao, Yongcheng; Ji, Huijun; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to present a case of successful relief of bilateral occipital neuralgia (ON) using unilateral occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) and to discuss the possible underlying mechanisms. Materials and methods We present the case of a 59-year-old female patient with severe bilateral ON treated with unilateral ONS. We systematically reviewed previous studies of ONS for ON, discussing the possible mechanisms of ONS in the relief of ON. Results The patient reported complete pain relief after consistent unilateral ONS during the follow-up period. The underlying mechanisms may be linked to the relationship between pain and several brain regions, including the pons, midbrain, and periaqueductal gray. Conclusion ONS is an effective and safe option for treating ON. Future studies will be required to clarify the mechanisms by which unilateral occipital stimulation provided relief for bilateral neuralgia in this case. PMID:28176938

  14. Blood flow activation in rat somatosensory cortex under sciatic nerve stimulation revealed by laser speckle imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    In many functional neuroimaging research the change of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by sensory stimulation is regarded as an indicator of the change in cortical neuronal activity although a precise and full spatio-temporal description of local CBF response coupled to neural activity has still not been laid out. Using the laser speckle imaging technique a relatively large exposed area in somatosensory cortex of rat was imaged for the observation of the variations of CBF during sciatic nerve stimulation. The results showed that cerebral blood flow activation was spatially localized and discretely distributed in the targeted microvasculature. Individual arteries, veins and capillaries in different diameters were activated with the time going. The response pattern of CBF related to the function of brain activity and energy metabolism is delineated exactly.

  15. Occipital nerve stimulation in medically intractable, chronic cluster headache. The ICON study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A; Teernstra, Onno Pm; Haan, Joost

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: About 10% of cluster headache patients have the chronic form. At least 10% of this chronic group is intractable to or cannot tolerate medical treatment. Open pilot studies suggest that occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) might offer effective prevention in these patients. Controlled...... in medically intractable, chronic cluster headache patients of high- versus low-amplitude ONS. Primary outcome measure is the mean number of attacks over the last four weeks. After a study period of six months there is an open extension phase of six months. Alongside the randomised trial an economic evaluation...... study is performed. DISCUSSION: The ICON study will show if ONS is an effective preventive therapy for patients suffering medically intractable chronic cluster headache and if there is a difference between high- and low-amplitude stimulation. The innovative design of the study will, for the first time...

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation may be a sound therapeutic option in the treatment of refractory epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo S. Meneses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Refractory epilepsy accounts for 20 to 30% of epilepsy cases and remains a challenge for neurologists. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is an option for palliative treatment. OBJECTIVE: It was to study the efficacy and tolerability of VNS in patients implanted with a stimulator at the Curitiba Institute of Neurology (INC. METHODS: A case study of six patients with refractory epilepsy submitted to a VNS procedure at the INC in the last four years was described and discussed. RESULTS: Mean age at time of implantation was 29 years. Mean follow-up was 26.6 months. Seizure frequency decreased in all patients (40-50% (n=2 and >80% (n=4. Three patients no longer required frequent hospitalizations. Two patients previously restricted to wheelchairs started to walk, probably because of improved mood. CONCLUSION: In this population, VNS proved to be a sound therapeutic option for treating refractory epilepsy.

  17. In situ repair of vagus nerve stimulator lead damage: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston, Ashley; Ogden, Patti; Kohrman, Michael H; Frim, David M

    2016-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulators (VNSs) are currently an accepted treatment for intractable epilepsy not amenable to ablative surgery. Battery death and lead damage are the main reasons for reoperation in patients with VNSs. In general, any damage to the lead requires revision surgery to remove the helical electrodes from the vagus nerve and replace the electrode array and wire. The electrodes are typically scarred and difficult to remove from the vagus nerve without injury. The authors describe 6 patients with VNSs who presented with low lead impedance on diagnostic testing, leading to the intraoperative finding of lead insulation disruption, or who were found incidentally at the time of implantable pulse generator battery replacement to have a tear in the outer insulation of the electrode wire. Instead of replacement, the wire insulation was repaired and reinforced in situ, leading to normal impedance testing. All 6 devices remained functional over a follow-up period of up to 87 months, with 2 of the 6 patients having a relatively shorter follow-up of only 12 months. This technique, applicable in a subset of patients with VNSs requiring lead exploration, obviates the need for lead replacement with its attendant risks.

  18. Evidence of activation of vagal afferents by non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation: An electrophysiological study in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonis, Romain; D'Ostilio, Kevin; Schoenen, Jean; Magis, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    Background Benefits of cervical non-invasive vagus nerve stimulation (nVNS) devices have been shown in episodic cluster headache and preliminarily suggested in migraine, but direct evidence of vagus nerve activation using such devices is lacking. Vagal somatosensory evoked potentials (vSEPs) associated with vagal afferent activation have been reported for invasive vagus nerve stimulation (iVNS) and non-invasive auricular vagal stimulation. Here, we aimed to show and characterise vSEPs for cervical nVNS. Methods vSEPs were recorded for 12 healthy volunteers who received nVNS over the cervical vagus nerve, bipolar electrode/DS7A stimulation over the inner tragus, and nVNS over the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle. We measured peak-to-peak amplitudes (P1-N1), wave latencies, and N1 area under the curve. Results P1-N1 vSEPs were observed for cervical nVNS (11/12) and auricular stimulation (9/12), with latencies similar to those described previously, whereas SCM stimulation revealed only a muscle artefact with a much longer latency. A dose-response analysis showed that cervical nVNS elicited a clear vSEP response in more than 80% of the participants using an intensity of 15 V. Conclusion Cervical nVNS can activate vagal afferent fibres, as evidenced by the recording of far-field vSEPs similar to those seen with iVNS and non-invasive auricular stimulation.

  19. Impact of Anesthetics on Immune Functions in a Rat Model of Vagus Nerve Stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloé A Picq

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS has been successfully performed in animals for the treatment of different experimental models of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of VNS involves the release of acetylcholine by vagus nerve efferent fibers inhibiting pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. TNF-α produced by macrophages. Moreover, it has recently been demonstrated that splenic lymphocytic populations may also be involved. As anesthetics can modulate the inflammatory response, the current study evaluated the effect of two different anesthetics, isoflurane and pentobarbital, on splenic cellular and molecular parameters in a VNS rat model. Spleens were collected for the characterization of lymphocytes sub-populations by flow cytometry and quantification of cytokines secretion after in vitro activation. Different results were observed depending on the anesthetic used. The use of isoflurane displayed a non-specific effect of VNS characterized by a decrease of most splenic lymphocytes sub-populations studied, and also led to a significantly lower TNF-α secretion by splenocytes. However, the use of pentobarbital brought to light immune modifications in non-stimulated animals that were not observed with isoflurane, and also revealed a specific effect of VNS, notably at the level of T lymphocytes' activation. These differences between the two anesthetics could be related to the anti-inflammatory properties of isoflurane. In conclusion, pentobarbital is more adapted than isoflurane in the study of the anti-inflammatory effect of VNS on an anesthetized rat model in that it allows more accurate monitoring of subtle immunomodulatory processes.

  20. Membrane depolarization and carbamoylcholine stimulate phosphatidylinositol turnover in intact nerve terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audigier, S.M.P.; Wang, J.K.T.; Greengard, P.

    1988-04-01

    Synaptosomes, purified from rat cerebral cortex, were prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)inositol to study phosphatidylinositol turnover in nerve terminals. Labeled synaptosomes were either depolarized with 40 mM K/sup +/ or exposed to carbamoylcholine (carbachol). K/sup +/ depolarization increased the level of inositol phosphates in a time-dependent manner. The inositol bisphosphate level also increased rapidly, but its elevated level was sustained during continued depolarization. The elevated level of inositol bisphosphate was reversed upon repolarization of the synaptosomes. The level of inositol monophosphate increased slowly to 120-130% of control. These effects of K/sup +/ depolarization depended on the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ in the incubation medium. Carbachol stimulated the turnover of phosphatidylinositol in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The level of inositol bisphosphate increased to 210% of control, and this maximal response was seen from 15 to 60 min. Accumulation of inositol monophosphate was larger than that of inositol bisphosphate, but its time course was slower. Atropine and pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol effect with high affinities. These data show that both Ca/sup 2 +/ influx and M/sub 1/ muscarinic receptor activation stimulate phospholipase C activity in synaptosomes, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol turnover may be involved in regulating neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals.

  1. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients.

  2. Impediment in upper airway stabilizing forces assessed by phrenic nerve stimulation in sleep apnea patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vérin E

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forces developed during inspiration play a key role in determining upper airway stability and the occurrence of nocturnal breathing disorders. Phrenic nerve stimulation applied during wakefulness is a unique tool to assess Upper airway dynamic properties and to measure the overall mechanical effects of the inspiratory process on UA stability. Objectives To compare the flow/pressure responses to inspiratory and expiratory twitches between sleep apnea subjects and normal subjects. Methods Inspiratory and expiratory twitches using magnetic nerve stimulation completed in eleven untreated sleep apnea subjects and ten normal subjects. Results In both groups, higher flow and pressure were reached during inspiratory twitches. The two groups showed no differences in expiratory twitch parameters. During inspiration, the pressure at which flow-limitation occurred was more negative in normals than in apneic subjects, but not reaching significance (p = 0.07. The relationship between pharyngeal pressure and flow adequately fitted with a polynomial regression model providing a measurement of upper airway critical pressure during twitch. This pressure significantly decreased in normals from expiratory to inspiratory twitches (-11.1 ± 1.6 and -15.7 ± 1.0 cm H2O respectively, 95% CI 1.6–7.6, p Conclusion Inspiratory-related upper airway dilating forces are impeded in sleep apnea patients.

  3. An alternative therapy for drug-resistant epilepsy: transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Peijing; Liu Aihua; Zhang Jianguo; Wang Yuping; Yang Anchao; Li Liang; Ben Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies demonstrated that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an effective therapy for drugresistant epilepsy.Acupuncture is also used to treat epilepsy.This study was designed to examine the safety and effectiveness of transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.Methods A total of 50 volunteer patients with drug-resistant epilepsy were selected for a random clinical trial to observe the therapeutic effect of ta-VNS.The seizure frequency,quality of life,and severity were assessed in weeks 8,16,and 24 of the treatment according to the percentage of seizure frequency reduction.Results In the pilot study,47 of the 50 epilepsy patients completed the 24-week treatment; three dropped off.After 8-week treatment,six of the 47 patients (12%) were seizure free and 12 (24%) had a reduction in seizure frequency.In week 16 of the continuous treatment,six of the 47 patients (12%)were seizure free; 17 (34%) had a reduction in seizure frequency.After 24 weeks' treatment,eight patients (16%) were seizure free; 19 (38%) had reduced seizure frequency.Conclusion Similar to the therapeutic effect of VNS,ta-VNS can suppress epileptic seizures and is a safe,effective,economical,and widely applicable treatment option for drug-resistant epilepsy.(ChiCTR-TRC-10001023)

  4. Acupuncture Treatment for Low Back Pain and Lower Limb Symptoms—The Relation between Acupuncture or Electroacupuncture Stimulation and Sciatic Nerve Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Inoue

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment for lumbar spinal canal stenosis and herniated lumbar disc and to clarify the mechanisms in an animal experiment that evaluated acupuncture on sciatic nerve blood flow. In the clinical trial, patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis or herniated lumbar disc were divided into three treatment groups; (i Ex-B2 (at the disordered level, (ii electrical acupuncture (EA on the pudendal nerve and (iii EA at the nerve root. Primary outcome measurements were pain and dysesthesia [evaluated with a visual analogue scale (VAS] and continuous walking distance. In the animal study, sciatic nerve blood flow was measured with laser-Doppler flowmetry at, before and during three kinds of stimulation (manual acupuncture on lumber muscle, electrical stimulation on the pudendal nerve and electrical stimulation on the sciatic nerve in anesthetized rats. For the clinical trial, approximately half of the patients who received Ex-B2 revealed amelioration of the symptoms. EA on the pudendal nerve was effective for the symptoms which had not improved by Ex-B2. Considerable immediate and sustained relief was observed in patients who received EA at the nerve root. For the animal study, increase in sciatic nerve blood flow was observed in 56.9% of the trial with lumber muscle acupuncture, 100% with pudendal nerve stimulation and 100% with sciatic nerve stimulation. Sciatic nerve stimulation sustained the increase longer than pudendal nerve stimulation. One mechanism of action of acupuncture and electrical acupuncture stimulation could be that, in addition to its influence on the pain inhibitory system, it participates in causing a transient change in sciatic nerve blood blow, including circulation to the cauda equine and nerve root.

  5. Motor unit recruitment when neuromuscular electrical stimulation is applied over a nerve trunk compared with a muscle belly: triceps surae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergquist, A J; Clair, J M; Collins, D F

    2011-03-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) can be delivered over a nerve trunk or muscle belly and can generate contractions by activating motor (peripheral pathway) and sensory (central pathway) axons. In the present experiments, we compared the peripheral and central contributions to plantar flexion contractions evoked by stimulation over the tibial nerve vs. the triceps surae muscles. Generating contractions through central pathways follows Henneman's size principle, whereby low-threshold motor units are activated first, and this may have advantages for rehabilitation. Statistical analyses were performed on data from trials in which NMES was delivered to evoke 10-30% maximum voluntary torque 2-3 s into the stimulation (Time(1)). Two patterns of stimulation were delivered: 1) 20 Hz for 8 s; and 2) 20-100-20 Hz for 3-2-3 s. Torque and soleus electromyography were quantified at the beginning (Time(1)) and end (Time(2); 6-7 s into the stimulation) of each stimulation train. H reflexes (central pathway) and M waves (peripheral pathway) were quantified. Motor unit activity that was not time-locked to each stimulation pulse as an M wave or H reflex ("asynchronous" activity) was also quantified as a second measure of central recruitment. Torque was not different for stimulation over the nerve or the muscle. In contrast, M waves were approximately five to six times smaller, and H reflexes were approximately two to three times larger during NMES over the nerve vs. the muscle. Asynchronous activity increased by 50% over time, regardless of the stimulation location or pattern, and was largest during NMES over the muscle belly. Compared with NMES over the triceps surae muscles, NMES over the tibial nerve produced contractions with a relatively greater central contribution, and this may help reduce muscle atrophy and fatigue when NMES is used for rehabilitation.

  6. Pairing tone trains with vagus nerve stimulation induces temporal plasticity in auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetake, Jai A; Engineer, Navzer D; Vrana, Will A; Wolf, Jordan T; Kilgard, Michael P

    2012-01-01

    The selectivity of neurons in sensory cortex can be modified by pairing neuromodulator release with sensory stimulation. Repeated pairing of electrical stimulation of the cholinergic nucleus basalis, for example, induces input specific plasticity in primary auditory cortex (A1). Pairing nucleus basalis stimulation (NBS) with a tone increases the number of A1 neurons that respond to the paired tone frequency. Pairing NBS with fast or slow tone trains can respectively increase or decrease the ability of A1 neurons to respond to rapidly presented tones. Pairing vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) with a single tone alters spectral tuning in the same way as NBS-tone pairing without the need for brain surgery. In this study, we tested whether pairing VNS with tone trains can change the temporal response properties of A1 neurons. In naïve rats, A1 neurons respond strongly to tones repeated at rates up to 10 pulses per second (pps). Repeatedly pairing VNS with 15 pps tone trains increased the temporal following capacity of A1 neurons and repeatedly pairing VNS with 5 pps tone trains decreased the temporal following capacity of A1 neurons. Pairing VNS with tone trains did not alter the frequency selectivity or tonotopic organization of auditory cortex neurons. Since VNS is well tolerated by patients, VNS-tone train pairing represents a viable method to direct temporal plasticity in a variety of human conditions associated with temporal processing deficits.

  7. Time course of the hemodynamic responses to aortic depressor nerve stimulation in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, M.T.; Mota, A.L. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Barale, A.R. [Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil); Castania, J.A.; Fazan, R. Jr.; Salgado, H.C. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-16

    The time to reach the maximum response of arterial pressure, heart rate and vascular resistance (hindquarter and mesenteric) was measured in conscious male spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive control rats (NCR; Wistar; 18-22 weeks) subjected to electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve (ADN). The parameters of stimulation were 1 mA intensity and 2 ms pulse length applied for 5 s, using frequencies of 10, 30, and 90 Hz. The time to reach the hemodynamic responses at different frequencies of ADN stimulation was similar for SHR (N = 15) and NCR (N = 14); hypotension = NCR (4194 ± 336 to 3695 ± 463 ms) vs SHR (3475 ± 354 to 4494 ± 300 ms); bradycardia = NCR (1618 ± 152 to 1358 ± 185 ms) vs SHR (1911 ± 323 to 1852 ± 431 ms), and the fall in hindquarter vascular resistance = NCR (6054 ± 486 to 6550 ± 847 ms) vs SHR (4849 ± 918 to 4926 ± 646 ms); mesenteric = NCR (5574 ± 790 to 5752 ± 539 ms) vs SHR (5638 ± 648 to 6777 ± 624 ms). In addition, ADN stimulation produced baroreflex responses characterized by a faster cardiac effect followed by a vascular effect, which together contributed to the decrease in arterial pressure. Therefore, the results indicate that there is no alteration in the conduction of the electrical impulse after the site of baroreceptor mechanical transduction in the baroreflex pathway (central and/or efferent) in conscious SHR compared to NCR.

  8. Electrochemical properties of titanium nitride nerve stimulation electrodes: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijs, Suzan; Fjorback, Morten; Jensen, Carina; Sørensen, Søren; Rechendorff, Kristian; Rijkhoff, Nico J M

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo electrochemical behavior of titanium nitride (TiN) nerve stimulation electrodes was compared to their in vitro behavior for a period of 90 days. Ten electrodes were implanted in two Göttingen minipigs. Four of these were used for electrical stimulation and electrochemical measurements. Five electrodes were kept in Ringer's solution at 37.5°C, of which four were used for electrical stimulation and electrochemical measurements. The voltage transients measured in vivo were 13 times greater than in vitro at implantation and they continued to increase with time. The electrochemical properties in vivo and the tissue resistance (Rtissue) followed a similar trend with time. There was no consistent significant difference between the electrochemical properties of the in vivo and in vitro electrodes after the implanted period. The differences between the in vivo and in vitro electrodes during the implanted period show that the evaluation of electrochemical performance of implantable stimulation electrodes cannot be substituted with in vitro measurements. After the implanted period, however, the performance of the in vivo and in vitro electrodes in saline was similar. In addition, the changes observed over time during the post-implantation period regarding the electrochemical properties of the in vivo electrodes and Rtissue were similar, which indicates that these changes are due to the foreign body response to implantation.

  9. Strength-Duration Time Constant in Peripheral Nerve: No Abnormality in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gençer Genç

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the properties of the strength-duration time constant (SDTC in multiple sclerosis (MS patients. Methods. The SDTC and rheobase in 16 MS patients and 19 healthy controls were obtained following stimulation of the right median nerve at the wrist. Results. SDTC and rheobase values were 408.3±60.0 μs and 4.0±1.8 mA in MS patients, versus 408.0±62.4 μs and 3.8±2.1 mA in controls. The differences were not significant in SDTC or rheobase values between the patients and controls (=0.988 for SDTC and =0.722 for rheobase. Conclusion. Our study showed no abnormality in relapsing remitting MS patients in terms of SDTC, which gives some indirect information about peripheral Na+ channel function. This may indicate that alterations in the Na+ channel pattern in central nervous system (CNS couldnot be shown in the peripheral nervous system (PNS in the MS patients by SDTC. The opinion that MS can be a kind of channelopathy might be proven by performing other axonal excitability tests or SDTC in progressive forms of MS.

  10. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats: mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Feng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually increased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our findings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the prefrontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation.

  11. Resuscitation therapy for traumatic brain injury-induced coma in rats:mechanisms of median nerve electrical stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Feng; Ying-jun Zhong; Liang Wang; Tian-qi Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, rats were put into traumatic brain injury-induced coma and treated with median nerve electrical stimulation. We explored the wake-promoting effect, and possible mechanisms, of median nerve electrical stimulation. Electrical stimulation upregulated the expression levels of orexin-A and its receptor OX1R in the rat prefrontal cortex. Orexin-A expression gradually in-creased with increasing stimulation, while OX1R expression reached a peak at 12 hours and then decreased. In addition, after the OX1R antagonist, SB334867, was injected into the brain of rats after traumatic brain injury, fewer rats were restored to consciousness, and orexin-A and OXIR expression in the prefrontal cortex was downregulated. Our ifndings indicate that median nerve electrical stimulation induced an up-regulation of orexin-A and OX1R expression in the pre-frontal cortex of traumatic brain injury-induced coma rats, which may be a potential mechanism involved in the wake-promoting effects of median nerve electrical stimulation.

  12. Electrophysiologic response recorded in the first dorsal interosseous muscle with stimulation of the tibial and deep fibular nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kathleen M; Greathouse, David G; Olson, Ronald; Tracy, Mary

    2004-05-01

    Foot intrinsic muscle innervation may demonstrate some variability. The first dorsal interosseous muscle (FDI) is innervated by the deep branch of the lateral plantar nerve (LPN) from the main trunk of the tibial nerve. Contribution from the deep fibular nerve (DFN) may also play a role in the supply of the FDI. Thirty healthy adult volunteers were studied to determine the presence and type of response in the FDI with stimulation of the tibial nerve/deep branch of the LPN and DFN. Both nerves were stimulated at the ankle and knee with a surface and needle recording from the FDI. Latency, amplitude, and conduction values were recorded for each nerve. The incidence of DFN supply to the FDI was 16.6% with a mean ankle amplitude of 152 microV. The incidence of tibial nerve/deep branch of the LPN supply to the FDI was 100%, with a mean ankle amplitude of 5.11 mV. The superficial branch of the LPN is most often studied when evaluating for tarsal tunnel syndrome because the standard recording site is the abductor digiti minimi (ADM). Recording from the ADM, however, frequently produces a less than desirable waveform, and the technical challenges encountered with this site make tarsal tunnel syndrome assessment difficult. It is also possible that selective involvement of the deep branch of the LPN may occur, and if so, recording from the FDI may prove valuable. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. An Isolated Bee Sting Involving Multiple Cranial Nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Motamed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are self-limiting events or due to allergic reactions. Sometimes envenomation with Hymenoptera can cause rare complications such as acute encephalopathy, peripheral neuritis, acute renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, silent myocardial infarction, rhabdomyolysis, conjunctivitis, corneal infiltration, lens subluxation, and optic neuropathy. The mechanism of peripheral nervous system damage is not clearly known. In our studied case after bee sting on face between the eyebrows with little erythema and  cm in size, bilateral blindness developed and gradually improved. Lateral movement of eyes was restricted with no pain. Involvement of cranial nerves including II, V, and VI was found. With conservative therapy after a year significant improvement has been achieved.

  14. Quadriceps strength assessed by magnetic stimulation of femoral nerve in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JU Chun-rong; CHEN Rong-chang

    2011-01-01

    Background Skeletal muscle dysfunction is one of important systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and is associated with mortality in patients with COPD, thus quantifying its strength is of great clinical interest and of particular value. Quadriceps maximal volitional contraction (MVC) is often used for the routine measurements of this muscle's strength; while twitch tension (TwQ) evoked by magnetic stimulation of the femoral nerve has been employed for measurement of quadriceps strength non-volitionally. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and severity of skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients by measurement of quadriceps strength with volitional and non-volitional techniques, and to probe into some methodological issues. Methods We recruited 71 COPD patients and 60 control subjects. Quadriceps strength was measured with both maximality of TwQ and MVC force. The reproducibility for TwQ and MVC was investigated using within-occasion variability from three repeated maneuvers. Results Maximal TwQ was achieved in 121 participants at a mean of 90% of the stimulator's maximum output. The mean maxmality of TwQ was decrease by about 44%-47% in COPD patients as compared with controls (P<0.05), so was MVC. There was a significant correlation between quadriceps TwQ and MVC, and the mean ratio of TwQ/MVC was 0.29 in controls and 0.33 in patients. The coefficient of variation showed that TwQ yielded lower within-occasion variability than MVC in both groups. Conclusions Quadriceps strength is commonly and substantially impaired in patients with COPD, in terms of MVC as well as TwQ. The magnetic stimulation of the femoral nerve presents a higher reproducibility and is a better technique for measurement of quadriceps strength for the general population, especially for those who are too unwell to perform a full MVC; while it may not be applied to subjects who are over-weighted.

  15. Transcorneal electrical stimulation alters morphology and survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich-Noack, Petra; Voigt, Nadine; Prilloff, Sylvia; Fedorov, Anton; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-05-24

    Traumatic optic nerve injury leads to retrograde death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), but transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) can increase the cell survival rate. To understand the mechanisms and to further define the TES-induced effects we monitored in living animals RGC morphology and survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) in real time by using in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) of the retina. ONC was performed in rats and ICON was performed before crush and on post-lesion days 3, 7 and 15 which allowed us to repeatedly record RGC number and size. TES or sham-stimulation were performed immediately after the crush and on post-injury day 11. Three days after ONC we detected a higher percentage of surviving RGCs in the TES group as compared to sham-treated controls. However, the difference was below significance level on day 7 and disappeared completely by day 15. The death rate was more variable amongst the TES-treated rats than in the control group. Morphological analysis revealed that average cell size changed significantly in the control group but not in stimulated animals and the morphological alterations of surviving neurons were smaller in TES-treated compared to control cells. In conclusion, TES delays post-traumatic cell death significantly. Moreover, we found "responder animals" which also benefited in the long-term from the treatment. Our in vivo cellular imaging results provide evidence that TES reduces ONC-associated neuronal swelling and shrinkage especially in RGCs which survived long-term. Further studies are now needed to determine the differences of responders vs. non-responders.

  16. Long-term seizure and psychosocial outcomes of vagus nerve stimulation for intractable epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasade, Vibhangini S; Schultz, Lonni; Mohanarangan, Karthik; Gaddam, Aryamaan; Schwalb, Jason M; Spanaki-Varelas, Marianna

    2015-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a widely used adjunctive treatment option for intractable epilepsy. Most studies have demonstrated short-term seizure outcomes, usually for up to 5 years, and thus far, none have reported psychosocial outcomes in adults. We aimed to assess long-term seizure and psychosocial outcomes in patients with intractable epilepsy on VNS therapy for more than 15 years. We identified patients who had VNS implantation for treatment of intractable epilepsy from 1997 to 2013 at our Comprehensive Epilepsy Program and gathered demographics including age at epilepsy onset and VNS implantation, epilepsy type, number of antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs) and seizure frequency before VNS implantation and at the last clinic visit, and the most recent stimulation parameters from electronic medical records (EMR). Phone surveys were conducted by research assistants from May to November 2014 to determine patients' current seizure frequency and psychosocial metrics, including driving, employment status, and use of antidepressants. Seizure outcomes were based on modified Engel classification (I: seizure-free/rare simple partial seizures; II: >90% seizure reduction (SR), III: 50-90% SR, IV: 50% SR)=favorable outcome). A total of 207 patients underwent VNS implantation, 15 of whom were deceased at the time of the phone survey, and 40 had incomplete data for medical abstraction. Of the remaining 152, 90 (59%) were contacted and completed the survey. Of these, 51% were male, with the mean age at epilepsy onset of 9.4 years (range: birth to 60 years). There were 35 (39%) patients with extratemporal epilepsy, 19 (21%) with temporal, 18 (20%) with symptomatic generalized, 5 (6%) with idiopathic generalized, and 13 (14%) with multiple types. Final VNS settings showed 16 (18%) patients with an output current >2 mA and 14 (16%) with rapid cycling. Of the 80 patients with seizure frequency information, 16 (20%) had a modified Engel class I outcome, 14 (18%) had class II, 24 (30

  17. The characteristics of acupuncture-like transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (acupuncture-like TENS): a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Richard P; Johnson, Mark I

    2011-01-01

    Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is used for pain relief. This study aimed to review the descriptions of the characteristics of acupuncture-like TENS reported within the published literature up to June 2011. A total of 88 items of published literature were retrieved.. 35 authors or groups provided 1 publication (Single Contributions - SC) and 10 authors or groups provided more than 1 publication (Multiple Contributions - MC). In order to gain the acupuncture-like effects of TENS, authors often characterised acupuncture-like TENS using: an intensity that caused muscle contractions (6MC, 17SC), or a sensation to tolerance threshold (3MC, 4SC); a 1-4 pulses per second (pps) pulse rate (5MC, 16SC); a 100-200 micros pulse duration (2MC, 8SC); stimulation to acupuncture points (5MC, 4SC), or myotomes (3MC, 3SC), or over the painful area (3MC, 1SC). Critically, unlike many authors included in the present review, the International Association for the Study of Pain core curriculum does not mention the triggering of muscle contractions when acupuncture-like TENS is defined. This may be an area that that they should reconsider.

  18. [Exploration Research of Treatment Effect Improvement of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Using Parameter-changing Chaotic Signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jincun; Zhang, Hui; Qin, Binyi; Wang, Hai; Nie, Guochao; Chen, Tiejun

    2015-10-01

    This article presents a transcutaneous electric stimulator that is based on chaotic signal. Firstly, we in the study used the MATLAB platform in the PC to generate chaotic signal through the chaos equation, and then we transferred the signal out by data acquisition equipment of USB-6251 manufactured by NI Company. In order to obtain high-power signal for transcutaneous electric stimulator, we used the chip of LM3886 to amplify the signal. Finally, we used the power-amplified chaotic signal to stimulate the internal nerve of human through the electrodes fixed on the skin. We obtained different stimulation effects of transcutaneous electric stimulator by changing the parameters of chaotic model. The preliminary test showed that the randomness of chaotic signals improved the applicability of electrical stimulation and the rules of chaos ensured that the stimulation was comfort. The method reported in this paper provides a new way for the design of transcutaneous electric stimulator.

  19. Postoperative Issues of Sacral Nerve Stimulation for Fecal Incontinence and Constipation: A Systematic Literature Review and Treatment Guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maeda, Yasuko; Matzel, Klaus; Lundby, Lilli;

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a lack of knowledge on the incidence and management of suboptimal therapeutic effect and the complications associated with sacral nerve stimulation for fecal incontinence and constipation. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to review current literature on postoperative issues...... and to propose a treatment algorithm. DATA SOURCE: PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE were searched using the keywords “sacral nerve stimulation,” “sacral neuromodulation,” “fecal incontinence,” and “constipation” for English-language articles published from January 1980 to August 2010. A further search was conducted...

  20. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  1. A Phenomenological Model of the Electrically Stimulated Auditory Nerve Fiber: Temporal and Biphasic Response Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Colin D F; Sumner, Christian J; Seeber, Bernhard U

    2016-01-01

    We present a phenomenological model of electrically stimulated auditory nerve fibers (ANFs). The model reproduces the probabilistic and temporal properties of the ANF response to both monophasic and biphasic stimuli, in isolation. The main contribution of the model lies in its ability to reproduce statistics of the ANF response (mean latency, jitter, and firing probability) under both monophasic and cathodic-anodic biphasic stimulation, without changing the model's parameters. The response statistics of the model depend on stimulus level and duration of the stimulating pulse, reproducing trends observed in the ANF. In the case of biphasic stimulation, the model reproduces the effects of pseudomonophasic pulse shapes and also the dependence on the interphase gap (IPG) of the stimulus pulse, an effect that is quantitatively reproduced. The model is fitted to ANF data using a procedure that uniquely determines each model parameter. It is thus possible to rapidly parameterize a large population of neurons to reproduce a given set of response statistic distributions. Our work extends the stochastic leaky integrate and fire (SLIF) neuron, a well-studied phenomenological model of the electrically stimulated neuron. We extend the SLIF neuron so as to produce a realistic latency distribution by delaying the moment of spiking. During this delay, spiking may be abolished by anodic current. By this means, the probability of the model neuron responding to a stimulus is reduced when a trailing phase of opposite polarity is introduced. By introducing a minimum wait period that must elapse before a spike may be emitted, the model is able to reproduce the differences in the threshold level observed in the ANF for monophasic and biphasic stimuli. Thus, the ANF response to a large variety of pulse shapes are reproduced correctly by this model.

  2. Central modulation in cluster headache patients treated with occipital nerve stimulation: an FDG-PET study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laureys Steven

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS has raised new hope for drug-resistant chronic cluster headache (drCCH, a devastating condition. However its mode of action remains elusive. Since the long delay to meaningful effect suggests that ONS induces slow neuromodulation, we have searched for changes in central pain-control areas using metabolic neuroimaging. Methods Ten drCCH patients underwent an 18FDG-PET scan after ONS, at delays varying between 0 and 30 months. All were scanned with ongoing ONS (ON and with the stimulator switched OFF. Results After 6-30 months of ONS, 3 patients were pain free and 4 had a ≥ 90% reduction of attack frequency (responders. In all patients compared to controls, several areas of the pain matrix showed hypermetabolism: ipsilateral hypothalamus, midbrain and ipsilateral lower pons. All normalized after ONS, except for the hypothalamus. Switching the stimulator ON or OFF had little influence on brain glucose metabolism. The perigenual anterior cingulate cortex (PACC was hyperactive in ONS responders compared to non-responders. Conclusions Metabolic normalization in the pain neuromatrix and lack of short-term changes induced by the stimulation might support the hypothesis that ONS acts in drCCH through slow neuromodulatory processes. Selective activation in responders of PACC, a pivotal structure in the endogenous opioid system, suggests that ONS could restore balance within dysfunctioning pain control centres. That ONS is nothing but a symptomatic treatment might be illustrated by the persistent hypothalamic hypermetabolism, which could explain why autonomic attacks may persist despite pain relief and why cluster attacks recur shortly after stimulator arrest. PET studies on larger samples are warranted to confirm these first results.

  3. Quantification of the impact of vagus nerve stimulation parameters on electroencephalographic measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewernitz, Michael; Ghacibeh, Georges; Seref, Onur; Pardalos, Panos M.; Liu, Chang-Chia; Uthman, Basim

    2007-11-01

    This study presents an application of support vector machines (SVMs) to the analysis of electroencephalograms (EEG) obtained from the scalp of patients with epilepsy implanted with the vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) used in VNS Therapy®. The purpose of this study is to devise a physiologic marker using scalp EEG for determining optimal VNS parameters. Scalp EEG recordings were obtained from six patients with history of intractable partial onset epilepsy treated with VNS as adjunctive therapy to medicines. Averaged scalp EEG samples were used as features for separation. SVM classification accuracy was used as a measure of EEG similarity to separate a time segment during the beginning of stimulation from all the successive non-overlapping time segments within a full VNS on/off cycle. This analysis was performed for all the automated VNS cycles occurring during approximately twenty-four hours of 25 channels of scalp EEG. The patient that resulted in the lowest degree of EEG pattern similarity had the highest VNS stimulation frequency and experienced a monthly seizure rate among the lowest of all six patients included in this study The patient with the greatest degree of pattern similarity had the lowest VNS stimulation frequency, shortest VNS pulse width, and experienced the greatest monthly seizure rate of all six patients included in this study. It is possible that VNS exerts its therapeutic effect by mimicking a theorized seizure effect for which a seizure has been observed to "reset" the brain from an unfavorable preictal state to a more favorable interictal state. These encouraging results suggest that data mining tools may be able to extract EEG patterns which could be used as an electrographic marker of optimal VNS stimulation parameters.

  4. Topographical effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the H-reflex of the triceps surae muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, C; Arsenault, A B; Bourbonnais, D; Levin, M F

    1994-01-01

    The present study was conducted on eight normal subjects in order to evaluate the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS); 99 Hz, 250 μs pulse duration, applied over either the common peroneal (CPN) or sural nerve, on the H-reflex of the soleus (SO), gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) muscles. Within each session, SO, GL and GM H-reflexes were recorded before (for 5 min), during (for 30 min) and after (for 10 min) TENS was applied at twice the sensory threshold for perception. It was found that, on average, while the stimulation was administered on the CPN: (a) the GL H-reflex amplitude increased by 40% (Friedman test: χ(2) = 11.71, P sural nerve were found on any of the investigated muscles. The finding of increased H-reflex amplitudes in GL during TENS made it less likely that CPN stimulation had reciprocal inhibitory effects. However, such an increase could be attributed to a selective effect (such as a decrease in the recruitment threshold) on type II motoneurons of the GL. Furthermore, the topographical effects observed on the GL during TENS may reflect selective local effects due to stimulation of a sensory branch of the CPN, the lateral sural nerve, which mainly innervates the skin overlying the GL. The absence of effects noted on the GM during TENS further supports this hypothesis as the cutaneous afferents overlying that muscle were not stimulated. The repetitive cutaneous stimulation over the sural nerve, at the lateral malleolus, may have been too distal to stimulate the cutaneous receptors overlying the SO.

  5. Clinical application of peroneal nerve stimulator system using percutaneous intramuscular electrodes for correction of foot drop in hemiplegic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoichi; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Misawa, Akiko; Ando, Shigeru; Itoi, Eiji; Konishi, Natsuo

    2006-10-01

    Objective.  To assess the orthotic effect of a functional electrical stimulation device (Akita Heel Sensor System; AHSS) in the treatment of hemiplegic gait with foot drop. Materials and Methods.  In the AHSS, a heel sensor is attached to a small plastic heel brace, and the peroneal nerve is stimulated via percutaneous intramuscular electrodes. During the swing phase of the hemiplegic gait, the common peroneal nerve is stimulated by the AHSS. Eight patients in chronic stages of hemiplegia participated in this study. Walking speeds and step cadences on a 10-m course were compared between walking with stimulation and walking without stimulation. Results.  Mean walking speed (± SD) was 0.50 ± 0.26 m/sec without stimulation and 0.64 ± 0.31 m/sec with stimulation. The mean percentage increase in walking speed with stimulation was 30.1%. Mean step cadence was 31 ± 7 steps/10 m without stimulation and 27 ± 7 steps/10 m with stimulation. By correcting foot drop, the AHSS significantly increased walking speed and decreased cadence (p AHSS can significantly improve walking in hemiplegic patients with foot drop.

  6. A controlled trial of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihua, Liu; Lu, Song; Liping, Li; Xiuru, Wang; Hua, Lin; Yuping, Wang

    2014-10-01

    This study explored the efficacy and safety of transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (t-VNS) in patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. A total of 60 patients were randomly divided into two groups based on the stimulation zone: the Ramsay-Hunt zone (treatment group) and the earlobe (control group). Before and after the 12-month treatment period, all patients completed the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale (LSSS), and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31). Seizure frequency was determined according to the patient's seizure diary. During our study, the antiepileptic drugs were maintained at a constant level in all subjects. After 12 months, the monthly seizure frequency was lower in the treatment group than in the control group (8.0 to 4.0; P=0.003). This reduction in seizure frequency was correlated with seizure frequency at baseline and duration of epilepsy (both P>0.05). Additionally, all patients showed improved SAS, SDS, LSSS, and QOLIE-31 scores that were not correlated with a reduction in seizure frequency. The side effects in the treatment group were dizziness (1 case) and daytime drowsiness (3 cases), which could be relieved by reducing the stimulation intensity. In the control group, compared with baseline, there were no significant changes in seizure frequency (P=0.397), SAS, SDS, LESS, or QOLIE-31. There were also no complications in this group.

  7. Device development guided by user satisfaction survey on auricular vagus nerve stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampusch Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of wearable point-of-care medical devices faces many challenges. Besides technological and clinical issues, demands on robustness, miniaturization, and user interface design are of paramount importance. However, a systematic assessment of these non-functional but essential requirements is often impossible within the first product cycle. Later, surveys on user satisfaction with existing devices and user demands can offer significant input for device re-development and improvement. In this paper, we present a survey on satisfaction with and demands for a wearable medical device for percutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (pVNS. We analyzed 36 responses from patients treated with pVNS and five responses from experienced physicians in order to devise a future concept of pVNS. Main shortcomings of a current pVNS device were identified to be lacking water resistance and mechanical robustness, both impairing daily activities. Painful sensation during pVNS application, unwanted side effects like skin irritations and strongly varying perception of the stimulation were reported. Results urge for more patient self-governance and an (automatic adjustment of the stimulation to the current physiological state of the patient. Attained results support a strategic approach for future developments of pVNS towards personalized health care.

  8. Treatment of peritendinitis calcarea of the shoulder by transcutaneous nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaada, B

    1984-01-01

    Low-frequency transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS) is known to produce pain relief as well as widespread and prolonged increases in micro-circulation in the skin and other organs. Such stimulation has further been shown to eliminate skin calcium deposits in systemic sclerosis. The present study tested the effects of TNS on clinical symptoms in peritendinitis calcarea of the shoulder and the possibility that this procedure could eliminate calcium deposits in this disease. Ten patients with 14 calcareous shoulders received TNS-treatment with a follow-up time of 3-10 months. Two of these were classified as acute, 9 as chronic, and 3 as asymptomatic. Great relief of pain and of restricted mobility was encountered in 10 of the 11 symptomatic shoulders one week or two after the onset of daily stimulation with subsequent progressive improvement of residual complaints during the following weeks. There was one relapse after 2 months' freedom of pain. Calcium deposits persisted in the 3 asymptomatic shoulders, but was completely eliminated or greatly reduced in 7 of the 11 symptomatic ones. Comparison is made with reported untreated series. Even if most shoulders with calcified peritendinitis will spontaneously improve in time, TNS-treatment shortens the period of incapacitation and discomfort, secures freedom of pain, and allows earlier mobilization. It may thus represent an alternative method to other therapeutic procedures, such as roentgen irradiation and injection of anesthetics and hydrocortisone, in this disabling disorder.

  9. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soo Ryang Kim; Fumio Kanda; Hiroshi Kobessho; Koji Sugimoto; Toshiyuki Matsuoka; Masatoshi Kudo; Yoshitake Hayashi

    2006-01-01

    We describe a rare case of HCV-related recurrent multiple hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasizing to the skull base involving multiple cranial nerves in a 50-yearold woman. The patient presented with symptoms of ptosis, fixation of the right eyeball, and left abducens palsy, indicating disturbances of the right oculomotor and trochlear nerves and bilateral abducens nerves. Brain contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) revealed an ill-defined mass with abnormal enhancement around the sella turcica. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)disclosed that the mass involved the clivus, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex. On contrast-enhanced MRI with gadolinium-chelated contrast medium, the mass showed inhomogeneous intermediate enhancement.The diagnosis of metastatic HCC to the skull base was made on the basis of neurological findings and imaging studies including CT and MRI, without histological examinations. Further studies may provide insights into various methods for diagnosing HCC metastasizing to the craniospinal area.

  10. Vagus nerve stimulation increases energy expenditure: relation to brown adipose tissue activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy H E J Vijgen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human brown adipose tissue (BAT activity is inversely related to obesity and positively related to energy expenditure. BAT is highly innervated and it is suggested the vagus nerve mediates peripheral signals to the central nervous system, there connecting to sympathetic nerves that innervate BAT. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS is used for refractory epilepsy, but is also reported to generate weight loss. We hypothesize VNS increases energy expenditure by activating BAT. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fifteen patients with stable vns therapy (age: 45 ± 10 yrs; body mass index; 25.2 ± 3.5 kg/m(2 were included between January 2011 and June 2012. Ten subjects were measured twice, once with active and once with inactivated VNS. Five other subjects were measured twice, once with active VNS at room temperature and once with active VNS under cold exposure in order to determine maximal cold-induced BAT activity. BAT activity was assessed by 18-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose-Positron-Emission-Tomography-and-Computed-Tomography. Basal metabolic rate (BMR was significantly higher when VNS was turned on (mean change; +2.2%. Mean BAT activity was not significantly different between active VNS and inactive VNS (BAT SUV(Mean; 0.55 ± 0.25 versus 0.67 ± 0.46, P = 0.619. However, the change in energy expenditure upon VNS intervention (On-Off was significantly correlated to the change in BAT activity (r = 0.935, P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: VNS significantly increases energy expenditure. The observed change in energy expenditure was significantly related to the change in BAT activity. This suggests a role for BAT in the VNS increase in energy expenditure. Chronic VNS may have a beneficial effect on the human energy balance that has potential application for weight management therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was registered in the Clinical Trial Register under the ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01491282.

  11. Feasibility, repeatability, and safety of ultrasound-guided stimulation of the first cervical nerve at the alar foramen in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mespoulhès-Rivière, Céline; Brandenberger, Olivier; Rossignol, Fabrice; Robert, Céline; Perkins, Justin D; Marie, Jean-Paul; Ducharme, Norm

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop and assess the feasibility, repeatability, and safety of an ultrasound-guided technique to stimulate the first cervical nerve (FCN) at the level of the alar foramen of the atlas of horses. ANIMALS 4 equine cadavers and 6 clinically normal Standardbreds. PROCEDURES In each cadaver, the FCN pathway was determined by dissection, and any anastomosis between the first and second cervical nerves was identified. Subsequently, each of 6 live horses underwent a bilateral ultrasound-guided stimulation of the FCN at the alar foramen 3 times at 3-week intervals. After each procedure, horses were examined daily for 5 days. RESULTS In each cadaver, the FCN passed through the alar foramen; a communicating branch between the FCN and the accessory nerve and anastomoses between the ventral branches of the FCN and second cervical nerve were identified. The anastomoses were located in the upper third of the FCN pathway between the wing of the atlas and the nerve's entry in the omohyoideus muscle. Successful ultrasound-guided electrical stimulation was confirmed by twitching of the ipsilateral omohyoideus muscle in all 6 live horses; this finding was observed bilaterally during each of the 3 experimental sessions. No complications developed at the site of stimulation. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that ultrasound-guided stimulation of the FCN at the alar foramen appears to be a safe and straightforward procedure in horses. The procedure may have potential for use in horses with naturally occurring recurrent laryngeal neuropathy to assess reinnervation after FCN transplantation or nerve-muscle pedicle implantation in the cricoarytenoideus dorsalis muscle.

  12. The effect of loco-regional anaesthesia on motor activity induced by direct stimulation of the sciatic nerve in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, A P; Michou, J N

    2016-03-01

    A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents. Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P = 0.31 sciatic site, P = 0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P = 0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia.

  13. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders.

  14. Early and continued manual stimulation is required for long-term recovery after facial nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosheva, Maria; Rink, Svenja; Jansen, Ramona; Bendella, Habib; Pavlov, Stoyan P; Sarikcioglu, Levent; Angelov, Doychin N; Dunlop, Sarah A

    2017-02-18

    We previously have shown that manual stimulation (MS) of vibrissal muscles for 2 months after facial nerve injury in rats improves whisking and reduces motor end plate polyinnervation. Here, we seek to determine whether discontinuing or delaying MS after facial-facial anastomosis (FFA) leads to similar results. Rats were subjected to FFA and received MS for (1) 4 months (early and continued), (2) the first but not the last 2 months (discontinued), or (3) the last 2 months (delayed). Intact animals and those not receiving MS (no MS) were also examined. Early and continued MS restored whisking amplitude to 43°, a value significantly higher compared with the discontinued, delayed, and no MS groups (32°, 24°, and 10°, respectively). Motor end plate polyinnervation occurred in all experimental groups but was significantly higher in the delayed group. Early and continued MS results in better recovery than when it is either discontinued or delayed. Muscle Nerve, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effects of Afferent Stimulation of the Lingual Nerve on Gastrointestinal Motility in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto,Masaharu

    1987-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of afferent stimulation of the lingual nerve (LNAS on gastrointestinal motility and the reflex pathways which mediate the response to LNAS were investigated in rats. LNAS induced excitatory, inhibitory or biphasic responses in the stomach, duodenum and proximal colon. These responses continued after bilateral vagotomy, but were abolished after additional bilateral splanchnicotomy or transection of the spinal cord between Th4 and Th5. The inhibitory, excitatory and biphasic responses induced by LNAS were not affected by decerebration. Both after administration of atropine (0.2 mg/kg, i.v. and guanethidine (3-5 mg/kg, i.v., LNAS-induced excitatory and inhibitory responses were abolished in most cases, but the slight inhibitory response in the stomach and duodenum to LNAS remained in a few cases. These results suggest that the reflex centers which cause LNAS-induced excitatory and inhibitory responses are located in the dorsal nucleus of vagus and that the reflex pathways include the vagus and splanchnic nerves.

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNST) in epilepsy - implications for dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowska, P; Daly, B

    2012-01-27

    Epilepsy is a chronic condition which affects about 1% of the population. It is important that the dental team is aware of the management of epileptic seizures and epileptic syndromes including recent advances in seizure management. As people with epilepsy often get a warning aura before seizures begin, the management of the condition has increasingly involved measures to prevent the seizure, once the aura has begun. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy (VNST) in epilepsy involves the use of an implantable electronic device and is being increasingly used in the UK to control severe treatment resistant epilepsy. As a result, more patients will be presented to clinicians in the primary healthcare setting and hospital services with these devices in place. Members of the dental team need to understand the principles of epilepsy control, how VNST is used in the management of intractable epilepsy, how the VNST system operates and the implications of VNST use for dental practice including medical devices, interactions and safety features.

  17. Evoked potentials elicited by stimulation of the lateral and anterior femoral cutaneous nerves in meralgia paresthetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordato, Dennis J; Yiannikas, Con; Stroud, Jill; Halpern, Jean-Pierre; Schwartz, Raymond S; Akbunar, Mehmet; Cook, Melissa

    2004-01-01

    Seventy-five consecutive patients with clinical symptoms and signs of meralgia paresthetica underwent bilateral somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) studies involving stimulation of skin areas innervated by the lateral and anterior femoral cutaneous nerves of the thighs. The most common abnormality was an absolute lateral femoral cutaneous SEP latency > 40 ms in 35 patients (47%), followed by an absent response in 14 patients (19%), an absolute latency 50% compared with the contralateral response in 8 patients (11%), and an absolute latency 5 ms interside latency difference in 5 patients (7%). Anterior femoral cutaneous SEPs were of value in distinguishing meralgia paresthetica from a proximal lumbar radiculopathy in an additional 4 patients and confirming bilateral meralgia paresthetica in 10 patients.

  18. The therapeutic dilemma of vagus nerve stimulator-induced sleep disordered breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Hinesh; Bhat, Sushanth; Gupta, Divya; Mulvey, Martha; Ming, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can reduce the frequency of seizures in patients with refractory epilepsy, but can affect respiration in sleep. Untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can worsen seizure frequency. Unfortunately, OSA and VNS-induced sleep disordered breathing (SDB) may occur in the same patient, leading to a therapeutic dilemma. We report a pediatric patient in whom OSA improved after tonsillectomy, but coexistent VNS-induced SDB persisted. With decrease in VNS output current, patient's SDB improved, but seizure activity exacerbated, which required a return to the original settings. Continuous positive airway pressure titration was attempted, which showed only a partial improvement in apnea–hypopnea index. This case illustrates the need for clinicians to balance seizure control and SDB in patients with VNS. PMID:27168865

  19. Rates and Predictors of Seizure Freedom With Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Intractable Epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englot, Dario J; Rolston, John D; Wright, Clinton W; Hassnain, Kevin H; Chang, Edward F

    2016-09-01

    Neuromodulation-based treatments have become increasingly important in epilepsy treatment. Most patients with epilepsy treated with neuromodulation do not achieve complete seizure freedom, and, therefore, previous studies of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy have focused instead on reduction of seizure frequency as a measure of treatment response. To elucidate rates and predictors of seizure freedom with VNS. We examined 5554 patients from the VNS therapy Patient Outcome Registry, and also performed a systematic review of the literature including 2869 patients across 78 studies. Registry data revealed a progressive increase over time in seizure freedom after VNS therapy. Overall, 49% of patients responded to VNS therapy 0 to 4 months after implantation (≥50% reduction seizure frequency), with 5.1% of patients becoming seizure-free, while 63% of patients were responders at 24 to 48 months, with 8.2% achieving seizure freedom. On multivariate analysis, seizure freedom was predicted by age of epilepsy onset >12 years (odds ratio [OR], 1.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38-2.58), and predominantly generalized seizure type (OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01-1.82), while overall response to VNS was predicted by nonlesional epilepsy (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.06-1.81). Systematic literature review results were consistent with the registry analysis: At 0 to 4 months, 40.0% of patients had responded to VNS, with 2.6% becoming seizure-free, while at last follow-up, 60.1% of individuals were responders, with 8.0% achieving seizure freedom. Response and seizure freedom rates increase over time with VNS therapy, although complete seizure freedom is achieved in a small percentage of patients. AED, antiepileptic drugVNS, vagus nerve stimulation.

  20. Hyposensitivity to nerve stimulation in portal hypertensive rats: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, C C; Sumanovski, L T; Moll-Kaufmann, C; Stalder, G A

    1997-11-01

    Portal hypertension goes along with vascular hyporeactivity, partly mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Interactions between the adrenergic nervous system and NO in portal hypertension are undetermined. We tested (1) whether superior mesenteric arterial beds of portal hypertensive rats have an altered sensitivity to periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) and (2) the role of NO in modulating nerve-stimulated responses. Vasopressor responses to PNS (Hz, 2-32) were similar in preparations of partial portal vein-ligated (PVL, n = 12) and control (CON, n = 12) rats (60.0 +/- 6.7 and 47.8 +/- 6.1 CmH2O respectively) for 24 Hz (NS), but sensitivity of vessels of portal hypertensive animals displayed a significant rightward shift [Hz needed for 50% of maximal response (HZ50) being 15.5 +/- 0.4 and 12.9 +/- 0.6 for PVL and CON respectively, P < 0.001]. NO formation inhibition by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (10(-4) mol L-1) significantly increased responses to PNS (P < 0.05), the absolute values for 24 Hz being 101.4 +/- 11.7 cmH2O for PVL (n = 8) and 86.4 +/- 11.4 cmH2O for CON (n = 7) (NS). NO formation inhibition reversed the hyposensitivity in preparations of PVL, Hz50 being 13.9 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.2 for PVL and CON respectively (NS). Adrenergic receptor antagonism with prazosin (10(-7) mol L-1) and yohimbine (10(-6) mol L-1) inhibited PNS-mediated vasopressor reactivity (n = 6 per group, P < 0.001), confirming the nervous origin of vasoconstrictor responses. It is concluded that (1) portal hypertension goes along with a significant hyposensitivity to PNS and (2) this hyposensitivity is reversed by NO-formation inhibition

  1. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the treatment of patients with poststroke urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo ZF

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Zhui-feng Guo,1,* Yi Liu,2,* Guang-hui Hu,1 Huan Liu,1 Yun-fei Xu11Department of Urology, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To investigate the therapeutic effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS on poststroke urinary incontinence (UI.Patients and methods: Sixty-one patients with poststroke UI were enrolled at the Neurology Department in the Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University between January 2010–January 2011 and were divided into treatment and control groups (n=32 and n=29, respectively. TENS was applied to the treatment group, while the control group received basic therapy. The therapeutic group completed the whole set of TENS therapy with a treatment frequency of 30 minutes once a day for 60 days. The positive electrode was placed on the second lumbar spinous process, and the negative electrodes were inside the middle and lower third of the junction between the posterior superior iliac spine and ischia node. The overactive bladder symptom score, Barthel Index, and urodynamics examination were estimated before and after therapy in both groups.Results: The daily micturition, nocturia, urgent urination, and urge UI in the treatment group significantly improved compared to the control group (P<0.05. The patients in the treatment group were superior in the self-care ability of daily living and also had an advantage over the indexes on maximum cystometry volume, flow rate, and the pressure of detrusor in the end of the filling phase.Conclusion: TENS improved incontinence symptoms, enhanced the quality of life, and decreased adverse effects; hence, it is recommended in treating poststroke UI.Keywords: stroke, urinary incontinence, OABSS, Barthel Index, urodynamics, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

  2. Long-term outcome in occipital nerve stimulation patients with medically intractable primary headache disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ann Chang; Trentman, Terrence L; Ivancic, Michael G; Vargas, Bert B; Rebecca, Alanna M; Zimmerman, Richard S; Rosenfeld, David M; Dodick, David W

    2013-01-01

    €‚ Occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) may provide relief for refractory headache disorders. However, scant data exist regarding long-€term ONS outcomes. €‚ The methods used were retrospective review of the medical records of all (nonindustry study) patients who were trialed and implanted with occipital nerve stimulator systems at our institution, followed by a phone interview. Up to three attempts were made to contact each patient, and those who were contacted were given the opportunity to participate in a brief phone interview regarding their ONS experience. Data for analysis were gleaned from both the phone interview and the patient's medical records. €‚ Twenty-nine patients underwent a trial of ONS during the 8.5-€year study period. Three patients did not go on to permanent implant, 12 could not be contacted, and 14 participated in the phone interview. Based upon the phone interview (if the patient was contacted) or chart review, ONS was deemed successful in five of the 12 migraine, four of the five cluster headache, and five of the eight miscellaneous headache patients, and therapy was documented as long as 102 months. In one of the 26 patients, success of ONS could not be determined. Among patients deemed to have successful outcomes, headache frequency decreased by 18%, severity by 27%, and migraine disability score by 50%. Fifty-€eight percent of patients required at least one lead revision. €‚ These results, although limited by their retrospective nature, suggest that ONS can be effective long term despite technical challenges. The number of patients within each headache subtype was insufficient to draw conclusions regarding the differential effect of ONS. €‚ Randomized controlled long-€term studies in specific, intractable, primary headache disorders are indicated. © 2012 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Immediate effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping Ho Chung, Bryan; Kam Kwan Cheng, Benson

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the immediate effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on spasticity in patients with spinal cord injury. Randomized controlled trial. Extended rehabilitation centre. Eighteen subjects with spinal cord injury and symptoms of spasticity over lower limbs were randomly assigned to receive either 60 minutes of active TENS (0.25 ms, 100 Hz, 15 mA) or 60 minutes of placebo non-electrically stimulated TENS over the common peroneal nerve. Composite Spasticity Score was used to assess the spasticity level of ankle plantar flexors immediately before and after TENS application. Composite Spasticity Score consisted of Achilles tendon jerks, resistance to full-range passive ankle dorsiflexion and ankle clonus. Between-group statistical differences of reduction of Composite Spasticity Score, Achilles tendon jerks, resistance to full-range passive ankle dorsiflexion and ankle clonus were calculated using the Mann-Whitney test. Within-group statistical differences of Composite Spasticity Score, Achilles tendon jerks, resistance to full-range passive ankle dorsiflexion and ankle clonus were calculated using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Significant reductions were shown in Composite Spasticity Score by 29.5% (p = 0.017), resistance to full-range passive ankle dorsiflexion by 31.0% (p = 0.024) and ankle clonus by 29.6% (p = 0.023) in the TENS group but these reductions were not found in the placebo TENS group. The between-group differences of both Composite Spasticity Score and resistance to full-range passive ankle dorsiflexion were significant (p = 0.027 and p = 0.024, respectively). This study showed that a single session of TENS could immediately reduce spasticity.

  4. Long-term changes in sleep and electroencephalographic activity by chronic vagus nerve stimulation in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Cruz, Alejandro; Magdaleno-Madrigal, Victor M; Martínez-Vargas, David; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador

    2008-04-01

    We previously reported the effect of vagus nerve electrical stimulation (VNS) on sleep and behavior in cats. The aim of the present study is to analyze the long-term effects of VNS on the electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum and on the different stages of the sleep-wakefulness cycle in the freely moving cat. To achieve this, six male cats were implanted with electrodes on the left vagal nerve and submitted to 15 rounds of 23 h continuous sleep recordings in three categories: baseline (BL), VNS and post-stimulus recording (PSR). The following parameters were analyzed: EEG power spectrum, total time and number of sleep phases, ponto-geniculo-occipital (PGO) wave density of the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and the number of times the narcoleptic reflex was present (sudden transition from wakefulness to REM sleep). Significant changes were detected, such as an enhancement of slow-wave sleep (SWS) stage II; a power increase in the bands corresponding to sleep spindles (8-14 Hz) and delta waves (1-4 Hz) with VNS and PSR; an increase in the total time, number of stages, and density of PGO wave in REM sleep with VNS; a decrease of wakefulness in PSR, and the eventual appearance of the narcoleptic reflex with VNS. The results show that the effect of the VNS changes during different stages of the sleep-wakefulness cycle. In REM sleep, the effect was present only during VNS, while the SWS II was affected beyond VNS periods. This suggests that ponto-medullar and thalamic mechanisms of slow EEG activity may be due to plastic changes elicited by vagal stimulation.

  5. Slow Repetitive Nerve Stimulation in Patients with Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning after Clinical Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheera Jayasinghe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged inhibition of acetylcholine esterase may lead to the intermediate syndrome. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ dysfunction has been shown with repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. Subclinical NMJ dysfunction may also occur. We aimed to examine the NMJ function following acute organophosphorus (OP poisoning by using exercise modified slow RNS. Methods: A cohort study was conducted with matched controls. Patients with acute OP poisoning were enrolled. NMJ function, muscle power and tendon reflexes were assessed at discharge and six weeks after exposure. NMJ function was assessed with exercise modified supramaximal slow RNS of the median nerve. Results: There were 68 patients and 71 controls. Mean (SD age of patients and controls were 32 (12 and 33 (12 years. In some particular amplitude, the decrement response was statistically significant. They were decrement response at rest, at fourth amplitude (95% CI: -0.2 to -2.7 and two minutes post-exercise at fourth and fifth amplitudes (95% CI: -0.8 to -5, -1 to -5 respectively in the second assessment compared to controls, decrement response at rest at fourth and fifth amplitudes (95% CI: -4 to -0.5, -3.9 to -0.01 respectively and two minutes post-exercise at fourth amplitude (95% CI: -5 to -0.8 in the second assessment compared to the first assessment. Patients in the first assessment and controls showed more than 8% decrement response either to the second, fourth or fifth stimuli in seven and five occasions respectively. Conclusion:  There was no significant neuromuscular junction dysfunction assessed by exercise modified slow repetitive stimulation following acute exposure to OP. Since, NMJ dysfunctions are likely to occur following OP poisoning, other electrodiagnostic modalities such as SF-EMG are probably more efficient to assess these abnormalities.

  6. Effects of Simultaneously Applied Short-Term Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Tactile Stimulation on Memory and Affective Behaviour of Patients with Probable Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scherder

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies beneficial effects of peripheral electrical or tactile nerve stimulation were observed on memory and affective behaviour in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, it was investigated whether electrical and tactile stimulation applied simultaneously to Alzheimer patients would exceed the effects which were observed following treatment by each type of stimulation separately. Our data reveal that the simultaneous application of the two types of stimulation had a beneficial effect on non-verbal and verbal long-term recognition memory. In addition, patients who were treated participated more in activities of daily living, and were more interested in social contacts. In spite of these positive results, comparisons with those of previous studies suggest that a combination of electrical and tactile stimulation does not yield more effects than application of each type of stimulation separately.

  7. Repair of multiple cervical root avulsion with sural nerve graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Sanford P C; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Huang, Ming-Chao; Chuang, Tien-Yow; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Pei-Hsin; Lee, Liang-Shong; Cheng, Henrich

    2004-09-01

    To obtain easier access to avulsed roots in the intradural space for patients suffering cervical root avulsion, the authors of this study developed a novel repair method. This involves using nerve grafts to bridge corresponding segments of the spinal cord and the trunk or cord level of the plexus, respectively, in two surgical stages. All eight patients admitted to this study received pre- and post-operative workups of electrophysiological evaluations and muscle power grading through Medical Research Council (MRC) scores. The degrees of impairment were also graded according to a modified version of Dumitru's and Wilbourn's scale (mild = 1; moderate = 2; severe = 3). The preoperative versus post-operative differences in the severity of the injuries and in the grading of the target muscle power were calculated according to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The preoperative degree of the severity of the injuries, as measured by electromyography (EMG), was 3.00 +/- 0.00 (mean +/- S.D.). The post-operative result was 2.125 +/- 0.641. Significant change took place after repair (P = 0.0313). Moreover, although little improvement was observed in the triceps, brachioradialis (BR), extensor carpi radialis (ECR), flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) and intrinsic hand muscles, the MRC grading showed significant yet not prominent motor recovery in the deltoid and biceps brachii (both P = 0.0313). We were impressed that the initial significant statistical results of differences in pre- and post-operative severity of the injuries and muscle power grading, demonstrated that regeneration does occur with this repair strategy.

  8. Single session of brief electrical stimulation immediately following crush injury enhances functional recovery of rat facial nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen M. Foecking, PhD

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries lead to a variety of pathological conditions, including paresis or paralysis when the injury involves motor axons. We have been studying ways to enhance the regeneration of peripheral nerves using daily electrical stimulation (ES following a facial nerve crush injury. In our previous studies, ES was not initiated until 24 h after injury. The current experiment tested whether ES administered immediately following the crush injury would further decrease the time for complete recovery from facial paralysis. Rats received a unilateral facial nerve crush injury and an electrode was positioned on the nerve proximal to the crush site. Animals received daily 30 min sessions of ES for 1 d (day of injury only, 2 d, 4 d, 7 d, or daily until complete functional recovery. Untreated animals received no ES. Animals were observed daily for the return of facial function. Our findings demonstrated that one session of ES was as effective as daily stimulation at enhancing the recovery of most functional parameters. Therefore, the use of a single 30 min session of ES as a possible treatment strategy should be studied in human patients with paralysis as a result of acute nerve injuries.

  9. Sacral nerve stimulation enhances early intestinal mucosal repair following mucosal injury in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brégeon, Jérémy; Coron, Emmanuel; Da Silva, Anna Christina Cordeiro; Jaulin, Julie; Aubert, Philippe; Chevalier, Julien; Vergnolle, Nathalie; Meurette, Guillaume; Neunlist, Michel

    2016-08-01

    Reducing intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions is recognized as being of major therapeutic interest for various intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability. Here, we report in a pig model that SNS enhances morphological and functional recovery of IEB following mucosal injury induced via 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. These effects are associated with an increased expression of tight junction proteins such as ZO-1 and FAK. These results establish that SNS enhances intestinal barrier repair in acute mucosal injury. They further set the scientific basis for future use of SNS as a complementary or alternative therapeutic option for the treatment of gut disorders with IEB dysfunctions such as inflammatory bowel diseases or irritable bowel syndrome. Intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) dysfunctions, such as increased permeability or altered healing, are central to intestinal disorders. Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is known to reduce IEB permeability, but its ability to modulate IEB repair remains unknown. This study aimed to characterize the impact of SNS on mucosal repair following 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced lesions. Six pigs were stimulated by SNS 3 h prior to and 3 h after TNBS enema, while sham animals (n = 8) were not stimulated. The impact of SNS on mucosal changes was evaluated by combining in vivo imaging, histological and functional methods. Biochemical and transcriptomic approaches were used to analyse the IEB and mucosal inflammatory response. We observed that SNS enhanced the recovery from TNBS-induced increase in transcellular permeability. At 24 h, TNBS-induced alterations of mucosal morphology were significantly less in SNS compared with sham animals. SNS reduced TNBS-induced changes in ZO-1 expression and its epithelial pericellular distribution, and also increased pFAK/FAK expression compared with sham. Interestingly, SNS increased the mucosal density of neutrophils

  10. Immediate electrical stimulation enhances regeneration and reinnervation and modulates spinal plastic changes after sciatic nerve injury and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivó, Meritxell; Puigdemasa, Antoni; Casals, Laura; Asensio, Elena; Udina, Esther; Navarro, Xavier

    2008-05-01

    We have studied whether electrical stimulation immediately after nerve injury may enhance axonal regeneration and modulate plastic changes at the spinal cord level underlying the appearance of hyperreflexia. Two groups of adult rats were subjected to sciatic nerve section followed by suture repair. One group (ES) received electrical stimulation (3 V, 0.1 ms at 20 Hz) for 1 h after injury. A second group served as control (C). Nerve conduction, H reflex, motor evoked potentials, and algesimetry tests were performed at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after surgery, to assess muscle reinnervation and changes in excitability of spinal cord circuitry. The electrophysiological results showed higher levels of reinnervation, and histological results a significantly higher number of regenerated myelinated fibers in the distal tibial nerve in group ES in comparison with group C. The monosynaptic H reflex was facilitated in the injured limb, to a higher degree in group C than in group ES. The amplitudes of motor evoked potentials were similar in both groups, although the MEP/M ratio was increased in group C compared to group ES, indicating mild central motor hyperexcitability. Immunohistochemical labeling of sensory afferents in the spinal cord dorsal horn showed prevention of the reduction in expression of substance P at one month postlesion in group ES. In conclusion, brief electrical stimulation applied after sciatic nerve injury promotes axonal regeneration over a long distance and reduces facilitation of spinal motor responses.

  11. Differential cardiac responses to unilateral sympathetic nerve stimulation in the isolated innervated rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, James; Tanko, Abdul Samed; Brack, Kieran E; Coote, John H; Ng, G André

    2012-01-26

    The heart receives both a left and right sympathetic innervation. Currently there is no description of an in vitro whole heart preparation for comparing the influence of each sympathetic supply on cardiac function. The aim was to establish the viability of using an in vitro model to investigate the effects of left and right sympathetic chain stimulation (LSS/RSS). For this purpose the upper sympathetic chain on each side was isolated and bipolar stimulating electrodes were attached between T2-T3 and electrically insulated from surrounding tissue in a Langendorff innervated rabbit heart preparation (n=8). Heart rate (HR) was investigated during sinus rhythm, whilst dromotropic, inotropic and ventricular electrophysiological effects were measured during constant pacing (250 bpm). All responses exhibited linear increases with increases in stimulation frequency (2-10 Hz). The change in HR was larger during RSS than LSS (P<0.01), increasing by 78±9 bpm and 49±8 bpm respectively (10 Hz, baseline; 145±7 bpm). Left ventricular pressure was increased from a baseline of 50±4 mmHg, by 22±5 mmHg (LSS, 10 Hz) and 4±1 mmHg (RSS, 10 Hz) respectively (P<0.001). LSS, but not RSS, caused a shortening of basal and apical monophasic action potential duration (MAPD90). We demonstrate that RSS exerts a greater effect at the sinoatrial node and LSS at the left ventricle. The study confirms previous experiments on dogs and cats, provides quantitative data on the comparative influence of right and left sympathetic nerves and demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and stimulating the ipsilateral cardiac sympathetic supply in an in vitro innervated rabbit heart preparation.

  12. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan;

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  13. Plasticity of urinary bladder reflexes evoked by stimulation of pudendal afferent nerves after chronic spinal cord injury in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Changfeng; Chen, Mang; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Liu, Hailong; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C

    2011-03-01

    Bladder reflexes evoked by stimulation of pudendal afferent nerves (PudA-to-Bladder reflex) were studied in normal and chronic spinal cord injured (SCI) adult cats to examine the reflex plasticity. Physiological activation of pudendal afferent nerves by tactile stimulation of the perigenital skin elicits an inhibitory PudA-to-Bladder reflex in normal cats, but activates an excitatory reflex in chronic SCI cats. However, in both normal and chronic SCI cats electrical stimulation applied to the perigenital skin or directly to the pudendal nerve induces either inhibitory or excitatory PudA-to-Bladder reflexes depending on stimulation frequency. An inhibitory response occurs at 3-10 Hz stimulation, but becomes excitatory at 20-30 Hz. The inhibitory reflex activated by electrical stimulation significantly (Preflex significantly (Preflex in normal cats; however, in chronic SCI cats a volume less than 20% of bladder capacity was sufficient to unmask an excitatory response. This study revealed the co-existence of both inhibitory and excitatory PudA-to-Bladder reflex pathways in cats before and after chronic SCI. However our data combined with published electrophysiological data strongly indicates that the spinal circuitry for both the excitatory and inhibitory PudA-to-Bladder reflexes undergoes a marked reorganization after SCI. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the H-reflex of muscles of different fibre type composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet, C G; Arsenault, A B; Bourbonnais, D; Levin, M F

    1997-09-01

    Differential effects of repetitive stimulation of low threshold afferents on both the recruitment threshold and motoneuronal excitability of type I and type II motor units have been demonstrated. The present study was aimed at further investigating the differential effects of 30 minutes of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on the H-reflex amplitude (Hmax/2) of the Soleus (SO), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL) and medialis (GM) muscles. Eleven healthy subjects were tested in order to evaluate the effects of TENS on either the common peroneal (CPN), saphenous or sural nerve. The experimental session consisted of three consecutive 45 min periods. Within each of these periods, H-reflexes were recorded before, during and after the TENS was applied. It was hypothesized that repetitive low threshold afferent stimulation would either have inhibitory or facilitatory effects on the H-reflex amplitude of the SO or gastrocnemii muscles respectively. Non-parametric Friedman ANOVAs revealed a significant tendency (p sural nerve, as well as that of the GM during repetitive stimulation of the saphenous nerve. Although the present study failed to reveal any differential effects of TENS on the H-reflex amplitude of muscle on different fibre type content, the significant decrease in H-reflex observed on the triceps surae muscles during TENS applied over the CPN might have promising clinical outcomes for hyperreflexive subjects.

  15. The acute and chronic effect of vagus nerve stimulation in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S Dedeurwaerdere; K. Vonck; P Hese van; W.J. Wadman; P Boon

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of acute and chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). This is a validated model for absence epilepsy, characterized by frequent spontaneous absences concomitant with spike and wave disc

  16. Stimulation Induced Changes in Frog Neuromuscular Junctions: A Quantitative Ultrastructural Comparison of Rapid-Frozen and Chemically Fixed Nerve Terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-06

    mitochondria to sequester calcium has been well established ( Lehninger , 197O; Alnaes and Rahamimoff, 1975; Rahamimoff, 1976; Lehninger , Reynafarje...mitochondria swell as they sequester calcium (Greenawalt, Rossi and Lehninger , 1964; Peachy, 1964; Hackenbrock and Caplan, 1969) and mitochondria...Rossi and Lehninger , 1964; Peachy, 1964; Lehninger , Reynafarje, Vercesi and Tew, 1978). Mitochondrial swelling correlates with nerve stimulation in

  17. Changes in particular glycogen populations of the nerve terminals of Torpedo electric organ stimulated to fatigue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, P; Goffinet, G; Schoffeniels, E

    1980-01-01

    Stimulation to fatigue of Torpedo electric organ fragments in partial anoxic conditions induces a loss of particular glycogen associated with the nerve terminals. These results show that the metabolic requirements imposed by the process of bioelectrogenesis in anoxia involve the utilisation glycogen.

  18. A randomized controlled trial of an implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator on walking speed and activity in poststroke hemiplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kottink, A.I.R.; Kottink, Anke I.; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Nene, A.V.; Tenniglo, Martinus Johannes Bernardus; van der Aa, Hans E.; Buschman, H.P.J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    Objective To determine the effect of a new implantable 2-channel peroneal nerve stimulator on walking speed and daily activities, in comparison with the usual treatment in chronic stroke survivors with a drop foot. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting All subjects were measured 5 times in the

  19. Cost-effectiveness of the ketogenic diet and vagus nerve stimulation for the treatment of children with intractable epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinderen, R.J. de; Postulart, D.; Aldenkamp, A.P.; Evers, S.M.; Lambrechts, D.A.; Louw, A.J.; Majoie, M.H.; Grutters, J.P.C.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to estimate the expected cost-utility and cost-effectiveness of the ketogenic diet (KD), vague nerve stimulation (VNS) and care as usual (CAU), using a decision analytic model with a 5-year time horizon. METHODS: A Markov decision analytical model was constru

  20. Occipital nerve stimulation in medically intractable, chronic cluster headache. The ICON study: Rationale and protocol of a randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, Leopoldine A.; Teernstra, Onno P.M.; Haan, Joost; Zwet, van Erik W.; Evers, Silvia M.A.A.; Spincemaille, Geert H.; Veltink, Peter H.; Mulleners, Wim; Brand, Ronald; Huygen, Frank J.P.M.; Jensen, Rigmor H.; Paemeleire, Koen; Goadsby, Peter J.; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Ferrari, Michel D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: About 10% of cluster headache patients have the chronic form. At least 10% of this chronic group is intractable to or cannot tolerate medical treatment. Open pilot studies suggest that occipital nerve stimulation (ONS) might offer effective prevention in these patients. Controlled neurom

  1. A Model of Electrically Stimulated Auditory Nerve Fiber Responses with Peripheral and Central Sites of Spike Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Suyash Narendra; Dau, Torsten; Epp, Bastian

    2017-01-01

    A computational model of cat auditory nerve fiber (ANF) responses to electrical stimulation is presented. The model assumes that (1) there exist at least two sites of spike generation along the ANF and (2) both an anodic (positive) and a cathodic (negative) charge in isolation can evoke a spike. ...

  2. Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Sensation Thresholds in Patients with Painful Diabetic Neuropathy: An Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharic, Metka

    2010-01-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is one of the therapies for painful neuropathy. Its analgesic mechanisms probably involve the gate control theory, the physiological block and the endogenous pain inhibitory system. The aim of the study was to determine whether TENS improves small fibre function diminished because of painful…

  3. Rat vagus nerve stimulation model of seizure suppression: nNOS and ΔFos B changes in the brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers, K; Majoie, H J M; Aalbers, M W; Philippens, M; Doenni, V M; Vles, J S H; Steinbusch, H M W; Moers-Hornikx, V M P; Hopkins, D A; Hoogland, G

    2012-12-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a moderately effective treatment for intractable epilepsy. However, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. The effect of left VNS in amygdala kindled rats was investigated by studying changes in nNOS and ΔFos B expression in primary and secondary vagus nerve projection nuclei: the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMV), parabrachial nucleus (PBN) and locus coeruleus (LC). Rats were fully kindled by stimulation of the amygdala. Subsequently, when the fully kindled state was reached and then maintained for ten days, rats received a single 3-min train of VNS starting 1min prior to the kindling stimulus and lasting for 2min afterwards. In control animals the vagus nerve was not stimulated. Animals were sacrificed 48h later. The brainstems were stained for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and ΔFos B. VNS decreased seizure duration with more than 25% in 21% of rats. No VNS associated changes in nNOS immunoreactivity were observed in the NTS and no changes in ΔFos B were observed in the NTS, PBN, or LC. High nNOS immunopositive cell densities of >300cells/mm(2) were significantly more frequent in the left DMV than in the right (χ(2)(1)=26.2, pvagus nerve was stimulated. We conclude that the observed nNOS immunoreactivity in the DMV suggests surgery-induced axonal damage. A 3-min train of VNS in fully kindled rats does not affect ΔFos B expression in primary and secondary projection nuclei of the vagus nerve.

  4. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the orbit with associated enhancement of the meninges and multiple cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, A M; Short, J; Lucato, L; SantaCruz, K; McKinney, Z; Kim, Y

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT), Tolosa-Hunt syndrome (THS), and idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis (IHP) seem to be part of a spectrum of disorders that have diverse locations but similar histologic and imaging findings. We report a case of a 50-year-old man presenting with multiple progressive cranial nerves palsies with leptomeningeal cranial nerve enhancement on MRI (II, V1-V3, and X), orbital and infraorbital masses, prominence within the left cavernous sinus, and diffuse dural enhancement. Biopsies of the orbital lesion and infraorbital nerve revealed IMT. The patient's lesions, symptoms, and dural enhancement quickly improved with steroid administration and nearly resolved over multiple subsequent scans over the next few months. This case illustrates a rare case of pseudotumor mimicking a more aggressive appearance that would usually portend a case of malignancy. There is a potential association of IMT, THS, and IHP, which may have existed in a concomitant fashion in this patient. The case also describes the unique finding of enhancement of the cisternal segments of multiple cranial nerves (simulating leptomeningeal malignant involvement), which may be related to inflammatory perineural edema or ischemic neuropathy.

  5. Vagal Nerve Stimulation Evoked Heart Rate Changes and Protection from Cardiac Remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Mokelke, Eric; Ruble, Stephen B; Stolen, Craig M

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated whether vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) leads to improvements in ischemic heart failure via heart rate modulation. At 7 ± 1 days post left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligation, 63 rats with myocardial infarctions (MI) were implanted with ECG transmitters and VNS devices (MI + VNS, N = 44) or just ECG transmitters (MI, N = 17). VNS stimulation was active from 14 ± 1 days to 8 ± 1 weeks post MI. The average left ventricular (LV) end diastolic volumes at 8 ± 1 weeks were MI = 672.40 μl and MI + VNS = 519.35 μl, p = 0.03. The average heart weights, normalized to body weight (± std) at 14 ± 1 weeks were MI = 3.2 ± 0.6 g*kg(-1) and MI + VNS = 2.9 ± 0.3 g*kg(-1), p = 0.03. The degree of cardiac remodeling was correlated with the magnitude of acute VNS-evoked heart rate (HR) changes. Further research is required to determine if the acute heart rate response to VNS activation is useful as a heart failure biomarker or as a tool for VNS therapy characterization.

  6. High frequency oscillations after median nerve stimulations in healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Sergio; Del Piero, Ivana; Martucci, Lucia; Restuccia, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present research was to address somatosensory high frequency oscillations (400-800Hz) in healthy children and adolescents in comparison with healthy adults. We recorded somatosensory evoked potentials following median nerve stimulation in nineteen resting healthy children/adolescents and in nineteen resting healthy adults with eyes closed. We administered six consecutive stimulation blocks (500 sweeps each). The presynaptic component of high frequency oscillations amplitudes was smaller in healthy children/adolescents than in healthy adults (no difference between groups was found as far as the postsynaptic component was concerned). Healthy children/adolescents had smaller presynaptic component than the postsynaptic one (the postsynaptic component amplitude was 145% of the presynaptic one), while healthy adults showed the opposite (reduction of the postsynaptic component to 80% of the presynaptic one). No habituation phenomena concerning high frequency oscillation amplitudes were registered in neither healthy children/adolescents nor healthy adults. These findings suggest that healthy children/adolescents present with significantly different pattern of somatosensory high frequency oscillations compared with healthy adults' ones. This different pattern is reasonably expression of higher cortical excitability of the developing brain cortex. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in post-operative analgesia

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    Sukhyanti Kerai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS as non-pharmacological therapeutic modality is increasing. The types of TENS used clinically are conventional TENS, acupuncture TENS and intense TENS. Their working is believed to be based on gate control theory of pain and activation of endogenous opioids. TENS has been used in anaesthesia for treatment of post-operative analgesia, post-operative nausea vomiting and labour analgesia. Evidence to support analgesic efficacy of TENS is ambiguous. A systematic search of literature on PubMed and Cochrane Library from July 2012 to January 2014 identified a total of eight clinical trials investigating post-operative analgesic effects of TENS including a total of 442 patients. Most of the studies have demonstrated clinically significant reduction in pain intensity and supplemental analgesic requirement. However, these trials vary in TENS parameters used that is, duration, intensity, frequency of stimulation and location of electrodes. Further studies with adequate sample size and good methodological design are warranted to establish general recommendation for use of TENS for post-operative pain.

  8. Laryngeal motility alteration: A missing link between sleep apnea and vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrelli, Elena; Saibene, Alberto M; Furia, Francesca; Chiesa, Valentina; Vignoli, Aglaia; Pipolo, Carlotta; Felisati, Giovanni; Canevini, Maria Paola

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and the relationship of sleep breathing disorders (SBDs) and laryngeal motility alterations in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy after vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) implantation. Twenty-three consecutive patients with medically refractory epilepsy underwent out-of-center sleep testing before and after VNS implantation. Eighteen eligible subjects underwent endoscopic laryngeal examination post-VNS implantation. Statistical analysis was carried out to assess an association between laryngeal motility alterations and the onset/worsening of SBDs. After VNS implantation, 11 patients showed a new-onset mild/moderate SBD. Half of the patients already affected by obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) showed worsening of SBD. All of the patients with a new-onset OSA had a laryngeal pattern with left vocal cord adduction (LVCA) during VNS stimulation. The association between VNS-induced LVCA and SBD was statistically significant. This study suggests an association between VNS and SBD, hinting to a pivotal role of laryngeal motility alterations. The relationship between SBD and VNS-induced LVCA supports the need to routinely investigate sleep respiratory and laryngeal motility patterns before and after VNS implantation.

  9. Effects of cervical sympathetic nerve stimulation on the cerebral microcirculation: possible clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Roatta, S; Grassi, C; Micieli, G

    1996-01-01

    The action of bilateral cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) stimulation on mean cerebral blood flow (CBF) and on its rhythmical fluctuations was studied in normotensive rabbits by using laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). A reduction in mean CBF, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors, was the predominant effect; it was more often present and larger in size in the vascular beds supplied by the carotid than in those supplied by the vertebro-basilar system. This suggests that the sympathetic action facilitates a redistribution of blood flow to the brain stem. The effect induced by CSN stimulation on CBF spontaneous oscillations was a consistent decrease in amplitude and an increase in frequency, irrespective of the changes produced on the mean level of CBF. The possible implications of the sympathetic action on the state of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are discussed. Experimental and clinical data dealing with the influence of sympathetic activation on the cerebrovascular system have been compared. As a result the possibility of analysing the spontaneous oscillations of CBF for clinical purposes is suggested.

  10. Tail nerve electrical stimulation induces body weight-supported stepping in rats with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-Xin; Huang, Fengfa; Gates, Mary; White, Jason; Holmberg, Eric G

    2010-03-30

    Walking or stepping has been considered the result from the activation of the central pattern generator (CPG). In most patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) the CPG is undamaged. To date, there are no noninvasive approaches for activating the CPG. Recently we developed a noninvasive technique, tail nerve electrical stimulation (TANES), which can induce positive hind limb movement of SCI rats. The purpose of this study is to introduce the novel technique and examine the effect of TANES on CPG activation. A 25 mm contusion injury was produced at spinal cord T10 of female, adult Long-Evans rats by using the NYU impactor device. Rats received TANES ( approximately 40 mA at 4 kHz) 7 weeks after injury. During TANES all injured rats demonstrated active body weight-supported stepping of hind limbs with left-right alternation and occasional front-hind coordination, resulting in significant, temporary increase in BBB scores (pelectrical stimulation. Therefore the TANES may have considerable potential for achieving improvement of functional recovery in animal models and a similar method may be suggested for human study. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The reflex effects of nonnoxious sural nerve stimulation on human triceps surae motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukulka, C G

    1994-05-01

    1. The effects of low-intensity electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral sural nerve on the reflex response of human triceps surae motor neurons were examined in 169 motor units recorded in 11 adult volunteers: 69 units from soleus (SOL), 48 units from lateral gastrocnemius (LG), and 52 units from medial gastrocnemius (MG). The reflex effects were assessed by the peristimulus time histogram (PSTH) technique, categorized according to onset latencies, and the magnitudes of effects were calculated as percent changes in baseline firing rates. 2. Sural stimulation evoked complex changes in motor-unit firing at onset latencies between 28 and 140 ms. The two most common responses seen in all muscles were a short-latency depression (D1) in firing (mean onset latency = 40 ms) in 42% of all units studied and a secondary enhancement (E2) in firing (mean onset latency = 72 ms) in 43% of all units. In LG, the D1 effect represented a mean decrease in firing of 52% which was statistically different from the changes in MG (42% decrease) and SOL (38% decrease). The magnitudes of E2 effects were similar across muscles with an average of 47% increase in firing. 3. No differences were found in the frequencies of occurrence for the enhancements in firing among the muscles studied. The main difference in reflex responses was the occurrence of an intermediate latency depression (D2) in 27% of the LG units with a mean onset latency of 72 ms. 4. Based on estimates of conduction times for activation of low-threshold cutaneous afferents, the short-latency D1 response likely represents an oligosynaptic spinal reflex with transmission times similar to the Ia reciprocal inhibitory pathway. These findings raise the question as to the possibility of low-threshold cutaneous afferents sharing common interneurons with low-threshold muscle afferent reflexes that have identical onset latencies. The complex reflex effects associated with low-level stimulation of a cutaneous nerve indicate a rich

  12. Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for pain control after total knee arthroplasty: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjun; Feng, Yuxing; Peng, Lihua

    2017-09-21

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is a possible adjunctive therapy to pharmacological treatment for controlling pain after total knee arthroplasty. However, the results are controversial. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on patients with total knee arthroplasty. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, EBSCO, and Cochrane Library databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on patients with total knee arthroplasty were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. Primary outcome was visual analogue scale (VAS) score over a period of 24 h. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effect model. Six randomized controlled trials involving 529 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce VAS scores and total postoperative morphine dose over a period of 24 h, and to improve active range of knee motion (standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.37; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 0.06-0.68; p = 0.02), but had no effect on VAS scores at 2 weeks (SMD = 0.20; 95% CI = -0.07 to 0.48; p = 0.15). Compared with control intervention, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation supplementation intervention was found to significantly reduce pain and morphine requirement over a period of 24 h and to promote functional recovery in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty.

  13. Pharmacological switch in Aβ-fiber stimulation-induced spinal transmission in mice with partial sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Lin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously demonstrated that different spinal transmissions are involved in the nociceptive behavior caused by electrical stimulation of Aβ-, Aδ- or C-fibers using a Neurometer® in naïve mice. In this study, we attempted to pharmacologically characterize the alteration in spinal transmission induced by partial sciatic nerve injury in terms of nociceptive behavior and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK in the spinal dorsal horn. Results Aβ-fiber responses (2000-Hz, which were selectively blocked by the AMPA/kainate antagonist CNQX in naïve mice, were hypersensitized but blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonists MK-801 and AP-5 in injured mice in an electrical stimulation-induced paw withdrawal (EPW test. Although Aδ-fiber responses (250-Hz were also hypersensitized by nerve injury, there was no change in the pharmacological characteristics of Aδ-fiber responses through NMDA receptors. On the contrary, C-fiber responses (5-Hz were hyposensitized by nerve injury. Moreover, Aδ- and C-, but not Aβ-fiber stimulations significantly increased the number of pERK-positive neurons in the superficial spinal dorsal horns of naïve mice, and corresponding antagonists used in the EPW test inhibited this increase. In mice with nerve injury, Aβ- as well as Aδ-fiber stimulations significantly increased the number of pERK-positive neurons in the superficial spinal dorsal horn, whereas C-fiber stimulation decreased this number. The nerve injury-specific pERK increase induced by Aβ-stimulation was inhibited by MK-801 and AP-5, but not by CNQX. However, Aβ- and Aδ-stimulations did not affect the number or size of pERK-positive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion, whereas C-fiber-stimulation selectively decreased the number of pERK-positive neurons. Conclusion These results suggest that Aβ-fiber perception is newly transmitted to spinal neurons, which originally receive only Aδ- and C

  14. Exercise training enhances insulin-stimulated nerve arterial vasodilation in rats with insulin-treated experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olver, T Dylan; McDonald, Matthew W; Grisé, Kenneth N; Dey, Adwitia; Allen, Matti D; Medeiros, Philip J; Lacefield, James C; Jackson, Dwayne N; Rice, Charles L; Melling, C W James; Noble, Earl G; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2014-06-15

    Insulin stimulates nerve arterial vasodilation through a nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) mechanism. Experimental diabetes reduces vasa nervorum NO reactivity. Studies investigating hyperglycemia and nerve arterial vasodilation typically omit insulin treatment and use sedentary rats resulting in severe hyperglycemia. We tested the hypotheses that 1) insulin-treated experimental diabetes and inactivity (DS rats) will attenuate insulin-mediated nerve arterial vasodilation, and 2) deficits in vasodilation in DS rats will be overcome by concurrent exercise training (DX rats; 75-85% VO2 max, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk, for 10 wk). The baseline index of vascular conductance values (VCi = nerve blood flow velocity/mean arterial blood pressure) were similar (P ≥ 0.68), but peak VCi and the area under the curve (AUCi) for the VCi during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC; 10 mU·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were lower in DS rats versus control sedentary (CS) rats and DX rats (P ≤ 0.01). Motor nerve conduction velocity (MNCV) was lower in DS rats versus CS rats and DX rats (P ≤ 0.01). When compared with DS rats, DX rats expressed greater nerve endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein content (P = 0.04). In a separate analysis, we examined the impact of diabetes in exercise-trained rats alone. When compared with exercise-trained control rats (CX), DX rats had a lower AUCi during the EHC, lower MNCV values, and lower sciatic nerve eNOS protein content (P ≤ 0.03). Therefore, vasa nervorum and motor nerve function are impaired in DS rats. Such deficits in rats with diabetes can be overcome by concurrent exercise training. However, in exercise-trained rats (CX and DX groups), moderate hyperglycemia lowers vasa nervorum and nerve function.

  15. Vagus nerve stimulator stability and interference on radiation oncology x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Michael S.; Ketkar, Amruta; Liu, Arthur K.; Olin, Bryan

    2012-10-01

    Five different models of Cyberonics, Inc. vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) therapy pulse generators were investigated for their stability under radiation and their ability to change the absorbed dose from incident radiation. X-ray beams of 6 MV and 18 MV were used to quantify these results up to clinical doses of 68-78 Gy delivered in a single fraction. In the first part, the effect on electronic stimulation signaling of each pulse generator was monitored during and immediately afterwards with computer interrogation. In the second part, the effects of having the pulse generators scatter or attenuate the x-ray beam was also characterized from dose calculations on a treatment planning system as well as from actual radiation measurements. Some device models were found to be susceptible to radiation interference when placed directly in the beam of high energy therapeutic x-ray radiation. While some models exhibited no effect at all, others showed an apparent loss of stimulation output immediately after radiation was experienced. Still, other models were observed to have a cumulative dose effect with a reduced output signal, followed by battery depletion above 49 Gy. Absorbed dose changes on computer underestimated attenuation by nearly half for both energies amongst all pulse generators, although the computer did depict the proper shape of the changed distribution of dose around the device. Measured attenuation ranged from 7.0% to 11.0% at 6 MV and 4.2% to 5.2% at 18 MV for x-rays. Processes of back-scatter and side-scatter were deemed negligible although recorded. Identical results from 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams conclude no neutron effect was induced for the 18 MV beam. As there were documented effects identified in this research regarding pulse generation, it emphasizes the importance of caution when considering radiation therapy on patients with implanted VNS devices with observed malfunctions consequential.

  16. Vagus nerve stimulation mitigates intrinsic cardiac neuronal and adverse myocyte remodeling postmyocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Eric; Southerland, Elizabeth M; Hardwick, Jean C; Wright, Gary L; Ryan, Shannon; Li, Ying; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew; Ardell, Jeffrey L

    2015-10-01

    This paper aims to determine whether chronic vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) mitigates myocardial infarction (MI)-induced remodeling of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICNS), along with the cardiac tissue it regulates. Guinea pigs underwent VNS implantation on the right cervical vagus. Two weeks later, MI was produced by ligating the ventral descending coronary artery. VNS stimulation started 7 days post-MI (20 Hz, 0.9 ± 0.2 mA, 14 s on, 48 s off; VNS-MI, n = 7) and was compared with time-matched MI animals with sham VNS (MI n = 7) vs. untreated controls (n = 8). Echocardiograms were performed before and at 90 days post-MI. At termination, IC neuronal intracellular voltage recordings were obtained from whole-mount neuronal plexuses. MI increased left ventricular end systolic volume (LVESV) 30% (P = 0.027) and reduced LV ejection fraction (LVEF) 6.5% (P < 0.001) at 90 days post-MI compared with baseline. In the VNS-MI group, LVESV and LVEF did not differ from baseline. IC neurons showed depolarization of resting membrane potentials and increased input resistance in MI compared with VNS-MI and sham controls (P < 0.05). Neuronal excitability and sensitivity to norepinephrine increased in MI and VNS-MI groups compared with controls (P < 0.05). Synaptic efficacy, as determined by evoked responses to stimulating input axons, was reduced in VNS-MI compared with MI or controls (P < 0.05). VNS induced changes in myocytes, consistent with enhanced glycogenolysis, and blunted the MI-induced increase in the proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (P < 0.05). VNS mitigates MI-induced remodeling of the ICNS, correspondingly preserving ventricular function via both neural and cardiomyocyte-dependent actions.

  17. Effect of vagus nerve stimulation on the secretory-granule volume of the principal cells of the mouse gallbladder epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlin, T; Hulliger, M; Axelsson, H

    1979-07-01

    Experiments in mice were performed in order to investigate whether vagal activity could affect glycoprotein secretion from gallbladder principal cells. This cell type was studied with the electron microscope in control animals and after electric stimulation of the right or left nervus vagus. The volume density of glycoprotein containing granules was determined using morphometry. It was found that stimulation of the left vagus nerve significantly reduced the relative cellular volume of secretory granules in the principal cells of the gallbladder. Right vagus stimulation was accompanied by a weak but insignificant increase in secretory granule content. It is suggested that the left vagus nerve may exert a direct influence on glycoprotein secretion from gallbladder principal cells.

  18. Vagus nerve electrical stimulation inhibits serum levels of S100A8 protein in septic shock rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Liu, Xin-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The vagus nerve and the released acetylcholine exert anti-inflammatory effects and inhibit septic shock. However, their detailed mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of vagus nerve electrical stimulation on serum S100A8 levels in septic shock rats. A total of 36 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into six equal groups: i) Sham group, receiving sham operation; ii) CLP group, subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) to establish a model of polymicrobial sepsis; iii) VGX group, subjected to CLP and bilateral cervical vagotomy; iv) STM group, subjected to CLP, bilateral cervical vagotomy and electrical stimulation on the left vagus nerve trunk; v) α‑bungarotoxin (BGT) group was administered α‑BGT prior to electrical stimulation; vi) Anti‑receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) group, administered intraperitoneal injection of anti‑RAGE antibody prior to electrical stimulation. The right carotid artery was cannulated to monitor mean artery pressure (MAP). The serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were measured to assess the liver function. Serum S100A8 and advanced glycation end product (AGE) levels were measured using enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assays. The expression of hepatic RAGE was determined by western blotting. The present study revealed that Sprague‑Dawley rats exhibited progressive hypotension and significantly increased serum AST and ALT levels following CLP challenge compared with the sham group. The levels of S100A8 and AGEs, and the protein expression of hepatic RAGE were significantly increased following CLP compared with the sham group. Vagus nerve electrical stimulation significantly prevented the development of CLP‑induced hypotension, alleviated the hepatic damage, reduced serum S100A8 and AGEs production, and reduced the expression of hepatic RAGE. The inhibitory effect of vagus nerve electrical

  19. Defining the neural fulcrum for chronic vagus nerve stimulation: implications for integrated cardiac control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardell, Jeffrey L; Nier, Heath; Hammer, Matthew; Southerland, E Marie; Ardell, Christopher L; Beaumont, Eric; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew

    2017-09-01

    The evoked cardiac response to bipolar cervical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) reflects a dynamic interaction between afferent mediated decreases in central parasympathetic drive and suppressive effects evoked by direct stimulation of parasympathetic efferent axons to the heart. The neural fulcrum is defined as the operating point, based on frequency-amplitude-pulse width, where a null heart rate response is reproducibly evoked during the on-phase of VNS. Cardiac control, based on the principal of the neural fulcrum, can be elicited from either vagus. Beta-receptor blockade does not alter the tachycardia phase to low intensity VNS, but can increase the bradycardia to higher intensity VNS. While muscarinic cholinergic blockade prevented the VNS-induced bradycardia, clinically relevant doses of ACE inhibitors, beta-blockade and the funny channel blocker ivabradine did not alter the VNS chronotropic response. While there are qualitative differences in VNS heart control between awake and anaesthetized states, the physiological expression of the neural fulcrum is maintained. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is an emerging therapy for treatment of chronic heart failure and remains a standard of therapy in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. The objective of this work was to characterize heart rate (HR) responses (HRRs) during the active phase of chronic VNS over a wide range of stimulation parameters in order to define optimal protocols for bidirectional bioelectronic control of the heart. In normal canines, bipolar electrodes were chronically implanted on the cervical vagosympathetic trunk bilaterally with anode cephalad to cathode (n = 8, 'cardiac' configuration) or with electrode positions reversed (n = 8, 'epilepsy' configuration). In awake state, HRRs were determined for each combination of pulse frequency (2-20 Hz), intensity (0-3.5 mA) and pulse widths (130-750 μs) over 14 months. At low intensities and higher frequency VNS, HR increased during the

  20. Effect of Efferent Vagus Nerve Excitation by Electrical Stimulation on Acute Liver Injury in Rabbits with Endotoxemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENGChong-ming; XUXing-rong; WANGYong; ZUOXiang-rong

    2004-01-01

    To study the effect of electrical stimulation of efferent vagus nerve on the acute liver injury induced by endotoxemia in rabbits. Methods : Sixteen rabbits were randomly divided into stimulation group (GroupA. n = 8) and control group ( Group B. n = 8). They were subjected to bilateral cervical vagotomy and intravenously challenged by lipopolysaccharide (LI~) (E.coli 0111:B4.DIFCO.USA/ at a dose of 100 l~g/kg injected within 30 min.The distal end of the left vagus nerve trunk was placed across bipolar electrodes connected to a stimulation module and controlled by an acquisition system. Stimuli with constant voltage ( 10V. 5Hz. 5ms) were applied twice to the nerve for 10 min before and after the administration of LPS in Group A.At the time 30.60,120,180,240.300 min before and after infusion of LPS respectively in each animal, blood samples were taken for late measurement of the sermn Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST). tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10). Immediately after the experiment was finished, autopsy was performed and liver samples were taken to pathologic study.Resu/ts - Compared with Group B, the electrical stimulation of efferent vagus nerve could significantly decrease the contents of ALT, AST and TNF-tt, but increase the contents of IL-10. in serum of Group A. It could also alleviate inflammation of liver tissue after LPS attack. Conclus/on : The results suggest that excitation of the efferent vagus nerve can inhibit the inflammation cascade in liver after LPS challenge. Thus, it might have a protective effect on acute liver damage caused by endotoxemia.

  1. The influence of electrical stimulation of vagus nerve on elemental composition of dopamine related brain structures in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Wrobel, Pawel; Bukowczan, Mateusz; Zizak, Ivo

    2012-07-01

    Recent studies of Parkinson's disease indicate that dorsal motor nucleus of nerve vagus is one of the earliest brain areas affected by alpha-synuclein and Lewy bodies pathology. The influence of electrical stimulation of vagus nerve on elemental composition of dopamine related brain structures in rats is investigated. Synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence was applied to the elemental micro-imaging and quantification in thin tissue sections. It was found that elements such as P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn, Se, Br and Rb are present in motor cortex, corpus striatum, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, ventral tectal area, and dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. The topographic analysis shows that macro-elements like P, S, Cl and K are highly concentrated within the fiber bundles of corpus striatum. In contrast the levels of trace elements like Fe and Zn are the lowest in these structures. It was found that statistically significant differences between the animals with electrical stimulation of vagus nerve and the control are observed in the left side of corpus striatum for P (p = 0.04), S (p = 0.02), Cl (p = 0.05), K (p = 0.02), Fe (p = 0.04) and Zn (p = 0.02). The mass fractions of these elements are increased in the group for which the electrical stimulation of vagus nerve was performed. Moreover, the contents of Ca (p = 0.02), Zn (p = 0.07) and Rb (p = 0.04) in substantia nigra of right hemisphere are found to be significantly lower in the group with stimulation of vagus nerve than in the control rats.

  2. Stimulating Multiple-Demand Cortex Enhances Vocabulary Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwinska, Magdalena W; Violante, Inês R; Wise, Richard J S; Leech, Robert; Devlin, Joseph T; Geranmayeh, Fatemeh; Hampshire, Adam

    2017-08-09

    It is well established that networks within multiple-demand cortex (MDC) become active when diverse skills and behaviors are being learnt. However, their causal role in learning remains to be established. In the present study, we first performed functional magnetic resonance imaging on healthy female and male human participants to confirm that MDC was most active in the initial stages of learning a novel vocabulary, consisting of pronounceable nonwords (pseudowords), each associated with a picture of a real object. We then examined, in healthy female and male human participants, whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of a frontal midline node of the cingulo-opercular MDC affected learning rates specifically during the initial stages of learning. We report that stimulation of this node, but not a control brain region, substantially improved both accuracy and response times during the earliest stage of learning pseudoword-object associations. This stimulation had no effect on the processing of established vocabulary, tested by the accuracy and response times when participants decided whether a real word was accurately paired with a picture of an object. These results provide evidence that noninvasive stimulation to MDC nodes can enhance learning rates, thereby demonstrating their causal role in the learning process. We propose that this causal role makes MDC candidate target for experimental therapeutics; for example, in stroke patients with aphasia attempting to reacquire a vocabulary.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Learning a task involves the brain system within which that specific task becomes established. Therefore, successfully learning a new vocabulary establishes the novel words in the language system. However, there is evidence that in the early stages of learning, networks within multiple-demand cortex (MDC), which control higher cognitive functions, such as working memory, attention, and monitoring of performance, become active. This activity declines

  3. Skin impedance is not a factor in transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vance CG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carol GT Vance,1 Barbara A Rakel,1,2 Dana L Dailey,1 Kathleen A Sluka1,2 1Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, 2University of Iowa, College Nursing Iowa City, IA, USA Objective: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS is a nonpharmacological intervention used to manage pain using skin surface electrodes. Optimal electrode placement is unclear. We hypothesized that better analgesia would occur if electrodes were placed over sites with lower skin impedance. Optimal site selection (OSS and sham site selection (SSS electrode sites on the forearm were identified using a standard clinical technique. Methods: Experiment 1 measured skin impedance in the forearm at OSS and SSS. Experiment 2 was a crossover design double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing OSS-TENS, SSS-TENS, and placebo TENS (P-TENS to confirm differences in skin impedance between OSS and SSS, and measure change in pressure pain threshold (PPT following a 30-minute TENS treatment. Healthy volunteers were recruited (ten for Experiment 1 [five male, five female] and 24 for Experiment 2 [12 male, 12 female]. TENS was applied for 30 minutes at 100 Hz frequency, 100 µs pulse duration, and “strong but nonpainful” amplitude. Results: Experiment 1 results demonstrate significantly higher impedance at SSS (17.69±1.24 Ω compared to OSS (13.53±0.57 Ω (P=0.007. For Experiment 2, electrode site impedance was significantly higher over SSS, with both the impedance meter (P=0.001 and the TENS unit (P=0.012 compared to OSS. PPT change was significantly greater for both OSS-TENS (P=0.024 and SSS-TENS (P=0.025 when compared to P-TENS. PPT did not differ between the two active TENS treatments (P=0.81. Conclusion: Skin impedance is lower at sites characterized as optimal using the described technique of electrode site selection. When TENS is applied at adequate intensities, skin impedance is not a factor in

  4. Vagus Nerve Stimulation for Pediatric and Adult Patients with Pharmaco-resistant Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan-Gang Meng; Fu-Min Jia; Xiao-Hui Ren; Yan Ge; Kai-Liang Wang; Yan-Shan Ma; Ming Ge

    2015-01-01

    Background:Over past two decades,vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been widely used and reported to alleviate seizure frequency worldwide,however,so far,only hundreds of patients with pharmaco-resistant epilepsy (PRE) have been treated with VNS in mainland China.The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of VNS for Chinese patients with PRE and compare its relationship with age cohort and gender.Methods:We retrospectively assessed the clinical outcome of 94 patients with PRE,who were treated with VNS at Beijing Fengtai Hospital and Beij ing Tiantan Hospital between November 2008 and April 2014 from our database of 106 consecutive patients.The clinical data analysis was retrospectively examined.Results:Seizure frequency significantly decreased with VNS therapy after intermittent stimulation of the vagus nerve.At last follow-up,we found McHugh classifications of Class Ⅰ in 33 patients (35.1%),Class Ⅱ in 27 patients (28.7%),Class Ⅲ in 20 patients (21.3%),Class Ⅳ in 3 patients (3.2%),and Class Ⅴ in 11 patients (l 1.7%).Notably,8 (8.5%) patients were seizure-free while ≥50% seizure frequency reduction occurred in as many as 60 patients (63.8%).Furthermore,with regard to the modified Engel classification,12 patients (12.8%) were classified as Class Ⅰ,l l patients (11.7%) were classified as Class Ⅱ,37 patients (39.4%) were classified as Class Ⅲ,34 patients (36.2%) were classified as Class Ⅳ.We also found that the factors of gender or age are not associated with clinical outcome.Conclusions:This comparative study confirmed that VNS is a safe,well-tolerated,and effective treatment for Chinese PRE patients.VNS reduced the seizure frequency regardless of age or gender of studied patients.

  5. Nicotine stimulates nerve growth factor in lung fibroblasts through an NFκB-dependent mechanism.

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    Cherry Wongtrakool

    Full Text Available Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR is classically found in asthma, and persistent AHR is associated with poor asthma control. Although airway smooth muscle (ASM cells play a critical pathophysiologic role in AHR, the paracrine contributions of surrounding cells such as fibroblasts to the contractile phenotype of ASM cells have not been examined fully. This study addresses the hypothesis that nicotine promotes a contractile ASM cell phenotype by stimulating fibroblasts to increase nerve growth factor (NGF secretion into the environment.Primary lung fibroblasts isolated from wild type and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR deficient mice were treated with nicotine (50 µg/ml in vitro for 72 hours. NGF levels were measured in culture media and in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid from asthmatic, smoking and non-smoking subjects by ELISA. The role of the NFκB pathway in nicotine-induced NGF expression was investigated by measuring NFκB nuclear translocation, transcriptional activity, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, and si-p65 NFκB knockdown. The ability of nicotine to stimulate a fibroblast-mediated, contractile ASM cell phenotype was confirmed by examining expression of contractile proteins in ASM cells cultured with fibroblast-conditioned media or BAL fluid.NGF levels were elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of nicotine-exposed mice, current smokers, and asthmatic children. Nicotine increased NGF secretion in lung fibroblasts in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and stimulated NFκB nuclear translocation, p65 binding to the NGF promoter, and NFκB transcriptional activity. These responses were attenuated in α7 nAChR deficient fibroblasts and in wild type fibroblasts following NFκB inhibition. Nicotine-treated, fibroblast-conditioned media increased expression of contractile proteins in ASM cells.Nicotine stimulates NGF release by lung fibroblasts through α7 nAChR and NFκB dependent pathways. These novel findings

  6. Rewarding electrical brain stimulation in rats after peripheral nerve injury: decreased facilitation by commonly abused prescription opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewan, Eric E; Martin, Thomas J

    2011-12-01

    Prescription opioid abuse is a significant concern in treating chronic pain, yet few studies examine how neuropathic pain alters the abuse liability of commonly abused prescription opioids. Normal and spinal nerve ligated (SNL) rats were implanted with electrodes into the left ventral tegmental area (VTA). Rats were trained to lever press for intracranial electrical stimulation (VTA ICSS), and the effects of methadone, fentanyl, hydromorphone, and oxycodone on facilitation of VTA ICSS were assessed. A second group of neuropathic rats were implanted with intrathecal catheters, and the effects of intrathecal clonidine, adenosine, and gabapentin on facilitation of VTA ICSS were assessed. The effects of electrical stimulation of the VTA on mechanical allodynia were assessed in SNL rats. Responding for VTA ICSS was similar in control and SNL rats. Methadone, fentanyl, and hydromorphone were less potent in facilitating VTA ICSS in SNL rats. Oxycodone produced a significant facilitation of VTA ICSS in control (maximum shift 24.10 ± 6.19 Hz) but not SNL rats (maximum shift 16.32 ± 7.49 Hz), but also reduced maximal response rates in SNL rats. Intrathecal administration of clonidine, adenosine, and gabapentin failed to facilitate VTA ICSS in SNL rats, and electrical stimulation of the VTA did not alter mechanical allodynia following nerve injury. The present data suggests that the positive reinforcing effects of commonly abused prescription opioids are diminished following nerve injury. In addition, alleviation of mechanical allodynia with nonopioid analgesics does not appear to stimulate limbic dopamine pathways originating from the VTA in SNL rats.

  7. Epicardial distribution of ST segment and T wave changes produced by stimulation of intrathoracic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, P; Cardinal, R; Nadeau, R A; Armour, J A

    1991-06-01

    Sixty-three ventricular epicardial electrograms were recorded simultaneously in 8 atropinized dogs during stimulation of acutely decentralized intrathoracic autonomic ganglia or cardiopulmonary nerves. Three variables were measured: (1) isochronal maps representing the epicardial activation sequence, (2) maps depicting changes in areas under the QRS complex and T wave (regional inhomogeneity of repolarization), and (3) local and total QT intervals. Neural stimulations did not alter the activation sequence but induced changes in the magnitude and polarity of the ST segments and T waves as well as in QRST areas. Stimulation of the same neural structure in different dogs induced electrical changes with different amplitudes and in different regions of the ventricles, except for the ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerve which usually affected the dorsal wall of the left ventricle. Greatest changes occurred when the right recurrent, left intermediate medial, left caudal pole, left ventral lateral cardiopulmonary nerves and stellate ganglia were stimulated. Local QT durations either decreased or did not change, whereas total QT duration as measured using a root-mean-square signal did not change, indicating the regional nature of repolarization changes. Taken together, these data indicate that intrathoracic efferent sympathetic neurons can induce regional inhomogeneity of repolarization without prolonging the total QT interval.

  8. Comparação das técnicas transarterial e de estimulação de múltiplos nervos para bloqueio do plexo braquial por via axilar usando lidocaína com epinefrina Comparación de las técnicas transarterial y de estimulación de múltiples nervios para bloqueo del plexo braquial por vía axilar usando lidocaína con epinefrina Comparison of transarterial and multiple nerve stimulation techniques for axillary block using lidocaine with epinephrine

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    Luiz Eduardo Imbelloni

    2005-02-01

    resulta en alta efectividad para el bloqueo axilar del plexo braquial. La técnica de utilizar múltiples estímulos exige más tiempo y mayor experiencia. Este estudio prospectivo compara la latencia y el índice de éxito del bloqueo del plexo braquial usando dos técnicas de localización: transarterial o múltipla estimulación de los nervios. MÉTODO: La lidocaína con epinefrina, 800 mg, fue usada inicialmente para el bloqueo axilar. En el grupo transarterial, 30 mL de lidocaína a 1,6% con epinefrina fueron inyectados profundamente y 20 mL superficialmente a la arteria axilar. En el grupo de múltipla estimulación, tres nervios fueron localizados eléctricamente y bloqueados con volúmenes 20 mL, 20 mL y 10 mL de la solución. El bloqueo fue considerado efectivo cuando la analgesia estaba presente en todos los nervios en la área distal al codo. RESULTADOS: El tiempo de latencia (8,8 ± 2,3 min versus 10,2 ± 2,4 min; p-valor = 0,010 fue significativamente menor en el grupo transarterial. Bloqueos sensitivos completos en los cuatro nervios (mediano, ulnar, radial y musculocutáneo fueron logrados en un 92,5% versus 83,3% en el grupo de múltipla estimulación y acceso transarterial, respectivamente sin diferencia significativa (p-valor = 0,68. El nervio musculocutáneo fue significativamente más fácil de bloquear con el estimulador de nervio periférico (p = 0,034. CONCLUSIONES: La técnica de múltipla estimulación para el bloqueo axilar usando estimulador de nervios (3 inyecciones y la técnica transarterial (2 inyecciones producen resultados semejantes en la calidad del bloqueo. El nervio musculocutáneo es más facilmente bloqueado con el uso del estimulador del nervio periférico. La técnica de múltipla estimulación necesitó menor suplementación del bloqueo y aumentó el tiempo para el inicio de la cirugía.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: High-dose transarterial technique results in highly effective axillary block. The multiple nerve stimulation technique

  9. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces pain, fatigue and hyperalgesia while restoring central inhibition in primary fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Dana L; Rakel, Barbara A; Vance, Carol G T; Liebano, Richard E; Amrit, Anand S; Bush, Heather M; Lee, Kyoung S; Lee, Jennifer E; Sluka, Kathleen A

    2013-11-01

    Because transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) works by reducing central excitability and activating central inhibition pathways, we tested the hypothesis that TENS would reduce pain and fatigue and improve function and hyperalgesia in people with fibromyalgia who have enhanced central excitability and reduced inhibition. The current study used a double-blinded randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over design to test the effects of a single treatment of TENS with people with fibromyalgia. Three treatments were assessed in random order: active TENS, placebo TENS and no TENS. The following measures were assessed before and after each TENS treatment: pain and fatigue at rest and in movement; pressure pain thresholds, 6-m walk test, range of motion; 5-time sit-to-stand test, and single-leg stance. Conditioned pain modulation was completed at the end of testing. There was a significant decrease in pain and fatigue with movement for active TENS compared to placebo and no TENS. Pressure pain thresholds increased at the site of TENS (spine) and outside the site of TENS (leg) when compared to placebo TENS or no TENS. During active TENS, conditioned pain modulation was significantly stronger compared to placebo TENS and no TENS. No changes in functional tasks were observed with TENS. Thus, the current study suggests TENS has short-term efficacy in relieving symptoms of fibromyalgia while the stimulator is active. Future clinical trials should examine the effects of repeated daily delivery of TENS, similar to the way in which TENS is used clinically on pain, fatigue, function, and quality of life in individuals with fibromyalgia.

  10. Effects of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on venous vascular reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, O.S.; Paulitsch, F.S.; Pereira, A.P.C.; Teixeira, A.O. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Martins, C.N. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Silva, A.M.V. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Santa Maria, RS, Brasil, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Plentz, R.D.M. [Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Reabilitação, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Irigoyen, M.C. [Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto do Coração, Unidade de Hipertensão, São Paulo, SP, Brasil, Unidade de Hipertensão, Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Signori, L.U. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Faculdade de Medicina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Rio Grande, RS, Brasil, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Fisiologia Animal Comparada, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Santa Maria, RS, Brasil, Departamento de Fisioterapia e Reabilitação, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2014-04-04

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a type of therapy used primarily for analgesia, but also presents changes in the cardiovascular system responses; its effects are dependent upon application parameters. Alterations to the cardiovascular system suggest that TENS may modify venous vascular response. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of TENS at different frequencies (10 and 100 Hz) on venous vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomized into three groups: placebo (n=10), low-frequency TENS (10 Hz, n=9) and high-frequency TENS (100 Hz, n=10). TENS was applied for 30 min in the nervous plexus trajectory from the superior member (from cervical to dorsal region of the fist) at low (10 Hz/200 μs) and high frequency (100 Hz/200 μs) with its intensity adjusted below the motor threshold and intensified every 5 min, intending to avoid accommodation. Venous vascular reactivity in response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent) and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent) was assessed by the dorsal hand vein technique. The phenylephrine effective dose to achieve 70% vasoconstriction was reduced 53% (P<0.01) using low-frequency TENS (10 Hz), while in high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz), a 47% increased dose was needed (P<0.01). The endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine) and independent (sodium nitroprusside) responses were not modified by TENS, which modifies venous responsiveness, and increases the low-frequency sensitivity of α1-adrenergic receptors and shows high-frequency opposite effects. These changes represent an important vascular effect caused by TENS with implications for hemodynamics, inflammation and analgesia.

  11. Effects of different frequencies of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on venous vascular reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.S. Franco

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS is a type of therapy used primarily for analgesia, but also presents changes in the cardiovascular system responses; its effects are dependent upon application parameters. Alterations to the cardiovascular system suggest that TENS may modify venous vascular response. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of TENS at different frequencies (10 and 100 Hz on venous vascular reactivity in healthy subjects. Twenty-nine healthy male volunteers were randomized into three groups: placebo (n=10, low-frequency TENS (10 Hz, n=9 and high-frequency TENS (100 Hz, n=10. TENS was applied for 30 min in the nervous plexus trajectory from the superior member (from cervical to dorsal region of the fist at low (10 Hz/200 μs and high frequency (100 Hz/200 μs with its intensity adjusted below the motor threshold and intensified every 5 min, intending to avoid accommodation. Venous vascular reactivity in response to phenylephrine, acetylcholine (endothelium-dependent and sodium nitroprusside (endothelium-independent was assessed by the dorsal hand vein technique. The phenylephrine effective dose to achieve 70% vasoconstriction was reduced 53% (P<0.01 using low-frequency TENS (10 Hz, while in high-frequency stimulation (100 Hz, a 47% increased dose was needed (P<0.01. The endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine and independent (sodium nitroprusside responses were not modified by TENS, which modifies venous responsiveness, and increases the low-frequency sensitivity of α1-adrenergic receptors and shows high-frequency opposite effects. These changes represent an important vascular effect caused by TENS with implications for hemodynamics, inflammation and analgesia.

  12. Vagal nerve stimulation in intractable epilepsy: clinical experience on 100 patients and review of the literature

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    Franco RYCHLICKI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS is an effective alternative treatment for patients with refractory epilepsy. Nevertheless, information regarding VNS is still limited. Materials and Methods: In the present non randomized, prospectic study we report our clinical safety and effectiveness of VNS in 100 patients (52 Males and 48 Females with drug resistant epilepsy. Patient’s age at implant ranged from 0,64 to 51,04 years (mean age 15.3 years. The mean follow-up time was 54,8 months ( range 2 to 108,3 months. Seventeen patients suffered from Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, 34 patients suffered from partial epilepsy with drop attacks and secondary bysinchronism on the EEG (Lennox Gastaut-like and 49 patients had Partial Epilepsy without drop attacks. Data collection forms were designed for prospectively gathering data on each patient’s history, seizures, drug therapy, implant device settings and side effects. Patients were assessed prior the implant and 3, 12 and 24 months after surgery. Results: Seventy-eight patients completed the 24 months follow-up session. VNS produced a mean seizure rate reduction of 32% at 3 months, 41% at 12 months, and 45% at 24 months. At 24 months, only the Partial Epilepsy patients showed a seizures reduction of 50%, which is considered clinically significant. Moreover both the age at implant and epilepsy duration were inversely correlated with the percentage of seizure reduction at 24 months. Side effects were minor and transient; the most common were voice alteration and coughing during stimulation. In 7 patients electrode breakage occurred three years after the surgical procedure. Conclusion: In our study, clinical effectiveness is higher in younger children implanted before than 12 years with shorter epilepsy duration suggesting a precocious useful role of VNS. Patients with Lennox Gastaut Syndrome show a worse clinical response rather than other epileptic syndromes.

  13. Complications and safety of vagus nerve stimulation: 25 years of experience at a single center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, David; Rydenhag, Bertil; Ben-Menachem, Elinor

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this paper was to investigate surgical and hardware complications in a longitudinal retrospective study. METHODS The authors of this registry study analyzed the surgical and hardware complications in 247 patients who underwent the implantation of a vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) device between 1990 and 2014. The mean follow-up time was 12 years. RESULTS In total, 497 procedures were performed for 247 primary VNS implantations. Complications related to surgery occurred in 8.6% of all implantation procedures that were performed. The respective rate for hardware complications was 3.7%. Surgical complications included postoperative hematoma in 1.9%, infection in 2.6%, vocal cord palsy in 1.4%, lower facial weakness in 0.2%, pain and sensory-related complications in 1.4%, aseptic reaction in 0.2%, cable discomfort in 0.2%, surgical cable break in 0.2%, oversized stimulator pocket in 0.2%, and battery displacement in 0.2% of patients. Hardware-related complications included lead fracture/malfunction in 3.0%, spontaneous VNS turn-on in 0.2%, and lead disconnection in 0.2% of patients. CONCLUSIONS VNS implantation is a relatively safe procedure, but it still involves certain risks. The most common complications are postoperative hematoma, infection, and vocal cord palsy. Although their occurrence rates are rather low at about 2%, these complications may cause major suffering and even be life threatening. To reduce complications, it is important to have a long-term perspective. The 25 years of follow-up of this study is of great strength considering that VNS can be a life-long treatment for many patients. Thus, it is important to include repeated surgeries such as battery and lead replacements, given that complications also may occur with these surgeries.

  14. Vagal nerve stimulation reverses aberrant dopamine system function in the methylazoxymethanol acetate rodent model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Stephanie M; Carreno, Flavia R; Frazer, Alan; Lodge, Daniel J

    2014-07-01

    Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) is an alternative therapy for epilepsy and treatment refractory depression. Here we examine VNS as a potential therapy for the treatment of schizophrenia in the methylozoxymethanol acetate (MAM) rodent model of the disease. We have previously demonstrated that hyperactivity within ventral regions of the hippocampus (vHipp) drives the dopamine system dysregulation in this model. Moreover, by targeting the vHipp directly, we can reverse aberrant dopamine system function and associated behaviors in the MAM model. Although the central effects of VNS have not been completely delineated, positron emission topographic measurements of cerebral blood flow in humans have consistently reported that VNS stimulation induces bilateral decreases in hippocampal activity. Based on our previous observations, we performed in vivo extracellular electrophysiological recordings in MAM- and saline-treated rats to evaluate the effect of chronic (2 week) VNS treatment on the activity of putative vHipp pyramidal neurons, as well as downstream dopamine neuron activity in the ventral tegmental area. Here we demonstrate that chronic VNS was able to reverse both vHipp hyperactivity and aberrant mesolimbic dopamine neuron function in the MAM model of schizophrenia. Additionally, VNS reversed a behavioral correlate of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia. Because current therapies for schizophrenia are far from adequate, with a large number of patients discontinuing treatment due to low efficacy or intolerable side effects, it is important to explore alternative nonpharmacological treatments. These data provide the first preclinical evidence that VNS may be a possible alternative therapeutic approach for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  15. Neurological results of the modified treatment of epilepsy by stimulation of the vagus nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, Michael; Heyman, Eli; Lotan, Gad

    2017-07-08

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is used for treatment of drug-resistant epilepsy but laryngeal side effects are common. We tried to improve VNS by modifying the implantation procedure. The aim was to reduce the rate of side effects that have prevented using VNS to its full capacity. We operated on 74 pediatric patients for VNS device implantation using a modified surgical protocol incorporating lower neck incision for electrode placement and 36 patients who were operated by standard technique were used for control group. We retrospectively analyzed reduction in frequency of seizures, reduction in severity of seizures (assessed by the shortened Ictal/post-ictal subscale of the Liverpool Seizure Severity Scale that included falling to the ground, postictal headache and sleepiness, incontinence, tongue biting, and injury during attack). Using the new implantation technique, side effects related directly to VNS therapy occurred in six cases (8.1%) showing statistically sound improvement over the standard implantation technique (p ˂ 0.05). To achieve good results, the maximum stimulation (3.5 mA) was used in 24 patients (32.4%), with no laryngeal side effects detected. Twelve patients (16.2%) were seizure-free after the first year of VNS treatment. 74.3% of patients experienced a 50% reduction in seizure frequency and improved ictal or postictal activity. To minimize laryngeal complications in implantation surgery for VNS devices, the surgical technique may be modified, and lower neck incision could be used. A low rate of laryngeal side effects allows using the VNS device to its full electrical capacity.

  16. Experience of Using Vagus Nerve Stimulation to Treat Drug Resistant Epilepsy

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    L. V. Lipatova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine tolerability and effectiveness of continuous vagus nerve stimulation (VNS in patients with drug resistance epilepsy (DRE. Patients and Methods. A VNS system was implanted to 9 adults (aged 14–38 with DRE. The duration of catamnesis was 8–12 months. Results. During the first 2–3 months after the VNS system had been implanted, seizure frequency reduced by over 50% in half of the patients with DRE. The remaining patients showed a similar positive effect 8–12 months after the VNS parameters had been adjusted. A decrease in seizure frequency, duration and severity, as well as shortening of the post-seizure period were observed in 12.5% of patients. Negative side effects, such as dysphonia and throat discomfort, were found in 12.5% of patients. These undesirable effects were eliminated by adjusting magnetic stim- ulation parameters. Significant positive EEG dynamics, such as regression of paroxysmal epileptic activity, were obtained in 62.5% the cases. Conclusions. VNS therapy is a safe and effective treatment method for reducing the frequency and severity of seizures in patients with DRE. 

  17. Value of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome

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    Hina Handa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain in facial region originating from both temporomandibular joint (TMJ and jaw muscles is a common clinical problem and is a diagnostic dilemma till today. There are many synonyms for this condition including myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome, mandibular dysfunction syndrome, and the TMJ dysfunction syndrome. With change in time, advances and new diagnostic criteria have been made in the diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome, its epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and etiopathogenesis, but many unknowns remain. An integrated hypothesis has provided a greater understanding of the physiopathology of trigger points, which may allow the development of new diagnostic criteria and treatment of this chronic disease and combined pharmacological as well as physical therapy for the management of the disease. The purpose of this paper is to describe the multidisciplinary approach highlighting the effect of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS for the treatment of a 60-year-old female who suffered from myofascial pain and 5-day TENS therapy for management of pain.

  18. Comparison of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Parasternal Block for Postoperative Pain Management after Cardiac Surgery

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    Nilgun Kavrut Ozturk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parasternal block and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS have been demonstrated to produce effective analgesia and reduce postoperative opioid requirements in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives. To compare the effectiveness of TENS and parasternal block on early postoperative pain after cardiac surgery. Methods. One hundred twenty patients undergoing cardiac surgery were enrolled in the present randomized, controlled prospective study. Patients were assigned to three treatment groups: parasternal block, intermittent TENS application, or a control group. Results. Pain scores recorded 4 h, 5 h, 6 h, 7 h, and 8 h postoperatively were lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. Total morphine consumption was also lower in the parasternal block group than in the TENS and control groups. It was also significantly lower in the TENS group than in the control group. There were no statistical differences among the groups regarding the extubation time, rescue analgesic medication, length of intensive care unit stay, or length of hospital stay. Conclusions. Parasternal block was more effective than TENS in the management of early postoperative pain and the reduction of opioid requirements in patients who underwent cardiac surgery through median sternotomy. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov number NCT02725229.

  19. Antihypertensive effect of low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in comparison with drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverdal, Jonas; Mourtzinis, Georgios; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Mannheimer, Clas; Manhem, Karin

    2012-10-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for vascular disease, yet blood pressure (BP) control is unsatisfactory low, partly due to side-effects. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is well tolerated and studies have demonstrated BP reduction. In this study, we compared the BP lowering effect of 2.5 mg felodipin once daily with 30 min of bidaily low-frequency TENS in 32 adult hypertensive subjects (mean office BP 152.7/90.0 mmHg) in a randomized, crossover design. Office BP and 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) were performed at baseline and at the end of each 4-week treatment and washout period. Felodipin reduced office BP by 10/6 mmHg (p TENS reduced office BP by 5/1.5 mmHg (p TENS washout, BP was further reduced and significantly lower than at baseline, but at levels similar to BP after felodipin washout and therefore reasonably caused by factors other than the treatment per se. ABPM revealed a significant systolic reduction of 3 mmHg by felodipin, but no significant changes were noted after TENS. We conclude that our study does not present any solid evidence of BP reduction of TENS.

  20. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) accelerates cutaneous wound healing and inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürgen, Seren Gülşen; Sayın, Oya; Cetin, Ferihan; Tuç Yücel, Ayşe

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and other common treatment methods used in the process of wound healing in terms of the expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In the study, 24 female and 24 male adult Wistar-Albino rats were divided into five groups: (1) the non-wounded group having no incision wounds, (2) the control group having incision wounds, (3) the TENS (2 Hz, 15 min) group, (4) the physiological saline (PS) group and (5) the povidone iodine (PI) group. In the skin sections, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemical methods. In the non-wounded group, the expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α signaling molecules was weaker in the whole tissue; however, in the control group, significant inflammatory response occurred, and strong cytokine expression was observed in the dermis, granulation tissue, hair follicles, and sebaceous glands (P TENS group, the decrease in TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 immunoreaction in the skin was significant compared to the other forms of treatment (P TENS group suggest that TENS shortened the healing process by inhibating the inflammation phase.

  1. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Reduces Post-Thoractomy Ipsilateral Shoulder Pain. A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban González, Pedro; Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo

    2015-12-01

    The patient's position during an axillary thoracotomy can cause postoperative pain and decrease mobility of the ipsilateral shoulder. In this study, we assessed whether the implementation of a standardized analgesia program using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) decreases local pain and improves ipsilateral shoulder mobility. Randomized, single-blind, single-center clinical trial of 50 patients who had undergone anatomical lung resection via axillary muscle-sparing thoracotomy. Patients were treated with TENS devices for 30 minutes every 8 hours, beginning on postoperative day 1. Pain and mobility of the affected limb were recorded at the same time on postoperative days 1 through 3. A visual analogue scale was used for pain assessment and shoulder mobility was assessed with a goniometer. Results were compared using a non-parametric test. Twenty-five patients were randomized to each group. Mean age of the control group was 62.7±9.3 years and 63.4±10.2 years in the experimental group. Shoulder mobility parameters were similar in both groups on all postoperative days. However, pain during flexion significantly decreased on day 2 (P=.03) and day 3 (P=.04) in the experimental group. The use of TENS decreases pain from shoulder flexion in patients undergoing axillary thoracotomy for pulmonary resection. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Vagus nerve stimulation for refractory epilepsy:long term efficacy and side-effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    許志輝; 蓝明權; 黄家星; 祈理治; 潘偉生

    2004-01-01

    Background In general vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) can serve as an adjunctive treatment for patients with refractory partial -onset seizures. And we evaluated the long-term efficacy and safety of VNS in a group of Chinese patients with refratory epilepsy.Methods Of 127 patients with refractory epilepsy, 13 patients who were not eligible for surgical intervention were implanted with the Cyberonics VNS system. Seizure frequency, physical examination and side effects profile were recorded at follow-up visits for a minimum of 18 months.Results Mean duration of treatment was 47.4 months, and the longest follow-up period was 71 months. Mean baseline seizure frequency was 26.6 seizures per month. The mean percentage reductions in convulsions were 33.2%, 47.1% and 40.0% at 6, 12 and 18 months, respectively. One patient became seizure free, and six (46%) had 50% or more reduction in seizure frequency. Response was poor (<20% reduction) in five patients (39%). Side effects were uncommon.Conclusions The effectiveness of VNS was sustained and was well tolerated but benefited only a sub-group of patients with intractable convulsions.

  3. Safety of a dedicated brain MRI protocol in patients with a vagus nerve stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Melis, Gerrit I; Gebbink, Tineke A; de Kort, Gérard A P; Leijten, Frans S S

    2014-11-01

    Although implanted metallic devices constitute a relative contraindication to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, the safety of brain imaging in a patient with a vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) is classified as "conditional," provided that specific manufacturer guidelines are followed when a transmit and receive head coil is used at 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of performing brain MRI scans in patients with the VNS. From September 2009 until November 2011, 101 scans were requested in 73 patients with the VNS in The Netherlands. Patients were scanned according to the manufacturer's guidelines. No patient reported any side effect, discomfort, or pain during or after the MRI scan. In one patient, a lead break was detected based on device diagnostics after the MRI-scan. However, because no system diagnostics had been performed prior to MR scanning in this patient, it is unclear whether MR scanning was responsible for the lead break. The indication for most scans was epilepsy related. Twenty-six scans (26%) were part of a (new) presurgical evaluation and could probably better have been performed prior to VNS implantation. Performing brain MRI scans in patients with an implanted VNS is safe when a modified MRI protocol is followed.

  4. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation for Management of Limb Spasticity: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Patricia Branco; Dossa, Farhana

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) for management of limb spasticity. Randomized controlled trials were searched using electronic databases through July 2015. Fourteen randomized controlled trials were included, involving 544 participants. Intervention protocols fit within three categories: 1) TENS vs. no TENS or placebo TENS (n = 7), 2) TENS vs. another TENS protocol or another intervention for spasticity management (n = 7), and 3) TENS as an adjunct to another intervention for spasticity management (n = 4). There was level 1 and 2 evidence for TENS improving spasticity-related outcome measures within the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health domains of body structure and function (e.g., Modified Ashworth Scale) as well as activity (e.g., gait). Better responses in outcome measures in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health activity domain were seen when TENS was used in combination with active therapy (e.g., exercise and task-related training) vs. as a single therapeutic modality.

  5. Low Intensity Laser Therapy (LILT) Versus Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation On Microcirculation In Diabetic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battecha, Kadria H.; Atya, Azza M.

    2011-09-01

    Reduced microcirculation is a morbid element of neuropathy and one of the most common complications of uncontrolled diabetes. Many physical modalities have gained a considerable attention for enhancing cutaneous microcirculation in diabetic patients and prevent its serious complications. Accordingly, the present study was conducted to compare between the effect of low intensity laser therapy (LILT) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on microcirculation in diabetic neuropathy. Thirty diabetic polyneuropathic patients ranged in age from 45-60 years participated in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups of equal number; patients in group (A) received LILT on plantar surface of foot with a dose of 3 J/cm2 and wavelength (904 nm), while those in group (B) received TENS on lower leg for 30 minutes with frequency (2 HZ). Treatment was conducted 3 times/week for 6 weeks. The cutaneous microcirculation was evaluated by Laser Doppler flowmetry at the baseline and at the end of treatment. Results revealed that group (A) showed statistically significant increase in the cutaneous microcirculation compared with group (B). So, it was concluded that LILT has to be more efficient than TENS in increasing cutaneous microcirculation in patients with diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Efficacy of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Overactive Bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Kaja; Srinivasan, Krishnamurthy Jayashree

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Overactive Bladder (OAB) accounts for 40-70% cases of incontinence. The etiology is unknown though detrusor instability is found in urodynamic evaluation of almost all cases. Detrusor instability or hyperreflexia can be inhibited by direct inhibition of impulses in the pre-ganglionic afferent neuron or by inhibition of bladder pre-ganglionic neurons of the efferent limb of micturition reflex. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is based on the gate control theory of abolishing the local micturition reflex arc. Aim To assess the effectiveness and safety of TENS in idiopathic OAB. Materials and Methods It is a prospective experimental study to evaluate the effectiveness of TENS v/s placebo in reducing OAB symptoms. (n1=20, n2 =20). Ten treatment sessions (5 sessions/week) of 30 minutes, were conducted. Results There was a significant improvement in Overactive Bladder Symptom Scores (OABSS) in TENS group and 2 patients were completely dry following TENS therapy. Conclusion In elderly women, patients with OAB where other co-medications have their own anticholinergic side effects and impairment of cognition is a concern, TENS can be a useful intervention. TENS units are safe, economical and easily commercially available. PMID:27891403

  7. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus tolterodine for overactive bladder in women: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preyer, Oliver; Umek, Wolfgang; Laml, Thomas; Bjelic-Radisic, Vesna; Gabriel, Boris; Mittlboeck, Martina; Hanzal, Engelbert

    2015-08-01

    We performed a randomised controlled trial of percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus tolterodine for treating treatment naïve women with overactive bladder (OAB). 36 patients with symptoms of OAB were randomised to 3 months of treatment with weekly PTNS or tolterodine (2mg bid p.o.). The primary outcome measure was the difference of micturitions per 24h. The secondary outcome measure was the impact on quality of life (QoL) measured with a visual analogue scale (VAS) between baseline and after 3 months of therapy. Micturition frequencies did not decline significantly (p=0.13) over time and there were no significant treatment differences (p=0.96). QoL was significantly dependent from its level at baseline (p=0.002) and showed improvement over time compared to baseline measurements but no significant differences between both treatment groups (p=0.07). Incontinence episodes per 24h depended significantly on the level at baseline (p=0.0001) and declined significantly (p=0.03) during 3 months of therapy in both therapy groups. However no significant treatment differences on the reduction of incontinence episodes in 24h could be shown between both therapy groups (p=0.89). PTNS had fewer side effects than tolterodine (p=0.04). PTNS and tolterodine were both effective in reducing incontinence episodes and improving QoL in patients with OAB but not micturition frequencies. PTNS had fewer side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Schwann Cells Overexpressing FGF-2 Alone or Combined with Manual Stimulation Do Not Promote Functional Recovery after Facial Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Haastert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether transplantation of Schwann cells (SCs overexpressing different isoforms of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2 combined with manual stimulation (MS of vibrissal muscles improves recovery after facial nerve transection in adult rat. Procedures. Transected facial nerves were entubulated with collagen alone or collagen plus naïve SCs or transfected SCs. Half of the rats received daily MS. Collateral branching was quantified from motoneuron counts after retrograde labeling from 3 facial nerve branches. Quality assessment of endplate reinnervation was combined with video-based vibrissal function analysis. Results. There was no difference in the extent of collateral axonal branching. The proportion of polyinnervated motor endplates for either naïve SCs or FGF-2 over-expressing SCs was identical. Postoperative MS also failed to improve recovery. Conclusions. Neither FGF-2 isoform changed the extent of collateral branching or polyinnervation of motor endplates; furthermore, this motoneuron response could not be overridden by MS.

  9. Electrical stimulation of the sural cutaneous afferent nerve controls the amplitude and onset of the swing phase of locomotion in the spinal cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier-Lanvin, Karen; Krupka, Alexander J; AuYong, Nicholas; Miller, Kassi; Prilutsky, Boris I; Lemay, Michel A

    2011-05-01

    Sensory feedback plays a crucial role in the control of locomotion and in the recovery of function after spinal cord injury. Investigations in reduced preparations have shown that the locomotor cycle can be modified through the activation of afferent feedback at various phases of the gait cycle. We investigated the effect of phase-dependent electrical stimulation of a cutaneous afferent nerve on the locomotor pattern of trained spinal cord-injured cats. Animals were first implanted with chronic nerve cuffs on the sural and sciatic nerves and electromyographic electrodes in different hindlimb muscles. Cats were then transected at T12 and trained daily to locomote on a treadmill. We found that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve can enhance the ongoing flexion phase, producing higher (+129%) and longer (+17.4%) swing phases of gait even at very low threshold of stimulation. Sural nerve stimulation can also terminate an ongoing extension and initiate a flexion phase. A higher prevalence of early switching to the flexion phase was observed at higher stimulation levels and if stimulation was applied in the late stance phase. All flexor muscles were activated by the stimulation. These results suggest that electrical stimulation of the sural nerve may be used to increase the magnitude of the swing phase and control the timing of its onset after spinal cord injury and locomotor training.

  10. Chapter 23: Manual stimulation of target muscles has different impact on functional recovery after injury of pure motor or mixed nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinis, Nektarios; Manoli, Thodora; Werdin, Frank; Kraus, Armin; Schaller, Hans E; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Grosheva, Maria; Irintchev, Andrey; Skouras, Emanouil; Dunlop, Sarah; Angelov, Doychin N

    2009-01-01

    Direct coaptation and interpositional nerve grafting (IPNG) of an injured peripheral nerve is still associated with poor functional recovery. Main reasons for that are thought to be an extensive collateral axonal branching at the site of transection and the polyinnervation of motor endplates due to terminal axonal and intramuscular sprouting. Moreover, severe changes occurring within the muscle after long-term denervation, like loss of muscle bulk and circulation as well as progressive fibrosis, have a negative effect on the quality of functional recovery after reinnervation. We have recently shown that manual stimulation (MS) of paralyzed vibrissal muscles in rat promotes full recovery after facial nerve coaptation. Furthermore, MS improved functional recovery after hypoglossal nerve repair, hypoglossal-facial IPNG of the facial nerve in rat. In contrary, MS did not improve recovery after injury of the median nerve in rat, which is however a mixed peripheral nerve comparing to the facial nerve. It is speculated that manually stimulated recovery of motor function requires an intact sensory input, which is affected in case of mixed peripheral nerves but not in case of pure motor nerves. In this article, we summarize our results of MS in several peripheral nerve injury models in order to illustrate the application potential of this method and to give insights into further investigations on that field.

  11. Difficulty in Clinical Evaluation of Radial Nerve Injury due to Multiple Trauma to the Humerus, Wrist, and Hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balik Mehmet Sabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve damage is frequently encountered in humeral fractures. The radial nerve is primarily damaged when the humerus gets fractured, while secondary damage maybe due to post-traumatic manipulations and surgical exploration. High impact traumatic nerve injury, serious neuropathic pain, lack of response to therapeutic interventions, and indifference to the Tinel test are indications for surgical intervention. Since most humeral fracture-induced low impact radial nerve injuries resolve spontaneously, conservative therapy is preferred. We present a patient with humeral fracture-associated radial nerve injury, accompanied with digital amputation and flexor tendon avulsion on the same arm. These injuries required immediate surgery, thus rendering the clinical evaluation of the radial nerve impossible. We would like to highlight and discuss the inherent difficulties associated with multiple trauma of the upper arm.

  12. Associative stimulation of the supraorbital nerve fails to induce timing-specific plasticity in the human blink reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Kirsten E; Knutzen, Arne; Al-Ali, Asmaa;

    2010-01-01

    Associative high-frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of the supraorbital nerve in five healthy individuals induced long-term potentiation (LTP)-like or depression (LTD)-like changes in the human blink reflex circuit according to the rules of spike timing-dependent plasticity (Mao and Evinger...... the orbicularis oculi muscles, HFS(LTP) induced excessive LTP-like associative plasticity relative to healthy controls, which was normalized after botulinum toxin (BTX) injections (Quartarone et al, 2006)....

  13. Acupuncture and transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in the treatment of pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. A randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Søren; Christophersen, S J; Dawids, Steen

    1985-01-01

    In 23 patients with pancreatitis, daily pain for at least 3 months, and no abuse of alcohol, the pain-relieving effect of electroacupuncture (13 patients) or transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) (16 patients) was studied. In two prospective studies with a cross-over design, active acu...... acupuncture was compared with sham acupuncture, and TENS of the segmental points of the pancreas with sham treatment. Neither electroacupuncture nor TENS brought about pain relief that could substitute for or supplement medical treatment....

  14. Analgesic effectiveness of the association of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and cryotherapy for chronic low back pain

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu,Eliziete Almeida de; Santos, Jean Douglas Moura dos; Ventura,Patrícia Lima

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and cryotherapy are physical therapy resources individually used, since there is the possibility of interaction between TENS and cryotherapy if they are associated. This study aimed at evaluating the analgesic effectiveness of the association or not of TENS and cryotherapy to relieve chronic low back pain. METHOD: Clinical trial involving six chronic low back pain patients distributed in three groups: cryotherapy, T...

  15. Single vagus nerve stimulation reduces early postprandial C-peptide levels but not other hormones or postprandial metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, M W; van Nierop, F S; Koopman, F A; Eggink, H M; Gerlag, D M; Chan, M W; Zitnik, R; Vaz, F M; Romijn, J A; Tak, P P; Soeters, M R

    2017-04-08

    A recent study in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients using electrical vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to activate the inflammatory reflex has shown promising effects on disease activity. Innervation by the autonomic nerve system might be involved in the regulation of many endocrine and metabolic processes and could therefore theoretically lead to unwanted side effects. Possible effects of VNS on secretion of hormones are currently unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a single VNS on plasma levels of pituitary hormones and parameters of postprandial metabolism. Six female patients with RA were studied twice in balanced assignment (crossover design) to either VNS or no stimulation. The patients selected for this substudy had been on VNS therapy daily for at least 3 months and at maximum of 24 months. We compared 10-, 20-, and 30-min poststimulus levels to baseline levels, and a 4-h mixed meal test was performed 30 min after VNS. We also determined energy expenditure (EE) by indirect calorimetry before and after VNS. VNS did not affect pituitary hormones (growth hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, adrenocorticotropic hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone), postprandial metabolism, or EE. Of note, VNS reduced early postprandial insulin secretion, but not AUC of postprandial plasma insulin levels. Cortisol and catecholamine levels in serum did not change significantly. Short stimulation of vagal activity by VNS reduces early postprandial insulin secretion, but not other hormone levels and postprandial response. This suggests VNS as a safe treatment for RA patients.

  16. Acupuncture: a potential modality for the treatment of auricular pruritus in Ramsay Hunt Syndrome with multiple cranial nerve lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan Ying; Wang, He Sheng; Sun, Jian Hua

    2015-03-01

    Auricular pruritus coexisted with multiple cranial nerve lesions in Ramsay Hunt syndrome has been rarely reported in the literature especially its treatment. However, auricular pruritus cannot be better improved along with the improvement of multiple cranial nerve lesions. We tried to solve the problem with acupuncture and got experience from it. The following 2 cases of Ramsay Hunt syndrome show a potential modality for the treatment of auricular pruritus with acupuncture.

  17. High-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation alters thermal but not mechanical allodynia following chronic constriction injury of the rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, D L; Clemente, F R

    1998-11-01

    To determine if daily transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can alter the thermal and mechanical allodynia that develops after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the right sciatic nerve of rats. A completely randomized experimental design was used. Four groups of rats underwent CCI surgery to the right sciatic nerve and either were not treated with TENS or received TENS starting at different times after the CCI surgery. TENS was delivered daily for 1 hour to CCI rats through self-adhesive electrodes applied to skin innervated by the right dorsal rami of lumbar spinal nerves L1-6. Rats of different groups received daily TENS starting immediately, 20 to 30 hours, or 3 days after the CCI surgery. Thermal and mechanical pain thresholds of hind paws were assessed bilaterally in all rats twice before the CCI surgery (baseline) and then 2, 7, 12, and 14 days after surgery. Thermal and mechanical allodynia were expressed as difference scores between the pain thresholds of right and left hind paws. These values were normalized to differences that existed between the two paws at baseline. Daily TENS beginning immediately after CCI surgery prevented the development of thermal allodynia at all assessment times (p < .05). Daily TENS starting 1 day after surgery reduced thermal allodynia, but only on days 2 and 14 (p < .05). Daily TENS beginning 3 days after surgery had no effect on the development of thermal allodynia. Regardless of when it was started, daily TENS did not consistently alter mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. It appears that daily TENS can prevent thermal but not mechanical allodynia in this model. However, early intervention with the treatment is critical if it is to be effective at all.

  18. Sleeve bridging of the rhesus monkey ulnar nerve with muscular branches of the pronator teres:multiple ampliifcation of axonal regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-hui Kou; Pei-xun Zhang; Yan-hua Wang; Bo Chen; Na Han; Feng Xue; Hong-bo Zhang; Xiao-feng Yin; Bao-guo Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple-bud regeneration,i.e., multiple amplification, has been shown to exist in peripheral nerve regeneration. Multiple buds grow towards the distal nerve stump during proximal nerve ifber regeneration. Our previous studies have veriifed the limit and validity of multiple ampli-ifcation of peripheral nerve regeneration using small gap sleeve bridging of small donor nerves to repair large receptor nerves in rodents. The present study sought to observe multiple ampli-ifcation of myelinated nerve ifber regeneration in the primate peripheral nerve. Rhesus monkey models of distal ulnar nerve defects were established and repaired using muscular branches of the right forearm pronator teres. Proximal muscular branches of the pronator teres were su-tured into the distal ulnar nerve using the small gap sleeve bridging method. At 6 months after suture, two-ifnger lfexion and mild wrist lfexion were restored in the ulnar-sided injured limbs of rhesus monkey. Neurophysiological examination showed that motor nerve conduction veloc-ity reached 22.63 ± 6.34 m/s on the affected side of rhesus monkey. Osmium tetroxide staining demonstrated that the number of myelinated nerve fibers was 1,657 ± 652 in the branches of pronator teres of donor, and 2,661 ± 843 in the repaired ulnar nerve. The rate of multiple ampliifcation of regenerating myelinated nerve ifbers was 1.61. These data showed that when muscular branches of the pronator teres were used to repair ulnar nerve in primates, effective regeneration was observed in regenerating nerve ifbers, and functions of the injured ulnar nerve were restored to a certain extent. Moreover, multiple ampliifcation was subsequently detected in ulnar nerve axons.

  19. Spinal Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging in a Rat Model of Nerve Injury-Induced Pain and the Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.M. Jongen (Joost); H. Smits (Helwin); T. Pederzani (Tiziana); M. Bechakra (Malik); S.M. Hossaini (Mehdi); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); F.J.P.M. Huygen; C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); J.C. Holstege (Jan C.); E.A.J. Joosten (Elbert A.J.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractNerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprote

  20. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Joost L M; Smits, Helwin; Pederzani, Tiziana; Bechakra, Malik; Hossaini, Mehdi; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K; Huygen, Frank J P M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Holstege, Jan C; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (

  1. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Joost L M; Smits, Helwin; Pederzani, Tiziana; Bechakra, Malik; Hossaini, Mehdi; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K; Huygen, Frank J P M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Holstege, Jan C; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging

  2. Spinal Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging in a Rat Model of Nerve Injury-Induced Pain and the Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.M. Jongen (Joost); H. Smits (Helwin); T. Pederzani (Tiziana); M. Bechakra (Malik); S.M. Hossaini (Mehdi); S.K.E. Koekkoek (Bas); F.J.P.M. Huygen; C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris); J.C. Holstege (Jan C.); E.A.J. Joosten (Elbert A.J.)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractNerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent

  3. Subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve stimulation to treat urgency urinary incontinence, a pilot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrikje eVan Breda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesTo evaluate the effect of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve stimulation on non-neurogenic urgency urinary incontinence in a domestic setting.Materials and MethodsNon-neurogenic patients >18 years with overactive bladder symptoms and urgency urinary incontinence were included. Exclusion criteria were mainly stress urinary incontinence. Patients underwent one week of subject-controlled, on-demand, dorsal genital nerve stimulation, delivered by a percutaneously placed electrode near the dorsal genital nerve connected to an external stimulator (pulse-rate 20 Hz, pulse-width 300 μs. Patients activated the stimulator when feeling the urge to void and stimulated for 30 s. The amplitude was set at the highest tolerable level. A bladder diary including a severity score of the urgency urinary incontinence episodes/void (scores: 0=none, 1=drops, 2=dashes, 3=soaks and a padtest was kept 3 days prior to, during, and 3 days after the test period. The subjective improvement was also scored.ResultsSeven patients (4 males / 3 females were enrolled, the mean age was 55 years (range 23-73. Six completed the test week. In the remaining patient the electrode migrated and was removed. 5/6 finalized the complete bladder diary, 1/6 recorded only the heavy incontinence episodes (score=3. 4/6 completed the padtest. In all patients who finalized the bladder diary the number of urgency urinary incontinence episodes decreased, in 3/5 with ≥60%. The heavy incontinence episodes (score=3 were resolved in 2/6 patients, and improved ≥ 80% in the other 4. The severity score of the urgency urinary incontinence episodes/void was improved with ≥60% in 3/5 patients. The mean subjective improvement was 73%. ConclusionThis feasibility study indicates that subject-controlled, on-demand dorsal genital nerve stimulation using a percutaneously placed electrode is possible over a longer time period, in a home setting, with a positive effect on non

  4. Effect of selective vagal nerve stimulation on blood pressure, heart rate and respiratory rate in rats under metoprolol medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierthmuehlen, Mortimer; Plachta, Dennis T T

    2016-02-01

    Selective vagal nerve stimulation (sVNS) has been shown to reduce blood pressure without major side effects in rats. This technology might be the key to non-medical antihypertensive treatment in patients with therapy-resistant hypertension. β-blockers are the first-line therapy of hypertension and have in general a bradycardic effect. As VNS itself can also promote bradycardia, it was the aim of this study to investigate the influence of the β1-selective blocker Metoprolol on the effect of sVNS especially with respect to the heart rate. In 10 male Wistar rats, a polyimide multichannel-cuff electrode was placed around the vagal nerve bundle to selectively stimulate the aortic depressor nerve fibers. The stimulation parameters were adapted to the thresholds of individual animals and were in the following ranges: frequency 30-50 Hz, amplitude 0.3-1.8 mA and pulse width 0.3-1.3 ms. Blood pressure responses were detected with a microtip transducer in the carotid artery, and electrocardiography was recorded with s.c. chest electrodes. After IV administration of Metoprolol (2 mg kg(-1) body weight), the animals' mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) decreased significantly. Although the selective electrical stimulation of the baroreceptive fibers reduced MAP and HR, both effects were significantly alleviated by Metoprolol. As a side effect, the rate of stimulation-induced apnea significantly increased after Metoprolol administration. sVNS can lower the MAP under Metoprolol without causing severe bradycardia.

  5. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation reduces exercise-induced perceived pain and improves endurance exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astokorki, Ali H Y; Mauger, Alexis R

    2017-03-01

    Muscle pain is a natural consequence of intense and prolonged exercise and has been suggested to be a limiter of performance. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and interferential current (IFC) have been shown to reduce both chronic and acute pain in a variety of conditions. This study sought to ascertain whether TENS and IFC could reduce exercise-induced pain (EIP) and whether this would affect exercise performance. It was hypothesised that TENS and IFC would reduce EIP and result in an improved exercise performance. In two parts, 18 (Part I) and 22 (Part II) healthy male and female participants completed an isometric contraction of the dominant bicep until exhaustion (Part I) and a 16.1 km cycling time trial as quickly as they could (Part II) whilst receiving TENS, IFC, and a SHAM placebo in a repeated measures, randomised cross-over, and placebo-controlled design. Perceived EIP was recorded in both tasks using a validated subjective scale. In Part I, TENS significantly reduced perceived EIP (mean reduction of 12%) during the isometric contraction (P = 0.006) and significantly improved participants' time to exhaustion by a mean of 38% (P = 0.02). In Part II, TENS significantly improved (P = 0.003) participants' time trial completion time (~2% improvement) through an increased mean power output. These findings demonstrate that TENS can attenuate perceived EIP in a healthy population and that doing so significantly improves endurance performance in both submaximal isometric single limb exercise and whole-body dynamic exercise.

  6. Vagus nerve stimulation: outcome and predictors of seizure freedom in long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, Kazem; Elsharkawy, Alaa Eldin; Schulz, Reinhard; Hoppe, Matthias; Polster, Tilman; Pannek, Heinz; Ebner, Alois

    2010-06-01

    To present long-term outcome and to identify predictors of seizure freedom after vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). All patients who had undergone VNS implantation in the Epilepsy Centre Bethel were retrospectively reviewed. There were 144 patients who had undergone complete presurgical evaluation, including detailed clinical history, magnetic resonance imaging, and long-term video-EEG with ictal and interictal recordings. After implantation, all patients were examined at regular intervals of 4 weeks for 6-9 months. During this period the antiepileptic medication remained constant. All patients included in this study were followed up for a minimum of 2 years. Ten patients remained seizure-free for more than 1 year after VNS implantation (6.9%). Seizures improved in 89 patients (61.8%) but no changes were observed in 45 patients (31.3%). The following factors were significant in the univariate analysis: age at implantation, multifocal interictal epileptiform discharges, unilateral interictal epileptiform discharge, cortical dysgenesis, and psychomotor seizure. Stepwise multivariate analysis showed that unilateral interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs), P=0.014, HR=0.112 (95% CIs, 0.019-0.642), cortical dysgenesis P=0.007, HR=0.065 (95% CIs, 0.009-0.481) and younger age at implantation P=0.026, HR=7.533 (95% CIs 1.28-44.50) were independent predictors of seizure freedom in the long-term follow-up. VNS implantation may render patients with some forms of cortical dysgenesis (parietooccipital polymicrogyria, macrogyria) seizure-free. Patients with unilateral IEDs and earlier implantation achieved the most benefit from VNS. Copyright 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of evoked tactile sensation in forearm amputees with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guohong; Sui, Xiaohong; Li, Si; He, Longwen; Lan, Ning

    2015-12-01

    Objective. The goal of this study is to characterize the phenomenon of evoked tactile sensation (ETS) on the stump skin of forearm amputees using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Approach. We identified the projected finger map (PFM) of ETS on the stump skin in 11 forearm amputees, and compared perceptual attributes of the ETS in nine forearm amputees and eight able-bodied subjects using TENS. The profile of perceptual thresholds at the most sensitive points (MSPs) in each finger-projected area was obtained by modulating current amplitude, pulse width, and frequency of the biphasic, rectangular current stimulus. The long-term stability of the PFM and the perceptual threshold of the ETS were monitored in five forearm amputees for a period of 11 months. Main results. Five finger-specific projection areas can be independently identified on the stump skin of forearm amputees with a relatively long residual stump length. The shape of the PFM was progressively similar to that of the hand with more distal amputation. Similar sensory modalities of touch, pressure, buzz, vibration, and numb below pain sensation could be evoked both in the PFM of the stump skin of amputees and in the normal skin of able-bodied subjects. Sensory thresholds in the normal skin of able-bodied subjects were generally lower than those in the stump skin of forearm amputees, however, both were linearly modulated by current amplitude and pulse width. The variation of the MSPs in the PFM was confined to a small elliptical area with 95% confidence. The perceptual thresholds of thumb-projected areas were found to vary less than 0.99 × 10-2 mA cm-2. Significance. The stable PFM and sensory thresholds of ETS are desirable for a non-invasive neural interface that can feed back finger-specific tactile information from the prosthetic hand to forearm amputees.

  8. Do the Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation on Knee Osteoarthritis Pain and Function Last?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Jeffrey Jai; Harrison, Paige E; Benjamin, Samantha A; Bhave, Anil; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has been shown to decrease pain associated with knee osteoarthritis, which potentially leads to better function, improved quality of life, and postpones the need for surgical intervention. The purpose of this study was to perform a 1-year follow-up of a previous prospective group of patients with knee osteoarthritis, randomized to TENS or standard of care, who were asked to rate their changes in: (1) patient pain perception; (2) subjective medication use; (3) subjective functional abilities; (4) quality of life; (5) device use; and (6) conversion to TKA. A population of 70 patients were randomized to receive either a TENS device or a standard conservative therapy regimen. Patients were evaluated based on various subjective outcomes at minimum 1-year (mean, 19 months) follow-up. The TENS cohort had lower visual analog pain scores compared with the matching cohort. Subjective functional outcomes, as well as functional and activity scores, were also greater in the TENS cohort. Patients in TENS cohort showed significant improvements in their subjective and functional outcomes as compared with their initial status, while the control group did not show significant change. A majority of the TENS patients were able to reduce the amount of pain medications. Additionally, a large portion of the patients assigned to the TENS group continue to use the device, after completion of the trial. This study demonstrated the benefit of TENS for improving subjective outcomes in patients with pain due to knee osteoarthritis, compared with standard conservative treatments. The results of the study suggest that TENS is a safe and effective adjunct as part of the spectrum of current nonoperative treatment methods for knee osteoarthritis.

  9. Percutaneous nerve stimulation in chronic neuropathic pain patients due to spinal cord injury: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopsky, David Jos; Ettema, Frank Willem Leo; van der Leeden, Marike; Dekker, Joost; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke Marjan

    2014-03-01

    The long-term prognosis for neuropathic pain resolution following spinal cord injury (SCI) is often poor. In many SCI patients, neuropathic pain continues or even worsens over time. Thus, new treatment approaches are needed. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility and effect of percutaneous (electrical) nerve stimulation (P(E)NS) in SCI patients with chronic neuropathic pain. In 18 weeks, 12 P(E)NS treatments were scheduled. Assessment with questionnaires was performed at baseline (T0), after 8 weeks (T8), 18 weeks (T18), and 12 weeks post-treatment (T30). From 26 screened patients, 17 were included. In total, 91.2% questionnaires were returned, 2 patients dropped out, and 4.2% of the patients reported minor side effects. Pain scores on the week pain diary measured with the numerical rating scale improved significantly at T8, from 6.5 at baseline to 5.4, and were still significantly improved at T18. Pain reduction of ≥ 30% directly after a session was reported in 64.6% sessions. In total, 6 patients experienced reduction in size of the pain areas at T18 and T30, with a mean reduction of 45.8% at T18 and 45.3% at T30. P(E)NS is feasible as an intervention in SCI patients and might have a positive effect on pain reduction in a part of this patient group. © 2013 The Authors Pain Practice © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  10. Cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex elicited by the superior laryngeal nerve stimulation in rats.

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    Rahman Md Mostafeezur

    Full Text Available Cannabinoids have been reported to be involved in affecting various biological functions through binding with cannabinoid receptors type 1 (CB1 and 2 (CB2. The present study was designed to investigate whether swallowing, an essential component of feeding behavior, is modulated after the administration of cannabinoid. The swallowing reflex evoked by the repetitive electrical stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve in rats was recorded before and after the administration of the cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55-212-2 (WIN, with or without CB1 or CB2 antagonist. The onset latency of the first swallow and the time intervals between swallows were analyzed. The onset latency and the intervals between swallows were shorter after the intravenous administration of WIN, and the strength of effect of WIN was dose-dependent. Although the intravenous administration of CB1 antagonist prior to intravenous administration of WIN blocked the effect of WIN, the administration of CB2 antagonist did not block the effect of WIN. The microinjection of the CB1 receptor antagonist directly into the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS prior to intravenous administration of WIN also blocked the effect of WIN. Immunofluorescence histochemistry was conducted to assess the co-localization of CB1 receptor immunoreactivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67 or glutamate in the NTS. CB1 receptor was co-localized more with GAD67 than glutamate in the NTS. These findings suggest that cannabinoids facilitate the swallowing reflex via CB1 receptors. Cannabinoids may attenuate the tonic inhibitory effect of GABA (gamma-aminobuteric acid neurons in the central pattern generator for swallowing.

  11. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury via endogenous cholinergic pathway in rat.

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    Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available Inflammation and apoptosis play critical roles in the acute progression of ischemic injury pathology. Emerging evidence indicates that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS following focal cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R may be neuroprotective by limiting infarct size. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we investigated whether the protective effects of VNS in acute cerebral I/R injury were associated with anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic processes. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats underwent VNS at 30 min after focal cerebral I/R surgery. Twenty-four h after reperfusion, neurological deficit scores, infarct volume, and neuronal apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected using enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA, and immunofluorescence staining for the endogenous "cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway" was also performed. The protein expression of a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAchR, phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt, and cleaved caspase 3 in ischemic penumbra were determined with Western blot analysis. I/R rats treated with VNS (I/R+VNS had significantly better neurological deficit scores, reduced cerebral infarct volume, and decreased number of TdT mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL positive cells. Furthermore, in the ischemic penumbra of the I/R+VNS group, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cleaved caspase 3 protein were significantly decreased, and the levels of a7nAchR and phosphorylated Akt were significantly increased relative to the I/R alone group. These results indicate that VNS is neuroprotective in acute cerebral I/R injury by suppressing inflammation and apoptosis via activation of cholinergic and a7nAchR/Akt pathways.

  12. Dynamic Causal Modelling and physiological confounds: a functional MRI study of vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Sébastien; Picq, Chloé; Sinniger, Valérie; Clarençon, Didier; Bonaz, Bruno; David, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) has been proposed to estimate neuronal connectivity from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a biophysical model that links synaptic activity to hemodynamic processes. However, it is well known that fMRI is sensitive not only to neuronal activity, but also to many other psychophysiological responses which may be task-related, such as changes in cardio-respiratory activity. They are not explicitly taken into account in the generative models of DCM and their effects on estimated neuronal connectivity are not known. The main goal of this study was to report the face validity of DCM in the presence of strong physiological confounds that presumably cannot be corrected for, using an fMRI experiment of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) performed in rats. First, a simple simulation was used to evaluate the principled ability of DCM to recover directed connectivity in the presence of a confounding factor. Second, we tested the experimental validity using measures of the BOLD correlates of left 5Hz VNS. Because VNS mostly activates the central autonomic regulation system, fMRI signals were likely to represent both direct and indirect vascular responses to such activation. In addition to the inference of standard statistical parametric maps, DCM was thus used to estimate directed neural connectivity in a small brain network including the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) known to receive vagal afferents. Though blood pressure changes may constitute a major physiological confound in this dataset, model comparison of DCMs still allowed the identification of the NTS as the input station of the VNS pathway to the brain. Our study indicates that current developments of DCM are robust to psychophysiological responses to some extent, but does not exclude the need to develop specific models of brain - body interactions within the DCM framework to better estimate neuronal connectivity from fMRI time series. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All

  13. [Electrical stimulation and swimming in the acute phase of axonotmesis: their influence on nerve regeneration and functional recovery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, L S; Sobral, L L; Takeda, S Y M; Betini, J; Guirro, R R J; Somazz, M C; Teodori, R M

    Little attention has been given to the influence of low-frequency phasic electrical stimulation (LFPES) and physical exercise on the quality of peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery. AIM. To evaluate the influence of LFPES, swimming and the association between the two in terms of the morphology of the regenerated sciatic nerve following axonotmesis. Thirty Wistar mice (222.05 +/- 42.2 g) were distributed into groups: control (C), denervated (D), denervated + swimming (DS), denervated + electrostimulation (DE) and denervated + swimming + electrostimulation (DSE). After 24 hours of axonotmesis, the soleus muscle of the DE and DSE groups was stimulated electrically. The DS and DSE groups swam over a period of 22 days. The number of axons, morphometric data on the nerve and the functional index of the sciatic nerve (FIS) were evaluated. The number of axons in the denervated groups was higher than in the control group, and in the DE group the figure was higher than in the D group. The axonal diameter was smaller in the denervated groups, yet in the DS group it was higher than in the D group. The other morphometric parameters were quite similar to those of the C group. The FIS between days 7 and 14 of the post-operative period was different to the pre-operative index and that measured on day 21 of the post-operative period; the DSE group, however, differed from the pre-operative values. Swimming and LFPES, applied on an individual basis, do not affect the maturation of the regenerated fibres or functional recovery. LFPES favoured axonal regeneration and combining the treatments delayed functional recovery without having any influence on nerve regeneration.

  14. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation induces tidal melatonin secretion and has an antidiabetic effect in Zucker fatty rats.

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    Shuxing Wang

    Full Text Available Melatonin plays a protective role in type 2 diabetes (T2D through regulation of glucose metabolism. Whether transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS is antidiabetic and whether a modulated melatonin production is involved in the antidiabetic mechanism of taVNS is unknown. In this study, once daily 30 min noninvasive taVNS was administered in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF, fa/fa and Zucker lean (ZL, +/fa littermates under anesthesia for 5 consecutive weeks. The acute and chronic influences of taVNS on the secretion of melatonin were studied as well as the effects of taVNS on blood glucose metabolism. We found that naïve ZDF rats develop hyperglycemia naturally with age. Each taVNS session would trigger a tidal secretion of melatonin both during and after the taVNS procedure and induce an acute two-phase glycemic change, a steep increase followed by a gradual decrease. Once daily taVNS sessions eventually reduced the glucose concentration to a normal level in seven days and effectively maintained the normal glycemic and plasma glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc levels when applied for five consecutive weeks. These beneficial effects of taVNS also exist in pinealectomized rats, which otherwise would show overt and continuous hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and high HbAlc levels. We concluded that multiple taVNS sessions are antidiabetic in T2D through triggering of tidal secretion of melatonin. This finding may have potential importance in developing new approaches to the treatment of T2D, which is highly prevalent, incurable with any current approaches, and very costly to the world.

  15. Transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation induces tidal melatonin secretion and has an antidiabetic effect in Zucker fatty rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuxing; Zhai, Xu; Li, Shaoyuan; McCabe, Michael F; Wang, Xing; Rong, Peijing

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin plays a protective role in type 2 diabetes (T2D) through regulation of glucose metabolism. Whether transcutaneous vagus nerve stimulation (taVNS) is antidiabetic and whether a modulated melatonin production is involved in the antidiabetic mechanism of taVNS is unknown. In this study, once daily 30 min noninvasive taVNS was administered in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF, fa/fa) and Zucker lean (ZL, +/fa) littermates under anesthesia for 5 consecutive weeks. The acute and chronic influences of taVNS on the secretion of melatonin were studied as well as the effects of taVNS on blood glucose metabolism. We found that naïve ZDF rats develop hyperglycemia naturally with age. Each taVNS session would trigger a tidal secretion of melatonin both during and after the taVNS procedure and induce an acute two-phase glycemic change, a steep increase followed by a gradual decrease. Once daily taVNS sessions eventually reduced the glucose concentration to a normal level in seven days and effectively maintained the normal glycemic and plasma glycosylated hemoglobin (HbAlc) levels when applied for five consecutive weeks. These beneficial effects of taVNS also exist in pinealectomized rats, which otherwise would show overt and continuous hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and high HbAlc levels. We concluded that multiple taVNS sessions are antidiabetic in T2D through triggering of tidal secretion of melatonin. This finding may have potential importance in developing new approaches to the treatment of T2D, which is highly prevalent, incurable with any current approaches, and very costly to the world.

  16. Spinal Cord Stimulation Modulates Gene Expression in the Spinal Cord of an Animal Model of Peripheral Nerve Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Dana M; Cedeño, David L; Kelley, Courtney A; Benyamin, Ramsin; Vallejo, Ricardo

    Previously, we found that application of pulsed radiofrequency to a peripheral nerve injury induces changes in key genes regulating nociception concurrent with alleviation of paw sensitivity in an animal model. In the current study, we evaluated such genes after applying spinal cord stimulation (SCS) therapy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6 per group) were randomized into test and control groups. The spared nerve injury model was used to simulate a neuropathic pain state. A 4-contact microelectrode was implanted at the L1 vertebral level and SCS was applied continuously for 72 hours. Mechanical hyperalgesia was tested. Spinal cord tissues were collected and analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction to quantify levels of IL1β, GABAbr1, subP, Na/K ATPase, cFos, 5HT3ra, TNFα, Gal, VIP, NpY, IL6, GFAP, ITGAM, and BDNF. Paw withdrawal thresholds significantly decreased in spared nerve injury animals and stimulation attenuated sensitivity within 24 hours (P = 0.049), remaining significant through 72 hours (P = 0.003). Nerve injury caused up-regulation of TNFα, GFAP, ITGAM, and cFOS as well as down-regulation of Na/K ATPase. Spinal cord stimulation therapy modulated the expression of 5HT3ra, cFOS, and GABAbr1. Strong inverse relationships in gene expression relative to the amount of applied current were observed for GABAbr1 (R = -0.65) and Na/K ATPase (R = -0.58), and a positive linear correlations between 5HT3r (R = 0.80) and VIP (R = 0.50) were observed. Continuously applied SCS modulates expression of key genes involved in the regulation of neuronal membrane potential.

  17. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is preferred by many doctors, patients and families. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) works through a device implanted under ... skin that sends electrical pulses through the left vagus nerve, half of a prominent pair of nerves that ...

  18. [A pharmacological analysis of the central control of the preganglionic sympathetic neurons during stimulation of the afferent nerve fibers of the digestive tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itina, L V; Posniak, V A

    1995-12-01

    In acute experiments on cats, effect of adrenergic brain neurons on impulse activity of preganglionic fibers of the left splanchnic nerve was studied. Afferent fibers of nerves innervating the stomach, duodenum, ileum and ileocecal angle were electrically stimulated. Phenoxybenzamine, obsidan, amizyl, iprazid, nuredal, dalargine, and morphine were used for pharmacological analysis. Nerves, stimulation at 20 Hz of different segments of the digestive tract was accompanied by different inhibition of preganglionic neurons. Sympathetic-stimulating effects were observed more frequently at 5 Hz stimulation. After vagotomy, alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor block, central cholinoreceptor and monoamine oxidase (MAO) block, and after dalargine (0.1 and 0.01 mg/kg) nerves stimulation at 20 Hz was followed by sympathetic-stimulating effect. A weak regulatory effect of morphine (1 and 10 mg/kg) on ileal nerve stimulation effects was shown. It is suggested that excitation from afferent neurons of the vagus is transmitted to central cholinergic neurons which, in their turn, excite adrenergic neurons of the brain, and the latter inhibit impulsation of preganglionic fibers. MAO block increased the balance of excitatory effect of serotonin on spinal reflexes. Morphine and dalargine intracentrally may block adrenergic and cholinergic transmissions, as well as decrease the release of substance P from afferent neurons. Their regulatory action is revealed when different frequencies of stimulation are used.

  19. Material properties and electrical stimulation regimens through polycaprolactone fumarate-polypyrrole scaffolds as potential conductive nerve conduits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroder, Philipp; Wang, Huan; Ruesink, Terry; Lu, Lichun; Windebank, Anthony J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Runge, M. Brett

    2010-01-01

    Mechanical and electrical properties of polycaprolactone fumarate-polypyrrole (PCLF-PPy) scaffolds were studied under physiological conditions to evaluate their ability to maintain material properties necessary for application as conductive nerve conduits. PC12 cells cultured on PCLF-PPy scaffolds were stimulated with regimens of 10 μA of constant or 20 Hz frequency current passed through the scaffolds for 1 h/day. PC12 cellular morphologies were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy after 48 h. PCLF-PPy scaffolds exhibited excellent mechanical properties at 37°C which would allow suturing and flexibility. The surface resistivity of the scaffolds was 2kΩ and the scaffolds were electrically stable during application of electrical stimulation (ES). In vitro studies showed significant increases in percentage of neurite bearing cells, number of neurites per cell and neurite length in the presence of ES compared to no ES. Additionally, extending neurites were observed to align in the direction of the applied current. This study shows that electrically conductive PCLF-PPy scaffolds possess material properties necessary for application as nerve conduits. Additionally, the capability to significantly enhance and direct neurite extension by passing electrical current through PCLF-PPy scaffolds renders them even more promising as future therapeutic treatments for severe nerve injuries. PMID:20965280

  20. Effects of vagus nerve stimulation and vagotomy on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model in rats.

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    Matthijs Kox

    Full Text Available Pulmonary inflammation contributes to ventilator-induced lung injury. Sepsis-induced pulmonary inflammation (first hit may be potentiated by mechanical ventilation (MV, second hit. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve has been shown to attenuate inflammation in various animal models through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. We determined the effects of vagotomy (VGX and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS on systemic and pulmonary inflammation in a two-hit model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were i.v. administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently underwent VGX, VNS or a sham operation. 1 hour following LPS, MV with low (8 mL/kg or moderate (15 mL/kg tidal volumes was initiated, or animals were left breathing spontaneously (SP. After 4 hours of MV or SP, rats were sacrificed. Cytokine and blood gas analysis was performed. MV with 15, but not 8 mL/kg, potentiated the LPS-induced pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokine response (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to LPS-SP, but did not affect systemic inflammation or impair oxygenation. VGX enhanced the LPS-induced pulmonary, but not systemic pro-inflammatory cytokine response in spontaneously breathing, but not in MV animals (TNF-α, IL-6, KC: p<0.05 compared to SHAM, and resulted in decreased pO(2 (p<0.05 compared to sham-operated animals. VNS did not affect any of the studied parameters in both SP and MV animals. In conclusion, MV with moderate tidal volumes potentiates the pulmonary inflammatory response elicited by systemic LPS administration. No beneficial effects of vagus nerve stimulation performed following LPS administration were found. These results questions the clinical applicability of stimulation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in systemically inflamed patients admitted to the ICU where MV is initiated.

  1. No relation between afferent facilitation induced by digital nerve stimulation and the latency of cutaneomuscular reflexes and somatosensory evoked magnetic fields

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    Sho eKojima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary motor cortex (M1 excitability can be assessed using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and can be modulated by a conditioning electrical stimulus delivered to a peripheral nerve prior to TMS. This is known as afferent facilitation (AF. The aim of this study was to determine whether AF can be induced by digital nerve stimulation and to evaluate the relation between the interstimulus interval (ISI required for AF and the latency of the E2 component of the cutaneomuscular reflex (CMR and the prominent somatosensory evoked field (SEF deflection that occurs approximately 70 ms after digital nerve stimulation (P60m. Stimulation of the digital nerve of the right index finger was followed, at various time intervals, by single-pulse TMS applied to the contralateral hemisphere. The ISI between digital nerve stimulation and TMS was 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 140, 180, 200, or 220 ms. Single-pulse TMS was performed alone as a control. SEFs were recorded following digital nerve stimulation of the index finger, and the equivalent current dipole of prominent deflections that occurred around 70 ms after the stimulation was calculated. CMRs were recorded following digital nerve stimulation during muscle contraction. Motor evoked potentials were facilitated at an ISI between 50 and 100 ms in 11 of 13 subjects, and the facilitated MEP amplitude was larger than the unconditioned MEP amplitude (p < 0.01. There was no significant correlation between the ISI at which AF was maximal and the latency of the P60m component of the SEF (r = -0.50, p = 0.12 or the E2 component of the CMR (r = -0.54, p = 0.88. These results indicate that the precise ISI required for AF cannot be predicted using SEF or CMR.

  2. A continuous spinal cord stimulation model attenuates pain-related behavior in vivo following induction of a peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Dana M; Vallejo, Ricardo; Kelley, Courtney A; Benyamin, Ramsin; Cedeño, David L

    2015-04-01

    Models that simulate clinical conditions are needed to gain an understanding of the mechanism involved during spinal cord stimulation (SCS) treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. An animal model has been developed for continuous SCS in which animals that have been injured to develop neuropathic pain behavior were allowed to carry on with regular daily activities while being stimulated for 72 hours. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into each of six different groups (N = 10-13). Three groups included animals in which the spared nerve injury (SNI) was induced. Animals in two of these groups were implanted with a four-contact electrode in the epidural space. Animals in one of these groups received stimulation for 72 hours continuously. Three corresponding sham groups (no SNI) were included. Mechanical and cold-thermal allodynia were evaluated using von Frey filaments and acetone drops, respectively. Mean withdrawal thresholds were compared. Statistical significance was established using one-way ANOVAs followed by Holm-Sidak post hoc analysis. Continuous SCS attenuates mechanical allodynia in animals with neuropathic pain behavior. Mechanical withdrawal threshold increases significantly in SNI animals after 24 and 72 hours stimulation vs. SNI no stimulation (p = 0.007 and p stimulation (p = 0.001 and p Stimulation did not provide recovery to baseline values. SCS did not seem to attenuate cold-thermal allodynia. A continuous SCS model has been developed. Animals with neuropathic pain behavior that were continuously stimulated showed significant increase in withdrawal thresholds proportional to stimulation time. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  3. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation.

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    Joost L M Jongen

    Full Text Available Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS, an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (AFI to study changes in spinal dorsal horn metabolic activity. In the Seltzer model of nerve-injury induced pain, hypersensitivity was confirmed using the von Frey and hotplate test. 14 Days after nerve-injury, rats were anesthetized, a bipolar electrode was placed around the affected sciatic nerve and the spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy at T13. AFI recordings were obtained in neuropathic rats and a control group of naïve rats following 10 seconds of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength, or following non-noxious palpation. Neuropathic rats were then treated with 30 minutes of SCS or sham stimulation and AFI recordings were obtained for up to 60 minutes after cessation of SCS/sham. Although AFI responses to noxious electrical stimulation were similar in neuropathic and naïve rats, only neuropathic rats demonstrated an AFI-response to palpation. Secondly, an immediate, short-lasting, but strong reduction in AFI intensity and area of excitation occurred following SCS, but not following sham stimulation. Our data confirm that AFI can be used to directly visualize changes in spinal metabolic activity following nerve injury and they imply that SCS acts through rapid modulation of nociceptive processing at the spinal level.

  4. Spinal autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging in a rat model of nerve injury-induced pain and the effect of spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongen, Joost L M; Smits, Helwin; Pederzani, Tiziana; Bechakra, Malik; Hossaini, Mehdi; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan K; Huygen, Frank J P M; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Holstege, Jan C; Joosten, Elbert A J

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injury may cause neuropathic pain, which involves hyperexcitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons. The mechanisms of action of spinal cord stimulation (SCS), an established treatment for intractable neuropathic pain, are only partially understood. We used Autofluorescent Flavoprotein Imaging (AFI) to study changes in spinal dorsal horn metabolic activity. In the Seltzer model of nerve-injury induced pain, hypersensitivity was confirmed using the von Frey and hotplate test. 14 Days after nerve-injury, rats were anesthetized, a bipolar electrode was placed around the affected sciatic nerve and the spinal cord was exposed by a laminectomy at T13. AFI recordings were obtained in neuropathic rats and a control group of naïve rats following 10 seconds of electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at C-fiber strength, or following non-noxious palpation. Neuropathic rats were then treated with 30 minutes of SCS or sham stimulation and AFI recordings were obtained for up to 60 minutes after cessation of SCS/sham. Although AFI responses to noxious electrical stimulation were similar in neuropathic and naïve rats, only neuropathic rats demonstrated an AFI-response to palpation. Secondly, an immediate, short-lasting, but strong reduction in AFI intensity and area of excitation occurred following SCS, but not following sham stimulation. Our data confirm that AFI can be used to directly visualize changes in spinal metabolic activity following nerve injury and they imply that SCS acts through rapid modulation of nociceptive processing at the spinal level.

  5. Characterization of postsynaptic potentials evoked by sural nerve stimulation in hindlimb motoneurons from acute and chronic spinal cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L L; Chandler, S H

    1987-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the changes in postsynaptic potentials recorded in ankle extensor motoneurons resulting from activation of the sural nerve after spinal cord transection in the adult cat. Eight acute and nine chronic animals were spinalized at T12. Intracellular recordings from motoneurons innervating the triceps surae were performed. Sural nerve stimulation evoked complex synaptic potentials consisting of early and late components in all motoneurons. Early excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (PSPs), as well as long latency excitatory postsynaptic potentials were recorded and averaged for assessment of PSP amplitude and duration. Early PSPs, both excitatory and inhibitory, were significantly larger in the motoneurons of cats spinalized 4-6 months earlier. Central latency of excitatory potentials were similar in the two samples of motoneurons, but the central latency associated with the initial inhibitory PSP was significantly shorter in the recordings from motoneurons of chronic spinal cats. In most recordings, an additional inhibitory PSP followed the initial excitatory PSP in motoneurons, and this secondary inhibitory PSP was similar in peak amplitude and duration in both samples of motoneurons. Also, a long latency excitatory PSP was recorded in a large percentage of motoneurons from both samples. This potential was typically of greater amplitude and longer duration in the motoneurons from chronic animals, when compared to recordings from acute animals. Although changes in amplitude and duration of PSP activity could be documented, there was no marked alteration in the frequency of occurrence of each PSP pattern recorded from the two preparations. This suggests that the synaptic pathways mediating the sural nerve reflexes have not qualitatively changed in the chronic spinal animal. The changes in amplitudes and durations of the PSPs in the chronic spinal cat indicate, however, that quantitative changes have occurred

  6. Multiple Sites Ultrasonography of Peripheral Nerves in Differentiating Charcot–Marie–Tooth Type 1A from Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy

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    Jingwen Niu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionMultiple sites measurement of cross-sectional areas (CSA by ultrasound was performed to differentiate Charcot–Marie–Tooth type 1A (CMT1A and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP.MethodsNine patients with CMT1A, 28 patients with CIDP, and 14 healthy controls (HC were recruited prospectively. Consecutive ultrasonography scanning was performed from wrist to axilla on median and ulnar nerves. CSAs were measured at 10 predetermined sites of each nerve.ResultsCMT1A had significantly larger CSAs at all sites of median and ulnar nerves (p < 0.01. In CMT1A, CSAs increased gradually and homogeneously from distal to proximal along the nerve, except potential entrapment sites. CIDP displayed three different morphological patterns, including mild enlargement in 15 patients, prominent segmental enlargement in 12, and slight enlargement in 1, among which different treatment responses were observed. All patients with mild nerve enlargement treated with intravenous immunoglobulin were responsive (7/7, while less than half of those with prominent segmental enlargement (3/7 were responsive (p < 0.01.DiscussionConsecutive scan along the nerve and multiple sites measurement by ultrasound could supply more detailed morphological feature of the nerve and help to differentiate CMT1A from CIDP.

  7. Percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training for overactive bladder syndrome in women: results of a randomized controlled study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaldazza, Carlo Vecchioli; Morosetti, Carolina; Giampieretti, Rosita; Lorenzetti, Rossana; Baroni, Marinella

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT) in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Materials and Methods 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. Results A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups. Quality of life improved in both groups, whereas patient perception of urgency improved only in women treated with PTNS. Global impression of improvement revealed a greater satisfaction in patients treated with PTNS. Conclusion This study demonstrates the effectiveness of PTNS and ES with PFMT in women with OAB, but greater improvements were found with PTNS.

  8. The impact of high-frequency magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves: muscle hardness, venous blood flow, and motor function of upper extremity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudera, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of high-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation on the upper limb function. Twenty-five healthy adults (16 men and 9 women) participated in this study. The radial nerve of the non-dominant hand was stimulated by high-frequency magnetic stimulation device. A total of 600 impulses were applied at a frequency of 20 Hz and intensity of 1.2 resting motor threshold (rMT). At three time points (before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation), muscle hardness of the extensor digitorum muscle on the stimulated side was measured using a mechanical tissue hardness meter and a shear wave imaging device, cephalic venous blood flow on the stimulated side was measured using an ultrasound system, and the Box and Block test (BBT) was performed. Mechanical tissue hardness results did not show any significant differences between before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation. Measurements via shear wave imaging showed that muscle hardness significantly decreased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P nerve magnetic stimulation can achieve effects similar to electrical stimulation in a less invasive manner, and may therefore become an important element in next-generation rehabilitation.

  9. [CT-guided electrode placement for sacral nerve stimulation in the treatment of faecal incontinence (cSNS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goos, M; Ruf, G; Jargon, D; Trummer, C; Thomusch, O; Grüneberger, J; Bulla, S; Kotter, E; Ruthmann, O

    2014-12-01

    The sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) can be performed in the screening phase under local anaesthesia. Implantation of the tined-lead electrodes is usually performed in an inpatient setting under general anaesthesia. An outpatient procedure for both PNE and implantation of the electrodes offers decisive advantages with respect to the accuracy of electrode placement. From 2006 to 2011 a total of 51 patients was treated with SNS in an outpatient setting. Of 51 patients having the PNE, in four patients the procedure could not successfully be completed. In 39 of the 47 patients screened, the testing was positive. Eight times the screening was negative. The functional results show a significant decline in the Cleveland scores from 14.9 to 6.4. The manometric resting pressure improved from 23.4 mmHg to 43.81 mmHg, the squeezing pressure improved from 42.2 mmHg to 76.12 mmHg. Due to patients' perception and according to the response on the stimulus, the electrodes were placed on the left in S4 11 times, 23 times in the left S3, 3 times in the right S3, once in the left S2 and once in the right S2. CT-guided electrode placement is safe for temporary (subchronic) and permanent (chronic) sacral nerve stimulation and provides a valuable means for placement of the stimulating material. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Dock3 overexpression and p38 MAPK inhibition synergistically stimulate neuroprotection and axon regeneration after optic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semba, Kentaro; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Kimura, Atsuko; Harada, Chikako; Katome, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Harada, Takayuki

    2014-10-03

    The dedicator of cytokinesis 3 (Dock3) is an atypical guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is predominantly expressed in the CNS. Dock3 exerts neuroprotective effects and stimulates optic nerve regeneration. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase acts downstream of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) signaling and plays an important role in neural cell death. We assessed a therapeutic efficacy of Dock3 stimulation and p38 inhibition in retinal degeneration induced by optic nerve injury (ONI). In vivo retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography revealed that ONI-induced retinal degeneration was ameliorated in SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor)-treated WT mice and PBS-treated Dock3 overexpressing (Dock3 Tg) mice, and SB203580 further stimulated retinal protection in Dock3 Tg mice. In addition, SB203580 increased the number of regenerating axons after ONI in both WT and Dock3 Tg mice. ONI-induced phosphorylation of ASK1, p38 and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor 2B subunit were suppressed in the retina of Dock3 Tg mice. Inhibition of the ASK1 pathway in Dock3 Tg mice suggests that Dock3 may have an antioxidant-like property. These results indicate that overexpression of Dock3 and pharmacological interruption of p38 have synergistic effects for both neuroprotection and axon regeneration, thus combined application may be beneficial for the treatment of ONI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Persistent effects after trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation by mandibular extension on rat blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapi, D; Colantuoni, A; Del Seppia, C; Ghione, S; Tonlorenzi, D; Brunelli, M; Scuri, R

    2013-03-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex is a brainstem reflex known to lead to a decrement in heart rate and blood pressure, whereas few data have been collected about its effects on the cerebral hemodynamic. In this study we assess the in vivo effects of trigeminal nerve peripheral stimulation by mandibular extension on pial microcirculation and systemic arterial blood pressure in rats. Experiments were performed in male Wistar rats subjected to mandibular extension obtained inserting an ad hoc developed retractor between the dental arches. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate were recorded and the pial arterioles were visualized by fluorescence microscopy to measure the vessel diameters before (15 minutes) during (5-15 minutes) and after (80 minutes) mandibular extension. While in control rats (sham-operated rats) and in rats subjected to the dissection of the trigeminal peripheral branches mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and pial microcirculation did not change during the whole observation period (110 minutes), in rats submitted to mandibular extension, mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arteriolar diameter significantly decreased during stimulation. Afterward mean arterial blood pressure remained reduced as well as heart rate, while arteriolar diameter significantly increased evidencing a vasodilatation persisting for the whole remaining observation time. Therefore, trigeminal nerve proprioceptive stimulation appears to trigger specific mechanisms regulating systemic arterial blood pressure and pial microcirculation.

  12. MRI of optic nerve and postchiasmal visual pathways and visual evoked potentials in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis

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    Davies, M.B.; Hawkins, C.P. [School of Postgraduate Medicine, Keele Univ. (United Kingdom)]|[Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, Royal Infirmary, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Williams, R. [MRI Unit Cornwall House, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Haq, N. [Department of Neurology, North Staffordshire Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Pelosi, L. [Department of Neurology and Neurophysiology, Royal Infirmary, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    We studied the relationship between abnormalities shown by MRI and functional disturbances in the visual pathway as assessed by the visual evoked potential (VEP) in 25 patients with established multiple sclerosis (MS); only 4 of whom had a history of acute optic neuritis. Optic nerve MRI was abnormal in 19 (76 %) and is thus useful in detecting subclinical disease. Optic nerve total lesion length and area on the STIR sequence was found to correlate significantly with prolongation of the VEP latency. This may reflect a predominantly demyelinating rather than inflammatory origin for the signal change in the optic nerve. (orig.) With 5 figs., 1 tab., 25 refs.

  13. Comparison of dopamine kinetics in the larval Drosophila ventral nerve cord and protocerebrum with improved optogenetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privman, Eve; Venton, B Jill

    2015-11-01

    Dopamine release and uptake have been studied in the Drosophila larval ventral nerve cord (VNC) using optogenetics to stimulate endogenous release. However, other areas of the central nervous system remain uncharacterized. Here, we compare dopamine release in the VNC and protocerebrum of larval Drosophila. Stimulations were performed with CsChrimson, a new, improved, red light-activated channelrhodopsin. In both regions, dopamine release was observed after only a single, 4 ms duration light pulse. Michaelis-Menten modeling was used to understand release and uptake parameters for dopamine. The amount of dopamine released ([DA]p ) on the first stimulation pulse is higher than the average [DA]p released from subsequent pulses. The initial and average amount of dopamine released per stimulation pulse is smaller in the protocerebrum than in the VNC. The average Vmax of 0.08 μM/s in the protocerebrum was significantly higher than the Vmax of 0.05 μM/s in the VNC. The average Km of 0.11 μM in the protocerebrum was not significantly different from the Km of 0.10 μM in the VNC. When the competitive dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor nisoxetine was applied, the Km increased significantly in both regions while Vmax stayed the same. This work demonstrates regional differences in dopamine release and uptake kinetics, indicating important variation in the amount of dopamine available for neurotransmission and neuromodulation. We use a new optogenetic tool, red light activated CsChrimson, to stimulate the release of dopamine in the ventral nerve cord and medial protocerebrum of the larval Drosophila central nervous system. We monitored extracellular dopamine by fast scan cyclic voltammetry and used Michaelis-Menten modeling to probe the regulation of extracellular dopamine, discovering important similarities and differences in these two regions.

  14. Nerve Stimulation Enhances Task-Oriented Training in Chronic, Severe Motor Deficit After Stroke: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Cheryl; Chelette, Kenneth C; Westgate, Philip M; Powell, Elizabeth; Nichols, Laurie; Fleischer, Anne; Sawaki, Lumy

    2016-07-01

    A sensory-based intervention called peripheral nerve stimulation can enhance outcomes of motor training for stroke survivors with mild-to-moderate hemiparesis. Further research is needed to establish whether this paired intervention can have benefit in cases of severe impairment (almost no active movement). Subjects with chronic, severe poststroke hemiparesis (n=36) were randomized to receive 10 daily sessions of either active or sham stimulation (2 hours) immediately preceding intensive task-oriented training (4 hours). Upper extremity movement function was assessed using Fugl-Meyer Assessment (primary outcome measure), Wolf Motor Function Test, and Action Research Arm Test at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 1-month follow-up. Statistically significant difference between groups favored the active stimulation group on Fugl-Meyer at postintervention (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-6.9; P=0.008) and 1-month follow-up (95% CI, 0.6-8.3; P=0.025), Wolf Motor Function Test at postintervention (95% CI, -0.21 to -0.02; P=0.020), and Action Research Arm Test at postintervention (95% CI, 0.8-7.3; P=0.015) and 1-month follow-up (95% CI, 0.6-8.4; P=0.025). Only the active stimulation condition was associated with (1) statistically significant within-group benefit on all outcomes at 1-month follow-up and (2) improvement exceeding minimal detectable change, as well as minimal clinically significant difference, on ≥1 outcomes at ≥1 time points after intervention. After stroke, active peripheral nerve stimulation paired with intensive task-oriented training can effect significant improvement in severely impaired upper extremity movement function. Further confirmatory studies that consider a larger group, as well as longer follow-up, are needed. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02633215. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The multiple sclerosis drug fingolimod (FTY720) stimulates neuronal gene expression, axonal growth and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Sofia; Knöll, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Fingolimod (FTY720) is a new generation oral treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). So far, FTY720 was mainly considered to target trafficking of immune cells but not brain cells such as neurons. Herein, we analyzed FTY720's potential to directly alter neuronal function. In CNS neurons, we identified a FTY720 governed gene expression response. FTY720 upregulated immediate early genes (IEGs) encoding for neuronal activity associated transcription factors such as c-Fos, FosB, Egr1 and Egr2 and induced actin cytoskeleton associated genes (actin isoforms, tropomyosin, calponin). Stimulation of primary neurons with FTY720 enhanced neurite growth and altered growth cone morphology. In accordance, FTY720 enhanced axon regeneration in mice upon facial nerve axotomy. We identified components of a FTY720 engaged signaling cascade including S1P receptors, G12/13G-proteins, RhoA-GTPases and the transcription factors SRF/MRTF. In summary, we uncovered a broader cellular and therapeutic operation mode of FTY720, suggesting beneficial FTY720 effects also on CNS neurons during MS therapy and for treatment of other neurodegenerative diseases requiring neuroprotective and neurorestorative processes.

  16. Electrical vagus nerve stimulation decreases food consumption and weight gain in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Krzysztof; Bugajski, A; Thor, P

    2011-12-01

    There is growing evidence that vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has a suppressive effect on both short- and long-term feeding in animal models. We previously showed that long-term VNS (102 days) with low-frequency electrical impulses (0.05 Hz) decreased food intake and body weight in rats. In the present study, we investigated the effect of high frequency (10 Hz) VNS on feeding behavior and appetite in rats fed a high-fat diet; peptide secretion and other parameters were assessed as well. Adult male Wistar rats were each implanted subcutaneously with a microstimulator (MS) and fed a high-fat diet throughout the entire study period (42 days). The left vagus nerve was stimulated by rectangular electrical pulses (10 ms, 200 mV, 10 Hz, 12 h a day) generated by the MS. Body weight and food intake were measured each morning. At the end of the experimental period, animals were euthanized and blood samples were taken. Serum levels of ghrelin, leptin and nesfatin-1 were assessed using radioimmunoassays. Adipose tissue content was evaluated by weighing epididymal fat pads, which were incised at the time of sacrifice. To determine whether VNS activated the food-related areas of the brain, neuronal c-Fos induction in the nuclei of the solitary tract (NTS) was assessed. Chronic vagus nerve stimulation significantly decreased food intake, body weight gain and epididymal fat pad weight in animals that received VNS compared with control animals. Significant neuronal responses in the NTS were observed following VNS. Finally, serum concentrations of ghrelin were increased, while serum levels of leptin were decreased. Although not significant, serum nesfatin-1 levels were also elevated. These results support the theory that VNS leads to reductions in food intake, body weight gain and adipose tissue by increasing brain satiety signals conducted through the vagal afferents. VNS also evoked a feed-related hormonal response, including elevated blood concentrations of nesfatin-1.

  17. Epileptologists probe vagus nerve stimulation in children with refractory epilepsy: a promise against sudden unexpected death in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera C. Terra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is clear that sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP is mainly a problem for people with refractory epilepsy, but our understanding of the best way to its prevention is still incomplete. Although the pharmacological treatments available for epilepsies have expanded, some antiepileptic drugs are still limited in clinical efficacy. In the present paper, we described an experience with vagus nerve stimulation (VNS treatment by opening space and providing the opportunity to implement effective preventative maps to reduce the incidence of SUDEP in children and adolescents with refractory epilepsy.

  18. Acute effect of electrical stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve on rectal capacity in patients with spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsøe, J; Fynne, L; Laurberg, S; Krogh, K; Rijkhoff, N J M

    2012-06-01

    Constipation and fecal incontinence are considerable problems for most individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). Neurogenic bowel symptoms are caused by several factors including abnormal rectal wall properties. Stimulation of the dorsal genital nerve (DGN) can inhibit bladder contractions and because of common innervation inhibitory effects are anticipated in the rectum too. Therefore, DNG could have a future role in the treatment of neurogenic fecal incontinence. To study the effect of acute DGN stimulation on the rectal cross sectional area (CSA) in SCI patients. Seven patients with complete supraconal SCI (median age 50 years) were included. Stimulation was applied via plaster-electrodes using an amplitude of twice the genito-anal reflex threshold (pulse width: 200 μs; pulse rate: 20 Hz). A pressure controlled phasic (10, 20 and 30 cmH(2)O) rectal distension protocol was repeated four times with subjects randomized to stimulation during 1st and 3rd distension series or 2nd and 4th distension series. The rectal CSA and pressure were measured using impedance planimetry and manometry. All patients completed the investigation. Median stimulation amplitude was 51 mA (range 30-64). CSA was smaller during stimulation and differences reached statistical significance at distension pressures of 20 cmH(2)O (average decrease 9%; P = 0.02) and 30 cmH(2)O (average decrease 4%; P = 0.03) above resting rectal pressure. Accordingly, rectal pressure-CSA relation was significantly reduced during stimulation at 20 (P=0.03) and 30 cmH(2)O distension (P=0.02). DGN Stimulation in patients with supraconal SCI results in an acute decrease of rectal CSA and the rectal pressure-CSA relation.

  19. N-Propionylmannosamine stimulates axonal elongation in a murine model of sciatic nerve injury

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    Christian Witzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that sialic acid plays an important role during nerve regeneration. Sialic acids can be modified in vitro as well as in vivo using metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of the N-acyl side chain. N-Propionylmannosamine (ManNProp increases neurite outgrowth and accelerates the reestablishment of functional synapses in vitro. We investigated the influence of systemic ManNProp application using a specific in vivo mouse model. Using mice expressing axonal fluorescent proteins, we quantified the extension of regenerating axons, the number of regenerating axons, the number of arborising axons and the number of branches per axon 5 days after injury. Sciatic nerves from non-expressing mice were grafted into those expressing yellow fluorescent protein. We began a twice-daily intraperitoneal application of either peracetylated ManNProp (200 mg/kg or saline solution 5 days before injury, and continued it unti