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Sample records for multiplanar reformatted images

  1. Demonstration of the pulmonary interlobar fissures on multiplanar reformatted images with 64-slices spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yafei; Chen Yerong; Shan Xiuhong; Tang Zhiyang; Ni Enzhen; Huang Hao; Wu Shuchun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the optimal orientation and slice thickness of reformatted images to visualize the interlobar fissures on multiplanar reformation (MPR) images and to recommend MPR imaging protocal for visualizing interlobar fissures in clinical practise. Methods: 64-slices CT scans of chest were obtained in 300 patients without pulmonary diseases. Axial, sagittal and coronal images were reformatted at 1, 2, 3, 7 mm slice thickness respectively from the raw volume data. Three experienced radiologists evaluated all of the MPR images in the lung window and compared the differences in visualization of the interlohar fissures among the three reformatted orientations and at the different slice thicknesses with Fisher test and Friedman test. Results: Fissures on sagittal MPR images using 1, 2, 3, and 7 mm reformatted slice thickness appeared as a fine line and the preference value analysis showed the MPR images with a 3 mm reformatted slice thickness is the best for visualizing the interlobar fissure. Compared to the sagittal orientation, the coronal was not as good and the axial was the worst among the three orientations. The coronal images with a 3 mm reformatted slice thickness were slightly inferior to sagittal images. The right horizontal fissures were observed as a fine line in all coronal image in 94.0% (282)of cases and in some of the images in 6.0% (18) of cases, the right oblique fissures were displayed as a fine line in coronal images in 2.3% (7) of cases and in some images in 85.0% (255) of cases, the left oblique fissures were displayed as a fine line in some coronal images in 35.7% (107) of cases and displayed as a coarse line in 64.3% (193) of cases. On axial MPR images using 3 mm reformation slice thickness, the right oblique fissures and the left oblique fissures were displayed as a fine line in some axial images in 79.3% (238) and 81.0% (243) of cases respectively, none of the images showed horizontal fissures as a fine line. There was

  2. Multidetector CT evaluation of central airways stenoses: Comparison of virtual bronchoscopy, minimal-intensity projection, and multiplanar reformatted images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K Sundarakumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the diagnostic utility of virtual bronchoscopy, multiplanar reformatted images, and minimal-intensity projection in assessing airway stenoses. Settings and Design: It was a prospective study involving 150 patients with symptoms of major airway disease. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six patients were selected for analysis based on the detection of major airway lesions on fiber-optic bronchoscopy (FB or routine axial images. Comparisons were made between axial images, virtual bronchoscopy (VB, minimal-intensity projection (minIP, and multiplanar reformatted (MPR images using FB as the gold standard. Lesions were evaluated in terms of degree of airway narrowing, distance from carina, length of the narrowed segment and visualization of airway distal to the lesion. Results: MPR images had the highest degree of agreement with FB (Κ = 0.76 in the depiction of degree of narrowing. minIP had the least degree of agreement with FB (Κ = 0.51 in this regard. The distal visualization was best on MPR images (84.2%, followed by axial images (80.7%, whereas FB could visualize the lesions only in 45.4% of the cases. VB had the best agreement with FB in assessing the segment length (Κ = 0.62. Overall there were no statistically significant differences in the measurement of the distance from the carina in the axial, minIP, and MPR images. MPR images had the highest overall degree of confidence, namely, 70.17% (n = 40. Conclusion: Three-dimensional reconstruction techniques were found to improve lesion evaluation compared with axial images alone. The technique of MPR images was the most useful for lesion evaluation and provided additional information useful for surgical and airway interventions in tracheobronchial stenosis. minIP was useful in the overall depiction of airway anatomy.

  3. Usefulness of multiplanar reformatted images of multi-detector row helical CT in assessment of biliary stent patency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Suk; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Tae Hong; Choo, Ki Seok; Koo, Young Baek; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, Suk Hong

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT), multiplanar reformatted images for the noninvasive assessment of biliary stent patency, and for the planning for management in patients with a sele-expandable metallic stent due to malignant biliary obstruction. Among 90 consecutive patients, from August 1999 to July 2003, 26 cases in 23 patients with malignant biliary obstruction who underwent self-expandable metaIlic stent insertion in the biliary system and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage within 7 days after CT were enrolled in this study. On CT images, the complete and functional obstruction of the stent and the precise level of obstruction were evaluated. The presence of an enhancing intraluminal mass or wall thickening around stent was determined, and the causes of obstruction were evaluated. These findings were then compared with percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Multi-detector row helical CT correctly demonstrated the patency of a stent in 24 cases (92.3%). It was adequate in helping to depict the precise level of stent occlusion in 23 cases (88.5%). Multi-detector row helical CT also revealed the extent of tumor that represented as an enhancing intraluminal mass or wall thickening around the stent in 23 cases, and this was represented as complete obstruction on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. In the case of functional obstruction, MDCT predicted the possible cause of the obstruction. Multiplanar reformatted images of multi-detector row helical CT is a useful imaging modality for the noninvasive assessment of stent patency and the precise level of obstruction when stent obstruction is suspected in the patients with self-expandable metallic stent due to malignant biliary obstruction. It can also predict the possible cause of the obstruction and allows adequate planning for the medical management of such cases

  4. Usefulness of multiplanar reformatted images of multi-detector row helical CT in assessment of biliary stent patency

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    Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Suk; Kim, Chang Won; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Tae Hong; Choo, Ki Seok; Koo, Young Baek; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, Suk Hong [Pusan National Univ. Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT), multiplanar reformatted images for the noninvasive assessment of biliary stent patency, and for the planning for management in patients with a sele-expandable metallic stent due to malignant biliary obstruction. Among 90 consecutive patients, from August 1999 to July 2003, 26 cases in 23 patients with malignant biliary obstruction who underwent self-expandable metaIlic stent insertion in the biliary system and percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage within 7 days after CT were enrolled in this study. On CT images, the complete and functional obstruction of the stent and the precise level of obstruction were evaluated. The presence of an enhancing intraluminal mass or wall thickening around stent was determined, and the causes of obstruction were evaluated. These findings were then compared with percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. Multi-detector row helical CT correctly demonstrated the patency of a stent in 24 cases (92.3%). It was adequate in helping to depict the precise level of stent occlusion in 23 cases (88.5%). Multi-detector row helical CT also revealed the extent of tumor that represented as an enhancing intraluminal mass or wall thickening around the stent in 23 cases, and this was represented as complete obstruction on percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography. In the case of functional obstruction, MDCT predicted the possible cause of the obstruction. Multiplanar reformatted images of multi-detector row helical CT is a useful imaging modality for the noninvasive assessment of stent patency and the precise level of obstruction when stent obstruction is suspected in the patients with self-expandable metallic stent due to malignant biliary obstruction. It can also predict the possible cause of the obstruction and allows adequate planning for the medical management of such cases.

  5. Diagnostic value of curved multiplanar reformatted images in multislice CT for the detection of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima, Hiromichi; Takada, Akira; Mori, Yoshimi; Suzuki, Kojiro; Sawaki, Akiko; Iwano, Shingo; Satake, Hiroko; Ota, Toyohiro; Ishigaki, Takeo; Itoh, Shigeki; Ikeda, Mitsuru

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of curved multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images obtained by multislice CT for the depiction of the main pancreatic duct (MPD) and detection of resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study included 28 patients with pancreatic carcinoma (size range 12-40 mm) and 22 without. Curved MPR images with 0.5-mm continuous slices were generated along the long axis of the pancreas from pancreatic-phase images with a 0.5- or 1-mm slice thickness. Seven blinded readers independently interpreted three sets of images (axial images, curved MPR images, and both axial and curved MPR images) in scrolling mode. The depiction of the MPD and the diagnostic performance for the detection of carcinoma were statistically compared among these images. MPR images were significantly superior to axial images in depicting the MPD, and the use of both axial and MPR images resulted in further significant improvements. For the detection of carcinoma, MPR images were equivalent to axial images, and the diagnostic performance was significantly improved by the use of both axial and MPR images. High-resolution curved MPR images can improve the depiction of the MPD and the diagnostic performance for the detection of carcinoma compared with axial images alone. (orig.)

  6. Multiplanar reformatted CT applications in the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Takafumi; Kojima, Shinsaburo; Araki, Nobuto; Miyauchi, Sumihiko

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic value and limitations of multiplanar reformatted CT were evaluated in 55 patients with lumbar diseases. Reformatted images in coronal, sagittal, paraxial, and oblique planes were acquired from the transverse axial images, thereby allowing three-dimensional visualization of lesions in the lumbar spine. Oblique images that were reformmated along the nervous root were useful in visualizing lesions in the root canal, which were not available on either conventional myelography or transverse axial CT. A definitive plane determination is required for reformation of images, taking curvature of the spinal column into account. (Namekawa, K.)

  7. Can independent coronal multiplanar reformatted images obtained using state-of-the-art MDCT scanners be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis? A feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, Sunit; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Mittal, Pardeep; Saini, Sanjay; Small, William C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate if coronal reformatted images can be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis using 64-slice MDCT. Materials and methods: IRB approval was obtained. We reviewed MDCT studies of the abdomen and pelvis of 220 consecutive patients performed with 64 row MDCT with constant scanning parameters. Based on a 0.625 mm raw data set, transverse images were reconstructed at 5 mm and coronal images at 3 mm using standard reconstruction algorithms. Reader familiarity was achieved by simultaneous evaluation of transverse and coronal reformats in an initial group of 20 separate cases for findings in consensus. Two subsequent phases of image analysis were then performed in two groups of 100 patients each. In the first phase two radiologists evaluated the added utility of simultaneous review of MDCT of transverse and coronal reformatted images over transverse images alone in 100 consecutive patients referred for MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis. In the second phase, the same radiologists evaluated whether coronal multiplanar reformats could be used for primary interpretation of MDCT of the abdomen and pelvis in a separate but similar cohort of 100 consecutive abdominopelvic MDCT studies. The number of lesion(s), their location, size of smallest lesion, presence of artifacts and likely diagnosis were noted at each image interpretation. Image quality and confidence for interpretation was evaluated using five-point and three-point scale, respectively. The time required for primary interpretation of coronal reformats and transverse images were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Both readers detected additional findings (n = 37, 35), respectively, on simultaneous review of transverse and coronal reformats as compared with transverse images alone (p < 0.001). Excellent interobserver agreement was noted (r = 0.94-0.96). Both readers detected additional findings (n = 62, 53), respectively, on

  8. The contribution of high-resolution multiplanar reformats of the skull base to the detection of skull-base fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Flis, C.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the contribution of routine review of submillimetric multiplanar reformats to the diagnosis of skull-base fractures. METHODS: A prospective analysis was performed of 407 cases referred over a 6-month period for CT of the skull following cranial trauma. The reformatted 5-mm axial sections and subsequently the high-resolution multiplanar reformats (HRMPRs) were viewed on an ADW 4.1 workstation using bone windows and algorithm. All skull-base fractures and related features, recorded by the consensus of two radiologists, were classified as anatomically significant or non-significant on the basis of eight criteria. The clinical features of skull-base injury and any subsequent treatment were noted in all cases of skull-base fracture. RESULTS: HRMPRs detected 80 separate skull-base fractures in 36/407 cases. Of these 80 fractures, 57 were visible on 5-mm axial sections. In 8 of the 36 cases, the significant anatomical features were only evident on review of the HRMPRs. In 6 of the 36 cases, none of the skull-base fractures was visible on 5-mm sections, but these individuals had only minor associated clinical features and no therapeutic requirements. Review of HRMPRs could have been confined to patients with skull-base fractures, abnormal intracranial and extracranial air collections or opacified mastoid air cells revealed by 5-mm axial sections. This policy would have led to the detection of 79/80 (99%) of skull-base fractures and all significant anatomical features. CONCLUSION: The 5-mm axial sections demonstrated 71% of skull-base fractures and 78% of skull-base fractures with significant anatomical features, using HRMPRs as a gold standard. There were no significant clinical sequelae at short-term follow-up of those fractures only evident on HRMPRs

  9. Thin-section multiplanar reformats from multidetector-row CT data: Utility for assessment of regional tumor extent in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higashino, Takanori; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Nogami, Munenobu; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Satouchi, Miyako; Nishimura, Yoshihiro; Fujii, Masahiko; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical utility of thin-section multiplanar reformats (MPRs) from multidetector-row CT (MDCT) data sets for assessing the extent of regional tumors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Materials and methods: Sixty consecutive NSCLC patients, who were considered candidates for surgical treatment, underwent contrast-enhanced MDCT examinations, surgical resection and pathological examinations. All MDCT examinations were performed with a 4-detector row computed tomography (CT). From each raw CT data set, 5 mm section thickness CT images (routine CT), 1.25 mm section thickness CT images (thin-section CT) and 1.25 mm section thickness sagittal (thin-section sagittal MPR) and coronal images (thin-section coronal MPR) were reconstructed. A 4-point visual score was used to assess mediastinal, interlobar and chest wall invasions on each image set. For assessment of utility in routine clinical practice, mean reading times for each image set were compared by means of Fisher's protected least significant difference (PLSD) test. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the diagnostic capability of each of the image data sets. Finally, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the reconstructed images were compared by McNemar test. Results: Mean reading times for thin-section sagittal and coronal MPRs were significantly shorter than those for routine CT and thin-section CT (p < 0.05). Areas under the curve (Azs) showing interlobar invasion on thin-section sagittal and coronal MPRs were significantly larger than that on routine CT (p = 0.03), and the Az on thin-section sagittal MPR was also significantly larger than that on routine CT (p = 0.02). Accuracy of chest wall invasion by thin-section sagittal MPR was significantly higher than that by routine CT (p = 0.04). Conclusion: Thin-section multiplanar reformats from multidetector-row CT data sets are useful for assessing the extent of regional tumors in non

  10. Anatomic guidelines defined by reformatting images on MRI for volume measurement of amygdala and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshida, Tohru; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Uematsu, Sumio.

    1995-01-01

    Twelve patients with intractable partial epilepsy underwent MR scans at the Epilepsy Center of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were five women and seven men, ranging in age from five to 51 years (mean age: 26 years). Coronal images were obtained using a 3-D SPGR. The coronal images were transferred to an Allegro 5.1 workstation, and reformatted along the cardinal axes (axial and sagittal) in multiple view points. The anterior end of the amygdala was measured at the level just posterior to the disappearance of the temporal stem. The semilunar gyrus of the amygdala was separated from the ambient gyrus by the semianular sulcus that forms the boundary between the amygdala and the entorhinal cortex. The delineation of the hippocampal formation included the subicular complex, hippocampal proper, dentate gyrus, alveus, and fimbria. The uncal cleft separated the uncus above from the parahippocampal gyrus below. The roof of this cleft was formed by the hippocampus and the dentate gyrus, and the floor, by the presubiculum and subiculum. Although using some guidelines, strictly separating the hippocampal head from the posterior part of the amygdala was not feasible as was previously reported, because of the isointensity on MRI between the cortex of the amygdala and the hippocampus. The most posterior portion of the hippocampus was measured at the level of the subsplenial gyri, just below the splenium of the corpus callosum, to measure the hippocampal volume in its near totality. Therefore, it is reliable, and clinically useful, to measure the combined total volume of the amygdala and the hippocampus when comparing results with those of other centers. (S.Y.)

  11. Influence of model based iterative reconstruction algorithm on image quality of multiplanar reformations in reduced dose chest CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barras, Heloise; Dunet, Vincent; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Grimm, Jochen; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) reduces image noise and improves image quality (IQ) but its influence on post-processing tools including maximal intensity projection (MIP) and minimal intensity projection (mIP) remains unknown. To evaluate the influence on IQ of MBIR on native, mIP, MIP axial and coronal reformats of reduced dose computed tomography (RD-CT) chest acquisition. Raw data of 50 patients, who underwent a standard dose CT (SD-CT) and a follow-up RD-CT with a CT dose index (CTDI) of 2–3 mGy, were reconstructed by MBIR and FBP. Native slices, 4-mm-thick MIP, and 3-mm-thick mIP axial and coronal reformats were generated. The relative IQ, subjective IQ, image noise, and number of artifacts were determined in order to compare different reconstructions of RD-CT with reference SD-CT. The lowest noise was observed with MBIR. RD-CT reconstructed by MBIR exhibited the best relative and subjective IQ on coronal view regardless of the post-processing tool. MBIR generated the lowest rate of artefacts on coronal mIP/MIP reformats and the highest one on axial reformats, mainly represented by distortions and stairsteps artifacts. The MBIR algorithm reduces image noise but generates more artifacts than FBP on axial mIP and MIP reformats of RD-CT. Conversely, it significantly improves IQ on coronal views, without increasing artifacts, regardless of the post-processing technique

  12. Nonunion of acetabular fractures: evaluation with interactive multiplanar CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhlman, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Ney, D.R.; Brooker, A.F. Jr.; Magid, D.

    1989-01-01

    Nonunions involving fractures of the acetabulum are reportedly rare, with few citings and little discussion in the literature. It is possible that acetabular nonunions go undetected because imaging of the acetabulum is difficult by conventional radiography. We report two cases of fracture nonunion involving the weight-bearing surface of the acetabulum diagnosed with the aid of computed tomography (CT) and a newly developed interactive 2D/3D orthotool that uniquely processes and reformats routine CT data. The interactive 2D/3D orthotool is a sophisticated computer program that allows dynamic viewing of standard multiplanar reconstructions in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes as well as multiple oblique projections. The 2D/3D orthotool provides on screen correlation of two-dimensional multiplanar images with three-dimensional reconstructions of the pelvis. The authors found this capability ideally suited for studying fractures with off-axis orientation such as those through the acetabular dome, greatly facilitating the diagnosis of nonunion

  13. CT triage for lung malignancy: coronal multiplanar reformation versus images in three orthogonal planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusk, Martin Weber; Karstoft, Jens; Mussmann, Bo Redder

    2015-11-01

    Generation of multiplanar reformation (MPR) images has become automatic on most modern computed tomography (CT) scanners, potentially increasing the workload of the reporting radiologists. It is not always clear if this increases diagnostic performance in all clinical tasks. To assess detection performance using only coronal multiplanar reformations (MPR) when triaging patients for lung malignancies with CT compared to images in three orthogonal planes, and to evaluate performance comparison of novice and experienced readers. Retrospective study of 63 patients with suspicion of lung cancer, scanned on 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with images reconstructed in three planes. Coronal images were presented to four readers, two novice and two experienced. Readers decided whether the patients were suspicious for malignant disease, and indicated their confidence on a five-point scale. Sensitivity and specificity on per-patient basis was calculated with regards to a reference standard of histological diagnosis, and compared with the original report using McNemar's test. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to compare the performance of the four readers, using the area under the curve (AUC) as figure of merit. No statistically significant difference of sensitivity and specificity was found for any of the readers when compared to the original reports. ROC analysis yielded AUCs in the range of 0.92-0.93 for all readers with no significant difference. Inter-rater agreement was substantial (kappa = 0.72). Sensitivity and specificity were comparable to diagnosis using images in three planes. No significant difference was found between experienced and novice readers. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014.

  14. The usefulness of multiplanar reconstruction images in preoperative t-staging of advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Young Baek; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Soo Jin; Choo, Ki Seok; Lee, Tae Hong; Moon, Tae Yong; Lee, Suk Hong; Jeon, Tae Yong

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) in the preoperative T-staging of patients with advanced gastric cancer. A total of 65 patients with an established diagnosis of advanced gastric cancer (T2 or more) were evaluated with MDCT. The protocol of MDCT consisted of high-quality (HQ) mode helical scanning with a slice thickness of 2.5 mm. The axial CT images were reconstructed with a slice thickness of 5 mm. MPR images were reconstructed from the raw axial data with a slice thickness of 5 mm. A comparison between the standard axial and axial MPR images was performed by two radiologists with regard to the evaluation of the tumor location and T-stage. These findings were compared with the pathologic and surgical findings. T-staging of the advanced stomach cancer was correct in 89% (58/65) and 69% (45/65) of the MPR images and axial images, respectively. The MPR images improved the detection rate (5 lesions) of the tumors and increased the accuracy of the T-staging (13 lesions) in comparison with the axial images. The MPR images are of greater diagnostic value for the evaluation of omental seeding (5 lesions: axial images, 9 lesions: MPR images), tumor location and extension. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images provide increased confidence in the location and T-staging of certain cases of advanced gastric cancer, such as those in locations where CT images are susceptible to be affected by the difficulties associated with partial volume averaging. In this study, the MPR images provided more precise information about the tumor location and T-staging than the standard axial images in the preoperative evaluation of advanced gastric cancer

  15. Image quality of multiplanar reconstruction of pulmonary CT scans using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, O; Yanagawa, M; Inoue, A; Kikuyama, A; Yoshida, S; Sumikawa, H; Tobino, K; Koyama, M; Tomiyama, N

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the image quality of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) using adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR). Inflated and fixed lungs were scanned with a garnet detector CT in high-resolution mode (HR mode) or non-high-resolution (HR) mode, and MPR images were then reconstructed. Observers compared 15 MPR images of ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) with those of ASIR (0%), and assessed image quality using a visual five-point scale (1, definitely inferior; 5, definitely superior), with particular emphasis on normal pulmonary structures, artefacts, noise and overall image quality. The mean overall image quality scores in HR mode were 3.67 with ASIR (40%) and 4.97 with ASIR (80%). Those in non-HR mode were 3.27 with ASIR (40%) and 3.90 with ASIR (80%). The mean artefact scores in HR mode were 3.13 with ASIR (40%) and 3.63 with ASIR (80%), but those in non-HR mode were 2.87 with ASIR (40%) and 2.53 with ASIR (80%). The mean scores of the other parameters were greater than 3, whereas those in HR mode were higher than those in non-HR mode. There were significant differences between ASIR (40%) and ASIR (80%) in overall image quality (pASIR did not suppress the severe artefacts of contrast medium. In general, MPR image quality with ASIR (80%) was superior to that with ASIR (40%). However, there was an increased incidence of artefacts by ASIR when CT images were obtained in non-HR mode.

  16. Assessment of intraocular foreign bodies by helical-CT multiplanar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadopoulos, A.; Fotinos, A.; Maniatis, V.; Kavadias, S.; Michaelides, A.; Avouri, M.; Kalamara, C.; Stringaris, K.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of helical CT in the assessment of intraocular foreign bodies, evaluating two protocols with different collimation. We performed helical-CT studies in 30 patients. Fifteen patients were examined with 1.5-mm collimation and the other 15 patients with 3.0-mm collimation. All other imaging parameters were identical in both protocols. Multiplanar images were reconstructed. The examinations were reviewed for presence, localization and size of intraocular foreign bodies. We compare our results with the surgical data. We estimate the required examination time. In the first group (collimation 1.5 mm) an intraorbital foreign body was detected in 8 of 15 patients. In 3 of 8 patients an intraocular foreign body (all were metallic) was detected. In the second group (collimation 3.0 mm) an intraorbital foreign body was detected in 9 of 15 patients. In 8 of 9 patients an intraocular foreign body (all were metallic) was detected. Our results were confirmed by surgery in all cases. Examination time was 36 s in the first group and 18 s in the second group. Computed tomography should be considered the imaging modality of choice in the assessment of metallic intraocular foreign bodies and 3.0-mm collimation is optional, because of reduced examination time and radiation exposure. (orig.)

  17. Transthoracic CT-guided biopsy with multiplanar reconstruction image improves diagnostic accuracy of solitary pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Takenaka, Daisuke; Imai, Masatake; Ohbayashi, Chiho; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the utility of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) image for CT-guided biopsy and determine factors of influencing diagnostic accuracy and the pneumothorax rate. Materials and methods: 390 patients with 396 pulmonary nodules underwent transthoracic CT-guided aspiration biopsy (TNAB) and transthoracic CT-guided cutting needle core biopsy (TCNB) as follows: 250 solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) underwent conventional CT-guided biopsy (conventional method), 81 underwent CT-fluoroscopic biopsy (CT-fluoroscopic method) and 65 underwent conventional CT-guided biopsy in combination with MPR image (MPR method). Success rate, overall diagnostic accuracy, pneumothorax rate and total procedure time were compared in each method. Factors affecting diagnostic accuracy and pneumothorax rate of CT-guided biopsy were statistically evaluated. Results: Success rates (TNAB: 100.0%, TCNB: 100.0%) and overall diagnostic accuracies (TNAB: 96.9%, TCNB: 97.0%) of MPR were significantly higher than those using the conventional method (TNAB: 87.6 and 82.4%, TCNB: 86.3 and 81.3%) (P<0.05). Diagnostic accuracy were influenced by biopsy method, lesion size, and needle path length (P<0.05). Pneumothorax rate was influenced by pathological diagnostic method, lesion size, number of punctures and FEV1.0% (P<0.05). Conclusion: The use of MPR for CT-guided lung biopsy is useful for improving diagnostic accuracy with no significant increase in pneumothorax rate or total procedure time

  18. Multiplanar reconstructed CT images increased depiction of intracranial hemorrhages in pediatric head trauma

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    Langford, Stacey; Panigrahy, Ashok; Narayanan, Srikala; Hwang, Misun; Fitz, Charles; Flom, Lynda; Lee, Vincent Kyu; Zuccoli, Giulio [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Department of Radiology, Section of Neuroradiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2015-12-15

    The benefits of multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) of unenhanced axial head computed tomography (CT) data have not been established in trauma patients younger than 3 years old, a population in which a reliable history and physical examination may be most difficult. We retrospectively evaluated unenhanced head CTs in pediatric trauma patients to investigate the various benefits of MPR in this age group. A total of 221 unenhanced head CTs performed for any case of head trauma (HT) on children younger than 3 years old were independently reviewed by two radiologists. Studies were reviewed first in the standard axial plane alone and then with the addition of MPR. Reviewers were asked to determine if the MPR affected the ability to make findings of hemorrhage, incidental findings, and artifacts. MPR improved the detection of hemorrhage in 14 cases (6.5 %, p-value < 0.01) and incidental findings in five cases (2.3 %, p-value < 0.05) as well as helped prove artifacts in five cases (2.3 %, p-value < 0.05). Routine use of MPR in HT patients younger than 3 years old has the potential to increase the detection of acute and incidental imaging findings. (orig.)

  19. Comparative analysis of maximum renal longitudinal length with positional changes on ultrasound with multiplanar reconstructed MR image in Korea Adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yun Hee; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho; Kang, Woo Young; Lee, Jisun; Kim, Yook; Lee, Soo Hyun; Lee, Soo Jung; Lee, Jin Yong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine a suitable position in which the measured length on ultrasound is close to the true renal length obtained through a multiplanar reconstructed MR image. A total of 33 individuals (males: 15, females: 18) without any underlying renal disease were included in the present study. Renal length was measured as the longest axis at the level of the renal hilum in three positions-supine, lateral decubitus, and prone, respectively. With a 3.0 T MR scanner, 3D eTHRIVE was acquired. Subsequently, the maximum longitudinal length of both the kidneys was measured through multiplanar reconstructed MR images. Paired t-test was used to compare the renal length obtained from ultrasonographic measurement with the length obtained through multiplanar reconstructed MR images. Our study demonstrated significant difference between sonographic renal length in three positions and renal length through MRI (p < 0.001). However, the longest longitudinal length of right kidney among the measured three values by ultrasound was statistically similar to the renal length measured by reconstructed MR image. Among them, the lateral decubitus position showed the strongest correlation with true renal length (right: 0.887; left: 0.849). We recommend measurement of the maximum renal longitudinal length in all possible positions on ultrasonography. If not allowed, the best measurement is on the lateral decubitus showing the strongest correlation coefficient with true renal length

  20. Comparative analysis of maximum renal longitudinal length with positional changes on ultrasound with multiplanar reconstructed MR image in Korea Adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yun Hee; Cho, Bum Sang; Kang, Min Ho; Kang, Woo Young; Lee, Jisun; Kim, Yook; Lee, Soo Hyun; Lee, Soo Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Yong [Public Health Medical Service, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine a suitable position in which the measured length on ultrasound is close to the true renal length obtained through a multiplanar reconstructed MR image. A total of 33 individuals (males: 15, females: 18) without any underlying renal disease were included in the present study. Renal length was measured as the longest axis at the level of the renal hilum in three positions-supine, lateral decubitus, and prone, respectively. With a 3.0 T MR scanner, 3D eTHRIVE was acquired. Subsequently, the maximum longitudinal length of both the kidneys was measured through multiplanar reconstructed MR images. Paired t-test was used to compare the renal length obtained from ultrasonographic measurement with the length obtained through multiplanar reconstructed MR images. Our study demonstrated significant difference between sonographic renal length in three positions and renal length through MRI (p < 0.001). However, the longest longitudinal length of right kidney among the measured three values by ultrasound was statistically similar to the renal length measured by reconstructed MR image. Among them, the lateral decubitus position showed the strongest correlation with true renal length (right: 0.887; left: 0.849). We recommend measurement of the maximum renal longitudinal length in all possible positions on ultrasonography. If not allowed, the best measurement is on the lateral decubitus showing the strongest correlation coefficient with true renal length.

  1. Diagnostic value of multidetector row CT in rectal cancer staging: comparison of multiplanar and axial images with histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, R.; Verma, R.; Rajesh, A.; Richards, C.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Although magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is widely used for rectal cancer staging, many centres in the UK perform computed tomography (CT) for staging rectal cancer at present. Furthermore in a small proportion of cases contraindications to MR imaging may lead to staging using CT. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of current generation multidetector row CT (MDCT) in local staging of rectal cancer. In particular the accuracy of multiplanar (MPR) versus axial images in the staging of rectal cancer was assessed. Material and methods: Sixty-nine consecutive patients were identified who had undergone staging of rectal cancer on CT. The imaging data were reviewed as axial images and then as MPR images (coronal and sagittal) perpendicular and parallel to the tumour axis. CT staging on axial and MPR images was then compared to histopathological staging. Results: MPR images detected more T4 and T3 stage tumours than axial images alone. The overall accuracy of T-staging on MPR images was 87.1% versus 73.0% for axial images alone. The overall accuracy of N staging on MPR versus axial images was 84.8% versus 70.7%. There was a statistically significant difference in the staging of T3 tumours between MPR and axial images (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Multidetector row CT has high accuracy for local staging of rectal cancer. Addition of MPR images to standard axial images provides higher accuracy rates for T and N staging of rectal cancer than axial images alone

  2. Congenital anomalies of the inferior vena cava: importance of multiplanar imaging methods: an iconographic essay; Anomalias congenitas da veia cava inferior: valor dos metodos multiplanares em seu diagnostico - ensaio iconografico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viana, Sergio Lopes; Mendonca, Jose Luiz Furtado de; Freitas, Flavia Mendes Oliveira [Clinica Radiologica Vila Rica, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)] (and others). E-mail: radiolog@uol.com.br

    2006-10-15

    The inferior vena cava is the result of a complex embryologic process which takes place between 6 and 8 weeks of intra-uterine life. Several variations can occur during this process, and a defective embryogenesis of this vessel may lead to the development of anatomic variants. Although many of these variants are asymptomatic, the radiologist should be aware of them and of the potential medico-legal issues involved, especially in cases in which abdominal surgery or hemodynamic procedures are contemplated. In this paper, the major congenital anomalies involving the inferior vena cava are reviewed under the form of a pictorial essay, highlighting the role of the multiplanar imaging methods (volumetric computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) in their diagnosis. Keywords: Congenital variations; Inferior vena cava; Renal veins; Computed tomography; Magnetic resonance imaging. author)

  3. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics

  4. Improved visualization of collateral ligaments of the ankle: multiplanar reconstructions based on standard 2D turbo spin-echo MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duc, Sylvain R.; Mengiardi, Bernard; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Hodler, Juerg; Zanetti, Marco

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the visualization of the collateral ankle ligaments on multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) based on standard 2D turbo spin-echo images. Coronal and axial T2-weighted turbo spin-echo and MPR angled parallel to the course of the ligaments of 15 asymptomatic and 15 symptomatic ankles were separately analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists. Image quality was assessed in the asymptomatic ankles qualitatively. In the symptomatic ankles interobserver agreement and reader confidence was determined for each ligament. On MPR the tibionavicular and calcaneofibular ligaments were more commonly demonstrated on a single image than on standard MR images (reader 1: 13 versus 0, P=0.002; reader 2: 14 versus 1, P=0.001 and reader 1: 13 versus 2, P=0.001; reader 2: 14 versus 0, P<0.001). The tibionavicular ligament was considered to be better delineated on MPR by reader 1 (12 versus 3, P=0.031). In the symptomatic ankles, reader confidence was greater with MPR for all ligaments except for the tibiocalcanear ligament (both readers) and the anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments (for reader 2). Interobserver agreement was increased with MPR for the tibionavicular ligament. Multiplanar reconstructions of 2D turbo spin-echo images improve the visualization of the tibionavicular and calcaneofibular ligaments and strengthen diagnostic confidence for these ligaments. (orig.)

  5. 16 multi-slice CT three-dimensional and multiplanar reconstruction for evaluation of pediatric congenital scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yun; Zhang Ningning; Zhang Xuejun; Sun Guoqiang; Zeng Jinjin

    2006-01-01

    the amount of hemivertebrae. The curved multiplanar reconstruction images in all eases were best for defining the spinal canal and spinal medulla, and showed clearly the modality and developed way of bony spur, even the relationship with spinal cord in 6 cases. The standard muhiplanar reformatted images in 4 cases were helpful in showing occipital-C1-C2 anatomy and malformation, especially the junction of skull and cervix malformation. Conclusion: Our data suggest that 16 MSCT three- dimensional images and muhiplanar reconstruction images appears to be most useful tool in the patients with congenital scoliosis in which the anomalies are complex, multiple, or obscured by deformity and rib malformation. The reformatted images of MSCT is markedly superior to conventional X-ray images and axial CT images when used to evaluate the progressive spinal curvatures and work out surgical plan. (authors)

  6. Comparison of a GPS needle-tracking system, multiplanar imaging and 2D imaging for real-time ultrasound-guided epidural anaesthesia: A randomized, comparative, observer-blinded study on phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menacé, Cécilia; Choquet, Olivier; Abbal, Bertrand; Bringuier, Sophie; Capdevila, Xavier

    2017-04-01

    The real-time ultrasound-guided paramedian sagittal oblique approach for neuraxial blockade is technically demanding. Innovative technologies have been developed to improve nerve identification and the accuracy of needle placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate three types of ultrasound scans during ultrasound-guided epidural lumbar punctures in a spine phantom. Eleven sets of 20 ultrasound-guided epidural punctures were performed with 2D, GPS, and multiplanar ultrasound machines (660 punctures) on a spine phantom using an in-plane approach. For all punctures, execution time, number of attempts, bone contacts, and needle redirections were noted by an independent physician. Operator comfort and visibility of the needle (tip and shaft) were measured using a numerical scale. The use of GPS significantly decreased the number of punctures, needle repositionings, and bone contacts. Comfort of the physician was also significantly improved with the GPS system compared with the 2D and multiplanar systems. With the multiplanar system, the procedure was not facilitated and execution time was longer compared with 2D imaging after Bonferroni correction but interaction between the type of ultrasound system and mean execution time was not significant in a linear mixed model. There were no significant differences regarding needle tip and shaft visibility between the systems. Multiplanar and GPS needle-tracking systems do not reduce execution time compared with 2D imaging using a real-time ultrasound-guided paramedian sagittal oblique approach in spine phantoms. The GPS needle-tracking system can improve performance in terms of operator comfort, the number of attempts, needle redirections and bone contacts. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Three-dimensional short-range MR angiography and multiplanar reconstruction images in the evaluation of neurovascular compression in hemifacial spasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Lee, Jae Gue; Rhee, Bong Arm [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three-dimensional(3D) short-range MR angiography(MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction(MPR) imaging in hemifacial spasm(HS). Materials and Methods : Two hundreds patients with HS were studied using a 1.5T MRI system with a 3D time-of-flight(TOF) MRA sequence. To reconstruct short-range MRA, 6-10 source images near the 7-8th cranial nerve complex were processed using a maximum-intensity projection technique. In addition, an MPR technique was used to investigate neurovascular compression. We observed the relationship between the root-exit zone(REZ) of the 7th cranial nerve and compressive vessel, and identified the compressive vessels on symptomatic sides. To investigate neurovascular contact, asymptomatic contralateral sides were also evaluated. Results : MRI showed that in 197 of 200 patients there was vascular compression or contact with the facial nerve REZ on symptomatic sides. One of the three remaining patients was suffering from acoustic neurinoma on the symptomatic side, while in two patients there were no definite abnormal findings.Compressive vessels were demonstrated in all 197 patients; 80 cases involved the anterior inferior cerebellar artery(AICA), 74 the posterior cerebellar artery(PICA), 13 the vertebral artery(VA), 16 the VA and AICA, eight the VA and PICA, and six the AICA and PICA. In all 197 patients, compressive vessels were reconstructed on one 3D short-range MRA image without discontinuation from vertebral or basilar arteries. 3D MPR studies provided additional information such as the direction of compression and course of the compressive vessel. In 31 patients there was neurovascular contact on the contralateral side at the 7-8th cranial nerve complex. Conclusion : Inpatients with HS, 3D short-range MRA and MPR images are excellent and very helpful for the investigation of neurovascular compression and the identification of compressive vessels.

  8. Three-dimensional short-range MR angiography and multiplanar reconstruction images in the evaluation of neurovascular compression in hemifacial spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Lee, Jae Gue; Rhee, Bong Arm

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of three-dimensional(3D) short-range MR angiography(MRA) and multiplanar reconstruction(MPR) imaging in hemifacial spasm(HS). Materials and Methods : Two hundreds patients with HS were studied using a 1.5T MRI system with a 3D time-of-flight(TOF) MRA sequence. To reconstruct short-range MRA, 6-10 source images near the 7-8th cranial nerve complex were processed using a maximum-intensity projection technique. In addition, an MPR technique was used to investigate neurovascular compression. We observed the relationship between the root-exit zone(REZ) of the 7th cranial nerve and compressive vessel, and identified the compressive vessels on symptomatic sides. To investigate neurovascular contact, asymptomatic contralateral sides were also evaluated. Results : MRI showed that in 197 of 200 patients there was vascular compression or contact with the facial nerve REZ on symptomatic sides. One of the three remaining patients was suffering from acoustic neurinoma on the symptomatic side, while in two patients there were no definite abnormal findings.Compressive vessels were demonstrated in all 197 patients; 80 cases involved the anterior inferior cerebellar artery(AICA), 74 the posterior cerebellar artery(PICA), 13 the vertebral artery(VA), 16 the VA and AICA, eight the VA and PICA, and six the AICA and PICA. In all 197 patients, compressive vessels were reconstructed on one 3D short-range MRA image without discontinuation from vertebral or basilar arteries. 3D MPR studies provided additional information such as the direction of compression and course of the compressive vessel. In 31 patients there was neurovascular contact on the contralateral side at the 7-8th cranial nerve complex. Conclusion : Inpatients with HS, 3D short-range MRA and MPR images are excellent and very helpful for the investigation of neurovascular compression and the identification of compressive vessels

  9. CT imaging of bronchus related to solitary pulmonary lesion: comparison of minimum intensity projection and multi-planar reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jun; Shan Fei; Zhang Zhiyong; Yang Shan; Zhang Xingwei; Wu Dong; Zhan Songhua

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical value of 64-slice computed tomography with MinIP and MPR for imaging the bronchus related to a solitary pulmonary lesion (SPL). Methods: Seventy-five subjects with solitary pulmonary lesions underwent chest 64-slice CT and their bronchi were analyzed retrospectively. All images of thin-section (0.625 mm) were reconstructed with MPR and MinIP into images of 1, 2, 3, and 5 mm thickness and 1 mm gap in two orthogonal planes along the long axis of bronchus related to the SPL. The image quality of four series of MinIP and MPR images was evaluated in the aspect of bronchus visibility and pulmonary vascular masking. One-way ANOVA with Bonferroni correction and interclass correlation coefficient were used in the statistical analysis. Results: (1) The mean scores of display of the bronchi on MinIP images of four series (4.85, 4.77 and 4.84, 4.63 and 4.67, 4.25 and 4.28, in 1, 2, 3, and 5 mm thickness, respectively) and on MPR images of 1 or 2 mm thickness (4.77 and 4.76, 4.04 and 4.27, in 1 and 2 mm thickness, respectively) were good or excellent. MPR images of 1 mm thickness and MinIP images of 1-3 mm thickness showed no significant differences (t=0.318, P> 0.05 for all), but they were superior to MinIP images of 5 mm thickness (t=6.318 and 6.610, P 0.05). (2) The effect of suppression of pulmonary vascular markings on MinIP images was better with the increase of slice thickness (F= 45.312 and 40.415, P<0.01). The mean scores of MinIP images of 3 mm and 5 mm thickness (4.67 and 4.64, 5.00 and 4.97, for 3 and 5 mm thickness, respectively) were good or excellent, but MinIP images of 2 mm thickness were just acceptable. Conclusion: MinIP images of 3 mm thickness may display the bronchus related to SPL more clearly. (authors)

  10. Simplifying the Exploration of Volumetric Images: Development of a 3D User Interface for the Radiologist’s Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Teistler, M.; Breiman, R. S.; Lison, T.; Bott, O. J.; Pretschner, D. P.; Aziz, A.; Nowinski, W. L.

    2007-01-01

    Volumetric imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) provides increased diagnostic detail but is associated with the problem of navigation through large amounts of data. In an attempt to overcome this problem, a novel 3D navigation tool has been designed and developed that is based on an alternative input device. A 3D mouse allows for simultaneous definition of position and orientation of orthogonal or oblique multiplanar reformatted images or slabs, which are presented wit...

  11. An evaluation of the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurement by xenon-enhanced dynamic CT with helical scanning technique and the functional imaging by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR). Fundamental study and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenichi

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the quantitative rCBF by xenon-enhanced dynamic CT with helical scanning technique on all brain regions, and also examined clinical usefulness of coronal and sagittal section images which are similar to SPECT images obtained by the functional multiplanar reconstitution (MPR) imaging of many successive flow maps. We used 14 clinical cases. The conventional xenon-enhanced CT was simple and ideal method to measure rCBF, however, it had disadvantages; it gives a few laminagraphical images or only the axial directional images, compared to SPECT or PET. There is a risk to overlook lesions out of the image or not to obtain the whole images of the lesion. Although the helical scanning technique has a methodological characteristics to use adjacent data for the image reconstitution, it is by no means inferior to the conventional method in the contrast resolution or the image resolution when the co-helical function and an appropriate reconstituted function were used. It has an advantage to scan all brain regions by only one cycle of scanning. Furthermore on making good use of the property that the helical scanning technique can give the successive data, we can observe rCBF by coronal and sagittal images when many flow maps were made up by reconstituted images of the narrow steps. This shows the clinical usefulness of this technique. One of the future problem to be solved is to decrease the exposure dose. (K.H.)

  12. Rapid reformatting of cine CT data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyatt, E.D.; Reynolds, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Cine CT scanners acquire data sufficiently rapidly to freeze the cardiac motion. Display hardware with sufficient highspeed computer memory permits instantaneous reformatting of sections at any orientation. Normal or abnormal cardiac motion may be studies interactively along any axial, sagittal, coronal, or oblique plane through the beating heart. Cine Ct studies, consisting of eight levels through the heart with 8-mm interlevel spacing, acquired at 10 time intervals for a total of 80 sections, were acquired on an Imatron C-100 scanner and displayed. Each entire study was loaded into t = internal display processor memory, permitting instantaneous recall without loss of spatial or density resolution. Results are presented

  13. Usefulness of Reformatted CT Rib Series in Patients with Thoracic Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Nam; Park, Seong Hoon; Kim, Na Hyung; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Yoon, Kwon Ha [Dept. of Radiology and Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Dong Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Aerospace Medical Center, Cheongwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    To assess the value of adding a reformatted computed tomography (CT) rib series to transversely reconstructed CT imaging in the evaluation of rib fractures in patients with suspected traumatic thoracic injuries. One hundred consecutive patients with suspected traumatic thoracic injuries underwent 128-section multi-detector row CT. Transverse CT images with 5-mm-thick sections were reconstructed and rib series were reformatted using isotropic vogel data. Three independent radiologists, who were blinded to the data, interpreted the CT scans at 2 sessions with a 4-week interval between the sessions. Only transverse CT images were reviewed at the first session. At the second session, the CT images were reviewed along with the reformatted CT rib series. The following parameters were analyzed: receiver operating characteristic (Roc) curve, pairwise comparisons of Roc curves, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value. There were 153 rib fractures in 29 patients. The level of the area under the Roc curve, Az improved for all observers. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of each observer tended to improve in the second session. The mean confidence scores for all observers of patients with rib fractures improved significantly in the second session. A reformatted CT rib series together with transverse CT scan is useful for the evaluation of rib fracture.

  14. [Fetal neurosonography using 3-dimensional multiplanar sonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoui, R; Heling, K S; Kainer, F; Karl, K

    2012-04-01

    This review focuses on the examination of the fetal brain, using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound and the multiplanar rendering mode (MPR). The routine examination of the brain is achieved with axial planes but a dedicated fetal neurosonogram requires additional coronal and sagittal views, in order to provide a complete view of the different brain structures. Because these planes are difficult to obtain under many conditions, the present paper shows how 3D MPR allows one to obtain 1 or multiple reconstructed images from a digital volume. The display can be either as orthogonal planes, tomographic planes with parallel slices or as one single plane of the region of interest, which can be selected by the examiner. This approach allows easily the demonstration of the corpus callosum, the cerebellar vermis, the three-horn view, the foetal hippocampus and other regions. In addition, early neurosonography of the developing brain from the 7th week of pregnancy onwards can be achieved. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Measurements of angles of the normal auditory ossicles relative to the reference plane and image reconstruction technique for obtaining optimal sections of the ossicles in high-resolution multiplanar reconstruction using a multislice CT scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Naoko; Katada, Kazuhiro; Yoshioka, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Takasu, Akihiko; Naito, Kensei

    2005-01-01

    Using high-resolution isotropic volume data obtained by 0.5 mm, 4-row multislice CT, cross-sectional observation of the auditory ossicles is possible from any desired direction without difficulty in high-resolution multiplanar reconstruction (HR-MPR) images, also distortion-free three-dimensional images of the ossicles are generated in three-dimensional CT (3D-CT) images. We measured angles of fifty normal ossicles relative to the reference plane, which has been defined as a plane through the bilateral infraorbital margins to the middle portion of the external auditory canal. Based on the results of angle measurement, four optimal sections of the ossicles for efficient viewing to the ossicular chain were identified. To understand the position of the angle measurement and the four sections, the ossicles and the reference plane were reconstructed in the 3D-CT images. As the result of observation of the ossicles and the reference plane, the malleus was parallel to the incudal long process and perpendicular to the reference plane. As the results of angle measurement, the mean angle of the tympanic portion of the facial nerve relative to the reference plane in the sagittal plane was found to be 17 deg, and the mean angle of the stapedial crura relative to the reference plane in the sagittal plane was found to be 6 deg. The mean angle of the stapes relative to the reference plane in the coronal plane was 44 deg, and the mean angle of the incudal long process relative to the stapes in the coronal plane was 89 deg. In 80% of ears, the stapes extended straight from the incudal long process. Image reconstruction technique for viewing four sections of the ossicles was investigated. Firstly, the image of the malleal head and the incudal short process was identified in the axial plane. Secondly, an image of the malleus along the malleal manubrium was reconstructed in the coronal plane. Thirdly, the image of the incudal long process was seen immediately behind the malletis image

  16. MR imaging of articular cartilage : comparison of magnetization transfer contrast and fat-suppression in multiplanar and 3D gradient-echo, spin-echo, turbo spin-echo techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Joon; Joo, Eun Young; Eun, Choong Ki

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of magnetization transfer contrast(MTC) and fat-suppression(FS) in variable spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences for articular cartilage imaging and to determine the optimal pulse sequences. Using variable 7-pulse sequences, the knees of 15 pigs were imaged Axial images were obtained using proton density and T2-weighted spin-echo (PDWSE and T2WSE), turbo spin-echo (TSE), multiplanar gradient-echo (MPGR), and 3D steady-state gradient-echo (3DGRE) sequences, and the same pulse sequences were then repeated using MTC. Also T1-weighted spin-echo(T1WSE) and 3D spoiled gradient-echo(3DSPGR) images of knees were also acquired, and the procedure was repeated using FS. For each knee, a total of 14 axial images were acquired, and using a 6-band scoring system, the visibility of and the visibilities of the the articular cartilage was analyzed. The visual effect of MTC and FS was scored using a 4-band scale. For each image, the signal intensities of articular cartilage, subchondral bone, muscles, and saline were measured, and signal-to-noise ratios(SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios(CNR) were also calculated. Visibility of the cartilage was best when 3DSPGR and T1WSE sequences were used. MTC imaging increased the negative contrast between cartilage and saline, but FS imaging provided more positive contrast. CNR between cartilage and saline was highest when using TSE with FS(-351.1±15.3), though CNR between cartilage and bone then fell to -14.7±10.8. In MTC imaging using MPGR showed the greatest increase of negative contrast between cartilage and saline(CNR change=-74.7); the next highest was when 3DGRE was used(CNR change=-34.3). CNR between cartilage and bone was highest with MPGR(161.9±17.7), but with MTC, the greatest CNR decrease(-81.8) was observed. The greatest CNR increase between cartilage and bone was noted in T1WSE with FS. In all scans, FS provided a cartilage-only positive contrast image, though the absolute

  17. Missed rib fractures on evaluation of initial chest CT for trauma patients: pattern analysis and diagnostic value of coronal multiplanar reconstruction images with multidetector row CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S H; Sung, Y M; Kim, M S

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to review the prevalence and radiological features of rib fractures missed on initial chest CT evaluation, and to examine the diagnostic value of additional coronal images in a large series of trauma patients. 130 patients who presented to an emergency room for blunt chest trauma underwent multidetector row CT of the thorax within the first hour during their stay, and had follow-up CT or bone scans as diagnostic gold standards. Images were evaluated on two separate occasions: once with axial images and once with both axial and coronal images. The detection rates of missed rib fractures were compared between readings using a non-parametric method of clustered data. In the cases of missed rib fractures, the shapes, locations and associated fractures were evaluated. 58 rib fractures were missed with axial images only and 52 were missed with both axial and coronal images (p=0.088). The most common shape of missed rib fractures was buckled (56.9%), and the anterior arc (55.2%) was most commonly involved. 21 (36.2%) missed rib fractures had combined fractures on the same ribs, and 38 (65.5%) were accompanied by fracture on neighbouring ribs. Missed rib fractures are not uncommon, and radiologists should be familiar with buckle fractures, which are frequently missed. Additional coronal imagescan be helpful in the diagnosis of rib fractures that are not seen on axial images.

  18. Usefulness of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for the diagnosis of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI): Assessment of morphology and diameter of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) on multi-planar reconstructed (MPR) images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhams, Reiko; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Fujii, Kaoru; Kakita, Satoko; Hayakawa, Kazushige

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) for the diagnosis of non-occlusive mesenteric ischemia (NOMI) by analyzing morphology and diameter of superior mesenteric artery (SMA). We assessed whether MDCT was as useful as angiography for the diagnosis of NOMI. Materials and methods: Four patients who were diagnosed with NOMI were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had 8-row MDCT followed by laparotomy. Two of them underwent angiography after MDCT. The morphology and diameter of SMA of these cases was analyzed on multi-planar reconstructed (MPR) images. The mean diameter of SMA of NOMI cases was compared to that of 13 control cases. Results: MPR images of all NOMI cases showed irregular narrowing of the SMA, spasm of the arcades of SMA, and poor demonstration of intramural vessels. MPR images of two patients who had angiography were concordant with their angiograms. The mean diameter of SMA of NOMI patients was 3.4 ± 1.1 mm, which was statistically smaller than that of 13 control patients, 6.0 ± 1.5 mm (P < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank sum tests). Conclusion: Angiography has been recognized essential for the diagnosis of NOMI. This study shows the possibility of MDCT to be an equivalently useful modality compared to angiography for the diagnosis of NOMI by interpreting morphologic appearance and diameter of SMA. Introduction of MDCT in the decision tree of NOMI treatment may bring the benefit of prompt diagnosis and subsequent early and efficient initiation of therapy, which may improve the mortality.

  19. Comparison of the image quality between volumetric and conventional high-resolution CT with 64-slice row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yanli; Zhang Lei; Zhao Xia; Ma Min; Zhai Renyou

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the image quality between volumetric high-resolution CT (VHRCT) and conventional high-resolution CT (CHRCT), and investigate the feasibility of VHRCT. Methods: Catphan 412 phantom was scanned with protocols of CHRCT and VHRCT on a set of GE Lightspeed VCT. The spatial-resolution (LP/cm), noise (standard deviation in an ROI) and radiation close (CTDI) were recorded for each CT scan. Difference of noise between CHRCT and VHRCT were evaluated by paired t test. In clinical study, 32 patients were scanned with VHRCT and CHRCT protocols. The image quality of CHRCT and VHRCT was rated and compared. The quality difference between CHRCT and VHRCT was assessed by Wilcoxon paired signed rank sum test. Results: In phantom study, the in-plane spatial-resolution of both VHRCT and CHRCT was 11 LP/cm for axial images and 12 LP/cm for coronal reformatted images. The noise of VHRCT and CHRCT was (69.18±2.77)HU and (54.62±2.12) HU respectively (t=-15.929, P 0.05). The quality assessment scores of VHRCT coronal reformatted images and CHRCT coronal reformatted images were 3.05 and 1.88 respectively with significant difference (Z= -5.088, P<0.01). Conclusion: The image quality of VHRCT cross-sectional image is similar to that of CHRCT. Multiplanar images with high resolution of VHRCT are recommended. The radiation dose of VHRCT remains to be optimized. (authors)

  20. Normal anatomy of the female pelvis in axial, coronal, and sagittal planes demonstrated with reformatted CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constant, O.C.; Cooke, J.C.; Parsons, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Axial CT is used in assessing gynecologic malignancies. Accurate delineation of local tumor extent in carcinoma of the cervix is important in initial staging and in planning subsequent management. A modified scanning technique produces reformatted coronal and sagittal images, which demonstrate additional valuable information about the cardinal ligaments, parametria, ureters, boundaries between the cervix, bladder, and rectum, and extension to vagina and uterus. This information is illustrated by representative axial, coronal, and sagittal scans. Familiarity with normal appearances is essential to allow correct interpretation of pathology

  1. Evaluation of Rib Fractures on a Single-in-plane Image Reformation of the Rib Cage in CT Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankerl, Peter; Seuss, Hannes; Ellmann, Stephan; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of using a reformatted single-in-plane image reformation of the rib cage for the detection of rib fractures in computed tomography (CT) examinations, employing different levels of radiological experience. We retrospectively evaluated 10 consecutive patients with and 10 patients without rib fractures, whose CT scans were reformatted to a single-in-plane image reformation of the rib cage. Eight readers (two radiologists, two residents in radiology, and four interns) independently evaluated the images for the presence of rib fractures using a reformatted single-in-plane image and a multi-planar image reformation. The time limit was 30 seconds for each read. A consensus of two radiologist readings was considered as the reference standard. Diagnostic performance (sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value [PPV], and negative predictive value [NPV]) was assessed and evaluated per rib and per location (anterior, lateral, posterior). To determine the time limit, we prospectively analyzed the average time it took radiologists to assess the rib cage, in a bone window setting, in 50 routine CT examinations. McNemar test was used to compare the diagnostic performances. Single image reformation was successful in all 20 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV for the detection of rib fractures using the conventional multi-planar read were 77.5%, 99.2%, 89.9%, and 98.0% for radiologists; 46.3%, 99.7%, 92.5%, and 95.3% for residents; and 29.4%, 99.4%, 82.5%, and 93.9% for interns, respectively. Sensitivity, PPV, and NPV increased across all three groups of experience, using the reformatted single-in-plane image of the rib cage (radiologists: 85.0%, 98.6%, and 98.7%; residents: 80.0%, 92.8%, and 98.2%; interns: 66.9%, 89.9%, and 97.1%), whereas specificity did not change significantly (99.9%, 99.4%, and 99.3%). The diagnostic performance of the interns and residents was significantly better when

  2. Effect of variable scanning protocolson the pre-implant site evaluation of the mandible in reformatted computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kee Deog; Park, Chang Seo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of variable scanning protocols of computed tomography for evaluation of pre-implant site of the mandible through the comparison of the reformatted cross-sectional images of helical CT scans obtained with various imaging parameters versus those of conventional CT scans. A dry mandible was imaged using conventional nonoverlapped CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and helical CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and pitches of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0. All helical images were reconstructed at reconstruction interval of 1 mm. DentaScan reformatted images were obtained to allow standardized visualization of cross-sectional images of the mandible. The reformatted images were reviewed and measured separately by 4 dental radiologists. The image qualities of continuity of cortical outline, trabecular bone structure and visibility of the mandibular canal were evaluated and the distance between anatomic structures were measured by 4 dental radiologists. On image qualities of continuity of cortical outline, trabecular bone structure and visibility of the mandibular canal and in horizontal measurement, there was no statistically significant difference among conventional and helical scans with pitches of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0. In vertical measurement, there was no statistically significant difference among the conventional and all imaging parameters of helical CT scans with pitches of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0. The images of helical CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and pitches of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 are as good as those of conventional CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness for evaluation of pre-dental implant site of the mandible. Considering the radiation dose and patient comfort, helical CT scans with 1 mm slice thickness and pitch of 2.0 is recommended for evaluation of pre-implant site of the mandible.

  3. Quantification of resolution in multiplanar reconstructions for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vent, Trevor L.; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Kwon, Young Joon; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-03-01

    Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) allows tomographic images to be portrayed in various orientations. We have conducted research to determine the resolution of tomosynthesis MPR. We built a phantom that houses a star test pattern to measure resolution. This phantom provides three rotational degrees of freedom. The design consists of two hemispheres with longitudinal and latitudinal grooves that reference angular increments. When joined together, the hemispheres form a dome that sits inside a cylindrical encasement. The cylindrical encasement contains reference notches to match the longitudinal and latitudinal grooves that guide the phantom's rotations. With this design, any orientation of the star-pattern can be analyzed. Images of the star-pattern were acquired using a DBT mammography system at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Images taken were reconstructed and analyzed by two different methods. First, the maximum visible frequency (in line pairs per millimeter) of the star test pattern was measured. Then, the contrast was calculated at a fixed spatial frequency. These analyses confirm that resolution decreases with tilt relative to the breast support. They also confirm that resolution in tomosynthesis MPR is dependent on object orientation. Current results verify that the existence of super-resolution depends on the orientation of the frequency; the direction parallel to x-ray tube motion shows super-resolution. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the direction of the spatial frequency relative to the motion of the x-ray tube is a determinant of resolution in MPR for DBT.

  4. CT and MR imaging of the normal and pathologic conditions of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeger, Lorenz E-mail: jaeger@ikra.med.uni-muenchen.de; Reiser, Maximilian

    2001-11-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are well established imaging modalities to examine the facial nerve as well as the course of the facial nerve itself. High spatial resolution is guaranteed not only in the x- and y-axis, but also in the z-axis using multislice spiral CT. With this technique, reformatted multiplanar images in oblique planes, avoiding additional examinations in the coronal plane, facilitate the delineation of the facial nerve canal. This is beneficial in patients with temporal bone trauma, malformation or osseous changes. MR has a superior soft-tissue contrast to CT that enables imaging of the facial nerve itself. Therefore the normal facial nerve as well as pathologic changes of the facial nerve is readily visualized from the brain stem to the parotid gland. This review article presents anatomy, pathology and imaging strategies in the diagnostics of the facial nerve.

  5. The values of MSCT multi-planar reconstruction in the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Qixuan; Zhu Gangming; Qian Huirong; Zhong Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the reasonable schedule and diagnostic values of MSCT multi-planar reconstruction in patients with lumbar spondylolysis. Methods: Volume scan ranging from T12 to S1 was done in 540 cases suffered from backleg pain without definite trauma. The lumbar disc axial and whole lumbar axial, sagital, coronal images were reconstructed from raw data of MSCT. Results: Of the 540 cases, 54 spondylolysis in isthmus of lumbar pedicle were demonstrated in 29 ones (29/540, 5.37%). 20 cases were accompanied with spondylolisthesis. The sagital multi-planar reconstruction was the best way to reveal the fissures of spondylolysis and accompanying abnormalities. The detectable ratio of fissures in lumbar disc with axial, whole lumbar axial, sagital and coronal multi-planer reconstruction images were 7.41%, 100%, 100% and 51.85% respectively. Conclusions: MSCT sagital multi-planar reconstruction is the best images to reveal the fissures of spondylolysis. It should be taken as routine item in MSCT examination for the patients with lower back pain. (authors)

  6. Clinical applications for multiplanar- and three-dimensional-reconstructions by helical-CT for the diagnosis of acetabular fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroszczynski, C.; Schedel, H.; Stoeckle, U.; Wellmann, A.; Beier, J.; Wicht, L.; Hoffmann, R.; Felix, R.

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent visualizations of computed tomography for the diagnosis of acetabular fractures. The techniques of conventional and helical-CT for the imaging of the acetabulum are compared. Furthermore, the different methods of multiplaner and three-dimensional reconstructions e.g. shaded surface display, maximum intensity projection, and volume rendering are presented. Figures of multiplanar and three-dimensional imaging for fractures of the pelvis is discussed. (orig.) [de

  7. Feasibility of self-gated isotropic radial late-phase MR imaging of the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Jakob; Taron, Jana; Othman, Ahmed E.; Kuendel, Matthias; Martirosian, Petros; Ruff, Christer; Schraml, Christina; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Notohamiprodjo, Mike [Eberhard Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Grimm, Robert [Siemens Healthcare MR, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate feasibility of a 3D-isotropic self-gated radial volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) for late-phase MRI of the liver. 70 patients were included and underwent liver MRI at 1.5 T. Depending on the diagnosis, either Gd-EOB-DTPA (35 patients) or gadobutrol (35 patients) were administered. During late (gadobutrol) or hepatocyte-specific phase (Gd-EOB-DTPA), a radial prototype sequence was acquired and reconstructed using (1) self-gating with 40 % acceptance (rVIBE{sub 40}); (2) with 100 % acceptance of the data (rVIBE{sub 100}) and compared to Cartesian VIBE (cVIBE). Images were assessed qualitatively (image quality, lesion conspicuity, artefacts; 5-point Likert-scale: 5 = excellent; two independent readers) and quantitatively (coefficient-of-variation (CV); contrast-ratio) in axial and coronal reformations. In eight cases only rVIBE provided diagnostic image quality. Image quality of rVIBE{sub 40} was rated significantly superior (p < 0.05) in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced and coronal reformatted examinations as compared to cVIBE. Lesion conspicuity was significantly improved (p < 0.05) in coronal reformatted Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced rVIBE{sub 40} in comparison to cVIBE. CV was higher in rVIBE{sub 40} as compared to rVIBE{sub 100}/cVIBE (p < 0.01). Gadobutrol-enhanced rVIBE{sub 40} and cVIBE showed higher contrast-ratios than rVIBE{sub 100} (p < 0.001), whereas no differences were found in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced examinations. Self-gated 3D-isotropic rVIBE provides significantly superior image quality compared to cVIBE, especially in multiplanar reformatted and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced examinations. (orig.)

  8. Feasibility of self-gated isotropic radial late-phase MR imaging of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Jakob; Taron, Jana; Othman, Ahmed E.; Kuendel, Matthias; Martirosian, Petros; Ruff, Christer; Schraml, Christina; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Grimm, Robert

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility of a 3D-isotropic self-gated radial volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) for late-phase MRI of the liver. 70 patients were included and underwent liver MRI at 1.5 T. Depending on the diagnosis, either Gd-EOB-DTPA (35 patients) or gadobutrol (35 patients) were administered. During late (gadobutrol) or hepatocyte-specific phase (Gd-EOB-DTPA), a radial prototype sequence was acquired and reconstructed using (1) self-gating with 40 % acceptance (rVIBE_4_0); (2) with 100 % acceptance of the data (rVIBE_1_0_0) and compared to Cartesian VIBE (cVIBE). Images were assessed qualitatively (image quality, lesion conspicuity, artefacts; 5-point Likert-scale: 5 = excellent; two independent readers) and quantitatively (coefficient-of-variation (CV); contrast-ratio) in axial and coronal reformations. In eight cases only rVIBE provided diagnostic image quality. Image quality of rVIBE_4_0 was rated significantly superior (p < 0.05) in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced and coronal reformatted examinations as compared to cVIBE. Lesion conspicuity was significantly improved (p < 0.05) in coronal reformatted Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced rVIBE_4_0 in comparison to cVIBE. CV was higher in rVIBE_4_0 as compared to rVIBE_1_0_0/cVIBE (p < 0.01). Gadobutrol-enhanced rVIBE_4_0 and cVIBE showed higher contrast-ratios than rVIBE_1_0_0 (p < 0.001), whereas no differences were found in Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced examinations. Self-gated 3D-isotropic rVIBE provides significantly superior image quality compared to cVIBE, especially in multiplanar reformatted and Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced examinations. (orig.)

  9. Diagnosis of Peripheral Lung Lesions via Conventional Flexible Bronchoscopy with Multiplanar CT Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Anastasia De Roza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conventional flexible bronchoscopy has limited sensitivity in the diagnosis of peripheral lung lesions and is dependent on lesion size. However, advancement of CT imaging offers multiplanar reconstruction facilitating enhanced preprocedure planning. This study aims to report efficacy and safety while considering the impact of patient selection and multiplanar CT planning. Method. Prospective case series of patients with peripheral lung lesions suspected of having lung cancer who underwent flexible bronchoscopy (forceps biopsy and lavage. Endobronchial lesions were excluded. Patients with negative results underwent CT-guided transthoracic needle aspiration, surgical biopsy, or clinical-radiological surveillance to establish the final diagnosis. Results. 226 patients were analysed. The diagnostic yield of bronchoscopy was 80.1% (181/226 with a sensitivity of 84.2% and specificity of 100%. In patients with a positive CT-Bronchus sign, the diagnostic yield was 82.4% compared to 72.8% with negative CT-Bronchus sign (p=0.116. Diagnostic yield was 84.9% in lesions > 20 mm and 63.0% in lesions ≤ 20 mm (p=0.001. Six (2.7% patients had transient hypoxia and 2 (0.9% had pneumothorax. There were no serious adverse events. Conclusion. Flexible bronchoscopy with appropriate patient selection and preprocedure planning is more efficacious in obtaining a diagnosis in peripheral lung lesions compared to historical data. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01374542.

  10. The significance of multi-slice helical CT multiplanar reconstruction in the diagnoses of laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Lin; Luo Dehong; Zhou Chunwu; Zhao Xinming; Jiang Liming; Huang Yao; Jiang Lingxia; Li Jing; Wu Ning

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of multi-slice helical CT with multiplanar reconstruction in laryngeal carcinoma. Methods: Thirty-five patients with laryngeal carcinoma were studied by helical CT, MPR were subsequently done. The lesion extent of the axial image findings, MPR findings and the combined image findings were compared with the pathological results respectively. The data were statistically analyzed. Results: In the evaluation of the anterior commissure, the axial image findings, MPR findings and the combined image findings were 82.9%, 68.6% and 91.4% in accuracy respectively, the results were statistically different (P 0.05). The combined images were superior to the axial images and the MPR images in sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the lesion extent. Conclusion: The axial images could show the shape, size, extension of the tumor and the lymphadenopathy, MPR images displayed the shape, size and extension roundly and directly, they were the supplement for the axial images. Axial images combined with MPR could improve the accuracy in the diagnoses of laryngeal carcinoma. (authors)

  11. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Lefevre

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears.

  12. A Current Review of the Meniscus Imaging: Proposition of a Useful Tool for Its Radiologic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Nicolas; Naouri, Jean Francois; Herman, Serge; Gerometta, Antoine; Klouche, Shahnaz; Bohu, Yoann

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this review was to present a synthesis of the current literature in order to provide a useful tool to clinician in radiologic analysis of the meniscus. All anatomical descriptions were clearly illustrated by MRI, arthroscopy, and/or drawings. The value of standard radiography is extremely limited for the assessment of meniscal injuries but may be indicated to obtain a differential diagnosis such as osteoarthritis. Ultrasound is rarely used as a diagnostic tool for meniscal pathologies and its accuracy is operator-dependent. CT arthrography with multiplanar reconstructions can detect meniscus tears that are not visible on MRI. This technique is also useful in case of MRI contraindications, in postoperative assessment of meniscal sutures and the condition of cartilage covering the articular surfaces. MRI is the most accurate and less invasive method for diagnosing meniscal lesions. MRI allows confirming and characterizing the meniscal lesion, the type, the extension, its association with a cyst, the meniscal extrusion, and assessing cartilage and subchondral bone. New 3D-MRI in three dimensions with isotropic resolution allows the creation of multiplanar reformatted images to obtain from an acquisition in one sectional plane reconstructions in other spatial planes. 3D MRI should further improve the diagnosis of meniscal tears. PMID:27057352

  13. Investigation of reconstruction conditions in sagittal-plane multiplanar reconstruction of the temporal bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Miyako; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Ichikawa, Ginichiro; Kobayashi, Kenichi; Ando, Ichiro

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, it has become possible to quickly obtain a large amount of 3D data with high continuity by helical CT scanning, in which the body is scanned continuously in a helical fashion. MPR (multiplanar reconstruction) can be performed using this data to generate images in arbitrary sectional planes, making it possible to obtain sagittal-plane images of the highest quality, which is useful for surgical planning. However, the procedures involved are rather complicated. Therefore, this study was conducted to investigate conditions for standardization of sagittal-plane MPR examinations performed using Xvigor CT scanners and Xtension. The results showed that a slice interval of 1 mm, no imaging filter, a zooming factor of 1.5, a window level of 350, and a window width of 3500 are the optimal imaging conditions. The stapes can be visualized in 70% of cases with sagittal-plane MPR based on axial images, and can be recognized at surgery in 75% or more of cases. Images of consistent quality can be obtained by standardizing the conditions for sagittal-plane MPR, which should prove advantageous in the clinical setting. (author)

  14. Frequency and types of fractures in maxillofacial traumas. Assessment using MDCT with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomich, G.; Baigorria, P.; Orlando, N.; Mejico, M.; Costamagna, C.; Villavicencio, R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Maxillofacial trauma (MFT) is a common reason for attendance at Emergency Departments. The complex anatomy of the facial bones requires multiplanar imaging techniques for a proper evaluation. Objectives. To describe frequency and types of fractures in a series of patients with MFT evaluated by multi-slice computed tomography (MDCT) with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions. Materials and Methods: Facial bone CTs ordered for MFT by the Emergency Department from June 2008 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The following data were obtained: age, gender, cause of trauma, presence and type of fractures. Patients were evaluated with an 8-channel MDCT. Multiplanar reconstructions were performed in all cases using high resolution bone window and soft tissue window, as well as 3D reconstructions. Results: One-hundred and thirty-seven CTs were performed for MFT: 78 (57%) showed 131 fractures. Of these 78 patients, 52 (66%) were males and 26 (34%) were females; mean age 33 years old (range: 14-90 yrs.). Causes: 58 % were injuries from traffic accidents; 24% were injuries from fights; 13% were sport injuries; and 7% were due to miscellaneous etiologies. Type and frequency of fractures: 18.3% were orbital floor fractures, 16% were maxillary sinus fractures, 15.3% were nasal fractures, 13% were jaw fractures, 9.2% were orbital fractures, and 12.3% were fractures of the zygomatic-malar complex; two cases of Le Fort II-III fractures were also observed. Conclusions: Fractures were more common in males, in the age range from 15 to 35 years old. Most fractures, and the most complex ones, were caused by traffic accidents. The most common fracture, either isolated or associated with other fractures, was the orbital floor fracture. (authors)

  15. Imaging system for creating 3D block-face cryo-images of whole mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debashish; Breen, Michael; Salvado, Olivier; Heinzel, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot; Wilson, David

    2006-03-01

    We developed a cryomicrotome/imaging system that provides high resolution, high sensitivity block-face images of whole mice or excised organs, and applied it to a variety of biological applications. With this cryo-imaging system, we sectioned cryo-preserved tissues at 2-40 μm thickness and acquired high resolution brightfield and fluorescence images with microscopic in-plane resolution (as good as 1.2 μm). Brightfield images of normal and pathological anatomy show exquisite detail, especially in the abdominal cavity. Multi-planar reformatting and 3D renderings allow one to interrogate 3D structures. In this report, we present brightfield images of mouse anatomy, as well as 3D renderings of organs. For BPK mice model of polycystic kidney disease, we compared brightfield cryo-images and kidney volumes to MRI. The color images provided greater contrast and resolution of cysts as compared to in vivo MRI. We note that color cryo-images are closer to what a researcher sees in dissection, making it easier for them to interpret image data. The combination of field of view, depth of field, ultra high resolution and color/fluorescence contrast enables cryo-image volumes to provide details that cannot be found through in vivo imaging or other ex vivo optical imaging approaches. We believe that this novel imaging system will have applications that include identification of mouse phenotypes, characterization of diseases like blood vessel disease, kidney disease, and cancer, assessment of drug and gene therapy delivery and efficacy and validation of other imaging modalities.

  16. Morphological and functional diagnosis in the head and neck with multiplanar spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lell, M.; Baum, U.; Noemayr, A.; Greess, H.; Lenz, M.; Bautz, W.; Koester, M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the improvement of multislice-spiral CT in the assessment of head and neck tumors. Material and methods: 80 patients with suspected tumor in the head and neck region were examined with MSCT (Somatom Plus 4 VZ) after the administration of i.v. contrast material. Slice collimation was 4x1 mm with a pitch factor of 6. Additional multiplanar reformations were calculated in each case. Results: The specific anatomy and pathways of tumor spread is difficult to demonstrate in cross-sectional imaging. Tumor infiltration of the base of the skull or the palate could be depicted or excluded on coronal MPR, additional coronal scanning was not necessary. The detection of pathologic lymph nodes was improved with MPR in 7 patients. Discussion: The exact determination of tumor margins is mandatory for modern therapy concepts of limited surgery. High resolution datasets are basis for reformations in arbitrary planes, making additional coronal scanning not necessary. Functional imaging of the larynx and hypopharynx improve the diagnostic accuracy of CT, a short scantime is necessary to reduce motion artifacts. Conclusive assessment of tumor infiltration, lymphatic spread and functional alterations is improved with MSCT. (orig.) [de

  17. ANATOMICAL STUDY OF CRANIAL NERVE EMERGENCE AND SKULL FORAMINA IN THE HORSE USING MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rita; Malalana, Fernando; McConnell, James Fraser; Maddox, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For accurate interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) images of the equine brain, knowledge of the normal cross-sectional anatomy of the brain and associated structures (such as the cranial nerves) is essential. The purpose of this prospective cadaver study was to describe and compare MRI and computed tomography (CT) anatomy of cranial nerves' origins and associated skull foramina in a sample of five horses. All horses were presented for euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the head. Heads were collected posteuthanasia and T2-weighted MR images were obtained in the transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes. Thin-slice MR sequences were also acquired using transverse 3D-CISS sequences that allowed mutliplanar reformatting. Transverse thin-slice CT images were acquired and multiplanar reformatting was used to create comparative images. Magnetic resonance imaging consistently allowed visualization of cranial nerves II, V, VII, VIII, and XII in all horses. The cranial nerves III, IV, and VI were identifiable as a group despite difficulties in identification of individual nerves. The group of cranial nerves IX, X, and XI were identified in 4/5 horses although the region where they exited the skull was identified in all cases. The course of nerves II and V could be followed on several slices and the main divisions of cranial nerve V could be distinguished in all cases. In conclusion, CT allowed clear visualization of the skull foramina and occasionally the nerves themselves, facilitating identification of the nerves for comparison with MRI images. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  18. A survey of medical students on the impact of a new digital imaging library in the dissection room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, T D; Tam, M D B S; Loughna, S

    2009-09-01

    Radiology has a recognised role in undergraduate anatomy education. The recent digitalisation of radiology has created new learning opportunities involving techniques such as image labelling, 3D reconstruction, and multiplanar reformatting. An opportunity was identified at the University of Nottingham to create a digital library of normal radiology images as a learner-driven adjunct in anatomy dissection sessions. We describe the process of creating a de novo digital library by sourcing images for presentation at computer workstations. Students' attitudes towards this new resource were assessed using a questionnaire which used a 5 point Likert scale and also offered free text responses. One hundred and forty-one out of 260 students (54%) completed the questionnaire. The most notable findings were: a positive response to the relevance of imaging to the session topics (median score 4), strong agreement that images should be available on the university website (median score 5), and disagreement that enough workstations were available (median score 2). About 24% of respondents suggested independently that images needed more labeling to help with orientation and identification. This first phase of supplying a comprehensive imaging library can be regarded as a success. Increasing availability and incorporating dynamic labeling are well recognized as important design concepts for electronic learning resources and these will be improved in the second phase of delivery as a direct result of student feedback. Hopefully other centers can benefit from this experience and will consider such a venture to be worthwhile.

  19. Echocardiographic anatomy of the mitral valve: a critical appraisal of 2-dimensional imaging protocols with a 3-dimensional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Feroze; Hess, Philip E; Matyal, Robina; Mackensen, G Burkhard; Wang, Angela; Qazi, Aisha; Panzica, Peter J; Lerner, Adam B; Maslow, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    To highlight the limitations of traditional 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiographic mitral valve (MV) examination methodologies, which do not account for patient-specific transesophageal echocardiographic (TEE) probe adjustments made during an actual clinical perioperative TEE examination. Institutional quality-improvement project. Tertiary care hospital. Attending anesthesiologists certified by the National Board of Echocardiography. Using the technique of multiplanar reformatting with 3-dimensional (3D) data, ambiguous 2D images of the MV were generated, which resembled standard midesophageal 2D views. Based on the 3D image, the MV scallops visualized in each 2D image were recognized exactly by the position of the scan plane. Twenty-three such 2D MV images were created in a presentation from the 3D datasets. Anesthesia staff members (n = 13) were invited to view the presentation based on the 2D images only and asked to identify the MV scallops. Their responses were scored as correct or incorrect based on the 3D image. The overall accuracy was 30.4% in identifying the MV scallops. The transcommissural view was identified correctly >90% of the time. The accuracy of the identification of A1, A3, P1, and P3 scallops was <50%. The accuracy of the identification of A2P2 scallops was ≥50%. In the absence of information on TEE probe adjustments performed to acquire a specific MV image, it is possible to misidentify the scallops. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The diagnostic value of multiplanar reconstruction on MDCT colonography for the preoperative staging of colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Shin, Kyung-Sook

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images can improve the accuracy of MDCT-based colorectal cancer preoperative staging by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Fifty-five patients with colorectal cancer underwent contrast-enhanced CT colonography using an 8- or 16-row scanner. Two separate interval reviews of the axial MDCT datasets with/without MPR images (coronal and sagittal) were performed independently by two radiologists blinded to both the colonoscopic and histopathologic results. At each review session, the radiologists were asked to determine the colorectal cancer TNM stage within the context of differentiating ≤T3 from T4, N0 from ≥N1 and M0 from M1 using a five-point confidence scale. The radiologists' performance for staging the colorectal cancer using axial CT datasets with/without MPR images was evaluated using ROC analysis. Sensitivities, specificities and interobserver agreement were assessed. When MPR images were added, significant improvement was achieved by both radiologists for differentiating N0 from ≥N1 in terms of both A Z (0.651 to 0.769; 0.573 to 0.713) and specificity (26.7 to 69.2%; 23.1 to 76.9%) (P 0.05), but a significant improvement in the specificity (70 to 90%; 80 to 92%) was achieved by one radiologist (P<0.05). In terms of the M staging, a significant improvement in the Az (0.844 to 0.996) was observed for the combined interpretation of the axial and MPR images by one radiologist (P<0.05). Furthermore, substantial or almost perfect interobserver agreement was achieved for all TNM stagings for the combined interpretations (κ=0.641-0.866), whereas only fair to substantial agreement was achieved for the axial images alone (κ=0.337-0.707). In conclusion, the combined interpretation of the axial and MPR MDCT images significantly improved the local staging of colorectal cancer compared with assessments based on axial images alone. (orig.)

  1. Potential contribution of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) to computer-aided detection of lung nodules on MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamagata, Hitoshi; Nogami, Munenobu; Kono, Atsushi; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate potential benefits of using multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) in computer-aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Materials and methods: MDCT datasets of 60 patients with suspected lung nodules were retrospectively collected. Using “second-read” CAD, two radiologists (Readers 1 and 2) independently interpreted these datasets for the detection of non-calcified nodules (≥4 mm) with concomitant confidence rating. They did this task twice, first without MPR (using only axial images), and then 4 weeks later with MPR (using also coronal and sagittal MPR images), where the total reading time per dataset, including the time taken to assess the detection results of CAD software (CAD assessment time), was recorded. The total reading time and CAD assessment time without MPR and those with MPR were statistically compared for each reader. The radiologists’ performance for detecting nodules without MPR and the performance with MPR were compared using jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) analysis. Results: Compared to the CAD assessment time without MPR (mean, 69 s and 57 s for Readers 1 and 2), the CAD assessment time with MPR (mean, 46 s and 45 s for Readers 1 and 2) was significantly reduced (P < 0.001). For Reader 1, the total reading time was also significantly shorter in the case with MPR. There was no significant difference between the detection performances without MPR and with MPR. Conclusion: The use of MPR has the potential to improve the workflow in CAD of lung nodules on MDCT.

  2. Diagnostic value of multiplanar reconstruction in CT recognition of lumbar spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, S. K.; Choi, J. H.; Kim, C. H.; Sohn, M. H.; Lim, K. Y.; Choi, K. C.

    1984-01-01

    The computer tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the lumbar spine. Recently, the multiplanar reconstruction of lumbar spine of CT of significant value for the anatomical localization and for the myelographic and surgical correlation. We observed 177 cases of lumbar spine CT, who complains of spinal symptom, during the period from Dec. 1982 to Aug. 1984. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 113 males and 44 females. The CT diagnosis showed 152 cases of herniated lumbar disc, 15 cases of degenerative disease, 5 cases of spine tbc., 3 cases of spine trauma and 2 cases of meningocele. 2. CT findings of herniated disc were as follows: focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, indentation on dural sac in 92 cases (60.5%) soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 85 cases (55.9%), compression or displacement of nerve root sheath in 22 cases(14.4%). 3. Sites of herniated lumbar disc were at L4-L5 level in 100 cases(59.1%) and at L5-S1 level in 65 cases (38.4%). Location of it were central type in 70 cases(41.1%), left-central type in 46 cases (27.2%), right-central type in 44 cases(26.0%) and lateral type in 9 cases (5.1%). 4. The sagittal reconstruction images were helpful in evaluating neural foramina, size of disc bluge into spinal canal, especially at L5-S1, and patients with spondylolisthesis. The coronal reconstruction images were the least informative, although they contributed to the evaluation of lumbar nerve roots of course, the axial CT scans were the most sensitive and specific.

  3. Simplifying the exploration of volumetric images: development of a 3D user interface for the radiologist's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teistler, M; Breiman, R S; Lison, T; Bott, O J; Pretschner, D P; Aziz, A; Nowinski, W L

    2008-10-01

    Volumetric imaging (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) provides increased diagnostic detail but is associated with the problem of navigation through large amounts of data. In an attempt to overcome this problem, a novel 3D navigation tool has been designed and developed that is based on an alternative input device. A 3D mouse allows for simultaneous definition of position and orientation of orthogonal or oblique multiplanar reformatted images or slabs, which are presented within a virtual 3D scene together with the volume-rendered data set and additionally as 2D images. Slabs are visualized with maximum intensity projection, average intensity projection, or standard volume rendering technique. A prototype has been implemented based on PC technology that has been tested by several radiologists. It has shown to be easily understandable and usable after a very short learning phase. Our solution may help to fully exploit the diagnostic potential of volumetric imaging by allowing for a more efficient reading process compared to currently deployed solutions based on conventional mouse and keyboard.

  4. CT-based virtual tracheobronchoscopy in children - comparison with axial CT and multiplanar reconstruction: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorantin, Erich; Lindbichler, Franz; Eber, Ernst; Schimpl, Guenther

    2002-01-01

    Background: 3D post-processing of spiral-CT (S-CT) data using perspective projection allows the generation of virtual views similar to endoscopy. Objective: To evaluate whether simultaneous reading of axial S-CT, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) and virtual tracheobronchoscopy (VTB) is more precise and accurate than reading of axial S-CT and MPR alone in paediatric patients. Materials and methods: S-CT studies of 15 symptomatic and 4 normal patients were investigated. Two radiologists independently read two sets of images for airway abnormalities: first axial CT and MPR, followed by axial CT, MPR and VTB. A final decision was later made by consensus. All results were compared to fibre-optic bronchoscopy (FTB). Interobserver agreement was used as an indicator of precision for the display technique used. Results: At reading of axial S-CT and MPR an interobserver agreement of 89.5% (κ=0.776, P<0.00103) was found. Based on the consensus decision, a diagnostic accuracy of 89.5% at a sensitivity 86.6% and specificity of 100% (κ=0.776, 95% CI 0.491-1.062, P<0.00103) was achieved. At reporting on axial S-CT, MPR and VTB, all cases were classified correctly by both readers, indicating 100% accuracy, interobserver agreement, sensitivity and specificity (κ=1.00, 95% CI 1.0-1.0, P<0.000258). Conclusions: The simultaneous display of axial S-CT, MPR and VTB raises the precision, accuracy and sensitivity of radiological reports. (orig.)

  5. Indications for direct multidirectional or multiplanar electronic reconstructions in CT-scanning of the head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, M.C.; Veiga-Pires, J.A.; Gooskens, R.; Troost, J.

    1982-01-01

    The authors set out to indicate the optimal applications at minimum radiation penalty of both direct multidirectional and multiplanar electronic reconstruction modes in CT-scanning of the head by means of two illustrative case reports of midline congenital tumours. (orig.)

  6. MDCT imaging of calcinosis in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, V.; Becce, F.; Feydy, A.; Guérini, H.; Campagna, R.; Allanore, Y.; Drapé, J.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Calcinosis is a typical feature of systemic sclerosis (SSc) and can be found in many different tissues including the superficial soft tissues, periarticular structures, muscles, and tendons. It can also provoke erosive changes on bones. Investigation is conducted most often with plain radiographs. However, when a more detailed assessment is necessary, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is helpful owing to its multiplanar reformat (MPR) ability. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the various appearances of calcinosis in SSc patients as visualized at MDCT

  7. Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) follow-up imaging: the assessment and treatment of common postoperative complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Shaida, N.; Thakor, A.S.; Winterbottom, A.; Cousins, C.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) is a well-established procedure, which has long-term mortality rates similar to that of open repair. It has the additional benefit of being less invasive, making it the favoured method of treating abdominal aortic aneurysms in elderly and high-risk patients with multiple co-morbidities. The main disadvantage of EVAR is the higher rate of re-intervention, due to device-related complications, including endoleaks, limb occlusion, stent migration, kinking, and infection. As a result lifelong surveillance is required. In order to avoid missing these complications, intricate knowledge of stent graft design, good-quality diagnostic ultrasound skills, multiplanar reformatting of CT images, and reproducible investigations are important. Most of these complications can be treated via an endovascular approach using cuff extensions, uncovered stents, coils, and liquid embolic agents. Open surgery is reserved for complex complications, where an endovascular approach is not feasible. - Highlights: • Comprehensive pictorial review of EVAR related complications. • Importance of life-long EVAR surveillance, to prevent aortic rupture or lower limb ischaemia. • Identification and management of endoleaks, rupture, migration, kink/infolding, occlusion and infection

  8. Assessment of pisotriquetral misalignment with magnetic resonance imaging: Is it associated with trauma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Hee-Dong; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Jongno-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seongnam-City, Gyeongi-Do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Our objective was to determine whether there is an association between pisotriquetral (PT) malalignment and acute distal radius fracture by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We evaluated 138 patients who underwent 3-T MRI of the wrists. Group A comprised 85 patients with acute distal radius fracture, and group B comprised 53 patients without trauma. PT interval and angle and pisiform excursion were measured on oblique axial and sagittal multiplanar reformats. The presence of abnormalities in the flexor carpi ulnaris tendon (FCU), pisometacarpal ligament (PML), and pisohamate ligament (PHL) were evaluated. PT interval was wider in group A on both the axial and sagittal planes (P < 0.001). Axial PT angle opened more radially in group A (P < 0.001), and the absolute value of the sagittal PT angle in group A was wider than that in group B (P = 0.006). Abnormalities in FCU, PML, and PHL were more frequently observed in group A (P < 0.001). On multiple linear regression, distal radius fracture remained significant after adjusting for the patient's age and PT osteoarthritis. Acute distal radius fracture can affect normal alignment of the PT joint, resulting in associated injuries to the primary PT joint stabilizers. (orig.)

  9. Multi-Scale Characterization of the PEPCK-Cmus Mouse through 3D Cryo-Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashish Roy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed, for the Case 3D Cryo-imaging system, a specialized, multiscale visualization scheme which provides color-rich volume rendering and multiplanar reformatting enabling one to visualize an entire mouse and zoom in to organ, tissue, and microscopic scales. With this system, we have anatomically characterized, in 3D, from whole animal to tissue level, a transgenic mouse and compared it with its control. The transgenic mouse overexpresses the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK-C in its skeletal muscle and is capable of greatly enhanced physical endurance and has a longer life-span and reproductive life as compared to control animals. We semiautomatically analyzed selected organs such as kidney, heart, adrenal gland, spleen, and ovaries and found comparatively enlarged heart, much less visceral, subcutaneous, and pericardial adipose tissue, and higher tibia-to-femur ratio in the transgenic animal. Microscopically, individual skeletal muscle fibers, fine mesenteric blood vessels, and intestinal villi, among others, were clearly seen.

  10. Reproducibility of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Diameter Measurement and Growth Evaluation on Axial and Multiplanar Computed Tomography Reformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugas, Alexandre; Therasse, Éric; Kauffmann, Claude; Tang, An; Elkouri, Stephane; Nozza, Anna; Giroux, Marie-France; Oliva, Vincent L.; Soulez, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare different methods measuring abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) maximal diameter (Dmax) and its progression on multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scan. Materials and Methods: Forty AAA patients with two MDCT scans acquired at different times (baseline and follow-up) were included. Three observers measured AAA diameters by seven different methods: on axial images (anteroposterior, transverse, maximal, and short-axis views) and on multiplanar reformation (MPR) images (coronal, sagittal, and orthogonal views). Diameter measurement and progression were compared over time for the seven methods. Reproducibility of measurement methods was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland–Altman analysis. Results: Dmax, as measured on axial slices at baseline and follow-up (FU) MDCTs, was greater than that measured using the orthogonal method (p = 0.046 for baseline and 0.028 for FU), whereas Dmax measured with the orthogonal method was greater those using all other measurement methods (p-value range: <0.0001–0.03) but anteroposterior diameter (p = 0.18 baseline and 0.10 FU). The greatest interobserver ICCs were obtained for the orthogonal and transverse methods (0.972) at baseline and for the orthogonal and sagittal MPR images at FU (0.973 and 0.977). Interobserver ICC of the orthogonal method to document AAA progression was greater (ICC = 0.833) than measurements taken on axial images (ICC = 0.662–0.780) and single-plane MPR images (0.772–0.817). Conclusion: AAA Dmax measured on MDCT axial slices overestimates aneurysm size. Diameter as measured by the orthogonal method is more reproducible, especially to document AAA progression.

  11. The usefulness of three-dimensional imaging with spiral CT in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Won Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Rho, Young Soo; Jung, Yin Gyo [Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) spiral CT imaging in patients with upper airway stenosis. We performed 3D spiral CT imagings in ten patients in whom upper airway stenosis was clinically suspected. Eight of these patients had upper airway stenosis caused by intubation or tracheostomy (n-6), tuberculosis (n=1), or extrinsic compression by a thyroid mass (n=1). Spiral CT scanning (30-second continuous exposure and 90-mm length) was performed with a table speed of 3mm/sec and a section thickness of 3mm. The selected starting point was the epiglottis. The resulting data were reformatted by multiplanar reformation (MPR) and shaded surface display (SSD) with peeling after reconstruction of 2mm interval. In the evaluation of location and extent of stenosis, we compared fidings of 3D imaging with those of baseline axial images (n=10), endoscopy (n=9) and operation (n=4). The locations of stenosis in eight patients were as follows;tracheostoma (n=4), subglottic region (n=3), and larynx (n=1). In all eight, 3D imaging demonstrated the location and extent of stenosis, which exactly correlated with endoscopic and operative findings. In one patient, however, another stenotic area in the tracheal bifurcation was not discovered because this lesion was not included in the field of CT scan. In two patients, the diagnosis on 3D images of no 'stenosis' was comfirmed by clinical findings or operation. No differences in diagnostic accuracy were noted between axial images, MPR, and SSD when evalvating the location and extent of stenosis; vertical extent was shown more easily by 3D imaging than by axial images, however. 3D imaging with spiral CT may be an useful adjunctive method in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis with variable causes.

  12. The usefulness of three-dimensional imaging with spiral CT in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Won Ho; Yoon, Dae Young; Bae, Sang Hoon; Rho, Young Soo; Jung, Yin Gyo

    1996-01-01

    To assess the usefulness of three-dimensional (3D) spiral CT imaging in patients with upper airway stenosis. We performed 3D spiral CT imagings in ten patients in whom upper airway stenosis was clinically suspected. Eight of these patients had upper airway stenosis caused by intubation or tracheostomy (n-6), tuberculosis (n=1), or extrinsic compression by a thyroid mass (n=1). Spiral CT scanning (30-second continuous exposure and 90-mm length) was performed with a table speed of 3mm/sec and a section thickness of 3mm. The selected starting point was the epiglottis. The resulting data were reformatted by multiplanar reformation (MPR) and shaded surface display (SSD) with peeling after reconstruction of 2mm interval. In the evaluation of location and extent of stenosis, we compared fidings of 3D imaging with those of baseline axial images (n=10), endoscopy (n=9) and operation (n=4). The locations of stenosis in eight patients were as follows;tracheostoma (n=4), subglottic region (n=3), and larynx (n=1). In all eight, 3D imaging demonstrated the location and extent of stenosis, which exactly correlated with endoscopic and operative findings. In one patient, however, another stenotic area in the tracheal bifurcation was not discovered because this lesion was not included in the field of CT scan. In two patients, the diagnosis on 3D images of no 'stenosis' was comfirmed by clinical findings or operation. No differences in diagnostic accuracy were noted between axial images, MPR, and SSD when evalvating the location and extent of stenosis; vertical extent was shown more easily by 3D imaging than by axial images, however. 3D imaging with spiral CT may be an useful adjunctive method in the evaluation of upper airway stenosis with variable causes

  13. Multiplanar transesophageal echocardiography for the evaluation and percutaneous management of ostium secundum atrial septal defects in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino, Ayax; Basmadjian, Arsène J; Ducharme, Anique; Ibrahim, Reda; Mercier, Lise-Andrée; Pelletier, Guy B; Marcotte, François; Garceau, Patrick; Burelle, Denis; O'Meara, Eileen; Dore, Annie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the usefulness of multiplanar transesophageal echocardiography before, during and after percutaneous transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defects. Transesophageal echocardiography imaging techniques,including their role in patient selection, procedural guidance and immediate assessment of technical success and complications are described and discussed in this review. Percutaneous transcatheter closure is indicated for ostium secundum atrial septal defects of less than 40 mm in maximal diameter. The defect must have a favorable anatomy, with adequate rims of at least 5 mm to anchor the prosthesis. Transesophageal echocardiography plays a critical role before the procedure in identifying potential candidates for percutaneous closure and to exclude those with unfavorable anatomy or associated lesions, which could not be addressed percutaneously. Transesophageal echocardiography is also important during the procedure to guide the deployment of the device. After device deployment, the echocardiographer must assess the device (integrity, position and stability), residual shunt, atrio-ventricular valve regurgitation, obstruction to systemic or venous return and pericardial effusion, in order to determine procedural success and diagnose immediate complications.

  14. Comparative study of the macroscopic finding, conventional tomographic imaging, and computed tomographic imaging in locating the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Moon; You, Dong Soo

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was comparison of conventional tomography with reformatted computed tomography for dental implant in locating the mandibular canal. Five dogs were used and after conventional tomographs and fitted computed tomographs were taken, four dentist traced all films. Mandibles were sectioned with 2 mm slice thickness and the sections were then radiographed (contact radiography). Each radiograpic image was traced and linear measurements were made from mandibular canal to alveolar crest, buccal cortex, lingual cortex, and inferior border. The following results were obtained; 1. Reformatted computed tomographs were exacter than conventional tomography by alveolar crest to canal length of -0.6 mm difference between real values and radiographs 2. The average measurements of buccal cortex to mandibular canal width and lingual cortex to mandibular canal width of conventional tomographs were exacter than reformatted computed tomographs, but standard deviations were higher than reformatted computed tomographs. 3. Standard deviations of reformatted computed tomographs were lower than conventional tomographs at all comparing sites 4. At reformatted computed tomography 62.5% of the measurements performed were within ±1 mm of the true value, and at conventional tomography 24.1% were. 5. Mandibular canal invisibility was 0.8% at reformatted computed tomography and 9.2% at conventional tomography. Reformatted computed tomography has been shown to be more useful radiographic technique for assessment of the mandibular canal than conventional tomography.

  15. Frecuencia y tipo de fracturas en traumatismos maxilofaciales: Evaluación con Tomografía Multislice con reconstrucciones multiplanares y tridimensionales Frequency and types of fractures in maxillofacial traumas: Assessment using MDCT with multiplanar and 3D reconstructions

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela Tomich; Patricio Baigorria; Nicolás Orlando; Mariano Méjico; Cecilia Costamagna; Roberto Villavicencio

    2011-01-01

    Introducción. Los traumatismos maxilofaciales (TMF) representan un motivo de consulta común en los servicios de Urgencias. La compleja anatomía del macizo facial requiere de métodos de imágenes multiplanares para su correcta evaluación. Objetivos. Describir la frecuencia y tipos de fracturas en una serie de pacientes con TMF evaluados mediante tomografía computada multislice (TCMS) con reconstrucciones multiplanares y tridimensionales. Materiales y Métodos. Se revisaron en forma retrospectiva...

  16. Imaging the Cisternal Segment of Cranial Nerves with 3.0TMR 3D-COSMIC and Multiplanar Reconstruction%3.0TMR3D-COSMIC成像序列结合MRP对Ⅰ-Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段的成像研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李家才; 郑红伟; 漆剑频; 夏黎明; 胡道予

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of To compare 3D-COSMIC MRI sequences for cranial nerves I ~XII. Methods 3D-C0SMIC were used in 20 volunteers and 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves. 480 nerves were evaluated. Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings into 3 grades: 1 (completely visualized), 2 (partially visualized), and 3 (not visualized). The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization, the relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades: 1 (notcontact),2(contact),3(compression). Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-COSMIC sequenceswere as follows respectively: nerve I (86%); nerve 11(100%); nerve 111(97%); nerve IV(23%); nerve V (100%); nerve VT(90%); nerve W( 100%); nerve Wl( 100%); nerve K-XI complex (63%, 100% and53%); nerve XE(40%). 3 of 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact. Conclusion 3D-COSM1C sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels, especially II -> UL V-, VI-. VII-. V1IK X cranial nerves, to help clinical treatment.%目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC 成像序列对Ⅰ-Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 采用3.0TMR扫描仪对20例健康志愿者和10例疑因血管等原因压迫相应颅脑神经产生临床症状的患者进行MR检查.并由两名神经放射学医师根据20例志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为以下3个等级:清晰、较清晰、不清晰,前两者定义为显示,后者定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 脑神经在3D-COSMIC序列的显示率分别为:嗅神经(86%),视神经(100%),动眼神经(97%),滑车神经(23%),三叉神经(100%),外展神经(90%),面神经(100%),前庭蜗神经 (100%),后组颅神经复合体(舌咽神经、迷走神经、副神经)(63%、100%、53%),

  17. 3.0T MR3D-COSMIC序列结合多平面重建对12对脑神经脑池段的成像价值%Imaging the cisternal segment of cranial nerves with 3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC and multiplanar reconstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑红伟; 马秀华; 薛鹏; 漆剑频; 胡道予; 吕富荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the applying value of 3D-COSMIC MRI sequences for cranial nerves I-M.Methods 3D-COSMIC were used in 20 volunteers and 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves.480 nerves were evaluated.Two radiologists independently divided the imaging findings into 3 grades: 1 (completely visualized) ,2 (partially visualized) ,and 3 (not visualized).The first two grades were defined as visualization and the last grade was no visualization,the relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels were divided into grades;1 (notcontact) ,2(contact) ,3 (compression).Results The rate of visualization of these cranial nerves with 3D-COSMIC sequences were as follows respectively: nerve I (86%);nerve Ⅱ (100%);nerve Ⅲ (97% );nerve Ⅳ(23%);nerve Ⅴ(100%) ;nerve Ⅵ (90%) ;nerve Ⅶ(100%);nerve 1(100%);nerve IX-XI complex(63% ,100% and 53%);nerve Ⅻ(40%)3 of 10 patients with complaint of cranial nerves displayed nerve had vascular compression or contact.Conclusion 3D-COSMIC sequence can show detailed anatomy of the cranial nerves and relationship between nerves and surrounding vessels ,especially Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ,Ⅴ,Ⅵ,Ⅶ,Ⅷ,Ⅹ cranial nerves?to help clinical treatment.%目的 探讨3.0T MR 3D-COSMIC成像序列对Ⅰ~Ⅻ对脑神经脑池段显示的临床价值.方法 采用3.0T MR扫描仪对20例健康志愿者和10例疑因血管等原因压迫相应颅脑神经产生临床症状的患者进行MR检查,扫描序列包括3D-COSMIC及3D-TOF-SPGR.并由2名神经放射学医师根据20例健康志愿者480支颅神经显示的清晰程度分为清晰、较清晰、不清晰3个等级,清晰和较清晰定义为显示,不清晰定义为未显示,而神经与血管的关系分为无接触、接触、压迫.结果 脑神经在3D-COSMIC序列的显示率分别为:嗅神经(86%),视神经(100%),动眼神经(97%),滑车神经(23%),三叉神经(100%),外展神经(90%),面神经(100%),前庭蜗神经(100%),后组颅神经复合体[舌咽神经(63%)

  18. Multiplanar lumbopelvic control in patients with low back pain: is multiplanar assessment better than single plane assessment in discriminating between patients and healthy controls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Wong, E; Gallant, P; Alexander, S; Dehmer, K; Ingvalson, S; McClenahan, B; Piatte, A; Poupore, K; Davis, A M

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low back pain (LBP) commonly have lumbopelvic control deficits. Lumbopelvic assessment during sagittal motion is incorporated into commonly used clinical examination algorithms for Treatment Based Classification. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether combined assessment of lumbopelvic control during sagittal and frontal plane motion discriminates between people with and without LBP better than single plane assessment alone. Nineteen patients with LBP and 18 healthy control participants volunteered for this study. The active straight leg raise (ASLR) and active hip abduction (AHAbd) tests were used to assess lumbopelvic control during sagittal and frontal plane motion, respectively. The tests were scored as positive or negative using published scoring criteria. Contingency tables were created for each test alone and for the combined tests (both positive/both negative) with presence/absence of LBP as the reference standard to calculate accuracy statistics of sensitivity (sn), specificity (sp), likelihood (+LR and -LR), and diagnostic odds ratios (OR). Active straight leg raise and AHAbd tests alone had sn of 0·63, 0·74, respectively, sp of 0·61, 0·50, respectively, and OR of 2·7, 2·8, respectively. The combined tests had sn = 0·89, sp = 0·60, and OR = 12·0. Forty percent of patients with LBP had control deficits in both planes of motion. The AHAbd and ALSR tests appear to have greater diagnostic discrimination when used in combination than when used independently. A percentage of patients with LBP had control deficits in both planes, while others demonstrated uniplanar deficits only. These findings highlight the importance of multiplanar assessment in patients with LBP.

  19. The Development of LED-Based Dental Light Using a Multiplanar Reflector Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Hsieh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiplanar reflector was designed to enhance the application efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED light sources that can be employed as LED-based dental lights. This study used a high-power LED developed by Nichia, that is, a single LED capable of providing a total luminous flux of 120 lm, as the primarily light source to design and develop an LED-based dental light. This LED complies with the international standards and regulations stipulated in ISO 9680:2007. The light spots produced by the prototype were rectangular, with a length of 200 mm and a width of 100 mm. These light spots achieved maximum illumination of 12,000 lux. The use of LEDs can reduce energy consumption from 50 W to 3 W, providing an energy saving of more than 90%.

  20. Multiplanar and two-dimensional imaging of central airway stenting with multidetector computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgul Mehmet

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT provides guidance for primary screening of the central airways. The aim of our study was assessing the contribution of multidetector computed tomography- two dimensional reconstruction in the management of patients with tracheobronchial stenosis prior to the procedure and during a short follow up period of 3 months after the endobronchial treatment. Methods This is a retrospective study with data collected from an electronic database and from the medical records. Patients evaluated with MDCT and who had undergone a stenting procedure were included. A Philips RSGDT 07605 model MDCT was used, and slice thickness, 3 mm; overlap, 1.5 mm; matrix, 512x512; mass, 90 and kV, 120 were evaluated. The diameters of the airways 10 mm proximal and 10 mm distal to the obstruction were measured and the stent diameter (D was determined from the average between D upper and D lower. Results Fifty-six patients, 14 (25% women and 42 (75% men, mean age 55.3 ± 13.2 years (range: 16-79 years, were assessed by MDCT and then treated with placement of an endobronchial stent. A computed tomography review was made with 6 detector Philips RSGDT 07605 multidetector computed tomography device. Endobronchial therapy was provided for the patients with endoluminal lesions. Stents were placed into the area of stenosis in patients with external compression after dilatation and debulking procedures had been carried out. In one patient the migration of a stent was detected during the follow up period by using MDCT. Conclusions MDCT helps to define stent size, length and type in patients who are suitable for endobronchial stinting. This is a non-invasive, reliable method that helps decisions about optimal stent size and position, thus reducing complications.

  1. Abducens nerve enhancement demonstrated by multiplanar reconstruction of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosoya, T.; Adachi, M.; Sugai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan); Yamaguchi, K.; Yamaguchi, K. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan); Kato, T. [3. Dept. of Internal Medicine, Yamagata University School of Medicine (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    We describe contrast enhancement of the cisternal portion of the abducens nerve and discuss its clinical significance. We examined 67 patients with ophthalmoplegia using contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional (3D) MRI with multiplanar reconstruction along the nerves and found 16 patients (ten men, six women), aged 10-73 years (mean 34.4 years), with contrast enhancement of the abducens nerve. Of the 36 patients who had an abducens palsy, 14 (39 %) showed contrast enhancement. In the 16 patients, 23 abducens nerves enhanced; 13 were symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic at the time. The causes were disseminated tumour (1), an inflammatory process (3), trauma (2), ischaemia (2) and autoimmune diseases (8), such as the Miller Fisher syndrome, acute ophthalmoparesis, polyneuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Abducens and/or oculomotor nerve enhancement was the only abnormality on MRI in the patients with traumatic or ischaemic neuropathy or autoimmune diseases. There were 14 patients who recovered fully within 1-6 months after treatment, and resolution of the enhancement correlated well with recovery. (orig.)

  2. Abducens nerve enhancement demonstrated by multiplanar reconstruction of contrast-enhanced three-dimensional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoya, T.; Adachi, M.; Sugai, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kato, T.

    2001-01-01

    We describe contrast enhancement of the cisternal portion of the abducens nerve and discuss its clinical significance. We examined 67 patients with ophthalmoplegia using contrast-enhanced 3-dimensional (3D) MRI with multiplanar reconstruction along the nerves and found 16 patients (ten men, six women), aged 10-73 years (mean 34.4 years), with contrast enhancement of the abducens nerve. Of the 36 patients who had an abducens palsy, 14 (39 %) showed contrast enhancement. In the 16 patients, 23 abducens nerves enhanced; 13 were symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic at the time. The causes were disseminated tumour (1), an inflammatory process (3), trauma (2), ischaemia (2) and autoimmune diseases (8), such as the Miller Fisher syndrome, acute ophthalmoparesis, polyneuropathy and multiple sclerosis. Abducens and/or oculomotor nerve enhancement was the only abnormality on MRI in the patients with traumatic or ischaemic neuropathy or autoimmune diseases. There were 14 patients who recovered fully within 1-6 months after treatment, and resolution of the enhancement correlated well with recovery. (orig.)

  3. [3D FSPGR (fast spoiled gradient echo) magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alikhanov, A A; Sinitsyn, V E; Perepelova, E M; Mukhin, K Iu; Demushkina, A A; Omarova, M O; Piliia, S V

    2001-01-01

    Small dysplastic lesions of the cerebral cortex are often missed by conventional MRI methods. The identification of subtle structural abnormalities by traditional multiplanar rectilinear slices is often limited by the complex convolutional pattern of the brain. We used a method of FSPGR (fast spoiled gradient-echo) of three-dimensional MRI data that improves the anatomical display of the sulcal structure of the hemispheric convexities. It also reduces the asymmetric sampling of gray-white matter that may lead to false-positive results. We present 5 from 12 patients with dysplastic cortical lesions in whom conventional two-dimensional and three-dimensional MRI with multiplanar reformatting was initially considered normal. Subsequent studies using 3D FSPGR identified various types of focal cortical dysplasia in all. These results indicate that an increase in the detection of subtle focal dysplastic lesions may be accomplished when one improves the anatomical display of the brain sulcal structure by performing 3D FSPGR.

  4. Multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography for diagnosis of scaphoid waist fracture union: a prospective cohort analysis of accuracy and precision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannemann, P.F.W.; Brouwers, L.; Gottgens, K.W.A.; Poeze, M.; Brink, P.R.G. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of Surgery and Traumasurgery, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Zee, D. van der; Stadler, A.; Weijers, R. [Maastricht University Medical Centre, Department of radiology, PO Box 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    To examine reliability and validity concerning union of scaphoid fractures determined by multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography randomized at 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. We used Fleiss' kappa to measure the opinions of three observers reviewing 44 sets of computed tomographic scans of 44 conservatively treated scaphoid waist fractures. We calculated kappa for the extent of consolidation (0-24 %, 25-49 %, 50-74 %, or 75-100 %) on the transverse, sagittal and coronal views. We also calculated kappa for no union, partial union, and union, and grouped the results for 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. As the reference standard for union, CT scans were performed at a minimum of 6 months after injury to determine validity. Overall inter-observer agreement was found to be moderate ({kappa} = 0.576). No union ({kappa} = 0.791), partial union ({kappa} = 0.502), and union ({kappa} = 0.683) showed substantial, moderate, and substantial agreement, respectively. The average sensitivity of multiplanar reconstruction CT for diagnosing union of scaphoid waist fractures was 73 %. The average specificity was 80 %. Our results suggest that multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography is a reliable and accurate method for diagnosing union or nonunion of scaphoid fractures. However, inter-observer agreement was lower with respect to partial union. (orig.)

  5. Multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography for diagnosis of scaphoid waist fracture union: a prospective cohort analysis of accuracy and precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannemann, P.F.W.; Brouwers, L.; Gottgens, K.W.A.; Poeze, M.; Brink, P.R.G.; Zee, D. van der; Stadler, A.; Weijers, R.

    2013-01-01

    To examine reliability and validity concerning union of scaphoid fractures determined by multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography randomized at 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. We used Fleiss' kappa to measure the opinions of three observers reviewing 44 sets of computed tomographic scans of 44 conservatively treated scaphoid waist fractures. We calculated kappa for the extent of consolidation (0-24 %, 25-49 %, 50-74 %, or 75-100 %) on the transverse, sagittal and coronal views. We also calculated kappa for no union, partial union, and union, and grouped the results for 6, 12, and 24 weeks after injury. As the reference standard for union, CT scans were performed at a minimum of 6 months after injury to determine validity. Overall inter-observer agreement was found to be moderate (κ = 0.576). No union (κ = 0.791), partial union (κ = 0.502), and union (κ = 0.683) showed substantial, moderate, and substantial agreement, respectively. The average sensitivity of multiplanar reconstruction CT for diagnosing union of scaphoid waist fractures was 73 %. The average specificity was 80 %. Our results suggest that multiplanar reconstruction computed tomography is a reliable and accurate method for diagnosing union or nonunion of scaphoid fractures. However, inter-observer agreement was lower with respect to partial union. (orig.)

  6. Multidetector CT portal venography in evaluation of portosystemic collateral vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, A.; Jain, M.

    2008-01-01

    This essay shows the usefulness of multidetector CT angiography for evaluation of the splenoportal venous system, which is essential in the management of patients with portal hypertension and its complications, such as portal vein thrombosis. By providing scanning with reconstruction of thin axial source images and reformatting into thicker multiplanar reformats, multidetector CT can help to determine the extent and location of portosystemic collateral vessels in patients with portal hypertension and is probably the optimal imaging technique in this setting.

  7. The value of multislice helical CT in the diagnosis of the rib micro-fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shuli; Wang Linsen; Sun Dingyuan; Deng Xin; Geng Xin; Li Jian; Liu Zhigang; Guo Lin; Jia Zhihong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of MSCT with thin-section reconstruction and curved multiplanar reformation of rib micro-fracture. Methods: Thirty-eight patients suspected ribs fracture by clinical examination, which had negative appearance in X-ray film, were performed with MSCT scan with thin-section reconstructed and curved multiplanar reformation. The imaging of 5 mm, 1 mm thickness and curved reformatted imags were analysed by three groups of radiologists respectively. Results: Of the 38 patients, 26 patients were demonstrated ribs fracture with 1 mm thin-section reconstructed and curved multiplanar reformatted CT imaging, which were classified as complete fracture in 18 ribs and incomplete fracture in 41 ribs. The ends of the fractures displacement located within a distance of double-thickness of the cortex of the complete ribs fracture. With 5 mm thickness imaging, the accuracy of the diagnosis was 86.4%, 89.8% and 94.9% by three groups radiologists, respectively. Conclusion: The rib fracture is very common in clinic, the incomplete and non evident displacement complete ribs fracture are difficult to be diagnosed by plain radiography. The MSCT can produce a large range volume information scan. Thin-section reconstructed and curved multiplanar reformatted imaging should be the effective method in diagnosis of ribs fracture. The total rib pattern and location, extend of all the ribs fracture in this cases can be displayed in one scan by the curved multiplanar reformatted imaging. (authors)

  8. Do Foley Catheters Adequately Drain the Bladder? Evidence from CT Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Avulova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:The Foley catheter has been widely assumed to be an effective means of draining the bladder. However, recent studies have brought into question its efficacy. The objective of our study is to further assess the adequacy of Foley catheter for complete drainage of the bladder.Materials and Methods:Consecutive catheterized patients were identified from a retrospective review of contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced computed tomo-graphic (CT abdomen and pelvis studies completed from 7/1/2011-6/30/2012. Residual urine volume (RUV was measured using 5mm axial CT sections as follows: The length (L and width (W of the bladder in the section with the greatest cross sectional area was combined with bladder height (H as determined by multiplanar reformatted images in order to calculate RUV by applying the formula for the volume (V of a sphere in a cube: V=(ϖ/6*(L*W*H.Results:RUVs of 167 (mean age 67 consecutively catheterized men (n=72 and women (n=95 identified by CT abdomen and pelvis studies were calculated. The mean RUV was 13.2 mL (range: 0.0 mL-859.1 mL, standard deviation: 75.9 mL, margin of error at 95% confidence:11.6 mL. Four (2.4% catheterized patients had RUVs of >50 mL, two of whom had an improperly placed catheter tip noted on their CT-reports.Conclusions:Previous studies have shown that up to 43% of catheterized patients had a RUV greater than 50 mL, suggesting inadequacy of bladder drainage via the Foley catheter. Our study indicated that the vast majority of patients with Foley catheters (97.6%, had adequately drained bladders with volumes of

  9. Do Foley catheters adequately drain the bladder? Evidence from CT imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avulova, Svetlana; Li, Valery J.; Khusid, Johnathan A. [Department of Urology, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Choi, Woo S. [Radiology, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Weiss, Jeffrey P., E-mail: johnathan.khusid@downstate.edu [Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Introduction: The Foley catheter has been widely assumed to be an effective means of draining the bladder. However, recent studies have brought into question its efficacy. The objective of our study is to further assess the adequacy of Foley catheter for complete drainage of the bladder. Materials and Methods: Consecutive catheterized patients were identified from a retrospective review of contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) abdomen and pelvis studies completed from 7/1/2011-6/30/2012. Residual urine volume (RUV) was measured using 5mm axial CT sections as follows: The length (L) and width (W) of the bladder in the section with the greatest cross sectional area was combined with bladder height (H) as determined by multiplanar reformatted images in order to calculate RUV by applying the formula for the volume (V) of a sphere in a cube:V=(π/6)⁎L⁎W⁎H). Results: RUVs of 167 (mean age 67) consecutively catheterized men (n=72) and women (n=95) identified by CT abdomen and pelvis studies were calculated. The mean RUV was 13.2 mL (range: 0.0 mL-859.1 mL, standard deviation: 75.9 mL, margin of error at 95% confidence:11.6 mL). Four (2.4%) catheterized patients had RUVs of >50 mL, two of whom had an improperly placed catheter tip noted on their CT-reports. Conclusions: Previous studies have shown that up to 43% of catheterized patients had a RUV greater than 50 mL, suggesting inadequacy of bladder drainage via the Foley catheter. Our study indicated that the vast majority of patients with Foley catheters (97.6%), had adequately drained bladders with volumes of <50 mL. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the anterior ethmoidal artery by 3D dual volume rotational digital subtraction angiography and native multidetector CT with multiplanar reformations. Initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandolfo, Ignazio; Vinci, Sergio; Salamone, Ignazio; Granata, Francesca; Mazziotti, Silvio

    2007-06-01

    Our purpose is to codify the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) course and its relationship with adjacent structures. Twenty patients with cerebrovascular disease underwent selective internal carotid dual volume angiography. Fusion of the vascular and bony images was obtained successively on a second console. MDCT of the cranium was performed in all patients. To identify the AEA course, multiplanar CT reformations were obtained. In all cases the entry-point of AEA and its course were identified by means of dual volume angiography. The information was confirmed by MDCT. In a second phase, we studied another 78 patients affected by inflammatory disease and polyposis only by means of MDCT, in order to confirm the previous data obtained by comparison between angiography and MDCT. In this second phase, 110/156 vessels were indirectly detected by means of visualization of the ethmoidal entry point. In the remaining cases, AEA was directly shown due to integrity of the thin ethmoidal bone lamellae or bony canal. Dual volume angiography is essential to identify the course of the AEA (standard of reference for the interpretation of CT). In patients with benign rhinosinusal pathology, where invasivity techniques are not justified, MPR reconstructions were of pivotal importance in the evaluation of the course of the artery with particular reference to its relationship with the frontal recess.

  11. Angle-independent measure of motion for image-based gating in 3D coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, Glen C.; Holdsworth, David W.; Drangova, Maria

    2006-01-01

    compared to an ECG-based gating strategy in a porcine model. The image-based gating strategy selected 61 projection images, compared to 45 selected by the ECG-gating strategy. Qualitative comparison revealed that although both the SIC-based and ECG-gated reconstructions decreased motion artifact compared to reconstruction with no gating, the SIC-based gating technique increased the conspicuity of smaller vessels when compared to ECG gating in maximum intensity projections of the reconstructions and increased the sharpness of a vessel cross section in multi-planar reformats of the reconstruction

  12. Changes in fatigue, multiplanar knee laxity, and landing biomechanics during intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sandra J; Schmitz, Randy J; Cone, John R; Henson, Robert A; Montgomery, Melissa M; Pye, Michele L; Tritsch, Amanda J

    2015-05-01

    Knee laxity increases during exercise. However, no one, to our knowledge, has examined whether these increases contribute to higher-risk landing biomechanics during prolonged, fatiguing exercise. To examine associations between changes in fatigue (measured as sprint time [SPTIME]), multiplanar knee laxity (anterior-posterior [APLAX], varus-valgus [VVLAX] knee laxity, and internal-external rotation [IERLAX]) knee laxity and landing biomechanics during prolonged, intermittent exercise. Descriptive laboratory study. Laboratory and gymnasium. A total of 30 male (age = 20.3 ± 2.0 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.05 m, mass = 75.2 ± 7.2 kg) and 29 female (age = 20.5 ± 2.3 years, height = 1.67 ± 0.08 m, mass = 61.8 ± 9.0 kg) competitive athletes. A 90-minute intermittent exercise protocol (IEP) designed to simulate the physiologic and biomechanical demands of a soccer match. We measured SPTIME, APLAX, and landing biomechanics before and after warm-up, every 15 minutes during the IEP, and every 15 minutes for 1 hour after the IEP. We measured VVLAX and IERLAX before and after the warm-up, at 45 and 90 minutes during the IEP, and at 30 minutes after the IEP. We used hierarchical linear modeling to examine associations between exercise-related changes in SPTIME and knee laxity with exercise-related changes in landing biomechanics while controlling for initial (before warm-up) knee laxity. We found that SPTIME had a more global effect on landing biomechanics in women than in men, resulting in a more upright landing and a reduction in landing forces and out-of-plane motions about the knee. As APLAX increased with exercise, women increased their knee internal-rotation motion (P = .02), and men increased their hip-flexion motion and energy-absorption (P = .006) and knee-extensor loads (P = .04). As VVLAX and IERLAX increased, women went through greater knee-valgus motion and dorsiflexion and absorbed more energy at the knee (P ≤ .05), whereas men were positioned in greater hip

  13. Validity of gradient-echo three-dimensional delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage: A histologically controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilkens, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.zilkens@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Miese, Falk, E-mail: falk.miese@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Herten, Monika, E-mail: Moherten@web.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Kurzidem, Sabine, E-mail: sabine.kurzidem@uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Jäger, Marcus [Univ Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, D-45147 Essen (Germany); König, Dietmar, E-mail: Dietmarpierre.koenig@lvr.de [LVR Clinic for Orthopedic Surgery, D-41749 Viersen (Germany); Antoch, Gerald, E-mail: antoch@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Krauspe, Rüdiger, E-mail: krauspe@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Bittersohl, Bernd, E-mail: bernd.bittersohl@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Moorenstraße 5, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Objective: To validate gradient-echo three-dimensional (3D) delayed gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cartilage (dGEMRIC) by means of histological analyses in the assessment of hip joint cartilage. Materials and methods: Twenty-one femoral head specimens collected from 21 patients (7 males, 14 females, mean age: 60.9 ± 9.6 years; range: 37.6–77.3 years), who underwent total hip replacement for symptomatic hip joint osteoarthritis, underwent MRI and histological assessment. A region of 2 cm{sup 2} at the weight-bearing area was marked with four pins to enable multi-planar MRI reformatting to be matched with histological sections. MRI was performed at 3 T with a 3D double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence for morphological cartilage assessment and 3D Volumetric Interpolated Breathhold Examination (VIBE) for T1{sub Gd} mapping. Histological sections were evaluated according to the Mankin score system. Total Mankin score, grade of toluidine staining (sensitive for glycosaminoglycan content) and a modified Mankin score classification system with four sub-groups of cartilage damage were correlated with MRI data. Results: Spearman's rho correlation analyses revealed a statistically significant correlation between T1{sub Gd} mapping and histological analyses in all categories including total Mankin score (r = −0.658, p-value ≤ 0.001), toluidine staining (r = −0.802, p-value < 0.001) and modified Mankin score (r = −0.716, p-value < 0.001). The correlation between morphological MRI and histological cartilage assessment was statistically significant but inferior to the biochemical cartilage MRI (r-values ranging from −0.411 to 0.525, p-values < 0.001). Conclusions: Gradient-echo dGEMRIC is reliable while offering the unique features of high image resolution and 3D biochemically sensitive MRI for the assessment of early cartilage degeneration.

  14. Effectiveness of a Rapid Lumbar Spine MRI Protocol Using 3D T2-Weighted SPACE Imaging Versus a Standard Protocol for Evaluation of Degenerative Changes of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayah, Anousheh; Jay, Ann K; Toaff, Jacob S; Makariou, Erini V; Berkowitz, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Reducing lumbar spine MRI scanning time while retaining diagnostic accuracy can benefit patients and reduce health care costs. This study compares the effectiveness of a rapid lumbar MRI protocol using 3D T2-weighted sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast with different flip-angle evolutions (SPACE) sequences with a standard MRI protocol for evaluation of lumbar spondylosis. Two hundred fifty consecutive unenhanced lumbar MRI examinations performed at 1.5 T were retrospectively reviewed. Full, rapid, and complete versions of each examination were interpreted for spondylotic changes at each lumbar level, including herniations and neural compromise. The full examination consisted of sagittal T1-weighted, T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE), and STIR sequences; and axial T1- and T2-weighted TSE sequences (time, 18 minutes 40 seconds). The rapid examination consisted of sagittal T1- and T2-weighted SPACE sequences, with axial SPACE reformations (time, 8 minutes 46 seconds). The complete examination consisted of the full examination plus the T2-weighted SPACE sequence. Sensitivities and specificities of the full and rapid examinations were calculated using the complete study as the reference standard. The rapid and full studies had sensitivities of 76.0% and 69.3%, with specificities of 97.2% and 97.9%, respectively, for all degenerative processes. Rapid and full sensitivities were 68.7% and 66.3% for disk herniation, 85.2% and 81.5% for canal compromise, 82.9% and 69.1% for lateral recess compromise, and 76.9% and 69.7% for foraminal compromise, respectively. Isotropic SPACE T2-weighted imaging provides high-quality imaging of lumbar spondylosis, with multiplanar reformatting capability. Our SPACE-based rapid protocol had sensitivities and specificities for herniations and neural compromise comparable to those of the protocol without SPACE. This protocol fits within a 15-minute slot, potentially reducing costs and discomfort for a large subgroup of

  15. Cone beam computed tomography in veterinary dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thielen, B.; Siguenza, F.; Hassan, B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in imaging dogs and cats for diagnostic dental veterinary applications. CBCT scans of heads of six dogs and two cats were made. Dental panoramic and multi-planar reformatted (MPR) para-sagittal

  16. Four-channel multidetector-row computed tomography in the evaluation of facial fractures - optimized parameters for acquisition and multiplanar reformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omid, P. M.

    2002-08-01

    The first part of this thesis is designed to give the reader a comprehensive survey on the complex basic principles of computed tomography (CT), from the early beginning to the recent development of multidetector-row CT (MD-CT). Attention is focused on imaging of trauma in general and on imaging of facial fractures in particular. The second part of this thesis describes a clinical study performed to optimize acquisition protocols and multiplanar reformation (MPR) algorithms for the evaluation of facial fractures using MD-CT, which has not been yet described in literature. For this study, a cadaver head with artificial blunt facial trauma was examined using a 4-channel MD-CT scanner. The influence of acquisition parameters (collimation: 2x0.5 mm/4x1 mm/4x2.5 mm; tube current: 120 mAs/90 mAs/60 mAs), image reconstruction algorithms (standard vs. ultra-high resolution (UHR) modes; reconstructed slice thicknesses: 0.5 mm/1 mm/3 mm; increment: 0.3 mm/0.6 mm/1.5 mm), and reformation algorithms (slice thicknesses: 0.5 mm/1 mm/3 mm; overlap: 0.5 mm/1 mm/3 mm) on detectability of facial fractures in MPRs with MD-CT was analyzed. Effects of algorithms and parameters on image noise, artifacts and delineation of soft tissues were evaluated. The results of this study reliably demonstrate that fracture detection was significantly higher with thin MPRs (0.5/0.5 mm, 1/0.5 mm, 1/1 mm) (p = 0 .014) acquired with 2x0.5 mm collimation (p = 0 .046), in UHR mode (p .0005) with 120 mAs (p = 0 .025). Inter-observer variability showed very good agreement (κ > = 0 .942). Non-UHR mode, lower mAs and thick MPRs (3/0.5 mm, 3/1 mm, 3/0.5 mm) showed significantly decreased detectability. (author)

  17. Quantitative parameters of image quality in 64-slice computed tomography angiography of the coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferencik, Maros; Nomura, Cesar H.; Maurovich-Horvat, Pal; Hoffmann, Udo; Pena, Antonio J.; Cury, Ricardo C.; Abbara, Suhny; Nieman, Koen; Fatima, Umaima; Achenbach, Stephan; Brady, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    We explored quantitative parameters of image quality in consecutive patients undergoing 64-slice multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) coronary angiography for clinical reasons. Forty-two patients (36 men, mean age 61 ± 11 years, mean heart rate 63 ± 10 bpm) underwent contrast-enhanced MDCT coronary angiography with a 64-slice scanner (Siemens Sensation 64, 64 mmx 0.6 mm collimation, 330 ms tube rotation, 850 mAs, 120 kV). Two independent observers measured the overall visualized vessel length and the length of the coronary arteries visualized without motion artifacts in curved multiplanar reformatted images. Contrast-to-noise ratio was measured in the proximal and distal segments of the coronary arteries. The mean length of visualized coronary arteries was: left main 12 ± 6 mm, left anterior descending 149 ± 25 mm, left circumflex 89 ± 30 mm, and right coronary artery 161 ± 38 mm. On average, 97 ± 5% of the total visualized vessel length was depicted without motion artifacts (left main 100 ± 0%, left anterior descending 97 ± 6%, left circumflex 98 ± 5%, and right coronary artery 95 ± 6%). In 27 patients with a heart rate ≤65 bpm, 98 ± 4% of the overall visualized vessel length was imaged without motion artifacts, whereas 96 ± 6% of the overall visualized vessel length was imaged without motion artifacts in 15 patients with a heart rate >65 bpm (p < 0.001). The mean contrast-to-noise ratio in all measured coronary arteries was 14.6 ± 4.7 (proximal coronary segments: range 15.1 ± 4.4 to 16.1 ± 5.0, distal coronary segments: range 11.4 ± 4.2 to 15.9 ± 4.9). In conclusion, 64-slice MDCT permits reliable visualization of the coronary arteries with minimal motion artifacts and high CNR in consecutive patients referred for non-invasive MDCT coronary angiography. Low heart rate is an important prerequisite for excellent image quality

  18. MR imaging of invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, H.H.

    1999-01-01

    MR imaging is noninvasive and provides direct multiplanar images with good contrast between different soft tissues. It has a potential in distinguishing normal from abnormal tissue and is a valuable technique in examination of the female pelvis. This report reviews the present role of MR imaging in the initial work-up of patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix. (orig./AJ)

  19. Clinical applications of 2D and 3D CT imaging of the airways - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvolini, Luca; Bichi Secchi, Elisabetta; Costarelli, Leonardo; De Nicola, Maurizio

    2000-01-01

    to detect otherwise overlooked slight pathological findings. In the exploration of the air-spaces of the head and neck, targeted multiplanar study can now be performed without additional scanning by retro-reconstructed sections from original transverse CT slices. Additional rendering can help in surgical planning, by simulation of surgical approaches, and allows better integration with functional paranasal sinuses endoscopic surgery, by endoscopic perspective rendering. Whichever application we perform, the clinical value of 2D and 3D rendering techniques lies in the possibility of overcoming perceptual difficulties and 'slice pollution', by easing more efficient data transfer without loss of information. 3D imaging should not be considered, in the large majority of cases, as a diagnostic tool: looking at reformatted images may increase diagnostic accuracy in only very few cases, but an increase in diagnostic confidence could be not negligible. The purpose of the radiologist skilled in post-processing techniques should be that of modifying patient management, by more confident diagnostic evaluation, in a small number of patients, and, in a larger number of cases, by simplifying communication with referring physicians and surgeons. We will display in detail possible clinical applications of the different 2D and 3D imaging techniques, in the study of the tracheobronchial tree, larynx, nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses by Helical CT, review relating bibliography, and briefly discuss pitfalls and perspectives of CT rendering techniques for each field

  20. Clinical applications of 2D and 3D CT imaging of the airways - a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvolini, Luca E-mail: u.salvolini@popcsi.unian.it; Bichi Secchi, Elisabetta; Costarelli, Leonardo; De Nicola, Maurizio

    2000-04-01

    to detect otherwise overlooked slight pathological findings. In the exploration of the air-spaces of the head and neck, targeted multiplanar study can now be performed without additional scanning by retro-reconstructed sections from original transverse CT slices. Additional rendering can help in surgical planning, by simulation of surgical approaches, and allows better integration with functional paranasal sinuses endoscopic surgery, by endoscopic perspective rendering. Whichever application we perform, the clinical value of 2D and 3D rendering techniques lies in the possibility of overcoming perceptual difficulties and 'slice pollution', by easing more efficient data transfer without loss of information. 3D imaging should not be considered, in the large majority of cases, as a diagnostic tool: looking at reformatted images may increase diagnostic accuracy in only very few cases, but an increase in diagnostic confidence could be not negligible. The purpose of the radiologist skilled in post-processing techniques should be that of modifying patient management, by more confident diagnostic evaluation, in a small number of patients, and, in a larger number of cases, by simplifying communication with referring physicians and surgeons. We will display in detail possible clinical applications of the different 2D and 3D imaging techniques, in the study of the tracheobronchial tree, larynx, nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses by Helical CT, review relating bibliography, and briefly discuss pitfalls and perspectives of CT rendering techniques for each field.

  1. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyue Luo

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT and its multiplanar reformation (MPR, volume rendering (VR and virtual bronchoscopy (VB postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors.Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology.Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6, tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16, extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1, longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1, morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1 and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10, and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density

  2. Diagnostic Value of Multidetector CT and Its Multiplanar Reformation, Volume Rendering and Virtual Bronchoscopy Postprocessing Techniques for Primary Trachea and Main Bronchus Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingyue; Duan, Chaijie; Qiu, Jianping; Li, Wenru; Zhu, Dongyun; Cai, Wenli

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of multidetector CT (MDCT) and its multiplanar reformation (MPR), volume rendering (VR) and virtual bronchoscopy (VB) postprocessing techniques for primary trachea and main bronchus tumors. Detection results of 31 primary trachea and main bronchus tumors with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB postprocessing techniques, were analyzed retrospectively with regard to tumor locations, tumor morphologies, extramural invasions of tumors, longitudinal involvements of tumors, morphologies and extents of luminal stenoses, distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae, and internal features of tumors. The detection results were compared with that of surgery and pathology. Detection results with MDCT and its MPR, VR and VB were consistent with that of surgery and pathology, included tumor locations (tracheae, n = 19; right main bronchi, n = 6; left main bronchi, n = 6), tumor morphologies (endoluminal nodes with narrow bases, n = 2; endoluminal nodes with wide bases, n = 13; both intraluminal and extraluminal masses, n = 16), extramural invasions of tumors (brokethrough only serous membrane, n = 1; 4.0 mm-56.0 mm, n = 14; no clear border with right atelectasis, n = 1), longitudinal involvements of tumors (3.0 mm, n = 1; 5.0 mm-68.0 mm, n = 29; whole right main bronchus wall and trachea carina, n = 1), morphologies of luminal stenoses (irregular, n = 26; circular, n = 3; eccentric, n = 1; conical, n = 1) and extents (mild, n = 5; moderate, n = 7; severe, n = 19), distances between main bronchus tumors and trachea carinae (16.0 mm, n = 1; invaded trachea carina, n = 1; >20.0 mm, n = 10), and internal features of tumors (fairly homogeneous densities with rather obvious enhancements, n = 26; homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; homogeneous density without obvious enhancement, n = 1; not enough homogeneous density with obvious enhancement, n = 1; punctate calcification with obvious enhancement, n = 1; low density without

  3. Musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging: Council on Scientific Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Fisher, C.F.; Fulmer, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior contrast, resolution, and multiplanar imaging capability, allowing excellent definition of soft-tissue and bone marrow abnormalities. For these reasons, magnetic resonance imaging has become a major diagnostic imaging method for the evaluation of many musculoskeletal disorders. The applications of magnetic resonance imaging for musculoskeletal diagnosis are summarized and examples of common clinical situations are given. General guidelines are suggested for the musculoskeletal applications of magnetic resonance imaging

  4. Interpretation of Radiological Images: Towards a Framework of Knowledge and Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Gijp, A.; van der Schaaf, M. F.; van der Schaaf, I. C.; Huige, J. C. B. M.; Ravesloot, C. J.; van Schaik, J. P. J.; ten Cate, Th. J.

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge and skills that are required for radiological image interpretation are not well documented, even though medical imaging is gaining importance. This study aims to develop a comprehensive framework of knowledge and skills, required for two-dimensional and multiplanar image interpretation in radiology. A mixed-method study approach was…

  5. Multi-slice spiral CT multiplanar reconstruction findings of localized fat collection adjection to the subdiaphragmatic inferior vena cava

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hetao; Lu Jian; Zhao Jinli; Liu Tingting; Qin Jufeng; Xu Wen; Qin Jiangchun; Jiang Junkang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discusses the MSCT multiplanar reconstruction manifestation (MPR) of localized fat collection adjection to subdiaphragmatic inferior vena cava (IVC fat ). Methods: The thoracic and abdominal MSCT scan data of 8246 patients were browsed,45 patients with presumed IVC fat on axial CT scans were further studied prospectively with MSCT MPR. The predisposing position of IVC fat and its relationship with IVC were observed. It was divided into two kinds of intraluminal type and extraluminal type according to the angle of IVC fat with respect of the wall of IVC.The other 50 patients without IVC fat were randomly selected as the control group. The sagittal inclination angle (SIA) and diameter ratio (DR) between supra- and sub-diaphragmatic IVC between the two groups were compared by using t test. Results: The detection rate was 0.55% (45/8246). Of which hepatic vein lacuna 8 patients, subdiaphragmatic gap medial to IVC 28 patients and IVC groove 9 patients. The shape of IVC fat showed mainly for the round, oval and crescents on axial CT scans, of 15 patients intraluminal type, 4 showed 'target signs'. The shape of IVC fat showed mainly for 'half-moon' at MPR.The SIA and DR at IVC fat group were 21.62° ± 8.42° and 2.01 ±0.84 respectively, at control group were 16.75° ±7.82° (t=1.594, P>0.05) and 1.31 ±0.28 (t=2.341, P<0.05) respectively. Conclusion: The round, oval or half of limited fat density shadow adjection to subdiaphragmatic inferior vena cava which similar to in the lumen is the characteristic performance of IVC fat , it may be an anatomical variation. (authors)

  6. Comparison of 3D vs. 2D fast spin echo imaging for evaluation of articular cartilage in the knee on a 3 T system scientific research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, Matthew D.; Smitaman, Edward; Moukaddam, Hicham; Katz, Lee D.; Essig, David A.; Medvecky, Michael J.; Haims, Andrew H.

    2012-01-01

    82.5%, 48%, and 76.7% respectively for the 2D sequences. For the lateral compartment surfaces, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 89.3%, 39%, and 79.5% for the 3D sequences and were 94.7%, 18.8%, and 79.5% respectively for the 2D sequences. The accuracies were not significantly different between 3D and 2D sequences. Fleiss Kappa agreement values for the assessment of inter-observer agreement ranged from substantial for the patella and medial femur to moderate for the trochlea and fair for the medial tibia and lateral compartment. Conclusion: There was no significant difference in accuracy for the evaluation of articular cartilage of a single three-dimensional, fast spin echo sequence with multi-planar reformatted images vs. two-dimensional, fast spin echo sequences acquired in all three imaging planes in the knee.

  7. Imaging of spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomoschitz, F. . e-mai: friedrich.lomoschitz@univie.ac.at

    2001-01-01

    Spinal trauma requires a prompt and detailed diagnosis for estimating the prognosis and installing proper therapy. Conventional radiograms are the first imaging modality in most cases. In the cervical and the lumbar spine, a CT has to be performed in patients with polytrauma and a higher risk of complications or with signs of instability. Especially for imaging the cervicocranium, multiplanar reformations in sagittal and coronal planes are necessary. For fractures of the thoracic spine, MR imaging is superior to CT because of the better detection of associated neurologic complications. (author)

  8. Don’t get caught out! A rare case of a calcified urachal remnant mimicking a bladder calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonathan Carl Luis; Gandhi, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Computer tomography through the kidneys, ureters and bladder (CT KUB) is the mainstay investigation of suspected renal tract calculi. However, several pathologies other than renal tract calculi can cause apparent urinary bladder calcification. We describe the case of a 45 year old man who presented with left sided renal colic. Prone CT KUB performed on admission revealed a calcified urachal remnant mimicking a urinary bladder calculus in the dependent portion of the urinary bladder, confirmed by reviewing the multi-planar reformatted images. This is the first reported case in the literature of this phenomenon. We discuss the importance of using multi-planar reformatted images (MPR) and maximum intensity projection images (MIP), as well as careful review of previous imaging, in making the correct diagnosis. We also discuss the differential diagnoses that should be considered when presented with urinary bladder calcification. PMID:23705044

  9. Post-processing of digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Luca; Politi, Marco; Foschi, Raffaella; Masini, Valentina; Reale, Francesca; Costantini, Alessandro Maria; Marano, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Post-processing of bi- and three-dimensional images plays a major role for clinicians and surgeons in both diagnosis and therapy. The new spiral (single and multislice) CT and MRI machines have allowed better quality of images. With the associated development of hardware and software, post-processing has become indispensable in many radiologic applications in order to address precise clinical questions. In particular, in CT the acquisition technique is fundamental and should be targeted and optimized to obtain good image reconstruction. Multiplanar reconstructions ensure simple, immediate display of sections along different planes. Three-dimensional reconstructions include numerous procedures: multiplanar techniques as maximum intensity projections (MIP); surface rendering techniques as the Shaded Surface Display (SSD); volume techniques as the Volume Rendering Technique; techniques of virtual endoscopy. In surgery computer-aided techniques as the neuronavigator, which with information provided by neuroimaging helps the neurosurgeon in simulating and performing the operation, are extremely interesting.

  10. Dynamic Neuromuscular Control of the Lower Limbs in Response to Unexpected Single-Planar versus Multi-Planar Support Perturbations in Young, Active Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malfait, Bart; Staes, Filip; de Vries, Aijse; Smeets, Annemie; Hawken, Malcolm; Robinson, Mark A; Vanrenterghem, Jos; Verschueren, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury involves a multi-planar injury mechanism. Nevertheless, unexpected multi-planar perturbations have not been used to screen athletes in the context of ACL injury prevention yet could reveal those more at risk. The objective of this study was to compare neuromuscular responses to multi-planar (MPP) and single-planar perturbations (SPP) during a stepping-down task. These results might serve as a basis for future implementation of external perturbations in ACL injury screening programs. Thirteen young adults performed a single leg stepping-down task in eight conditions (four MPP and four SPP with a specified amplitude and velocity). The amplitudes of vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), hamstrings lateralis (HL), hamstrings medialis (HM) EMG activity, medio-lateral and anterior-posterior centre of mass (COM) displacements, the peak knee flexion and abduction angles were compared between conditions using an one-way ANOVA. Number of stepping responses were monitored during all conditions. Significantly greater muscle activity levels were found in response to the more challenging MPP and SPP compared to the less challenging conditions (p neuromuscular activity were found between the MPP conditions and their equivalents in the SPP. Eighteen stepping responses were monitored in the SPP versus nine in the MPP indicating that the overall neuromuscular control was even more challenged during the SPP which was supported by greater COM displacements in the SPP. The more intense MPP and SPP evoked different neuromuscular responses resulting in greater muscle activity levels compared to small perturbations. Based on the results of COM displacements and based on the amount of stepping responses, dynamic neuromuscular control of the knee joint appeared less challenged during the MPP. Therefore, future work should investigate extensively if other neuromuscular differences (i.e. co-activation patterns and kinetics) exist between MPP

  11. Bone grafting via reamer-irrigator-aspirator for nonunion of open Gustilo-Anderson type III tibial fractures treated with multiplanar external fixator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnezov Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the outcomes following reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA autogenous bone grafting (ABG of high-grade open tibia fracture nonunions stabilized via multiplanar external fixation. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients with Gustilo-Anderson type III open tibia fractures treated with multiplanar external fixation and who underwent RIA ABG for nonunion at our institutional Level 1 Trauma Center between 2008 and 2015. All patients between 15 and 65 years of age with a minimum of six-month follow-up were included. The primary outcomes of interest were achievement of union, time to union, and incidence of revision surgery. Complications and all-cause reoperation were recorded as secondary endpoints. Results: Fifteen patients met the inclusion criteria with a mean age of 41.1 ± 14.0 years. RIA ABG was harvested from the femur in all cases, with a mean volume of 34 ± 15 mL. At an average follow-up of 13.3 ± 6.8 months, all patients achieved union, including two who required repeat RIA ABG. One patient experienced a femoral shaft fracture four months following RIA that required intramedullary fixation. The average time to union was 6.0 ± 6.3 months. Twelve patients (80% went on to union within six months and 13 (86.7% within one year. Five patients experienced a total of six post-operative complications including three deep infections, one refracture through the nonunion site, and one gradual varus deformity. Two patients in this series required a subsequent RIA autografting procedure secondary to persistent nonunion despite initial RIA. Conclusion: We found that RIA ABG offered a reliable solution to nonunion of Gustilo-Anderson type III open tibial fractures treated with multiplanar external fixation, circumventing the need to change the method of fixation.

  12. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Tanderup, Kari; Bergstrand, Eva Stabell

    2007-01-01

    in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method...

  13. The effect of mandibular position and gantry angle on the evaluation of implant site with implant CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sul Mi; An, Chang Hyeon; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Park, Tae Won; Choi, Hang Moon

    2002-01-01

    The altered gantry angle during scanning for some multiplanar reconstruction CT program (CT/MPR) may cause distortion of the image. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether there is a image distortion in a reformatted image when the gantry and the object are equally inclined using ToothPix and DentaScan program.A resin block model with four cylindrical holes and a human dry mandible were used. Two MPR software packages, ToothPix and DentaScan program, were used for reformatted panoramic images. The block and the gantry were equally inclined at 0 degree, 15 degrees, and 30 degrees. With ToothPix program, a resin block model with empty holes and a dry mandible showed inclined images in the reformatted panoramic image. Increasing the gantry angle, the depth and inclination of the holes were increased in the reformatted central panoramic images. However, a resin block model with gutta percha in its holes and a dry mandible with a wire in its mandibular canal didn't show image distortion. With DentaScan program, image distortion was not seen in any situation. ToothPix program may distort the reformatted image when the gantry angle is not at zero degrees. However, with DentaScan program, the patient may be positioned comfortably and the gantry can be adjusted to the patient positioning.

  14. Low-dose computed tomographic imaging in orbital trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, A.; Whitehouse, R.W. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1993-08-01

    The authors review findings in 75 computed tomographic (CT) examinations of 66 patients with orbital trauma who were imaged using a low-radiation-dose CT technique. Imaging was performed using a dynamic scan mode and exposure factors of 120 kVp and 80 mAs resulting in a skin dose of 11 mGy with an effective dose-equivalent of 0.22 mSv. Image quality was diagnostic in all cases and excellent in 73 examinations. Soft-tissue abnormalities within the orbit including muscle adhesions were well demonstrated both on primary axial and reconstructed multiplanar images. The benefits of multiplanar reconstructions are stressed and the contribution of soft-tissue injuries to symptomatic diplopia examined. (author).

  15. MR imaging in female pelvic organs prolapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capiel, Carlos A. h; Bouzas, Carlos A.

    2003-01-01

    Pelvic floor weakness and consequent organ prolapse may result in a variety of symptoms, including pain, urinary or fecal incontinence and constipation. Diagnosis is made primary on the basis of findings at physical pelvic examination. Imaging is useful in patients in whom findings at physical examination are equivocal. Different imaging techniques (fluoroscopy, ultrasonography), can be useful in evaluating pelvic organs prolapse. MR imaging is a new noninvasive technique that provides a multiplanar global evaluation of the pelvic contents and demonstrates pelvic organs prolapse. Reference points are the pubococcygeal line and puborectalis muscle sling. This pictorial assay illustrates different grades of cystourethrocele, recto-sigmoidocele and hysteroptosis (uterine prolapse) on MR imaging. (author)

  16. The spectrum of benign esophageal lesions: imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Soon Jin; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Dae Hee; Shim, Young Mog

    2002-01-01

    Benign esophageal lesions occur in various diseases. Barium studies are useful for the evaluation of mucosal surface lesions but provide little information about the extramucosal extent of disease. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, on the other hand, permit the assessment of wall thickness, mediastinal involvement, adjacent lymphadenopathy, and distant spread. In diseases such as fibrovascular polyps, duplication cysts, scleroderma, trauma, caustic esophagitis, hiatal hernia, esophageal diverticulum, achalasia, and paraesophageal varices, the findings of imaging studies are specific, obviating the need for further invasive diagnostic work-up. The advent of helical computed tomography and its volume data set allows the acquisition of multiplanar images, and magnetic resonance imaging is useful both for this and for tissue characterization. Thus, multiplanar cross-sectional imaging further extends the role of imaging modalities to the evaluation of benign esophageal lesions. Through an awareness of the multiplanar cross-sectional appearances of various benign esophageal lesions, the radiologist can play an important role in the detection, diagnosis, further diagnostic planning, and treatment of the diseases in which they occur

  17. The spectrum of benign esophageal lesions: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Kyung Mi; Lee, Kyung Soo; Lee, Soon Jin; Kim, Eun A; Kim, Tae Sung; Han, Dae Hee; Shim, Young Mog [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-01

    Benign esophageal lesions occur in various diseases. Barium studies are useful for the evaluation of mucosal surface lesions but provide little information about the extramucosal extent of disease. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, on the other hand, permit the assessment of wall thickness, mediastinal involvement, adjacent lymphadenopathy, and distant spread. In diseases such as fibrovascular polyps, duplication cysts, scleroderma, trauma, caustic esophagitis, hiatal hernia, esophageal diverticulum, achalasia, and paraesophageal varices, the findings of imaging studies are specific, obviating the need for further invasive diagnostic work-up. The advent of helical computed tomography and its volume data set allows the acquisition of multiplanar images, and magnetic resonance imaging is useful both for this and for tissue characterization. Thus, multiplanar cross-sectional imaging further extends the role of imaging modalities to the evaluation of benign esophageal lesions. Through an awareness of the multiplanar cross-sectional appearances of various benign esophageal lesions, the radiologist can play an important role in the detection, diagnosis, further diagnostic planning, and treatment of the diseases in which they occur.

  18. TDat: An Efficient Platform for Processing Petabyte-Scale Whole-Brain Volumetric Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuxin; Gong, Hui; Yang, Xiaoquan; Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Li, Xiangning; Sun, Qingtao; Zhu, Dan; Wang, Zhenyu; Luo, Qingming; Li, Anan

    2017-01-01

    Three-dimensional imaging of whole mammalian brains at single-neuron resolution has generated terabyte (TB)- and even petabyte (PB)-sized datasets. Due to their size, processing these massive image datasets can be hindered by the computer hardware and software typically found in biological laboratories. To fill this gap, we have developed an efficient platform named TDat, which adopts a novel data reformatting strategy by reading cuboid data and employing parallel computing. In data reformatting, TDat is more efficient than any other software. In data accessing, we adopted parallelization to fully explore the capability for data transmission in computers. We applied TDat in large-volume data rigid registration and neuron tracing in whole-brain data with single-neuron resolution, which has never been demonstrated in other studies. We also showed its compatibility with various computing platforms, image processing software and imaging systems.

  19. Automated curved planar reformation of 3D spine images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaz; Likar, Bostjan; Pernus, Franjo

    2005-01-01

    Traditional techniques for visualizing anatomical structures are based on planar cross-sections from volume images, such as images obtained by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, planar cross-sections taken in the coordinate system of the 3D image often do not provide sufficient or qualitative enough diagnostic information, because planar cross-sections cannot follow curved anatomical structures (e.g. arteries, colon, spine, etc). Therefore, not all of the important details can be shown simultaneously in any planar cross-section. To overcome this problem, reformatted images in the coordinate system of the inspected structure must be created. This operation is usually referred to as curved planar reformation (CPR). In this paper we propose an automated method for CPR of 3D spine images, which is based on the image transformation from the standard image-based to a novel spine-based coordinate system. The axes of the proposed spine-based coordinate system are determined on the curve that represents the vertebral column, and the rotation of the vertebrae around the spine curve, both of which are described by polynomial models. The optimal polynomial parameters are obtained in an image analysis based optimization framework. The proposed method was qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated on five CT spine images. The method performed well on both normal and pathological cases and was consistent with manually obtained ground truth data. The proposed spine-based CPR benefits from reduced structural complexity in favour of improved feature perception of the spine. The reformatted images are diagnostically valuable and enable easier navigation, manipulation and orientation in 3D space. Moreover, reformatted images may prove useful for segmentation and other image analysis tasks

  20. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong; Lee, Young Hwan

    1994-01-01

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions

  1. Diagnosis of temporal bone diseases using three-dimensional images with multislice CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyama, Yoshihiro; Togami, Taro; Murota, Makiko; Fukunaga, Kotaro; Hino, Ichiro; Sato, Katashi; Ohkawa, Motoomi [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan)

    2001-08-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of three-dimensional images with multislice CT in the temporal bone diseases. Fifty-nine cases (26 with medial otitis, 8 choresteatoma, 10 congenital malformation, 3 high jugular bulb, 2 otosclerosis, and 10 others) were included in this study. In the ossicular and inner ear lesions, oblique multiplanar images of the long axis of each ossicle was useful the detection of abnormality. Structural deformity of ossicles and bony labyrinth were clearly delineated by surface rendering images. (author)

  2. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-09-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties.

  3. The use of median polish (MP) for the daily quality assurance of a multiplanar positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, K.J.; Thaler, H.T.; Dukes, A.L.; Carmichael, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Daily sensitivity data were obtained for The Cyclotron Corporation PC 4600 Neuro-PET on an almost daily basis for 3 months during installation and for 6 months during full clinical utilization. A uniform phantom was filled with a known concentration of isotope (typically 0.14 μCi/cc Ga-68), centered in the scanner port using crossed lasers and scanned. Images were reconstructed using analytic attenuation correction for a total of 4-5 million uncorrected coincidence counts/plane (random/true <2%). The entire quality assurance procedure, with analysis, was performed within 1.5 hr. The resulting sensitivities for various planes and days can be represented as a two-way table. Median polish (MP) is a statistically robust technique for looking at structured or cross-classified data to identify trends and outliers by iteratively computing medians of rows and columns in order to obtain a linear fit to the data. Outliers (both for variant planes, experiments and combinations) were immediately discernible when MP was used to analyze the sensitivity data. While the standard deviations of the residuals in the MP table ranged from 2.1% to 18.5% during machine installation, subsequent variations were smaller (0.6-4.2%), and the number of outliers was substantially reduced. In addition, MP was useful in pointing out a sudden change in machine behavior related to a high-voltage power supply problem. Systematic drifts in sensitivity and reliability of both individual planes and of the entire machine are readily revealed by MP, which is therefore very useful in monitoring performance and in directing maintenance

  4. Imaging in epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Arun Kumar; Sharma, Raju; Sarma, Dipanka

    2000-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common problem in the paediatric age group. Imaging plays a vital role in identifying the seizure focus. Cross-sectional imaging modalities like CT and MRI have had a major impact on the management of seizure disorders. MRI, because of its high contrast resolution and multiplanar capability is the ideal imaging modality but its use is restricted due to high cost. Computed tomography is cheaper and is the first, and often, the only modality used, especially in the under privileged areas of the world. In the tropical countries inflammatory granuloma are a common cause of epilepsy and CT is adequate to detect these lesions. Other causes include congenital abnormalities, neoplastic and vascular causes. (author)

  5. Computed tomography imaging for superior semicircular canal dehiscence syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobeli, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Superior semicircular canal dehiscence is a newly described syndrome of sound and/or pressure induced vertigo. Computed tomography (CT) imaging plays an important role in confirmation of a defect in the bone overlying the canal. A high resolution CT technique utilising 0.5 mm or thinner slices and multi-planar reconstructions parallel to the superior semicircular canal is required. Placement of a histogram over a suspected defect can assist CT diagnosis

  6. Evaluation of Medial Acetabular Wall Bone Stock in Patients with Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Using a Helical Computed Tomography Multiplanar Reconstruction Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Yu Liu; Kun Zheng Wang; Chun Sheng Wang; Xiao Qian Dang; Zhi Qin Tong (Second Hospital Affiliated to the Medical College of Xi' an Jiaotong Univ., Xi' an Shaanxi (China))

    2009-08-15

    Background: The technique of medialization has been used to reconstruct acetabula at the level of true acetabula in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Appreciation of the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall is significant for making an optimal acetabular reconstruction plan and avoiding complications. Purpose: To evaluate the bone stock of the medial acetabular wall and its relation to the degree of subluxation in patients with DDH using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Helical CT scans of 27 hips were obtained from 21 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to DDH who were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. Eleven hips belonged to Crowe class I, while 16 hips belonged to Crowe class II/III. The raw CT data were reprocessed in various planes by scrolling multiplanar reformation (MPR). Acetabular opening, depth, and medial bone stock, as indicated by the minimum thickness of the medial acetabular wall, were measured in the transverse reformed MPR plane. Results: The minimum thicknesses of the medial acetabular wall in Crowe-I and Crowe-II/III hips were 3.8+-2.1 mm and 7.1+-3.1 mm, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall correlated with the degree of subluxation (R=0.69) and the acetabular depth (R= ;- ;0.71). Conclusion: There was significantly more bone stock in the medial acetabular wall in patients with higher-degree subluxation than there was in the less-severe class. This difference should be taken into consideration when reconstructing acetabula in THA in patients with DDH using the technique of medialization

  7. Evaluation of Medial Acetabular Wall Bone Stock in Patients with Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip Using a Helical Computed Tomography Multiplanar Reconstruction Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rui Yu Liu; Kun Zheng Wang; Chun Sheng Wang; Xiao Qian Dang; Zhi Qin Tong

    2009-01-01

    Background: The technique of medialization has been used to reconstruct acetabula at the level of true acetabula in total hip arthroplasty (THA) in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). Appreciation of the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall is significant for making an optimal acetabular reconstruction plan and avoiding complications. Purpose: To evaluate the bone stock of the medial acetabular wall and its relation to the degree of subluxation in patients with DDH using computed tomography (CT). Material and Methods: Helical CT scans of 27 hips were obtained from 21 patients with osteoarthritis secondary to DDH who were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. Eleven hips belonged to Crowe class I, while 16 hips belonged to Crowe class II/III. The raw CT data were reprocessed in various planes by scrolling multiplanar reformation (MPR). Acetabular opening, depth, and medial bone stock, as indicated by the minimum thickness of the medial acetabular wall, were measured in the transverse reformed MPR plane. Results: The minimum thicknesses of the medial acetabular wall in Crowe-I and Crowe-II/III hips were 3.8±2.1 mm and 7.1±3.1 mm, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, the bone stock in the medial acetabular wall correlated with the degree of subluxation (R=0.69) and the acetabular depth (R= ;- ;0.71). Conclusion: There was significantly more bone stock in the medial acetabular wall in patients with higher-degree subluxation than there was in the less-severe class. This difference should be taken into consideration when reconstructing acetabula in THA in patients with DDH using the technique of medialization

  8. Need for three-dimensional imaging in postsurgical ''falled back'' syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinreich, S.J.; Wang, H.; Long, D.M.; Quinn, C.M.; Rosenbaum, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred ten patients with persistent symptoms after low back surgery were examined with direct axial CT, 2D multiplanar, and 3D imaging. Sixty-three of these patients had lumbar spinal fusion. The 3D images were found to best display the integrity of fusion (assessed by continuity, pseudoarthrosis, incomplete fusion, transitional syndrome) in 44 of the 63 patients (65%). In 55 of the 110 patients lateral spinal stenosis was found; in 43% (24 of 55) this was uncovered on the 3D images. 3D also better showed the extent and type of surgery performed in 23% (26 of 110). Furthermore, 15 pars interarticularis, four facet fractures, and eight spinal malalignments were perceived only on 3D. 3D image afforded additional information over the direct axial and multiplanar reconstruction techniques in 63 of 110 patients

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, K.; Lotx, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is now accepted as an effective method of investigating a wide range of disorders, especially of the brain and spine. A short introduction on image contrast in MRI is given and the advantages and disadvantages for the different diseases of the brain is discussed. Excellent soft-tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capabilities and lack of ionising radiation are conspicuous advantages, and it is now established as the investigation of choice in a large number of clinical conditions, especially when the central nervous system is involved. However, it remains only one of a series of imaging modalities. A confident provisional clinical diagnosis is essential for establishing an imaging protocol and the intention should always be to reach a definitive diagnosis in the least invasive and most cost-effective way. 7 figs., 19 refs

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part I: Normal anatomy, imaging technique, and osseous abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Part I of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses normal elbow anatomy and the technical factors involved in obtaining high-quality magnetic resonance images of the elbow. Part I also discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with osseous abnormalities of the elbow. With proper patient positioning and imaging technique, magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the osseous structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early osteochondritis dissecans of the capitellum and can be used to evaluate the size, location, stability, and viability of the osteochondritis dissecans fragment. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect early stress injury to the proximal ulna in athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect radiographically occult fractures of the elbow in both children and adults. Magnetic resonance imaging is also useful in children to further evaluate elbow fractures which are detected on plain-film radiographs. (orig.)

  11. Imaging of the vagina and vulva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Luis Ronan Marquez Ferreira de; Szejnfeld, Jacob; Signorini Filho, Roney Cesar; Marques, Renato Moretti; Nicolau, Sergio Mancini; Goldman, Suzan Menasce

    2006-01-01

    In gynecological daily practices, the vulva and vagina are examined during physical examination, however there are situations where this is not possible or it is needed to determine the extension of an injury through imaging methods. The magnetic resonance imaging is an excellent cross-sectional modality for evaluation the alterations of vulva and vagina due its multiplanar evaluation and high tecidual contrast. Other cross-sectional modalities are ultrasound and enhanced computed tomography. This paper intends to give an overview of vaginal and vulvar pathology that can be identified by the radiologist. (author)

  12. Usefulness of MPR images of nephrogram in ureteropelvic junction stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usui, Nobutaka; Munechika, Hirotsugu

    2005-01-01

    The study was to see if the multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images of nephrogram were useful to evaluate the causative lesion of ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) stenosis. Thirty-two cases with UPJ stenosis were selected retrospectively for evaluation. MPR images were compared between nephrogram and ureterogram to see which was more useful for evaluation of the causative lesion. Most of the lesions were evaluated better in nephrogram or equal to ureterogram except for one case of a small ureteral tumor. MPR images in nephrogram were useful for evaluation of crossing vessels and a ureteral tumor. Benign stricture and calculi were also confirmed by the images. (author)

  13. Optimising imaging parameters in experimental spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiitola, M.; Vehmas, T.; Kivisaari, R.P.; Kivisaari, L.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This in vitro study was conducted to analyse lesion detection and relative radiation exposure in different CT techniques. Material and Methods: We used a plastic phantom (12 x 8 x 2 cm) containing holes filled with air or fluid of varying densities to simulate lesions. This was imaged with Siemens Somatom Plus S and GE High Speed Advantage units. We varied table feeds (3 and 6 mm/s in Siemens and 3 and 4.5 mm/s in GE) and increments (2 mm and 4 mm) while keeping collimation at 3 mm. The SmartScan program of GE and the reformating algorithm of Siemens were also analysed. To evaluate the different methods, the phatnom lesions were counted by 3 observers. Radiation exposures associated with each technique were also measured. Results: The images reformatted to a coronal direction were significantly inferior (p<0.01) to those in other techniques. The use of SmartScan did not influence lesion detection, nor did changes in pitch or increment. Spiral and non-spiral techniques proved to be equal. Radiation exposure was lowest when a greater pitch or the SmartScan program was used. Conclusion: Radiation exposure in CT can be limited without significantly impairing the image quality by using low-dose techniques. Reformatting to a coronal direction should be used with care as it debases the image quality. (orig.)

  14. Advantages of digital imaging for radiological diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trapero, M. A.; Gonzalez, S.; Albillos, J. C.; Martel, J.; Rebollo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of radiological digital images in comparison with analogic ones are analyzed. We discuss three main topics: acquisition, post-procedure manipulation, and visualization, archive and communication. Digital acquisition with computed radiology systems present a global sensitivity very close to conventional film for diagnostic purposes. However, flat panel digital systems seems to achieve some advantages in particular clinical situations. A critical issue is the radiation dose-reduction that can be accomplished without reducing image quality nor diagnostic exactitude. The post-procedure manipulation allows, particularly in multiplanar modalities like CT or MR, to extract all implicit diagnostic information in the images: Main procedures are multiplanar and three-dimensional reformations, dynamic acquisitions, functional studies and image fusion. The use of PACS for visualization, archive and communication of images, improves the effectiveness and the efficiency of the workflow, allows a more comfortable diagnosis for the radiologist and gives way to improvements in the communication of images, allowing tele consulting and the tele radiology. (Author) 6 refs

  15. Volumetric Single-Beat Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography: Relationship of Image Quality, Heart Rate, and Body Mass Index. Initial Patient Experience With a New Computed Tomography Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Muhammad Aamir; Sanchez, Frank W; Sayegh, Karl; Veledar, Emir; Aziz, Muhammad; Malik, Rehan; Haider, Imran; Agatston, Arthur S; Batlle, Juan C; Janowitz, Warren; Peña, Constantino; Ziffer, Jack A; Nasir, Khurram; Cury, Ricardo C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) image quality (IQ) is very important for accurate diagnosis. We propose to evaluate IQ expressed as Likert scale, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) from coronary CT angiography images acquired with a new volumetric single-beat CT scanner on consecutive patients and assess the IQ dependence on heart rate (HR) and body mass index (BMI). We retrospectively analyzed the data of the first 439 consecutive patients (mean age, 55.13 [SD, 12.1] years; 51.47% male), who underwent noninvasive coronary CT angiography in a new single-beat volumetric CT scanner (Revolution CT) to evaluate chest pain at West Kendall Baptist Hospital. Based on patient BMI (mean, 29.43 [SD, 5.81] kg/m), the kVp (kilovolt potential) value and tube current were adjusted within a range of 80 to 140 kVp and 122 to 720 mA, respectively. Each scan was performed in a single-beat acquisition within 1 cardiac cycle, regardless of the HR. Motion correction software (SnapShot Freeze) was used for correcting motion artifacts in patients with higher HRs. Autogating was used to automatically acquire systolic and diastolic phases for higher HRs with electrocardiographic milliampere dose modulation. Image quality was assessed qualitatively by Likert scale and quantitatively by SNR and CNR for the 4 major vessels right coronary, left main, left anterior descending, and left circumflex arteries on axial and multiplanar reformatted images. Values for Likert scale were as follows: 1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, good; 4, very good; and 5, excellent. Signal-to-noise ratio and CNR were calculated from the average 2 CT attenuation values within regions of interest placed in the proximal left main and proximal right coronary artery. For contrast comparison, a region of interest was selected from left ventricular wall at midcavity level using a dedicated workstation. We divided patients in 2 groups related to the HR: less than or equal to 70 beats/min (bpm) and

  16. Détermination automatique de l'indice d'octane et de la composition des reformats par chromatographie en phase gazeuse Automatic Determination of Reformate Octane Number and Composition by Gas Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petroff N.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Utilisant des analyses par chromatographie en phase gazeuse, diverses méthodes ont été testées pour calculer l'indice d'octane de reformats. L'une d'elles s'est imposée par la simplicité de l'appareillage, ses possibilités d'automatisation et son adéquation à des échantillons provenant de charges différentes. Cette étude décrit les conditions opératoires de la méthode chromatographique optimisées pour les réformes, en vue d'obtenir des valeurs calculées de l'indice d'octane (IO dit Recherche différant de moins de un point des valeurs mesurées sur un moteur CFR selon la norme ASTM/D2699 (NF MO7026. L'analyse chromatographique est faite sur une colonne capillaire fonctionnant en température programmée. Le traitement des données est réalisé par un logiciel qui assure àla fois l'identification des constituants et le calcul de l'indice d'octane, à partir des données chromatographiques standard (temps de rétention et surface des pics. Les résultats obtenus portent sur une soixantaine de reformats divers. La fiabilité de la méthode d'identification, la répétabilité et la reproductibilité des valeurs de IO calculés sont démontrées. Ces résultats permettent d'envisager l'exploitation de la méthode en sortie d'unité. Various methods were tested by gas chromatography analysis for calculating the octane number of reformates. One of them was superior because of the simplicity of its equipment, its possibilities of automation and its suitability for samples coming from different feeds. This article describes the operating conditions of the optimized chromatographic method for reformates with a view to obtaining calculated values of the so-called Researchoctane number (RON different by at least one point from the values measured with a CFR engine according to the ASTM/D2699 standard. Chromatographic analysis is performed in a capillary column operating with programmedtemperature. Data processing is done with a software

  17. MR imaging of oropharynx and oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogl, T.; Markl, A.F.; Bruning, R.; Greves, G.; Kang, K.; Lissner, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of intravenously administered Gd-DTPA on signal intensity, in the oropharynx and oral cavity was analyzed, in comparison with plain imaging the examinations were carried out on 150 patients, with a 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging unit. During and after the application of Gd-DTPA, flash images with a repetition time of 30, an echo time of 12 msec, and a 20 0 flip angle were acquired over a period of 7 minutes. In 89 patients, malignant tumors were discovered, located primarily in the oropharynx and oral cavity. Plain MR imaging was equal to or better than computed tomograph in all patients except five. Marked contrast enhancement was observed in carcinomas, sarcomas, and inflammation. The enhancement of signal intensity versus time allowed a better differentiation of histologic features. MR imaging contributes substantially to the imaging of the oropharynx and oral cavity by improved soft-tissue contrast and the capacity for multiplanar imaging

  18. CT of the musculoskeletal system: What is left is the days of MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, A.T.H.; Marshall, T.J.; Bearcroft, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a central role in the modern imaging of musculoskeletal disorders, due to its ability to produce multiplanar images and characterise soft tissues accurately. However, computed tomography (CT) still has an important role to play, not merely as an alternative to MRI, but as being the preferred imaging investigation in some situations. This article briefly reviews the history of CT technology, the technical factors involved and a number of current applications, as well as looking at future areas where CT may be employed. The advent of ever-increasing numbers of rows of detectors has opened up more possible uses for CT technology. However, diagnostic images may be obtained from CT systems with four rows of detectors or more, and their ability to produce near isotropic voxels and therefore multiplanar reformats. (orig.)

  19. CT Imaging of facial trauma. The role of different types of reconstruction. Part II - soft tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myga-Porosilo, J.; Sraga, W.; Borowiak, H.; Jackowska, Z.; Kluczewska, E.; Skrzelewski, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Injury to facial soft tissues as a complication of skeleton fractures is an important problem among patients with facial trauma. The aim of this work was to assess the value of multiplanar and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using multi-detector row technology in spiral data acquisition in patients with facial injuries of soft tissue. Material/Methods: Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with injury to the facial skeleton underwent a CT scan with the use of GE Hispeed Qx/i scanner. For each patient: a two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and 3D volume rendering (VR) were conducted. Post-injury lesions of soft tissues were assessed. During the assessment of the post-injury lesions of soft tissues, the following features were evaluated: Extra ocular muscle and fat tissue herniation through fractures in the medial and inferior orbital walls. Fluid in the sinuses and in the nasal cavity. Subcutaneous tissue emphysema. Results: For subcutaneous emphysema and sinus fluid imaging, both the axial and the 2D image reconstruction proved comparably effective. However, 2D reconstructions were superior to transverse plane images with regard to herniations into fractures of the inferior orbital wall. 3D reconstruction has no importance in diagnosing soft tissue injuries. Conclusions: Multiplanar CT reconstructions increase the effectiveness of imaging of orbital tissue herniations, especially in case of fractures in the inferior orbital wall. In suspected soft tissue herniations, as well as prior to surgical treatment, spiral CT with 2D multiplanar reconstructions should be the method of choice. (authors)

  20. Optimization of T2-weighted imaging for shoulder magnetic resonance arthrography by synthetic magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Young Han; Hahn, Seok; Yang, Jaemoon; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2017-01-01

    Background Synthetic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows reformatting of various synthetic images by adjustment of scanning parameters such as repetition time (TR) and echo time (TE). Optimized MR images can be reformatted from T1, T2, and proton density (PD) values to achieve maximum tissue contrast between joint fluid and adjacent soft tissue. Purpose To demonstrate the method for optimization of TR and TE by synthetic MRI and to validate the optimized images by comparison with conventional shoulder MR arthrography (MRA) images. Material and Methods Thirty-seven shoulder MRA images acquired by synthetic MRI were retrospectively evaluated for PD, T1, and T2 values at the joint fluid and glenoid labrum. Differences in signal intensity between the fluid and labrum were observed between TR of 500-6000 ms and TE of 80-300 ms in T2-weighted (T2W) images. Conventional T2W and synthetic images were analyzed for diagnostic agreement of supraspinatus tendon abnormalities (kappa statistics) and image quality scores (one-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis). Results Optimized mean values of TR and TE were 2724.7 ± 1634.7 and 80.1 ± 0.4, respectively. Diagnostic agreement for supraspinatus tendon abnormalities between conventional and synthetic MR images was excellent (κ = 0.882). The mean image quality score of the joint space in optimized synthetic images was significantly higher compared with those in conventional and synthetic images (2.861 ± 0.351 vs. 2.556 ± 0.607 vs. 2.750 ± 0.439; P optimized TR and TE for shoulder MRA enables optimization of soft-tissue contrast.

  1. Postoperative imaging of paranasal sinuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, S.; Czerny, C.; Formanek, M.

    2007-01-01

    The radiological interpretation of postoperative changes of the paranasal sinuses requires knowledge of why and how the surgical intervention was performed and what the basic clinical findings were. It is important to know whether there was an inflammation, a reconstructive procedure, or a tumorous process. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) evaluated in a high-resolution bone window level setting represents the method of choice for imaging after nonfunctional and functional procedures after inflammatory changes as well as for imaging after reconstructive surgery because of facial trauma or before dental implantation. In the postoperative follow-up of tumor patients contrast-enhanced MDCT evaluated in a soft tissue window and bone window and especially magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represent the standard. In many cases it is possible to differentiate tumor recurrence from inflammation with the help of contrast-enhanced multiplanar MRI and to detect bone marrow changes prior to CT. (orig.)

  2. Analysis of normal and dysplastic glenohumeral morphology at magnetic resonance imaging in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunt, Fabian van de [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pearl, Michael L.; Lee, Eric K.; Peng, Lauren; Didomenico, Paul [Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Glenoid version and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line are commonly used 2-D measures to assess deformity of the glenohumeral joint of children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. To assess whether glenoid version and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line would be altered by standardizing the measurements to the orientation of the scapula. Twenty-one bilateral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were evaluated by four reviewers. Measurements were performed on the axial image slices and again after applying 3-D reformatting. Three-dimensional reformatting led to intrapatient corrections up to 25 for version and -30% for percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line. The mean difference on the involved side between clinical and anatomical version across all subjects from all reviewers was 2.2 ± 3.9 (range: -4.5 to 11.5 ). The mean difference in the percentage of the humeral head anterior to the scapular line after reformatting was -1.8% (range: -15.9% to 5.2%). Measurements can differ greatly for the same child depending on technical factors of image acquisition and presentation in the clinical setting. With this study, we present a clinically accessible protocol to correct for scapular orientation from MRI data of children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. (orig.)

  3. Three-dimensional volume rendering of the ankle based on magnetic resonance images enables the generation of images comparable to real anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasi, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Bruschetta, Daniele; Trimarchi, Fabio; Ielitro, Giuseppe; Cammaroto, Simona; Duca, Antonio; Bramanti, Placido; Favaloro, Angelo; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2009-11-01

    We have applied high-quality medical imaging techniques to study the structure of the human ankle. Direct volume rendering, using specific algorithms, transforms conventional two-dimensional (2D) magnetic resonance image (MRI) series into 3D volume datasets. This tool allows high-definition visualization of single or multiple structures for diagnostic, research, and teaching purposes. No other image reformatting technique so accurately highlights each anatomic relationship and preserves soft tissue definition. Here, we used this method to study the structure of the human ankle to analyze tendon-bone-muscle relationships. We compared ankle MRI and computerized tomography (CT) images from 17 healthy volunteers, aged 18-30 years (mean 23 years). An additional subject had a partial rupture of the Achilles tendon. The MRI images demonstrated superiority in overall quality of detail compared to the CT images. The MRI series accurately rendered soft tissue and bone in simultaneous image acquisition, whereas CT required several window-reformatting algorithms, with loss of image data quality. We obtained high-quality digital images of the human ankle that were sufficiently accurate for surgical and clinical intervention planning, as well as for teaching human anatomy. Our approach demonstrates that complex anatomical structures such as the ankle, which is rich in articular facets and ligaments, can be easily studied non-invasively using MRI data.

  4. Parasellar meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Alair Augusto S.M.D. dos; Fontes, Cristina Asvolinsque P.

    2001-01-01

    We reviewed 22 cases of patients with parasellar meningiomas evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in private clinics of the cities of Niteroi and Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Our aim was to characterize the imaging findings in this type of tumor. MRI scanners with 0.5 and 1.0 Tesla magnets were used for the acquisition of multiplanar T1-weighted (pre-and post-gadolinium administration) and T2-weighted images. The main symptoms observed were headache and visual disturbances. Hyperprolactinaemia was observed in only one patient. The most frequent imaging finding was a parasellar mass which appeared hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and enhanced intensively after gadolinium administration. MRI is useful to demonstrate the lesion and to asses the damage to adjacent structures, particularly when the patient presents visual disturbances due to involvement of the cavernous sinuses. (author)

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    MRI of the abdomen currently competes with CT and ultrasonography as an imaging technique for abdominal pathology. Although ultrasonography has certain advantages, such as real-time scanning, the major comparison is to be made between MR and CT. CT has slightly superior spatial resolution and minimal motion artifacts, and enables the use of contrast agents in bowel. MR, on the other hand, has improved capabilities in contrasting soft tissues and providing multiplanar imaging. The greatest advantage of CT is the experience that the medical community has gained with it over the last decade. Further development in technology and improvement in the clinical experience with MR will be important in determining its future role in abdominal imaging. Large series of clinical trials are required for further experience. Chemical spectroscopy with proton and possibly other nuclei may improve diagnostic specificity. Paramagnetic contrast agents for bowel specification would certainly improve imaging quality. Thus, MR will play a significant role in abdominal imaging in the future

  6. Pneumomediastinum on Multidetector CT: The Radiologic Signs and Underlying Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Soo Jin; Kim, Young Tong [Soonchunhyang University Chunan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We can see the typical signs of pneumomediastinum on chest radiography and we can also see them on the multiplanar reformatted (MPR) image of multidetector CT (MDCT). MDCT can help to understand the anatomical feature of these signs and differentiate pneumomediastinum from pneumothorax, pneumopericardium and the Mach band effect. MDCT shows the peribronchovascular air, which reveals the Macklin effect, and it can also evaluate the underlying disorders that cause pneumomediastinum. The purpose of this pictorial essay is to inform physicians about the mechanism and anatomical features of pneumomediastinum, and to help them understand the imaging findings and underlying disorders of pneumomediastinum as seen on MDCT

  7. Multidetector row computed tomography in bowel obstruction. Part 2. Large bowel obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, R. [Department of Radiology, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rakesh.sinha@uhl-tr.nhs.uk; Verma, R. [Department of Radiology, Glenfield Hospital, Leicester (United Kingdom)

    2005-10-01

    Large bowel obstruction may present as an emergency as high-grade colonic obstruction and can result in perforation. Perforated large bowel obstruction causes faecal peritonitis, which can result in high morbidity and mortality. Multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) has the potential of providing an accurate diagnosis of large bowel obstruction. The rapid acquisition of images within one breath-hold reduces misregistration artefacts than can occur in critically ill or uncooperative patients. The following is a review of the various causes of large bowel obstruction with emphasis on important pathogenic factors, CT appearances and the use of multiplanar reformatted images in the diagnostic workup.

  8. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  9. Using a web-based image quality assurance reporting system to improve image quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czuczman, Gregory J; Pomerantz, Stuart R; Alkasab, Tarik K; Huang, Ambrose J

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to show the impact of a web-based image quality assurance reporting system on the rates of three common image quality errors at our institution. A web-based image quality assurance reporting system was developed and used beginning in April 2009. Image quality endpoints were assessed immediately before deployment (period 1), approximately 18 months after deployment of a prototype reporting system (period 2), and approximately 12 months after deployment of a subsequent upgraded department-wide reporting system (period 3). A total of 3067 axillary shoulder radiographs were reviewed for correct orientation, 355 shoulder CT scans were reviewed for correct reformatting of coronal and sagittal images, and 346 sacral MRI scans were reviewed for correct acquisition plane of axial images. Error rates for each review period were calculated and compared using the Fisher exact test. Error rates of axillary shoulder radiograph orientation were 35.9%, 7.2%, and 10.0%, respectively, for the three review periods. The decrease in error rate between periods 1 and 2 was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Error rates of shoulder CT reformats were 9.8%, 2.7%, and 5.8%, respectively, for the three review periods. The decrease in error rate between periods 1 and 2 was statistically significant (p = 0.03). Error rates for sacral MRI axial sequences were 96.5%, 32.5%, and 3.4%, respectively, for the three review periods. The decrease in error rates between periods 1 and 2 and between periods 2 and 3 was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). A web-based system for reporting image quality errors may be effective for improving image quality.

  10. Diagnostic imaging in undergraduate medical education: an expanding role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    Radiologists have been involved in anatomy instruction for medical students for decades. However, recent technical advances in radiology, such as multiplanar imaging, 'virtual endoscopy', functional and molecular imaging, and spectroscopy, offer new ways in which to use imaging for teaching basic sciences to medical students. The broad dissemination of picture archiving and communications systems is making such images readily available to medical schools, providing new opportunities for the incorporation of diagnostic imaging into the undergraduate medical curriculum. Current reforms in the medical curriculum and the establishment of new medical schools in the UK further underline the prospects for an expanding role for imaging in medical education. This article reviews the methods by which diagnostic imaging can be used to support the learning of anatomy and other basic sciences

  11. Optimising the image of the intradural nerve root: the value of MR radiculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, P.A.M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1996-10-01

    We evaluated the additional value of MR radiculography for increasing the sensitivity and specificity of MRI with regard to nerve root compression in patients with sciatica. The single slices of a heavily T 2-weighted oblique coronal image set were reformatted with a maximum intensity projection protocol. This image resembles a classical contrast radiculogram and shows the intradural nerve root and its sleeve. In 43 patients studied with a standard MRI examination there was a need for further assessment of nerve root compression in 19 (44 %). In 13 (68 %) of these, MR radiculography made a definite verdict possible. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Optimising the image of the intradural nerve root: the value of MR radiculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, P.A.M.; Wilmink, J.T.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated the additional value of MR radiculography for increasing the sensitivity and specificity of MRI with regard to nerve root compression in patients with sciatica. The single slices of a heavily T 2-weighted oblique coronal image set were reformatted with a maximum intensity projection protocol. This image resembles a classical contrast radiculogram and shows the intradural nerve root and its sleeve. In 43 patients studied with a standard MRI examination there was a need for further assessment of nerve root compression in 19 (44 %). In 13 (68 %) of these, MR radiculography made a definite verdict possible. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Endometrial cancer: magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, R; Gui, B; Maresca, G; Fanfani, F; Bonomo, L

    2005-01-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy of the female genital tract. Clinically, patients with endometrial carcinoma present with abnormal uterine bleeding. The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in endometrial carcinoma is disease staging and treatment planning. MRI has been shown to be the most valuable imaging mod-ality in this task, compared with endovaginal ultrasound and computed tomography, because of its intrinsic contrast resolution and multiplanar capability. MRI protocol includes axial T1-weighted images; axial, sagittal, and coronal T2-weighted images; and dynamic gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted imaging. MR examination is usually performed in the supine position with a phased array multicoil using a four-coil configuration. Endometrial carcinoma is isointense with the normal endometrium and myometrium on noncontrast T1-weighted images and has a variable appearance on T2-weighted images demonstrating heterogeneous signal intensity. The appearance of noninvasive endometrial carcinoma on MRI is characterized by a normal or thickened endometrium, with an intact junctional zone and a sharp tumor-myometrium interface. Invasive endometrial carcinoma is characterized disruption or irregularity of the junctional zone by intermediate signal intensity mass on T2-weighted images. Invasion of the cervical stroma is diagnosed when the low signal intensity cervical stroma is disrupted by the higher signal intensity endometrial carcinoma. MRI in endometrial carcinoma performs better than other imaging modalities in disease staging and treatment planning. Further, the accuracy and the cost of MRI are equivalent to those of surgical staging.

  14. Sports-related muscle injuries of the lower extremity: MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Marquez, A.; Gil-Garcia, M.; Valls, C.; Narvaez-Garcia, J.; Andia-Navarro, E.; Pozuelo-Segura, O.; Portabella-Blavia, F.

    1999-01-01

    Sports-related injuries of the lower extremity are frequent. Before magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was available, ultrasound, radionuclide scintigraphy and computed tomography were used to evaluate muscle trauma. Although relatively inexpensive, these imaging modalities are limited by their low specificity. The high degree of soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability of MR imaging, allow direct visualization as well as characterization of traumatic muscle lesions. This pictorial review highlights the spectrum of traumatic muscle lesions on MRI, with emphasis on its typical appearances. (orig.)

  15. Postoperative evaluation after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: Measurements and abnormalities on radiographic and CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Cheol; Choi, Yun Sun; KIm, Hyoung Seop; Choi, Nam Hong [Nowon Eulji Medical Center, Eulji University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Reconstruction of a ruptured anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a well-established procedure for repair of ACL injury. Despite improvement of surgical and rehabilitation techniques over the past decades, up to 25% of patients still fail to regain satisfactory function after an ACL reconstruction. With development of CT imaging techniques for reducing metal artifacts, multi-planar reconstruction, and three-dimensional reconstruction, early post-operative imaging is increasingly being used to provide immediate feedback to surgeons regarding tunnel positioning, fixation, and device placement. Early post-operative radiography and CT imaging are easy to perform and serve as the baseline examinations for future reference.

  16. USRC: a new strategy for adding digital images to the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelle, David; Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil

    2012-10-01

    Many medical schools use learning management systems (LMSs) to give students access to online lecture notes, assignments, quizzes, and other learning resources. LMSs can also be used to provide access to digital radiology images, potentially improving preclinical teaching in anatomy, physiology, and pathology while also allowing students to develop interpretation skills that are important in clinical practice. However, it is unclear how radiology images can best be stored, imported, and displayed in an LMS. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a new web application that allows course designers to import images into pages linked to BlackBoard Learn, a popular LMS. Page content, including images, annotations, captions, and supporting text, are stored as teaching cases on a MIRC (Medical Imaging Resource Center) server. Course designers create cases in MIRC, and then create a corresponding page in BlackBoard by modifying an HTML template so that it holds the URL of a MIRC case. When a user visits the page in BlackBoard, the page requests content from the MIRC case, reformats the text for display in BlackBoard, and loads an image viewer plug-in that allows students to view and interact with the images stored in the case. The USRC technology can be used to reformat MIRC cases for presentation in any website or in any learning management system that supports custom pages written in HTML with embedded JavaScript.

  17. A case of severe congenital kyphoscoliosis secondary to multiple bilateral thoracic pedicle aplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geoffray, Anne; Leloutre, Beatrice; Albertario, Marco; Bechard-Sevette, Nancy; Clement, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    A 9-month-old boy with congenital kyphoscoliosis secondary to multiple bilateral thoracic pedicle aplasias is presented. This anomaly has rarely been described in the literature. Plain films showed absence of thoracic pedicles bilaterally from T2 to T9, which was better demonstrated on CT multiplanar and 3-D reformatted images. There were no neurological symptoms even though the deformity progressed rapidly. Congenital kyphosis or kyphoscoliosis is often related to spinal anomalies that are located on the anterior aspect of the vertebrae. However, posterior anomalies may also be responsible and should be recognized before neurological complications occur. (orig.)

  18. Liver imaging with MDCT and high concentration contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spielmann, Audrey L.

    2003-01-01

    Liver imaging has advanced greatly over the last 10 years with helical CT capability and more recently the addition of multidetector-row CT (MDCT). Multidetector CT technology facilitates imaging at faster speeds with improved image quality and less breathing artifact [Abdom. Imaging 25 (2000) 643]. Exquisite three-dimensional data sets can be obtained with thin collimation providing improved lesion detection, multiplanar imaging, and the ability to perform CT angiography of the liver and mesenteric vessels. New challenges arise with this advance in technology including safety considerations. The radiation dose to the patient has increased with MDCT and this is compounded by the ability to perform multi-phase liver imaging. Furthermore, issues of contrast media administration require reconsideration including optimal timing and rate of administration, the total volume of contrast needed and the ideal iodine concentration of the contrast media. Recently, the use of high concentration contrast media (HCCM) has been explored and study results to date will be reviewed

  19. - LAA Occluder View for post-implantation Evaluation (LOVE) - standardized imaging proposal evaluating implanted left atrial appendage occlusion devices by cardiac computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnes, Michael; Akin, Ibrahim; Sartorius, Benjamin; Fastner, Christian; El-Battrawy, Ibrahim; Borggrefe, Martin; Haubenreisser, Holger; Meyer, Mathias; Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Henzler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A standardized imaging proposal evaluating implanted left atrial appendage (LAA) occlusion devices by cardiac computed tomography angiography (cCTA) has never been investigated. cCTA datasets were acquired on a 3 rd generation dual-source CT system and reconstructed with a slice thickness of 0.5 mm. An interdisciplinary evaluation was performed by two interventional cardiologists and one radiologist on a 3D multi-planar workstation. A standardized multi-planar reconstruction algorithm was developed in order to assess relevant clinical aspects of implanted LAA occlusion devices being outlined within a pictorial essay. The following clinical aspects of implanted LAA occlusion devices were evaluated within the most appropriate cCTA multi-planar reconstruction: (1) topography to neighboring structures, (2) peri-device leaks, (3) coverage of LAA lobes, (4) indirect signs of neo-endothelialization. These are illustrated within concise CT imaging examples emphasizing the potential value of the proposed cCTA imaging algorithm: Starting from anatomical cCTA planes and stepwise angulation planes perpendicular to the base of the LAA devices generates an optimal LAA Occluder View for post-implantation Evaluation (LOVE). Aligned true axial, sagittal and coronal LOVE planes offer a standardized and detailed evaluation of LAA occlusion devices after percutaneous implantation. This pictorial essay presents a standardized imaging proposal by cCTA using multi-planar reconstructions that enables systematical follow-up and comparison of patients after LAA occlusion device implantation. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12880-016-0127-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  20. Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellum, C.D.; Fisher, L.M.; Tegtmeyer, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the advantages of the use of excretory urography for diagnosis. According to the authors, excretory urography remains the basic radiologic examination of the urinary tract and is the foundation for the evaluation of suspected urologic disease. Despite development of the newer diagnostic modalities such as isotope scanning, ultrasonography, CT, and magnetic resonsance imaging (MRI), excretory urography has maintained a prominent role in ruorradiology. Some indications have been altered and will continue to change with the newer imaging modalities, but the initial evaluation of suspected urinary tract structural abnormalities; hematuria, pyuria, and calculus disease is best performed with excretory urography. The examination is relatively inexpensive and simple to perform, with few contraindictions. Excretory urography, when properly performed, can provide valuable information about the renal parenchyma, pelvicalyceal system, ureters, and urinary bladder

  1. High performance graphics processors for medical imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldwasser, S.M.; Reynolds, R.A.; Talton, D.A.; Walsh, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a family of high- performance graphics processors with special hardware for interactive visualization of 3D human anatomy. The basic architecture expands to multiple parallel processors, each processor using pipelined arithmetic and logical units for high-speed rendering of Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance (MR) and Positron Emission Tomography (PET) data. User-selectable display alternatives include multiple 2D axial slices, reformatted images in sagittal or coronal planes and shaded 3D views. Special facilities support applications requiring color-coded display of multiple datasets (such as radiation therapy planning), or dynamic replay of time- varying volumetric data (such as cine-CT or gated MR studies of the beating heart). The current implementation is a single processor system which generates reformatted images in true real time (30 frames per second), and shaded 3D views in a few seconds per frame. It accepts full scale medical datasets in their native formats, so that minimal preprocessing delay exists between data acquisition and display

  2. Validation of phalanx bone three-dimensional surface segmentation from computed tomography images using laser scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVries, Nicole A.; Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Shivanna, Kiran H. [The University of Iowa, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Magnotta, Vincent A. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Radiology, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States); Grosland, Nicole M. [The University of Iowa, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Center for Computer Aided Design, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2008-01-15

    To examine the validity of manually defined bony regions of interest from computed tomography (CT) scans. Segmentation measurements were performed on the coronal reformatted CT images of the three phalanx bones of the index finger from five cadaveric specimens. Two smoothing algorithms (image-based and Laplacian surface-based) were evaluated to determine their ability to represent accurately the anatomic surface. The resulting surfaces were compared with laser surface scans of the corresponding cadaveric specimen. The average relative overlap between two tracers was 0.91 for all bones. The overall mean difference between the manual unsmoothed surface and the laser surface scan was 0.20 mm. Both image-based and Laplacian surface-based smoothing were compared; the overall mean difference for image-based smoothing was 0.21 mm and 0.20 mm for Laplacian smoothing. This study showed that manual segmentation of high-contrast, coronal, reformatted, CT datasets can accurately represent the true surface geometry of bones. Additionally, smoothing techniques did not significantly alter the surface representations. This validation technique should be extended to other bones, image segmentation and spatial filtering techniques. (orig.)

  3. Validation of phalanx bone three-dimensional surface segmentation from computed tomography images using laser scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVries, Nicole A.; Gassman, Esther E.; Kallemeyn, Nicole A.; Shivanna, Kiran H.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Grosland, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    To examine the validity of manually defined bony regions of interest from computed tomography (CT) scans. Segmentation measurements were performed on the coronal reformatted CT images of the three phalanx bones of the index finger from five cadaveric specimens. Two smoothing algorithms (image-based and Laplacian surface-based) were evaluated to determine their ability to represent accurately the anatomic surface. The resulting surfaces were compared with laser surface scans of the corresponding cadaveric specimen. The average relative overlap between two tracers was 0.91 for all bones. The overall mean difference between the manual unsmoothed surface and the laser surface scan was 0.20 mm. Both image-based and Laplacian surface-based smoothing were compared; the overall mean difference for image-based smoothing was 0.21 mm and 0.20 mm for Laplacian smoothing. This study showed that manual segmentation of high-contrast, coronal, reformatted, CT datasets can accurately represent the true surface geometry of bones. Additionally, smoothing techniques did not significantly alter the surface representations. This validation technique should be extended to other bones, image segmentation and spatial filtering techniques. (orig.)

  4. Diagnostic imaging of craniofacial trauma and fractures and their sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buitrago-Tellez, C.H.; Kunz, C.

    2001-01-01

    The value and applications of the CT modalities are on the rise, particularly since the availability of spiral CT techniques, while conventional native diagnostics is increasingly used for special imaging purposes. Multiplanar spiral CT enables high-quality coronary 2D reconstructions which, in the acute phase, make redundant primary coronary imaging modalities. Exact knowledge of typical fracture patterns facilitates the analysis of images of the relevant facial areas. 3D reconstructions are indispensable in pin-pointed surgery planning, generation of stereolithographic models, and image-guided interventions for examination of post-traumatic deformities. Since a secondary correction only very rarely leads to restitutio ad integrum, it is necessary to detect the therapy-relevant injuries very early, during acute diagnostic imaging, in order to lay the basis for subsequent therapy and restoration of the craniofacial structures and functions. (orig./CB) [de

  5. Multi-Detector Computed Tomography Imaging Techniques in Arterial Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Adler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional imaging has become a critical aspect in the evaluation of arterial injuries. In particular, angiography using computed tomography (CT is the imaging of choice. A variety of techniques and options are available when evaluating for arterial injuries. Techniques involve contrast bolus, various phases of contrast enhancement, multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, and maximum intensity projection. After the images are rendered, a variety of features may be seen that diagnose the injury. This article provides a general overview of the techniques, important findings, and pitfalls in cross sectional imaging of arterial imaging, particularly in relation to computed tomography. In addition, the future directions of computed tomography, including a few techniques in the process of development, is also discussed.

  6. CT Imaging of facial trauma. Role of different types of reconstruction. Part I - bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myga-Porosilo, J.; Sraga, W.; Borowiak, H.; Jackowska, Z.; Kluczewska, E.; Skrzelewski, S.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Injury to the facial skeleton and the adjoining soft tissues is a frequently occurring condition. The main aim of this work was to assess the value of multiplanar and three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction computed tomography (CT) images obtained by using multi-detector row technology in spiral data acquisition in patients with facial skeleton injury. The authors attempted to answer the following questions: Are there particular mechanisms and types of injuries or locations of fractures which can be diagnosed significantly more effectively by conducting additional multiplanar image reconstructions? Do 3D image reconstructions contribute to the diagnostic process, to what extent? Compared to other imaging techniques, is the spiral CT data acquisition a more convenient for the patient and a faster investigation method of diagnosing post-injury lesions involving the facial skeleton? Material/Methods: Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with injury to the facial skeleton were referred for emergent CT scanning. Each patient underwent a CT scan with the use of a GE HiSpeed Qx/i scanner. The scans were conducted with the use of spiral data acquisition technique in the transverse plane. The following secondary image reconstructions were conducted for each patient: a two dimensional (2D) multiplanar reconstruction (MPR), maximum intensity projection (MIP), and 3D volume rendering (VR). Post-injury lesions of the facial skeleton were assessed and the presence of any loose displaced bone fragments was taken into consideration. Results: As far as fracture imaging is concerned, the 2D image reconstruction and volume rendering proved to be the most effective in the majority of locations. 3D image reconstructions proved the most sensitive in most cases of loose displaced bone fragments, except for fine structures such as the ethmoid bone and the inferior orbital wall. Conclusions: 1. Multiplanar computer reconstructions increase the effectiveness of visualisation of

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow. Part II: Abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kijowski, Richard; Tuite, Michael; Sanford, Matthew [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Part II of this comprehensive review on magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow discusses the role of magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating patients with abnormalities of the ligaments, tendons, and nerves of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can yield high-quality multiplanar images which are useful in evaluating the soft tissue structures of the elbow. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the ulnar collateral ligament and lateral collateral ligament of the elbow with high sensitivity and specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging can determine the extent of tendon pathology in patients with medial epicondylitis and lateral epicondylitis. Magnetic resonance imaging can detect tears of the biceps tendon and triceps tendon and can distinguishing between partial and complete tendon rupture. Magnetic resonance imaging is also helpful in evaluating patients with nerve disorders at the elbow. (orig.)

  8. Advances in medical imaging for the diagnosis and management of common genitourinary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mohammad H; Ahlman, Mark A; Lindenberg, Liza; Turkbey, Baris; Lin, Jeffrey; Cahid Civelek, Ali; Malayeri, Ashkan A; Agarwal, Piyush K; Choyke, Peter L; Folio, Les R; Apolo, Andrea B

    2017-07-01

    Medical imaging of the 3 most common genitourinary (GU) cancers-prostate adenocarcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and urothelial carcinoma of the bladder-has evolved significantly during the last decades. The most commonly used imaging modalities for the diagnosis, staging, and follow-up of GU cancers are computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET). Multiplanar multidetector computed tomography and multiparametric MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging are the main imaging modalities for renal cell carcinoma and urothelial carcinoma, and although multiparametric MRI is rapidly becoming the main imaging tool in the evaluation of prostate adenocarcinoma, biopsy is still required for diagnosis. Functional and molecular imaging using 18-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET and sodium fluoride-PET are essential for the diagnosis, and especially follow-up, of metastatic GU tumors. This review provides an overview of the latest advances in the imaging of these 3 major GU cancers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of elephantiasis neuromatosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, K.J.; Sully, L.; Preston, B.J. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ludman, C.N. [Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]|[Division of Academic Radiology, University Hospital, Queen`s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed elephantiasis neuromatosa of his left leg. The gross limb enlargement was extremely disfiguring, and resulted in such severe disability that he was only able to walk a very short distance using crutches. Previous debulking procedures had resulted in massive blood loss, and prior to attempting further surgical intervention MRI studies were requested. Taking advantage of the excellent tissue characterisation and multiplanar imaging capabilities of MRI, we were able to assess the extent of soft tissue and osseous involvement. The use of recently developed MR angiographic sequences enabled us to non-invasively provide detailed images to assess the relationship of the lesions to the major vessels, as well as the vascular supply and angiographic features of the lesions themselves. This article describes our MRI-based findings, which precluded debulking surgery in this unusual manifestation of neurofibromatosis. (orig.) With 6 figs., 23 refs.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of elephantiasis neuromatosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, K.J.; Sully, L.; Preston, B.J.; Ludman, C.N.

    1998-01-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1 who developed elephantiasis neuromatosa of his left leg. The gross limb enlargement was extremely disfiguring, and resulted in such severe disability that he was only able to walk a very short distance using crutches. Previous debulking procedures had resulted in massive blood loss, and prior to attempting further surgical intervention MRI studies were requested. Taking advantage of the excellent tissue characterisation and multiplanar imaging capabilities of MRI, we were able to assess the extent of soft tissue and osseous involvement. The use of recently developed MR angiographic sequences enabled us to non-invasively provide detailed images to assess the relationship of the lesions to the major vessels, as well as the vascular supply and angiographic features of the lesions themselves. This article describes our MRI-based findings, which precluded debulking surgery in this unusual manifestation of neurofibromatosis. (orig.)

  11. MR imaging evaluation of congenital spine anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bury, E.A.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Grossman, R.I.; Goldberg, H.I.; Bilaniuk, L.T.; Hackney, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Over a 2-year period, 135 patients between the ages of 1 week and 18 years were examined with MR imaging for possible congenital anomalies of the spine and spinal cord. Tethered cords with various other associated pathologies such as lipomas and myelomeningoceles were found in 36 patients. The remaining abnormal examinations consisted of syrinxes, Chiari malformations, diastematomyelia, and conus masses. In 55 patients the studies were interpreted as normal. Of these, three were subsequently shown by surgery of myelography to be abnormal. The first had a thickened filum with a small epidermoid, the second a thickened filum, and the third, with only sagittal images, a diastematomyelia. Children presenting with symptoms highly suspicious for congenital abnormalities but with a normal MR study in multiple planes may still require further evaluation with myelography. Multiplanar MR examination in most instances will be a sufficient evaluation for congenital anomalies

  12. MR imaging of neuronal migration anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Eun Wan; Kim, Dae Ho; Chung, Moo Chan; Kwon, Kuy Hyang; Kim, Ki Jung

    1991-01-01

    Abnormalities of neuronal migration are characterized by anectopic location of neurons in the cerebral cortex. This broad group of anomalies includes agyria, pachygyria, schizencephaly, unilateral megalencephaly, and gray matter heterotopia. Patients with this anomaly present clinically with a variety of symptoms which are proportional to the extent of the brain involved. These abnormalities have characterized pathologically in vivo by sonography and CT scan. MR appears to be an imaging technique of choice in evaluating these anomalies because it is capable of exceptionally good differentiation between gray and white matter, high contrast resolution, multiplanar display of the anatomy, and lack of overlying bone artifac. The purpose of this paper is to describe the MR findings of neuronal migration anomaly. The results of our study support that MR appears to be the imaging method of choice for diagnosing migration anomalies and the primary screening method for infants or children who have seisure/and delayed development

  13. Three-dimensional display and measurement of cardiac dynamic indexes from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, M.; Matsuo, M.; Yamasaki, K.; Banno, T.; Toriwaki, J.; Yokoi, S.; Oshita, H.

    1986-01-01

    The cardiac dynamic index, to which such variables as cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion contribute, is routinely determined using various modalities such as angiography, radionuclide imaging, US, and x-ray CT. Each of these modalities, however, has some disadvantages in regard to evaluating the cardiac dynamic index. The authors have obtained precise multidirectional projection images of the heart by means of computer graphics and reformatted data of cardiac MR images obtained with cardiac gating. The contiguous coronal MR images of the heart are made at an interimage distance of 5 mm. In each section, five or six cardiac images can be obtained, depending on the systolic or diastolic phase. These images are stored in a computer, and a three-dimensional display of the heart with biocular observation and with multiplex holograms is made possible with computer graphics. Three-dimensional measurement of the cardiac index is now being attempted, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion

  14. Single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle using Cartesian sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzl, Jens; Schmidt, Michaela; Pontana, François; Longère, Benjamin; Lugauer, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim; Forman, Christoph

    2018-02-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate a single-breath-hold approach for Cartesian 3-D CINE imaging of the left ventricle with a nearly isotropic resolution of [Formula: see text] and a breath-hold duration of [Formula: see text]19 s against a standard stack of 2-D CINE slices acquired in multiple breath-holds. Validation is performed with data sets from ten healthy volunteers. A Cartesian sampling pattern based on the spiral phyllotaxis and a compressed sensing reconstruction method are proposed to allow 3-D CINE imaging with high acceleration factors. The fully integrated reconstruction uses multiple graphics processing units to speed up the reconstruction. The 2-D CINE and 3-D CINE are compared based on ventricular function parameters, contrast-to-noise ratio and edge sharpness measurements. Visual comparisons of corresponding short-axis slices of 2-D and 3-D CINE show an excellent match, while 3-D CINE also allows reformatting to other orientations. Ventricular function parameters do not significantly differ from values based on 2-D CINE imaging. Reconstruction times are below 4 min. We demonstrate single-breath-hold 3-D CINE imaging in volunteers and three example patient cases, which features fast reconstruction and allows reformatting to arbitrary orientations.

  15. Imaging of laryngeal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Minerva; Leuchter, Igor; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D.; Dulguerov, Pavel; Varoquaux, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed

  16. Imaging of laryngeal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Minerva, E-mail: Minerva.Becker@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Leuchter, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Leuchter@hcuge.ch [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervico-facial Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Platon, Alexandra, E-mail: Alexandra.Platon@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Becker, Christoph D., E-mail: Christoph.Becker@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Dulguerov, Pavel, E-mail: Pavel.Dulguerov@hcuge.ch [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Cervico-facial Surgery, University Hospital of Geneva, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Varoquaux, Arthur, E-mail: Arthur.Varoquaux@hcuge.ch [Department of Radiology, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 4, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    External laryngeal trauma is a rare but potentially life-threatening situation in the acutely injured patient. Trauma mechanism and magnitude, maximum focus of the applied force, and patient related factors, such as age and ossification of the laryngeal cartilages influence the spectrum of observed injuries. Their correct diagnosis and prompt management are paramount in order to avoid patient death or long-term impairment of breathing, swallowing and speaking. The current review provides a comprehensive approach to the radiologic interpretation of imaging studies performed in patients with suspected laryngeal injury. It describes the key anatomic structures that are relevant in laryngeal trauma and discusses the clinical role of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the acute emergency situation. The added value of two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions (2D MPR), three-dimensional volume rendering (3D VR) and virtual endoscopy (VE) for the non-invasive evaluation of laryngeal injuries and for treatment planning is discussed. The clinical presentation, biomechanics of injury, diagnostic pitfalls and pearls, common and uncommon findings are reviewed with emphasis of fracture patterns, involvement of laryngeal joints, intra- and extralaryngeal soft tissue injuries, and complications seen in the acute emergency situation. The radiologic appearance of common and less common long-term sequelae, as well as treatment options are equally addressed.

  17. Vaginal Masses: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features with Pathologic Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsayes, K.M.; Narra, V.R.; Dillman, J.R.; Velcheti, V.; Hameed, O.; Tongdee, R.; Menias, C.O.

    2007-01-01

    The detection of vaginal lesions has increased with the expanding use of cross-sectional imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) - with its high-contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities - is often useful for characterizing vaginal masses. Vaginal masses can be classified as congenital, inflammatory, cystic (benign), and neoplastic (benign or malignant) in etiology. Recognition of the typical MR imaging features of such lesions is important because it often determines the treatment approach and may obviate surgery. Finally, vaginal MR imaging can be used to evaluate post-treatment changes related to previous surgery and radiation therapy. In this article, we will review pertinent vaginal anatomy, vaginal and pelvic MRI technique, and the MRI features of a variety of vaginal lesions with pathological correlation

  18. Diagnostic imaging of injuries and overuse in soccer players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonge, M.C. de; Maas, M.; Kuijk, C. van

    2002-01-01

    Soccer is one of the most popular sports worldwide. There is a high incidence of injuries in soccer in which several intrinsic and extrinsic factors play a part. Most injuries are minor, self-limiting and do not need extensive medical treatment or imaging. Imaging can be required for several reasons e.g. when the clinical findings are doubtful, to replace arthroscopy (i. e. of the knee) or for prognostic reasons. All imaging modalities available to the radiologist can be used but MRI is the most valuable imaging modality with its superior contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Basically, injuries in the soccer player can occur anywhere in the body like in every sport. The lower extremities, more specific the knee and ankle, are however the most injured parts. (orig.) [de

  19. MR imaging of brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, A.; Ciccotosto, C.; Dragani, M.; Manes, L.; Bonomo, L.

    1991-01-01

    The brachial plexus is a difficult region to evaluate with radiological techniques. MR imaging has great potentials for the depiction of the various anatomical structures of the branchial plexus - i.e., spinal ganglion, ventral nerve rami root exit of the neural foramina, trunks an cordes. Moreover, MR imaging, thanks to its direct multiplanarity, to its excellent soft-tissue contrast, and to its lack of motion artifacts, allows good evaluation of pathologic conditions in the branchial plexus, especially traumas and cancers. On the contrary CT, in spite of its high spatial resolution and good contrast, cannot demonstrate the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus. US detects superficials structures, and conventional radiographs depict only indirect changes in the adjacent lung apex and skeletal structures. From November 1989 to May 1990, 20 normal volunteers (15 males and 5 females; average age: 35 years) were studied with MR imaging. Multisection technique was employed with a dedicated coil and a primary coil. The anatomical structures of the brachial plexus were clearly demonstrated by T1-weighted sequences on the sagittal and axial planes. T2-weighted pulse sequences on the coronal plane were useful for the anatomical definition of the brachial plexus and for eventual tissue characterization. The correct representation of the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus allowed by MR imaging with author's standard technique makes MR imaging the most appropriate exam for the diagnosis of pathologic conditions in the brachial plexus, although its use must be suggested by specific clinical questions

  20. Advanced MR brain imaging. Why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Tekes, Aylin

    Repeated examinations, also known as so-called 'follow-up examinations' are nowadays frequently used to decide whether or not a chosen treatment should be continued, adapted or discontinued. The side effects of X-rays on biological systems, especially on developing systems did, however, limit the use of X-rays in children. The development of high-resolution, non-ionizing imaging modalities like US and MRI revolutionized diagnostic medicine for the second time after the discovery of X-rays. US is nowadays an essential imaging modality in paediatrics; it can be performed at the bedside, has no side effects on the child, is widely available, well accepted by parents and can be repeated without limitations. MRI with its high spatial resolution, different imaging contrasts and multiplanar capabilities has grown into a second line imaging modality if plain films and US cannot make the diagnosis accurately or reliably. A third revolution in diagnostic imaging occurred as MRI allowed studying biological processes and functions non-invasively. (orig.)

  1. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Ewan [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade [University of Bristol, CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties. (orig.)

  2. Curved reformat of the paediatric brain MRI into a 'flat-earth map' - standardised method for demonstrating cortical surface atrophy resulting from hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, Ewan; Andronikou, Savvas; Vedajallam, Schadie; Chacko, Anith; Thai, Ngoc Jade

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy is optimally imaged with brain MRI in the neonatal period. However neuroimaging is often also performed later in childhood (e.g., when parents seek compensation in cases of alleged birth asphyxia). We describe a standardised technique for creating two curved reconstructions of the cortical surface to show the characteristic surface changes of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in children imaged after the neonatal period. The technique was applied for 10 cases of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and also for age-matched healthy children to assess the visibility of characteristic features of hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. In the abnormal brains, fissural or sulcal widening was seen in all cases and ulegyria was identifiable in 7/10. These images could be used as a visual aid for communicating MRI findings to clinicians and other interested parties. (orig.)

  3. Uterine cervical carcinoma: a comparison of two- and three-dimensional T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MR imaging at 3.0 T for image quality and local-regional staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Y.R. [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, 222, Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, Bupyeong 6-dong, Bupyeong-gu, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Rha, S.E.; Choi, B.G.; Oh, S.N.; Park, M.Y.; Byun, J.Y. [The Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, 222, Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    To compare three-dimensional (3D) T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE) with multiplanar two-dimensional (2D) T2-weighted TSE for the evaluation of invasive cervical carcinoma. Seventy-five patients with cervical carcinoma underwent MRI of the pelvis at 3.0 T, using both 5-mm-thick multiplanar 2D (total acquisition time = 12 min 25 s) and 1-mm-thick coronal 3D T2-weighted TSE sequences (7 min 20 s). Quantitative analysis of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and qualitative analysis of image quality were performed. Local-regional staging was performed in 45 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy. The estimated SNR of cervical carcinoma and the relative tumour contrast were significantly higher on 3D imaging (P < 0.0001). Tumour conspicuity was better with the 3D sequence, but the sharpness of tumour margin was better with the 2D sequence. No significant difference in overall image quality was noted between the two sequences (P = 0.38). There were no significant differences in terms of the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of parametrial invasion, vaginal invasion, and lymph node metastases. Multiplanar reconstruction 3D T2-weighted imaging is largely equivalent to 2D T2-weighted imaging for overall image quality and staging accuracy of cervical carcinoma with a shorter MR data acquisition, but has limitations with regard to the sharpness of the tumour margin. circle 3D T2-weighted MR sequence is equivalent to 2D for cervical carcinoma staging. (orig.)

  4. MR imaging of the pediatric spine: Comparison of myelography, MCT, and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.C.; Hoffman, J.C.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.; Braun, I.F.; Fry, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of MR imaging of 53 pediatric patients with suspected spinal abnormalities were compared findings on metrizamide myelography, MCT, and surgery. Prototype surface coil studies with multisection multiplanar imaging (0.5 and 1.5 T) using T1-weighted sequences were optimum for anatomic definition, while T2-weighted sequences were utilized for intramedullary pathology. Diseases studied included neoplasia, infection, trauma, scoliosis, and dysrhaphsium. Surface coils were essential for imaging the thoracic and lumbar spine. MR imaging yielded approximately equivalent information to that obtained on myelography or MCT in 25 of 31 patients. Limitations to MR imaging included bony spurs, small eccentric lesions, tumor seeding, metal artifacts, postoperative scarring, and motion. With further refinements, MR imaging may replace more invasive techniques for pediatric spinal imaging

  5. Comparison of image quality in head CT studies with different dose-reduction strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Nielsen, Rikke; Fink-Jensen, Vibeke

    The number of multi-detector CT examinations is increasing rapidly. They allow high quality reformatted images providing accurate and precise diagnosis at maximum speed. Brain examinations are the most commonly requested studies, and although they come at a lower effective dose than body CT, can...... account to a considerable radiation dose as many patients undergo repeated studies. Therefore, various dose-reduction strategies are applied such as automated tube current and voltage modulation and recently different iterative reconstruction algorithms. However, the trade-off of all dose......-reduction maneuvers is reduction of image quality due to image noise or artifacts. The aim of our study was therefore to find the best diagnostic images with lowest possible dose. We present results of dose- and image quality optimizing strategies of brain CT examinations at our institution. We compare sequential...

  6. Pericardial sinuses and recesses effusion of 16-slice helical CT imaging and anatomic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chunyan; Yang Zhigang; Zhou Xiangping; Yu Jianqun; Zhu Jie; Yang Kaiqing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT features and implications of the pericardial sinuses and recesses effusion by combining the sectional cadavers and 16 multi-slice CT (MSCT) reformation. Methods: The anatomy and communication of the pericardial sinuses and recesses on the axial, coronal and saggital sectional cadavers (respectively 1 case), and the morphologic features on MSCT reformatted images in 104 patients were observed. The detection rate of effusion was analyzed. Results: The sectional cadavers and CT images showed that the pericardial sinuses and recesses were formed by the reflections of the pericardium on the root of the great vessels. The detection rate of the sinuses and recesses was lower in small effusion than in moderate and large effusion (P<0.05). The superior aortic recess was the most common recess for pericardial effusion. Conclusion: The MSCT reformatted images can show the morphologic features of pericardial sinuses and recesses effusion and communications with the pericardial cavity, help differentiate pericardial effusion from other mediastinal or pericardial lesions. (authors)

  7. Initial clinical experience with a 64-MDCT whole-body scanner in an emergency department: better time management and diagnostic quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Michael; Czermak, Benedikt; El Attal, Rene; Sumann, Günther; Jaschke, Werner; Freund, Martin

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess time management and diagnostic quality when using a 64-multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) whole-body scanner to evaluate polytraumatized patients in an emergency department. Eighty-eight consecutive polytraumatized patients with injury severity score (ISS) > or = 18 (mean ISS = 29) were included in this study. Documented and evaluated data were crash history, trauma mechanism, number and pattern of injuries, injury severity, diagnostics, time flow, and missed diagnoses. Data were stored in our hospital information system. Seven time intervals were evaluated. In particular, attention was paid to the "acquisition interval," the "reformatting and evaluation time" as well as the "CT time" (time from CT start to preliminary diagnosis). A standardized whole-body CT was performed. The acquired CT data together with automatically generated multiplanar reformatted images ("direct MPR") were transferred to a 3D rendering workstation. Diagnostic quality was determined on the basis of missed diagnoses. Head-to-toe scout images were possible because volume coverage was up to 2 m. Experienced radiologists at an affiliated workstation performed radiologic evaluation of the acquired datasets immediately after acquisition. The "acquisition interval" was 12 minutes +/- 4.9 minutes, the "reformatting and evaluation interval" 7.0 minutes +/- 2.1 minutes, and the "CT time" 19 minutes +/- 6.1 minutes. Altogether, 7 of 486 lesions were recognized but not communicated in the "reformatting and evaluation interval", and 10 injuries were initially missed and detected during follow-up. This study indicates that 64-MDCT saves time, especially in the "reformatting and evaluation interval." Diagnostic quality is high, as reflected by the small number of missed diagnoses.

  8. Three dimensional digital rotational imaging in the evaluation of the fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, Se Min; Lee, Min Hee; Kwag, Hyon Joo; Lee, Young Rae; Kook, Shin Ho; Park, Hae Won; Moon, Woo Jin; Kim, Seung Kwon; Chung, Eun Chul

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and the application of three dimensional digital rotational imaging (3D DRI) by the evaluation of fractures. Sixteen patients with clinically diagnosed or suspicious fracture were involved in this study. The lesion or suspicious sites of all 16 cases were spines (n=7), pelvis (n=3) and so on (n=6; knee elbow, ankle, wrist and foot). In all cases, conventional radiography, multiplanar 2D (slice thickness/pitch=3 or 5 mm/1:1)and volume rendering 3D reconstructed single detector helical CT (HiSpeed Advantage, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WIS) scans and 3D DRI (Integris V-5000, Philips Medical Systems, The Netherlands) with multiplanar intersection and gray scaling as postprocessing technique were performed. 3D DRI was evaluated and compared with conventional radiography, multiplanar 2D CT and volume rendering 3D CT. 3D DRI provided more detail and additional information in 14 cases (88%), comparing with 2D and 3D CT scans. Two fractures were revealed only on 3D DRI other than conventional radiography and CT scans and one case was revealed on 2D CT and 3D DRI. In all cases, we could acquired more detail and additional information from 3D DRI than from 3D CT in the acquisition of 3D imaging. 3D DRI didn't change the classification of fracture in 12 of 13 cases (92%), which revealed the fracture on the conventional radiography or CT. 3D DRI can diagnose and evaluate the fracture rapidly and easily with anatomical and spatial resolution by acquisition of 3D imaging with postprocessing using DRI

  9. Three dimensional digital rotational imaging in the evaluation of the fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Se Min; Lee, Min Hee; Kwag, Hyon Joo; Lee, Young Rae; Kook, Shin Ho; Park, Hae Won; Moon, Woo Jin; Kim, Seung Kwon; Chung, Eun Chul [School of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate the usefulness and the application of three dimensional digital rotational imaging (3D DRI) by the evaluation of fractures. Sixteen patients with clinically diagnosed or suspicious fracture were involved in this study. The lesion or suspicious sites of all 16 cases were spines (n=7), pelvis (n=3) and so on (n=6; knee elbow, ankle, wrist and foot). In all cases, conventional radiography, multiplanar 2D (slice thickness/pitch=3 or 5 mm/1:1)and volume rendering 3D reconstructed single detector helical CT (HiSpeed Advantage, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WIS) scans and 3D DRI (Integris V-5000, Philips Medical Systems, The Netherlands) with multiplanar intersection and gray scaling as postprocessing technique were performed. 3D DRI was evaluated and compared with conventional radiography, multiplanar 2D CT and volume rendering 3D CT. 3D DRI provided more detail and additional information in 14 cases (88%), comparing with 2D and 3D CT scans. Two fractures were revealed only on 3D DRI other than conventional radiography and CT scans and one case was revealed on 2D CT and 3D DRI. In all cases, we could acquired more detail and additional information from 3D DRI than from 3D CT in the acquisition of 3D imaging. 3D DRI didn't change the classification of fracture in 12 of 13 cases (92%), which revealed the fracture on the conventional radiography or CT. 3D DRI can diagnose and evaluate the fracture rapidly and easily with anatomical and spatial resolution by acquisition of 3D imaging with postprocessing using DRI.

  10. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J.S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  11. Pathologic and post-operative conditions of the plantar fascia: review of MR imaging appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, J.S.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as an important noninvasive diagnostic imaging technique for assessment of foot pathology. This modality, owing to its multiplanar imaging capability and inherent superiority in contrast, has been shown to be more accurate and sensitive for detection of plantar fascia pathology than any other imaging method. One of the most important and recognizable causes of heel pain is plantar fasciitis. With the exception of plantar fasciitis, there has been little emphasis on imaging other conditions that affect this important structure. The objective of this review is to demonstrate, from a perspective of MR imaging, the many different pathologic conditions that affect the plantar fascia. Included in this review will be a discussion of normal anatomy as well as entities such as acute plantar fasciitis, chronic plantar fasciitis, traumatic rupture, normal post-surgical changes, pathologic post-fasciotomy conditions, infection, and fibromatosis. (orig.)

  12. Neonatal imaging using an on-site small footprint MR scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merhar, Stephanie L.; Tkach, Jean A.; Dumoulin, Charles L.; Woods, Jason C.; South, Andrew P.; Wiland, Emily L.; Rattan, Mantosh S.; Kline-Fath, Beth M.

    2017-01-01

    With its soft-tissue definition, multiplanar capabilities and advanced imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for neonatal care can provide better understanding of pathology, allowing for improved care and counseling to families. However, MR imaging in neonates is often difficult due to patient instability and the complex support necessary for survival. In our institution, we have installed a small footprint magnet in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimize patient risks and provide the ability to perform MR imaging safely in this population. With this system, we have been able to provide more information with regard to central nervous system disorders, abdominal pathology, and pulmonary and airway abnormalities, and have performed postmortem imaging as an alternative or supplement to pathological autopsy. In our experience, an MR scanner situated within the NICU has allowed for safer and more expedited imaging of this vulnerable population. (orig.)

  13. Neonatal imaging using an on-site small footprint MR scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merhar, Stephanie L. [Perinatal Institute, Division of Neonatology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tkach, Jean A.; Dumoulin, Charles L. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Woods, Jason C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Imaging Research Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); South, Andrew P.; Wiland, Emily L. [Children' s Hospital Medical Center of Akron, Division of Neonatology, Akron, OH (United States); Rattan, Mantosh S.; Kline-Fath, Beth M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2017-07-15

    With its soft-tissue definition, multiplanar capabilities and advanced imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for neonatal care can provide better understanding of pathology, allowing for improved care and counseling to families. However, MR imaging in neonates is often difficult due to patient instability and the complex support necessary for survival. In our institution, we have installed a small footprint magnet in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to minimize patient risks and provide the ability to perform MR imaging safely in this population. With this system, we have been able to provide more information with regard to central nervous system disorders, abdominal pathology, and pulmonary and airway abnormalities, and have performed postmortem imaging as an alternative or supplement to pathological autopsy. In our experience, an MR scanner situated within the NICU has allowed for safer and more expedited imaging of this vulnerable population. (orig.)

  14. Helical CT in evaluation of the bronchial tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perhomaa, M.; Laehde, S.; Rossi, O.; Suramo, I.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To establish a protocol for and to assess the value of helical CT in the imaging of the bronchial tree. Material and Methods: Noncontrast helical CT was performed in 30 patients undergoing fiberoptic bronchoscopy for different reasons. Different protocols were compared; they included overlapping 10 mm, 5 mm, or 3 mm slices and non-tilted, cephalad or caudal tilted images. Ordinary cross-sectional and multiplanar 2D reformats were applied for visualization of the bronchial branches. The effect of increasing the helical pitch was tested in one patient. Results: A total of 92.1-100% of the segmental bronchi present in the helical acquisitions were identified by the different protocols. The collimation had no significant impact on the identification of the bronchial branches, but utilization of 3-mm overlapping slices made it easier to distinguish the nearby branches and provided better longitudinal visualization of the bronchi in 2D reformats. The tilted scans illustrated the disadvantage of not covering all segmental bronchi in one breath-hold. An increase of the pitch from 1 to 1.5 did not cause noticeable blurring of the images. CT and bronchoscopic findings correlated well in the area accessible to bronchoscopy, but CT detected 5 additional pathological lesions (including 2 cancers) in the peripheral lung. Conclusion: Helical CT supplemented with bronchography-like 2D reformats provides an effective method complementary to bronchoscopy in the examination of the bronchial tree. (orig.)

  15. Imaging in the diagnosis of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyaranjan Mishra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA is a rare, benign, highly vascular, and locally aggressive tumor that predominantly occurs in adolescent males. Usually, the presenting symptom is a painless nasal obstruction or epistaxis; however, other symptoms may develop depending on the size and extent of the tumor mass. Owing to the vascularity of the tumor, incisional biopsy is not attempted. The diagnosis is dependent on multiplanar imaging modalities like Computed Tomography (CT, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, and Angiography. These imaging modalities help in assessing the tumor mass, pre-operative embolization of the feeder vessel, and treatment planning. Usually, patients with JNA are diagnosed by otorhinolaryngologists, but here, we present a rare case of JNA reporting to the dental hospital due to a tender palatal swelling.

  16. MR imaging of the pediatric central nervous system utilization review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.D.; Prince, J.R.; Galloway, D.C.; Ross-Duggan, J.; Lester, P.D.; Yamanashi, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    MR has been done in over 500 pediatric and adolescent patients (ages 5 days to 20 years) with central nervous system (CNS) disease (brain, n = 331; spine, n = 218), including high-field and special coil application in 362 cases. T1-weighted, multiplanar MR imaging provides superior anatomic delineation of organogenetic CNS malformations, while multiparameter (T1, T2, p) MR is usually necessary for more complete characterization of histogenetic malformations, as well as acquired conditions. MR imaging is a desirable method for the initial and definitive evaluation of many cranial and spinal conditions of childhood (more-invasive procedures were obviated in 164 patients). CT or other modalities may be added when MR imaging does not satisfy the clinical query

  17. Advanced imaging of the musculoskeletal system: Standard, three-dimensional, and contrast-enhanced CT and MR imaging, and quantitative bone densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnick, D.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This course reviews the application of advanced imaging techniques to a broad spectrum of musculoskeletal disorders. The indications for and utility of standard CT in both the axial and the appendicular skeleton is explored. The combined use of CT with air and contrast arthrography at sites including the hip, knee, and shoulder is discussed. A summary of the proved and potential applications of MR imaging in osseous, articular, bone marrow, and soft-tissue disorders is provided. The utility of intraarticular contrast agents in enhancing the diagnostic capabilities of MR imaging for disorders of hyaline cartilage and and fibrocartilage is demonstrated. The advantages of multiplanar reformation and three-dimensional image reconstruction of cross-sectional imaging data are described in conjunction with the fundamental technological principles of these strategies. Accepted methods as well as investigative techniques for the diagnosis and follow-up of metabolic bone disease are contrasted with regard to relative indications, advantages, and limitations

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of epidermoid, including diffusion weighted images and an atypical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Shoki; Higano, Shuichi; Kurihara, Noriko

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in diagnosing intracranial epidermoid, we evaluated the MRI findings on five cases with such tumor, all of which were surgically verified. In addition to standard spin-echo (SE) images obtained in all cases, diffusion-weighted images were acquired in two patients. In four patients, the tumor revealed to be almost isointense relative to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on both T 1 -and T 2 -weighted images, while it tended to show slightly hyperintense to CSF on proton-density-weighted images; thus, based on the signal intensity on standard SE images the distinction between epidermoid and arachnoid cyst may be difficult. Furthermore, the presence of the tumor which has a tendency to grow in and along the subarachnoid space causing relatively minimal mass effect may be overlooked. Diffusion-weighted images were shown to have advantages in such cases by demonstrating the tumor unequivocally as a mass of high signal, and differentiating it from arachnoid cysts. In the remaining patient, its appearance was atypical, showing bright signal on both T 1 -and T 2 -weighted images. In conclusion free of bone artifacts, multiplanar MRI with additional diffusion-weighted images provides a clear demonstration of epidermoid, and its differentiation from arachnoid cyst, thus obviating the need for CT cisternography. (author)

  19. Traumatic thoracic injury: the role of Multidetector-row CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Joo; Kang, Doo Kyung; Kim, Tae Hee [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-05-15

    The introduction of Multidetector-row CT (MDCT) has revolutionized the diagnostic strategy of multitrauma patients. The rapid acquisition of a large scanning volume with a thin slice collimation allows for motion-free images of high spatial resolution, and this enables the application of the multiplanar reformat (MPR) and 3D volume-rendering (VR) images. The MPR images more accurately demonstrate aortic rupture or dissection, diaphragmatic injuries and fracture of vertebrae, sternum and costal cartilages. Diagnosing vascular injuries can be aided by using the MIP images. Rib fracture, trachea and bronchial laceration are more easily detected by the 3D images, while airway and vascular injuries can be detected from performing virtual endoscopy. We introduce our current CT imaging protocol and we present our clinical experience with using MDCT in the assessment of patients with blunt thoracic trauma.

  20. Multidetector computed tomography enteroclysis (MDCT-E) with neutral enteral and IV contrast enhancement in tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania; Lutio, Elisabetta de; Romano, Luigia [Cardarelli Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Naples (Italy); Rollandi, Gian Andrea [San Martino Hospital, 2. Service of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Second University of Naples, Institute of Radiology, Naples (Italy); Maglinte, Dean D.T. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2005-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of MDCT-enteroclysis (MDCT-E), an emerging technique of small bowel examination that combines the advantages of MDCT examination of the abdomen and the enteral volume challenge of enteroclysis, in evaluation of small bowel neoplasms. In our institutions, MDCT-E was used to study 456 patients (age range 21-84 years, mean 53 years) admitted for suspicion of small bowel disease. All examinations were done on multichannel CT units, 129 on a 16-slice scanner and 327 on a four-slice scanner. Post-processing and multiplanar reformatting and interpretation were performed on dedicated workstations. After adequate gastrointestinal preparation and naso-enteric intubation, small bowel was distended by methylcellulose infused by a peristaltic pump. One volumetric MDCT acquisition was obtained after 120-130 ml of intravenous contrast medium. Multiplanar reformatting was based on the image reconstruction parameters from 3 to 4 mm. Forty-five small bowel neoplasms were found; in the remaining cases, 223 Crohn's diseases and 149 other abnormalities were detected. All findings were confirmed by surgery, endoscopy or clinical follow-up. In our experience, MDCT-E with neutral enteral and IV contrast seems to be a reliable method in the diagnosis of small bowel neoplasms. (orig.)

  1. [Imaging of pelvic organ prolapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapray, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Colpocystodefecography (CCD) and dynamic MRI with defecography (MRId) allow an alternation between filling and emptying the hollow organs and the maximum abdominal strain offered by the defecation. When applied in imaging these two principles reveal the masked or underestimated prolapses at the time of the physical examination. A rigorous application of the technique guarantees almost equivalent results from the two examinations. The CCD provides voiding views and improved analysis of the anorectal pathology (intussusception, anismus) but involves radiation and a more invasive examination. MRId has the advantage of providing continuous visibility of the peritoneal compartment, and a multiplanar representation, enabling an examination of the morphology of the pelvic organs and of the supporting structures, with the disadvantage of still necessitating a supine examination, resulting sometimes in an incomplete or impossible evacuation. The normal and abnormal results (cystoptosis, vaginal vault prolapse, enterocele, anorectal intussuception, rectocele, descending perineum, urinary and fecal incontinence) and the respective advantages and limits of the various imaging methods are detailed. Dynamic perineal and introital ultrasound remains more limited in the appreciation of posterior colpoceles and especially in anorectal disorders, than CCD or MRId. Endoanal ultrasound is the first line morphological evaluation of the anal sphincter. Transvaginal and introital ultrasound can detect some complications of suburethral tapes and meshes. Morphological and dynamic imaging are essential complementary tools to the physical examination, especially when a precise anatomic assessment is required to understand the functional complaint or when a reintervention is needed.

  2. Curved planar reconstruction of MR images in focal cortical dysplasia of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Gyung Ho; Lee, Sang Yong; Kim, Chong So; Kim, Young Kon; Lee, Young Hwan; Jeong, Su Hyun

    2002-01-01

    To describe curved planar reconstruction imaging (CPR) and determine its usefulness in the evaluation of focal cortical dysplasia of the brain. In 17 cases of focal cortical dysplasia (cortical dysplasia (n=9), schizencephaly (n=5), and heterotopia (n=3), CPR images were created using a multiplanar reconstruction program and imaging data obtained during T1 magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo MR imaging. We assessed the precise configuration of abnormalities and their relation to adjacent gyri and sulci. CPRI showed the brain cortex as a 2D panoramic image, demonstrating the precise configurations and locations of dysplasia-associated abnormalities and their relation to adjacent gyri and sulci, and the precise shape of the gray-white matter interface. CPRI can provide important radiological information about the extension and configuration of focal cortical dysplasia, and its relation to neighboring cortical structures. We believe that CPRI should form an essential part of the routine investigation os suspected cases of focal cortical dysplasia

  3. Prospective comparison of MR imaging (1.5 T) and CT detection of small intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, C.F.; Dillon, W.P.; Laxer, K.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Prior studies indicate lack of MR imaging sensitivity in the evaluation of intractable seizure patients. The authors reviewed MR imaging studies of 15 patients with intractable seizures. High-quality thin-section multiplanar images were obtained with electrocardiographic gating and/or flow compensation techniques and a 1.5-T General Electric Signa unit. Correlation with intracranial electro-encephalography (EEG), CT, and pathology was obtained in all patients. Abnormalities on MR imaging were detected in all but one patient. Pathology revealed MTS in 12 of 15 patients. Other entities included heterotopias and cavernous angiomas. The authors' study indicates that high-resolution, flow-compensated MR imaging is quite sensitive for localization of eleptogenic structural abnormalities and complements EEG

  4. Osteoblastic lesion screening with an advanced post-processing package enabling in-plane rib reading in CT-images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seuss, Hannes; Dankerl, Peter; Cavallaro, Alexander; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias

    2016-05-20

    To evaluate screening and diagnostic accuracy for the detection of osteoblastic rib lesions using an advanced post-processing package enabling in-plane rib reading in CT-images. We retrospectively assessed the CT-data of 60 consecutive prostate cancer patients by applying dedicated software enabling in-plane rib reading. Reading the conventional multiplanar reconstructions was considered to be the reference standard. To simulate clinical practice, the reader was given 10 s to screen for sclerotic rib lesions in each patient applying both approaches. Afterwards, every rib was evaluated individually with both approaches without a time limit. Sensitivities, specificities, positive/negative predictive values and the time needed for detection were calculated depending on the lesion's size (largest diameter  10 mm). In 53 of 60 patients, all ribs were properly displayed in plane, in five patients ribs were partially displayed correctly, and in two patients none of the ribs were displayed correctly. During the 10-s screening approach all patients with sclerotic rib lesions were correctly identified reading the in-plane images (including the patients without a correct rib segmentation), whereas 14 of 23 patients were correctly identified reading conventional multiplanar images. Overall screening sensitivity, specificity, and positive/negative predictive values were 100/27.0/46.0/100 %, respectively, for in-plane reading and 60.9/100/100/80.4 %, respectively, for multiplanar reading. Overall diagnostic (no time limit) sensitivity, specificity, and positive/negative predictive values of in-plane reading were 97.8/92.8/74.6/99.5 %, respectively. False positive results predominantly occurred for lesions <5 mm in size. In-plane reading of the ribs allows reliable detection of osteoblastic lesions for screening purposes. The limited specificity results from false positives predominantly occurring for small lesions.

  5. Post-therapeutic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollice, Saverio, E-mail: saveriopollice@hotmail.it [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, “L. Bonomo Hospital”, 76123 Andria, BT (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Department of Neuroradiology, “Cardarelli Hospital”, Naples (Italy); Scarabino, Tommaso, E-mail: tscarabino@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, “L. Bonomo Hospital”, 76123 Andria, BT (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • This study is the result of collaboration between neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. • Comparison between neuroimaging techniques to better evaluate the complications after treatment of the spin. • Evaluation of the imaging features of complications and definition of follow-up. - Abstract: Any surgical approach modifies the normal anatomical and functional arrangement of the segmental spine which is aimed, therefore image interpretation cannot ignore a correct set of knowledge in the field of anatomy, pathophysiology, drug compliance, interventional radiology and surgery. Neuroradiological imaging has an important role before surgery to direct the surgeon or interventional radiologist during the operation, both in post-surgery, where imaging examination can rightly evaluate properties and effects of the treatment and can detect potential complications as infections, abscess, bleeding, exuberant scar, mobilization and rupture of devices. The available methods of imaging are the X-rays (XR) made at least in two projections, Computed Tomography (CT) with MPR (multiplanar) and VR (volume rendering) reconstruction, and Magnetic Resonance (MR), often performed before and after contrast media injection. Imaging assessment of spine after surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including surgical procedures and disease for which it was performed; biomechanical of the underlying cortical and cancellous bone findings; conditions of muscles, intervertebral disk and ligaments; time since surgery procedures; duration and nature of the post-surgical syndrome. Depending upon several factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities (X-rays, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance) may be required to evaluate effectiveness of the treatment; to demonstrate any clinically relevant abnormality at the treated region and adjacent structures (complications such as inflammation, abscesses, bleeding and misplacement of the device); to

  6. Post-therapeutic imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollice, Saverio; Muto, Mario; Scarabino, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This study is the result of collaboration between neuroradiologists and neurosurgeons. • Comparison between neuroimaging techniques to better evaluate the complications after treatment of the spin. • Evaluation of the imaging features of complications and definition of follow-up. - Abstract: Any surgical approach modifies the normal anatomical and functional arrangement of the segmental spine which is aimed, therefore image interpretation cannot ignore a correct set of knowledge in the field of anatomy, pathophysiology, drug compliance, interventional radiology and surgery. Neuroradiological imaging has an important role before surgery to direct the surgeon or interventional radiologist during the operation, both in post-surgery, where imaging examination can rightly evaluate properties and effects of the treatment and can detect potential complications as infections, abscess, bleeding, exuberant scar, mobilization and rupture of devices. The available methods of imaging are the X-rays (XR) made at least in two projections, Computed Tomography (CT) with MPR (multiplanar) and VR (volume rendering) reconstruction, and Magnetic Resonance (MR), often performed before and after contrast media injection. Imaging assessment of spine after surgery is complex and depends upon several factors, including surgical procedures and disease for which it was performed; biomechanical of the underlying cortical and cancellous bone findings; conditions of muscles, intervertebral disk and ligaments; time since surgery procedures; duration and nature of the post-surgical syndrome. Depending upon several factors, one or a combination of complementary imaging modalities (X-rays, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance) may be required to evaluate effectiveness of the treatment; to demonstrate any clinically relevant abnormality at the treated region and adjacent structures (complications such as inflammation, abscesses, bleeding and misplacement of the device); to

  7. Utility of reconstructed image from 3-D MRI in the region of oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Shumei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Nakatani, Atsutoshi; Furuya, Shigeo; Furukawa, Shouhei; Fuchihata, Hajime

    1998-01-01

    The 3-D MRI with short TR was performed in the region of oral cavity, jaw and face, and utility of the reconstructed image was examined. Subjects were 8 healthy volunteers and 12 patients. The 3-D MRI was performed using SPGR with the following parameters; TR: 8 or 9 msec, TE: 2 or 3 msec, and FA: 20-30 degrees. Imaging direction was vertical to body axis. The matrix number was 256 x 192, slice thickness was 1 mm, slice interval was 0 and slice number was 128. The obtained image was reconstructed using software Reformat''. Detectability of temporomandibular joint disc was not enough in 8 of 20 cases. Detectability of mandibular canal was clear in 18 of 20 cases. In panorama MRI, soft tissue such as submandibular gland was detected. But, in hard tissue such as teeth or maxilla, there was a more little information in panorama MRI than in panorama X-ray photography. (K.H.)

  8. Reconstruction CT imaging of the hypopharynx and the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Tetsuji; Fujimura, Akiko; Murakami, Yasushi; Shiga, Hayao

    1986-01-01

    The multiplanar reconstruction CT imaging of the hypopharynx and the larynx was performed on a total of 20 cases: 8 with laryngeal carcinomas, 6 with hypopharyngeal carcinomas, 4 with vocal cord paralyses due to various causes, 1 with laryngeal amyloidosis, 1 with inflammatory granuloma of the hypopharynx. Coronal, segittal, and parasagittal reconstruction images were obtained from either 1 or 2 mm overlapping axial scans with 4 or 5 mm slice thickness (3 cases) using 5 sec scan times during queit breathing. In 15 cases with coronal reconstruction imaging, the anatomical derangements of the laryngopharyngeal structures especially along the undersurface of the true vocal cord to the false cord level, the lateral wall of the pyriform sinus, and the paraglottic space were demonstrated more clearly than the axial CT imaging. In 5 cases with sagittal reconstruction imaging, the vertical extension of the lesions through the anterior commisure was more clearly depicted than the axial CT imaging. In 8 cases with parasagittal reconstruction imaging, which is along the vocal fold or across the aryepiglottic fold, pathological changes along the aryepiglottic fold, the arytenoid-corniculate cartilage complex, and the tip of the pyriform sinus were more clearly demonstrated than the axial CT imaging. In determining the feasibility of conservation surgery of the larynx and the hypopharynx, reconstruction CT imaging is recommended as the diagnostic procedure of a choice, which would supplement the findings of the routine axial CT imaging. (author)

  9. MR imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Scheidler, J.; Sommer, B.; Graser, A.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Massmann, J.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PC) is developing into an important health care issue in light of the high incidence of PC and the improvements in stage-adapted therapy. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the current role of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging of PC.Material and methods Pertinent literature was searched and evaluated to collect information on current clinical indications, study techniques, diagnostic value, and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Major indications for MR imaging of patients with supected PC are to define tumor location before biopsy when clinical or TRUS findings are inconclusive, and to provide accurate staging of histologically proven PC to ascertain effective therapy. Current MR imaging techniques for the evaluation of PC include multiplanar high-resolution T2-weighted FSE and T1-weighted SE sequences using combined endorectal and phased-array coils. Using these techniques, the reported accuracy of MR imaging for the diagnosis of extracapsular tumor extension ranges between 82 and 88% with sensitivities between 80 and 95%, and specificities between 82 and 93%. Typical MR findings of PC in different stages of disease, as well as diagnostic problems, such as chronic prostatitis, biopsy-related hemorrhage and therapy-related changes of prostatic tissue are discussed. In addition, the current perspectives and limitations of MR spectroscopy in PC are summarized. Current MR imaging techniques provide important diagnostic information in the pretherapeutic workup of PC including a high staging accuracy, and is superior to TRUS. (orig.) [de

  10. MR imaging of the finger tendons: Normal anatomy and commonly encountered pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, Dina; Stanley, Anthony; Gentili, Amilcare; Hughes, Tudor; Chung, Christine B.

    2005-01-01

    MR imaging has emerged as a powerful tool in the evaluation of soft tissue structures such as the tendons of the hand and finger due to its excellent soft tissue contrast and multiplanar imaging capabilities. In the finger and hand, perhaps more than in any other location in the body, a detailed and intimate understanding of anatomy is crucial for lesion localization, directing clinical management and predicting long-term prognosis. These issues are of paramount importance to both the clinician and imager, both faced with the challenge of the complex anatomy and pathology associated with these delicate structures. The anatomy of the finger including intrinsic and extrinsic muscles, retinacular structures, and tendons will be discussed. The MR imaging features of common lesions of the tendons of the hand and finger will be reviewed

  11. Fat-suppressed volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) MR imaging in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus: Focusing on reader-defined axial reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Daekeon; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sungjun; Song, Ho-Taek; Suh, Jin-Suck, E-mail: jss@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-01

    Objective: To assess the diagnostic value of fat-suppressed (FS) three-dimensional (3D) volume isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) imaging in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus, including the reader-defined reformatted axial (RDA) plane. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with arthroscopically confirmed radial or root tears of the meniscus underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with 2D and FS 3D VISTA sequences. MRIs were reviewed independently by two musculoskeletal radiologists blinded to the arthroscopic findings. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and interobserver agreement were calculated for radial and root tears. Both radiologists reported confidence scale for the presence of meniscal tears in 2D axial imaging, 3D axial imaging, and RDA imaging, based on a five-point scale. Wilcoxon's signed rank test was used to compare confidence scale. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of FS 3D VISTA MR imaging versus 2D MR imaging were as follows: 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 91%, 91%, and 91%, respectively in reader 1, and 96%, 96%, and 96% versus 83%, 91%, and 87%, respectively, in reader 2. Interobserver agreement for detecting meniscal tears was excellent (κ = 1) with FS 3D VISTA. The confidence scale was significantly higher for 3D axial images than 2D imaging (p = 0.03) and significantly higher in RDA images than 3D axial image in detecting radial and root tears. Conclusions: FS 3D VISTA had a better diagnostic performance in evaluating radial and root tears of the meniscus. The reader-defined reformatted axial plane obtained from FS 3D VISTA MR imaging is useful in detecting radial and root tears of the meniscus.

  12. Potentially Low Cost Solution to Extend Use of Early Generation Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonna, Joseph E

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In preparing a case report on Brown-Séquard syndrome for publication, we made the incidental finding that the inexpensive, commercially available three-dimensional (3D rendering software we were using could produce high quality 3D spinal cord reconstructions from any series of two-dimensional (2D computed tomography (CT images. This finding raises the possibility that spinal cord imaging capabilities can be expanded where bundled 2D multi-planar reformats and 3D reconstruction software for CT are not available and in situations where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is either not available or appropriate (e.g. metallic implants. Given the worldwide burden of trauma and considering the limited availability of MRI and advanced generation CT scanners, we propose an alternative, potentially useful approach to imaging spinal cord that might be useful in areas where technical capabilities and support are limited. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:463-466.

  13. Detailed sectional anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauschning, W.

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic studies on the human spine constitute a special challenge because of the spine's complex topographic anatomy and the intimate relationship between the supporting skeleton and the contiguous soft tissues (muscles, discs, joint capsules) as well as the neurovascular contents of the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina. The improving resolution and multiplanar image reformatting capabilities of modern CT scanners call for accurate anatomic reference material. Such anatomic images should be available without distortion, in natural colors, and in considerable detail. The images should present the anatomy in the correct axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and should also be sufficiently closely spaced so as to follow the thin cuts of modern CT scanners. This chapter details one of several recent attempts to correlate gross anatomy with the images depicted by high-resolution CT. The methods of specimen preparation, sectioning, and photographing have been documented elsewhere

  14. Recent advances in imaging technologies in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Sahai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental implants have become a part of routine treatment plans in oral rehabilitation. Diagnostic imaging is critical to presurgical treatment planning and the success of implants. Various imaging modalities may aid the placing of implants in an appropriate location with relative ease and also obtain a predictable outcome. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT and, more recently, cone beam-computed tomography (CBCT are invaluable during preoperative planning for endosseous dental implantation procedures. An understanding of geometric and software parameters, and image formatting options to maximize image display is necessary to optimize diagnostic yield while maintaining minimal patient radiation dose. Multiplanar CT or CBCT images contain far more detailed information of the maxillofacial region than do panoramic or other bidimensional (2D images and necessitate a thorough knowledge of the tridimensional (3D anatomy of the region and considerations of variability in the range of the anatomically normal. This article provides: (1 an overview of the fundamental principles of operation of maxillofacial CT and CBCT; (2 an understanding of image processing and display protocols specific to pre-implant bone assessment; (3 the basics of qualitative and quantitative bone evaluation; and (4 an introduction to image-guided implant surgery using custom or computer-generated surgical guides.

  15. Computer-assisted imaging of the fetus with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, P M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the fetus and to propose future techniques and applications. Institutional review board approved MR images of the fetus were acquired in 66 patients with sonographically suspected fetal abnormalities. Axial, coronal, and sagittal short TR, short TE images were obtained. In addition, 12 studies were performed with rapid scans requiring 700-1200 ms using either GRASS or Spoiled GRASS techniques. Sequential studies demonstrating fetal motion were also performed. Three studies with 3D IR prepped GRASS were performed. These allowed for orthogonal and non-orthogonal reformatted views and 3D display. Normal fetal structures were shown with MRI, including brain, heart, liver, stomach, intestines, and bladder. Gross fetal anomalies could generally be demonstrated with MRI. MRI may give additional information to that of sonography in fetal anomalies, particularly those involving the central nervous system, and in the detection of fat, blood, and meconium. MRI of the fetus can demonstrate normal and abnormal structures. Newer techniques with faster imaging will allow for greater possibility of computer assisted manipulation of data.

  16. Method and structure for an improved data reformatting procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha [Yorktown Heights, NY; Gunnels, John A [Brewster, NY; Gustavson, Fred Gehrung [Briarcliff Manor, NY

    2009-06-30

    A method (and structure) of managing memory in which a low-level mechanism is executed to signal, in a sequence of instructions generated at a higher level, that at least a portion of a contiguous area of memory is permitted to be overwritten.

  17. Reformatted CT diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas in hyperprolactinemic women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kowada, Masayoshi; Hariu, Mineko; Miyauchi, Koji

    1983-01-01

    The CT diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas was made in 13 among 20 female sterile patients with hyperprolactinemia, utilizing sagittal- and coronal-sectioned reformation on the basis of 1.5 mm-sliced high-resolution axial CT scanning. The pituitary stalk was found to have been shifted in 10 patients, and in all of them adenomas were verified. This was in contrast to the findings that, among another 10 patients with no definite evidence of the stalk shifting, only 3 patients had adenomas. Pituitary adenomas were present in 11 of the 12 patients demonstrating the pituitary suface in a ''convex'' fashion. In contrast, 2 among 6 patients with a ''flat'' surface demonstrated the presence of pituitary adenomas. Enhancement patterns in the sella could be classified as of four types: homogeneous, diffuse-low, punched-out, and nodular types. The adenomas tended to occur in either the nodular or diffuse-low type; they were less frequently seen in the punched-out or homogeneous type. With regard to the correlation between the patterns of contrast enhancement and the serum concentrations of prolactin, it may be of note that the nodular type corresponded well to the higher prolactin serum level, and the homogeneous type to the lower level. (author)

  18. Nuclear analysis software. Pt. 1: Spectrum transfer and reformatting (SPEDAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    GANAAS (Gamma, Activity, and Neutron Activation Analysis System) is one in the family of software packages developed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Primarily, the package was intended to support the IAEA Technical Assistance and Cooperation projects in developing countries. However, it is open domain software that can be copied and used by anybody, except for commercial purposes. All the nuclear analysis software provided by the IAEA has the same design philosophy and similar structure. The intention was to provide the user with maximum flexibility, at the same time with a simple and logical organization that requires minimum digging through the manuals. GANAAS is a modular system. It consists of several programmes that can be installed on the hard disk as the are needed. Obviously, some parts of they system are required in all cases. Those are installed at the beginning, without consulting the operator. GANAAS offers the opportunity to expand and improve the system. The gamma spectrum evaluation programmes using different fitting algorithms can be added to GANAAS, under the condition that the format of their input and output files corresponds to the rules of GANAAS. The same applies to the quantitative analysis parts of the programme

  19. Head and neck imaging with MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imhof, H.; Czerny, Chr.; Dirisamer, A.

    2003-01-01

    Multi-slice CT (MDCT) is rapidly becoming the new standard in radiological imaging. Although its advantages in cardiovascular, thoracic and abdominal imaging are evident, the extent of its usefulness for imaging the head and neck has yet to be clarified. Because of the shorter examination time motion artifacts are reduced, phonation-studies are possible. Due to the thin-slicing and nearly isotropic multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) examination in only one plane is necessary, saving both time and radiation exposure. The shorter examination requires the use of higher concentrated contrast medium (400 mg of iodine/ml). The use of such a contrast medium produces a higher degree of contrast enhancement and provides a 5-10% higher contrast between the surrounding normal and pathological tissue, but is more time critical. MPRs are easily done in any plane within seconds and enables also three-dimensional visualization, what helps in the use of minimal invasive therapy, training and teaching and provides a way of handling the hundreds of images acquired during scanning

  20. Advanced imaging of the scapholunate ligamentous complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahabpour, Maryam; Maeseneer, Michel de; Boulet, Cedric; Mey, Johan de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Staelens, Barbara; Scheerlinck, Thierry [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel (UZ Brussel), Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Brussels (Belgium); Overstraeten, Luc van [Hand and Foot Surgery Unit (HFSU), Tournai (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The scapholunate joint is one of the most involved in wrist injuries. Its stability depends on primary and secondary stabilisers forming together the scapholunate complex. This ligamentous complex is often evaluated by wrist arthroscopy. To avoid surgery as diagnostic procedure, optimization of MR imaging parameters as use of three-dimensional (3D) sequences with very thin slices and high spatial resolution, is needed to detect lesions of the intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the scapholunate complex. The paper reviews the literature on imaging of radial-sided carpal ligaments with advanced computed tomographic arthrography (CTA) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) to evaluate the scapholunate complex. Anatomy and pathology of the ligamentous complex are described and illustrated with CTA, MRA and corresponding arthroscopy. Sprains, mid-substance tears, avulsions and fibrous infiltrations of carpal ligaments could be identified on CTA and MRA images using 3D fat-saturated PD and 3D DESS (dual echo with steady-state precession) sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices. Imaging signs of scapholunate complex pathology include: discontinuity, nonvisualization, changes in signal intensity, contrast extravasation (MRA), contour irregularity and waviness and periligamentous infiltration by edema, granulation tissue or fibrosis. Based on this preliminary experience, we believe that 3 T MRA using 3D sequences with 0.5-mm-thick slices and multiplanar reconstructions is capable to evaluate the scapholunate complex and could help to reduce the number of diagnostic arthroscopies. (orig.)

  1. Advances tomographic in evaluation of middle ear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, Mayara Alves Pinheiro dos; Ledo, Mirelle D'arc Frota; Ribeiro, Marcio Duarte

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography has a key role in the study of hearing, since through it can be evaluated structures not seen by otoscope. In many clinical situations the diagnosis through this test proves limited, being fundamental examination of the associated image reconstructions: multiplanar reconstruction, maximum intensity projection, and volume-rendering technique. The ossicular chain is a complex formed by the ossicles malleus, incus and stapes, situated in the middle ear; it is difficult to view them in orthogonals planes. This review article intends to demonstrate the importance of post-processing the image of the ossicular chain for a better representation of the anatomy and possible diseases. Reformatting of images helps, significantly, to a better visualization of these structures as related congenital malformations, vascular abnormalities, inflammatory conditions, neoplasia and traumas. (author)

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of the abdomen and pelvis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen presents greater inherent difficulties than other anatomic regions. However, new techniques now allow imaging comparable in quality to computed tomography (CT). Magnetic resonance imaging offers the advantages of greater tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging, and lack of ionizing radiation or risk of toxic reactions from iodinated contrast media. Its use remains limited by high cost, limited availability, lack of a bowel contrast agent, and long imaging time, which some patients cannot tolerate. In many areas of abdominal imaging, MRI is now comparable to CT, but because of the greater availability and lesser cost, CT remains the procedure of choice. Magnetic resonance imaging is more accurate for staging neoplasms of the liver, adrenal glands, kidneys, bladder, prostate, uterus, and cervix and may aid in diagnosis of hepatic, adrenal, and uterine masses. In selected patients, especially those in whom CT is inconclusive or those who cannot tolerate iodinated contrast material, MRI can provide valuable information. Development of faster scanning techniques and MRI contrast agents and wider availability will probably increase the usefulness of abdominal MRI. At this time, MRI complements other abdominal imaging procedures. In a small number of patients, however, it can provide unique information in a virtually risk-free manner

  3. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in patient selection for uterine artery embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cura, M.; Cura, A.; Bugnone, A.

    2006-01-01

    Uterine fibroids are common tumors of the female pelvis. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is an effective treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyoma in the appropriate candidates, reducing or eliminating leiomyoma-related symptoms of bleeding, bulk, and/or pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to assess women with symptoms potentially attributable to uterine leiomyomas, and help to determine who is an appropriate candidate for UAE. Because of soft tissue characterization, multiplanar imaging capabilities, and enhancement, MR imaging not only accurately detects and characterizes uterine leiomyomas but also may predict who will benefit from the embolization. MRI ability to detect coexistent uterine or pelvic pathology may change the diagnosis and treatment management of patients being evaluated for UAE

  4. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in patient selection for uterine artery embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cura, M.; Cura, A.; Bugnone, A. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2006-12-15

    Uterine fibroids are common tumors of the female pelvis. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) is an effective treatment of symptomatic uterine leiomyoma in the appropriate candidates, reducing or eliminating leiomyoma-related symptoms of bleeding, bulk, and/or pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to assess women with symptoms potentially attributable to uterine leiomyomas, and help to determine who is an appropriate candidate for UAE. Because of soft tissue characterization, multiplanar imaging capabilities, and enhancement, MR imaging not only accurately detects and characterizes uterine leiomyomas but also may predict who will benefit from the embolization. MRI ability to detect coexistent uterine or pelvic pathology may change the diagnosis and treatment management of patients being evaluated for UAE.

  5. Advanced large airway CT imaging in children: evolution from axial to 4-D assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Edward Y.; Zucker, Evan J.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Daltro, Pedro; Boiselle, Phillip M.

    2013-01-01

    Continuing advances in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology are revolutionizing the non-invasive evaluation of congenital and acquired large airway disorders in children. For example, the faster scanning time and increased anatomical coverage that are afforded by MDCT are especially beneficial to children. MDCT also provides high-quality multiplanar 2-dimensional (2-D), internal and external volume-rendering 3-dimensional (3-D), and dynamic 4-dimensional (4-D) imaging. These advances have enabled CT to become the primary non-invasive imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis, treatment planning, and follow-up evaluation of various large airway disorders in infants and children. It is thus essential for radiologists to be familiar with safe and effective techniques for performing MDCT and to be able to recognize the characteristic imaging appearances of large airway disorders affecting children. (orig.)

  6. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma in pregnancy: ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, B.J.W.; Johnston, M.A.; Iwaniuk, G.

    1995-04-01

    The case of a 24-year-old woman with extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma during pregnancy was described. Initial ultrasonography (US) at 27 weeks gestational age failed to show the pheochromocytoma, which was subsequently found by US at 35 weeks gestational age. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provided diagnostic confirmation, as well as important information used by the obstetrician and the surgeon in operative planning. MRI proved to be ideally suited to investigation of extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas in pregnancy because it does not use ionizing radiation, and it has multiplanar capability and high contrast resolution. In the case described, the lesion was demonstrated with all MRI pulse sequences, but was best visualized with turbo spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, as well as with fat-suppressed imaging. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Imaging by magnetic resonance of pigmented villonodular synovitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Moreno, L.; Lafuente Martinez, J.; Marti Bonmati, L.; Perez Diaz, M.; Vilar Samper, J.; Paniagua, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) has become the method of choice for evaluating a large number of musculoskeletal disorders, especially because of its capacity to provide multiplanar tomographic sections and its greater contrast resolution as compared to other imaging methods. This report present seven cases of pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVS) located in joints. In six cases, the diagnosis was suggested by MR on the basis of the fact that the lesions showed hypointense areas with no signal in both the T1 and T2-weighted sequences. This is due to hemosiderin deposition in the lesion. In addition to its diagnostic value, in this disorder, MR is an excellent method for assessing the exact extension and location of the lesions, as well as the follow-up to these patients and the detection of possible recurrences. (Author) 17 refs

  8. NMR imaging of degenerative changes of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, H.K.

    1991-01-01

    Computerized tomography and nuclear spin resonance tomography, are today considered excellent ways of demonstrating herniae of intervertebral disks, especially in the lumbal region, at high sensitivity and accuracy. The facility of multiplanar imaging without reconstruction, the clearly greater amount of information by using different pulse sequences, better contrast resolution, and lacking ionizing radiation speak in favour of nuclear spin resonance tomography. Using nulcear spin resonance tomography, in all parts of the spine the excellent demonstration of the epidural space, of the myeloma, of the nerve roots as well as of the surrounding osseous and ligamentous structure is achieved. So, for the diagnosis of discopathies in the region of the cervical spine nuclear spin resonance tomography should be preferred to computerized tomography. In the region of the lumbar spine, however, CT will be of importance in the diagnosis of discopathies for some time. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Imaging and treatment of a fracture of the hamate bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, R.; Radmer, S.; Scheufler, O.; Banzer, D.

    2001-01-01

    The relatively rare fractures of the hamate bone are the most common osseous injuries of the distal carpal row, whereby fractures of both the body and the hook of the hamate occur. We present a hamulus ossis hamati fracture that was caused by direct trauma in a high-level game of underwater rugby. Although this was diagnosed by conventional X-ray, the precise position of the fracture was clearly imaged using thin-layer CT, while additional multiplanar MRT revealed further sequelae of the trauma. A CT follow-up after 10 weeks of conservative therapy did not show any osseous consolidation, which indicated the need for surgical revision with exstirpation of the hamulus. (orig.) [de

  10. Multislice helical computed tomography in the evaluation of lumbar spine diseases; Tomografia computadorizada 'multislice' no diagnostico das afeccoes da coluna lombar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Rios, Adriana Martins; Almeida, Milena Oliveira [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: laercio@einstein.br; Garbaccio, Viviane Ladeira; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem

    2003-06-01

    Multislice computed tomography has advantages in comparison to conventional computer tomography such as reduction in study time, lower radiation dose, fewer metal artifacts and high quality multiplanar reformatting and three-dimensional reconstructions. We reviewed approximately 300 lumbar spine examinations and selected the most illustrative cases including congenital anomalies, degenerative lesions, spinal infections, neoplasms traumatic injuries, spondylolysis and postoperative changes. In the majority of the cases the high quality multiplanar reformatted and volume reconstructions of multislice computed tomography allowed better evaluation of the lesions, particularly in the cases of complex anatomy (author)

  11. Multislice helical computed tomography in the evaluation of lumbar spine diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Rios, Adriana Martins; Almeida, Milena Oliveira; Garbaccio, Viviane Ladeira; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao

    2003-01-01

    Multislice computed tomography has advantages in comparison to conventional computer tomography such as reduction in study time, lower radiation dose, fewer metal artifacts and high quality multiplanar reformatting and three-dimensional reconstructions. We reviewed approximately 300 lumbar spine examinations and selected the most illustrative cases including congenital anomalies, degenerative lesions, spinal infections, neoplasms traumatic injuries, spondylolysis and postoperative changes. In the majority of the cases the high quality multiplanar reformatted and volume reconstructions of multislice computed tomography allowed better evaluation of the lesions, particularly in the cases of complex anatomy (author)

  12. Multidetector-row helical computed tomography in the evaluation of cervical spine disorders; Tomografia computadorizada multislice no diagnostico das afeccoes da coluna cervical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Almeida, Milena Oliveira; Rios, Adriana Martins; Garbaccio, Viviane Ladeira; Kim, Nelson Ji Tae; Daniel, Mauro Miguel; Funari, Marcelo Buarque de Gusmao [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Imagem]. E-mail: laercio@einstein.br

    2003-07-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MRCT) has advantages in comparison to conventional helical computed tomography, such as reduction of study time, lower radiation doses, fewer metallic artifacts and high quality multiplanar reformatting and three dimensional reconstructions. We reviewed 150 cervical spine examinations and selected the most illustrative cases including congenital anomalies, degenerative lesions, spinal infections, neoplasms, traumatic injuries and postoperative abnormalities. The quality of multiplanar reformatting and volume reconstructions of the MRCT made the detection and evaluation of most of cases with complex anatomy easier and more precise. (author)

  13. Image, Image, Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Robert T.

    2004-01-01

    With all the talk today about accountability, budget cuts, and the closing of programs in public education, teachers cannot overlook the importance of image in the field of industrial technology. It is very easy for administrators to cut ITE (industrial technology education) programs to save school money--money they might shift to teaching the…

  14. Diagnostic value of whole-body low-dose computed tomography (WBLDCT) in bone lesions detection in patients with multiple myeloma (MM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, Davide, E-mail: davide.atena@tiscalinet.it [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. San Gerardo, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Besostri, Valeria, E-mail: valeriabesostri@gmail.com [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. San Gerardo, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Bonaffini, Pietro Andrea, E-mail: pa.bonaffini@gmail.com [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. San Gerardo, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Rossini, Fausto, E-mail: valeriabesostri@hotmail.it [Department of Hematology, H. San Gerardo, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Di Lelio, Alessandro, E-mail: valebeso@libero.it [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. San Gerardo, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Sironi, Sandro, E-mail: sandrosironi@libero.it [School of Medicine, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy); Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H. San Gerardo, Via Pergolesi 33, 20900 Monza (MB) (Italy)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the role of whole-body low-dose computed tomography (WBLDCT) in the diagnosis and staging of patients with suspicion of multiple myeloma (MM). Materials and methods: A total of 138 patients (76 male and 62 female; mean age 63.5 years, range 50–81 years), with early MM, underwent WBLDCT protocol study, performed on 16-slice scanner (Brilliance, Philips Medical System, Eindhoven, The Netherlands): tube voltage 120 kV; tube current time product 40 mAs. Diagnosis of osteolytic lesions was performed on the basis of axial and multiplanar reformatted images, whereas the assessment of spinal misalignment and fracture was done by using multiplanar reformatted images. The overall dose delivered to each patient was 4.2 mSv. Every patient gave personal informed consent, as required by our institution guidelines. Results: The diagnosis was established either by histopathology or imaging follow-up (size increase of over a period time). In all 138 patients, image resolution was diagnostic, enabling correct classification of multiple myeloma patients. WBLDCT showed a total of 328 pathologic bone findings in 81/138 patients. CT scanning resulted in complete evaluation of the bone lesions in these areas of the skeleton: skull (42), humerus (15), femur (20), ribs (7), scapulae (13), pelvis (35), clavicle (13), sternum (10), cervical (39), dorsal (65), lombar (48) and sacral rachis (21). In 40/81 bone involvement detected by CT was the only CRAB criterion present. Furthermore, WBLDCT demonstrated pleuro-pulmonary lesions in 20 patients (11 infective, 9 as MM localizations) and 1 renal neoplasia. Conclusion: WBLDCT, detecting bone marrow localizations and demonstrating extra-osseous findings, with a fast scanning time and high resolution images, is a reliable imaging-based tool for a proper management of MM patients.

  15. Anatomic Illustrations of Cranial Ultrasound Images Obtained Through the Mastoid Fontanelle in Neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Man; Lee, Young Seok [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Neonatal cranial sonography performed through the mastoid fontanelle is more useful to evaluate the peripheral structures at the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem rather than that performed through the anterior fontanelle. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the anatomy of the extracerebral CSF space and brainstem and to suggest appropriate scan planes for performing neonatal cranial sonography through the mastoid fontanelle using MRI and multiplanar reconstruction programs. A neonate with normal features on ultrasonography and good image quality on MRI, including the 3D-SPGR axial scans, was selected. We made the reconstructed MR images corresponding to the sonongraphic planes and the anatomic models of the neonatal cranial sonographic images by using axial MRI as the standard reference on the same screen. We demonstrated the sonographic images at the levels of the body of the caudate nucleus and lentiform nucleus, the head of the caudate nucleus and thalamus, the third ventricle and midbrain, and the midbrain and cerebellar vermis on the oblique axial scans. Four oblique coronal images at the levels of the periventricular white matter, basal ganglia, thalamus and tentorium were also obtained. We illustrated the anatomic atlas with including four oblique axial scans and four oblique coronal scans that corresponded to the neonatal cranial sonographic images through the mastoid fontanelle. We objectively analyzed the anatomy of the extracerebral CSF space and brainstem by using MRI and multiplanar reconstruction programs and we provided the standardized sonographic scan planes through the mastoid fontanelle. This study will be very helpful for evaluating the abnormalities of the peripheral structures at the convexity of the cerebral hemispheres and brainstem

  16. Application value of curved planar reconstruction in sacroiliac joint of ankylosing spondylitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Tuxing; Huan Xiao; Zhu Xiang; Fang Chun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the application value of curved planar reconstruction (CPR) of multislice spiral computed tomography(MSCT) in changes of sacroiliac joint of ankylosing spondylitis(AS). Methods: 33 patients with AS diagnosed clinically were chosen to take MSCT scanning of bilateral sacroiliac joints with the slice thick of 5mm and the slice interval of 5 mm. The primary images were transported to General Electric AW4.0 workstation, and the multiplanar reformatted sagittal images of sacrum were obtained by the reformat software, and further the coronary images of bilateral sacroiliac joints by CPR with the construction curves coincident with sacrums. Results: All coronary images of bilateral sacroiliac joints by CPR were excellent in density and space resolution, and showed complete sacroiliac joints and their changes clearly and directly. Of all 33 cases, 2 were graded as grade 0, 5 grade I, 11 grade II, 10 grade III, 5 glade IV, according to grading standard. Conclusion: The coronary images of sacroiliac joint by CPR are enough clear and eligible for clinical diagnosis, and, in combination with transversal images, are helpful to complete assessment about the grade and scope of changes of sacroiliac joint in AS patients. (authors)

  17. [Imaging of pleural diseases: evaluation of imaging methods based on chest radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyraz, Necdet; Kalkan, Havva; Ödev, Kemal; Ceran, Sami

    2017-03-01

    The most commonly employed radiologic method in diagnosis of pleural diseases is conventional chest radiograph. The commonest chest- X-Ray findings are the presence of pleural effusion and thickening. Small pleural effusions are not readily identified on posteroanterior chest radiograph. However, lateral decubitus chest radiograph and chest ultrasonography may show small pleural effusions. These are more efficient methods than posteroanterior chest radiograph in the erect position for demonstrating small amounts of free pleural effusions. Chest ultrasonograph may be able to help in distinguishing the pleural pathologies from parenchymal lesions. On chest radiograph pleural effusions or pleural thickening may obscure the visibility of the underlying disease or parenchymal abnormality. Thus, computed tomography (CT) may provide additional information of determining the extent and severity of pleural disease and may help to differentiate malign pleural lesions from the benign ones. Moreover, CT may provide the differentiation of parenchmal abnormalities from pleural pathologies. CT (coronal and sagittal reformatted images) that also show invasion of chest wall, mediastinum and diaphragm, as well as enlarged hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Standart non-invasive imaging techniques may be supplemented with magnetic resonans imaging (MRI).

  18. Organization and visualization of medical images in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorang, T.

    2001-05-01

    In modern radiotherapy, various imaging equipment is used to acquire views from inside human bodies. Tomographic imaging equipment is acquiring stacks of cross-sectional images, software implementations derive three-dimensional volumes from planar images to allow for visualization of reconstructed cross-sections at any orientation and location and higher-level visualization systems allow for transparent views and surface rendering. Of upcoming interest in radiotherapy is mutual information, the integration of information from multiple imaging equipment res. from the same imaging equipment at different time stamps and varying acquisition parameters. Huge amounts of images are acquired nowadays at radiotherapy centers, requiring organization of images with respect to patient, acquisition and equipment to allow for visualization of images in a comparative and integrative manner. Especially for integration of image information from different equipment, geometrical information is required to allow for registration of images res. volumes. DICOM 3.0 has been introduced as a standard for information interchange with respect to medical imaging. Geometric information of cross-sections, demographic information of patients and medical information of acquisitions and equipment are covered by this standard, allowing for a high-level automation with respect to organization and visualization of medical images. Reconstructing cross-sectional images from volumes at any orientation and location is required for the purpose of registration and multi-planar views. Resampling and addressing of discrete volume data need be implemented efficiently to allow for simultaneous visualization of multiple cross-sectional images, especially with respect to multiple, non-isotropy volume data sets. (author)

  19. MR imaging of the toracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbagnati, F.; Castoldi, M.C.; Bianchini, E.

    1988-01-01

    Various pathological conditions of the thoracic aorta were studied by MR Imaging in 31 patients: 23 were aneurysms (branching and non-branching), 2 artero-venous fistulae, 2 aortic prostheses, 2 Marfan's syndromes, 1 coronary sinus aneurysm, and 1 isthmic stenosis. MRI studies were always performed on patients who had been examined by other imaging procedures. A comparative study was carried out on the results of MRI, angiography, computerized tomography, and ultrasounds. The possibility of propedeutic protocol was explored. Our experience, in accordance with the literature on the subject, indicates MRI as the procedure of choice in the study of aneurysms of the toracic aorta. The advantages offered by MRI-the high natural contrast between circulating blood and the supporting structures, the possibility of obtaining multiplanar images as well as data on intraluminal, parietal, and extraparietal conditions-make it a highly competitive procedure if compared to either CT or angiography. While awaiting further evidence, the use of a propedeutic protocol in non-aneurysmatic diseases is still not advisable, due to insufficient patient population, and to the lack of a consistent literature on the subject

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  1. Evaluation of the resolving power of different angles in MPR images of 16DAS-MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Mikio; Usui, Junshi; Nozawa, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the resolving power of three-dimensional (3D) multiplanar reformation (MPR) images with various angles by using 16 data acquisition system multi detector row computed tomography (16DAS-MDCT). We reconstructed the MPR images using data with a 0.75 mm slice thickness of the axial image in this examination. To evaluate resolving power, we used an original new phantom (RC phantom) that can be positioned at any slice angle in MPR images. We measured the modulation transfer function (MTF) by using the methods of measuring pre-sampling MTF, and used Fourier transform of image data of the square wave chart. The scan condition and image reconstruction condition that were adopted in this study correspond to the condition that we use for three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography(3D-CTA) examination of the head in our hospital. The MTF of MPR images showed minimum values at slice angles in parallel with the axial slice, and showed maximum values at the sagittal slice and coronal slice angles that are parallel to the Z-axis. With an oblique MPR image, MTF did not change with angle changes in the oblique sagittal slice plane, but in the oblique coronal slice plane, MTF increased as the tilt angle increased from the axial plane to the Z plane. As a result, we could evaluate the resolving power of a head 3D image by measuring the MTF of the axial image and sagittal image or the coronal image. (author)

  2. [Evaluation of the resolving power of different angles in MPR images of 16DAS-MDCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mikio; Usui, Junshi; Nozawa, Takeo

    2007-03-20

    In this study, we evaluated the resolving power of three-dimensional (3D) multiplanar reformation (MPR) images with various angles by using 16 data acquisition system multi detector row computed tomography (16DAS-MDCT) . We reconstructed the MPR images using data with a 0.75 mm slice thickness of the axial image in this examination. To evaluate resolving power, we used an original new phantom (RC phantom) that can be positioned at any slice angle in MPR images. We measured the modulation transfer function (MTF) by using the methods of measuring pre-sampling MTF, and used Fourier transform of image data of the square wave chart. The scan condition and image reconstruction condition that were adopted in this study correspond to the condition that we use for three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography (3D-CTA) examination of the head in our hospital. The MTF of MPR images showed minimum values at slice angles in parallel with the axial slice, and showed maximum values at the sagittal slice and coronal slice angles that are parallel to the Z-axis. With an oblique MPR image, MTF did not change with angle changes in the oblique sagittal slice plane, but in the oblique coronal slice plane, MTF increased as the tilt angle increased from the axial plane to the Z plane. As a result, we could evaluate the resolving power of a head 3D image by measuring the MTF of the axial image and sagittal image or the coronal image.

  3. Optimal pulse sequence for ferumoxides-enhanced MR imaging used in the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparative study using seven pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hoon; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Jang, Hyun Jung; Lim, Kyo Keun; Lee, Soon Jin; Cho, Jae Min; Kim, Seung Kwon; Kim, Gab Chul

    2002-01-01

    To identify the optimal pulse sequence for ferumoxides-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the detection of hepatocelluar carcinomas (HCCs). Sixteen patients with 25 HCCs underwent MR imaging following intravenous infusion of ferumoxides. All MR studies were performed on a 1.5-T MR system, using a phased-array coil. Ferumoxides (Feridex IV) at a dose of 15 μmol/Kg was slowly infused intravenously, and axial images of seven sequences were obtained 30 minutes after the end of infusion. The MR protocol included fast spin-echo (FSE) with two echo times (TR3333-8571/TE18 and 90-117), singleshot FSE (SSFSE) with two echo times (TR∞/TE39 and 98), T2-weighted gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) (TR216/TE20), T2-weighted fast multiplanar GRASS (FMPGR) (TR130/TE8.4-9.5), and T2-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled GRASS (FMPSPGR) (TR130/TE8.4-9.5). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of HCCs determined during the imaging sequences formed the basis of quantitative analysis, and images were qualitatively assessed in terms of lesion conspicuity and image artifacts. The diagnostic accuracy of all sequences was assessed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Quantitative analysis revealed that the CNRs of T2-weighted FMPGR and T2-weighted FMPSPGR were significantly higher than those of the other sequences, while qualitative analysis showed that image artifacts were prominent at T2-weighted GRASS imaging. Lesion conspicuity was statistically significantly less clear at SSFSE imaging. In term of lesion detection, T-weighted FMPGR, T2- weighted FMPSPGR, and proton density FSE imaging were statistically superior to the others. T2-weighted FMPGR, T2- weighted FMPSPGR, and proton density FSE appear to be the optimal pulse sequences for ferumoxidesenhanced MR imaging in the detection of HCCs

  4. Improving Accuracy for Image Fusion in Abdominal Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Ewertsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Image fusion involving real-time ultrasound (US is a technique where previously recorded computed tomography (CT or magnetic resonance images (MRI are reformatted in a projection to fit the real-time US images after an initial co-registration. The co-registration aligns the images by means of common planes or points. We evaluated the accuracy of the alignment when varying parameters as patient position, respiratory phase and distance from the co-registration points/planes. We performed a total of 80 co-registrations and obtained the highest accuracy when the respiratory phase for the co-registration procedure was the same as when the CT or MRI was obtained. Furthermore, choosing co-registration points/planes close to the area of interest also improved the accuracy. With all settings optimized a mean error of 3.2 mm was obtained. We conclude that image fusion involving real-time US is an accurate method for abdominal examinations and that the accuracy is influenced by various adjustable factors that should be kept in mind.

  5. Imaging and histological features of central subchondral osteophytes in racehorses with metacarpophalangeal joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, J; D'Anjou, M A; Girard, C; Laverty, S; Theoret, C L

    2009-12-01

    Marginal osteophytes represent a well known component of osteoarthritis in man and animals. Conversely, central subchondral osteophytes (COs), which are commonly present in human knees with osteoarthritis, have not been reported in horses. To describe and compare computed radiography (CR), single-slice computed tomography (CT), 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histological features of COs in equine metacarpophalangeal joints with macroscopic evidence of naturally-occurring osteoarthritis. MRI sequences (sagittal spoiled gradient recalled echo [SPGR] with fat saturation, sagittal T2-weighted fast spin echo with fat saturation [T2-FS], dorsal and transverse T1-weighted gradient-recalled echo [GRE], and sagittal T2*-weighted gradient echo with fast imaging employing steady state acquisition [FIESTA]), as well as transverse and reformatted sagittal CTI and 4 computed radiographic (CR) views of 20 paired metacarpophalangeal joints were acquired ex vivo. Following macroscopic evaluation, samples were harvested in predetermined sites of the metacarpal condyle for subsequent histology. The prevalence and detection level of COs was determined for each imaging modality. Abnormalities consistent with COs were clearly depicted on MRI, using the SPGR sequence, in 7/20 (35%) joints. They were identified as a focal hypointense protuberance from the subchondral plate into the cartilage, at the palmarodistal aspect (n=7) and/or at the very dorsal aspect (n=2) of the metacarpal condyle. COs were visible but less obvious in 5 of the 7 joints using FIESTA and reformatted sagittal CT, and were not identifiable on T2-FS, T1-GRE or CR. Microscopically, they consisted of dense bone protruding into the calcified cartilage and disrupting the tidemarks, and they were consistently associated with overlying cartilage defects. Subchondral osteophytes are a feature of osteoarthritis of equine metacarpophalangeal joints and they may be diagnosed using 1.5 Tesla MRI and CT. Central

  6. MR imaging features of the congenital uterine anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamcan, S.; Akgun, V.; Battal, B.; Kocaoglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Congenital uterine anomalies are common and usually asymptomatic. The agenesis, malfusion or deficient resorption of the Mullerian canals during embryogenesis may lead to these anomalies. Although ultrasonography (US) is the first step imaging technique in assessment of the uterine pathologies, it can be insufficient in differentiation of them. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is an adequate imaging technique in depicting pelvic anatomy and different types of uterine anomalies. Objectives and tasks: In this article, we aimed to present imaging features of the uterine anomalies. Material and methods: Pelvic MR scans of the cases who were referred to our radiology department for suspicious uterine anomaly were evaluated retrospectively. Results: We determined uniconuate uterus (type II), uterus didelphys (type III), bicornuate uterus (type IV), uterine septum (type V) and arcuate uterus (type VI) anomalies according to ASRM (American Society of Reproductive Medicine) classification. Conclusion: In cases with such pathologies leading to obstruction, dysmenorrhea or palpable pelvic mass in the puberty are the main clinical presentations. In cases without obstruction, infertility or multiple abortions can be encountered in reproductive ages. The identification of the subtype of the uterine anomalies is important for the preoperative planning of the management. MR that has multiplanar imaging capability and high soft tissue resolution is a non-invasive and the most important imaging modality for the detection and classification of the uterine anomalies

  7. Congenital frontonasal masses: developmental anatomy, malformations, and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedlund, Gary [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Medical Imaging, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2006-07-15

    The newborn, infant, or young child who presents with a midline frontonasal mass often poses a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. The most pressing issue is whether the mass extends intracranially. The development of the frontonasal region or anterior neuropore is complex. Aberrant embryogenesis leads to three main types of anomalies: nasal dermal sinus, anterior cephalocele, and nasal glioma. Understanding the developmental anatomy of the anterior neuropore and postnatal maturation will serve the radiologist well when it comes to imaging frontonasal masses. Pitfalls particularly common to CT imaging interpretation include the evolving ossification of the frontal, nasal and ethmoid bones in the first year of life, morphology and size of the foramen cecum, and the natural intumescence of the anterior nasal septum. Determination of the presence of a connection between the frontonasal mass and the anterior cranial fossae is crucial in the imaging assessment and clinical management. In the case of the nasal dermal sinus, failure to appreciate the intracranial components of the malformation can lead to fatal meningitis. MR imaging is the modality of choice for assessing the pediatric frontonasal region. Its advantages include multiplanar imaging, distinguishing the interface among cartilage, bone, brain and fluid, diffusion imaging to detect epidermoid tumors, and the capacity to evaluate the brain for associated cerebral anomalies. (orig.)

  8. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland); Martin, Ernst [Department of Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, University Children' s Hospital, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-08-01

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality. (orig.)

  9. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut; Martin, Ernst

    2002-01-01

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality. (orig.)

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain: technical considerations and normal brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Thierry A G M; Martin, Ernst; Kubik-Huch, Rahel; Marincek, Borut

    2002-08-01

    Fetal MRI examines non-invasively the unborn fetus. Ultrafast MRI sequences effectively suppress fetal motion. Multiple case reports and studies have shown that fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the central nervous system. The high contrast-to-noise ratio, the high spatial resolution, the multiplanar capabilities, the large field of view and the simultaneous visualisation of fetal and maternal structures have proven to be advantageous. Fetal MRI is particularly helpful in the evaluation of the normal and pathological development of the brain. Despite the fact that no side effects have been reported or are to be expected, the use of MRI during pregnancy is still limited to the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast media are not to be used as it passes the placenta. Ultrasound remains the primary screening modality for fetal pathology; fetal MRI can serve as an adjunct or second-line imaging modality.

  11. An imaging checklist for pre-FESS CT: framing a surgically relevant report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaid, S., E-mail: vaids@vsnl.co [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, Pune (India); Vaid, N. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, K.E.M. Hospital, Pune (India); Rawat, S. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Grant Medical Foundation, Pune (India); Ahuja, A.T. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Organ Imaging, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2011-05-15

    The reference standard for preoperative imaging in functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is multiplanar high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Surgeons require a precise preoperative anatomical road map, and hence it is essential for radiologists to be familiar with the normal three-dimensional sinonasal anatomy and the normal variants encountered in this region. Sagittal imaging has recently emerged as an important tool to visualize additional details in this critical anatomical region. Radiologists also need to report these examinations with special focus on the surgeon's expectations. Constant communication between the radiologist and the surgeon helps to resolve specific issues and improve the overall quality of reports. This results in better preoperative patient counselling and in predicting postoperative improvement in clinical status. This review provides a basic structured format for reporting pre-FESS CT, which can be tailored to meet individual requirements. The CT reporting format follows the order in which the sinonasal structures are approached during surgery.

  12. Imaging of Pericardiophrenic Bundles Using Multislice Spiral Computed Tomography for Phrenic Nerve Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Jing; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Meng-Chao; Sun, Huan; Zeng, Hong; Yang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    Phrenic nerve injury and diaphragmatic stimulation are common complications following arrhythmia ablation and pacing therapies. Preoperative comprehension of phrenic nerve anatomy via non-invasive CT imaging may help to minimize the electrophysiological procedure-related complications. Coronary CT angiography data of 121 consecutive patients were collected. Imaging of left and right pericardiophrenic bundles was performed with volume rendering and multi-planar reformation techniques. The shortest spatial distances between phrenic nerves and key electrophysiology-related structures were determined. The frequencies of the shortest distances ≤5 mm, >5 mm and direct contact between phrenic nerves and adjacent structures were calculated. Left and right pericardiophrenic bundles were identified in 86.8% and 51.2% of the patients, respectively. The right phrenic nerve was phrenic nerve, phrenic nerve was phrenic nerve had a distance phrenic nerve showed a distance phrenic nerve anatomy, which might facilitate avoidance of the phrenic nerve-related complications in interventional electrophysiology. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. MR imaging of peripheral nervous system involvement: Parsonage-Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Gabriella; Gasparotti, Roberto; Manara, Renzo

    2012-04-15

    A 55-year-old woman complained of right scapular pain, like burning, radiating down his right arm and numbness in the first three fingers of the hand. Neurologic examination showed a slight deficit of the right brachial triceps muscle. Neurophysiological assessment showed a mild involvement of the seventh right spinal root (C7). Conventional MR imaging of the cervical spine showed mild disc protrusion at level C5-C6 without spinal root compression. High resolution MR neurography with multiplanar reconstruction along the course of the right brachial plexus showed a mild increase in signal intensity and thickening of the C7 root, middle trunk and posterior cord, consistent with Parsonage-Turner Syndrome. STIR images showed increased signal intensity in the right infraspinatus muscle innervated by the suprascapular nerve. In our case, sensitivity and specificity of the new MR sequences are higher than the clinical and neurophysiological evaluations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The contribution of magnetic resonance imaging of the larynx compared with that of computed tomography in the pretreatment assessment of laryngeal cancers based on a series of ninety operated cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giron, J.; Joffre, P.; Serres-Cousine, O.; Castan, P.; Senac, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    The authors report a prospective and comparative study of the pre-operative staging of 90 laryngeal carcinomas by CT and MRI, with blind analysis of each examination. The radio-anatomic correlations and the inter-method correlations (CT versus MRI) are reported. According to the authors MRI seems to be the method of choice because of its capabilities in soft tissues differentiation and because of its multiplanar representation. The motion artefacts are resolved by the fast imaging technique and the spatial resolution is optimized by special surface coils [fr

  15. Image registration/fusion software for PET and CT/MRI by using simultaneous emission and transmission scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Keishi; Amano, Masaharu; Sato, Tomohiko; Okumura, Takeshi; Konishi, Norihiro; Komatsu, Masahiko

    2003-01-01

    When PET (positron emission tomography) is used for oncology studies, it is important to register and over-lay PET images with the images of other anatomical modalities, such as those obtained by CT (computed tomography) or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), in order for the lesions to be anatomically located with high accuracy. The Shimadzu SET-2000W Series PET scanners provide simultaneous acquisition of emission and transmission data, which is capable of complete spatial alignment of both functional and attenuation images. This report describes our newly developed image registration/fusion software, which reformats PET emission images to the CT/MRI grid by using the transform matrix obtained by matching PET transmission images with CT/MRI images. Transmission images are registered and fused either automatically or manually, through 3-dimensional rotation and translation, with the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal fused images being monitored on the screen. This new method permits sufficiently accurate registration and efficient data processing with promoting effective use of CT/MRI images of the DICOM format, without using markers in data acquisition or any special equipment, such as a combined PET/CT scanner. (author)

  16. 3 T MR 3D fast imaging employing steady state acquisition demonstrating branches of intraparotid facial nerve, parotid duct, and relation with parotid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yan; Li Chuanting; Zhang Dongsheng; Ai Bin; Zhang Weidong; Wu Lebin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the usefulness of 3 T MRI 3D-FIESTA in the evaluation of the intraparotid components of the facial nerve and parotid duct, and compare them with surgical findings. Methods: Twenty-two cases with parotid benign tumors were scanned with conventional and 3D-FIESTA sequences on 3 T MRI scanner. Postprocessed multiplanar images were obtained with the workstation. Parotid ducts and facial nerves and tumors were identified on these images. The relationship of the tumors to the facial nerves and Parotid ducts was confirmed at surgery. Results: Various types of parotid benign tumors had their characteristics on 3 T MR imaging. Parotid benign tumors mainly showed hypo-intensity on T 1 WI in 21 cases, and hyper-intensity on T 2 WI in 22 cases. But on 3D-FIESTA images, they appeared hypointensity (10 cases) or high intensity (12 cases) due to different types. Facial nerves in parotid appeared as linear structures with hypo-inteusity. The indication of the main trunks were 16 and 18 cases for T 1 WI and T 2 WI images, while on 3D-FIESTA images, the main trunks and cervicofacial and temporofacial divisions of the facial nerves were found in 22, 21,22 cases. Parotid ducts appeared as structures with hypo-intensity on T 1 WI and hyper-intensity on multiplanar images (14, 20, 22 cases). Compared with surgical results, the main trunks of the facial nerve were correctly showed by 3D-FIESTA images in 20 cases. However, in 2 cases they were not located in the operation because of shifting. Conclusion: 3 T MR 3D-FIESTA imaging could depict the extracranial facial nerve and the parotid duct in the parotid gland, which is useful for preoperative evaluation of parotid gland tumors. (authors)

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilieva, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an excellent non-invasive imaging tool that can complement the physical examination in the evaluation of traumatic and non-traumatic injuries of the shoulder. The superb soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capabilities of MRI make it a preferred modality to provide a global assessment of the soft tissue and osseous structures of the shoulder. Learning objectives: to review briefly the anatomy of the shoulder and the specificity of sequences and planes for MRI; to demonstrate the characteristic MR findings of some of the most common shoulder disorders; to indicate how MR arthrography (MRA) of the shoulder can add extra value to the diagnostic process; to outline a systematic approach to the interpretation of the shoulder MR examination. Choosing the most suitable sequences and planes as well as the thorough knowledge of the anatomic structures assist the correct diagnosis of the pathologic disorders of the shoulder which is of great importance for the precise treatment management, surgical versus conservative, as well as for the appropriate surgical approach, open versus arthroscopic

  18. The accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Duk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing in rat model. Sprague-Dawely strain rats weighing about 350 gms were selected. Then critical size bone defects were done at parietal bone with implantation of collagen sponge. The rats were divided into seven groups of 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and 8 weeks. The healing of surgical defect was assessed by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images and three-dimensional (3-D) images of cone beam computed tomography, compared with soft X-ray radiograph and histopathologic examination. MPR images and 3-D images showed similar reformation of the healing amount at 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks, however, lower reformation at 3 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks. According to imaging-based methodologies, MPR images revealed similar reformation of the healing mount than 3-D images compare with soft X-ray image. Among the four threshold values for 3-D images, 400-500 HU revealed similar reformation of the healing amount. Histopathologic examination confirmed the newly formed trabeculation correspond with imaging-based mythologies. MPR images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography is a clinically useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of bone defect healing

  19. Three-dimensional CT endoscopic images of the larynx. Clinical application of helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yumoto, Eiji; Sanuki, Tetsuji; Yasuhara, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with several laryngeal ailments underwent helical computed tomography (CT) on 37 occasions. Ten of these 27 patients suffered from unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). Three-dimensional (3D) images of the laryngeal lumen viewed from various angles were produced for all sets of CT volumetric data, except for three which contained excessive motion artifacts. The present paper examined whether 3D endoscopic images could offer useful diagnostic and therapeutic information about UVFP. The 3D endoscopic images viewed from the tracheal side and the hemilaryngeal images viewed from the opposite side could delineate the vocal folds, ventricular fold and ventricle three-dimensionally. Atrophy and hypotonic changes to the vocal fold and expansion of the ventricle on the affected side were clearly shown. The 3D endoscopic images accurately showed the phonosurgical effects on the laryngeal structures. The 3D endoscopic images could be produced even when the vocal folds could not be observed with conventional endoscopy due to their overadduction. Multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images in the coronal plane were reconstructed at a right angle to the glottic axis when the whole larynx was deviated. In addition, coronal MPR images showed a better resolution among the different layers of the vocal fold soft tissue than X-ray tomography. In conclusion, 3D endoscopic images combined with coronal MPR images can provide useful diagnostic an therapeutic information about UVFP, although motion artifacts may occur. (author)

  20. Contrast-enhanced CISS imaging of cerebellopontine angle tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tozaki, Mitsuhiro; Toyoda, Keiko; Hata, Yuichi; Fukuda, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Katano, Shuichi

    1999-10-01

    Our purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of contrast-enhanced CISS-3DFT MR imaging for the diagnosis of CP angle tumors. CISS-3DFT MR imaging is expected for screening procedure of acoustic schwannoma because of excellent spatial resolution. Recently, we discovered contrast enhancement effect on CISS sequence in spite of heavily T{sub 2}-weighted images. Fourteen patients with CP angle tumors were performed on a 1.0 T MR unit. Transaxial CISS-3DFT MRI was obtained both before and after intravenous injections of Gd-DTPA. Multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) were performed in all cases. Contrast enhancement effect of CP angle tumors, and the relationship between tumors and the adjacent cranial nerves were evaluated. Contrast enhancement effect of the tumors was present in all cases in spite of heavily T{sub 2}-weighted images of CISS sequences. In the internal auditory canal, relationship between the tumors and the cranial nerves was demonstrated in 6 cases (6/9). In the cerebellopontine cistern, all cases were demonstrated (11/11). Contrast-enhanced CISS-3DFT MR imaging with a good contrast resolution and an excellent spatial resolution is useful for the diagnosis of CP angle tumors. (author)

  1. Traumatic cervical root injury: Diagnostic value of MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seon Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Ho Chul; Kim, Jea Seung; Cha, Sang Hoon

    1993-01-01

    Although superior soft tissue contrast and direct multiplanar imaging capability of MRI are well recognized, myelography has been the imaging modality of choice in evaluation cervical root injury. We assessed the role of MRI and compared its diagnostic accuracy with myelography in the evaluation of cervical root injury. MR imagings of cervical root injury in ten patients (55 roots) were retrospectively reviewed. In 26 explored roots (6 patients). MR findings were compared with myelography and surgical results. In 29 roots (8 patients), which were confirmed by myelography or exploration, the MR findings were focal extradural CSF collections (pseudomeningocele) in 21/29 (72.4%, 8 patients), thickening of extradural roots in 4/29 (13.6%, 5 patients), and thickening of dura in 12/29 (41.4%, 6 patients) roots. T2-weighted axial image was superior to T1-weighted and protein-density- weighted images for delineation root avulsion. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 72.7% and 93.3% respectively, while those of myelography were 83% and 90%. Overall diagnostic accuracy of MRI and myelography were comparable (84.6% vs 87.5%). In conclusion, myelography is still considered as the modality of choice in the preoperative evaluation of the cervical root avulsion because of its higher sensitivity. MRI, however, may obviate the myelography with some technical refinements

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the renal sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Satheesh; Schieda, Nicola; Flood, Trevor A; Shanbhogue, Alampady Krishna; Ramanathan, Subramaniyan; Siegelman, Evan

    2018-04-09

    This article presents methods to improve MR imaging approach of disorders of the renal sinus which are relatively uncommon and can be technically challenging. Multi-planar Single-shot T2-weighted (T2W) Fast Spin-Echo sequences are recommended to optimally assess anatomic relations of disease. Multi-planar 3D-T1W Gradient Recalled Echo imaging before and after Gadolinium administration depicts the presence and type of enhancement and relation to arterial, venous, and collecting system structures. To improve urographic phase MRI, concentrated Gadolinium in the collecting systems should be diluted. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) should be performed before Gadolinium administration to minimize T2* effects. Renal sinus cysts are common but can occasionally be confused for dilated collecting system or calyceal diverticula, with the latter communicating with the collecting system and filling on urographic phase imaging. Vascular lesions (e.g., aneurysm, fistulas) may mimic cystic (or solid) lesions on non-enhanced MRI but can be suspected by noting similar signal intensity to the blood pool and diagnosis can be confirmed with MR angiogram/venogram. Multilocular cystic nephroma commonly extends to the renal sinus, however, to date are indistinguishable from cystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Solid hilar tumors are most commonly RCC and urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC). Hilar RCC are heterogeneous, hypervascular with epicenter in the renal cortex compared to UCC which are centered in the collecting system, homogeneously hypovascular, and show profound restricted diffusion. Diagnosis of renal sinus invasion in RCC is critically important as it is the most common imaging cause of pre-operative under-staging of disease. Fat is a normal component of the renal sinus; however, amount of sinus fat correlates with cardiovascular disease and is also seen in lipomatosis. Fat-containing hilar lesions include lipomas, angiomyolipomas, and less commonly other tumors which engulf sinus

  3. Multidetector-row CT of right hemidiaphragmatic rupture caused by blunt trauma: a review of 12 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, O.; Mirvis, S.E.; Shanmuganathan, K.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine the usefulness of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) with multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images in the sagittal and coronal plane in diagnosing acute right hemidiaphragmatic rupture. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients were identified who received chest and abdominal MDCT after major blunt trauma diagnosed with right diaphragmatic injury. Sagittal and coronal reformations were performed in all cases. The images were retrospectively reviewed by two experienced radiologists for signs of right diaphragm injury, such as direct diaphragm discontinuity, the 'collar sign', the 'dependent viscera sign', and intra-thoracic location of herniated abdominal contents. RESULTS: Of the 12 cases of right hemidiaphragm rupture, diaphragm discontinuity was seen in seven (58%) cases, the collar sign in five (42%), the dependent viscera sign in four (33%), and transdiaphragmatic herniation of the right colon and fat in another. Two variants of the collar sign were apparent on high-quality sagittal and coronal reformations. The first, termed the 'hump sign', describes a rounded portion of liver herniating through the diaphragm forming a hump-shaped mass, and the second, termed the 'band sign,' is a linear lucency across the liver along the torn edges of the hemidiaphragm. The hump sign occurred in 10 (83%) patients and the band sign in four (33%). CONCLUSION: MDCT is very useful in the diagnosis of right hemidiaphragm injury caused by blunt trauma when sagittal and coronal reformatted images are obtained, and should allow more frequent preoperative diagnosis

  4. Osseous temporomandibular joint abnormalities in rheumatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.; Kolbenstvedt, A.; Rikshospitalet, Oslo

    1990-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was compared with hypocycloidal tomography in 30 joints of 15 adults with rheumatic disease. CT included 1.5 mm thick axial scans (at 1.0 mm intervals) with reformatted oblique sagittal and oblique coronal sections. Multisection (at 2.0 mm intervals) tomography included oblique sagittal and occasionally, oblique coronal sections. CT demonstrated bone abnormalities in 21 and tomography in 20 joints, indicating high agreement between the imaging modalities regarding number of abnormal TMJs. Bone structures were, however, better visualized by multiplanar CT due to superior contrast and spatial resolution particularly in the most lateral and medial parts of the joint, indicating superiority of CT for depicting subtle bony TMJ abnormalities in patients with rheumatic disease. (orig.)

  5. Detection of hepatic VX2 carcinomas with ferucarbotran-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in rabbits: Comparison of nine pulse sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong Hyun; Choi, Dongil; Lim, Hyo K.; Kim, Min Ju; Jang, Kyung Mi; Kim, Seung Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Lee, Jongmee; Jeon, Yong Hwan; Lim, Jae Hoon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic performance of a variety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences, in order to identify the most effective ferucarbotran-enhanced sequence for the detection of multiple small hepatic VX2 carcinomas in rabbits. Methods: Fifteen rabbits with experimentally induced 135 VX2 carcinomas in the liver underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced MRI using the following nine pulse sequences: a fat-suppressed fast spin-echo (FSE) sequence with two echo times (TE) (proton density- and T2-weighted images), four different T2*-weighted fast multiplanar GRASS (gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state) (FMPGR) with the combination of three TEs (9, 12, 15 ms, respectively) and two flip angles (20 deg., 80 deg., respectively), T2*-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled GRASS (FMPSPGR), T1-weighted FMPSPGR, and dynamic T1-weighted FMPSPGR. All images were reviewed by three radiologists with quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results: Tumor-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio of the proton density-weighted FSE sequence was significantly higher than those of the others (p o ) images were superior to those of the others and for the detection of very small hepatic tumors of less than 5 mm, the sensitivities of these sequences were less than 30%. Conclusion: Ferucarbotran-enhanced T2- and proton density-weighted FSE and T2*-weighed FMPGR (TE/flip angle, 12/20 o ) images were found to be the most effective pulse sequences for the detection of multiple small hepatic VX2 carcinomas but these sequences were limited in the detection of very small hepatic tumors of less than 5 mm in size

  6. Curved planar reformation images for identification of the central sulcus of affected hemispheres. Comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Hideaki; Inoue, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the curved planar reformation (CPR) for identification of the central sulcus on affected hemispheres. Thirty four patients with an intracranial lesion adjacent to the central sulcus underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI was performed with a 3.0 Tesla scanner during repetitive opening and closing of each hand. The central sulcus was defined as the nearest sulcus to the highest activation spots. Three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging date sets were processed using the CPR method to create brain surface reformatted images. We evaluated five anatomical features widely used for clinical identification of the central sulcus: 1, termination of the superior frontal sulcus in the precentral sulcus; 2, the intraparietal sulcus joining the postcentral sulcus; 3, the precentral gyros thicker than the postcentral gyrus; 4, inverted omega-shape of the precentral gyrus; and 5, the central sulcus as an isolated sulcus. fMRI and CPR coincided in defining the central sulcus in 34 hemispheres of patients. Applicability of each of the five signs was 61.8, 73.5, 58.8, 50.0 and 67.6%, respectively. The present study indicates that the CPR method successfully defined the central sulcus in most patients with brain tumors. For identification of the central sulcus, the CPR method will be recommended. (author)

  7. Epidemiology, imaging, and treatment of Lisfranc fracture-dislocations revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, Vivek; Fishman, Elliot K.; Carrino, John A.; Fayad, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the features of Lisfranc injuries and identify their typical imaging findings on radiographs, CT, and MR imaging. Lisfranc injuries are most often caused by hyperplantarflexion of the foot, often during a sporting injury or in high-speed motor vehicle collisions. The most common radiographic findings include diastasis of the base of the first and second metatarsals and the ''fleck'' sign, though neither is necessarily present in every Lisfranc fracture-dislocation. Owing to their often subtle radiographic presentation, clinically suspected Lisfranc injuries warrant imaging with a more sensitive test for the detection of osseous and ligamentous Lisfranc injuries. 3D CT imaging provides a comprehensive evaluation of the injury for optimal treatment planning, with resultant decreased long-term patient morbidity. Furthermore, 3D volume-rendered CT and CT multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) provide osseous and neurovascular anatomic detail that may be a considerable help with surgical planning for operative cases of Lisfranc injuries. Also, with 3D CT and MPRs, other occult fractures, which are common in patients with high-energy injury and multiple trauma, may become evident. (orig.)

  8. Multislice spiral computed tomography imaging in congenital inner ear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hui; Han, Ping; Liang, Bo; Tian, Zhi-liang; Lei, Zi-qiao; Kong, Wei-jia; Feng, Gan-sheng

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of multislice spiral computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of congenital inner ear malformations. Forty-four patients with sensorineural hearing loss were examined on a Somatom Sensation 16 (Siemens) CT scanner. The 3-dimensional reconstructions and multiplanar reformation (MPR) were performed using the volume-rendering technique (VRT) on the workstation. Of the 44 patients examined for this study, 25 patients were found to be normal and 19 patients (36 ears) were diagnosed with congenital inner ear malformations. Of the malformations, the axial, MPR, and VRT images can all display the site and degree in 33 of the ears. Volume-rendering technique images were superior to the axial images in displaying the malformations in 3 ears with small lateral semicircular canal malformations. The common malformations were Michel deformity (1 ear), common cavity deformity (3 ears), incomplete partition I (3 ears), incomplete partition II (Mondini deformity) (5 ears), vestibular and semicircular canal malformations (14 ears), enlarged vestibular aqueduct (16 ears, 6 of which had other malformations), and internal auditory canal malformation (8 ears, all accompanied by other malformations). Multislice spiral CT allows a comprehensively assessment of various congenital inner ear malformations through high-quality MPR and VRT reconstructions. Volume-rendering technique images can display the site and degree of the malformation 3-dimensionally and intuitionisticly. This is very useful to the cochlear implantation.

  9. Evaluation of the upper airway measurements by multi-slice CT before and after operations in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Ping; Dang Yuqing; Chang Bei; Wang Xiao; Jin Zhengyu; Li Wuyi; Huo Hong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the changes of the upper airway of the patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) before and after operations and to know the effects of operations by MSCT. Methods: The upper airway dimensions of 26 patients with OSAS were measured on multiplanar reformatted (MPR), curved-planar reformatted (CPR), volume rendering (VR) images of 16-slice spiral CT. The measurements include the anteroposterior calibres and the areas on the reformatted axial images on the pharyngeal cavity levels, the calibres and the minimum areas in retropalatal and retroglossal regions, the areas of the soft palate and uvula on the reformatted sagittal view with maximum thickness, the maximum wall thickness of the right and left the upper airway on the coronary images, the volume of the upper airway before and after the operations. The measurements were correlated with the polysomnography (PSG) records. The data were analyzed paired-samples t-test and Pearson correlations. Results: By comparison, the anteroposterior calibres and the cross-sectional areas on the reformatted axial view of the lower retropalatal region (slice 4) of the upper airway increased significantly after operations. The anteroposterior diameter increased from 5.9 mm before operations to 12.8 mm after operations, where t=-5.506, P 2 before operations to 275.0 mm 2 after operations, where t=-5.011, P 2 before operations to 128.0 mm 2 after operations, where t=3.087, P 2 before operation to 10.9 mm, 76.0 mm 2 after operation, where t=-3.413, -2.216, respectively and P 2 before operations to 76.0 mm 2 after operations, were t=-4.932, P<0.05. The anteroposterior calibres increased from 4.6 mm before operations to 6.6 mm after operations, where t=-7.308, P<0.05. The L-R calibres increased from 8.3 mm before operations to 13.6 mm after operations, where t=-4.320, P<0.05. Conclusions: MPR, CPR, VR of MSCT can evaluate the not only the morphology but the function changes of the upper airways on the

  10. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Radiology Department, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-09-15

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  11. Imaging the cranial nerves: part II: primary and secondary neoplastic conditions and neurovascular conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2007-01-01

    There have been unprecedented improvements in cross-sectional imaging in the last decades. The emergence of volumetric CT, higher field MR scanners and higher resolution MR sequences is largely responsible for the increasing diagnostic yield of imaging in patients presenting with cranial nerve deficits. The introduction of parallel MR imaging in combination with small surface coils allows the depiction of submillimetric nerves and nerve branches, and volumetric CT and MR imaging is able to provide high quality multiplanar and curved reconstructions that can follow the often complex course of cranial nerves. Seeking the cause of a cranial nerve deficit is a common indication for imaging, and it is not uncommon that radiologists are the first specialists to see a patient with a cranial neuropathy. To increase the diagnostic yield of imaging, high-resolution studies with smaller fields of view are required. To keep imaging studies within a reasonable time frame, it is mandatory to tailor the study according to neuro-topographic testing. This review article focuses on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of primary and secondary neoplastic conditions affecting the cranial nerves as well as on neurovascular conflicts, an increasingly recognized cause of cranial neuralgias. (orig.)

  12. Inclusion of brain in FDG PET/CT scanning techniques in cancer patients: Does it obviate the need for dedicated brain imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purandare, Nilendu C.

    2011-01-01

    Metastases to the brain can affect about 10-20% cancer patients. Rising incidence of brain metastases in recent years is related to improved survival rates as a result of advances in cancer therapy and development of more sensitive diagnostic imaging techniques. In patients with extracranial malignancies detection of brain metastases is very important in deciding further diagnostic procedures, planning therapeutic strategies and also to ascertain prognosis. Computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the modalities which have been traditionally used to assess metastatic disease to the central nervous system. It is generally accepted that MRI (contrast enhanced) is superior to CT scan (contrast enhanced) in the diagnosis of brain metastases. An inherently better soft tissue contrast resolution, stronger contrast enhancement, lack of bone artifacts and partial volume effects and direct multiplanar imaging enables MRI to pick up smaller sized as well as more number of metastases than a CT scan

  13. Semi quantification study of [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 PET brain images in multiple sclerosis; Estudo da semiquantificacao de imagens PET cerebrais de [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 na esclerose multipla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narciso, Lucas D.L.; Schuck, Phelipi N.; Dartora, Caroline M.; Matushita, Cristina S.; Becker, Jefferson; Silva, Ana M. Marques da, E-mail: lucas.narciso@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    PET brain images with [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 are being widely used to visualize microglial activation in vivo in neuro degenerative diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study is to investigate the uptake behavior in justacortical and periventricular regions of [{sup 11}C]-(R)-PK11195 PET brain images reformatted in different time intervals by applying three methods, seeking method and time interval that significantly differentiate MS patients from healthy controls. Semi-quantitative SUV and uptake relative to a reference region methods were applied to PET images from different time intervals acquired from 10 patients with MS and 5 healthy controls. The results show significant SUV values difference (p = 0.01, 40 to 60 min) in justacortical and periventricular regions between groups and using the normalization method in which the uptake is relative to the mean concentration activity in the white matter (p <0.01, 10 to 60 min). (author)

  14. MR imaging assessment of cerebral vascular disease: A combination of angiographic and parenchymal techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Ruggieri, P.; Laub, G.; Haacke, E.M.

    1988-01-01

    This study tested the accuracy and clinical utility of a three-dimensional MR angiographic technique of the cervical carotids in combination with a routine spin-echo examination of the brain as a screening examination for cerebrovascular disease in 23 patients. The technique used a fast low-angle shot sequence with a reduced echo time and voxel size, gradient refocusing, and time of flight effects to minimize signal loss secondary to phase dispersion and maximize vessel contrast. Subsequent multiplanar three-dimensional reconstructions were obtained at 5 0 increments about the z-axis via ray-tracing linear thresholding algorithms. Examinations were compared with IV/IA-digital subtraction angiography or Doppler US as the objective of accuracy. Results of this ongoing study indicate that an MR angiographic screening examination can be coupled with routine brain MR imaging with only a 10-14 minute extension of examination time, providing both a vascular and a parenchymal evaluation

  15. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance for the advanced imaging of the normal nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercier, Marjorie; Alexander, Kate; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) for the cross-sectional imaging of the normal anatomy of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus), to provide reference figures for gross anatomy with corresponding CT and MR images and to compare the features of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses of the normal koala with that reported in other domestic species. Advanced imaging can be used to aid in diagnosis, to plan surgical intervention, and to monitor therapeutic responses to diseases of the nasal passages in koalas. One clinically normal koala was anesthetized twice for the separate acquisition of dorsal CT scan images and transverse, dorsal, and sagittal MR images of its nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Sagittal and transverse CT planes were reformatted. Three fresh koala skulls were also transected in one of each transverse, sagittal, and dorsal planes and photographed. The CT and MR images obtained were matched with corresponding gross anatomic images and the normal bone, tissues and airway passages were identified. All anatomic structures were readily identifiable on CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and gross images. CT and MRI are both valuable diagnostic tools for imaging the nasal cavities and paranasal sinuses of koalas. Images obtained from this project can be used as baseline references for future comparison with diseased koalas to help with diagnosis, surgical intervention, and response to therapy.

  16. Usefulness of biological fingerprint in magnetic resonance imaging for patient verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yasuyuki; Morishita, Junji; Kudomi, Shohei; Ueda, Katsuhiko

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of our study is to investigate the feasibility of automated patient verification using multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) images generated from three-dimensional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain. Several anatomy-related MPR images generated from three-dimensional fast scout scan of each MR examination were used as biological fingerprint images in this study. The database of this study consisted of 730 temporal pairs of MR examination of the brain. We calculated the correlation value between current and prior biological fingerprint images of the same patient and also all combinations of two images for different patients to evaluate the effectiveness of our method for patient verification. The best performance of our system were as follows: a half-total error rate of 1.59 % with a false acceptance rate of 0.023 % and a false rejection rate of 3.15 %, an equal error rate of 1.37 %, and a rank-one identification rate of 98.6 %. Our method makes it possible to verify the identity of the patient using only some existing medical images without the addition of incidental equipment. Also, our method will contribute to patient misidentification error management caused by human errors.

  17. Applicability of the 3D-VIBE sequence to whole brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makabe, Takeshi; Nakamura, Manami; Moriyama, Ryo

    2009-01-01

    The volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) method has been developed imaging also holds its breath in an abdomen, and to do three-dimensional T1WI in possible time in gradient echo sequence, and applied to dynamic study mainly and planning for time reduction using an interpolation and partial fourier. We considered the condition for imaging to do whole brain as high resolution image using VIBE. Even if base matrix was maintained when an interpolation and partial fourier were used too much excessively by Phantom experiment, the resolution of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) image fell. There was a limit of the interpolation therefore to maintain the resolution as voxel. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fell by flip angle (FA) increase by the applicability to the head, and peak existed in about 15 deg in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of white matter and gray matter. Therefore by it's clinical and optimizing the imaging condition of VIBE, whole brain, it was imaging possible in about 3 minutes as high resolution image. (author)

  18. Three-dimentional imaging of dentomaxillofacial region using electron beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takemasa; Kanda, Shigenobu; Muranaka, Toru

    1998-01-01

    Authors reported their results of the 3-D imaging of dentomaxillofacial region mainly for jaw deformity with electron beam tomography (EBT). The EBT apparatus used was Imatron C-100 (Imatron Corp.), with which, using bremsstrahlung radiation generated from the electron beam, CT is possible with rapid scanning rate at <0.1 sec. Imaging was done with those conditions as tube voltage: 130 kV, current: 610 mA, scanning rate: 0.1 sec/slice whose thickness was 1.5 mm, feeding rate: 1.5 mm and number of slices: 40-170. Patients were 15 cases with jaw deformity. Data were processed for 3-D image by Scribe Imaging Workstation (Multi-dimensional Imaging Inc.) which giving surface rendering and further by Power Macintosh 8500 (Apple Computer Inc.) with VoxBlast 1.1.0 (VayTec Inc.) software which giving volume rendering or with Image 1.60 (NIH) which allowing multi-planar reconstruction and re-analog projection. These actual images were presented in the report. (K.H.)

  19. Diagnosis of dorsal inter osseous pseudotumours by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peh, W.C.G.; Wong, L.L.S.; Ip, W.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Two middle-aged-patients each presenting with a progressively enlarging mass in the first dorsal web space of their hands are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the cause to be a hypertrophic first dorsal inter osseous muscle, with normal T1, T2 and post-gadopentetate dimeglumine signal characteristics. The ability of MRI to diagnose anatomical variants of hand muscles is important in the clinical management of patients with these pseudotumours. The usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of soft tissue tumours of the musculoskeletal system is now widely accepted. Its ability to maximize contrast between tumour and adjacent normal tissue in a multiplanar manner makes it the imaging modality of choice in pre-operative staging of soft tissue masses. In the hand and wrist, where benign tumours predominate, MRI may provide a specific diagnosis. We describe two cases in which MRI demonstrated the cause of a hand pseudotumour to be due to hypertrophy of the first dorsal inter osseous muscle. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Diagnosis of dorsal inter osseous pseudotumours by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, W.C.G.; Wong, L.L.S. [The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, (Hong Kong). Hand Surgery Division, Department of Diagnotic Radiology; Ip, W.Y. [The University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital, (Hong Kong). Hand Surgery Division, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery

    1999-08-01

    Two middle-aged-patients each presenting with a progressively enlarging mass in the first dorsal web space of their hands are reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated the cause to be a hypertrophic first dorsal inter osseous muscle, with normal T1, T2 and post-gadopentetate dimeglumine signal characteristics. The ability of MRI to diagnose anatomical variants of hand muscles is important in the clinical management of patients with these pseudotumours. The usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in evaluation of soft tissue tumours of the musculoskeletal system is now widely accepted. Its ability to maximize contrast between tumour and adjacent normal tissue in a multiplanar manner makes it the imaging modality of choice in pre-operative staging of soft tissue masses. In the hand and wrist, where benign tumours predominate, MRI may provide a specific diagnosis. We describe two cases in which MRI demonstrated the cause of a hand pseudotumour to be due to hypertrophy of the first dorsal inter osseous muscle. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 20 refs., 3 figs.

  1. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae [Sungkwunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults.

  2. MR imaging of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Yeon Hyeon; Kang, I Seok; Park, Seung Woo; Lee, Heung Jae

    2001-01-01

    Echocardiography and catheterization angiography suffer certain limitations in the evaluation of congenital heart diseases in adults, though these are overcome by MRI, in which a wide field-of view, unlimited multiplanar imaging capability and three-dimensional contrast-enhanced MR angiography techniques are used. In adults, recently introduced fast imaging techniques provide cardiac MR images of sufficient quality and with less artifacts. Ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and vascular flow measurements, including pressure gradients and pulmonary-to-systemic flow ratio, can be calculated or obtained using fast cine MRI, phase-contrast MR flow-velocity mapping, and semiautomatic analysis software. MRI is superior to echocardiography in diagnosing partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection, unroofed coronary sinus, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, aorta and systemic veins, complex heart diseases, and postsurgical sequelae. Biventricular function is reliably evaluated with cine MRI after repair of tetralogy of Fallot, and Senning's and Mustard's operations. MRI has an important and growing role in the morphologic and functional assessment of congenital heart diseases in adolescents and adults

  3. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  4. New frontiers in CT imaging of airway disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, Philippe A.; Beigelman-Aubry, Catherine; Fetita, Catalin; Preteux, Francoise; Brauner, Michel W.; Lenoir, Stephane

    2002-01-01

    Combining helical volumetric CT acquisition and thin-slice thickness during breath hold provides an accurate assessment of both focal and diffuse airway diseases. With multiple detector rows, compared with single-slice helical CT, multislice CT can cover a greater volume, during a simple breath hold, and with better longitudinal and in-plane spatial resolution and improved temporal resolution. The result in data set allows the generation of superior multiplanar and 3D images of the airways, including those obtained from techniques developed specifically for airway imaging, such as virtual bronchography and virtual bronchoscopy. Complementary CT evaluation at suspended or continuous full expiration is mandatory to detect air trapping that is a key finding for depicting an obstruction on the small airways. Indications for CT evaluation of the airways include: (a) detection of endobronchial lesions in patients with an unexplained hemoptysis; (b) evaluation of extent of tracheobronchial stenosis for planning treatment and follow-up; (c) detection of congenital airway anomalies revealed by hemoptysis or recurrent infection; (d) detection of postinfectious or postoperative airway fistula or dehiscence; and (e) diagnosis and assessment of extent of bronchiectasis and small airway disease. Improvement in image analysis technique and the use of spirometrically control of lung volume acquisition have made possible accurate and reproducible quantitative assessment of airway wall and lumen areas and lung density. This contributes to better insights in physiopathology of obstructive lung disease, particularly in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. (orig.)

  5. Three-dimensional isotropic fat-suppressed proton density-weighted MRI at 3 tesla using a T/R-coil can replace multiple plane two-dimensional sequences in knee imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homsi, R.; Luetkens, J.A. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Gieseke, J. [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); and others

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate whether a 3D proton density-weighted fat-suppressed sequence (PDwFS) of the knee is able to replace multiplanar 2D-PDwFS. 52 patients (26 men, mean age: 41.9±14.5 years) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the knee at 3.0 Tesla using a T/R-coil. The imaging protocol included 3 planes of 2D-PDwFS (acquisition time (AT): 6:40 min; voxel sizes: 0.40-0.63 x 0.44-0.89 x 3 mm{sup 3}) and a 3D-PDwFS (AT: 6:31 min; voxel size: 0.63 x 0.68 x 0.63 mm{sup 3}). Homogeneity of fat suppression (HFS), artifacts, and image sharpness (IS) were evaluated on a 5-point scale (5[excellent] - 1[non-diagnostic]). The sum served as a measure for the overall image quality (OIQ). Contrast ratios (CR) compared to popliteal muscle were calculated for the meniscus (MEN), anterior (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligaments (PCL). In 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic knee surgery, two radiologists evaluated the presence of meniscal, ligamental and cartilage lesions to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection. The CR was higher in the ACL, PCL and MEN in 3D- PDwFS compared to 2D-PDwFS (p<0.01 for ACL and PCL; p=0.07 for MEN). Compared to 2D images, the OIQ was rated higher in 3D-PDwFS images (p<0.01) due to fewer artifacts and HFS despite the lower IS (p<0.01). The sensitivity and specificity of lesion detection in 3D- and 2D-PDwFS were similar. Compared to standard multiplanar 2D-PDwFS knee imaging, isotropic high spatial resolution 3D-PDwFS of the knee at 3.0T can be acquired with high image quality in a reasonable scan time. Multiplanar reformations in arbitrary planes may serve as an additional benefit of 3D-PDwFS.

  6. Evaluation of image quality and dose in renal colic: comparison of different spiral-CT protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondini, A.; Mucelli, R.P.; Dalla Palma, L.; De Denaro, M.; Bregant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test different technical spiral-CT parameters to obtain optimal image quality with reduced X-ray dose. Images were acquired with a spiral-CT system Philips Tomoscan AVE1, using 250 mA, 120 kV, and 1-s rotational time. Three protocols were tested: protocol A with 5-mm thickness, pitch 1.6, slice reconstruction every 2.5 mm; protocol B with 3-mm thickness, pitch 1.6, slice reconstruction every 1.5 mm; and protocol C with 3-mm thickness, pitch 2, slice reconstruction every 1.5 mm. Two phantoms were employed to evaluate the image quality. Axial images were acquired, then sagittal and coronal images were reconstructed. Finally, the absorbed X-ray dose for each protocol was measured. Regarding image quality, 5-mm-thick images (protocol A) showed greater spatial resolution and lower noise compared with 3-mm-thick images (protocols B and C) on the axial plane; 3-mm reconstructed sagittal and coronal images (protocols B and C) showed an improved image quality compared with 5-mm reformatted images (protocol A). Concerning X-ray dose, the mean dose was: protocol A 19.6±0.8 mGy; protocol B 14.4±0.6 mGy; protocol C 12.5±1.0 mGy. Our study supports the use of thin slices (3 mm) combined with pitch of 1.6 or 2 in renal colic for X-ray dose reduction to the patient and good image quality. (orig.)

  7. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil- Centro de Lisboa, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Casselman, Jan [A.Z. St. Jan Brugge Hospital, Department of Radiology, Brugge (Belgium); A.Z. St. Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2007-08-15

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  8. Imaging the cranial nerves: Part I: Methodology, infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Many disease processes manifest either primarily or secondarily by cranial nerve deficits. Neurologists, ENT surgeons, ophthalmologists and maxillo-facial surgeons are often confronted with patients with symptoms and signs of cranial nerve dysfunction. Seeking the cause of this dysfunction is a common indication for imaging. In recent decades we have witnessed an unprecedented improvement in imaging techniques, allowing direct visualization of increasingly small anatomic structures. The emergence of volumetric CT scanners, higher field MR scanners in clinical practice and higher resolution MR sequences has made a tremendous contribution to the development of cranial nerve imaging. The use of surface coils and parallel imaging allows sub-millimetric visualization of nerve branches and volumetric 3D imaging. Both with CT and MR, multiplanar and curved reconstructions can follow the entire course of a cranial nerve or branch, improving tremendously our diagnostic yield of neural pathology. This review article will focus on the contribution of current imaging techniques in the depiction of normal anatomy and on infectious and inflammatory, traumatic and congenital pathology affecting the cranial nerves. A detailed discussion of individual cranial nerves lesions is beyond the scope of this article. (orig.)

  9. Navigation concepts for magnetic resonance imaging-guided musculoskeletal interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Image-guided musculoskeletal (MSK) interventions are a widely used alternative to open surgical procedures for various pathological findings in different body regions. They traditionally involve one of the established x-ray imaging techniques (radiography, fluoroscopy, computed tomography) or ultrasound scanning. Over the last decades, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has evolved into one of the most powerful diagnostic tools for nearly the whole body and has therefore been increasingly considered for interventional guidance as well.The strength of MRI for MSK applications is a combination of well-known general advantages, such as multiplanar and functional imaging capabilities, wide choice of tissue contrasts, and absence of ionizing radiation, as well as a number of MSK-specific factors, for example, the excellent depiction of soft-tissue tumors, nonosteolytic bone changes, and bone marrow lesions. On the downside, the magnetic resonance-compatible equipment needed, restricted space in the magnet, longer imaging times, and the more complex workflow have so far limited the number of MSK procedures under MRI guidance.Navigation solutions are generally a natural extension of any interventional imaging system, in particular, because powerful hardware and software for image processing have become routinely available. They help to identify proper access paths, provide accurate feedback on the instrument positions, facilitate the workflow in an MRI environment, and ultimately contribute to procedural safety and success.The purposes of this work were to describe some basic concepts and devices for MRI guidance of MSK procedures and to discuss technical and clinical achievements and challenges for some selected implementations.

  10. Interventional magnetic resonance imaging - non-invasive imaging for interventions; Interventionelle Magnetresonanztomographie - nichtinvasive Bildgebung fuer Interventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buecker, A.; Adam, G.; Neuerburg, J.M.; Glowinski, A.; Tacke, J.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Medizinische Fakultaet

    2000-02-01

    As a prerequisite for MR-guidance of interventional procedures, instruments have to be well depicted in the MR image without obscuring or distorting the underlying anatomy. For non-vascular interventions the imaging speed has to be in the range of seconds while control of vascular interventions requires real time imaging speed. The imaging contrast has to be maintained as well as a high spatial resolution. Furthermore, sufficient patient access has to be provided by the MR scanner. Neither an ideal magnet nor the optimal single sequence are available to fulfill the above-mentioned criteria. The type of sequence - gradient echo versus spin echo - together with changing of the echo time and phase encording direction will ensure an appropriate size of the artifact and thereby of the appearance of the instrument in the MR image. The feasibility of non-vascular MR-guided interventions has been proved at field strengths ranging from 0.064 T to 1.5 T. Bone biopsies, soft tissue biopsies, drainages, and control of interstitial thermo- and cryotherapy have been reported. For vascular interventions, different real time MR strategies are currently under investigation. The development of dedicated catheters and guide wires has enabled MR-guided dilatations, stenting, placement of vena cava filters, and TIPS procedures. Considering the fast progress being made in this field, there can be no question that interventional MRI will become a well-accepted clinical tool offering potential advantages such as excellent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging, flow measurements, high resolution imaging of vessel walls, and lack of ionizing radiation. (orig.) [German] Zur Durchfuehrung MR-gesteuerter Interventionen muessen interventionelle Instrumente gut sichtbar, aber ohne stoerende Artefakte darstellbar sein. Die Geschwindigkeit der Bilderstellung sollte fuer nichtvaskulaere Interventionen im Sekundenbereich liegen und fuer vaskulaere Interventionen Echtzeitbildgebung liefern. Weder

  11. Comparison of different reconstruction algorithms for three-dimensional ultrasound imaging in a neurosurgical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D; Lippert, C; Vollmer, F; Bozinov, O; Benes, L; Schulte, D M; Sure, U

    2012-09-01

    Freehand three-dimensional ultrasound imaging (3D-US) is increasingly used in image-guided surgery. During image acquisition, a set of B-scans is acquired that is distributed in a non-parallel manner over the area of interest. Reconstructing these images into a regular array allows 3D visualization. However, the reconstruction process may introduce artefacts and may therefore reduce image quality. The aim of the study is to compare different algorithms with respect to image quality and diagnostic value for image guidance in neurosurgery. 3D-US data sets were acquired during surgery of various intracerebral lesions using an integrated ultrasound-navigation device. They were stored for post-hoc evaluation. Five different reconstruction algorithms, a standard multiplanar reconstruction with interpolation (MPR), a pixel nearest neighbour method (PNN), a voxel nearest neighbour method (VNN) and two voxel based distance-weighted algorithms (VNN2 and DW) were tested with respect to image quality and artefact formation. The capability of the algorithm to fill gaps within the sample volume was investigated and a clinical evaluation with respect to the diagnostic value of the reconstructed images was performed. MPR was significantly worse than the other algorithms in filling gaps. In an image subtraction test, VNN2 and DW reliably reconstructed images even if large amounts of data were missing. However, the quality of the reconstruction improved, if data acquisition was performed in a structured manner. When evaluating the diagnostic value of reconstructed axial, sagittal and coronal views, VNN2 and DW were judged to be significantly better than MPR and VNN. VNN2 and DW could be identified as robust algorithms that generate reconstructed US images with a high diagnostic value. These algorithms improve the utility and reliability of 3D-US imaging during intraoperative navigation. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A model-based radiography restoration method based on simple scatter-degradation scheme for improving image visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Kang, S.; Cho, H.; Kang, W.; Seo, C.; Park, C.; Lee, D.; Lim, H.; Lee, H.; Kim, G.; Park, S.; Park, J.; Kim, W.; Jeon, D.; Woo, T.; Oh, J.

    2018-02-01

    In conventional planar radiography, image visibility is often limited mainly due to the superimposition of the object structure under investigation and the artifacts caused by scattered x-rays and noise. Several methods, including computed tomography (CT) as a multiplanar imaging modality, air-gap and grid techniques for the reduction of scatters, phase-contrast imaging as another image-contrast modality, etc., have extensively been investigated in attempt to overcome these difficulties. However, those methods typically require higher x-ray doses or special equipment. In this work, as another approach, we propose a new model-based radiography restoration method based on simple scatter-degradation scheme where the intensity of scattered x-rays and the transmission function of a given object are estimated from a single x-ray image to restore the original degraded image. We implemented the proposed algorithm and performed an experiment to demonstrate its viability. Our results indicate that the degradation of image characteristics by scattered x-rays and noise was effectively recovered by using the proposed method, which improves the image visibility in radiography considerably.

  13. Characterization of impact damage in metallic/nonmetallic composites using x-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, William H.; Wells, Joseph M.

    1999-01-01

    Characterizing internal impact damage in composites can be difficult, especially in structurally complex composites or those consisting of many materials. Many methods for nondestructive inspection/nondestructive testing (NDI/NDT) of materials have been known and in use for many years, including x-ray film, real-time, and digital radiographic techniques, and ultrasonic techniques. However, these techniques are generally not capable of three-dimensional (3D) mapping of complex damage patterns, which is necessary to visualize and understand damage cracking modes. Conventional x-ray radiography suffers from the loss of 3D information. Structural complexity and signal dispersion in materials with many interfaces significantly effect ultrasonic inspection techniques. This makes inspection scan interpretation difficult, especially in composites containing a number of different materials (i.e., polymer, ceramic, and metallic). X-ray computed tomography (CT) is broadly applicable to any material or test object through which a beam of penetrating radiation may be passed and detected, including metals, plastics, ceramics, metallic/nonmetallic composites, and assemblies. The principal advantage of CT is that it provides densitometric (that is, radiological density and geometry) images of thin cross sections through an object. Because of the absence of structural superposition, images are much easier to interpret than conventional radiological images. The user can quickly learn to read CT data because images correspond more closely to the way the human mind visualizes 3D structures than projection radiology (that is, film radiography, real-time radiography (RTR), and digital radiography (DR)). Any number of CT images, or slices, from scanning an object can be volumetrically reconstructed to produce a 3D attenuation map of the object. The 3D attenuation data can be rendered using multiplanar or 3D solid visualization. In multiplanar visualization there are four planes of view

  14. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of prostatic tumours, a comparison with X-ray CT and transrectal sonography (TRS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockisch, A.; Biersack, H.J.; Huenermann, B.; Schmitz, H.G.; Knopp, R.; Winkler, C.; Jaeger, N.; Vahlensieck, W.; Christ, F.

    1988-02-01

    A total of 7 healthy volunteers and 31 patients have been examined clinically, by MRI, TRS, and biopsy. In those patients with established carcinoma, a CT examination was also performed. For the MRI study, a superconducting MR 2000 imager (Picker International) operated at 0.15 T was used with multiplanar SE and IR sequnces. SE sequences with long echo times detected prostatitis, adenoma and carcinoma of the prostate with a high degree of sensitivity. However, at present, differentiation between adenoma, prostatis and carcinoma is not possible with sufficient accuracy. In these studies we were unable to establish a correlation between the signal pattern and staging and/or grading of the carcinoma. Reliable diagnosis of a prostate carcinoma still requires a biopsy. Because of the high soft tissue contrast and the possibility of selecting any orientation for the plane under investigation, however, MRI represents an improvement in the preoperative diagnosis of local spread.

  15. Maximum intensity projection MR angiography using shifted image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Yoshio; Ichinose, Nobuyasu; Hatanaka, Masahiko; Goro, Takehiko; Kitake, Shinichi; Hatta, Junicchi.

    1992-01-01

    The quality of MR angiograms has been significantly improved in past several years. Spatial resolution, however, is not sufficient for clinical use. On the other hand, MR image data can be filled at anywhere using Fourier shift theorem, and the quality of multi-planar reformed image has been reported to be improved remarkably using 'shifted data'. In this paper, we have clarified the efficiency of 'shifted data' for maximum intensity projection MR angiography. Our experimental studies and theoretical consideration showd that the quality of MR angiograms has been significantly improved using 'shifted data' as follows; 1) remarkable reduction of mosaic artifact, 2) improvement of spatial continuity for the blood vessels, and 3) reduction of variance for the signal intensity along the blood vessels. In other words, the angiograms looks much 'finer' than conventional ones, although the spatial resolution is not improved theoretically. Furthermore, we found the quality of MR angiograms dose not improve significantly with the 'shifted data' more than twice as dense as ordinal ones. (author)

  16. CT imaging and histopathological features of renal epithelioid angiomyolipomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, L.; Zhang, J.-G.; Hu, X.-Y.; Fang, X.-M.; Lerner, A.; Yao, X.-J.; Zhu, Z.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To describe computed tomography (CT) imaging and histopathological manifestations of renal epithelioid angiomyolipomas (EAMLs) for better understanding and cognition in the diagnosis of this new category of renal tumours. Materials and methods: Clinical data and CT images from 10 cases of EAML were retrospectively analysed. All patients underwent CT with and without contrast medium administration, with multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) when needed. Results: Plain CT manifestations of EAMLs were a higher density of mass (10–25 HU) than renal parenchyma, bulging contour of the involved kidney, absence of fat, distinct edges without a lobulate appearance. Contrast-enhanced CT features were markedly heterogeneous enhancement (from rapid wash-in to slow wash-out), large tumour size without lobular appearance, complete capsule with distinct margins and frequent mild necrotic areas. Histopathological features were epithelioid cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, large and deeply stained nuclei, and dense arrangement of tumour cells with patchy necrosis; diffuse sheets of epithelioid cells were positive for HMB-45 (melanoma-associated antigen) and negative for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) staining. Conclusion: Multiple specific CT features correlated well with the histopathology and may play an important role in the primary diagnosis of EAMLs.

  17. The clinical role of imaging in peritoneal carcinomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Intraperitoneal seeding, the so-called peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is a common mechanism of spread in advanced intra-abdominal malignancies including ovarian (71%), gastric (17%) and colorectal (10%) cancers. When cancer cells from a growing primary neoplasm reach the peritoneal surface, they are carried out by the peritoneal fluid and disseminated throughout the peritoneal cavity.the location of implants development is governed mostly by peritoneal fluid circulation and by anatomic pathways formed by peritoneal reflections, namely ligaments, mesenteries and omenta. The most common sites where the peritoneal fluid may temporarily arrested facilitating implantation of cancer cells include cul-de-sac, distal small bowel mesentery, right paracolic gutter, posterior sub-hepatic space, greater omentum and subphrenic spaces. MDCT with thin collimation and i.v contrast material supplemented by multiplanar reconstructions is the primary imaging modality for the investigation of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Ascitis, contrast enhanced smooth, nodular, or plaque-like peritoneal thickening, peritoneal nodules, plaques or masses, rounded, ill-defined soft-tissue or cystic mesenteric masses, mesenteric fixation with increased attenuation values and thickening, irregular soft-tissue permeation of omental fat or confluent solid omental masses are the most frequent CT findings of peritoneal carcinomatosis. CT has a sensitivity and specificity between 85-95%, depending on the size, location and applied examination protocol. MR imaging using a post-gadolinium enhanced 3dFlASH sequence with fat saturation may alternatively

  18. Differentiation between ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sang Yeol; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Chang Won; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Suck Hong

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the findings and differential points of ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma, as seen on MR images. The MRimaging findings of 31 surgically confirmed cases of ovarian fibroma (n=3D6) and subserosal leiomyoma (n=3D25; 28) lesions were evaluated. Multiplanar T1-T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted images were obtained using a 1.5T MR unit, and histologic examination was also performed. The MR findings were analyzed in terms of signal intensity, the presence and definition of margin, the histologic finding of hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images, the presence of the bridging vessel sign, degree of enhancement, and the presence of ipsilateral ovary and ascites. Both fibromas and leiomyomas showed hypo- or isointensity compared with uterine myometrium on T1-weighted images and compared with skeletal muscle on T2-weighted images. The latter revealed intratumoral hyperintense lesions in most cases of ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma. Three of four ovarian fibromas had a well defined margin after cystic change, but in 24 of 26 subserosal leiomyomas the margin was ill defined. The 'bridging vessel sign' was visible only in subserosal leiomyomas (22/28), and in all cases the enhancement of ovarian fibromas were less than that of myomtetrium. Subserosal leiomyomas (12/28), seen on enhancement as isointense or hyperintense to myometrium, showed a greater degree of enhancement than ovarian fibromas (0/6). Ipsilateral ovary was rarely seen in ovarian fibromas (1/6), but commonly seen in subserosal leiomyomas (20/250. Ascites was present in one case of ovarian fibroma. A defined margin of an intratumoral hyperintense lesion, as seen on T2-weighted images, and the presence or absence of the 'bridging vessel sign' and ipsilateral ovary are useful signs when differentiating between ovarian fibromas and subserosal leiomyomas. (author)

  19. Differentiation between ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma by MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sang Yeol; Lee, Jun Woo; Kim, Chang Won; Kim, Yong Woo; Lee, Suck Hong [College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the findings and differential points of ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma, as seen on MR images. The MRimaging findings of 31 surgically confirmed cases of ovarian fibroma (n=3D6) and subserosal leiomyoma (n=3D25; 28) lesions were evaluated. Multiplanar T1-T2-weighted and postcontrast T1-weighted images were obtained using a 1.5T MR unit, and histologic examination was also performed. The MR findings were analyzed in terms of signal intensity, the presence and definition of margin, the histologic finding of hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images, the presence of the bridging vessel sign, degree of enhancement, and the presence of ipsilateral ovary and ascites. Both fibromas and leiomyomas showed hypo- or isointensity compared with uterine myometrium on T1-weighted images and compared with skeletal muscle on T2-weighted images. The latter revealed intratumoral hyperintense lesions in most cases of ovarian fibroma and subserosal leiomyoma. Three of four ovarian fibromas had a well defined margin after cystic change, but in 24 of 26 subserosal leiomyomas the margin was ill defined. The 'bridging vessel sign' was visible only in subserosal leiomyomas (22/28), and in all cases the enhancement of ovarian fibromas were less than that of myomtetrium. Subserosal leiomyomas (12/28), seen on enhancement as isointense or hyperintense to myometrium, showed a greater degree of enhancement than ovarian fibromas (0/6). Ipsilateral ovary was rarely seen in ovarian fibromas (1/6), but commonly seen in subserosal leiomyomas (20/250. Ascites was present in one case of ovarian fibroma. A defined margin of an intratumoral hyperintense lesion, as seen on T2-weighted images, and the presence or absence of the 'bridging vessel sign' and ipsilateral ovary are useful signs when differentiating between ovarian fibromas and subserosal leiomyomas. (author)

  20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging versus Computed Tomography and Different Imaging Modalities in Evaluation of Sinonasal Neoplasms Diagnosed by Histopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Gomaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The study purpose was to detect the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI compared to computed tomography (CT and different imaging modalities as conventional radiology in evaluation of sinonasal neoplasms diagnosed by Histopathology. Methods Thirty patients (16 males and 14 females were complaining of symptoms related to sinonasal tract. After thorough clinical and local examination, the patients were subjected to the following: conventional radiography, CT, MRI, and histopathological examination. Results The nasal cavity was the most commonly involved site with sinonasal malignancies followed by the maxillary sinuses. The least commonly affected site was the frontal sinuses. Benign sinonasal tumors were present in 14 cases. The most common benign lesion was juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (6 cases, followed by inverted papilloma (3 cases. While malignant sinonasal tumors were present in 16 cases, squamous cell carcinoma was present in 5 cases, and undifferentiated carcinoma, in 3 cases. Lymphoepithelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphomas were present in 2 cases each, while adenocarcinoma, chondrosarcoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma were present in 1 case each. Conclusion MRI with its superior soft tissue contrast and multiplanar capability is superior to CT in pretreatment evaluation of primary malignant tumors of sinonasal cavity.

  1. Image quality analysis to reduce dental artifacts in head and neck imaging with dual-source computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketelsen, D.; Werner, M.K.; Thomas, C.; Tsiflikas, I.; Reimann, A.; Claussen, C.D.; Heuschmid, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Koitschev, A. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: Important oropharyngeal structures can be superimposed by metallic artifacts due to dental implants. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality of multiplanar reconstructions and an angulated spiral in dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) of the neck. Materials and Methods: Sixty-two patients were included for neck imaging with DSCT. MPRs from an axial dataset and an additional short spiral parallel to the mouth floor were acquired. Leading anatomical structures were then evaluated with respect to the extent to which they were affected by dental artifacts using a visual scale, ranging from 1 (least artifacts) to 4 (most artifacts). Results: In MPR, 87.1 % of anatomical structures had significant artifacts (3.12 {+-} 0.86), while in angulated slices leading anatomical structures of the oropharynx showed negligible artifacts (1.28 {+-} 0.46). The diagnostic growth due to primarily angulated slices concerning artifact severity was significant (p < 0.01). Conclusion: MPRs are not capable of reducing dental artifacts sufficiently. In patients with dental artifacts overlying the anatomical structures of the oropharynx, an additional short angulated spiral parallel to the floor of the mouth is recommended and should be applied for daily routine. As a result of the static gantry design of DSCT, the use of a flexible head holder is essential. (orig.)

  2. Fast, free-breathing, in vivo fetal imaging using time-resolved 3D MRI technique: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Glenn, Orit A; Xu, Duan

    2014-04-01

    Fetal MR imaging is very challenging due to the movement of fetus and the breathing motion of the mother. Current clinical protocols involve quick 2D scouting scans to determine scan plane and often several attempts to reorient the scan plane when the fetus moves. This makes acquisition of fetal MR images clinically challenging and results in long scan times in order to obtain images that are of diagnostic quality. Compared to 2D imaging, 3D imaging of the fetus has many advantages such as higher SNR and ability to reformat images in multiple planes. However, it is more sensitive to motion and challenging for fetal imaging due to irregular fetal motion in addition to maternal breathing and cardiac motion. This aim of this study is to develop a fast 3D fetal imaging technique to resolve the challenge of imaging the moving fetus. This 3D imaging sequence has multi-echo radial sampling in-plane and conventional Cartesian encoding through plane, which provides motion robustness and high data acquisition efficiency. The utilization of a golden-ratio based projection profile allows flexible time-resolved image reconstruction with arbitrary temporal resolution at arbitrary time points as well as high signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio. The nice features of the developed image technique allow the 3D visualization of the movements occurring throughout the scan. In this study, we applied this technique to three human subjects for fetal MRI and achieved promising preliminary results of fetal brain, heart and lung imaging.

  3. Clinical efficiency, image quality and dosimetric considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arreola, M. [Director of Clinical Radiological Physics, Shands Hospital at the University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Three decades have passed since the first clinical use of the famous EMI Computed Axial Tomography (Cat) scanner. At the time, the prospects for clinical success of this innovative idea were not very good. Time, however, has proven otherwise as what is now simply known as Computed tomography (CT) has been boosted in each one of these decades for different reasons. In the 1970s, technological progress augmented by the realization of the importance of tomographic imaging got everything started; in the 1980s, the boom in health care demand in the US solidified its position and in the 1990s the technological explosion in computers and the imperative need to lower costs in the health care industry have prompted the most dramatic changes in the wy CT is utilized in the year 2000. Thus, different motivations have led the way of progress in CT at various times, and in spite of amazing developments in other crucial imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging, CT maintains its rightful place as the premiere imaging modality in the modern radiology department. This work covers the basic principles of tomographic image reconstruction, and how axial CT scanners progressed historically in the first two decades. Developments in X-ray tubes, and detection systems are highlighted, as well as the impact of clinical efficiency, image quality and patient doses. The basic construction of translate-rotate (1st and 2nd generation), rotate-rotate (3rd generation) and detector ring (4th generation) scanners are described. The so-called 5th generation scanner, the electron beam scanner, is also described, with its clinical and technical advantages and its inherent financial and maintenance disadvantages, which brought the advent of spiral and multi-slice scanners. These most recent developments in CT technology have opened a new era in the clinical use of CT; and although image quality has reached an expected

  4. Clinical efficiency, image quality and dosimetric considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arreola, M.

    2000-01-01

    Three decades have passed since the first clinical use of the famous EMI Computed Axial Tomography (Cat) scanner. At the time, the prospects for clinical success of this innovative idea were not very good. Time, however, has proven otherwise as what is now simply known as Computed tomography (CT) has been boosted in each one of these decades for different reasons. In the 1970s, technological progress augmented by the realization of the importance of tomographic imaging got everything started; in the 1980s, the boom in health care demand in the US solidified its position and in the 1990s the technological explosion in computers and the imperative need to lower costs in the health care industry have prompted the most dramatic changes in the wy CT is utilized in the year 2000. Thus, different motivations have led the way of progress in CT at various times, and in spite of amazing developments in other crucial imaging modalities, such as ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging, CT maintains its rightful place as the premiere imaging modality in the modern radiology department. This work covers the basic principles of tomographic image reconstruction, and how axial CT scanners progressed historically in the first two decades. Developments in X-ray tubes, and detection systems are highlighted, as well as the impact of clinical efficiency, image quality and patient doses. The basic construction of translate-rotate (1st and 2nd generation, rotate-rotate (3rd generation) and detector ring (4th generation) scanners are described. The so-called 5th generation scanner, the electron beam scanner, is also described, with its clinical and technical advantages and its inherent financial and maintenance disadvantages, which brought the advent of spiral and multi-slice scanners. These most recent developments in CT technology have opened a new era in the clinical use of CT; and although image quality has reached an expected

  5. Method of multiplanar emission tomography and apparatus therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottschalk, S.C.; Smith, K.A.; Wake, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    A method of emission tomography using a gamma camera and a rotating collimator having an array of a large number of slanted, small diameter holes. A planar projection corresponding to each angular orientation assumed by the collimator is recorded. From these series of planar projections, a three-dimensional simulation model is reconstructed by an iterative algorithm which approximates the emitting object. The simulated model comprises multiple separable planes

  6. Oculomotor paralysis: 3D-CISS MR imaging with MPR in the evaluation of neuralgic manifestation and the adjacent structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Xiaoli; Liang Changhu [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jing-wu Road No. 324, Jinan 250021 (China); Liu Cheng [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jing-wu Road No. 324, Jinan 250021 (China)], E-mail: sdsxl2005@126.com; Liu Shuwei; Deng Kai; He Jingzhen [Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute, Shandong University, Jing-wu Road No. 324, Jinan 250021 (China)

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of three-dimensional (3D) constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) in displaying the relationship between the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures for patients with oculomotor paralysis. Materials and methods: 17 consecutive patients with oculomotor paralysis were examined with 3D-CISS and conventional spin-echo (SE) sequences on a 1.5-Tesla MR system. Original transverse and MPR images were used for image interpretation. The features of the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures were identified. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all patients. Results: Through 3D-CISS with MPR images, obvious relationship of the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures was demonstrated on 17 patients. Of those oculomotor nerves, 15 were compressed by the arteries (n = 15), one by the craniopharyngioma (n = 1), and another one by the neurofibroma (n = 1). Conclusion: 3D-CISS MR imaging with MPR provides an excellent way to characterize the relationship between the nerve and its adjacent structures in the cisternal segment of the oculomotor nerve in the patients with oculomotor paralysis. Moreover, this method shows anatomical details for imaging diagnosis and surgical procedure.

  7. Observer success rates for identification of 3D surface reconstructed facial images and implications for patient privacy and security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Joseph J.; Siddiqui, Khan M.; Fort, Leslie; Moffitt, Ryan; Juluru, Krishna; Kim, Woojin; Safdar, Nabile; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2007-03-01

    3D and multi-planar reconstruction of CT images have become indispensable in the routine practice of diagnostic imaging. These tools cannot only enhance our ability to diagnose diseases, but can also assist in therapeutic planning as well. The technology utilized to create these can also render surface reconstructions, which may have the undesired potential of providing sufficient detail to allow recognition of facial features and consequently patient identity, leading to violation of patient privacy rights as described in the HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) legislation. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether 3D reconstructed images of a patient's facial features can indeed be used to reliably or confidently identify that specific patient. Surface reconstructed images of the study participants were created used as candidates for matching with digital photographs of participants. Data analysis was performed to determine the ability of observers to successfully match 3D surface reconstructed images of the face with facial photographs. The amount of time required to perform the match was recorded as well. We also plan to investigate the ability of digital masks or physical drapes to conceal patient identity. The recently expressed concerns over the inability to truly "anonymize" CT (and MRI) studies of the head/face/brain are yet to be tested in a prospective study. We believe that it is important to establish whether these reconstructed images are a "threat" to patient privacy/security and if so, whether minimal interventions from a clinical perspective can substantially reduce this possibility.

  8. Oculomotor paralysis: 3D-CISS MR imaging with MPR in the evaluation of neuralgic manifestation and the adjacent structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaoli; Liang Changhu; Liu Cheng; Liu Shuwei; Deng Kai; He Jingzhen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of three-dimensional (3D) constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with multi-planar reconstruction (MPR) in displaying the relationship between the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures for patients with oculomotor paralysis. Materials and methods: 17 consecutive patients with oculomotor paralysis were examined with 3D-CISS and conventional spin-echo (SE) sequences on a 1.5-Tesla MR system. Original transverse and MPR images were used for image interpretation. The features of the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures were identified. The diagnosis was surgically confirmed in all patients. Results: Through 3D-CISS with MPR images, obvious relationship of the oculomotor nerve and its adjacent structures was demonstrated on 17 patients. Of those oculomotor nerves, 15 were compressed by the arteries (n = 15), one by the craniopharyngioma (n = 1), and another one by the neurofibroma (n = 1). Conclusion: 3D-CISS MR imaging with MPR provides an excellent way to characterize the relationship between the nerve and its adjacent structures in the cisternal segment of the oculomotor nerve in the patients with oculomotor paralysis. Moreover, this method shows anatomical details for imaging diagnosis and surgical procedure.

  9. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  10. 4 T MRI of chondrocalcinosis in combination with three-dimensional CT, radiography, and arthroscopy: a report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suan, J.C.; Chhem, R.K.; Gati, J.S.; Norley, C.J.; Holdsworth, D.W. [Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-11-01

    To describe 4 T MRI techniques in imaging chondrocalcinosis within the knee and examine the results together with those demonstrated using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography, conventional radiography, and arthroscopy. From a larger clinical imaging study of early osteoarthritis, knee arthroscopy patients were imaged using high-field MRI and high-resolution 3D CT prior to their surgery. Retrospective review of the imaging data diagnosed three patients with chondrocalcinosis. Fat-suppressed 3D spoiled gradient (3D SPGR) and two-dimensional fat-suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) imaging was performed at 4 T. The MR images, multi-planar reformatted CT (MPR-CT) and maximum intensity projection CT (MIP-CT) images, and radiographs were examined by a musculoskeletal radiologist for the presence and location of chondrocalcinosis. The findings from arthroscopy were also included. MRI showed 16 sites of punctate hypointense regions from 18 articular surfaces and five of six menisci with similar signal characteristics. Both meniscal chondrocalcinosis and meniscal tears were clearly visible using the 3D SPGR sequence. Only three sites were demonstrated to have calcification using MPR-CT and MIP-CT revealed an additional three. In articular cartilage surfaces showing surface disruption, arthroscopy demonstrated 11 sites with crystal deposition. Arthroscopy also revealed five menisci with calcification present. Our preliminary findings suggest that imaging chondrocalcinosis using spoiled gradient 4 T MRI is superior and complementary to the other imaging modalities in the detection of crystal deposition in both articular cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  11. Recommendations from Gynaecological (GYN) GEC-ESTRO Working Group (IV): Basic principles and parameters for MR imaging within the frame of image based adaptive cervix cancer brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Petrow, Peter; Tanderup, Kari; Petric, Primoz; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pedersen, Erik M.; Limbergen, Erik van; Haie-Meder, Christine; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The GYN GEC-ESTRO working group issued three parts of recommendations and highlighted the pivotal role of MRI for the successful implementation of 3D image-based cervical cancer brachytherapy (BT). The main advantage of MRI as an imaging modality is its superior soft tissue depiction quality. To exploit the full potential of MRI for the better ability of the radiation oncologist to make the appropriate choice for the BT application technique and to accurately define the target volumes and the organs at risk, certain MR imaging criteria have to be fulfilled. Technical requirements, patient preparation, as well as image acquisition protocols have to be tailored to the needs of 3D image-based BT. The present recommendation is focused on the general principles of MR imaging for 3D image-based BT. Methods and parameters have been developed and progressively validated from clinical experience from different institutions (IGR, Universities of Vienna, Leuven, Aarhus and Ljubljana) and successfully applied during expert meetings, contouring workshops, as well as within clinical and interobserver studies. It is useful to perform pelvic MRI scanning prior to radiotherapy (“Pre-RT-MRI examination”) and at the time of BT (“BT MRI examination”) with one MR imager. Both low and high-field imagers, as well as both open and close magnet configurations conform to the requirements of 3D image-based cervical cancer BT. Multiplanar (transversal, sagittal, coronal and oblique image orientation) T2-weighted images obtained with pelvic surface coils are considered as the golden standard for visualisation of the tumour and the critical organs. The use of complementary MRI sequences (e.g. contrast-enhanced T1-weighted or 3D isotropic MRI sequences) is optional. Patient preparation has to be adapted to the needs of BT intervention and MR imaging. It is recommended to visualise and interpret the MR images on dedicated DICOM-viewer workstations, which should also assist the contouring

  12. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notohamiprodjo, S; Deak, Z; Meurer, F; Maertz, F; Mueck, F G; Geyer, L L; Wirth, S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p ASiR was 2 (p ASiR (p ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. • Model-Based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) effectively decreased artefacts in cranial CT. • MBIR reconstructed images were rated with significantly higher scores for image quality. • Model-Based iterative reconstruction may allow reduced-dose diagnostic examination protocols.

  13. Detection of tibial condylar fractures using 3D imaging with a mobile image amplifier (Siemens ISO-C-3D): Comparison with plain films and spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsianos, D.; Rock, C.; Wirth, S.; Linsenmaier, U.; Brandl, R.; Fischer, T.; Pfeifer, K.J.; Reiser, M.; Euler, E.; Mutschler, W.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze a prototype mobile C-arm 3D image amplifier in the detection and classification of experimental tibial condylar fractures with multiplanar reconstructions (MPR). Method: Human knee specimens (n=22) with tibial condylar fractures were examined with a prototype C-arm (ISO-C-3D, Siemens AG), plain films (CR) and spiral CT (CT). The motorized C-arm provides fluoroscopic images during a 190 orbital rotation computing a 119 mm data cube. From these 3D data sets MP reconstructions were obtained. All images were evaluated by four independent readers for the detection and assessment of fracture lines. All fractures were classified according to the Mueller AO classification. To confirm the results, the specimens were finally surgically dissected. Results: 97% of the tibial condylar fractures were easily seen and correctly classified according to the Mueller AO classification on MP reconstruction of the ISO-C-3D. There is no significant difference between ISO-C and CT in detection and correct classification of fractures, but ISO-CD-3D is significant by better than CR. (orig.) [de

  14. Imaging of sports-related hip and groin injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischuk, Andrew W; Dorantes, Thomas M; Wong, William; Haims, Andrew H

    2010-05-01

    A normally functioning hip joint is imperative for athletes who use their lower extremities with running, jumping, or kicking activities. Sports-related injuries of the hip and groin are far less frequent than injuries to the more distal aspect of the extremity, accounting for less than 10% of lower extremity injuries. Despite the lower incidence, hip and groin injuries can lead to significant clinical and diagnostic challenges related to the complex anatomy and biomechanical considerations of this region. Loads up to 8 times normal body weight have been documented in the joint in common daily activities, such as jogging, with significantly greater force expected during competitive athletics. Additionally, treatment for hip and groin injuries can obviate the participation of medical and surgical specialties, with a multidisciplinary approach frequently required. Delay in diagnosis and triage of these injuries may cause loss of time from competition and, potentially, early onset of degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the hip has proven to be the gold standard for the diagnosis of sports-related hip and groin injuries in the setting of negative radiographs. With its exquisite soft tissue contrast, multiplanar capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation, MRI is unmatched in the noninvasive diagnosis of intra-articular and extra-articular pathology, as well as intraosseous processes. This review focuses on MRI of common athletic injuries of the hip and groin, including acetabular labral tears, femoral acetabular impingement syndrome, muscle injuries around the hip and groin (including athletic pubalgia), and athletic osseous injuries.

  15. Usefulness of three dimensional reconstructive images for thoracic trauma induced fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Kyung Hun; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Joo Nam [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional reconstructive images using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for thoracic traumatic patients visiting emergency room. 76 patients with fractures of the 105 patients who visited our emergency room with complaints of thoracic trauma were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients had thoracic MDCT performed and the three-dimensional reconstructive images were taken. The fractures were confirmed by axial CT, the clinical information, whole body bone scanning and the multiplanar reformation images. Plain x-ray images were analyzed by the fractured sites in a blind comparison of two radiologists' readings, and then that finding was compared with the axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images. The fracture sites were rib (n 68), sternum (n = 14), clavicle (n = 6), scapula (n = 3), spine (n = 5) and combined fractures (n = 14). Plain x-ray and axial CT scans had a correspondency of 0.555 for the rib fractures. Axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images had a correspondency of .952. For sternal fractures, those values were 0.692 and 0.928, respectively. The axial CT scans and three-dimensional reconstructive images showed sensitivities of 94% and 91% for rib and other fractures, respectively, and 93% and 100% for sternal fracture, respectively. Three-dimensional reconstructive image had an especially high sensitivity for the diagnosis of sternal fracture. While evaluating thoracic trauma at the emergency room, the three-dimensional reconstructive image was useful to easily diagnose the extent of fracture and it was very sensitive for detecting sternal fracture.

  16. Usefulness of three dimensional reconstructive images for thoracic trauma induced fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kyung Hun; Kim, Dong Hun; Kim, Young Sook; Byun, Joo Nam

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional reconstructive images using multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) for thoracic traumatic patients visiting emergency room. 76 patients with fractures of the 105 patients who visited our emergency room with complaints of thoracic trauma were analyzed retrospectively. All the patients had thoracic MDCT performed and the three-dimensional reconstructive images were taken. The fractures were confirmed by axial CT, the clinical information, whole body bone scanning and the multiplanar reformation images. Plain x-ray images were analyzed by the fractured sites in a blind comparison of two radiologists' readings, and then that finding was compared with the axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images. The fracture sites were rib (n 68), sternum (n = 14), clavicle (n = 6), scapula (n = 3), spine (n = 5) and combined fractures (n = 14). Plain x-ray and axial CT scans had a correspondency of 0.555 for the rib fractures. Axial CT scans and the three-dimensional reconstructive images had a correspondency of .952. For sternal fractures, those values were 0.692 and 0.928, respectively. The axial CT scans and three-dimensional reconstructive images showed sensitivities of 94% and 91% for rib and other fractures, respectively, and 93% and 100% for sternal fracture, respectively. Three-dimensional reconstructive image had an especially high sensitivity for the diagnosis of sternal fracture. While evaluating thoracic trauma at the emergency room, the three-dimensional reconstructive image was useful to easily diagnose the extent of fracture and it was very sensitive for detecting sternal fracture

  17. Potential benefit of a simultaneous, side-by-side display of contrast MDCT and echocardiography over routine sequential imaging for assessment of adult congenital heart disease: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oe, Hiroki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Miyoshi, Toru; Osawa, Kazuhiro; Akagi, Teiji; Kanazawa, Susumu; Ito, Hiroshi

    2018-06-18

    Management of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients requires understanding of its complex morphology and functional features. An innovative imaging technique has been developed to display a virtual multi-planar reconstruction obtained from contrast-enhanced multidetector-computed tomography (MDCT) corresponding to the same cross-sectional image from transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The aim of this study is to assess the usefulness of this imaging technology in ACHD patients. This study consisted of 46 consecutive patients (30 women; mean age, 52±18 years old) with ACHD who had undergone contrast MDCT. All patients underwent TTE within a week of MDCT. An experienced sonographer who did not know the results of MDCT conducted a diagnosis using TTE and, then, using the new imaging technology. We studied whether this imaging technology provided additional or unexpected findings or makes more accurate diagnosis. In this imaging technology, MDCT cross-section provides higher-resolution image to the deep compared to corresponding TTE image. Depending on the MDCT section which can be arbitrarily set under the echo guide, we can diagnose unexpected or incremental lesions or more accurately assess the severity of the lesion in 27 patients (59%) compared to TTE study alone. This imaging technology was useful in the following situations: CONCLUSIONS: This integrated imaging technology provides incremental role over TTE in complex anatomy, and allows functional information in ACHD patients. Copyright © 2018 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. iMagis 2.0: a platform toward image-based processes inherent to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daudinot Lopez, M.; Miller Clemente, R.; Gonce Hernandez, E.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the main weapons against the leading cause of death in Cuba. The integration between radiotherapy and imaging modalities show an increasing trend across clinical applications, innovation and research. The availability of a platform for the inclusion of new applications in this area is crucial. the goal of this work was to demonstrate the possibilities of iMagis 2.0 as an existing platform, with applications in the planning process of pre-treatment based on images of cancer patients. iMagis® was the first Cuban PACS DICOM support, and the most widely applied in the Cuban Health System. Some available plugins were applied for medical planning of simulated patients with a homemade flatbed prototype, the latter installed on a CT unit SHIMADZU SCT 7800 TC in an Oncology Center. Multiple views for definitions of treatment volume were used, including the two-dimensional multiplanar reconstructions visualization. the viability of basic operations such as zoom images, rotations and translations are demonstrated. Monitoring changes in tumor volume during treatment were shown in combination with the estimated statistics of regions of interest. iMagis® supports a wide range of imaging modalities: computed Tomography, Magnetic Imaging PET / CT scan, Ultrasound, angiography, SPECT and providing a ready platform for adding new feature for radiotherapy and diagnostic. (Author)

  19. MR defecography at 1.5 Tesla with radial real-time imaging at a reduced FOV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.; Glowinski, A.; Adam, G.; Guenther, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a new technique for MR defecography with real-time imaging using radial k-space profiles. Materials and Methods: A catheter-mounted condom was inserted into the rectum of 16 patients and filled in situ by a mixture of Nestargel trademark and Gadolinium. After multiplanar imaging of the pelvis by high resolution T 2 -weighted turbo-spin echo sequences, defecation was imaged by a gradient echo sequence with radial k-space filling using a reduced field of view (rFOV) in real-time. The documentation was performed on an S-VHS recorder. Results: At a constant background signal, radial k-space filling yields a real-time impression. An interactive software allowed the operator to modify the slice thickness, slice plane, flip angle and slice angulation during scanning, resulting in an optimum imaging quality of the defecation. Conclusions: This new imaging technique allows real-time MR defecography in a high-field scanner and provides all anatomical and functional information of the defecation. (orig.) [de

  20. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Shih-Ming [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Mok, Greta S.P. [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau (China); Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu [Department of Radiology, Shin Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ching-Ching, E-mail: g39220003@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiological Technology, Tzu Chi College of Technology, 880, Sec.2, Chien-kuo Rd. Hualien 970, Taiwan (China); Wu, Tung-Hsin, E-mail: tung@ym.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang Ming University, 155 Li-Nong St., Sec. 2, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-21

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm. Materials: All reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique. Results: No statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  1. 256-slice CT coronary angiography in atrial fibrillation: The impact of mean heart rate and heart rate variability on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang-Kuang; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Mok, Greta S.P.; Law, Wei-Yip; Lu, Kun-Mu; Yang, Ching-Ching; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the image quality of 256-MDCT in atrial fibrillation and to compare the findings with those among patients in sinus rhythm. Materials: All reconstructed images were evaluated by two independent experienced readers blinded to patient information, heart rate, and ECG results to assess the diagnostic quality of images of the coronary artery segments using axial images, multi-planar reformations, maximum intensity projections, and volume rendering technique. Results: No statistical significance was detected in terms of the overall image quality between patients in sinus rhythm and with atrial fibrillation. Pearson's correlation analysis showed no significant association between image quality and mean heart rate no matter for patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Similarly, there was no correlation between image quality and heart rate variability for either patients in sinus rhythm or with atrial fibrillation. Our results showed that the optimal reconstruction window depends on patient's HR, and the pattern for patients in atrial fibrillation is similar to that obtained from non-atrial fibrillation patients. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of using 256-MDCT coronary angiography in patients with atrial fibrillation. Our results suggest that when appropriate reconstruction timing window is applied, patients with atrial fibrillation do not have to be excluded from MDCT coronary angiographic examinations.

  2. MR imaging of abscess by use of lipid-coated iron oxide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, T.W.; Eley, C.G.S.; Kressel, H.Y.

    1990-01-01

    The authors of this paper investigate the potential application of lipid-coated iron oxide particles as an MR contrast agent for imaging inflammatory process by using a rat subcutaneous abscess model induced by turpentine. Ten male Sprague-Dawley rats received subcutaneous injections of 0.1 mL of turpentine in the flank. At 24-36 hours later, the rats developed a subcutaneous abscess of 1-1.8 cm. An intravenous injection of lipid-coated iron oxide particles, Ferrosome (Vestar) at doses of 25, 40, 100, 200 μg/kg was administered. The animals were imaged at 12-24 hours later on a 1.5-T magnet using a 3-inch (7.62-cm) surface coil. Two animals were also imaged 5 days later. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and multiplanar gradient-recalled (MPGR) sequences were obtained. The abscess was then excised and examined with routine H-E and iron staining

  3. CT and MR imaging of primary tumors of the masticator space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspestrand, F.; Boysen, M.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study of CT and MR examinations in 14 patients with benign and malignant tumors originating in the masticator space is presented. At presentation, 12 patients revealed tumor extension to adjacent regions and spaces. Perineutral tumor spread along trigeminal nerve branches to the cavernous sinus and orbits was combined with facial pain, and/or numbness, ophthalmoplegia, and exophthalmus. Detailed analysis of tumor growth and spread, enhancement and signal features at CT and MR imaging indicated that tumor histology was, with a few exceptions, nonspecific. More extensive growth and bone destruction was noted only among malignant tumors. MR imaging was found superior to CT in delineating tumor extension due to better soft tissue contrast resolution and multiplanar imaging. Posttreatment examinations were available in 11 patients and showed long-standing regional edema of the adjacent temporal lobe and masticator muscles in 4 out of 5 patients without clinical evidence of tumor. In 6 patients, CT and MR features were found almost unchanged with only small size differences after various forms of treatment. (orig.)

  4. Evaluation of the marsh deer stifle joint by imaging studies and gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigue, D A; Rahal, S C; Schimming, B C; Santos, R R; Vulcano, L C; Linardi, J L; Teixeira, C R

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the stifle joint of marsh deer using imaging studies and in comparison with gross anatomy. Ten hindlimbs from 5 marsh deer (Blastocerus dichotomus) were used. Radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed in each stifle joint. Two hindlimbs were dissected to describe stifle gross anatomy. The other limbs were sectioned in sagittal, dorsal or transverse planes. In the craniocaudal radiographic view, the lateral femoral condyle was broader than the medial femoral condyle. The femoral trochlea was asymmetrical. Subsequent multiplanar reconstruction revealed in the cranial view that the external surface of the patella was roughened, the medial trochlea ridge was larger than the lateral one, and the extensor fossa at the lateral condyle was next to the lateral ridge. The popliteal fossa was better visualized via the lateral view. Sagittal MRI images identified lateral and medial menisci, caudolateral and craniomedial bundles of cranial cruciate ligament, caudal cruciate ligament, patellar ligament and common extensor tendon. In conclusion, the marsh deer stifle presents some anatomical characteristics of the ovine stifle joint. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Reconstruction of a ring applicator using CT imaging: impact of the reconstruction method and applicator orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellebust, Taran Paulsen; Tanderup, Kari; Bergstrand, Eva Stabell; Knutsen, Bjoern Helge; Roeislien, Jo; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the method of applicator reconstruction and/or the applicator orientation influence the dose calculation to points around the applicator for brachytherapy of cervical cancer with CT-based treatment planning. A phantom, containing a fixed ring applicator set and six lead pellets representing dose points, was used. The phantom was CT scanned with the ring applicator at four different angles related to the image plane. In each scan the applicator was reconstructed by three methods: (1) direct reconstruction in each image (DR) (2) reconstruction in multiplanar reconstructed images (MPR) and (3) library plans, using pre-defined applicator geometry (LIB). The doses to the lead pellets were calculated. The relative standard deviation (SD) for all reconstruction methods was less than 3.7% in the dose points. The relative SD for the LIB method was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than for the DR and MPR methods for all but two points. All applicator orientations had similar dose calculation reproducibility. Using library plans for applicator reconstruction gives the most reproducible dose calculation. However, with restrictive guidelines for applicator reconstruction the uncertainties for all methods are low compared to other factors influencing the accuracy of brachytherapy

  6. Image Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... R S T U V W X Y Z Image Gallery Share: The Image Gallery contains high-quality digital photographs available from ... Select a category below to view additional thumbnail images. Images are available for direct download in 2 ...

  7. University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC): an assessment of its utility for teaching diagnostic imaging in the medical school curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil; Malin, Greg; Trinder, Krista; Pinelle, David

    2015-01-01

    We have found it very challenging to integrate images from our radiology digital imaging repository into the curriculum of our local medical school. Thus, it has been difficult to convey important knowledge related to viewing and interpreting diagnostic radiology images. We sought to determine if we could create a solution for this problem and evaluate whether students exposed to this solution were able to learn imaging concepts pertinent to medical practice. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a novel interactive web application that enables preclinical medical students to acquire image interpretation skills fundamental to clinical practice. This web application reformats content stored in Medical Imaging Resource Center teaching cases for BlackBoard Learn™, a popular learning management system. We have deployed this solution for 2 successive years in a 1st-year basic sciences medical school course at the College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan. The "courseware" content covers both normal anatomy and common clinical pathologies in five distinct modules. We created two cohorts of learners consisting of an intervention cohort of students who had used USRC for their 1st academic year, whereas the nonintervention cohort was students who had not been exposed to this learning opportunity. To assess the learning experience of the users we designed an online questionnaire and image review quiz delivered to both of the student groups. Comparisons between the groups revealed statistically significant differences in both confidence with image interpretation and the ability to answer knowledge-based questions. Students were satisfied with the overall usability, functions, and capabilities of USRC. USRC is an innovative technology that provides integration between Medical Imaging Resource Center, a teaching solution used in radiology, and a Learning Management System.

  8. MR imaging of prostate cancer; MR-Tomographie des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A.; Scheidler, J.; Sommer, B.; Graser, A. [Radiologisches Zentrum Muenchen-Pasing (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, U.G. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Massmann, J. [Gemeinschaftspraxis Pathologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PC) is developing into an important health care issue in light of the high incidence of PC and the improvements in stage-adapted therapy. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the current role of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging of PC.Material and methods Pertinent literature was searched and evaluated to collect information on current clinical indications, study techniques, diagnostic value, and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Major indications for MR imaging of patients with supected PC are to define tumor location before biopsy when clinical or TRUS findings are inconclusive, and to provide accurate staging of histologically proven PC to ascertain effective therapy. Current MR imaging techniques for the evaluation of PC include multiplanar high-resolution T2-weighted FSE and T1-weighted SE sequences using combined endorectal and phased-array coils. Using these techniques, the reported accuracy of MR imaging for the diagnosis of extracapsular tumor extension ranges between 82 and 88% with sensitivities between 80 and 95%, and specificities between 82 and 93%. Typical MR findings of PC in different stages of disease, as well as diagnostic problems, such as chronic prostatitis, biopsy-related hemorrhage and therapy-related changes of prostatic tissue are discussed. In addition, the current perspectives and limitations of MR spectroscopy in PC are summarized. Current MR imaging techniques provide important diagnostic information in the pretherapeutic workup of PC including a high staging accuracy, and is superior to TRUS. (orig.) [German] Der Diagnostik des Prostatakarzinoms kommt wegen seiner hohen Inzidenz und den verbesserten stadienadaptierten Therapiemoeglichkeiten eine grosse Bedeutung zu. Dabei spielen bildgebende Verfahren bei den klinisch oft unzureichend diagnostizierbaren Faellen eine wesentliche Rolle fuer die praetherapeutische

  9. Preoperative 3D FSE T1-Weighted MR Plaque Imaging for Severely Stenotic Cervical ICA: Accuracy of Predicting Emboli during Carotid Endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogasawara

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether preoperative three-dimensional (3D fast spin-echo (FSE T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR plaque imaging for severely stenotic cervical carotid arteries could accurately predict the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in carotid endarterectomy (CEA. Seventy-five patients underwent preoperative MR plaque imaging and CEA under transcranial Doppler ultrasonography of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. On reformatted axial MR image slices showing the maximum plaque occupation rate (POR and maximum plaque intensity for each patient, the contrast ratio (CR was calculated by dividing the internal carotid artery plaque signal intensity by the sternocleidomastoid muscle signal intensity. For all patients, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC—used to discriminate between the presence and absence of microembolic signals—was significantly greater for the CR on the axial image with maximum plaque intensity (CRmax intensity (0.941 than for that with the maximum POR (0.885 (p < 0.05. For 32 patients in whom both the maximum POR and the maximum plaque density were identified, the AUCs for the CR were 1.000. Preoperative 3D FSE T1-weighted MR plaque imaging accurately predicts the development of artery-to-artery emboli during exposure of the carotid arteries in CEA.

  10. Emergency department CT screening of patients with nontraumatic neurological symptoms referred to the posterior fossa: comparison of thin versus thick slice images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalian, Shervin; Atkinson, Wendy L; Florin, Lauren A; Pomerantz, Stuart R; Lev, Michael H; Romero, Javier M

    2014-06-01

    Evaluation of the posterior fossa (PF) on 5-mm-thick helical CT images (current default) has improved diagnostic accuracy compared to 5-mm sequential CT images; however, 5-mm-thick images may not be ideal for PF pathology due to volume averaging of rapid changes in anatomy in the Z-direction. Therefore, we sought to determine if routine review of 1.25-mm-thin helical CT images has superior accuracy in screening for nontraumatic PF pathology. MRI proof of diagnosis was obtained within 6 h of helical CT acquisition for 90 consecutive ED patients with, and 88 without, posterior fossa lesions. Helical CT images were post-processed at 1.25 and 5-mm-axial slice thickness. Two neuroradiologists blinded to the clinical/MRI findings reviewed both image sets. Interobserver agreement and accuracy were rated using Kappa statistics and ROC analysis, respectively. Of the 90/178 (51 %) who were MR positive, 60/90 (66 %) had stroke and 30/90 (33 %) had other etiologies. There was excellent interobserver agreement (κ > 0.97) for both thick and thin slice assessments. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for 1.25-mm images were 65, 44, and 84 %, respectively, and for 5-mm images were 67, 45, and 85 %, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy was not significantly different (p > 0.5). In this cohort of patients with nontraumatic neurological symptoms referred to the posterior fossa, 1.25-mm-thin slice CT reformatted images do not have superior accuracy compared to 5-mm-thick images. This information has implications on optimizing resource utilizations and efficiency in a busy emergency room. Review of 1.25-mm-thin images may help diagnostic accuracy only when review of 5-mm-thick images as current default is inconclusive.

  11. Feasibility of fabricating personalized 3D-printed bone grafts guided by high-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Abigail L.; Newman, Benjamin T.; Khalid, Arbab; Teter, Olivia M.; Kobe, Elizabeth A.; Shukurova, Malika; Shinde, Rohit; Sipzner, Daniel; Pignolo, Robert J.; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Rajapakse, Chamith S.

    2017-03-01

    Current methods of bone graft treatment for critical size bone defects can give way to several clinical complications such as limited available bone for autografts, non-matching bone structure, lack of strength which can compromise a patient's skeletal system, and sterilization processes that can prevent osteogenesis in the case of allografts. We intend to overcome these disadvantages by generating a patient-specific 3D printed bone graft guided by high-resolution medical imaging. Our synthetic model allows us to customize the graft for the patients' macro- and microstructure and correct any structural deficiencies in the re-meshing process. These 3D-printed models can presumptively serve as the scaffolding for human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) engraftment in order to facilitate bone growth. We performed highresolution CT imaging of a cadaveric human proximal femur at 0.030-mm isotropic voxels. We used these images to generate a 3D computer model that mimics bone geometry from micro to macro scale represented by STereoLithography (STL) format. These models were then reformatted to a format that can be interpreted by the 3D printer. To assess how much of the microstructure was replicated, 3D-printed models were re-imaged using micro-CT at 0.025-mm isotropic voxels and compared to original high-resolution CT images used to generate the 3D model in 32 sub-regions. We found a strong correlation between 3D-printed bone volume and volume of bone in the original images used for 3D printing (R2 = 0.97). We expect to further refine our approach with additional testing to create a viable synthetic bone graft with clinical functionality.

  12. Four-dimensional ultrasonography of the fetal heart with spatiotemporal image correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luís F; Lee, Wesley; Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Espinoza, Jimmy; Schoen, Mary Lou; Falkensammer, Peter; Treadwell, Marjorie; Romero, Roberto

    2003-12-01

    This study was undertaken to describe a new technique for the examination of the fetal heart using four-dimensional ultrasonography with spatiotemporal image correlation (STIC). Volume data sets of the fetal heart were acquired with a new cardiac gating technique (STIC), which uses automated transverse and longitudinal sweeps of the anterior chest wall. These volumes were obtained from 69 fetuses: 35 normal, 16 with congenital anomalies not affecting the cardiovascular system, and 18 with cardiac abnormalities. Dynamic multiplanar slicing and surface rendering of cardiac structures were performed. To illustrate the STIC technique, two representative volumes from a normal fetus were compared with volumes obtained from fetuses with the following congenital heart anomalies: atrioventricular septal defect, tricuspid stenosis, tricuspid atresia, and interrupted inferior vena cava with abnormal venous drainage. Volume datasets obtained with a transverse sweep were utilized to demonstrate the cardiac chambers, moderator band, interatrial and interventricular septae, atrioventricular valves, pulmonary veins, and outflow tracts. With the use of a reference dot to navigate the four-chamber view, intracardiac structures could be simultaneously studied in three orthogonal planes. The same volume dataset was used for surface rendering of the atrioventricular valves. The aortic and ductal arches were best visualized when the original plane of acquisition was sagittal. Volumes could be interactively manipulated to simultaneously visualize both outflow tracts, in addition to the aortic and ductal arches. Novel views of specific structures were generated. For example, the location and extent of a ventricular septal defect was imaged in a sagittal view of the interventricular septum. Furthermore, surface-rendered images of the atrioventricular valves were employed to distinguish between normal and pathologic conditions. Representative video clips were posted on the Journal's Web

  13. Image postprocessing of aortic CTA and MRA; Aktuelle Bildnachverarbeitung der aortalen CTA und MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengg-Kobligk, H. von; Weber, T.F.; Rengier, F.; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie E010, Heidelberg (Germany); Boeckler, D. [Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Gefaesschirurgie, vaskulaere und endovaskulaere Chrirurgie, Heidelberg (Germany); Schumacher, H. [Klinikum der Stadt Hanau, Klinik fuer Gefaesschirurgie, Hanau (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Multiplanar reformation (MPR) is the most relevant tool for patient selection and precise procedural planning and also for analyzing postinterventional complications. Curved MPR is used primarily for semiautomated or completely automated calculation of the centerline of the vascular lumen and to estimate the orthogonal vessel diameter and longitudinal extent. Reproducible and accurate measurement of complex pathologies and courses of vessels extends the range of diagnostic radiology. Contemporary scanner consoles allow automated processing of maximum intensity projections (MIP) and standard MPR and their storage in PACS. To improve patient selection, procedural planning, root-cause analysis postoperatively for assessment of treatment effects and to make better communication of findings to nonradiologists possible, volume rendering techniques (VRT) are a beneficial adjunct to source images. With current algorithms semiautomated segmentation is satisfactory for vessels and bones, but not for low-contrast structures (soft tissues), which still need to be segmented manually. In general, isotropic CT source data are preferable to MR images, which are often anisotropic. In many European countries image postprocessing is still not adequately reimbursed although the doctors making referrals often specifically and emphatically demand 3D visualization and measurements in daily practice. (orig.) [German] Die multiplanare Reformatierung (MPR) der Bilddaten aortaler CTA und MRA ist die wichtigste Rekonstruktionsmethode im Hinblick auf eine differenzierte Therapieentscheidung und die praeoperative Therapieplanung sowie die Beschreibung postoperativer Komplikationen. Die gekruemmte MPR wird semiautomatisch bzw. vollstaendig automatisch als Centerline im Gefaesslumen berechnet und fuer die Bestimmung des orthogonalen Durchmessers und der Laengsausdehnung der Pathologie verwendet. Eine reproduzierbar exakte Ausmessung komplexer Pathologien und Gefaesslaengsverlaeufe erweitert das

  14. Colonic surveillance by CT colonography using axial images only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzi, John F.; Brennan, Darren D.; Fenlon, Helen M.; Moss, Alan C.; MacMathuna, Padraic

    2004-01-01

    Patients at increased risk of colon cancer require strict colon surveillance. Our objective was to establish the efficacy of 2D axial CT colonography as a surveillance test when performed in routine clinical practice. Eighty-two patients at increased risk of colon cancer underwent CT colonography followed by conventional colonoscopy on the same morning. CT colonography studies were performed on a four-ring multidetector CT scanner (100 mAs, 120 kVp, 4 x 2.5 collimation) and were interpreted by two radiologists using 2D axial images only. Results were correlated with findings at colonoscopy. Note was made of subsequent histology reports from polypectomy specimens. A total of 52 polyps were detected at colonoscopy. Using 2D axial images alone, with no recourse to 2D multiplanar or 3D views, the sensitivity of CT colonography was 100, 33 and 19% for polyps larger than 9, 6-9 and smaller than 6 mm, respectively. Per-patient specificities were 98.8, 96 and 81.5%, respectively. Twenty-nine percent of polyps smaller than 1 cm were adenomatous and there were no histological features of severe dysplasia. CT colonography is a useful colon surveillance tool for patients at increased risk of colon cancer. It has a high specificity for identifying patients who should proceed to colonoscopy and polypectomy, while allowing further colon examination to be deferred in patients with normal studies. Using 2D axial images only, CT colonography can be performed as part of the daily CT workload, with a very low rate of referral for unnecessary colonoscopy. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    intensity. A complete tear of the anterior cruciate ligament is accompanied by disruption of all of its fibers and an irregular or wavy contour. Anterior cruciate ligament injuries are associated with anterolateral instability that may be manifested as a forward shift of the tibia with respect to the femur (MR drawer sign). The uncovered lateral meniscus sign is positive if a vertical line drawn tangent to the posterior- most cortical margin of the lateral tibial plateau on sagittal MR images intersects any part of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus. A forward shift of the tibia with respect for the femur may alter the appearance of the smooth curve of the posterior cruciate ligament. In patients with acute tears of the anterior cruciate ligament, bone bruises have been observed most often in the weight-bearing portion of the lateral femoral condyle and in the posterior aspect of the lateral tibial epiphysis. Articular cartilage is a uniquely adapted, highly differentiated tissue that acts as buffer to transmitted forces across the joint, protecting the underlying bone. Unlike other tissues such as muscels and tendons, cartilage has a very limited repair capability, which indicates the obvious need to detect these defects early in the course of the disease. Condral lesions of the knee are a common and important orthopedic problem in both young and old patients. Chondromalacia represents a localized lesion confined to the articular hyaline cartilage. Differentiation from osteoarthritis is not possible by means of histology. Because of the excellent soft-tissue contrast, the ability to visualize directly hyaline cartilage, and the multiplanar capabilities, MRI appears to be the best imaging technique for the evaluation of articular cartilage

  16. Meningiomas parasselares: aspectos na ressonância magnética Parasellar meningiomas: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alair Augusto S.M.D. dos Santos

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Foram revistos 22 casos de meningiomas parasselares avaliados por ressonância magnética em clínicas privadas nas cidades de Niterói e Rio de Janeiro, RJ. O objetivo deste trabalho é demonstrar os aspectos de imagem encontrados neste tumor. Os equipamentos utilizados tinham 0,5 e 1,0 Tesla, respectivamente, com aquisição de seqüências multiplanares ponderadas em T1 (antes e após a administração de gadolínio e em T2. Os sintomas principais foram cefaléia e alterações visuais, tendo apenas um caso cursado com hiperprolactinemia. O aspecto mais freqüente foi o de massa parasselar hipointensa em T1 e hiperintensa em T2, impregnando-se intensamente pelo gadolínio. A ressonância magnética é útil não apenas na demonstração da lesão mas, sobretudo, na avaliação do comprometimento das estruturas vizinhas, especialmente do seio cavernoso, o que explica as alterações visuais encontradas.We reviewed 22 cases of patients with parasellar meningiomas evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in private clinics of the cities of Niterói and Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. Our aim was to characterize the imaging findings in this type of tumor. MRI scanners with 0.5 and 1.0 Tesla magnets were used for the acquisition of multiplanar T1-weighted (pre- and post-gadolinium administration and T2-weighted images. The main symptoms observed were headache and visual disturbances. Hyperprolactinemia was observed in only one patient. The most frequent imaging finding was a parasellar mass which appeared hypointense on T1-weighted and hyperintense on T2-weighted images, and enhanced intensively after gadolinium administration. MRI is useful to demonstrate the lesion and to assess the damage to adjacent structures, particularly when the patient presents visual disturbances due to involvement of the cavernous sinuses.

  17. Mediastinal and hilar lymphadenopathy: cross-referenced anatomy on axial and coronal images displayed by using multi-detector row CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Hyun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Sung; Yi, Chin A; Cho, Jae Min; Lee, Min Hee

    2003-01-01

    The accurate evaluation of mediastinal and pulmonary hilar lymphadenopathy, especially in patients with lung cancer, is important for determining treatment options and evaluating the response to therapy. To indicate nodal location in detail, mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes have been assigned to one of 14 nodal stations. Mediastinal nodes of greater than 10 mm short-axis diameter are regarded as abnormal, irrespective of their nodal station, while hilar nodes are considered abnormal if their diameter is greater than 10 mm in any axis or they are convex compared to surrounding lung. By providing multiplanar images, multi-detector row CT allows detailed evaluation of thoracic anatomic structures more easily than in the past, when axial images only were available. At cross-referenced imaging, a lymph node depicted at axial imaging in one anatomical location can be visualized simultaneously and automatically at coronal imaging at the exactly corresponding anatomical location. Cross-referenced coincidental axial and coronal images help assess both the size and morphology of mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes

  18. [Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koichi; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute an MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI.

  19. Effects of the volume and shape of voxels on the measurement of phantom volume using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Koichi; Tonami, Syuichi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto; Hagino, Hirofumi; Saitou, Osamu; Yotsutsuji, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of volumetric studies of the human brain have been reported, using three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (3D-MRI). To our knowledge, however, there are few investigations on the relation of the volume and shape of voxels which constitute and MR image to the accuracy in volume measurement of an imaged object. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a different shape of voxel, that is, isotropic or anisotropic, as well as the volume of a voxel on the volume measurement based on the original image data and multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) data, respectively. In the experiment, we repeatedly acquired contiguous sagittal images of a single globe phantom with a known volume under the condition in which the volume and shape of voxels varied, on a 1.5 T MR scanner. We used a gradient echo sequence (3D FLASH). The volume of the globe phantom from both original images and MPR ones was measured on workstations employing a semi-automated local thresholding technique. As a result, the smaller volume of voxels tended to give us the more correct measurement, and an isotropic voxel reduced measurement errors as compared to an anisotropic one. Therefore, it is concluded that the setting of voxel with both an isotropic shape and small volume, e.g., a voxel of 1 mm x 1 mm x 1 mm at present, is recommended in order to get a precise volume measurement using 3D-MRI. (author)

  20. Diagnostic imaging of injuries and overuse in soccer players; Bildgebende Diagnostik von Verletzungen und Ueberlastungsschaeden bei Fussballern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonge, M.C. de; Maas, M.; Kuijk, C. van [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-10-01

    Soccer is one of the most popular sports worldwide. There is a high incidence of injuries in soccer in which several intrinsic and extrinsic factors play a part. Most injuries are minor, self-limiting and do not need extensive medical treatment or imaging. Imaging can be required for several reasons e.g. when the clinical findings are doubtful, to replace arthroscopy (i. e. of the knee) or for prognostic reasons. All imaging modalities available to the radiologist can be used but MRI is the most valuable imaging modality with its superior contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Basically, injuries in the soccer player can occur anywhere in the body like in every sport. The lower extremities, more specific the knee and ankle, are however the most injured parts. (orig.) [German] Fussball ist eine der weltweit populaersten Sportarten, und Verletzungen sind mit hoher Inzidenz zu finden, wobei bestimmte intrinsische und extrinsische Faktoren eine pathogenetisch wesentliche Rolle spielen. Der Schweregrad von Verletzungen ist meist gering und selbstlimitierend, eine ausgiebige Behandlung oder die Durchfuehrung bildgebender diagnostischer Massnahmen sind nicht noetig. Die radiologische Untersuchung ist indiziert bei klinisch unklaren Befunden, zur Planung einer etwaigen Arthroskopie oder zur klinisch-prognostischen Einschaetzung der Veraenderungen. Von den verfuegbaren Modalitaeten ist die MRT von groesster Bedeutung. Verletzungen als Folge des Fussballspielens sind in allen Koerperabschnitten zu beobachten, v. a. an den unteren Extremitaeten und hier besonders an Knie- und Sprunggelenk. (orig.)

  1. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  2. CT reconstruction and MRI fusion of 3D rotational angiography in the evaluation of pediatric cerebrovascular lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthusami, Prakash; Rea, Vanessa; Shroff, Manohar [The Hospital for Sick Children, Pediatric Neuroradiology and Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Shkumat, Nicholas [The Hospital for Sick Children, Medical Physics, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chiu, Albert H. [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Prince of Wales Hospital, Department of Interventional Neuroradiology, Randwick, NSW (Australia)

    2017-06-15

    Complex neurovascular lesions in children require precise anatomic understanding for treatment planning. Although 3DRA is commonly employed for volumetric reformation in neurointerventional procedures, the ability to reconstruct this data into CT-like images (3DRA-CT) is not widely utilized. This study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of 3DRA-CT and subsequent MRI fusion for problem solving in pediatric neuroangiography. This retrospective study includes 18 3DRA-CT studies in 16 children (age 9.6 ± 3.8 years, range 2-16 years) over 1 year. After biplane 2D-digital subtraction angiography (DSA), 5-second 3DRA was performed with selective vessel injection either with or without subtraction. Images were reconstructed into CT sections which were post-processed to generate multiplanar reformation (MPR) and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images. Fusion was performed with 3D T1 MRI images to precisely demonstrate neurovascular relationships. Quantitative radiation metrics were extracted and compared against those for the entire examination and for corresponding biplane 2D-DSA acquisitions. In all 18 cases, the 3DRA procedure and MRI fusion were technically successful and provided clinically useful information relevant to management. The unsubtracted and subtracted 3DRA acquisitions were measured to deliver 5.9 and 132.2%, respectively, of the mean radiation dose of corresponding biplane 2D-DSA acquisitions and contributed 1.2 and 12.5%, respectively, to the total procedure dose. Lower radiation doses, high spatial resolution, and multiplanar reformatting capability make 3DRA-CT a useful adjunct to evaluate neurovascular lesions in children. Fusing 3DRA-CT data with MRI is an additional capability that can further enhance diagnostic information. (orig.)

  3. 3D double-echo steady-state sequence assessment of hip joint cartilage and labrum at 3 Tesla: comparative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, Christoph; Antoch, Gerald [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hesper, Tobias; Rettegi, Fanni; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Ruediger; Bittersohl, Bernd [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hosalkar, Harish S. [Paradise Valley Hospital, Joint Preservation and Deformity Correction, San Diego, CA (United States); Tri-city Medical Center, Hip Preservation, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-10-15

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of a high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) double-echo steady-state (DESS) sequence with radial imaging at 3 Tesla (T) for evaluating cartilage and labral alterations in the hip. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data obtained at 3 T, including radially reformatted DESS images and intraoperative data of 45 patients (mean age 42 ± 13.7 years) who underwent hip arthroscopy, were compared. The acetabular cartilage and labrum of the upper hemisphere of the acetabulum and the central femoral head cartilage were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and negative and positive predictive values were determined. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the DESS technique were 96.7%, 75% and 93.7% for detecting cartilage lesions and 98%, 76.2% and 95.9% for detecting labral lesions. The positive and negative predictive values for detecting or ruling out cartilage lesions were 96% and 78.9%. For labral lesions, the positive and negative predictive values were 97.5% and 80%. A high-resolution, 3D DESS technique with radial imaging at 3 T demonstrated high accuracy for detecting hip cartilage and labral lesions with excellent interobserver agreement and moderate correlation between MRI and intraoperative assessment. (orig.)

  4. Spiral CT and optimization of the modalities of the iodinated intravenous contrast material: Experimental studies in human pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonaldi, V.

    1998-01-01

    Spiral (or helical) CT represents the most recent improvement in the field of computed assisted tomography (CAT scan). The capabilities of this new imaging modality are much superior to these of conventional CT scanning; then result from the rapid acquisition and from the volumetric nature of the derived data set. The short time of data acquisition had made mandatory the revision of protocols for intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. By the means of several studies, carried out on pathologic and healthy patients, we have attempted to improve knowledge in factors influencing CT attenuation values after injection of contrast material, in the aim of improving contrast administration performed during spiral CT scanning. Anatomical landmarks that we have studied till now have been liver, the pancreas, the kidney and the cervical spine. In addition, a paired based methodology has been used. The volumetric set of data derived from spiral CT scanning leads to optimal post-processing tasks, the most interesting being related to cine-display and multiplanar reformatting; both modalities have been evaluated, about the pancreas and the musculo-skeletal system respectively. Conversely, this new modality, as for other imaging modalities, is responsible for additional costs derived from restless increase in the number of images to be dealt with and from the occurrence of new tasks (in post-processing particularly). The place of spiral CT in diagnostic strategies among other modern imaging modalities should be assessed, especially with respect to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). (author)

  5. Is there a role for virtual otoscopy in the preoperative assessment of the ossicular chain in chronic suppurative otitis media? Comparison of HRCT and virtual otoscopy with surgical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, A.K. [University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, St. Paul Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bapuraj, J.R. [University of Michigan, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gupta, A.K. [Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Department of Otolaryngology, Chandigarh (India); Khandelwal, N. [Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Chandigarh (India)

    2009-06-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of virtual otoscopy and 3D ossicular reconstruction in the preoperative assessment of the ossicles in chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty three patients of chronic suppurative otitis media with conductive deafness (air-bone gap > 35 dB) were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent axial multidetector CT. The axial CT data set was utilized for multiplanar 2D reformations as well as virtual otoscopy (VO) and 3D reconstructions. The imaging findings on these two techniques were read independently by two radiologists with respect to different parts of the ossicular chain by using a three-point scoring system and were compared with surgical findings. Both imaging techniques had comparable accuracy for evaluation of larger ossicular parts. However, for evaluation of stapes superstructure, VO/3D images were more accurate (85.29%) than 2D images (76.97%). Assessment of the lenticular process and incudostapedial joint by HRCT and 2D reformatted images was not reliable (P > 0.1); however, significant correlation (P < 0.001) was present between VO/3D and the operative findings. Virtual otoscopy improves evaluation of the ossicular chain particularly that of smaller structures such as the lenticular process, incudostapedial joint and stapes superstructure which may influence decisions regarding planning of ossiculoplasty. (orig.)

  6. Is there a role for virtual otoscopy in the preoperative assessment of the ossicular chain in chronic suppurative otitis media? Comparison of HRCT and virtual otoscopy with surgical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, A.K.; Bapuraj, J.R.; Gupta, A.K.; Khandelwal, N.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of virtual otoscopy and 3D ossicular reconstruction in the preoperative assessment of the ossicles in chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty three patients of chronic suppurative otitis media with conductive deafness (air-bone gap > 35 dB) were included in this prospective study. All patients underwent axial multidetector CT. The axial CT data set was utilized for multiplanar 2D reformations as well as virtual otoscopy (VO) and 3D reconstructions. The imaging findings on these two techniques were read independently by two radiologists with respect to different parts of the ossicular chain by using a three-point scoring system and were compared with surgical findings. Both imaging techniques had comparable accuracy for evaluation of larger ossicular parts. However, for evaluation of stapes superstructure, VO/3D images were more accurate (85.29%) than 2D images (76.97%). Assessment of the lenticular process and incudostapedial joint by HRCT and 2D reformatted images was not reliable (P > 0.1); however, significant correlation (P < 0.001) was present between VO/3D and the operative findings. Virtual otoscopy improves evaluation of the ossicular chain particularly that of smaller structures such as the lenticular process, incudostapedial joint and stapes superstructure which may influence decisions regarding planning of ossiculoplasty. (orig.)

  7. Correlation among ultrasound, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the sciatic nerve: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayeri, Nizar; van Geffen, Geert J; Bruhn, Jörgen; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2010-01-01

    Efficient identification of the sciatic nerve (SN) requires a thorough knowledge of its topography in relation to the surrounding structures. Anatomic cross sections in similar oblique planes as observed during SN ultrasonography are lacking. A survey of sonoanatomy matched with ultrasound views of the major SN block sites will be helpful in pattern recognition, especially when combined with images that show the internal architecture of the nerve. From 1 cadaver, consecutive parts of the upper leg corresponding to the 4 major blocks sites were sectioned and deeply frozen. Using cryomicrotomy, consecutive transverse sections were acquired and photographed at 78-microm intervals, along with histologic sections at 5-mm intervals. Multiplanar reformatting was done to reconstruct the optimal planes for an accurate comparison of ultrasonography and gross anatomy. The anatomic and histologic images were matched with ultrasound images that were obtained from 2 healthy volunteers. By simulating the exact position and angulation as in the ultrasonographic images, detailed anatomic overviews of SN and adjacent structures were reconstructed in the gluteal, subgluteal, midfemoral, and popliteal regions. Throughout its trajectory, SN contains numerous fascicles with connective and adipose tissues. In this study, we provide an optimal matching between histology, anatomic cross sections, and short-axis ultrasound images of SN. Reconstructing ultrasonographic planes with this high-resolution digitized anatomy not only enables an overview but also shows detailed views of the architecture of internal SN. The undulating course of the nerve fascicles within SN may explain its varying echogenic appearance during probe manipulation.

  8. Location of Rotator Cuff Tear Initiation: A Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study of 191 Shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jeung Yeol; Min, Seul Ki; Park, Keun Min; Park, Yong Bok; Han, Kwang Joon; Yoo, Jae Chul

    2018-03-01

    Degenerative rotator cuff tears (RCTs) are generally thought to originate at the anterior margin of the supraspinatus tendon. However, a recent ultrasonography study suggested that they might originate more posteriorly than originally thought, perhaps even from the isolated infraspinatus (ISP) tendon, and propagate toward the anterior supraspinatus. Hypothesis/Purpose: It was hypothesized that this finding could be reproduced with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose was to determine the most common location of degenerative RCTs by using 3-dimensional multiplanar MRI reconstruction. It was assumed that the location of the partial-thickness tears would identify the area of the initiation of full-thickness tears. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A retrospective analysis was conducted including 245 patients who had RCTs (nearly full- or partial-thickness tears) at the outpatient department between January 2011 and December 2013. RCTs were measured on 3-dimensional multiplanar reconstruction MRI with OsiriX software. The width and distance from the biceps tendon to the anterior margin of the tear were measured on T2-weighted sagittal images. In a spreadsheet, columns of consecutive numbers represented the size of each tear (anteroposterior width) and their locations with respect to the biceps brachii tendon. Data were pooled to graphically represent the width and location of all tears. Frequency histograms of the columns were made to visualize the distribution of tears. The tears were divided into 2 groups based on width (group A, location related to size. The mean width of all RCTs was 11.9 ± 4.1 mm, and the mean length was 11.1 ± 5.0 mm. Histograms showed the most common location of origin to be 9 to 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon. The histograms of groups A and B showed similar tear location distributions, indicating that the region approximately 10 mm posterior to the biceps tendon is the most common site of tear initiation. These

  9. Sinonasal imaging after Caldwell-Luc surgery: MDCT findings of an abandoned procedure in times of functional endoscopic sinus surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, Stefan Franz; Peloschek, Philipp; Koelblinger, Claus; Mehrain, Sheida; Krestan, Christian Robert; Czerny, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Today, functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) is performed in most of the patients with sinonasal inflammatory disease. The postoperative imaging findings of FESS in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) considerably differ from those of historic Caldwell-Luc (CL) maxillary sinus surgery which is an uncommon procedure today. Thus, the postoperative CL imaging findings may lead to diagnostic confusion and misinterpretation. Therefore, this study explicitly presents the MDCT findings of post-CL patients which have not been described previously. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with clinically suspected sinusitis and documented history of CL-procedure underwent 16 row MDCT (MDCT Mx8000 IDT Philips) with multiplanar reconstructions of the paranasal sinuses in the axial plane. The following parameters were used: 140 kV, 50 mAs; 16 mm x 0.75 mm detector collimation; 1 mm reconstructed slice thickness; 0.5 mm increment. The studies were reconstructed with a bone algorithm (W3000/L600; 1 mm slice thickness) in axial plane and coronal plane (3 mm slice thickness). The images were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of normal surgery-related and pathological findings. Results: Surgery-related imaging characteristics presented as follows: an anterior and a medial bony wall defect and sclerosis and sinus wall thickening were observed in all 28/28 cases (100%). Collaps of the sinus cavity was seen in 26/28 cases (92.9%). Furthermore, inflammatory disease of the operated sinus(es) was found in 23/28 cases (82.1%): 14/28 patients (50%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening of the operated sinus(es) as well as of other sinonasal cavities and 9/28 patients (32.1%) had inflammatory mucosal thickening limited to the operated sinus(es). A postoperative mucocele was depicted in 3/28 cases (10.7%). 2/28 patients (7.1%) showed neither maxillary nor other mucosal swelling. Conclusion: MDCT with multiplanar reconstructions is a precise method to evaluate

  10. Clinical significance of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of wrist joint in Rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Yong Woon; Suh, Jin Suck; Lee, Soo Kon; Lee, Ji Soo; Cho, Jae Hyun

    1996-01-01

    To assess the role of contrast-enhanced dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in evaluation disease activity of rheumatoid arthritis. Forty-seven wrist joints with rheumatoid arthritis were examined prospectively. Coronal images of the wrist were obtained using fat-suppression Fast multi-planar spoiled gradient recalled (FMPSPGR) acquisition in the steady state ; TR/TE 102/6.4 msec, flip angle = 60, 4 slices per sequence, FOV = 8 cm, matrix 256 X 192 at 1.5 Tesla. Scans were carried out once before and five to eight times after an intravenous Gd-DPTA injection, at 30-second-intervals. The enhancement of synovium were measured, the enhancement ratio was calculated(postcontrast SNR/precontrast SNR) and time-enhancement ratio curves were plotted. Patients were divided into three groups according to the ratio of initial to peak enhancement : less than 30% ; 30-80% more than 80%. Differences among the three groups were statistically tested using clinical indices and laboratory data as variable. Comparing one group with another, there were no significant differences in clinical indices and laboratory data except for the parameter of grip strength. Enhancement pattern measured in a single wrist joint was not comparable to a clinical index in predicting disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

  11. Quantitative evaluation of small breast masses using a compartment model analysis on dynamic MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Osamu; Morishita, Shoji; Kido, Taeko; Kitajima, Mika; Okamura, Kenji; Fukuda, Seiji [Kumamoto Rosai Hospital, Yatsushiro (Japan); Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Mutsumasa

    1998-07-01

    To differentiate between malignant and benign breast masses using a compartmental analysis, 55 patients with breast masses (fibroadenoma, n=22; invasive ductal carcinoma, n=29; noninvasive ductal carcinoma, n=8) underwent Gd-DTPA enhanced dynamic MR imaging. Dynamic MR images obtained using two-dimensional fat-saturated fast multiplanar corrupted gradient echo technique over 10 minutes following bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. The triexponential concentration curve of Gd-DTPA was fitted to a theoretical model based on compartmental analysis. Using this method, the transfer constant (or permeability surface product per unit volume of component k) and f{sub 3}/f{sub 1}=f were measured, where f{sub 1} represents tumor vessel volume and f{sub 3} represents extracellular volume. The k value was significantly greater (p<0.01) for malignant tumors, and the k value seen in cases of noninvasive ductal carcinoma was less than that for invasive ductal carcinoma. The f value was significantly smaller (p<0.01) for malignant tumors, whereas the f value for noninvasive ductal carcinoma was not significantly different from that for invasive ductal carcinoma. We believe that this type of compartmental analysis may be of value for the evaluation of breast masses. (author)

  12. Imaging of coronary artery stents using multislice computed tomography: in vitro evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintz, David; Juergens, Kai-Uwe; Heindel, Walter; Fischbach, Roman; Wichter, Thomas; Grude, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate imaging features of different coronary artery stents during multislice CT Angiography (MSCTA). Nineteen stents made of varying material (steel, nitinol, tantalum) and of varying stent design were implanted in plastic tubes with an inner diameter of 3 mm to simulate a coronary artery. The tubes were filled with iodinated contrast material diluted to 200 Hounsfield units (HU), closed at both ends and positioned in a plastic container filled with oil (-70 HU). The MSCT scans were obtained perpendicular to the stent axes (detector collimation 4 x 1 mm, table feed 2 mm/rotation, 300 mAs, 120 kV). Axial images and multiplanar reformations were evaluated regarding artifact size, lumen visibility, and intraluminal attenuation values. Artifacts characterized by artifactual thickening of the stent struts leading to apparent reduction in the lumen diameter and increased intraluminal attenuation values were observed in all cases. The stent lumen was totally obscured in the Wiktor stent, the Wallgraft stent, and the Nir Royal stent. Partial residual of the stent lumen could be visualized in all other utilized stent products (artificial lumen reductions ranged from 62% in the V-Flex stent to 94% in the Bx Velocity stent). Parts of the stent lumen can be visualized in most coronary artery stents; however, detectability of in-stent stenoses remains to be evaluated for each stent type. (orig.)

  13. Fusion of SPECT/TC images: Usefulness and benefits in degenerative spinal cord pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo, Monica; Ucros, Gonzalo; Bermudez, Sonia; Morillo, Anibal; Rodriguez, Andres

    2005-01-01

    The objectives are to compare CT and SPECT bone scintigraphy evaluated independently with SPECT-CT fusion images in patients with known degenerative spinal pathology. To demonstrate the clinical usefulness of CT and SPECT fusion images. Materials and methods: Thirty-one patients with suspected degenerative spinal disease were evaluated with thin-slice, non-angled helical CT and bone scintigrams with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), both with multiplanar reconstructions within a 24-hour period After independent evaluation by a nuclear medicine specialist and a radiologist, multimodality image fusion software was used to merge the CT and SPECT studies and a final consensus interpretation of the combined images was obtained. Results: Thirty-two SPECT bone scintigraphy images, helical CT studies and SPECT-CT fusion images were obtained for 31 patients with degenerative spinal disease. The results of the bone scintigraphy and CT scans were in agreement in 17 pairs of studies (53.12%). In these studies image fusion did not provide additional information on the location or extension of the lesions. In 11 of the study pairs (34.2%), the information obtained was not in agreement between scintigraphy and CT studies: CT images demonstrated several abnormalities, whereas the SPECT images showed only one dominant lesion, or the SPECT images did not provide enough information for anatomical localization. In these cases image fusion helped establish the precise localization of the most clinically significant lesion, which matched the lesion with the greatest uptake. In 4 studies (12.5%) the CT and SPECT images were not in agreement: CT and SPECT images showed different information (normal scintigraphy, abnormal CT), thus leading to inconclusive fusion images. Conclusion: The use of CT-SPECT fusion images in degenerative spinal disease allows for the integration of anatomic detail with physiologic and functional information. CT-SPECT fusion improves the

  14. Image Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Laura Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-08

    In large datasets, it is time consuming or even impossible to pick out interesting images. Our proposed solution is to find statistics to quantify the information in each image and use those to identify and pick out images of interest.

  15. Image Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidance that explains the process for getting images approved in One EPA Web microsites and resource directories. includes an appendix that shows examples of what makes some images better than others, how some images convey meaning more than others

  16. Data imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepy, G.

    1999-01-01

    After an introduction about data imaging in general, the principles of imaging data collected via neutron scattering experiments are presented. Some computer programs designed for data imaging purposes are reviewed. (K.A.)

  17. Multi Detector Computed Tomography Fistulography In Patients of Fistula-in-Ano: An Imaging Collage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Shuchi; Jain, Bhupendra Kumar; Singh, Vikas Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Fistula-in-ano, or perianal fistula, is a challenging clinical condition for both diagnosis and treatment. Imaging modalities such as fistulography, anal endosonography, perineal sonography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and computed tomography (CT) are available for its evaluation. MRI is considered as the modality of choice for an accurate delineation of the tract in relation to the sphincter complex and for the detection of associated complications. However, its availability and affordability is always an issue. Moreover, the requirement to obtain multiple sequences to depict the fistula in detail is cumbersome and confusing for the clinicians to interpret. The inability to show the fistula in relation to normal anatomical structures in a single image is also a limitation. Multi detector computed tomography fistulography ( MDCTF ) is an underutilized technique for defining perianal fistulas. Acquisition of iso-volumetric data sets with instillation of contrast into the fistula delineates the tract and its components. Post-processing with thin sections allows for a generation of good quality images for presentation in various planes (multi-planar reconstructions) and formats (volume rendered technique, maximum intensity projection). MDCTF demonstrates the type of fistula, its extent, whether it is simple or complex, and shows the site of internal opening and associated complications; all in easy to understand images that can be used by the surgeons. Its capability to represent the entire pathology in relation to normal anatomical structures in few images is a definite advantage. MDCTF can be utilized when MRI is contraindicated or not feasible. This pictorial review shares our initial experience with MDCT fistulography in evaluating fistula-in-ano, demonstrates various components of fistulas, and discusses the types of fistulas according to the standard Parks classification.

  18. A combined solenoid-surface RF coil for high-resolution whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Yuan, Chun; Hayes, Cecil E

    2010-09-01

    Rat brain models effectively simulate a multitude of human neurological disorders. Improvements in coil design have facilitated the wider utilization of rat brain models by enabling the utilization of clinical MR scanners for image acquisition. In this study, a novel coil design, subsequently referred to as the rat brain coil, is described that exploits and combines the strengths of both solenoids and surface coils into a simple, multichannel, receive-only coil dedicated to whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 T clinical MR scanner. Compared with a multiturn solenoid mouse body coil, a 3-cm surface coil, a modified Helmholtz coil, and a phased-array surface coil, the rat brain coil improved signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 72, 61, 78, and 242%, respectively. Effects of the rat brain coil on amplitudes of static field and radiofrequency field uniformity were similar to each of the other coils. In vivo, whole-brain images of an adult male rat were acquired with a T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequence using an isotropic acquisition resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm(3) in 60.6 min. Multiplanar images of the in vivo rat brain with identification of anatomic structures are presented. Improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by the rat brain coil may broaden experiments that utilize clinical MR scanners for in vivo image acquisition. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Pancreatic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potsaid, M.S.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical use of [ 75 Se] selenomethionine for visualising the pancreas is described. The physiological considerations, imaging procedure, image interpretations and reliability are considered. (C.F.)

  20. Ileocecocolic volvulus in a German shepherd dog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javard, Romain; Specchi, Swan; Benamou, Jérôme; Lapointe, Catherine; Deffontaines, Jean-Baptiste; Planté, Jérôme; d’Anjou, Marc-André

    2014-01-01

    This report describes an ileocecocolic volvulus in a German shepherd dog with risk factors of previous abdominal surgeries and concurrent chronic enteropathy. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) with multiplanar reformatting was more sensitive than abdominal radiographs or ultrasound to obtain a diagnosis, because of the presence of a “whirl-sign” on CT. A combination of colopexy and cecopexy was succesfully used to treat the patient’s condition. PMID:25392556

  1. Comparison of 3D cube FLAIR with 2D FLAIR for multiple sclerosis imaging at 3 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzig, M.; Brueckmann, H.; Fesl, G. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Burke, M. [GE Healthcare, Solingen (Germany)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Three-dimensional (3 D) MRI sequences allow improved spatial resolution with good signal and contrast properties as well as multiplanar reconstruction. We sought to compare Cube, a 3 D FLAIR sequence, to a standard 2 D FLAIR sequence in multiple sclerosis (MS) imaging. Materials and Methods: Examinations were performed in the clinical routine on a 3.0 Tesla scanner. 12 patients with definite MS were included. Lesions with MS-typical properties on the images of Cube FLAIR and 2 D FLAIR sequences were counted and allocated to different brain regions. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were calculated. Results: With 384 the overall number of lesions found with Cube FLAIR was significantly higher than with 2 D FLAIR (N = 221). The difference was mostly accounted for by supratentorial lesions (N = 372 vs. N = 216) while the infratentorial lesion counts were low in both sequences. SNRs and CNRs were significantly higher in CUBE FLAIR with the exception of the CNR of lesion to gray matter, which was not significantly different. Conclusion: Cube FLAIR showed a higher sensitivity for MS lesions compared to a 2 D FLAIR sequence. 3 D FLAIR might replace 2 D FLAIR sequences in MS imaging in the future. (orig.)

  2. Effects of dose reduction on multi-detector computed tomographic images in evaluating the maxilla and mandible for pre-surgical implant planning: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Hiroshi; Sur, Jaideep; Seki, Kenji; Nakajima, Koh; Sano, Tsukasa; Okano, Tomohiro

    2010-08-01

    To assess effects of dose reduction on image quality in evaluating maxilla and mandible for pre-surgical implant planning using cadavers. Six cadavers were used for the study using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) operated at 120 kV and the variable tube current of 80, 40, 20 and 10 mA. A slice thickness of 0.625 mm and pitch 1 were used. Multi-planar images perpendicular and parallel to dentitions were created. The images were evaluated by five oral radiologists in terms of visibility of the anatomical landmarks including alveolar crest, mandibular canal, floors of the maxillary sinus and nasal cavity, contours/cortical layer of jaw bones and the details of trabecular bone. Observers were asked to determine the quality of the images in comparison with 80 mA images based on the criteria: excellent, good, fair or non-diagnostic. The average scores of all observers were calculated for each specimen in all exposure conditions. The 40 mA images could visualize such landmarks and were evaluated to be same or almost equivalent in quality to the 80 mA images. Even the 20 mA images could be accepted just for diagnostic purpose for implant with substantial deterioration of the image quality. The 10 mA images may not be accepted because of the obscured contour caused by image noise. Significant dose reduction by lowering mA can be utilized for pre-surgical implant planning in multi-detector CT.

  3. Evaluation of pituitary adenomas by multidirectional multislice dynamic CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, T.; Izumiyama, H.; Fujisawa, I.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Multidetector-row CT is a new technology with a short scanning time. Multislice dynamic CT (MSDCT) in various directions can be obtained using the multidetector-row CT with multiplanar reformatting (MPR) technique. Material and Methods: We evaluated the initial results of sagittal and coronal MSDCT images reconstructed by MPR (MSDCT-MPR) in 3 pituitary adenoma patients with a pacemaker. Results: In a patient with microadenoma, the maximum contrast between the normal anterior pituitary gland and the adenoma occurred approximately 50 s after the start of the contrast medium injection. A microadenoma was depicted as a less enhanced area relative to normal pituitary tissue. The macroadenomas were depicted as a less enhanced mass with cavernous sinus invasion in 1 patient and as a non-uniformly enhanced mass in another patient. Bone destruction and incomplete opening of the sellar floor during previous surgery were clearly detected in 2 patients with macroadenomas. These pituitary adenomas were removed via the transnasal route based on information from the MSDCT-MPR images only. The findings were verified surgically. Conclusion: The MSDCT-MPR provided the information needed for surgery with good image quality in the 3 patients with pacemakers. MSDCT-MPR appears to be a useful technique for patients with a pituitary adenoma in whom MR imaging is not available. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the MSDCT-MPR technique being used to demonstrate pituitary disorders

  4. Evaluation of pituitary adenomas by multidirectional multislice dynamic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, T.; Izumiyama, H. [Showa Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Fujisawa, I. [Kishiwada City Hospital, Kishiwada (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-11-01

    Purpose: Multidetector-row CT is a new technology with a short scanning time. Multislice dynamic CT (MSDCT) in various directions can be obtained using the multidetector-row CT with multiplanar reformatting (MPR) technique. Material and Methods: We evaluated the initial results of sagittal and coronal MSDCT images reconstructed by MPR (MSDCT-MPR) in 3 pituitary adenoma patients with a pacemaker. Results: In a patient with microadenoma, the maximum contrast between the normal anterior pituitary gland and the adenoma occurred approximately 50 s after the start of the contrast medium injection. A microadenoma was depicted as a less enhanced area relative to normal pituitary tissue. The macroadenomas were depicted as a less enhanced mass with cavernous sinus invasion in 1 patient and as a non-uniformly enhanced mass in another patient. Bone destruction and incomplete opening of the sellar floor during previous surgery were clearly detected in 2 patients with macroadenomas. These pituitary adenomas were removed via the transnasal route based on information from the MSDCT-MPR images only. The findings were verified surgically. Conclusion: The MSDCT-MPR provided the information needed for surgery with good image quality in the 3 patients with pacemakers. MSDCT-MPR appears to be a useful technique for patients with a pituitary adenoma in whom MR imaging is not available. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of the MSDCT-MPR technique being used to demonstrate pituitary disorders.

  5. Image city

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities.......Image city exhibition explores a condition of mediation, through a focus on image and sound narratives with a point of departure on a number of Asian cities....

  6. The Economics of Managed Print and Imaging Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    process are called poka - yokes , which are methods to prevent mistakes. This combination of controls is designed to make a system foolproof because it...must be reformatted prior to turn-in.” This sticker serves as a poka - yoke , as mentioned in Chapter IV. A breach of PII can also result from

  7. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notohamiprodjo, S.; Deak, Z.; Meurer, F.; Maertz, F.; Mueck, F.G.; Geyer, L.L.; Wirth, S. [Ludwig-Maximilians University Hospital of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p < 0.01). The median depiction score for MBIR was 3, whereas the median value for ASiR was 2 (p < 0.01). SNR and CNR were significantly higher in MBIR than ASiR (p < 0.01). MBIR showed significant improvement of IQ parameters compared to ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. (orig.)

  8. Image quality of iterative reconstruction in cranial CT imaging: comparison of model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notohamiprodjo, S.; Deak, Z.; Meurer, F.; Maertz, F.; Mueck, F.G.; Geyer, L.L.; Wirth, S.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cranial CT (CCT) image quality (IQ) of the MBIR algorithm with standard iterative reconstruction (ASiR). In this institutional review board (IRB)-approved study, raw data sets of 100 unenhanced CCT examinations (120 kV, 50-260 mAs, 20 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch) were reconstructed with both ASiR and MBIR. Signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were calculated from attenuation values measured in caudate nucleus, frontal white matter, anterior ventricle horn, fourth ventricle, and pons. Two radiologists, who were blinded to the reconstruction algorithms, evaluated anonymized multiplanar reformations of 2.5 mm with respect to depiction of different parenchymal structures and impact of artefacts on IQ with a five-point scale (0: unacceptable, 1: less than average, 2: average, 3: above average, 4: excellent). MBIR decreased artefacts more effectively than ASiR (p < 0.01). The median depiction score for MBIR was 3, whereas the median value for ASiR was 2 (p < 0.01). SNR and CNR were significantly higher in MBIR than ASiR (p < 0.01). MBIR showed significant improvement of IQ parameters compared to ASiR. As CCT is an examination that is frequently required, the use of MBIR may allow for substantial reduction of radiation exposure caused by medical diagnostics. (orig.)

  9. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in fetal intervention and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of this poster is to illustrate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide detailed anatomical information in the assessment of fetal anomalies, and the role this information plays in planning maternal and fetal management and treatment. Between November 1999 and June 2001, 41 fetal MRI examinations were performed on 34 patients at the Royal Children's Hospital. The patients were referred for further imaging by neonatologists and paediatric specialists, who had been consulted following an anomaly being detected on routine obstetric ultrasound. Gestational age ranged between 19 and 36 weeks, with a mean gestational age on presentation of 23.5 weeks. All the patients were scanned with high-resolution single shot fast spin echo (SSFSE) T2 weighted sequences, in multiple planes, using a 1.5 Tesla GE LX Echo-speed magnet. Fetal MRI confirmed the diagnosis in 10 cases, added to the ultrasound diagnosis or confirmed a differential diagnosis in 11 cases, and altered the diagnosis in 9 cases (of which 4 were shown to be normal variants). MRI was able to make the diagnosis in 1 case (cervical teratoma), and guided perinatal intervention in 4 cases (1 cervical teratoma, 1 sacrococcygeal teratoma, 1 vein of Galen aneurysm, and 1 case of conjoint twins). In all of the cases to date, MR imaging has provided useful information, particularly in the area of parental counselling, and for practitioners providing fetal management options. While ultrasound remains the screening modality of choice for fetal imaging, the introduction of ultra-fast imaging sequences has dramatically improved the ability of MRI to evaluate fetal anomalies. MRI, with its excellent soft tissue contrast, large field of view, and multiplanar capabilities, frequently provides invaluable additional and complementary information to ultrasound. This is proving particularly useful in the pre-natal management and counselling, the planning of antenatal and peripartum

  10. Three-dimensional Image Fusion Guidance for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacher, Vania; Petit, Arthur; Derbel, Haytham; Novelli, Luigi; Vitellius, Manuel; Ridouani, Fourat; Luciani, Alain; Rahmouni, Alain; Duvoux, Christophe; Salloum, Chady; Chiaradia, Mélanie; Kobeiter, Hicham

    2017-11-01

    To assess the safety, feasibility and effectiveness of image fusion guidance with pre-procedural portal phase computed tomography with intraprocedural fluoroscopy for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement. All consecutive cirrhotic patients presenting at our interventional unit for TIPS creation from January 2015 to January 2016 were prospectively enrolled. Procedures were performed under general anesthesia in an interventional suite equipped with flat panel detector, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and image fusion technique. All TIPSs were placed under image fusion guidance. After hepatic vein catheterization, an unenhanced CBCT acquisition was performed and co-registered with the pre-procedural portal phase CT images. A virtual path between hepatic vein and portal branch was made using the virtual needle path trajectory software. Subsequently, the 3D virtual path was overlaid on 2D fluoroscopy for guidance during portal branch cannulation. Safety, feasibility, effectiveness and per-procedural data were evaluated. Sixteen patients (12 males; median age 56 years) were included. Procedures were technically feasible in 15 of the 16 patients (94%). One procedure was aborted due to hepatic vein catheterization failure related to severe liver distortion. No periprocedural complications occurred within 48 h of the procedure. The median dose-area product was 91 Gy cm 2 , fluoroscopy time 15 min, procedure time 40 min and contrast media consumption 65 mL. Clinical benefit of the TIPS placement was observed in nine patients (56%). This study suggests that 3D image fusion guidance for TIPS is feasible, safe and effective. By identifying virtual needle path, CBCT enables real-time multiplanar guidance and may facilitate TIPS placement.

  11. Changes in signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratios of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas on ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yulri; Choi, Dongil; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Kim, Min Ju; Lee, Jongmee; Lim, Jae Hoon; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To verify changes in the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) on ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic T1-weighted MR imaging. Materials and methods: Fifty-two patients with 61 hypervascular HCCs underwent ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging, and then hepatic resection. Hypervascular HCCs were identified when definite enhancement was noted during the arterial dominant phase of three-phase MDCT. Dynamic MR Images with T1-weighted fast multiplanar spoiled gradient-recalled echo sequence (TR200/TE4.2) were obtained before and 20 s, and 1, 3, 5, and 10 min, after bolus injection of ferucarbotran. We estimated the signal intensities of tumors and livers, and calculated the SNRs and CNRs of the tumors. Results: On ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging, SNR measurements showed a fluctuating pattern, namely, an increase in SNR followed by a decrease and a subsequent increase (or a decrease in SNR followed by a increase and a subsequent decrease) in 50 (82.0%) of 61 tumors, a single-peak SNR pattern (highest SNR on 20 s, 1, 3, or 5 min delayed images followed by a decrease) in seven (11.5%), and a decrease in SNR followed by an increase in four (6.6%). Maximum absolute CNRs with positive value were noted on 10 min delayed images in 41 (67.2%) tumors, and maximum absolute CNRs with negative value were observed on 20 s delayed images in 12 (19.7%) and on 1 min delayed images in eight (13.1%). Conclusion: Despite showing various SNR and CNR changes, the majority of hypervascular HCCs demonstrated a fluctuating SNR pattern on ferucarbotran-enhanced dynamic MR imaging and a highest CNR on 10 min delayed image, which differed from the classic enhancement pattern on multiphasic CT

  12. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, E. E-mail: eciftcis7@hotmail.com; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-09-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts.

  13. Driven equilibrium (drive) MR imaging of the cranial nerves V-VIII: comparison with the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciftci, E.; Anik, Yonca; Arslan, Arzu; Akansel, Gur; Sarisoy, Tahsin; Demirci, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of the driven equilibrium radio frequency reset pulse (DRIVE) on image quality and nerve detection when used in adjunction with T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients with cranial nerve symptoms referable to the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) were examined using a T2-weighted 3D TSE pulse sequence with and without DRIVE. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MRI scanner. In addition to the axial resource images, reformatted oblique sagittal, oblique coronal and maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the inner ear were evaluated. The nerve identification and image quality were graded for the cranial nerves V-VIII as well as inner ear structures. These structures were chosen because fluid-solid interfaces existed due to the CSF around (the cranial nerves V-VIII) or the endolymph within (the inner ear structures). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test. P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The addition of the DRIVE pulse shortens the scan time by 25%. T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence with DRIVE performed slightly better than the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence without DRIVE in identifying the individual nerves. The image quality was also slightly better with DRIVE. Conclusion: The addition of the DRIVE pulse to the T2-weighted 3D TSE sequence is preferable when imaging the cranial nerves surrounded by the CSF, or fluid-filled structures because of shorter scan time and better image quality due to reduced flow artifacts

  14. 3T MRI and 128-slice dual-source CT cisternography images of the cranial nerves a brief pictorial review for clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto; Martinez-Anda, Jaime J; Corona-Cedillo, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    There is a broad community of health sciences professionals interested in the anatomy of the cranial nerves (CNs): specialists in neurology, neurosurgery, radiology, otolaryngology, ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, radiation oncology, and emergency medicine, as well as other related fields. Advances in neuroimaging using high-resolution images from computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) have made highly-detailed visualization of brain structures possible, allowing normal findings to be routinely assessed and nervous system pathology to be detected. In this article we present an integrated perspective of the normal anatomy of the CNs established by radiologists and neurosurgeons in order to provide a practical imaging review, which combines 128-slice dual-source multiplanar images from CT cisternography and 3T MR curved reconstructed images. The information about the CNs includes their origin, course (with emphasis on the cisternal segments and location of the orifices at the skull base transmitting them), function, and a brief listing of the most common pathologies affecting them. The scope of the article is clinical anatomy; readers will find specialized texts presenting detailed information about particular topics. Our aim in this article is to provide a helpful reference for understanding the complex anatomy of the cranial nerves. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. MRI findings of sacroiliitis in ankylosing spondylitis: roles of MPGR and delayed post-contrast T1-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Eui Yong; Joo, Kyung Bin; Koo, Ja Hong; Moon, Won Jin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Seong Yoon

    1997-01-01

    For early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in spondyloarthropathy, the MRI findings of sacroiliitis, roles of MPGR(multiplanar Gradient Recalled Acquisition in Steady State), and delayed post-contrast T1-weighted images were evaluated. Twenty six patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy(Probable clinical diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis) were grouped as either less than radiographic grade 1(group A) or more than grade 2(group B). The MRI findings of both sacroiliac joints were evaluated in every patient, and predominant sites were determined. The two groups were then compared. In 17 patients, the number of enhancing panni seen on early and delayed post-contrast T1-weighted images was counted and compared between the two groups. Panni were found in all cases, and in both groups, predominant patterns of involvement were the lower and iliac aspects of the sacroiliac joints in both groups; in group A, the synovial joints and punctate pannus were predominantly involved, and in group B, the ligamentous joints as well as the synovial joints and linear pannus. In group B, More periarticular fat accumulation than periarticular osteitis was found. For the evaluation of changes in joint space, MPGR images were superior to spin echo images. For the delineation of enhancing pannus less than radiographic grade I, delayed post-contrast images were statistically superior to those which were early post-contrast. MRI can detect early sacroiliitic change according to the predominant sites of involvement, and deslyed post-contrast images play a role in the diagnosis of early sacroiliitis. MPGR imaging is good for the evaluation of joint space change

  16. MRI findings of sacroiliitis in ankylosing spondylitis: roles of MPGR and delayed post-contrast T1-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Eui Yong; Joo, Kyung Bin; Koo, Ja Hong; Moon, Won Jin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Tae Hwan; Kim, Seong Yoon [Hanyang Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-10-01

    For early diagnosis of sacroiliitis in spondyloarthropathy, the MRI findings of sacroiliitis, roles of MPGR(multiplanar Gradient Recalled Acquisition in Steady State), and delayed post-contrast T1-weighted images were evaluated. Twenty six patients with seronegative spondyloarthropathy(Probable clinical diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis) were grouped as either less than radiographic grade 1(group A) or more than grade 2(group B). The MRI findings of both sacroiliac joints were evaluated in every patient, and predominant sites were determined. The two groups were then compared. In 17 patients, the number of enhancing panni seen on early and delayed post-contrast T1-weighted images was counted and compared between the two groups. Panni were found in all cases, and in both groups, predominant patterns of involvement were the lower and iliac aspects of the sacroiliac joints in both groups; in group A, the synovial joints and punctate pannus were predominantly involved, and in group B, the ligamentous joints as well as the synovial joints and linear pannus. In group B, More periarticular fat accumulation than periarticular osteitis was found. For the evaluation of changes in joint space, MPGR images were superior to spin echo images. For the delineation of enhancing pannus less than radiographic grade I, delayed post-contrast images were statistically superior to those which were early post-contrast. MRI can detect early sacroiliitic change according to the predominant sites of involvement, and deslyed post-contrast images play a role in the diagnosis of early sacroiliitis. MPGR imaging is good for the evaluation of joint space change.

  17. Veganism In Star Trek : A Comic Reformatting Of Plant-Based Space Exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Tamminen, Tiariia

    2017-01-01

    My thesis revolves around collecting references to veganism and animal rights in five different science fiction TV series of the Star Trek franchise. I especially concentrate on how the character creation, setting and spoken lines express development and implementation of food technology and ethics. My objective is to show how our relationship to food and animal rights is presented in the main canon of the Star Trek franchise in terms of exploration in space. I will express this further t...

  18. CONNJUR spectrum translator: an open source application for reformatting NMR spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowling, Ronald J; Vyas, Jay; Weatherby, Gerard; Fenwick, Matthew W; Ellis, Heidi J C; Gryk, Michael R

    2011-05-01

    NMR spectroscopists are hindered by the lack of standardization for spectral data among the file formats for various NMR data processing tools. This lack of standardization is cumbersome as researchers must perform their own file conversion in order to switch between processing tools and also restricts the combination of tools employed if no conversion option is available. The CONNJUR Spectrum Translator introduces a new, extensible architecture for spectrum translation and introduces two key algorithmic improvements. This first is translation of NMR spectral data (time and frequency domain) to a single in-memory data model to allow addition of new file formats with two converter modules, a reader and a writer, instead of writing a separate converter to each existing format. Secondly, the use of layout descriptors allows a single fid data translation engine to be used for all formats. For the end user, sophisticated metadata readers allow conversion of the majority of files with minimum user configuration. The open source code is freely available at http://connjur.sourceforge.net for inspection and extension.

  19. CONNJUR spectrum translator: an open source application for reformatting NMR spectral data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowling, Ronald J.; Vyas, Jay [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular, Microbial and Structural Biology (United States); Weatherby, Gerard [Western New England College, Department of Computer Science/Information Technology (United States); Fenwick, Matthew W. [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular, Microbial and Structural Biology (United States); Ellis, Heidi J. C. [Western New England College, Department of Computer Science/Information Technology (United States); Gryk, Michael R., E-mail: gryk@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular, Microbial and Structural Biology (United States)

    2011-05-15

    NMR spectroscopists are hindered by the lack of standardization for spectral data among the file formats for various NMR data processing tools. This lack of standardization is cumbersome as researchers must perform their own file conversion in order to switch between processing tools and also restricts the combination of tools employed if no conversion option is available. The CONNJUR Spectrum Translator introduces a new, extensible architecture for spectrum translation and introduces two key algorithmic improvements. This first is translation of NMR spectral data (time and frequency domain) to a single in-memory data model to allow addition of new file formats with two converter modules, a reader and a writer, instead of writing a separate converter to each existing format. Secondly, the use of layout descriptors allows a single fid data translation engine to be used for all formats. For the end user, sophisticated metadata readers allow conversion of the majority of files with minimum user configuration. The open source code is freely available at http://connjur.sourceforge.nethttp://connjur.sourceforge.net for inspection and extension.

  20. Maxillofacial imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larheim, T.A. [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Maxillofacial Radiology; Westesson, P.L. [Univ. of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY (United States). Div. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2006-07-01

    Maxillofacial imaging has evolved dramatically over the past two decades with development of new cross-sectional imaging techniques. Traditional maxillofacial imaging was based on plain films and dental imaging. However, today's advanced imaging techniques with CT and MRI have only been partially implemented for maxillofacial questions. This book bridges the gap between traditional maxillofacial imaging and advanced medical imaging. We have applied CT and MRI to a variety of maxillofacial cases and these are illustrated with high-quality images and multiple planes. A comprehensive chapter on imaging anatomy is also included. This book is useful for oral and maxillofacial radiologists, oral and maxillofacial surgeons, dentists, radiologists, plastic surgeons, head and neck surgeons, and others that work with severe maxillofacial disorders. (orig.)

  1. Imaging angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Natalie; Donaldson, Stephanie; Price, Pat

    2009-01-01

    There is a need for direct imaging of effects on tumor vasculature in assessment of response to antiangiogenic drugs and vascular disrupting agents. Imaging tumor vasculature depends on differences in permeability of vasculature of tumor and normal tissue, which cause changes in penetration of contrast agents. Angiogenesis imaging may be defined in terms of measurement of tumor perfusion and direct imaging of the molecules involved in angiogenesis. In addition, assessment of tumor hypoxia will give an indication of tumor vasculature. The range of imaging techniques available for these processes includes positron emission tomography (PET), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), perfusion computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound (US).

  2. Early Indicators of Treatment Success After Percutaneous Radiofrequency of Pulmonary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Ewan Mark; Lees, W. R.; Gillams, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the imaging of patients after radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of lung metastases performed at our institution to assess the usefulness of ground glass opacification (GGO) margin for the prediction of complete tumor ablation. From January 2004 to March 2007, patients were identified where there was a postprocedure thin collimation scan to allow multiplanar reformatting, either immediately or at 24 h and at least 6 months of imaging follow-up. Thirty-six tumors in 22 patients were identified. The scans were assessed for the presence and width of GGO margin, and minimal and maximal dimensions were measured. A second reviewer, blinded to the outcome of the postprocedure assessment, reviewed the follow-up imaging for recurrence. The recurrence group had larger tumors (p = 0.045) and smaller mean minimal GGO margin width (p = 0.0001). Multivariate binary regression analysis confirmed that the minimal GGO margin was significantly (p 5 mm is the minimal margion required to ensure complete tumor ablation.

  3. Functioning islet cell tumor of the pancreas. Localization with dynamic spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, M.J.; Choi, B.I.; Han, J.K.; Chung, J.W.; Han, M.C.; Bae, S.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of dynamic spiral CT, including multidimensional reformation, in the detection and localization of islet cell tumors of the pancreas. Material and Methods: Seven patients with histopathologically proven functioning islet cell tumors of the pancreas were studied with 2-phase contrast-enhanced spiral CT. Scanning of the arterial phase and late phase was started 30 s and 180 s, respectively, after injection of 100 ml of contrast medium at a rate of 3 ml/s. Results: Axial images in the arterial phase depicted the lesions in 5 patients, but in the late phase in only one patient. Multiplanar reformatted images of the arterial phase depicted the lesions in all 7 patients. Maximal intensity projection images demonstrated all lesions with information of their relationship to the vascular structure. Conclusion: Dynamic spiral CT with scanning during the arterial phase and retrospective multidimensional reformation is useful for preoperative detection and localization of small islet cell tumors of the pancreas. (orig.)

  4. Detection of biliary and vascular anatomy in living liver donors: Value of gadobenate dimeglumine enhanced MR and MDCT angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artioli, Diana; Tagliabue, Marianna; Aseni, Paolo; Sironi, Sandro; Vanzulli, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the assessment of living donor's vascular and biliary anatomy, having surgical findings as reference standard. Methods: Thirty-two living liver donors underwent MR cholangiography (1.5-T; standard cholangiography pulse sequences and delayed acquisitions after administration of biliary contrast agent) for biliary anatomy evaluation. MDCT (16-row multidetector scanner, multiphase protocol, 3 mm slice thickness) was also performed in all cases for the assessment of vascular anatomy before transplantation. Hepatic veins (<4 mm in diameter) were not considered. MR and MDCT images interpretation was performed by two reviewers by consensus, based on source axial images, multiplanar reformats, and three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing images. Surgical intraoperative findings were used as standard of reference. Results: At surgery, 17 biliary anomalies, 3 portal anomalies, 32 venous and 8 arterial variants were found in the 32 patients. MR correctly identified 15/17 biliary anomalies, with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93%. MDCT correctly identified 8/8 arterial, 3/3 portal and 29/32 venous variants, with a sensitivity of 100% and 91%, respectively, and a specificity of 100%. Conclusions: MR and MDCT proved to be efficient in evaluating living liver donor's biliary and vascular anatomy.

  5. Computational modeling of blood flow in the aorta--insights into eccentric dilatation of the ascending aorta after surgery for coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopos, Marcela; Poussineau, Nicole; Maday, Yvon; Canniffe, Carla; Celermajer, David S; Bonnet, Damien; Ou, Phalla

    2014-10-01

    To assess whether combining a computational modeling technique with data from patient magnetic resonance imaging studies can detect different fluid dynamics and vascular biomechanical properties of the ascending and horizontal aorta in patients with angulated "gothic" arch geometry compared with those with normal "Romanesque" arch geometry after aortic coarctation repair. Advanced computational fluid dynamics techniques (coupled Navier-Stokes and elastodynamics equations) were used to predict the fluid-wall interactions in large arteries. We modeled the fluid dynamics and shear stress in the ascending and horizontal aorta in cases of "gothic" arch and normal "Romanesque" aortic arch geometry. A total of 30 patients after aortic coarctation repair prospectively underwent 3-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging angiography of the thoracic aorta. Measurements of the ascending and horizontal aorta were assessed using multiplanar reformatting images. Our computational model demonstrated that wall shear stress is greater in those with an angulated "gothic" aortic arch than in those with a "Romanesque" arch. In particular, wall shear stress affected the anterior and posterior segments of the ascending aorta and the inferior and superior segments of the horizontal aorta (vs the left and right segments). In vivo, a "gothic" arch was associated with dilatation of the ascending and horizontal aorta, which was eccentric rather than concentric (Pgothic" aortic arch after repair of coarctation. This suggests that patients with an angulated "gothic" aortic arch might warrant increased surveillance for aortic complications. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of the anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Whal; Chung, Jin-Wook; Kang, Heung-Sik; Hong, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Kim, Ho-Sung; Kim, Seok-Jung; Kim, Hyung-Ho

    2004-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy in the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament and meniscus pathology. Thirty-eight consecutive patients sho underwent CT arthrography and arthroscopy of the knee were included in this study. The ages of the patients ranged from 19 to 52 years and all of the patients were male. Sagittal, coronal, transverse and oblique coronal multiplanar reconstruction images were reformatted from CT arthrography. Virtual arthroscopy was performed from 6 standard views using a volume rendering technique. Three radiologists analyzed the MPR images and two orthopedic surgeons analyzed the virtual arthroscopic images. The sensitivity and specificity of CT arthrography for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5%-100% and 93.3%-96.7%, respectively and those for meniscus abnormalities were 91.7%-100% and 98.1%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of virtual arthroscopy for the diagnosis of anterior cruciate ligament abnormalities were 87.5% and 83.3%-90%, respectively, and those for meniscus abnormalities were 83.3%-87.5% and 96.1-98.1%, respectively. CT arthrography and virtual arthroscopy showed good diagnostic accuracy for anterior cruciate ligament and meniscal abnormalities

  7. Anomalies of Pulmonary Circulation as a Cause of Hemoptysis: A Series of Unusual Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamini Gupta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The expectoration of blood originating from the lower respiratory tract, called hemoptysis, is a common clinical condition with many potential etiologies. Massive hemoptysis is life threatening and needs urgent intervention. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT is a useful non-invasive imaging modality for the initial assessment of hemoptysis. Using MDCT with multiplanar reformatted images has improved the diagnosis and management of hemoptysis by providing a more precise depiction of bronchial and non-bronchial systemic arteries than conventional computed tomography (CT. In 95% of hemoptysis cases, the systemic arterial system is the origin of bleeding and pulmonary vascular anomalies are a rare cause. Among these, pulmonary arteriovenous malformation, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, and Osler-Weber-Rendu disease are well known entities. However, primary anomalies affecting pulmonary vessels in the mediastinum or diseases secondarily affecting the pulmonary vessels are unusual causes. Here we present three cases where patients had pulmonary vascular anomalies causing hemoptysis. These patients had decreased pulmonary arterial pressures leading to bronchial and systemic arterial hypertrophy and development of bronchopulmonary collaterals. Secondary CT signs in the parenchyma and mediastinum (mosaic attenuation, ground glass haze, subpleural interstitial thickening, and hypertrophied bronchial arteries were similar in all patients. Hence, evaluation of the MDCT images for primary abnormality led to the diagnosis.

  8. Detection of biliary and vascular anatomy in living liver donors: Value of gadobenate dimeglumine enhanced MR and MDCT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artioli, Diana, E-mail: diansadiana@gmail.com [Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, 20162 Milano (Italy); Tagliabue, Marianna; Aseni, Paolo; Sironi, Sandro; Vanzulli, Angelo [Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Piazza Ospedale Maggiore 3, 20162 Milano (Italy)

    2010-11-15

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of magnetic resonance (MR) and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) in the assessment of living donor's vascular and biliary anatomy, having surgical findings as reference standard. Methods: Thirty-two living liver donors underwent MR cholangiography (1.5-T; standard cholangiography pulse sequences and delayed acquisitions after administration of biliary contrast agent) for biliary anatomy evaluation. MDCT (16-row multidetector scanner, multiphase protocol, 3 mm slice thickness) was also performed in all cases for the assessment of vascular anatomy before transplantation. Hepatic veins (<4 mm in diameter) were not considered. MR and MDCT images interpretation was performed by two reviewers by consensus, based on source axial images, multiplanar reformats, and three-dimensional (3D) postprocessing images. Surgical intraoperative findings were used as standard of reference. Results: At surgery, 17 biliary anomalies, 3 portal anomalies, 32 venous and 8 arterial variants were found in the 32 patients. MR correctly identified 15/17 biliary anomalies, with a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 93%. MDCT correctly identified 8/8 arterial, 3/3 portal and 29/32 venous variants, with a sensitivity of 100% and 91%, respectively, and a specificity of 100%. Conclusions: MR and MDCT proved to be efficient in evaluating living liver donor's biliary and vascular anatomy.

  9. Comparison of different radiographic methods for the detection of the mandibular canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung

    2003-01-01

    To compare the visibility of the mandibular canal at the different radiographic methods such as conventional panoramic radiographs, Vimplant multiplanar reformatting (MPR)-CT panoramic images, Vimplant MPR-CT paraxial images and film-based DentaScan MPR-CT images. Data of 11 mandibular dental implant patients, who had been planned treatment utilizing both panoramic and MPR-CT examination with DentaScan software (GE Medical systems, Milwaukee, USA), were used in this study. The archived axial CT data stored on CD-R discs were transferred to a personal computer with 17' LCD monitor. Paraxial and panoramic images were reconstructed using Vimplant software (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Conventional panoramic radiographs, monitor-based Vimplant MPR-CT panoramic images, monitor-based Vimplant MPR-CT paraxial images, and film-based DentaScan MPR-CT images were evaluated for visibility of the mandibular canal at the mental foramen, 1 cm, 2 cm, and 3 cm posterior to mental foramen using the 4-point grading score. Vimplant MPR-CT panoramic, paraxial, and DentaScan MPR-CT images revealed significantly clearer images than conventional panoramic radiographs. Particularly at the region 1 cm posterior to mental foramen, conventional panoramic radiographs showed a markedly lower percentage of 'excellent' mandibular canal images than images produced by other modalities. Vimplant MPR-CT and DentaScan MPR-CT images did not show significant difference in visibility of the mandibular canal. The study results shoe that Vimplant and DentaScan MPR-CT imaging systems offer significantly better images of the mandibular canal than conventional panoramic radiograph.

  10. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  11. Feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography of the normal female pelvic floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijta, F.M.; Froeling, M.; Paardt, M.P. van der; Bipat, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Stoker, J.; Lakeman, M.M.E.; Montauban van Swijndregt, A.D.; Strijkers, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    To prospectively determine the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography as a tool for the three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of normal pelvic floor anatomy. Five young female nulliparous subjects (mean age 28 ± 3 years) underwent DTI at 3.0T. Two-dimensional diffusion-weighted axial spin-echo echo-planar (SP-EPI) pulse sequence of the pelvic floor was performed, with additional T2-TSE multiplanar sequences for anatomical reference. Fibre tractography for visualisation of predefined pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles was performed offline by two observers, applying a consensus method. Three eigenvalues (λ1, λ2, λ3), fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated from the fibre trajectories. In all subjects fibre tractography resulted in a satisfactory anatomical representation of the pubovisceral muscle, perineal body, anal - and urethral sphincter complex and internal obturator muscle. Mean FA values ranged from 0.23 ± 0.02 to 0.30 ± 0.04, MD values from 1.30 ± 0.08 to 1.73 ± 0.12 x 10- 3 mm 2 /s. Muscular structures in the superficial layer of the pelvic floor could not be satisfactorily identified. This study demonstrates the feasibility of visualising the complex three-dimensional pelvic floor architecture using 3T-DTI with fibre tractography. DTI of the deep female pelvic floor may provide new insights into pelvic floor disorders. (orig.)

  12. [Virtual endoscopic navigation and body transparency based on computed tomography. A step towards in vivo imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanis, Emmanuel-Alain; Gombergh, Rodolphe; Castro, Albert; Gandjbakhch, Iradj; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Dubois, François

    2011-06-01

    Progress in HR-CTdata processing has led to lower X-ray exposure and to better diagnostic performance. We describe 19 adult patients (among 5000) examined by HR CT with 64 detectors, acquisition and exposure protocols in mSv, spiral, 0.6-mm slices, 5To PACS. After the two usual processing steps (60 gray values, 5122 and 10242 matrices, dedicated workstations for coronaroscopy and virtual coloscopy, 2D multiplanar reformation, surfacic, 3D volumes with dissection and navigation), a third original data processing step on additional workstations was added. Variable matrix extrapolated images, flexible colored curves (different from anatomical conventions), lighting (sources) and transparencies (unavailable with traditional endoscopy) were used. The digital film is a 16-minute "journey "consisting of 19 endo-body navigations in 5 regions, from the head to the bronchi, from the heart to the coronary arteries, and from the digestive tract to the abdomen and pelvis. One possible application is post-operative verification of an aortic graft. The movie is illustrated here with ten plates. This new approach is cost-effective and beneficial for the patient, in terms of early diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up. Ethical issues are also examined.

  13. Feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography of the normal female pelvic floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zijta, F.M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Froeling, M. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eindhoven University of Technology, Biomedical NMR, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Paardt, M.P. van der; Bipat, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Stoker, J. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lakeman, M.M.E. [University of Amsterdam, Department of Gynaecology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Montauban van Swijndregt, A.D. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Strijkers, G.J. [Eindhoven University of Technology, Biomedical NMR, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    To prospectively determine the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fibre tractography as a tool for the three-dimensional (3D) visualisation of normal pelvic floor anatomy. Five young female nulliparous subjects (mean age 28 {+-} 3 years) underwent DTI at 3.0T. Two-dimensional diffusion-weighted axial spin-echo echo-planar (SP-EPI) pulse sequence of the pelvic floor was performed, with additional T2-TSE multiplanar sequences for anatomical reference. Fibre tractography for visualisation of predefined pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles was performed offline by two observers, applying a consensus method. Three eigenvalues ({lambda}1, {lambda}2, {lambda}3), fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were calculated from the fibre trajectories. In all subjects fibre tractography resulted in a satisfactory anatomical representation of the pubovisceral muscle, perineal body, anal - and urethral sphincter complex and internal obturator muscle. Mean FA values ranged from 0.23 {+-} 0.02 to 0.30 {+-} 0.04, MD values from 1.30 {+-} 0.08 to 1.73 {+-} 0.12 x 10-{sup 3} mm{sup 2}/s. Muscular structures in the superficial layer of the pelvic floor could not be satisfactorily identified. This study demonstrates the feasibility of visualising the complex three-dimensional pelvic floor architecture using 3T-DTI with fibre tractography. DTI of the deep female pelvic floor may provide new insights into pelvic floor disorders. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR imaging for management of hemorrhagic esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Hideaki; Aikata, Hiroshi; Takaki, Shintaro; Azakami, Takahiro; Katamura, Yoshio; Kawaoka, Tomokazu; Hiramatsu, Akira; Waki, Koji; Imamura, Michio; Kawakami, Yoshiiku; Takahashi, Shoichi; Toyota, Naoyuki; Ito, Katsuhide; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between changes in portosystemic collaterals, evaluated by multidetector-row computed tomography imaging using multiplanar reconstruction (MDCT-MPR), and prognosis in patients with hemorrhagic esophageal varices (EV) after endoscopic treatment. Methods: Forty-nine patients with primary hemostasis for variceal bleeding received radical endoscopic treatment: endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) or endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Patients were classified according to the rate of reduction in feeding vessel diameter on MDCT-MPR images, into the narrowing (n = 24) and no-change (n = 25) groups. We evaluated changes in portosystemic collaterals by MDCT-MPR before and after treatment, and determined rebleeding and survival rates. Results: The left gastric and paraesophageal (PEV) veins were recognized as portosystemic collaterals in 100 and 80%, respectively, of patients with EV on MDCT-MPR images. The rebleeding rates at 1, 2, 3, and 5 years after endoscopic treatment were 10, 15, 23, and 23%, respectively, for the narrowing group, and 17, 24, 35, and 67%, respectively, for the no-change group (P = 0.068). Among no-change group, the rebleeding rate in patients with large PEV was significantly lower than that with small PEV (P = 0.027). The rebleeding rate in patients with small PEV of the no-change group was significantly higher than that in the narrowing group (P = 0.018). There was no significant difference in rebleeding rates between the no-change group with a large PEV and narrowing group (P = 0.435). Conclusion: Changes in portosystemic collaterals evaluated by MDCT-MPR imaging correlate with rebleeding rate. Evaluation of portosystemic collaterals in this manner would provide useful information for the management of hemorrhagic EV.

  15. Urogenital imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamm, B.; Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin; Asbach, P.; Beyersdorff, D.; Hein, P.; Lemke, U.

    2008-01-01

    The book in direct diagnosis in radiology, urogenital imaging, includes information concerning definition, imaging signs and clinical aspects on the following topics: kidneys and adrenals, the urinary tract, the male genitals and the female genitals

  16. Medical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, M. C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses four main types of medical imaging (x-ray, radionuclide, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance) and considers their relative merits. Describes important recent and possible future developments in image processing. (Author/MKR)

  17. Microwave imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Pastorino, Matteo

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the most relevant theoretical and algorithmic aspects of modern microwave imaging approaches Microwave imaging-a technique used in sensing a given scene by means of interrogating microwaves-has recently proven its usefulness in providing excellent diagnostic capabilities in several areas, including civil and industrial engineering, nondestructive testing and evaluation, geophysical prospecting, and biomedical engineering. Microwave Imaging offers comprehensive descriptions of the most important techniques so far proposed for short-range microwave imaging-in

  18. First performance evaluation of software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine at CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Jan-Erik; Wichmann, Julian L; Kaup, Moritz; Fischer, Sebastian; Kerl, J Matthias; Lehnert, Thomas; Vogl, Thomas J; Bauer, Ralf W

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate software for automatic segmentation, labeling and reformation of anatomical aligned axial images of the thoracolumbar spine on CT in terms of accuracy, potential for time savings and workflow improvement. 77 patients (28 women, 49 men, mean age 65.3±14.4 years) with known or suspected spinal disorders (degenerative spine disease n=32; disc herniation n=36; traumatic vertebral fractures n=9) underwent 64-slice MDCT with thin-slab reconstruction. Time for automatic labeling of the thoracolumbar spine and reconstruction of double-angulated axial images of the pathological vertebrae was compared with manually performed reconstruction of anatomical aligned axial images. Reformatted images of both reconstruction methods were assessed by two observers regarding accuracy of symmetric depiction of anatomical structures. In 33 cases double-angulated axial images were created in 1 vertebra, in 28 cases in 2 vertebrae and in 16 cases in 3 vertebrae. Correct automatic labeling was achieved in 72 of 77 patients (93.5%). Errors could be manually corrected in 4 cases. Automatic labeling required 1min in average. In cases where anatomical aligned axial images of 1 vertebra were created, reconstructions made by hand were significantly faster (pquality with excellent inter-observer agreement. The evaluated software for automatic labeling and anatomically aligned, double-angulated axial image reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine on CT is time-saving when reconstructions of 2 and more vertebrae are performed. Checking results of automatic labeling is necessary to prevent errors in labeling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef; Hernandez Filho, Guinel; Dirim, Berna; Wangwinyuvirat, Mani; Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald; Haghigi, Parvitz

    2012-01-01

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  20. Pericruciate fat pad of the knee: anatomy and pericruciate fat pad inflammation: cadaveric and clinical study emphasizing MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaf, Abdalla Youssef [Hospital do Coracao (HCor), Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hernandez Filho, Guinel [Santa Casa de Sao Paulo Hospital, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Dirim, Berna [Izmir Atatuerk Training and Research Hospital, Department of Radiology, Karsiyaka, izmir (Turkey); Wangwinyuvirat, Mani [Rajavithi Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bangkok (Thailand); Trudell, Debra; Resnick, Donald [University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States); Haghigi, Parvitz [University of California, San Diego, Department of Pathology, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2012-12-15

    The pericruciate fat pad is located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with the cruciate ligaments. With MR imaging, signal abnormality of the pericruciate fat pad has been observed in patients with posterior knee pain. The purpose of this study was to describe the anatomy of the pericruciate fat pad in cadaveric specimens and to document the clinical spectrum of pericruciate fat pad inflammation. Twelve cadaveric knees underwent MR imaging with T1 and T2 multiplanar images. Cadaveric sections were then prepared for macroscopic evaluation, with additional histologic analysis performed in four cases. MR images in seventeen patients (ten males, seven females; average age, 31.5 years; age range, 19-57 years) involved in intensive sporting activity and with posterior knee pain were reviewed. MR images in cadaveric specimens showed a fat pad that was located above and between the cruciate ligaments, near their attachment sites in the inner portion of the femoral condyles, within the intercondylar fossa. Fatty tissue covered by a thin layer of synovial membrane was confirmed at histology. Seventeen patients with posterior knee pain and without gross cartilage, meniscal, or ligamentous abnormalities all revealed an increased signal in this fat pad in fluid-sensitive fat-suppressed images, mainly in the sagittal and axial planes. In eight cases, enhancement of this fat pad was demonstrated following intravenous gadolinium administration. The pericruciate fat pad is a structure located in the intercondylar fossa, intimate with both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. Inflammatory changes in this fat pad may be found in patients, especially athletes with posterior knee pain. (orig.)

  1. Prospective electrocardiogram-gated axial 64-detector computed tomographic angiography vs retrospective gated helical technique to assess coronary artery bypass graft anastomosis. Comparison of image quality and patient radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Haruhiko; Masukawa, Ai; Tanaka, Isao; Fukui, Rika; Suzuki, Kazufumi; Ueno, Eiko; Kodera, Kojiro; Nakano, Kiyoharu; Shen, Y.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study the effective dose and image quality at distal anastomoses were retrospectively compared between prospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated axial and retrospective ECG-gated helical techniques on 64-detector computed tomographic (CT) angiography following coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Following bypass surgery, 52 patients with a heart rate <65 beats/min underwent CT angiography: 26 patients each with prospective and retrospective ECG gating techniques. The effective dose was compared between the 2 groups using a 4-point scale (4, excellent; 1, poor) to grade the quality of curved multiplanar reformation images at distal anastomoses. Patient characteristics of the 2 groups were well matched, and the same CT scan parameters were used for both, except for the interval between surgery and CT examination, tube current, and image noise index. Image quality scores did not differ significantly (3.26±0.95 vs 3.35±0.87; P=0.63), but the effective dose was significantly lower in the prospective (7.3±1.8 mSv) than in the retrospective gating group (23.6±4.5 mSv) (P<0.0001). Following bypass surgery, 64-detector CT angiography using prospective ECG gating is superior to retrospective gating in limiting the radiation dose and maintaining the image quality of distal anastomoses. (author)

  2. Tomographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, B.K.; Noreen Norfaraheen Lee Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Tomography is used to image anatomy of organs as in the case of CT and MRI or image body functions as in the case of SPECT and PET. The theory of reconstruction applies equally well to CT, SPECT and PET with a minor differences. The main difference between SPECT and PET is that SPECT images single photon emitters (radionuclides) which emit normal gamma rays (like Tc-99m), whereas PET images positron emitting radionuclides such as O 15 or F 18 . The word tomography means drawing of the body. Every tomography results in an image of the inside of the body and is represented as a slice. (author)

  3. Hierarchical storage of large volume of multidector CT data using distributed servers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratib, Osman; Rosset, Antoine; Heuberger, Joris; Bandon, David

    2006-03-01

    Multidector scanners and hybrid multimodality scanners have the ability to generate large number of high-resolution images resulting in very large data sets. In most cases, these datasets are generated for the sole purpose of generating secondary processed images and 3D rendered images as well as oblique and curved multiplanar reformatted images. It is therefore not essential to archive the original images after they have been processed. We have developed an architecture of distributed archive servers for temporary storage of large image datasets for 3D rendering and image processing without the need for long term storage in PACS archive. With the relatively low cost of storage devices it is possible to configure these servers to hold several months or even years of data, long enough for allowing subsequent re-processing if required by specific clinical situations. We tested the latest generation of RAID servers provided by Apple computers with a capacity of 5 TBytes. We implemented a peer-to-peer data access software based on our Open-Source image management software called OsiriX, allowing remote workstations to directly access DICOM image files located on the server through a new technology called "bonjour". This architecture offers a seamless integration of multiple servers and workstations without the need for central database or complex workflow management tools. It allows efficient access to image data from multiple workstation for image analysis and visualization without the need for image data transfer. It provides a convenient alternative to centralized PACS architecture while avoiding complex and time-consuming data transfer and storage.

  4. Analyses of the eustachian tube and its surrounding tissues with cross sectional images by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Haruo; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Takasaki, Kenji; Kanda, Yukihiko; Nakao, Yoshiaki; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Hayashi, Kuniaki

    2000-01-01

    We attempted to image the eustachian tube (ET) and its surrounding tissues by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). Twenty-two normal subjects (44 ears) without middle ear problems were studied, and a patient with severe patulous ET was also studied as an abnormal case. In our device of multiplanar reconstruction technique, we were able to obtain the clear reconstructed images of the ET lumen as well as of its surrounding tissues (bone, ET cartilage, tensor veli palatini muscle, levator veli palatini muscle, Ostmann's fat tissue, tensor tympani muscle, internal carotid artery) at any desired portion, either parallel or perpendicular to the long axis of the ET. However, the exact borders between the ET cartilage and the muscles, Ostmann's fat tissue and the tubal gland were not clearly identified. In the severe case of patulous ET, the ET lumen was widely opened at each cross-sectional image from the pharyngeal orifice to the tympanic orifice, in contrast with its being closed at the cartilaginous portion in the normal cases. In addition, the fat tissue and glands around the ET lumen were not clearly identified in this case. We suggest that this method will lead to better understanding of the ET-related diseases such as patulous ET. (author)

  5. Analyses of the eustachian tube and its surrounding tissues with cross sectional images by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Haruo; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu; Takasaki, Kenji; Kanda, Yukihiko; Nakao, Yoshiaki; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Hayashi, Kuniaki [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-07-01

    We attempted to image the eustachian tube (ET) and its surrounding tissues by high-resolution computed tomography (HR-CT). Twenty-two normal subjects (44 ears) without middle ear problems were studied, and a patient with severe patulous ET was also studied as an abnormal case. In our device of multiplanar reconstruction technique, we were able to obtain the clear reconstructed images of the ET lumen as well as of its surrounding tissues (bone, ET cartilage, tensor veli palatini muscle, levator veli palatini muscle, Ostmann's fat tissue, tensor tympani muscle, internal carotid artery) at any desired portion, either parallel or perpendicular to the long axis of the ET. However, the exact borders between the ET cartilage and the muscles, Ostmann's fat tissue and the tubal gland were not clearly identified. In the severe case of patulous ET, the ET lumen was widely opened at each cross-sectional image from the pharyngeal orifice to the tympanic orifice, in contrast with its being closed at the cartilaginous portion in the normal cases. In addition, the fat tissue and glands around the ET lumen were not clearly identified in this case. We suggest that this method will lead to better understanding of the ET-related diseases such as patulous ET. (author)

  6. The application of spiral-CT and 3D-imaging of airway for observation of efficacy and complication after tracheobronchial stent placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Ning; Xu Hao; Zu Maoheng; Gu Yuming; Li Gang; Zhang Qingqiao; Xu Wei; Cui Yanfeng; Liu Hongtao; Wang Wenliang

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of spiral-CT and 3D-imaging of airway for observation of efficacy and complication after tracheobronchial stent placement. Methods: Thirty-one patients treated with tracheal stents were retrospectively analyzed, of which there were 27 malignant tracheal stenosis, 2 benign tracheal stenosis, 1 bronchial remnant fistula and 1 gastroesophageal anastomosis tracheal fistula. The spiral-CT and 3D-imagings were analyzed and the location, shape and complication of the stents were assessed. Results: Thirty-one patients were treated with 8 Z-type stainless steel stents and 28 Ni-Ti memory alloy stents. The stents of 22 cases remained patent in the original position and restenosis was occurred in 5 cases, migration in 3 cases and fracture in 1 case. All the CT features were performed and reconstructed on the workstation, using multiplanar reconstruction, volume rendering, and CT virtual endoscopy. The location of tracheal stenosis and fistula were showed in different angle, and the location, shape of the stents, and the complications (such as restenosis, fracture) as well. Conclusion: Spiral-CT and 3D-imaging is a rapid, simple and effective method in assessing tracheal stent implantation and complication, therefore, it is of great value in clinical practice. (authors)

  7. High signal in bone marrow at diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) in healthy children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Avenarius, Derk [University Hospital North Norway, Department of Radiology, Tromsoe (Norway); Olsen, Oeystein E. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    In our experience, diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) is hard to interpret in children who commonly have foci of restricted diffusion in their skeletons unrelated to pathology, sometimes in an asymmetrical pattern. This raises serious concern about the accuracy of DWIBS in cancer staging in children. To describe the signal distribution at DWIBS in the normal developing lumbar spine and pelvic skeleton. Forty-two healthy children underwent an MR DWIBS sequence of the abdomen and pelvis. An axial short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence was used. Two radiologists did a primary review of the images and based on these preliminary observations, separate scoring systems for the lumbar spine, pelvis and proximal femoral epiphyses/femoral heads were devised. Visual evaluation of the images was then performed by the two radiologists in consensus. The scoring was repeated separately 2 months later by a third radiologist. Restricted diffusion was defined as areas of high signal compared to the background. Coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) reformats were used to assess the vertebral bodies. For the pelvis, the extension of high signal for each bone was given a score of 0 to 4. Cohen's Kappa interobserver agreement coefficients of signal distribution and asymmetry were calculated. All children had areas of high signal, both within the lumbar vertebral bodies and within the pelvic skeleton. Three patterns of signal distribution were seen in the lumbar spine, but no specific pattern was seen in the pelvis. There was a tendency toward a reduction of relative area of high signal within each bone with age, but also a widespread interindividual variation. Restricted diffusion is a normal finding in the pelvic skeleton and lumbar spine in children with an asymmetrical distribution seen in 48% of normal children in this study. DWIBS should be used with caution for cancer staging in children as this could

  8. High signal in bone marrow at diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) in healthy children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Avenarius, Derk; Olsen, Oeystein E.

    2011-01-01

    In our experience, diffusion-weighted imaging with body background suppression (DWIBS) is hard to interpret in children who commonly have foci of restricted diffusion in their skeletons unrelated to pathology, sometimes in an asymmetrical pattern. This raises serious concern about the accuracy of DWIBS in cancer staging in children. To describe the signal distribution at DWIBS in the normal developing lumbar spine and pelvic skeleton. Forty-two healthy children underwent an MR DWIBS sequence of the abdomen and pelvis. An axial short-tau inversion-recovery (STIR) echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence was used. Two radiologists did a primary review of the images and based on these preliminary observations, separate scoring systems for the lumbar spine, pelvis and proximal femoral epiphyses/femoral heads were devised. Visual evaluation of the images was then performed by the two radiologists in consensus. The scoring was repeated separately 2 months later by a third radiologist. Restricted diffusion was defined as areas of high signal compared to the background. Coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) reformats were used to assess the vertebral bodies. For the pelvis, the extension of high signal for each bone was given a score of 0 to 4. Cohen's Kappa interobserver agreement coefficients of signal distribution and asymmetry were calculated. All children had areas of high signal, both within the lumbar vertebral bodies and within the pelvic skeleton. Three patterns of signal distribution were seen in the lumbar spine, but no specific pattern was seen in the pelvis. There was a tendency toward a reduction of relative area of high signal within each bone with age, but also a widespread interindividual variation. Restricted diffusion is a normal finding in the pelvic skeleton and lumbar spine in children with an asymmetrical distribution seen in 48% of normal children in this study. DWIBS should be used with caution for cancer staging in children as this could lead

  9. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki, E-mail: fukuhiro1962@hotmail.com [International HIFU Center, Sanmu Medical Center Hospital, Naruto 167, Sanbu-shi, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Sakamoto, Akio [International HIFU Center, Sanmu Medical Center Hospital, Naruto 167, Sanbu-shi, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Otsuka, Masayuki; Togawa, Akira; Miyazaki, Masaru [Department of General Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba-shi, Chiba 260-0856 (Japan); Yamagata, Hitoshi [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara 324-0036 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths.

  10. US-CT 3D dual imaging by mutual display of the same sections for depicting minor changes in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ito, Ryu; Ohto, Masao; Sakamoto, Akio; Otsuka, Masayuki; Togawa, Akira; Miyazaki, Masaru; Yamagata, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of ultrasound-computed tomography (US-CT) 3D dual imaging for the detection of small extranodular growths of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The clinical and pathological profiles of 10 patients with single nodular type HCC with extranodular growth (extranodular growth) who underwent a hepatectomy were evaluated using two-dimensional (2D) ultrasonography (US), three-dimensional (3D) US, 3D computed tomography (CT) and 3D US-CT dual images. Raw 3D data was converted to DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine) data using Echo to CT (Toshiba Medical Systems Corp., Tokyo, Japan), and the 3D DICOM data was directly transferred to the image analysis system (ZioM900, ZIOSOFT Inc., Tokyo, Japan). By inputting the angle number (x, y, z) of the 3D CT volume data into the ZioM900, multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images of the 3D CT data were displayed in a manner such that they resembled the conventional US images. Eleven extranodular growths were detected pathologically in 10 cases. 2D US was capable of depicting only 2 of the 11 extranodular growths. 3D CT was capable of depicting 4 of the 11 extranodular growths. On the other hand, 3D US was capable of depicting 10 of the 11 extranodular growths, and 3D US-CT dual images, which enable the dual analysis of the CT and US planes, revealed all 11 extranodular growths. In conclusion, US-CT 3D dual imaging may be useful for the detection of small extranodular growths

  11. Severity mapping of the proximal femur: a new method for assessing hip osteoarthritis with computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turmezei, T D; Lomas, D J; Hopper, M A; Poole, K E S

    2014-10-01

    Plain radiography has been the mainstay of imaging assessment in osteoarthritis for over 50 years, but it does have limitations. Here we present the methodology and results of a new technique for identifying, grading, and mapping the severity and spatial distribution of osteoarthritic disease features at the hip in 3D with clinical computed tomography (CT). CT imaging of 456 hips from 230 adult female volunteers (mean age 66 ± 17 years) was reviewed using 3D multiplanar reformatting to identify bone-related radiological features of osteoarthritis, namely osteophytes, subchondral cysts and joint space narrowing. Scoresheets dividing up the femoral head, head-neck region and the joint space were used to register the location and severity of each feature (scored from 0 to 3). Novel 3D cumulative feature severity maps were then created to display where the most severe disease features from each individual were anatomically located across the cohort. Feature severity maps showed a propensity for osteophytes at the inferoposterior and superolateral femoral head-neck junction. Subchondral cysts were a less common and less localised phenomenon. Joint space narrowing osteophytes and joint space narrowing for the first time. We believe this technique can perform several important roles in future osteoarthritis research, including phenotyping and sensitive disease assessment in 3D. Copyright © 2014 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Morphological changes of the mandibular condyle in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Shiori

    1994-01-01

    The morphological changes of the mandibular condyle in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder were studied. The subjects were 420 patients (103 males and 317 females, 8 to 80 years of age, mean age 39.8 years) who were clinically diagnosed as temporomandibular joint disorder. MR imaging was performed with a GE-Signa 1.5 Tesla MR imaging system using the body coil as a transmitter and 3-inch bilateral surface coils. The patients were examined by a multiplanar gradient echo technique in a closed-loop cine fashion on both sagittal and coronal planes. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Morphological changes of the mandibular condyle were detected in 47.0% of the patients. The predominant morphological changes were then formation of osteophyte and marginal proliferation (65.8%). 2) The incidence of morphological changes in the mandubular condyle did not show any significant difference between male and female, and tended to be higher in patients over 40 years of age, and the incidence in patients under 20 years of age was lower, compared to that in patients from 20 to 39 years of age. 3) The incidence of morphological changes in patients with anterior disk displacement without reduction was higher than in those with anterior disk displacement with reduction (P<0.001). The incidence of morphological changes in patients with rotational disk displacement was higher than in those with medial disk displacement (P<0.001). 4) The anterior translation of mandibular condyle was influenced more by anterior disk displacement rather than by morphological changes. From these results. it is suggested that simultaneous bilateral condyle pseudodynamic MR imaging was useful in the diagnosis of internal derangement, evaluation of morphological changes and assessment of motional abnormality of the condyle. (author)

  13. Low field MR imaging of sellar and parasellar lesions: Experience in a developing country hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbole, G.I.; Adeyinka, O.A.; Okolo, C.A.; Ogun, A.O.; Atalabi, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), an advancement which followed computed tomography (CT) is expensive and inaccessible in most developing countries. However it is the procedure of choice in evaluating sellar and parasellar lesions. Its major advantages are its superior soft tissue contrast differentiation, its capacity for multiplanar imaging and nonexistence of ionising radiation. Its use is relatively new in Nigeria, a developing economy in Africa. Since its introduction in 2005, it has been utilised extensively for neuroimaging at the University College Hospital (UCH), Ibadan; a large hospital in south-western Nigeria. Objective: To review the role and pattern of low field MR Imaging in sellar and parasellar lesions presenting to a tertiary care centre in Nigeria. Methods: All 62 patients with clinically suspected sellar and parasellar masses, referred to the Department of Radiology, UCH Ibadan for MRI between December 2006 and January 2010 were retrospectively analysed. The examinations were performed using an open 0.2 T permanent magnet MR unit. T1W, T2W, T2/FLAIR, TOF and T1W post gadolinium DTPA sequences of the sellar region were obtained. Results: Of the 62 patients, there were 27 males and 35 females. The modal age group was 40–49 years with a mean age of 39.94 years (±16.65 years). Twenty-four cases (38.7%) had histological diagnosis, of which 20 (83.3%) were consistent with initial MRI diagnosis. Pituitary adenomas were the commonest (58.06%) lesions of the sellar and parasellar regions. Others include parasellar meningiomas, cranipharyngiomas, and giant aneurysms. Headache and visual impairment were the major presenting features and showed no significant correlation with tumour size. Conclusion: The use of low field MRI in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected sellar or parasellar lesions in developing countries of low economic resource is commendable as it provides beneficial outcomes in management.

  14. Imaging skeletal anatomy of injured cervical spine specimens: comparison of single-slice vs multi-slice helical CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obenauer, S.; Alamo, L.; Herold, T.; Funke, M.; Kopka, L.; Grabbe, E. [Department of Radiology, Georg August-University Goettingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Our objective was to compare a single-slice CT (SS-CT) scanner with a multi-slice CT (MS-CT) scanner in the depiction of osseous anatomic structures and fractures of the upper cervical spine. Two cervical spine specimens with artificial trauma were scanned with a SS-CT scanner (HighSpeed, CT/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various collimations (1, 3, 5 mm) and pitch factors (1, 1.5, 2, 3) and a four-slice helical CT scanner (LightSpeed, QX/i, GE, Milwaukee, Wis.) by using various table speeds ranging from 3.75 to 15 mm/rotation for a pitch of 0.75 and from 7.5 to 30 mm/rotation for a pitch of 1.5. Images were reconstructed with an interval of 1 mm. Sagittal and coronal multiplanar reconstructions of the primary and reconstructed data set were performed. For MS-CT a tube current resulting in equivalent image noise as with SS-CT was used. All images were judged by two observers using a 4-point scale. The best image quality for SS-CT was achieved with the smallest slice thickness (1 mm) and a pitch smaller than 2 resulting in a table speed of up to 2 mm per gantry rotation (4 points). A reduction of the slice thickness rather than of the table speed proved to be beneficial at MS-CT. Therefore, the optimal scan protocol in MS-CT included a slice thickness of 1.25 mm with a table speed of 7.5 mm/360 using a pitch of 1.5 (4 points), resulting in a faster scan time than when a pitch of 0.75 (4 points) was used. This study indicates that MS-CT could provide equivalent image quality at approximately four times the volume coverage speed of SS-CT. (orig.)

  15. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Litniewski, Jerzy; Kujawska, Tamara; 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging

    2012-01-01

    The International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging is a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place continuously since 1968. In the course of the years the proceedings volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have become a reference for cutting-edge research in the field. In 2011 the 31st International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Warsaw, Poland, April 10-13. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art as well as  in-depth research contributions by the specialists in the field, this Volume 31 in the Series contains an excellent collection of papers in six major categories: Biological and Medical Imaging Physics and Mathematics of Acoustical Imaging Acoustic Microscopy Transducers and Arrays Nondestructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Underwater Imaging

  16. Cerenkov Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L.J.; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial...

  17. Oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Role of pretreatment imaging and its influence on management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, S.; Rane, P.; Deshmukh, A.

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the commonest malignancy in the oral cavity. The oral cavity has several subsites. Knowledge of the patterns of disease spread at each subsite with the impact on treatment and prognosis provides a deeper understanding of the role of imaging. Information from imaging helps accurate staging, assess resectability, and plan multimodality treatment. Mandibular erosion, posterior soft tissue extent, and perineural spread influence treatment and prognosis in gingival, buccal, and retromolar trigone (RMT) cancers. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) with multiplanar reformations and bone and soft tissue algorithms provides the highest specificity for bone erosion. Hard palate SCC is optimally imaged with contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect perineural spread. In oral tongue and floor of the mouth (FOM) SCC, extrinsic muscle invasion, extension across the midline, extent of posterior and inferior spread, and proximity to the hyoid are issues that impact therapeutic options. Contrast-enhanced MRI is the optimal imaging method for staging the primary due to its superior soft tissue resolution. In oral tongue SCCs with tumour thickness ≤4 mm, elective neck dissection can be avoided. For nodal staging (N-staging), all imaging methods are comparable, but fall short of surgical staging. Sentinel lymph node biopsy has a promising role in N-staging. Positron emission tomography (PET)/integrated PET/CT has no role in evaluating the clinically negative neck. PET/CT has a role in pretreatment evaluation of advanced oral cavity SCC for depicting distant metastases and for mapping nodal extent in the clinically positive neck. Diffusion-weighted MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, and CT perfusion have a potential role as baseline pretreatment studies for response assessment to chemoradiation in advanced oral cavity SCC. - Highlights: • Brief outline of treatment principles in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OCSCC

  18. Image compression of bone images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayrapetian, A.; Kangarloo, H.; Chan, K.K.; Ho, B.; Huang, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) experiment conducted to compare the diagnostic performance of a compressed bone image with the original. The compression was done on custom hardware that implements an algorithm based on full-frame cosine transform. The compression ratio in this study is approximately 10:1, which was decided after a pilot experiment. The image set consisted of 45 hand images, including normal images and images containing osteomalacia and osteitis fibrosa. Each image was digitized with a laser film scanner to 2,048 x 2,048 x 8 bits. Six observers, all board-certified radiologists, participated in the experiment. For each ROC session, an independent ROC curve was constructed and the area under that curve calculated. The image set was randomized for each session, as was the order for viewing the original and reconstructed images. Analysis of variance was used to analyze the data and derive statistically significant results. The preliminary results indicate that the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed image is comparable to that of the original image

  19. TU-EF-207-00: Advances in Breast Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    mode due to lower photon fluence per projection. This may require fast-frame acquisition and symmetric or asymmetric pixel binning in some systems. Recent studies investigated the performance of increased conversion layer thickness for contrast-enhanced imaging of the breast in dual-energy acquisition mode. In other direct conversion detectors operating in the avalanche mode, sensitivities close to the single photon response are also explored for mammography and breast tomosynthesis. The potential advantages and challenges of this approach are described. Dedicated breast CT brings x-ray imaging of the breast to true tomographic 3D imaging. It can eliminate the tissue superposition problem and does not require physical compression of the breast. Using cone beam geometry and a flat-panel detector, several hundred projections are acquired and reconstructed to near isotropic voxels. Multiplanar reconstruction facilitates viewing the breast volume in any desired orientation. Ongoing clinical studies, the current state-of-the art, and research to advance the technology are described. Learning Objectives: To understand the ongoing developments in x-ray imaging of the breast To understand the approaches and applications of spectral mammography To understand the potential advantages of distributed x-ray source arrays for digital breast tomosynthesis To understand the ongoing developments in detector technology for digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis To understand the current state-of-the-art for dedicated cone-beam breast CT and research to advance the technology. Research collaboration with Koning Corporation.

  20. NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, E.R.

    1983-01-01

    Since hydrogen is the most abundant element in all living organisms, proton NMR lends itself well as a method of investigation in biology and medicine. NMR imaging has some special advantages as a diagnostic tool: no ionizing radiation is used, it is noninvasive; it provides a safer means of imaging than the use of x-rays, gamma rays, positrons, or heavy ions. In contrast with ultrasound, the radiation penetrates the bony structures without attenuation. In additional to morphological information, NMR imaging provides additional diagnostic insights through relaxation parameters, which are not available from other imaging methods. In the decade since the first primitive NMR images were obtained, the quality of images now obtained approaches those from CT x-ray scanners. Prototype instruments are being constructed for clinical evaluation and the first whole-body scanners are beginning to appear on the market at costs comparable to CT scanners. Primary differences in equipment for conventional NMR and NMR imaging are the much larger aperture magnets that are required for the examination of human subjects and the addition of coils to generate field gradients and facilities for manipulating the gradients. Early results from clinical trials in many parts of the world are encouraging, and in a few years, the usefuleness of this modality of medical imaging to the medical profession in diagnosis and treatment of disease will be defined. 10 figures

  1. Nuclear imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.H.; Reid, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Nuclear imaging, utilizing relatively low photon energy emitting isotopes, allows an assessment of anatomic configuration and organ function. This method of imaging is predicted on the utilization of physiologically active radioisotope-labeled compounds or biologically active radioisotopes. Localization of such isotopes in normal or abnormal concentrations may be due to varying physiological or pathological mechanisms

  2. Cerenkov imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudeep; Thorek, Daniel L J; Grimm, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence (CL) has been used recently in a plethora of medical applications like imaging and therapy with clinically relevant medical isotopes. The range of medical isotopes used is fairly large and expanding. The generation of in vivo light is useful since it circumvents depth limitations for excitation light. Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is much cheaper in terms of infrastructure than positron emission tomography (PET) and is particularly useful for imaging of superficial structures. Imaging can basically be done using a sensitive camera optimized for low-light conditions, and it has a better resolution than any other nuclear imaging modality. CLI has been shown to effectively diagnose disease with regularly used PET isotope ((18)F-FDG) in clinical setting. Cerenkov luminescence tomography, Cerenkov luminescence endoscopy, and intraoperative Cerenkov imaging have also been explored with positive conclusions expanding the current range of applications. Cerenkov has also been used to improve PET imaging resolution since the source of both is the radioisotope being used. Smart imaging agents have been designed based on modulation of the Cerenkov signal using small molecules and nanoparticles giving better insight of the tumor biology. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishkin, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    The techniques of brain imaging and results in perfusion studies and delayed images are outlined. An analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the brain scan in a variety of common problems is discussed, especially as compared with other available procedures. Both nonneoplastic and neoplastic lesions are considered. (Auth/C.F.)

  4. Star Imager

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta

    1997-01-01

    The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol.......The version of the star imager developed for Astrid II is described. All functions and features are described as well as the operations and the software protocol....

  5. Retinal Imaging and Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of blindness in the industrialized world that includes age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma, the review is devoted to retinal imaging and image analysis methods and their clinical implications. Methods for 2-D fundus imaging and techniques for 3-D optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging are reviewed. Special attention is given to quantitative techniques for analysis of fundus photographs with a focus on clinically relevant assessment of retinal vasculature, identification of retinal lesions, assessment of optic nerve head (ONH) shape, building retinal atlases, and to automated methods for population screening for retinal diseases. A separate section is devoted to 3-D analysis of OCT images, describing methods for segmentation and analysis of retinal layers, retinal vasculature, and 2-D/3-D detection of symptomatic exudate-associated derangements, as well as to OCT-based analysis of ONH morphology and shape. Throughout the paper, aspects of image acquisition, image analysis, and clinical relevance are treated together considering their mutually interlinked relationships. PMID:22275207

  6. Medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Townsend, David W

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of the X-ray scanner into radiology almost 25 years ago, non-invasive imaging has become firmly established as an essential tool in the diagnosis of disease. Fully three-dimensional imaging of internal organs is now possible, b and for studies which explore the functional status of the body. Powerful techniques to correlate anatomy and function are available, and scanners which combine anatomical and functional imaging in a single device are under development. Such techniques have been made possible through r ecent technological and mathematical advances. This series of lectures will review both the physical basis of medical imaging techniques using X-rays, gamma and positron emitting radiosiotopes, and nuclear magnetic resonance, and the mathematical methods used to reconstruct three-dimentional distributions from projection data. The lectures will trace the development of medical imaging from simple radiographs to the present-day non-invasive measurement of in vivo biochemistry. They ...

  7. Acoustical Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Akiyama, Iwaki

    2009-01-01

    The 29th International Symposium on Acoustical Imaging was held in Shonan Village, Kanagawa, Japan, April 15-18, 2007. This interdisciplinary Symposium has been taking place every two years since 1968 and forms a unique forum for advanced research, covering new technologies, developments, methods and theories in all areas of acoustics. In the course of the years the volumes in the Acoustical Imaging Series have developed and become well-known and appreciated reference works. Offering both a broad perspective on the state-of-the-art in the field as well as an in-depth look at its leading edge research, this Volume 29 in the Series contains again an excellent collection of seventy papers presented in nine major categories: Strain Imaging Biological and Medical Applications Acoustic Microscopy Non-Destructive Evaluation and Industrial Applications Components and Systems Geophysics and Underwater Imaging Physics and Mathematics Medical Image Analysis FDTD method and Other Numerical Simulations Audience Researcher...

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of extraocular muscles in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy using turbo field echo with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiwatashi, A; Togao, O; Yamashita, K; Kikuchi, K; Momosaka, D; Honda, H

    2018-03-20

    The purpose of this study was to correlate diffusivity of extraocular muscles, measured by three-dimensional turbo field echo (3DTFE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation, with their size and activity in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy. Twenty-three patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy were included. There were 17 women and 6 men with a mean age of 55.8±12.6 (SD) years (range: 26-83 years). 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium MR images were obtained with b-values of 0 and 500s/mm 2 . The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of extraocular muscles was measured on coronal reformatted MR images. Signal intensities of extraocular muscles on conventional MR images were compared to those of normal-appearing white matter, and cross-sectional areas of the muscles were also measured. The clinical activity score was also evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed with Pearson correlation and Mann-Whitney U tests. On 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation, the mean ADC of the extraocular muscles was 2.23±0.37 (SD)×10 -3 mm2/s (range: 1.70×10 -3 -3.11×10 -3 mm 2 /s). There was a statistically significant moderate correlation between ADC and the size of the muscles (r=0.61). There were no statistically significant correlations between ADC and signal intensity on conventional MR and the clinical activity score. 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation technique allows quantifying diffusivity of extraocular muscles in patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy. The diffusivity of the extraocular muscles on 3DTFE with diffusion-sensitized driven-equilibrium preparation MR images moderately correlates with their size. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Temporal bone trauma and imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, K.; Czerny, C.; Wunderbaldinger, P.; Steiner, E.

    1997-01-01

    Fractures of the temporal bone result from direct trauma to the temporal bone or occur as one component of a severe craniocerebral injury. Complications of temporal trauma are hemotympanon, facial nerve paralysis, conductive or sensorineur hearing loss, and leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Erly recognition and an appropiate therapy may improve or prevent permanent deficits related to such complications. Only 20-30% of temporal bone fractures can be visualized by plain films. CT has displaced plain radiography in the investigation of the otological trauma because subtle bony details are best evaluated by CT which even can be reformatted in multiple projections, regardless of the original plane of scanning. Associated epidural, subdural, and intracerebral hemorrhagic lesions are better defined by MRI. (orig.) [de

  10. Usefulness of dual echo volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (VISTA) in MR imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimori, Yuko; Tanaka, Shigeko; Naito, Yukari; Nishimura, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Akira; Miki, Yukio; Ohfuji, Satoko; Katsumata, Yasutomo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the ability to detect the articular disk and joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a method of dual echo volumetric isotropic turbo spin echo acquisition (DE-VISTA) additional fusion images (AFI). DE-VISTA was performed in the 26 TMJ of 13 volunteers and 26 TMJ of 13 patients. Two-dimensional (2D) dual echo turbo spin echo was performed in the 26 TMJ of 13 volunteers. On a workstation, we added proton density-weighted images (PDWI) and T 2 weighted images (T 2 WI) of the DE-VISTA per voxel to reconstruct DE-VISTA-AFI. Two radiologists reviewed these images visually and quantitatively. Visual evaluation of the articular disk was equivalent between DE-VISTA-AFI and 2D-PDWI. The sliding thin-slab multiplanar reformation (MPR) method of DE-VISTA-AFI could detect all articular disks. The ratio of contrast (CR) of adipose tissue by the articular disk to that of the articular disk itself was significantly higher in DE-VISTA-AFI than DE-VISTA-PDWI (P 2 WI but in only 3 of those joints in 2D-T 2 WI. The CR of joint effusion to adipose tissue on DE-VISTA-AFI did not differ significantly from that on DE-VISTA-PDWI. However, using DE-VISTA-T 2 WI in addition to DE-VISTA-PDWI, we could visually identify joint effusion on DE-VISTA-AFI that could not be identified on DE-VISTA-PDWI alone. DE-VISTA-AFI can depict the articular disk and a small amount of joint effusion by the required plane of MPR using the sliding thin-slab MPR method. (author)

  11. Image perception and image processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The author develops theoretical and practical models of image perception and image processing, based on phenomenology and structuralism and leading to original perception: fundamental for a positivistic approach of research work for the development of artificial intelligence that will be able in an automated system fo 'reading' X-ray pictures.

  12. Image perception and image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wackenheim, A.

    1987-01-01

    The author develops theoretical and practical models of image perception and image processing, based on phenomenology and structuralism and leading to original perception: fundamental for a positivistic approach of research work for the development of artificial intelligence that will be able in an automated system fo 'reading' X-ray pictures. (orig.) [de

  13. Retinal imaging and image analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abramoff, M.D.; Garvin, Mona K.; Sonka, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Many important eye diseases as well as systemic diseases manifest themselves in the retina. While a number of other anatomical structures contribute to the process of vision, this review focuses on retinal imaging and image analysis. Following a brief overview of the most prevalent causes of

  14. COLOR IMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lafon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to present specific capabilities and limitations of the use of color digital images in a characterization process. The whole process is investigated, from the acquisition of digital color images to the analysis of the information relevant to various applications in the field of material characterization. A digital color image can be considered as a matrix of pixels with values expressed in a vector-space (commonly 3 dimensional space whose specificity, compared to grey-scale images, is to ensure a coding and a representation of the output image (visualisation printing that fits the human visual reality. In a characterization process, it is interesting to regard color image attnbutes as a set of visual aspect measurements on a material surface. Color measurement systems (spectrocolorimeters, colorimeters and radiometers and cameras use the same type of light detectors: most of them use Charge Coupled Devices sensors. The difference between the two types of color data acquisition systems is that color measurement systems provide a global information of the observed surface (average aspect of the surface: the color texture is not taken into account. Thus, it seems interesting to use imaging systems as measuring instruments for the quantitative characterization of the color texture.

  15. Prospective study comparing three-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in potential living renal donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, Aftab A; Chugtai, Aamir; Haslam, Philip; Talbot, David; Rix, David A; Soomro, Naeem A

    2005-11-01

    To prospectively compare the accuracy of multislice spiral computed tomographic angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in evaluating the renal vascular anatomy in potential living renal donors. Thirty-one donors underwent multislice spiral CTA and gadolinium-enhanced MRA. In addition to axial images, multiplanar reconstruction and maximum intensity projections were used to display the renal vascular anatomy. Twenty-four donors had a left laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN), whereas seven had right open donor nephrectomy (ODN); LDN was only considered if the renal vascular anatomy was favourable on the left. CTA and MRA images were analysed by two radiologists independently. The radiological and surgical findings were correlated after the surgery. CTA showed 33 arteries and 32 veins (100% sensitivity) whereas MRA showed 32 arteries and 31 veins (97% sensitivity). CTA detected all five accessory renal arteries whereas MRA only detected one. CTA also identified all three accessory renal veins whereas MRA identified two. CTA had a sensitivity of 97% and 47% for left lumbar and left gonadal veins, whereas MRA had a sensitivity of 74% and 46%, respectively. Multislice spiral CTA with three-dimensional reconstruction was more accurate than MRA for both renal arterial and venous anatomy.

  16. Eleven fetal echocardiographic planes using 4-dimensional ultrasound with spatio-temporal image correlation (STIC): a logical approach to fetal heart volume analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantarasaengaram, Surasak; Vairojanavong, Kittipong

    2010-09-15

    Theoretically, a cross-sectional image of any cardiac planes can be obtained from a STIC fetal heart volume dataset. We described a method to display 11 fetal echocardiographic planes from STIC volumes. Fetal heart volume datasets were acquired by transverse acquisition from 200 normal fetuses at 15 to 40 weeks of gestation. Analysis of the volume datasets using the described technique to display 11 echocardiographic planes in the multiplanar display mode were performed offline. Volume datasets from 18 fetuses were excluded due to poor image resolution. The mean visualization rates for all echocardiographic planes at 15-17, 18-22, 23-27, 28-32 and 33-40 weeks of gestation fetuses were 85.6% (range 45.2-96.8%, N = 31), 92.9% (range 64.0-100%, N = 64), 93.4% (range 51.4-100%, N = 37), 88.7%(range 54.5-100%, N = 33) and 81.8% (range 23.5-100%, N = 17) respectively. Overall, the applied technique can favorably display the pertinent echocardiographic planes. Description of the presented method provides a logical approach to explore the fetal heart volumes.

  17. Image retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnager, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    The paper touches upon indexing and retrieval for effective searches of digitized images. Different conceptions of what subject indexing means are described as a basis for defining an operational subject indexing strategy for images. The methodology is based on the art historian Erwin Panofsky......), special knowledge about image codes, and special knowledge about history of ideas. The semiologist Roland Barthes has established a semiology for pictorial expressions based on advertising photos. Barthes uses the concepts denotation/connotation where denotations can be explained as the sober expression...

  18. Preoperative examination of potential renal transplant donors: value of gadolinium-enhanced 3D-MR-angiography in comparison with DSA and urography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterer, J.T.; Paul, G.; Einert, A.; Altehoefer, C.; Uhrmeister, P.; Laubenberger, J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess a contrast-enhanced standardized MRA protocol for the presurgical evaluation of potential renal transplant donors. Methods: Twenty-three potential donors for renal transplantations were examined with gadolinium-enhanced, two-phase MR angiograms (1.5 T) and DSA/urography for the number of renal arteries, the presence of aberrant arterial and venous branches, renal artery stenoses and anatomy of the renal collecting system and ureters. The diagnostic value was assessed by evaluating different image processing modalities and interobserver variability. Results: Using maximum intensity projections (MIP) together with multiplanar reformatting (MPR), accessory arteries were detected with a sensitivity/specificity of 100%/98%. Depending on diagnostic experience, exclusive evaluation of MIP yielded a sensitivitiy/specificity of 67-100%/95-100%. Using MIP/MPR, venous depiction was good in 80%, with MIP solely in 30-40%. At least the proximal third of the ureter was visible in 67%. Conclusion: MPR/MIP evaluation of two-phase, contrast-enhanced MRA provides an excellent depiction of renal vessel anatomy for presurgical evaluation of renal transplant donors. Exclusive MIP assessment is less reliable and depends strongly on the examiner's experience. For sufficient visualization of the ureters, either additional measurements or low-dose diuretic injection have to be performed. (orig.) [de

  19. Development of preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery and the guidance for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jun; Gu, Xin; Sun, Yi; Politis, Constantinus

    2016-04-01

    Preoperative planning is of great importance for transforaminal endoscopic techniques applied in percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy. In this study, a modular preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery was developed and demonstrated. The path searching method is based on collision detection, and the oriented bounding box was constructed for the anatomical models. Then, image reformatting algorithms were developed for multiplanar reconstruction which provides detailed anatomical information surrounding the virtual planned path. Finally, multithread technique was implemented to realize the steady-state condition of the software. A preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery (TE-Guider) was developed; seven cases of patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations were planned preoperatively using TE-Guider. The distances to the midlines and the direction of the optimal paths were exported, and each result was in line with the empirical value. TE-Guider provides an efficient and cost-effective way to search the ideal path and entry point for the puncture. However, more clinical cases will be conducted to demonstrate its feasibility and reliability.

  20. Clinical evaluation of multishot echo planar imaging after administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide for hepatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Yukio; Watanabe, Yorihisa; Ito, Kazushi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    Ten cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and three cases of metastatic liver tumor were evaluated using breath-hold multishot echo planar imaging (EPI) before and after administration of super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and the results were compared to those with breath-hold fast multi-planar SPGR (T 1 WI) and fat-suppressed respiratory-triggered FSE (T 2 WI). Qualitative imaging evaluation of lesion detectability showed that T 2 WI was much more useful than T 1 WI as previously reported, and more useful than EPI. Quantitative evaluation showed that the signal to noise (S/N) ratios of the liver parenchyma decreased after administration of SPIO and the changes were significant on all pulse sequences. The change ratio of the S/N ratio of the liver parenchyma after administration of SPIO on EPI was significantly higher than on T 1 WI and T 2 WI. The tumor-liver contrast to noise (C/N) ratios increased after administration of SPIO and the changes were significant on T 1 WI and T 2 WI, but not on EPI. These results suggested that the tumor S/N ratio decreased after administration of SPIO on EPI. The tumor diameters on EPI were significantly reduced after administration of SPIO. Magnetization and flow artifacts on EPI were detected in all cases and caused distortion: the signal decreased in the liver parenchyma. We concluded that EPI after administration of SPIO is not currently useful compared to other pulse sequences and cannot yet replace T 2 WI. (author)

  1. Image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Bischof, L.M.; Breen, E.J.; Peden, G.M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of modern image analysis techniques pertinent to materials science. The usual approach in image analysis contains two basic steps: first, the image is segmented into its constituent components (e.g. individual grains), and second, measurement and quantitative analysis are performed. Usually, the segmentation part of the process is the harder of the two. Consequently, much of the paper concentrates on this aspect, reviewing both fundamental segmentation tools (commonly found in commercial image analysis packages) and more advanced segmentation tools. There is also a review of the most widely used quantitative analysis methods for measuring the size, shape and spatial arrangements of objects. Many of the segmentation and analysis methods are demonstrated using complex real-world examples. Finally, there is a discussion of hardware and software issues. 42 refs., 17 figs

  2. Medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loshkajian, A.

    2000-01-01

    This didactical book presents the medical imaging techniques: radiography, scanner, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Examples are given for the most common pathologies in all domains of medicine. (J.S.)

  3. Image Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Jerram, Paul; Stefanov, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    An image sensor of the type for providing charge multiplication by impact ionisation has plurality of multiplication elements. Each element is arranged to receive charge from photosensitive elements of an image area and each element comprises a sequence of electrodes to move charge along a transport path. Each of the electrodes has an edge defining a boundary with a first electrode, a maximum width across the charge transport path and a leading edge that defines a boundary with a second elect...

  4. Brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, L.D.; Bennett, L.R.

    1976-01-01

    Imaging with radionuclides should be used in a complementary fashion with other neuroradiologic techniques. It is useful in the early detection and evaluation of intracranial neoplasm, cerebrovascular accident and abscess, and in postsurgical follow-up. Cisternography yields useful information about the functional status of cerebrospinal fluid pathways. Computerized axial tomography is a new technique of great promise that produced a cross-sectional image of the brain

  5. Emerging images

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2009-01-01

    Emergence refers to the unique human ability to aggregate information from seemingly meaningless pieces, and to perceive a whole that is meaningful. This special skill of humans can constitute an effective scheme to tell humans and machines apart. This paper presents a synthesis technique to generate images of 3D objects that are detectable by humans, but difficult for an automatic algorithm to recognize. The technique allows generating an infinite number of images with emerging figures. Our algorithm is designed so that locally the synthesized images divulge little useful information or cues to assist any segmentation or recognition procedure. Therefore, as we demonstrate, computer vision algorithms are incapable of effectively processing such images. However, when a human observer is presented with an emergence image, synthesized using an object she is familiar with, the figure emerges when observed as a whole. We can control the difficulty level of perceiving the emergence effect through a limited set of parameters. A procedure that synthesizes emergence images can be an effective tool for exploring and understanding the factors affecting computer vision techniques. © 2009 ACM.

  6. Utilization of an electronic portal imaging device for measurement of dynamic wedge data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elder, Eric S.; Miner, Marc S.; Butker, Elizabeth K.; Sutton, Danny S.; Davis, Lawrence W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Due to the motion of the collimator during dynamic wedge treatments, the conventional method of collecting comprehensive wedge data with a water tank and a scanning ionization chamber is obsolete. It is the objective of this work to demonstrate the use of an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) and software to accomplish this task. Materials and Methods: A Varian Clinac[reg] 2300 C/D, equipped with a PortalVision TM EPID and Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software, was used to produce the radiation field. The Dosimetry Research Mode experimental software allows for a band of 10 of 256 high voltage electrodes to be continuously read and averaged by the 256 electrometer electrodes. The file that is produced contains data relating to the integrated ionization at each of the 256 points, essentially the cross plane beam profile. Software was developed using Microsoft C ++ to reformat the data for import into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet allowing for easy mathematical manipulation and graphical display. Beam profiles were measured by the EPID with a 100 cm TSD for various field sizes. Each field size was measured open, steel wedged, and dynamically wedged. Scanning ionization chamber measurements performed in a water tank were compared to the open and steel wedged fields. Ionization chamber measurements taken in a water tank were compared with the dynamically wedged measurements. For the EPID measurements the depth was varied using Gammex RMI Solid Water TM placed directly above the EPID sensitive volume. Bolus material was placed between the Solid Water TM and the EPID to avoid an air gap. Results: Comparison of EPID measurements with those from an ion chamber in a water tank showed a discrepancy of ∼5%. Scans were successfully obtained for open, steel wedged and dynamically wedged beams. Software has been developed to allow for easy graphical display of beam profiles. Conclusions: Measurement of dynamic wedge data proves to be easily

  7. The effect of Moidal non-linear blending function for dual-energy CT on CT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fan; Yang Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the difference between linear blending and non-linear blending function for dual-energy CT, and to evaluate the effect on CT image quality. Methods: The model was made of a piece of fresh pork liver inserted with 5 syringes containing various concentrations of iodine solutions (16.3, 26.4, 48.7, 74.6 and 112.3 HU). Linear blending images were automatically reformatted after the model was scanned in the dual-energy mode. Non-linear blending images were reformatted using the software of optimal contrast in Syngo workstation. Images were divided into 3 groups, including linear blending group, non-linear blending group and 120 kV group. Contrast noise ratio (CNR) were measured and calculated respectively in the 3 groups and the different figure of merit (FOM) values between the groups were compared using one-way ANOVA. Twenty patients scanned in the dual-energy mode were randomly selected and the SNR of their liver, renal cortex, spleen, pancreas and abdominal aorta were measured. The independent sample t test was used to compare the difference of signal to noise ratio (SNR) between linear blending group and non linear blending group. Two readers' agreement score and single-blind method were used to investigate the conspicuity difference between linear blending group and non linear blending group. Results: With models of different CT values, the FOM values in non-linear blending group were 20.65± 8.18, 11.40±4.25, 1.60±0.82, 2.40±1.13, 45.49±17.86. In 74.6 HU and 112.3 HU models, the differences of the FOM values observed among the three groups were statistically significant (P<0.05), which were 0.30±0.06 and 14.43±4.59 for linear blending group, and 0.22±0.05 and 15.31±5.16 for 120 kV group. And non-linear blending group had a better FOM value. The SNR of renal cortex and abdominal aorta were 19.2±5.1 and 36.5±13.9 for non-linear blending group, while they were 12.4±3.8 and 22.6±7.0 for linear blending group. There were statistically

  8. PC image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwa, Mok Jin Il; Am, Ha Jeng Ung

    1995-04-01

    This book starts summary of digital image processing and personal computer, and classification of personal computer image processing system, digital image processing, development of personal computer and image processing, image processing system, basic method of image processing such as color image processing and video processing, software and interface, computer graphics, video image and video processing application cases on image processing like satellite image processing, color transformation of image processing in high speed and portrait work system.

  9. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonio; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  10. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  11. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Dept. of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy); Cianfoni, Alessandro [Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (United States); Cerase, Alfonso [General Hospital, Unit Neuroimaging and Neurointervention (NINT), Department of Neurosciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  12. Noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease by multislice spiral computed tomography using a new retrospectively ECG-gated image reconstruction technique. Comparison with angiographic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Naoya; Kato, Masahiko [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Surugadai Hospital] [and others

    2003-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the accuracy of multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) in detecting coronary artery disease, compared with coronary angiography (CAG), using a new retrospectively ECG-gated reconstruction method that reduced cardiac motion artifact. The study group comprised 54 consecutive patients undergoing MSCT and CAG. MSCT was performed using a SOMATOM Volume Zoom (4-detector-row, Siemens, Germany) with slice thickness 1.0 mm, pitch 1.5 (table feed: 1.5 mm per rotation) and gantry rotation time 500 ms. Metoprolol (20-60 mg) was administered orally prior to MSCT imaging. ECG-gated image reconstruction was performed with the reconstruction window (250 ms) positioned immediately before atrial contraction in order to reduce the cardiac motion artifact caused by the abrupt diastolic ventricular movement occurring during the rapid filling and atrial contraction periods. Following inspection of the volume rendering