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Sample records for multiphoton excited fluorescence

  1. Scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junpeng Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Using the combination of a reflective blazed grating and a reflective phase-only diffractive spatial light modulator (SLM, scanless multitarget-matching multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy (SMTM-MPM was achieved. The SLM shaped an incoming mode-locked, near-infrared Ti:sapphire laser beam into an excitation pattern with addressable shapes and sizes that matched the samples of interest in the field of view. Temporal and spatial focusing were simultaneously realized by combining an objective lens and a blazed grating. The fluorescence signal from illuminated areas was recorded by a two-dimensional sCMOS camera. Compared with a conventional temporal focusing multiphoton microscope, our microscope achieved effective use of the laser power and decreased photodamage with higher axial resolution.

  2. vuv fluorescence from selective high-order multiphoton excitation of N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffee, Ryan N.; Gibson, George N.

    2004-01-01

    Recent fluorescence studies suggest that ultrashort pulse laser excitation may be highly selective. Selective high-intensity laser excitation holds important consequences for the physics of multiphoton processes. To establish the extent of this selectivity, we performed a detailed comparative study of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence resulting from the interaction of N 2 and Ar with high-intensity infrared ultrashort laser pulses. Both N 2 and Ar reveal two classes of transitions, inner-valence ns ' l ' . From their pressure dependence, we associate each transition with either plasma or direct laser excitation. Furthermore, we qualitatively confirm such associations with the time dependence of the fluorescence signal. Remarkably, only N 2 presents evidence of direct laser excitation. This direct excitation produces ionic nitrogen fragments with inner-valence (2s) holes, two unidentified transitions, and one molecular transition, the N 2 + :X 2 Σ g + 2 Σ u + . We discuss these results in the light of a recently proposed model for multiphoton excitation

  3. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    ' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2......-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein) and diffusion coefficients of distinct fluorescence probes (raster imaging correlation spectroscopy) can be obtained from different regions of the tissue. Comparative studies of different tissue strata, but also between equivalent regions of normal and abnormal......This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes...

  4. Multi-photon excited luminescence of magnetic FePt core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, K M; Kuhn, B

    2014-07-01

    We present magnetic FePt nanoparticles with a hydrophilic, inert, and biocompatible silico-tungsten oxide shell. The particles can be functionalized, optically detected, and optically manipulated. To show the functionalization the fluorescent dye NOPS was bound to the FePt core-shell nanoparticles with propyl-triethoxy-silane linkers and fluorescence of the labeled particles were observed in ethanol (EtOH). In aqueous dispersion the NOPS fluorescence is quenched making them invisible using 1-photon excitation. However, we observe bright luminescence of labeled and even unlabeled magnetic core-shell nanoparticles with multi-photon excitation. Luminescence can be detected in the near ultraviolet and the full visible spectral range by near infrared multi-photon excitation. For optical manipulation, we were able to drag clusters of particles, and maybe also single particles, by a focused laser beam that acts as optical tweezers by inducing an electric dipole in the insulated metal nanoparticles. In a first application, we show that the luminescence of the core-shell nanoparticles is bright enough for in vivo multi-photon imaging in the mouse neocortex down to cortical layer 5.

  5. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of chemotherapy distribution in solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Marjorie; Watson, Adrienne L.; Anderson, Leah; Largaespada, David A.; Provenzano, Paolo P.

    2017-11-01

    Doxorubicin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic employed to treat multiple human cancers, including numerous sarcomas and carcinomas. Furthermore, doxorubicin possesses strong fluorescent properties that make it an ideal reagent for modeling drug delivery by examining its distribution in cells and tissues. However, while doxorubicin fluorescence and lifetime have been imaged in live tissue, its behavior in archival samples that frequently result from drug and treatment studies in human and animal patients, and murine models of human cancer, has to date been largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate imaging of doxorubicin intensity and lifetimes in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from mouse models of human cancer with multiphoton excitation and multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Multiphoton excitation imaging reveals robust doxorubicin emission in tissue sections and captures spatial heterogeneity in cells and tissues. However, quantifying the amount of doxorubicin signal in distinct cell compartments, particularly the nucleus, often remains challenging due to strong signals in multiple compartments. The addition of FLIM analysis to display the spatial distribution of excited state lifetimes clearly distinguishes between signals in distinct compartments such as the cell nuclei versus cytoplasm and allows for quantification of doxorubicin signal in each compartment. Furthermore, we observed a shift in lifetime values in the nuclei of transformed cells versus nontransformed cells, suggesting a possible diagnostic role for doxorubicin lifetime imaging to distinguish normal versus transformed cells. Thus, data here demonstrate that multiphoton FLIM is a highly sensitive platform for imaging doxorubicin distribution in normal and diseased archival tissues.

  6. Focal switching of photochromic fluorescent proteins enables multiphoton microscopy with superior image contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ya-Ting; Zhu, Xinxin; Xu, Fang; Min, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Probing biological structures and functions deep inside live organisms with light is highly desirable. Among the current optical imaging modalities, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy exhibits the best contrast for imaging scattering samples by employing a spatially confined nonlinear excitation. However, as the incident laser power drops exponentially with imaging depth into the sample due to the scattering loss, the out-of-focus background eventually overwhelms the in-focus signal, which defines a fundamental imaging-depth limit. Herein we significantly improve the image contrast for deep scattering samples by harnessing reversibly switchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) which can be cycled between bright and dark states upon light illumination. Two distinct techniques, multiphoton deactivation and imaging (MPDI) and multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI), are demonstrated on tissue phantoms labeled with Dronpa protein. Such a focal switch approach can generate pseudo background-free images. Conceptually different from wave-based approaches that try to reduce light scattering in turbid samples, our work represents a molecule-based strategy that focused on imaging probes.

  7. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  8. Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence of Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higbie, J. M.; Perreault, J. D.; Acosta, V. M.; Belthangady, C.; Lebel, P.; Kim, M. H.; Nguyen, K.; Demas, V.; Bajaj, V.; Santori, C.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon-vacancy color centers in nanodiamonds are promising as fluorescent labels for biological applications, with a narrow, nonbleaching emission line at 738 nm. Two-photon excitation of this fluorescence offers the possibility of low-background detection at significant tissue depth with high three-dimensional spatial resolution. We measure the two-photon fluorescence cross section of a negatively charged silicon vacancy (Si -V- ) in ion-implanted bulk diamond to be 0.74 (19 )×10-50 cm4 s /photon at an excitation wavelength of 1040 nm. Compared to the diamond nitrogen-vacancy center, the expected detection threshold of a two-photon excited Si -V center is more than an order of magnitude lower, largely due to its much narrower linewidth. We also present measurements of two- and three-photon excitation spectra, finding an increase in the two-photon cross section with decreasing wavelength, and we discuss the physical interpretation of the spectra in the context of existing models of the Si -V energy-level structure.

  9. The importance of spectroscopy for infrared multiphoton excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, W.; Kompa, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    It is substantiated by examples that the infrared spectra of molecules in high vibrational states are similar in width to those of the ground states. Therefore in order to explain collisionless infrared multiphoton excitation, the existence of resonance has to be checked, not only for the first three steps, but for all of them. That is, their (low resolution) spectra should be studied. This review summarizes the spectroscopic mechanisms contributing to multiphoton excitation, which have been suggested to date, including several kinds of rotational compensation and of vibrational level splitting, which cooperate to overcome the anharmonic shift. The spectral quasicontinuum, generated by intensity borrowing, must neither be very broad nor dense, and collisionless vibrational relaxation is only important at very high energies. Knowledge of relatively few spectroscopic detailes helps to understand many details and many differences in multiphoton excitatio. (orig.)

  10. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  11. Impulsive IR-multiphoton dissociation of acrolein: observation of non-statistical product vibrational excitation in CO ( v=1-12) by time resolved IR fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. K.

    2000-10-01

    On IR-multiphoton excitation, vibrationally highly excited acrolein molecules undergo concerted dissociation generating CO and ethylene. The vibrationally excited products, CO and ethylene, are detected immediately following the CO 2 laser pulse by observing IR fluorescence at 4.7 and 3.2 μm, respectively. The nascent CO is formed with significant vibrational excitation, with a Boltzmann population distribution for v=1-12 levels corresponding to T v=12 950±50 K. The average vibrational energy in the product CO is found to be 26 kcal mol -1, in contrast to its statistical share of 5 kcal mol -1, available from the product energy distribution. The nascent vibrationally excited ethylene either dissociates by absorbing further infrared laser photons from the tail of the CO 2 laser pulse or relaxes by collisional deactivation. Ethylene IR-fluorescence excitation spectrum showed a structure in the quasi-continuum, with a facile resonance at 10.53 μm corresponding to the 10P(14) CO 2 laser line, which explains the higher acetylene yield observed at a higher pressure. A hydrogen atom transfer mechanism followed by C-C impulsive break in the acrolein transition state may be responsible for such non-statistical product energy distribution.

  12. Multiphoton excitation and high-harmonics generation in topological insulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H K; Avetissian, A K; Avchyan, B R; Mkrtchian, G F

    2018-05-10

    Multiphoton interaction of coherent electromagnetic radiation with 2D metallic carriers confined on the surface of the 3D topological insulator is considered. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear interaction of a strong wave and metallic carriers with many-body Coulomb interaction is developed. The set of integrodifferential equations for the interband polarization and carrier occupation distribution is solved numerically. Multiphoton excitation of Fermi-Dirac sea of 2D massless carriers is considered for a THz pump wave. It is shown that in the moderately strong pump wave field along with multiphoton interband/intraband transitions the intense radiation of high harmonics takes place.

  13. Multiphoton excitation and high-harmonics generation in topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Avetissian, A. K.; Avchyan, B. R.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2018-05-01

    Multiphoton interaction of coherent electromagnetic radiation with 2D metallic carriers confined on the surface of the 3D topological insulator is considered. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear interaction of a strong wave and metallic carriers with many-body Coulomb interaction is developed. The set of integrodifferential equations for the interband polarization and carrier occupation distribution is solved numerically. Multiphoton excitation of Fermi–Dirac sea of 2D massless carriers is considered for a THz pump wave. It is shown that in the moderately strong pump wave field along with multiphoton interband/intraband transitions the intense radiation of high harmonics takes place.

  14. Characteristics of subgingival calculus detection by multiphoton fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Oi-Hong; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Lai, Yu-Lin; Chen, How-Foo

    2011-06-01

    Subgingival calculus has been recognized as a major cause of periodontitis, which is one of the main chronic infectious diseases of oral cavities and a principal cause of tooth loss in humans. Bacteria deposited in subgingival calculus or plaque cause gingival inflammation, function deterioration, and then periodontitis. However, subgingival calculus within the periodontal pocket is a complicated and potentially delicate structure to be detected with current dental armamentaria, namely dental x-rays and dental probes. Consequently, complete removal of subgingival calculus remains a challenge to periodontal therapies. In this study, the detection of subgingival calculus employing a multiphoton autofluorescence imaging method was characterized in comparison with a one-photon confocal fluorescence imaging technique. Feasibility of such a system was studied based on fluorescence response of gingiva, healthy teeth, and calculus with and without gingiva covered. The multiphoton fluorescence technology perceived the tissue-covered subgingival calculus that cannot be observed by the one-photon confocal fluorescence method.

  15. Application of Negative Curvature Hollow-Core Fiber in an Optical Fiber Sensor Setup for Multiphoton Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popenda, Maciej Andrzej; Stawska, Hanna Izabela; Mazur, Leszek Mateusz; Jakubowski, Konrad; Kosolapov, Alexey; Kolyadin, Anton; Bereś-Pawlik, Elżbieta

    2017-10-06

    In this paper, an application of negative curvature hollow core fiber (NCHCF) in an all-fiber, multiphoton fluorescence sensor setup is presented. The dispersion parameter (D) of this fiber does not exceed the value of 5 ps/nm × km across the optical spectrum of (680-750) nm, making it well suited for the purpose of multiphoton excitation of biological fluorophores. Employing 1.5 m of this fiber in a simple, all-fiber sensor setup allows us to perform multiphoton experiments without any dispersion compensation methods. Multiphoton excitation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) with this fiber shows a 6- and 9-fold increase, respectively, in the total fluorescence signal collected when compared with the commercial solution in the form of a hollow-core photonic band gap fiber (HCPBF). To the author's best knowledge, this is the first time an NCHCF was used in an optical-fiber sensor setup for multiphoton fluorescence experiments.

  16. Clinical multiphoton FLIM tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    This paper gives an overview on current clinical high resolution multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging in volunteers and patients. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in Life Sciences was introduced in Jena/Germany in 1988/89 based on a ZEISS confocal picosecond dye laser scanning microscope equipped with a single photon counting unit. The porphyrin distribution in living cells and living tumor-bearing mice was studied with high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. Ten years later, time-gated cameras were employed to detect dental caries in volunteers based on one-photon excitation of autofluorescent bacteria with long fluorescence lifetimes. Nowadays, one-photon FLIM based on picosecond VIS laser diodes are used to study ocular diseases in humans. Already one decade ago, first clinical twophoton FLIM images in humans were taken with the certified clinical multiphoton femtosecond laser tomograph DermaInspectTM. Multiphoton tomographs with FLIM modules are now operating in hospitals at Brisbane, Tokyo, Berlin, Paris, London, Modena and other European cities. Multiple FLIM detectors allow spectral FLIM with a temporal resolution down to 20 ps (MCP) / 250 ps (PMT) and a spectral resolution of 10 nm. Major FLIM applications include the detection of intradermal sunscreen and tattoo nanoparticles, the detection of different melanin types, the early diagnosis of dermatitis and malignant melanoma, as well as the measurement of therapeutic effects in pateints suffering from dermatitis. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the clinical multiphoton FLIM tomographs DermaInspectTM and MPTflexTM.

  17. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  18. The layered-resolved microstructure and spectroscopy of mouse oral mucosa using multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo Shuangmu [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen Jianxin [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Jiang Xingshan [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Xie Shusen [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen Rong [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Normal University, Ministry of Education, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Cao Ning [Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China); Zou Qilian [Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China); Xiong Shuyuan [Fujian Medical University, Fuzhou 350004 (China)

    2007-08-21

    The layered-resolved microstructure and spectroscopy of mouse oral mucosa are obtained using a combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis with different excitation wavelengths. In the keratinizing layer, the keratinocytes microstructure can be characterized and the keratinizing thickness can be measured. The keratin fluorescence signal can be further characterized by emission maxima at 510 nm. In the epithelium, the cellular microstructure can be quantitatively visualized with depth and the epithelium thickness can be determined by multiphoton imaging excited at 730 nm. The study also shows that the epithelial spectra excited at 810 nm, showing a combination of NADH and FAD fluorescence, can be used for the estimation of the metabolic state in epithelium. Interestingly, a second-harmonic generation (SHG) signal from DNA was observed for the first time within the epithelial layer in backscattering geometry and provides the possibility of analyzing the chromatin structure. In the stroma, the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis excited at 850 nm in tandem can obtain quantitative information regarding the biomorphology and biochemistry of stroma. Specifically, the microstructure of collagen, minor salivary glands and elastic fibers, and the optical property of the stroma can be quantitatively displayed. Overall, these results suggest that the combination of multiphoton imaging and spectral analysis with different excitation wavelengths has the potential to provide important and comprehensive information for early diagnosis of oral cancer.

  19. Examination of excited state populations in sputtering using Multiphoton Resonance Ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimock, F.M.; Baxter, J.P.; Pappas, D.L.; Kobrin, P.H.; Winograd, N.

    1984-01-01

    Multiphoton Resonance Ionization has been employed to study the populations of excited state atoms ejected from ion bombarded metal surfaces. Preliminary investigations have focused on three model systems: aluminum, indium and cobalt. In this paper the authors examine the effect of primary ion energy (2 to 12 keV Ar + ) on excited state yields for these three systems. The influence of the sample matrix on excited state populations of sputtered atoms is also discussed

  20. Study on infrared multiphoton excitation of the linear triatomic molecule by the Lie-algebra approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, H.; Zheng, Y.; Ding, S.

    2007-01-01

    Infrared multiphoton vibrational excitation of the linear triatomic molecule has been studied using the quadratic anharmonic Lie-algebra model, unitary transformations, and Magnus approximation. An explicit Lie-algebra expression for the vibrational transition probability is obtained by using a Lie-algebra approach. This explicit Lie-algebra expressions for time-evolution operator and vibrational transition probabilities make the computation clearer and easier. The infrared multiphoton vibrational excitation of the DCN linear tri-atomic molecule is discussed as an example

  1. Examination of excited state populations in sputtering using multiphoton resonance ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimock, F.M.; Baxter, J.P.; Pappas, D.L.; Kobrin, P.H.; Winograd, N.

    1984-01-01

    Multiphoton Resonance Ionization has been employed to study the populations of excited state atoms ejected from ion bombarded metal surfaces. Preliminary investigations have focused on three model systems: aluminum, indium and cobalt. In this paper we examine the effect of primary ion energy (2 to 12 keV Ar + ) on excited state yields for these three systems. The influence of the sample matrix on excited state populations of sputtered atoms is also discussed. 8 refs., 4 figs

  2. Characterizing lamina propria of human gastric mucosa by multiphoton microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y C; Yang, H Q; Zhuo, S M [Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Chen, G; Chen, J X [Department of Pathology, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou, 350014 (China); Yan, J, E-mail: chenjianxin@fjnu.edu.cn, E-mail: ynjun@yahoo.com [Department of Surgery, Fujian Provincial Tumor Hospital, Fuzhou, 350014 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) of gastric mucosa plays an important role in progression of gastric cancer because of the site at where inflammatory reactions occur. Multiphoton imaging has been recently employed for microscopic examination of intact tissue. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), high resolution multiphoton microscopic images of lamina propria (LP) are obtained in normal human gastric mucosa at excitation wavelength {lambda}{sub ex} = 800 nm. The main source of tissue TPEF originated from the cells of gastric glands, and loose connective tissue, collagen, produced SHG signals. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be effective for characterizing the microstructure of LP in human gastric mucosa. The findings will be helpful for diagnosing and staging early gastric cancer in the clinics.

  3. Characterizing lamina propria of human gastric mucosa by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. C.; Yang, H. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhuo, S. M.; Chen, J. X.; Yan, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lamina propria (LP) of gastric mucosa plays an important role in progression of gastric cancer because of the site at where inflammatory reactions occur. Multiphoton imaging has been recently employed for microscopic examination of intact tissue. In this paper, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG), high resolution multiphoton microscopic images of lamina propria (LP) are obtained in normal human gastric mucosa at excitation wavelength λex = 800 nm. The main source of tissue TPEF originated from the cells of gastric glands, and loose connective tissue, collagen, produced SHG signals. Our results demonstrated that MPM can be effective for characterizing the microstructure of LP in human gastric mucosa. The findings will be helpful for diagnosing and staging early gastric cancer in the clinics.

  4. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ + /sub u/, v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 1,2, b 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 3-5, and c 1 Pi/sub u/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization

  5. Multiphoton Laser Microscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging for the Evaluation of the Skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Seidenari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton laser microscopy is a new, non-invasive technique providing access to the skin at a cellular and subcellular level, which is based both on autofluorescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging. Whereas the former considers fluorescence intensity emitted by epidermal and dermal fluorophores and by the extra-cellular matrix, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM, is generated by the fluorescence decay rate. This innovative technique can be applied to the study of living skin, cell cultures and ex vivo samples. Although still limited to the clinical research field, the development of multiphoton laser microscopy is thought to become suitable for a practical application in the next few years: in this paper, we performed an accurate review of the studies published so far, considering the possible fields of application of this imaging method and providing high quality images acquired in the Department of Dermatology of the University of Modena.

  6. Photoionization of excited molecular states using multiphoton excitation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectron spectra are reported for three photon resonant, four photon ionization of H 2 via the B 1 Σ/sub u/ + , v = 7 (J = 2,4) and C 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0-4 (J = 1) levels and of N 2 via the o 3 1 π/sub u'/, v = 1,2, b 1 π/sub u'/, v = 3-5, and c 1 π/sub u'/, v = 0 levels. The results reflect both the spectroscopy and the dynamics of photoionization of excited molecular states and are discussed in terms of the selection rules for photoionization and the relative probabilities of photoionization from Rydberg and valence states. In some cases, in accordance with the Franck-Condon principle, the results demonstrate that resonant multiphoton ionization through Rydberg states may be a powerful technique for the production of electronic, vibrational, and rotational state selected ions. However, in other cases, systematic departures from Franck-Condon factors are observed, which reflect the more subtle dynamics of excited state photoionization. 23 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  7. Investigations of multiphoton excitation and ionization in a short range potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susskind, S.M.; Cowley, S.C.; Valeo, E.J.

    1989-02-01

    We introduce an approach to the study of excitation and ionization for a system with a short range potential. In particular, analytical and numerical results are presented for the multiphoton ionization rate, under strong field conditions, of an electron confined by a δ-function potential. 9 refs., 3 figs

  8. Investigations of multiphoton excitation and ionization in a short range potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susskind, S.M.; Cowley, S.C.; Valeo, E.J.

    1989-02-01

    We introduce an approach to the study of excitation and ionization for a system with a short range potential. In particular, analytical and numerical results are presented for the multiphoton ionization rate, under strong field conditions, of an electron confined by a delta-function potential. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Current developments in clinical multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    Two-photon microscopy has been introduced in 1990 [1]. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched by the JenLab company with the tomograph DermaInspectTM. In 2010, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel mobile multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. The multiphoton excitation of fluorescent biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin as well as the second harmonic generation of collagen is induced by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid highquality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system, and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research, and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research. So far, more than 1,000 patients and volunteers have been investigated with the multiphoton tomographs in Europe, Asia, and Australia.

  10. Enhanced eumelanin emission by stepwise three-photon excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerimo, Josef; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2011-03-01

    Eumelanin fluorescence from Sepia officinalis and black human hair was activated with near-infrared radiation and multiphoton excitation. A third order multiphoton absorption by a step-wise process appears to be the underlying mechanism. The activation was caused by a photochemical process since it could not be reproduced by simple heating. Both fluorescence and brightfield imaging indicate the near-infrared irradiation caused photodamage to the eumelanin and the activated emission originated from the photodamaged region. At least two different components with about thousand-fold enhanced fluorescence were activated and could be distinguished by their excitation properties. One component was excited with wavelengths in the visible region and exhibited linear absorption dependence. The second component could be excited with near-infrared wavelengths and had a third order dependence on the laser power. The third order dependence is explained by a step-wise excited state absorption (ESA) process since it could be observed equally with the CW and femtosecond lasers. The new method for photoactivating the eumelanin fluorescence was used to map the melanin content in human hair.

  11. Design and development of compact multiphoton microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehravar, SeyedSoroush

    A compact multi-photon microscope (MPM) was designed and developed with the use of low-cost mode-locked fiber lasers operating at 1040nm and 1560nm. The MPM was assembled in-house and the system aberration was investigated using the optical design software: Zemax. A novel characterization methodology based on 'nonlinear knife-edge' technique was also introduced to measure the axial, lateral resolution, and the field curvature of the multi-photon microscope's image plane. The field curvature was then post-corrected using data processing in MATLAB. A customized laser scanning software based on LabVIEW was developed for data acquisition, image display and controlling peripheral electronics. Finally, different modalities of multi-photon excitation such as second- and third harmonic generation, two- and three-photon fluorescence were utilized to study a wide variety of samples from cancerous cells to 2D-layered materials.

  12. Stepwise multiphoton activation fluorescence reveals a new method of melanin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; Mega, Yair; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2013-06-01

    The stepwise multiphoton activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave mode near infrared (NIR) laser, reveals a broad spectrum extending from the visible spectra to the NIR and has potential application for a low-cost, reliable method of detecting melanin. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin are compared with conventional multiphoton fluorescence microscopy and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). By combining CRM with SMPAF, we can locate melanin reliably. However, we have the added benefit of eliminating background interference from other components inside mouse hair and skin. The melanin SMPAF signal from the mouse hair is a mixture of a two-photon process and a third-order process. The melanin SMPAF emission spectrum is activated by a 1505.9-nm laser light, and the resulting spectrum has a peak at 960 nm. The discovery of the emission peak may lead to a more energy-efficient method of background-free melanin detection with less photo-bleaching.

  13. Cutaneous porphyrins exhibit anti-stokes fluorescence that is detectable in sebum (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Giselle; Zeng, Haishan; Zhao, Jianhua; Wu, Zhenguo; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Lui, Harvey; Mclean, David I.

    2016-02-01

    Porphyrins produced by Propionibacterium acnes represent the principal fluorophore associated with acne, and appear as orange-red luminescence under the Wood's lamp. Assessment of acne based on Wood's lamp (UV) or visible light illumination is limited by photon penetration depth and has limited sensitivity for earlier stage lesions. Inducing fluorescence with near infrared (NIR) excitation may provide an alternative way to assess porphyrin-related skin disorders. We discovered that under 785 nm CW laser excitation PpIX powder exhibits fluorescence emission in the shorter wavelength range of 600-715 nm with an intensity that is linearly dependent on the excitation power. We attribute this shorter wavelength emission to anti-Stokes fluorescence. Similar anti-Stokes fluorescence was also detected focally in all skin-derived samples containing porphyrins. Regular (Stokes) fluorescence was present under UV and visible light excitation on ex vivo nasal skin and sebum from uninflamed acne, but not on nose surface smears or sebum from inflamed acne. Co-registered CW laser-excited anti-Stokes fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence images of PpIX powder showed similar features. In the skin samples because of the anti-Stokes effect, the NIR-induced fluorescence was presumably specific for porphyrins since there appeared to be no anti-Stokes emission signals from other typical skin fluorophores such as lipids, keratins and collagen. Anti-Stokes fluorescence under NIR CW excitation is more sensitive and specific for porphyrin detection than UV- or visible light-excited regular fluorescence and fs laser-excited multi-photon fluorescence. This approach also has higher image contrast compared to NIR fs laser-based multi-photon fluorescence imaging. The anti-Stokes fluorescence of porphyrins within sebum could potentially be applied to detecting and targeting acne lesions for treatment via fluorescence image guidance.

  14. Line broadening in multiphoton processes with a resonant intermediate transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.; James, J.V.; Xia, J.

    1983-01-01

    The linewidth of the excitation spectrum for multiphoton ionization is found to be broadened much more severely than the cascade fluorescence originating from the resonant intermediate level. These results are due to the mutual effects of the ionizing and resonating transitions, which are not properly accounted for in perturbative treatments

  15. Experimental REMPI [Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization] studies of small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. We shall give an overview together with examples of current studies of excited molecular states to illustrate the principles of and prospects for REMPI. 27 refs., 3 figs

  16. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N R; Chen, G N; Wu, S S; Chen, R

    2014-01-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis. (paper)

  17. Distinguishing human normal or cancerous esophagus tissue ex vivo using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N. R.; Chen, G. N.; Wu, S. S.; Chen, R.

    2014-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to clinical cancer research has greatly developed over the last few years. In this paper, we mainly focus on two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) for investigating esophageal cancer. We chiefly discuss the SHG/TPEF image and spectral characteristics of normal and cancerous esophagus submucosa with the combined multi-channel imaging mode and Lambda mode of a multiphoton microscope (LSM 510 META). Great differences can be detected, such as collagen content and morphology, glandular-shaped cancer cells, TPEF/SHG intensity ratio, and so on, which demonstrate that the multiphoton imaging technique has the potential ability for minimally-invasive early cancer diagnosis.

  18. Optical Magnetometry Using Multiphoton Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenkolb, Skyler M.

    Optical magnetometry plays a critical role in low-energy precision measurements and numerous other applications. In particular, permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) searches impose strict requirements on magnetic field sensitivity of the underlying atomic or molecular species. Other magnetometer properties - such as chemical reactivity, dielectric strength, and interaction cross-sections with other species - also impose limitations on experimental conditions. Here, we explore a novel approach to optical magnetometry, using multiphoton transitions of diamagnetic atoms to detect Larmor precession of polarized nuclei. Resonant probes are possible at moderate ultraviolet wavelengths, and hyperfine structure couples spin precession to fluorescence transitions with negligible backgrounds; paramagnetic rotation due to intensity-dependent dispersion may also be detectable. Nuclear spins and nonlinear optical excitation introduce new degrees of freedom, and evade limitations arising from rapid electronic decoherence. This dissertation reports progress towards two-photon optical magnetometry using ytterbium, rubidium, and xenon. We characterize the influence of probe polarization and magnetic fields on fluorescence spectra, for one- and two-photon continuous-wave (cw) excitation of ytterbium. Resolved hyperfine and isotope structure allow us to use spin-zero isotopes for diagnostics and normalization, and we develop analysis for overlapping two-photon resonances. We also report measurements of two-photon excitation in ytterbium and rubidium using picosecond laser pulses, and in xenon using a cw laser. Although hyperfine structure is unresolved, the rubidium measurements are sensitive to probe field polarization. Fluorescence spectra from two-photon excitation of ytterbium with femtosecond pulses show modulation when the repetition rate changes. Although techniques for polarizing noble gas nuclei are mature, existing cell designs are incompatible with two

  19. MULTI-PHOTON PHOSPHOR FEASIBILITY RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Graham; W. Chow

    2003-05-01

    Development of multi-photon phosphor materials for discharge lamps represents a goal that would achieve up to a doubling of discharge (fluorescent) lamp efficacy. This report reviews the existing literature on multi-photon phosphors, identifies obstacles in developing such phosphors, and recommends directions for future research to address these obstacles. To critically examine issues involved in developing a multi-photon phosphor, the project brought together a team of experts from universities, national laboratories, and an industrial lamp manufacturer. Results and findings are organized into three categories: (1) Multi-Photon Systems and Processes, (2) Chemistry and Materials Issues, and (3) Concepts and Models. Multi-Photon Systems and Processes: This category focuses on how to use our current understanding of multi-photon phosphor systems to design new phosphor systems for application in fluorescent lamps. The quickest way to develop multi-photon lamp phosphors lies in finding sensitizer ions for Gd{sup 3+} and identifying activator ions to red shift the blue emission from Pr{sup 3+} due to the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 1}I{sub 6} transition associated with the first cascading step. Success in either of these developments would lead to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Chemistry and Materials Issues: The most promising multi-photon phosphors are found in fluoride hosts. However, stability of fluorides in environments typically found in fluorescent lamps needs to be greatly improved. Experimental investigation of fluorides in actual lamp environments needs to be undertaken while working on oxide and oxyfluoride alternative systems for backup. Concepts and Models: Successful design of a multi-photon phosphor system based on cascading transitions of Gd{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} depends critically on how the former can be sensitized and the latter can sensitize an activator ion. Methods to predict energy level diagrams and Judd-Ofelt parameters of multi-photon

  20. Nonlinear excitation fluorescence microscopy: source considerations for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokosin, David L.

    2008-02-01

    Ultra-short-pulse solid-state laser sources have improved contrast within fluorescence imaging and also opened new windows of investigation in biological imaging applications. Additionally, the pulsed illumination enables harmonic scattering microscopy which yields intrinsic structure, symmetry and contrast from viable embryos, cells and tissues. Numerous human diseases are being investigated by the combination of (more) intact dynamic tissue imaging of cellular function with gene-targeted specificity and electrophysiology context. The major limitation to more widespread use of multi-photon microscopy has been the complete system cost and added complexity above and beyond commercial camera and confocal systems. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, "turnkey" multiphoton imaging systems. This effort highlights the single box laser systems currently commercially available, with defined suggestions for the ranges for individual laser parameters as derived from a biological and fluorophore limited perspective. The standard two-photon dose is defined by 800nm, 10mW, 200fs, and 80Mhz - at the sample plane for tissue culture cells, i.e. after the full scanning microscope system. Selected application-derived excitation wavelengths are well represented by 700nm, 780nm, ~830nm, ~960nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. Many of the one-box lasers have fixed or very limited excitation wavelengths available, so the lasers will be lumped near 780nm, 800nm, 900nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. The following laser parameter ranges are discussed: average power from 200mW to 2W, pulse duration from 70fs to 700fs, pulse repetition rate from 20MHz to 200MHz, with the laser output linearly polarized with an extinction ratio at least 100:1.

  1. Multiphoton tomography of intratissue tattoo nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2012-02-01

    Most of today's intratissue tattoo pigments are unknown nanoparticles. So far, there was no real control of their use due to the absence of regulations. Some of the tattoo pigments contain carcinogenic amines e.g. azo pigment Red 22. Nowadays, the European Union starts to control the administration of tattoo pigments. There is an interest to obtain information on the intratissue distribution, their interaction with living cells and the extracellular matrix, and the mechanisms behind laser tattoo removal. Multiphoton tomographs are novel biosafety and imaging tools that can provide such information non-invasively and without further labeling. When using the spectral FLIM module, spatially-resolved emission spectra, excitation spectra, and fluorescence lifetimes can pr provided. Multiphoton tomographs are used by all major cosmetic comapanies to test the biosafety of sunscreen nanoparticles.

  2. A review of biomedical multiphoton microscopy and its laser sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefort, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been the subject of major development efforts for about 25 years for imaging biological specimens at micron scale and presented as an elegant alternative to classical fluorescence methods such as confocal microscopy. In this topical review, the main interests and technical requirements of MPM are addressed with a focus on the crucial role of excitation source for optimization of multiphoton processes. Then, an overview of the different sources successfully demonstrated in literature for MPM is presented, and their physical parameters are inventoried. A classification of these sources in function with their ability to optimize multiphoton processes is proposed, following a protocol found in literature. Starting from these considerations, a suggestion of a possible identikit of the ideal laser source for MPM concludes this topical review. (topical review)

  3. A review of biomedical multiphoton microscopy and its laser sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Claire

    2017-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been the subject of major development efforts for about 25 years for imaging biological specimens at micron scale and presented as an elegant alternative to classical fluorescence methods such as confocal microscopy. In this topical review, the main interests and technical requirements of MPM are addressed with a focus on the crucial role of excitation source for optimization of multiphoton processes. Then, an overview of the different sources successfully demonstrated in literature for MPM is presented, and their physical parameters are inventoried. A classification of these sources in function with their ability to optimize multiphoton processes is proposed, following a protocol found in literature. Starting from these considerations, a suggestion of a possible identikit of the ideal laser source for MPM concludes this topical review. Dedicated to Martin.

  4. From morphology to clinical pathophysiology: multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging at patients' bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, Christian; Zens, Katharina; Gorzelanny, Christian; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of skin diseases. By means of multiphoton excitation, endogenous biomolecules like NADH, collagen or elastin show autofluorescence or second harmonic generation. Thus, these molecules provide information about the subcellular morphology, epidermal architecture and physiological condition of the skin. To gain a deeper understanding of the linkage between cellular structure and physiological processes, non-invasive multiphotonbased intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) were combined within the scopes of inflammatory skin, chronic wounds and drug delivery in clinical application. The optical biopsies generated via MPT were morphologically analyzed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed a perinuclear accumulation in lesional skin in contrast to an even distribution in healthy skin. Confirmatively, MPT-FLIM showed an obvious metabolic shift in lesions. Moreover, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. The feasibility of primary in vivo tracking of applied therapeutic agents further broadened our scope: We examined the permeation and subsequent distribution of agents directly visualized in patientś skin in short-term repetitive measurements. Furthermore, we performed MPT-FLIM follow-up investigations in the long-term course of therapy. Therefore, clinical MPT-FLIM application offers new insights into the pathophysiology and the individual therapeutic course of skin diseases, facilitating a better understanding of the processes of inflammation and wound healing.

  5. Fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosinate anion using one-, two- and three-photon excitation: tyrosinate anion fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2013-03-01

    We examined the emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy of tyrosinate anion fluorescence with one-photon (250-310 nm), two-photon (570-620 nm) and three-photon (750-930 nm) excitation. Similar emission spectra of the neutral (pH 7.2) and anionic (pH 13) forms of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide (NATyrA) (pKa 10.6) were observed for all modes of excitation, with the maxima at 302 and 352 nm, respectively. Two-photon excitation (2PE) and three-photon excitation (3PE) spectra of the anionic form were the same as that for one-photon excitation (1PE). In contrast, 2PE spectrum from the neutral form showed ~30-nm shift to shorter wavelengths relative to 1PE spectrum (λmax 275 nm) at two-photon energy (550 nm), the latter being overlapped with 3PE spectrum, both at two-photon energy (550 nm). Two-photon cross-sections for NATyrA anion at 565-580 nm were 10 % of that for N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATrpA), and increased to 90 % at 610 nm, while for the neutral form of NATyrA decreased from 2 % of that for NATrpA at 570 nm to near zero at 585 nm. Surprisingly, the fundamental anisotropy of NATyrA anion in vitrified solution at -60 °C was ~0.05 for 2PE at 610 nm as compared to near 0.3 for 1PE at 305 nm, and wavelength-dependence appears to be a basic feature of its anisotropy. In contrast, the 3PE anisotropy at 900 nm was about 0.5, and 3PE and 1PE anisotropy values appear to be related by the cos(6) θ to cos(2) θ photoselection factor (approx. 10/6) independently of excitation wavelength. Attention is drawn to the possible effect of tyrosinate anions in proteins on their multi-photon induced fluorescence emission and excitation spectra as well as excitation anisotropy spectra.

  6. Multimodal microscopy and the stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence of melanin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua

    The author's work is divided into three aspects: multimodal microscopy, stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin, and customized-profile lenses (CPL) for on-axis laser scanners, which will be introduced respectively. A multimodal microscope provides the ability to image samples with multiple modalities on the same stage, which incorporates the benefits of all modalities. The multimodal microscopes developed in this dissertation are the Keck 3D fusion multimodal microscope 2.0 (3DFM 2.0), upgraded from the old 3DFM with improved performance and flexibility, and the multimodal microscope for targeting small particles (the "Target" system). The control systems developed for both microscopes are low-cost and easy-to-build, with all components off-the-shelf. The control system have not only significantly decreased the complexity and size of the microscope, but also increased the pixel resolution and flexibility. The SMPAF of melanin, activated by a continuous-wave (CW) mode near-infrared (NIR) laser, has potential applications for a low-cost and reliable method of detecting melanin. The photophysics of melanin SMPAF has been studied by theoretical analysis of the excitation process and investigation of the spectra, activation threshold, and photon number absorption of melanin SMPAF. SMPAF images of melanin in mouse hair and skin, mouse melanoma, and human black and white hairs are compared with images taken by conventional multi-photon fluorescence microscopy (MPFM) and confocal reflectance microscopy (CRM). SMPAF images significantly increase specificity and demonstrate the potential to increase sensitivity for melanin detection compared to MPFM images and CRM images. Employing melanin SMPAF imaging to detect melanin inside human skin in vivo has been demonstrated, which proves the effectiveness of melanin detection using SMPAF for medical purposes. Selective melanin ablation with micrometer resolution has been presented using the Target system

  7. Extending the fundamental imaging-depth limit of multi-photon microscopy by imaging with photo-activatable fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhixing; Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Min, Wei

    2012-08-13

    It is highly desirable to be able to optically probe biological activities deep inside live organisms. By employing a spatially confined excitation via a nonlinear transition, multiphoton fluorescence microscopy has become indispensable for imaging scattering samples. However, as the incident laser power drops exponentially with imaging depth due to scattering loss, the out-of-focus fluorescence eventually overwhelms the in-focal signal. The resulting loss of imaging contrast defines a fundamental imaging-depth limit, which cannot be overcome by increasing excitation intensity. Herein we propose to significantly extend this depth limit by multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) of photo-activatable fluorophores. The imaging contrast is drastically improved due to the created disparity of bright-dark quantum states in space. We demonstrate this new principle by both analytical theory and experiments on tissue phantoms labeled with synthetic caged fluorescein dye or genetically encodable photoactivatable GFP.

  8. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  9. Use of multi-photon laser-scanning microscopy to describe the distribution of xenobiotic chemicals in fish early life stages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, Michael W.; Cook, Philip M.; Flynn, Kevin M.; Lothenbach, Doug B.; Johnson, Rodney D.; Nichols, John W.

    2004-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms by which persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs) produce toxicity during fish early life stages (ELS), dose-response relationships need to be understood in relation to the dynamic distribution of chemicals in sensitive tissues. In this study, a multi-photon laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) was used to determine the multi-photon excitation spectra of several polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to describe chemical distribution among tissues during fish ELS. The multi-photon excitation spectra revealed intense fluorescent signal from the model fluorophore, pentamethyl-difluoro-boro-indacene (BODIPY[reg], less signal from benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene, and no detectable signal from pyrene. The imaging method was tested by exposing newly fertilized medaka (Oryzias latipes) eggs to BODIPY[reg] or fluoranthene for 6 h, followed by transfer to clean media. Embryos and larvae were then imaged through 5 days post-hatch. The two test chemicals partitioned similarly throughout development and differences in fluorescence intensity among tissues were evident to a depth of several hundred microns. Initially, the most intense signal was observed in the oil droplet within the yolk, while a moderate signal was seen in the portion of the yolk containing the yolk-platelets. As embryonic development progressed, the liver biliary system, gall bladder, and intestinal tract accumulated strong fluorescent signal. After hatch, once the gastrointestinal tract was completely developed, most of the fluorescent signal was cleared. The MPLSM is a useful tool to describe the tissue distribution of fluorescent PBTs during fish ELS

  10. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  11. Comparison of higher-order multiphoton signal generation and collection at the 1700-nm window based on transmittance measurement of objective lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wenhui; Wang, Yuxin; Liu, Hongji; Wang, Kai; Qiu, Ping; Wang, Ke

    2018-01-01

    One benefit of excitation at the 1700-nm window is the more accessible modalities of multiphoton signal generation. It is demonstrated here that the transmittance performance of the objective lens is of vital importance for efficient higher-order multiphoton signal generation and collection excited at the 1700-nm window. Two commonly used objective lenses for multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are characterized and compared, one with regular coating and the other with customized coating for high transmittance at the 1700-nm window. Our results show that, fourth harmonic generation imaging of mouse tail tendon and 5-photon fluorescence of carbon quantum dots using the regular objective lens shows an order of magnitude signal higher than those using the customized objective lens. Besides, the regular objective lens also enables a 3-photon fluorescence imaging depth of >1600 μm in mouse brain in vivo. Our results will provide guidelines for objective lens selection for MPM at the 1700-nm window. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. In vivo multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of the healthy and cholestatic liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Daria S.; Dudenkova, Varvara V.; Rodimova, Svetlana A.; Bobrov, Nikolai V.; Zagainov, Vladimir E.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2018-02-01

    A cholestatic liver disease presents one of the most common liver diseases and can potentially progress to cirrhosis or even cholangiocarcinoma. Conventional techniques are insufficient to precisely describe the complex internal structure, heterogeneous cell populations and the dynamics of biological processes of the liver. Currently, the methods of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy are actively introducing to biomedical research. Those methods are extremely informative and non-destructive that allows studying of a large number of processes occurring inside cells and tissues, analyzing molecular cellular composition, as well as evaluating the state of connective tissue fibers due to their ability to generate a second optical harmonic. Multiphoton and FLIM microscopy do not need additional staining of samples or the incorporation of any markers to study metabolism, lipid composition, microstructure analysis, evaluation of fibrous structures. These parameters have pronounced changes in hepatocytes of liver with common pathological diseases. Thereby in this study we investigated metabolic changes in the healthy and cholestatic liver based on the fluorescence of the metabolic co-factors NAD(P)H and FAD by multiphoton microscopy combined with FLIM. To estimate the contribution of energy metabolism and lipogenesis in the observed changes of the metabolic profile, a separate analysis of NADH and NADPH was presented. The data can be used to develop new criteria for the identification of hepatic pathology at the level of hepatocyte changes directed to personalized medicine in the future.

  13. High-resolution multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    This review focuses on multimodal multiphoton tomography based on near infrared femtosecond lasers. Clinical multiphoton tomographs for 3D high-resolution in vivo imaging have been placed into the market several years ago. The second generation of this Prism-Award winning High-Tech skin imaging tool (MPTflex) was introduced in 2010. The same year, the world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph. In particular, non-fluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen has been imaged with submicron resolution in patients suffering from psoriasis. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution wide-field systems such as ultrasound, optoacoustical, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer, optimization of treatment strategies, and cosmetic research including long-term testing of sunscreen nanoparticles as well as anti-aging products.

  14. Multiphoton dissociation and thermal unimolecular reactions induced by infrared lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, H.L.

    1981-04-01

    Multiphoton dissociation (MPD) of ethyl chloride was studied using a tunable 3.3 μm laser to excite CH stretches. The absorbed energy increases almost linearly with fluence, while for 10 μm excitation there is substantial saturation. Much higher dissociation yields were observed for 3.3 μm excitation than for 10 μm excitation, reflecting bottlenecking in the discrete region of 10 μm excitation. The resonant nature of the excitation allows the rate equations description for transitions in the quasicontinuum and continuum to be extended to the discrete levels. Absorption cross sections are estimated from ordinary ir spectra. A set of cross sections which is constant or slowly decreasing with increasing vibrational excitation gives good fits to both absorption and dissociation yield data. The rate equations model was also used to quantitatively calculate the pressure dependence of the MPD yield of SF 6 caused by vibrational self-quenching. Between 1000-3000 cm -1 of energy is removed from SF 6 excited to approx. > 60 kcal/mole by collision with a cold SF 6 molecule at gas kinetic rate. Calculation showed the fluence dependence of dissociation varies strongly with the gas pressure. Infrared multiphoton excitation was applied to study thermal unimolecular reactions. With SiF 4 as absorbing gas for the CO 2 laser pulse, transient high temperature pulses were generated in a gas mixture. IR fluorescence from the medium reflected the decay of the temperature. The activation energy and the preexponential factor of the reactant dissociation were obtained from a phenomenological model calculation. Results are presented in detail

  15. Differentiating the two main histologic categories of fibroadenoma tissue from normal breast tissue by using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Y T; Wu, Y; Fu, F M; Lian, Y E; Zhuo, S M; Wang, C; Chen, J X

    2015-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has become a novel biological imaging technique that allows cellular and subcellular microstructure imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second harmonic generation. In this work, we used multiphoton microscopy to obtain the high-contrast images of human normal breast tissue and two main histologic types of fibroadenoma (intracanalicular, pericanalicular). Moreover, quantitative image analysis was performed to characterize the changes of collagen morphology (collagen content, collagen orientation). The results show that multiphoton microscopy combined with quantitative method has the ability to identify the characteristics of fibroadenoma including changes of the duct architecture and collagen morphology in stroma. With the advancement of multiphoton microscopy, we believe that the technique has great potential to be a real-time histopathological diagnostic tool for intraoperative detection of fibroadenoma in the future. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  16. Multifocal multiphoton microscopy with adaptive optical correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Simao; Poland, Simon; Krstajic, Nikola; Li, David; Monypenny, James; Walker, Richard; Tyndall, David; Ng, Tony; Henderson, Robert; Ameer-Beg, Simon

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a well established approach for measuring dynamic signalling events inside living cells, including detection of protein-protein interactions. The improvement in optical penetration of infrared light compared with linear excitation due to Rayleigh scattering and low absorption have provided imaging depths of up to 1mm in brain tissue but significant image degradation occurs as samples distort (aberrate) the infrared excitation beam. Multiphoton time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) FLIM is a method for obtaining functional, high resolution images of biological structures. In order to achieve good statistical accuracy TCSPC typically requires long acquisition times. We report the development of a multifocal multiphoton microscope (MMM), titled MegaFLI. Beam parallelization performed via a 3D Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm using a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM), increases TCSPC count rate proportional to the number of beamlets produced. A weighted 3D GS algorithm is employed to improve homogeneity. An added benefit is the implementation of flexible and adaptive optical correction. Adaptive optics performed by means of Zernike polynomials are used to correct for system induced aberrations. Here we present results with significant improvement in throughput obtained using a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) 1024 pixel single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array, opening the way to truly high-throughput FLIM.

  17. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel

    2012-07-23

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  18. Saturated excitation of Fluorescence to quantify excitation enhancement in aperture antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Aouani, Heykel; Hostein, Richard; Mahboub, Oussama; Devaux, Eloï se; Rigneault, Hervé ; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Wenger, Jé rô me

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used to probe the electromagnetic intensity amplification on optical antennas, yet measuring the excitation intensity amplification is a challenge, as the detected fluorescence signal is an intricate combination of excitation and emission. Here, we describe a novel approach to quantify the electromagnetic amplification in aperture antennas by taking advantage of the intrinsic non linear properties of the fluorescence process. Experimental measurements of the fundamental f and second harmonic 2f amplitudes of the fluorescence signal upon excitation modulation are used to quantify the electromagnetic intensity amplification with plasmonic aperture antennas. © 2012 Optical Society of America.

  19. Superior optical nonlinearity of an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Tingchao [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Yanli [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Lin, Xiaodong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Sun, Handong, E-mail: linxd@szu.edu.cn, E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies (CDPT), School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-03-16

    Strong multiphoton absorption and harmonic generation in organic fluorescent chromophores are, respectively, significant in many fields of research. However, most of fluorescent chromophores fall short of the full potential due to the absence of the combination of such different nonlinear upconversion behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye could exhibit efficient two- and three-photon absorption under the excitation of femtosecond pulses in solution phase. Benefiting from its biocompatibility and strong excited state absorption behavior, in vitro two-photon bioimaging and superior optical limiting have been exploited, respectively. Simultaneously, the chromophore could generate efficient three-photon excited fluorescence and third-harmonic generation (THG) when dispersed into PMMA film, circumventing the limitations of classical fluorescent chromophores. Such chromophore may find application in the production of coherent light sources of higher photon energy. Moreover, the combination of three-photon excited fluorescence and THG can be used in tandem to provide complementary information in biomedical studies.

  20. Spin Multiphoton Antiresonance at Finite Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicke, Christian; Dykman, Mark

    2007-03-01

    Weakly anisotropic S>1 spin systems display multiphoton antiresonance. It occurs when an Nth overtone of the radiation frequency coincides with the distance between the ground and the Nth excited energy level (divided by ). The coherent response of the spin displays a sharp minimum or maximum as a function of frequency, depending on which state was initially occupied. We find the spectral shape of the response dips/peaks. We also study the stationary response for zero and finite temperatures. The response changes dramatically with increasing temperature, when excited states become occupied even in the absence of radiation. The change is due primarily to the increasing role of single-photon resonances between excited states, which occur at the same frequencies as multiphoton resonances. Single-photon resonances are broad, because the single-photon Rabi frequencies largely exceed the multi-photon ones. This allows us to separate different resonances and to study their spectral shape. We also study the change of the spectrum due to relaxational broadening of the peaks, with account taken of both decay and phase modulation.

  1. Coherent beam control through inhomogeneous media in multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari Prasad

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a primary tool for high-resolution deep tissue imaging because of its sensitivity to ballistic excitation photons in comparison to scattered excitation photons. The imaging depth of multi-photon microscopes in tissue imaging is limited primarily by background fluorescence that is generated by scattered light due to the random fluctuations in refractive index inside the media, and by reduced intensity in the ballistic focal volume due to aberrations within the tissue and at its interface. We built two multi-photon adaptive optics (AO) correction systems, one for combating scattering and aberration problems, and another for compensating interface aberrations. For scattering correction a MEMS segmented deformable mirror (SDM) was inserted at a plane conjugate to the objective back-pupil plane. The SDM can pre-compensate for light scattering by coherent combination of the scattered light to make an apparent focus even at a depths where negligible ballistic light remains (i.e. ballistic limit). This problem was approached by investigating the spatial and temporal focusing characteristics of a broad-band light source through strongly scattering media. A new model was developed for coherent focus enhancement through or inside the strongly media based on the initial speckle contrast. A layer of fluorescent beads under a mouse skull was imaged using an iterative coherent beam control method in the prototype two-photon microscope to demonstrate the technique. We also adapted an AO correction system to an existing in three-photon microscope in a collaborator lab at Cornell University. In the second AO correction approach a continuous deformable mirror (CDM) is placed at a plane conjugate to the plane of an interface aberration. We demonstrated that this "Conjugate AO" technique yields a large field-of-view (FOV) advantage in comparison to Pupil AO. Further, we showed that the extended FOV in conjugate AO is maintained over a

  2. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  3. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  4. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  5. New developments in multimodal clinical multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    80 years ago, the PhD student Maria Goeppert predicted in her thesis in Goettingen, Germany, two-photon effects. It took 30 years to prove her theory, and another three decades to realize the first two-photon microscope. With the beginning of this millennium, first clinical multiphoton tomographs started operation in research institutions, hospitals, and in the cosmetic industry. The multiphoton tomograph MPTflexTM with its miniaturized flexible scan head became the Prism-Award 2010 winner in the category Life Sciences. Multiphoton tomographs with its superior submicron spatial resolution can be upgraded to 5D imaging tools by adding spectral time-correlated single photon counting units. Furthermore, multimodal hybrid tomographs provide chemical fingerprinting and fast wide-field imaging. The world's first clinical CARS studies have been performed with a hybrid multimodal multiphoton tomograph in spring 2010. In particular, nonfluorescent lipids and water as well as mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen have been imaged in patients with dermatological disorders. Further multimodal approaches include the combination of multiphoton tomographs with low-resolution imaging tools such as ultrasound, optoacoustic, OCT, and dermoscopy systems. Multiphoton tomographs are currently employed in Australia, Japan, the US, and in several European countries for early diagnosis of skin cancer (malignant melanoma), optimization of treatment strategies (wound healing, dermatitis), and cosmetic research including long-term biosafety tests of ZnO sunscreen nanoparticles and the measurement of the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen by anti-ageing products.

  6. Use of multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate skin pigmentation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Favre, Amandine; Loy, Chong Jin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    There is a growing body of literature showing the usefulness of multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in situ characterization of skin constituents and the ensuing development of noninvasive diagnostic tools against skin diseases. Melanin and pigmentation-associated skin cancers constitute some of the major applications. We show that MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to measure changes in cutaneous melanin concentration and that these can be related to the visible skin color. Melanin in the skin of African, Indian, Caucasian, and Asian volunteers is detected on the basis of its emission wavelength and fluorescence lifetimes in solution and in a melanocyte-keratinocyte cell culture. Fluorescence intensity is used to characterize the melanin content and distribution as a function of skin type and depth into the skin (stratum granulosum and stratum basale). The measured fluorescence intensities in given skin types agree with melanin amounts reported by others using biopsies. Our results suggest that spatial distribution of melanin in skin can be studied using MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging, but further studies are needed to ascertain that the method can resolve melanin amount in smaller depth intervals.

  7. On the separation of enantiomers of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroiodoethane by IR multiphoton excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochert, J.; Quack, M.; Seyfang, G.

    2002-01-01

    The first attempt to separate enantiomers of chiral molecules using IR-multiphoton excitation with circularly polarized light is reported. 1,1,1,2-Tetrafuoroiodoethane CF 3 CHFI has been chosen as its IR-spectroscopy and its IR-photochemistry is well characterized by our previous work. A theoretical model based on a master equation is presented to predict the enrichment factor. The experimental results show that the experimental sensitivity must be improved to reach the limit of the theoretical prediction. (author)

  8. Efficient Multiphoton Generation in Waveguide Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tudela, A.; Paulisch, V.; Kimble, H. J.; Cirac, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Engineering quantum states of light is at the basis of many quantum technologies such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, or metrology among others. Though, single photons can be generated in many scenarios, the efficient and reliable generation of complex single-mode multiphoton states is still a long-standing goal in the field, as current methods either suffer from low fidelities or small probabilities. Here we discuss several protocols which harness the strong and long-range atomic interactions induced by waveguide QED to efficiently load excitations in a collection of atoms, which can then be triggered to produce the desired multiphoton state. In order to boost the success probability and fidelity of each excitation process, atoms are used to both generate the excitations in the rest, as well as to herald the successful generation. Furthermore, to overcome the exponential scaling of the probability of success with the number of excitations, we design a protocol to merge excitations that are present in different internal atomic levels with a polynomial scaling.

  9. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  10. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  11. Multiphotonic resonance processes in potassium vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensoussan, Paul.

    1975-01-01

    Despite several theoretical and experimental investigations, the phenomena of resonance multiphotonic ionization are still not completely understood. The following lines of investigation were undertaken to try and elucidate certain aspects of the resonance processes. The first line of investigation aims at finding the processes which can compete with ionization. Resonance ionization processes can be considered as taking place in two stages: absorption induced excitation of a bound state, followed by photoionization from the excited level. The problem is now to determine what are the processes which compete with the ionization processes starting from a level selectively populated by the absorption of one or two photons. The second line aims at finding the influence of the polarization of the radiation on resonance multiphotonic ionization for the second photon and to check the validity of the selection rules on the magnetic quantic number of the resonance bound linked states. The last study therefore relates to the development of a method of multiphotonic spectrometry which could determine the energy levels in the alcaline f series [fr

  12. Photoionization dynamics of excited molecular states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; O'Halloran, M.A.; Tomkins, F.S.; Dehmer, P.M.; Pratt, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of opportunities for exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. Here we will first give a brief overview of the large variety of experimental approaches to excited state phenomena made possible by REMPI. Then we will examine in more detail, recent studies of the three photon resonant, four photon (3 + 1) ionization of H 2 via the C 'PI/sup u/ state. Strong non-Franck-Condon behavior in the photoelectron spectra of this nominally simple Rydberg state has led to the examination of a variety of dynamical mechanisms. Of these, the role of doubly excited autoionizing states now seems decisive. Progress on photoelectron studies of autoionizing states in H 2 , excited in a (2 + 1) REMPI process via the E, F 1 Σ/sub g/ + will also be briefly discussed. 26 refs., 7 figs

  13. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  14. From morphology to biochemical state - intravital multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of inflamed human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Getova, Valentina; Niemeyer, Verena; Zens, Katharina; Unnerstall, Tim R.; Feger, Julia S.; Fallah, Mohammad A.; Metze, Dieter; Ständer, Sonja; Luger, Thomas A.; Koenig, Karsten; Mess, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2016-03-01

    The application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of inflammatory skin diseases. In the present study, we combined multiphoton-based intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM) within the scope of a clinical trial of atopic dermatitis with the aim of providing personalised data on the aetiopathology of inflammation in a non-invasive manner at patients’ bedsides. These ‘optical biopsies’ generated via MPT were morphologically analysed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Two independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed an even distribution in healthy skin and a perinuclear accumulation in inflamed skin. Moreover, using MPT-FLIM, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. In conclusion, the change in the distribution of mitochondria upon inflammation and the verification of an altered cellular metabolism facilitate a better understanding of inflammatory skin diseases and may permit early diagnosis and therapy.

  15. Order of multiphoton excitation of sulfonium photo-acid generators used in photoresists based on SU-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Henry E.; Diaz, Carlos; Padilla, Gabriel; Hernandez, Florencio E.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2017-06-01

    Multiphoton lithography (MPL), Z-scan spectroscopy, and quantum chemical calculations were employed to investigate the order of multiphoton excitation that occurs when femtosecond laser pulses are used to excite two sulfonium photo-acid generators (PAGs) commonly used in photoresists based on the cross-linkable epoxide SU-8. The mole-fractions of the mono- and bis-sulfonium forms of these PAGs were determined for the commercially available photoresist SU-8 2075 and for the PAGs alone from a separate source. Both were found to contain similar fractions of the mono- and bis-forms, with the mono form present in the majority. Reichert's method was used to determine the solvatochromic strength of the SU-8 matrix, so that results obtained for the PAGs in SU-8 and in solution could be reliably compared. The PAGs were found to exhibit a minimal solvatochromic shift for a series of solvents that span across the solvatochromic strength of SU-8 itself. Sub-micron-sized features were fabricated in SU-8 2075 by MPL using amplified and continuous-wave mode-locked laser pulses. Analysis of the features as a function of average laser power, scan speed, and excitation wavelength shows that the PAGs can be activated by both two- and three-photon absorption (2PA and 3PA). Which activation mode dominates depends principally upon the excitation wavelength because the average laser powers that can be used with the photoresist are limited by practical considerations. The power must be high enough to effect sufficient cross-linking, yet not so high as to exceed the damage threshold of the material. When the laser pulses have a duration on the order of 100 fs, 3PA dominates at wavelengths near 800 nm, whereas 2PA becomes dominant at wavelengths below 700 nm. These findings are corroborated by open-aperture Z-scan measurements and quantum chemical calculations of the cross-sections for 2PA and 3PA as a function of wavelength.

  16. Optimization of tube parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence (TEXRF) system using secondary fluorescers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, A.; Biswas, S.K.

    1995-12-01

    A study of the optimization of excitation parameters in a tube excited X-ray fluorescence system (TEXRF) having Mo as the primary target has been carried out for biological matrix. Fe, Zn and Mo were used as the secondary fluorecers. For the present investigation a cellulose based synthetic standard containing K, Cr, Ni, Zn, Se and Y was excited with the TEXRF system. All experiments were carried out under the same experimental conditions except the tube potential. For each fluorescer the minimum detection limits (MDL) of excited elements were calculated for the corresponding tube voltage. The MDLs were found to be increasing with decreasing atomic number and it was also observed that the maximum sensitivity with Fe and Zn secondary fluorescers for elements analyzed occurred around 35 kV of the excitation potential. For Mo secondary fluorescer maximum sensitivity was found at higher excitation potential. In most cases MDLs were minimum at 40-45 kV of the excitation potential. 5 refs., 12 figs

  17. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortrud Uckermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes.

  18. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Galli, Roberta; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim-Hakan; Later, Robert; Leipnitz, Elke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes. PMID:26355949

  19. QED theory of multiphoton transitions in atoms and ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalialiutdinov, Timur A.; Solovyev, Dmitry A.; Labzowsky, Leonti N.; Plunien, Günter

    2018-03-01

    This review surveys the quantum theory of electromagnetic radiation for atomic systems. In particular, a review of current theoretical studies of multiphoton processes in one and two-electron atoms and highly charged ions is provided. Grounded on the quantum electrodynamics description the multiphoton transitions in presence of cascades, spin-statistic behaviour of equivalent photons and influence of external electric fields on multiphoton in atoms and anti-atoms are discussed. Finally, the nonresonant corrections which define the validity of the concept of the excited state energy levels are introduced.

  20. Two-photon excited UV fluorescence for protein crystal detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, Jeremy T.; DeWalt, Emma L.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2011-01-01

    Complementary measurements using SONICC and TPE-UVF allow the sensitive and selective detection of protein crystals. Two-photon excited ultraviolet fluorescence (TPE-UVF) microscopy is explored for sensitive protein-crystal detection as a complement to second-order nonlinear optical imaging of chiral crystals (SONICC). Like conventional ultraviolet fluorescence (UVF), TPE-UVF generates image contrast based on the intrinsic fluorescence of aromatic residues, generally producing higher fluorescence emission within crystals than the mother liquor by nature of the higher local protein concentration. However, TPE-UVF has several advantages over conventional UVF, including (i) insensitivity to optical scattering, allowing imaging in turbid matrices, (ii) direct compatibility with conventional optical plates and windows by using visible light for excitation, (iii) elimination of potentially damaging out-of-plane UV excitation, (iv) improved signal to noise through background reduction from out-of-plane excitation and (v) relatively simple integration into instrumentation developed for SONICC

  1. Multiphoton microscopy for the in-situ investigation of cellular processes and integrity in cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerr, Daniel; Stark, Martin; Ehrhart, Friederike; Zimmermann, Heiko; Stracke, Frank

    2009-08-01

    In this study we demonstrate a new noninvasive imaging method to monitor freezing processes in biological samples and to investigate life in the frozen state. It combines a laser scanning microscope with a computer-controlled cryostage. Nearinfrared (NIR) femtosecond laser pulses evoke the fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and fluorescent labels due to multiphoton absorption.The inherent optical nonlinearity of multiphoton absorption allows 3D fluorescence imaging for optical tomography of frozen biological material in-situ. As an example for functional imaging we use fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to create images with chemical and physical contrast.

  2. Fluorescent nano-particles for multi-photon thermal sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaque, D., E-mail: daniel.jaque@uam.es [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Maestro, L.M.; Escudero, E. [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Rodriguez, E. Martin; Capobianco, J.A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke St. W., Montreal, QC, Canada H4B 1R6 (Canada); Vetrone, F. [Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, Universite du Quebec, Varennes, QC, Canada J3X 1S2 (Canada); Juarranz de la Fuente, A.; Sanz-Rodriguez, F. [Departamento de Biologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Iglesias-de la Cruz, M.C. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, C/Arzobispo Morcillo s/n, 29029 Madrid (Spain); Jacinto, C.; Rocha, U. [Grupo de Fotonica e Fluidos Complexos, Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-970 Maceio, Alagoas (Brazil); Garcia Sole, J. [Fluorescence Imaging Group, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain)

    2013-01-15

    In this work we report on the ability of Er/Yb co-doped NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals and CdTe Quantum Dots as two-photon excited fluorescent nano-thermometers. The basic physical phenomena causing the thermal sensitivity of the two-photon excited emission bands have been discussed and the maximum thermal resolution achievable in each case has been estimated. The practical application of both systems for thermal sensing at the micro-scale in biological systems is demonstrated. In particular, they have been used to evaluate the thermal loading induced by tightly focused laser beams in both living cells and fluids. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two-photon-excited optical probes capable of thermal sensing are introduced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The physics at the basis of thermal sensing is identified for each case. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical nano-thermometers are used to determine laser induced heating in cells and fluids.

  3. Imaging-guided two-photon excitation-emission-matrix measurements of human skin tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingqiu; Lee, Anthony M. D.; Wang, Hequn; Tang, Shuo; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-07-01

    There are increased interests on using multiphoton imaging and spectroscopy for skin tissue characterization and diagnosis. However, most studies have been done with just a few excitation wavelengths. Our objective is to perform a systematic study of the two-photon fluorescence (TPF) properties of skin fluorophores, normal skin, and diseased skin tissues. A nonlinear excitation-emission-matrix (EEM) spectroscopy system with multiphoton imaging guidance was constructed. A tunable femtosecond laser was used to vary excitation wavelengths from 730 to 920 nm for EEM data acquisition. EEM measurements were performed on excised fresh normal skin tissues, seborrheic keratosis tissue samples, and skin fluorophores including: NADH, FAD, keratin, melanin, collagen, and elastin. We found that in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis of normal skin, the cells have large sizes and the TPF originates from keratin. In the lower epidermis, cells are smaller and TPF is dominated by NADH contributions. In the dermis, TPF is dominated by elastin components. The depth resolved EEM measurements also demonstrated that keratin structure has intruded into the middle sublayers of the epidermal part of the seborrheic keratosis lesion. These results suggest that the imaging guided TPF EEM spectroscopy provides useful information for the development of multiphoton clinical devices for skin disease diagnosis.

  4. Multiphoton dissociation of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, P.A.

    1979-10-01

    The dynamics of infrared multiphoton excitation and dissociation of SF 6 was investigated under collision free conditions by a crossed laser-molecular beam method. In order to understand the excitation mechanism and to elucidate the requirements of laser intensity and energy fluence, a series of experiments were carried out to measure the dissociation yield dependences on energy fluence, vibrational temperature of SF 6 , the pulse duration of the CO 2 laser and the frequency in both one and two laser experiments. Translational energy distributions of the SF 5 dissociation product measured by time of flight and angular distributions and the dissociation lifetime of excited SF 6 as inferred from the observation of secondary dissociation of SF 5 into SF 4 and F during the laser pulse suggest that the dynamics of dissociation of excited molecules is dominated by complete energy randomization and rapid intramolecular energy transfer on a nanosecond timescale, and can be adequately described by RRKM theory. An improved phenomenological model including the initial intensity dependent excitation, a rate equation describing the absorption and stimulated emission of single photons, and the unimolecular dissociation of excited molecules is constructed based on available experimental results. The model shows that the energy fluence of the laser determines the excitation of molecules in the quasi-continuum and the excess energy with which molecules dissociate after the laser pulse. The role played by the laser intensity in multiphoton dissociation is more significant than just that of overcoming the intensity dependent absorption in the lowest levels. 63 references

  5. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy by stepwise optical saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yide; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Vigil, Genevieve D.; Khan, Aamir A.; Mason, Devon E.; Boerckel, Joel D.; Roeder, Ryan K.; Howard, Scott S.

    2018-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in biomedical research for its ability to discern features smaller than the diffraction limit. However, due to its difficult implementation and high cost, the super-resolution microscopy is not feasible in many applications. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a saturation-based super-resolution fluorescence microscopy technique that can be easily implemented and requires neither additional hardware nor complex post-processing. The method is based on the principle of stepwise optical saturation (SOS), where M steps of raw fluorescence images are linearly combined to generate an image with a M-fold increase in resolution compared with conventional diffraction-limited images. For example, linearly combining (scaling and subtracting) two images obtained at regular powers extends the resolution by a factor of 1.4 beyond the diffraction limit. The resolution improvement in SOS microscopy is theoretically infinite but practically is limited by the signal-to-noise ratio. We perform simulations and experimentally demonstrate super-resolution microscopy with both one-photon (confocal) and multiphoton excitation fluorescence. We show that with the multiphoton modality, the SOS microscopy can provide super-resolution imaging deep in scattering samples. PMID:29675306

  6. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  7. A novel multiphoton microscopy images segmentation method based on superpixel and watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weilin; Lin, Jinyong; Wang, Shu; Li, Yan; Liu, Mingyu; Liu, Gaoqiang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Guannan; Chen, Rong

    2017-04-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging technique based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) shows fantastic performance for biological imaging. The automatic segmentation of cellular architectural properties for biomedical diagnosis based on MPM images is still a challenging issue. A novel multiphoton microscopy images segmentation method based on superpixels and watershed (MSW) is presented here to provide good segmentation results for MPM images. The proposed method uses SLIC superpixels instead of pixels to analyze MPM images for the first time. The superpixels segmentation based on a new distance metric combined with spatial, CIE Lab color space and phase congruency features, divides the images into patches which keep the details of the cell boundaries. Then the superpixels are used to reconstruct new images by defining an average value of superpixels as image pixels intensity level. Finally, the marker-controlled watershed is utilized to segment the cell boundaries from the reconstructed images. Experimental results show that cellular boundaries can be extracted from MPM images by MSW with higher accuracy and robustness. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Theory of multiphoton ionization of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szoeke, A.

    1986-03-01

    A non-perturbative approach to the theory of multiphoton ionization is reviewed. Adiabatic Floquet theory is its first approximation. It explains qualitatively the energy and angular distribution of photoelectrons. In many-electron atoms it predicts collective and inner shell excitation. 14 refs

  9. Rapid creation of distant entanglement by multi-photon resonant fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Guy Z.; Sham, L. J.

    2014-03-01

    We study a simple, effective and robust method for entangling two separate stationary quantum dot spin qubits with high fidelity using multi-photon Gaussian state. The fluorescence signals from the two dots interfere at a beam splitter. The bosonic nature of photons leads, in analogy with the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect, to selective pairing of photon holes (photon absences in the fluorescent signals). By the HOM effect, two photon holes with the same polarization end up at the same beam splitter output. As a result, two odd photon number detections at the outgoing beams, which must correspond to two photon holes with different polarizations, herald entanglement creation. The robustness of the Gaussian states is evidenced by the ability to compensate for photon absorption and noise by a moderate increase in the number of photons at the input. We calculate the entanglement generation rate in the ideal, non-ideal and near-ideal detector regimes and find substantial improvement over single-photon schemes in all three regimes. Fast and efficient spin-spin entanglement creation can form the basis for a scalable quantum dot quantum computing network. Our predictions can be tested using current experimental capabilities. This research was supported by the U.S. Army Research Office MURI award W911NF0910406, by NSF grant PHY-1104446 and by ARO (IARPA, W911NF-08-1-0487). The authors thank D. G. Steel for useful discussions.

  10. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  11. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  12. Polarization control of multi-photon absorption under intermediate femtosecond laser field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenjing; Liang Guo; Wu Ping; Liu Pei; Jia Tianqing; Sun Zhenrong; Zhang Shian

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that the femtosecond laser polarization modulation is a very simple and well-established method to control the multi-photon absorption process by the light–matter interaction. Previous studies mainly focused on the multi-photon absorption control in the weak field. In this paper, we further explore the polarization control behavior of multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field. In the weak femtosecond laser field, the second-order perturbation theory can well describe the non-resonant two-photon absorption process. However, the higher order nonlinear effect (e.g., four-photon absorption) can occur in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and thus it is necessary to establish new theoretical model to describe the multi-photon absorption process, which includes the two-photon and four-photon transitions. Here, we construct a fourth-order perturbation theory to study the polarization control behavior of this multi-photon absorption under the intermediate femtosecond laser field excitation, and our theoretical results show that the two-photon and four-photon excitation pathways can induce a coherent interference, while the coherent interference is constructive or destructive that depends on the femtosecond laser center frequency. Moreover, the two-photon and four-photon transitions have the different polarization control efficiency, and the four-photon absorption can obtain the higher polarization control efficiency. Thus, the polarization control efficiency of the whole excitation process can be increased or decreased by properly designing the femtosecond laser field intensity and laser center frequency. These studies can provide a clear physical picture for understanding and controlling the multi-photon absorption process in the intermediate femtosecond laser field, and also can provide a theoretical guidance for the future experimental realization. (paper)

  13. Super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Chen, Zhixing; Min, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) offers the highest penetration depth with subcellular resolution in light microscopy, due to its unique advantage of nonlinear excitation. However, a fundamental imaging-depth limit, accompanied by a vanishing signal-to-background contrast, still exists for TPFM when imaging deep into scattering samples. Formally, the focusing depth, at which the in-focus signal and the out-of-focus background are equal to each other, is defined as the fundamental imaging-depth limit. To go beyond this imaging-depth limit of TPFM, we report a new class of super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging, including multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) harnessing novel photo-activatable fluorophores, stimulated emission reduced fluorescence (SERF) microscopy by adding a weak laser beam for stimulated emission, and two-photon induced focal saturation imaging with preferential depletion of ground-state fluorophores at focus. The resulting image contrasts all exhibit a higher-order (third- or fourth- order) nonlinear signal dependence on laser intensity than that in the standard TPFM. Both the physical principles and the imaging demonstrations will be provided for each super-nonlinear microscopy. In all these techniques, the created super-nonlinearity significantly enhances the imaging contrast and concurrently extends the imaging depth-limit of TPFM. Conceptually different from conventional multiphoton processes mediated by virtual states, our strategy constitutes a new class of fluorescence microscopy where high-order nonlinearity is mediated by real population transfer.

  14. Self-referenced axial chromatic dispersion measurement in multiphoton microscopy through 2-color THG imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Zhuang, Ziwei; He, Jiexing; Liu, Hongji; Qiu, Ping; Wang, Ke

    2018-05-16

    With tunable excitation light, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is widely used for imaging biological structures at subcellular resolution. Axial chromatic dispersion, present in virtually every transmissive optical system including the multiphoton microscope, leads to focal (and the resultant image) plane separation. Here we demonstrate experimentally a technique to measure the axial chromatic dispersion in a multiphoton microscope, using simultaneous 2-color third-harmonic generation (THG) imaging excited by a 2-color soliton source with tunable wavelength separation. Our technique is self-referenced, eliminating potential measurement error when 1-color tunable excitation light is used which necessitates reciprocating motion of the mechanical translation stage. Using this technique, we demonstrate measured axial chromatic dispersion with 2 different objective lenses in a multiphoton microscope. Further measurement in a biological sample also indicates that this axial chromatic dispersion, in combination with 2-color imaging, may open up opportunity for simultaneous imaging of two different axial planes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Kang, Deyong

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections. (paper)

  16. Identification of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Chen, Zhifen; Kang, Deyong; li, Lianhuang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Guan, Guoxian; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG) as a potential diagnostic tool is attractive. MPM can effectively provide information about morphological and biochemical changes in biological tissues at the molecular level. In this paper, we attempt to identify normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria by multiphoton microscopy in different sections (both in transverse and longitudinal sections). The results show that MPM can display different microstructure changes in the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. MPM also can quantitatively describe the alteration of collagen content between normal and cancerous muscle layers. These are important pathological findings that MPM images can bring more detailed complementary information about tissue architecture and cell morphology through observing the transverse and longitudinal sections of colorectal muscularis propria. This work demonstrates that MPM can be better for identifying the microstructural characteristics of normal and cancerous human colorectal muscularis propria in different sections.

  17. Cellular organization and spectral diversity of GFP-like proteins in live coral cells studied by single and multiphoton imaging and microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Anya; Cox, Guy C.; Larkum, Anthony W.

    2003-07-01

    Tissues of many marine invertebrates of class Anthozoa contain intensely fluorescent or brightly coloured pigments. These pigments belong to a family of photoactive proteins closely related to Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), and their emissions range from blue to red wavelengths. The great diversity of these pigments has only recently been realised. To investigate the role of these proteins in corals, we have performed an in vivo fluorescent pigment (FP) spectral and cellular distribution analyses in live coral cells using single and multi-photon laser scanning imaging and microspectroscopy. These analyses revealed that even single colour corals contain spectroscopically heterogeneous pigment mixtures, with 2-5 major colour types in the same area of tissue. They were typically arranged in step-wise light emission energy gradients (e.g. blue, green, yellow, red). The successive overlapping emission-excitation spectral profiles of differently coloured FPs suggested that they were suited for sequential energy coupling. Traces of red FPs (emission = 570-660 nm) were present, even in non-red corals. We confirmed that radiative energy transfer could occur between separate granules of blue and green FPs and that energy transfer was inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them. Multi-photon micro-spectrofluorometric analysis gave significantly improved spectral resolution by restricting FP excitation to a single point in the focal plane of the sample. Pigment heterogeneity at small scales within granules suggested that fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) might be occurring, and we confirmed that this was the case. Thus, energy transfer can take place both radiatively and by FRET, probably functioning in photoprotection by dissipation of excessive solar radiation.

  18. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Black, J.H.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature,

  19. Identification of intramural metastasis in esophageal cancer using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, jiangbo; Chen, Jianxin

    2017-02-01

    Intramural metastasis (IM) of esophageal cancer is defined as metastasis from a primary lesion to the esophageal wall without intraepithelial cancer extension. Esophageal cancer with IM is more common and such cases indicate a poor prognosis. In esophageal surgery, if curative resection is possible, the complete removal of both primary tumor and associated IMs is required. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of IMs in esophageal cancer prior to surgery is of particular importance. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) with subcellular resolution is well-suited for deep tissue imaging since many endogenous fluorophores of fresh biological tissues are excited through two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Here, a study to identify IM in fresh tissue section using MPM is reported. In this study, the morphological and spectral differences between IM and surrounding tissue are described. These results show that MPM has the ability to accurately identify IM in esophageal tissues. With improvement of the penetration depth of MPM and the development of multiphton microendoscope, MPM may be a promising imaging technique for preoperative diagnosis of IMs in esophageal cancer in the future.

  20. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Progress report, March 15, 1988--March 14, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have chosen to study reactions of Xe 5p 5 np because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 11 refs. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Multiphoton processes in isolated atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudbo, A.S.

    1979-11-01

    The theory of coherent excitation of a multilevel quantum mechanical system is developed. Damping of the system is taken into account by the use of a density matrix formalism. General properties of the wave function and/or the density matrix are discussed. The physical implications for the behavior of the system are described, together with possible applications of the formalism, including the infrared multiphoton excitation of molecules, and optical pumping in alkali atoms. Experimental results are presented on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of molecules, followed by a discussion of the general features of this process. The experimental results were obtained using a crossed laser and molecular beam method, and the emphasis is on determining the properties of the dissociating molecule and the dissociation products. The dissociation process is shown to be described very well by the standard statistical theory (RRKM theory) of unimolecular reactions, a brief presentation of which is also included

  2. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-05-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. Intrinsic multiphoton fluorescence properties of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin were characterized, and their distributions in mouse cornea in vivo were measured by 3D MPM imaging. Both moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin had similar multiphoton spectra, while moxifloxacin had stronger fluorescence than gatifloxacin. MPM imaging of mouse cornea in vivo showed (1) moxifloxacin had good penetration through the superficial corneal epithelium, while gatifloxacin had relatively poor penetration, (2) both ophthalmic solutions had high intracellular distribution. In vivo MPM results were consistent with previous studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MPM as a method for in vivo direct measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin in the cornea.

  3. Quantitative multiphoton imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada

    2014-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs for label-free multidimensional high-resolution in vivo imaging have been introduced to the market several years ago. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechanooptical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as a CARS module. Non-fluorescent lipids and water, mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged in vivo with submicron resolution in human skin. Sensitive and rapid detectors allow single photon counting and the construction of 3D maps where the number of detected photons per voxel is depicted. Intratissue concentration profiles from endogenous as well exogenous substances can be generated when the number of detected photons can be correlated with the number of molecules with respect to binding and scattering behavior. Furthermore, the skin ageing index SAAID based on the ratio elastin/collagen as well as the epidermis depth based on the onset of SHG generation can be determined.

  4. Imaging the morphological change of tissue structure during the early phase of esophageal tumor progression using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Successful strategies for primary prevention and early detection are critically needed to control this disease. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is becoming a novel optical tool of choice for imaging tissue architecture and cellular morphology by two-photon excited fluorescence. In this study, we used MPM to image microstructure of human normal esophagus, carcinoma in situ (CIS), and early invasive carcinoma in order to establish the morphological features to differentiate these tissues. The diagnostic features such as the appearance of cancerous cells, the significant loss of stroma, the absence of the basement membrane were extracted to distinguish between normal and cancerous esophagus tissue. These results correlated well with the paired histological findings. With the advancement of clinically miniaturized MPM and the multi-photon probe, combining MPM with standard endoscopy will therefore allow us to make a real-time in vivo diagnosis of early esophageal cancer at the cellular level.

  5. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  6. Сomparative Analysis of 0.266 and 0.355 µm Fluorescence Excitation Wavelengths for Laser Fluores-Cence Monitoring of Oil Pollution Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Belov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The on-line detection of pipeline spillage is really essential for the fast oil spill response to the ecological and economical consequences. However existing on-line pipelines spillage detection systems have a sensibility of 0.2 – 1 % of pipe flow and do not detect the smaller-sized spillages.For unpeopled or sparsely populated regions an advanced technique for detection of pipeline spillages (including low-intensity ones is to monitor oil pollution (petroleum spills on the earth surface along the pipeline using, for example, an air drone.The laser remote sensing method is an effective method to detect the pipelines spillage.The paper is dedicated to development of laser fluorescence detection method of oil pollution. The remote sensing laser method to monitor oil pollution is based on the fluorescence excitation of oil in UV spectral band and on the data record of the earth surface laser-induced fluorescence radiation.For laser fluorescence method of monitoring oil pollution the paper presents a comparative analysis  of 0.266 and 0.355 µm wavelengths of the fluorescence excitation in terms of earth atmosphere propagation, eye-safety, laser characteristics, and petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency.It is shown that in terms of eye-safety, laser characteristics, and propagation in the earth atmosphere a 0.355 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has a sure advantage.In the context of petroleum fluorescence excitation efficiency a 0.266 µm laser wavelength of the fluorescence excitation has the advantage, but this advantage depends heavily on the petroleum base. For low-sulfur (sweet oil for instance,  it is not that big.At large, in solving the task of oil pollution detection because of the oil pipeline spillages the 0.355 µm wavelength of fluorescence excitation ought to be preferable. However, when creating a monitoring system for the pipeline with a specific petroleum base the irreversible decision depends on the

  7. Multiphoton Microscopy for Ophthalmic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Gibson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We review multiphoton microscopy (MPM including two-photon autofluorescence (2PAF, second harmonic generation (SHG, third harmonic generation (THG, fluorescence lifetime (FLIM, and coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS with relevance to clinical applications in ophthalmology. The different imaging modalities are discussed highlighting the particular strength that each has for functional tissue imaging. MPM is compared with current clinical ophthalmological imaging techniques such as reflectance confocal microscopy, optical coherence tomography, and fluorescence imaging. In addition, we discuss the future prospects for MPM in disease detection and clinical monitoring of disease progression, understanding fundamental disease mechanisms, and real-time monitoring of drug delivery.

  8. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Huang, Yunxia

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye. (paper)

  9. Multiphoton ionization/dissociation of osmium tetroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, D.; Puretzky, A.A.; Compton, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms leading to laser multiphoton ionization and dissociation (MPI/MPD) of osmium tetroxide (OsO 4 ) have been investigated from measurements of the kinetic energies of product ions (Os + , Os 2+ , OsO + , O 2 + , O + ) and photoelectrons as a function of the laser wavelength. Neutral channels, intermediate to the dominant Os + ionization channel, such as OsO 4 →OsO 4-n +nO are examined using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of the fast O atoms. Equipartition of the available photon energy among the fragments is observed. The wavelength dependence of the Os + ion signal suggests that one or more of the steps leading to Os + ions involve molecular ions and/or excited neutral atoms. The observed preponderance of very slow ( 2+ is shown to result primarily from REMPI of Os +

  10. Choice of excitation source for determination of rare earth elements with radioisotope excited X ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Quanshi; Chang Yongfu

    2000-01-01

    The comparisons of two radioisotope source ( 241 Am and 238 Pu) which are the most available in the radioisotope excited X Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis technique and two characteristic X ray series (KX and LX) analyzed for the determination of the rare-earth (RE) elements were investigated in detail. According to the principle of emission and detection of X ray , the relative excitation efficiencies were calculated by the some fundamental physical parameters including the photoelectric mass attenuation coefficient, the fluorescent yield, the absorption jump factor, the emission probability of the detected fluorescent line with reference to other liens of the same series etc., The advantages and disadvantages of the two conditions are discussed. These results may determine the optimal excitation and detection conditions for different rare-earth elements. The experimental results with nine rare-earth elements (Ce, Nd, Sm, Tb, Tm, Ho, Er, Yb and Lu) are in agreement with the results of theoretical calculations

  11. Graphene oxide from silk cocoon: a novel magnetic fluorophore for multi-photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Manas; Kusurkar, Tejas Sanjeev; Maurya, Sandeep Kumar; Meena, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Sethy, Niroj; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sharma, Raj Kishore; Goswami, Debabrata; Sarkar, Sabyasachi; Das, Mainak

    2014-02-01

    In this work, we synthesized graphene oxide from silk cocoon embarking its new dimension as a magnetic fluorophore when compared with its present technical status, which at best is for extracting silk as a biomaterial for tissue engineering applications. We produced graphene oxide by pyrolysing the silk cocoon in an inert atmosphere. The collected raw carbon is oxidized by nitric acid that readily produces multilayer graphene oxide with nano carbon particulates. Structural properties of the graphene oxide were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The oxidized sample shows remarkable fluorescence, multi-photon imaging and magnetic properties. On increasing the excitation wavelength, the fluorescence emission intensity of the graphene oxide also increases and found maximum emission at 380 nm excitation wavelength. On studying the two photon absorption (TPA) property of aqueous graphene oxide using Z-scan technique, we found significant TPA activity at near infrared wavelength. In addition, the graphene oxide shows ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature. The observed fluorescence and magnetic property were attributed to the defects caused in the graphene oxide structure by introducing oxygen containing hydrophilic groups during the oxidation process. Previously silk cocoon has been used extensively in deriving silk-based tissue engineering materials and as gas filter. Here we show a novel application of silk cocoon by synthesizing graphene oxide based magnetic-fluorophore for bio-imaging applications.

  12. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation: Annual performance report for the period March 15, 1987-March 14, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this contract is the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions following two-photon laser excitation. We have specifically been studying reactions of Xe 5p 5 6p because of their relevance to the XeCl excimer laser. We are studying deactivation reactions in collisions with heavy atoms such as Ar, Kr, and Xe and reactive collisions with chlorides. The reactants are excited by multiphoton laser absorption. Product channels are observed by their fluorescence, or in experiments in the coming months by laser induced fluorescence using a second color laser. Reaction rates are measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measure interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra are obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. 4 figs

  13. Time gated fluorescence lifetime imaging and micro-volume spectroscopy using two-photon excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytsma, J.; Vroom, J.M.; de Grauw, C.J.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    A scanning microscope utilizing two-photon excitation in combination with fluorescence lifetime contrast is presented. The microscope makes use of a tunable femtosecond titanium:sapphire laser enabling the two-photon excitation of a broad range of fluorescent molecules, including UV probes.

  14. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomin, Vladimir I.; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  15. Characterization of excited-state reactions with instant spectra of fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomin, Vladimir I., E-mail: tomin@apsl.edu.pl; Ushakou, Dzmitryi V.

    2015-10-15

    Comprehensible knowledge of the excited-state proton transfer processes in organic compounds is overwhelmingly important not only for physics, but also chemistry and Life Sciences, since they play a key role in main processes of photosynthesis and functioning of biological organisms. Moreover compounds with Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer (ESIPT) are in the focus of the interest of scientists throughout the world, because dual fluorescence spectra of such objects corresponding to two forms of molecular structure (normal and photoproduct) are very sensitive to characteristics of molecular microenvironment. This property allows to use such substances as fluorescent probes for diverse applications in chemistry and Life Sciences. But at the same time studying of proton transfer processes is not simple, because this process is characterized by extremely fast times (on picoseconds time scale and less order) and very often contribution of reverse reactions is essentially complicates an interpretation of observed properties of dual fluorescence. Hence, understanding of a role of reversible reactions is crucial for a comprehensive description of all processes accompanying excited state reactions. We discuss new approach for treatment ESIPT reaction on the basis of experimentally measured instant spectra of dual fluorescence and temporal behavior of ratiometric signal of normal to tautomer form intensities. Simple analytical expressions show in transparent way how to distinguish a degree of reverse reaction contribution to ratiometric signal. A validation of the approach under consideration is fulfilled with two different flavonols – 3-hydroxyflavone and 4′-(Dimethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone – representing two extreme cases in affecting reversible reaction on dual emission. A comparing of new approach and traditional method when we analyze kinetics of separate the N* and T* fluorescence bands decays, has been carried out. - Highlights: • The excited

  16. One color multi-photon ionization of the Gadolinium atom in near UV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Tae; Yi, Jong Hoon; Lhee, Yong Joo; Lee, Jong Min

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the states of the gadolinium atom in near ultra-violet (UV) region (∼410 nm) using single photon excitation using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). Around 70 transitions among observed 180 single color multi-photon ionization signals have been assigned. Most of the multi-photon processes of the assigned ion signals are through single photon resonant three photon ionization and through two photon resonant three photon ionization. (author)

  17. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  18. Multiphoton tomography to detect chemo- and biohazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    In vivo high-resolution multiphoton/CARS tomography provides optical biopsies with 300 nm lateral resolution with chemical fingerprints. Thousands of volunteers and patients have been investigated for early cancer diagnosis, evaluation of anti-ageing cosmetic products, and changes of cellular metabolism by UV exposure and decreased oxygen supply. The skin as the outermost and largest organ is also the major target of CB agents. Current UV-based sensors are useful for bio-aerosol sensing but not for evaluating exposed in vivo skin. Here we evaluate the use of 4D multiphoton/CARS tomographs based on near infrared femtosecond laser radiation, time-correlated single photon counting (FLIM) and white light generation by photonic crystal fibers to detect bio- and chemohazards in human in vivo skin using twophoton fluorescence, SHG, and Raman signals.

  19. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  20. Laser excited fluorescence spectrum of Ho3+:SrF2 single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Bansi; Ramachandra Rao, D.

    1980-01-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of Ho 3+ : SrF 2 single crystal excited by the various lines of an Ar + laser, is reported. The three fluorescence groups recorded in the region 5300-7700 A, correspond to the transitions from ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 8 , 5 F 5 to 5 I 8 , 5 F 3 to 5 I 7 and ( 5 F 4 , 5 S 2 ) to 5 I 7 . Marked changes in the total integrated intensity of the various fluorescence groups with the change in the exciting wavelength are observed. (author)

  1. A portable tube exciting X-ray fluorescence analysis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Qiang; Lai Wanchang; Ge Liangquan

    2009-01-01

    Article introduced a portable tube exciting X-ray fluorescence analysis system which is based on arm architecture. Also, we designed Tube control circuit and finished preliminary application. The energy and the intensity of the photon can be adjusted continuously by using the tube. Experiments show that high excitation efficiency obtained by setting the appropriate parameters of the tube for the various elements. (authors)

  2. Comparative study of Nd(3+) emission from 4f2 5d and 4f3 configurations induced by multiphotonic process in YLF, GLF and LLF crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Librantz, Andre Felipe Henriques

    2000-01-01

    Nd 3+ ultraviolet fluorescence induced by multiphotonic laser excitations was studied in Nd-doped YLiF 4 (YLF) and LuLiF 4 (LLF) crystals by using the time resolved spectroscopy technique. The UV luminescences are due to transitions between the 4f 2 5d and the 4f 3 electronic configurations of Nd 3+ ions. The 4f 2 5d configuration can be reached by direct pumping the UV transition or by multiphotonic excitation, both processes give raise to the UV emission band with a structure due to the strong phonon coupling, expected for a 5d orbital involvement in the transition. The multiphotonic excitation process is due to three photons (532 nm) sequential absorptions of 532 nm-photons by metastable levels of the 4f 3 configuration splitted by crystalline local field. The sequential excitation of Nd by the pumping laser is attributed to the 4 I 9/2 +532nm → 4 G 7/2 ground state absorption followed by the 4 G 7/2 +532 nm →2 F 5/2 and 2 F 5/2 +532 nm → 4f 2 5d excited state absorptions. The UV emissions due to 4f 2 5d configuration are parity allowed, having lifetime of 35 ns in contrast to UV emissions from 4f 3 configuration which are induced by two absorption steps and are parity forbidden showing longer lifetime of 8μs and narrow tines. The polarization effects of the UV emissions were studied and their behavior are dependent on the excited state configuration involving or not the 5d orbital. The allowed UV emissions positions were affected by the host variation more than the ones originating from the 4f 3 configuration as expected. The electronic energy of the 4f 2 5d configuration shifts to lower energy when increasing the crystal field. (author)

  3. Comparison of sensitivities and detection limits between direct excitation and secondary excitation modes in energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artz, B.E.; Short, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison was made between the direct tube excitation mode and the secondary target excitation mode using a Kevex 0810 energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence system. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined with two system configurations. The first configuration used a standard, high power, x-ray fluorescence tube to directly excite the specimen. Several x-ray tubes, including chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten, both filtered and not filtered, were employed. The second configuration consisted of using the x-ray tube to excite a secondary target which in turn excited the specimen. Appropriate targets were compared to the direct excitation results. Relative sensitivities and detection limits were determined for K-series lines for elements from magnesium to barium contained in a low atomic number matrix and in a high atomic number matrix

  4. Multiphoton processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manus, C.; Mainfray, G.

    1980-01-01

    The main features of multiphoton processes are described on a somewhat elementary basis. The emphasis is put on multiphoton ionization of atoms where the influence of resonance effects is given through typical examples. The important role played by the coherence of light is shown to produce a very dramatic influence on multiphoton absorption. Different observations concerning molecules, electrons, as well as solid surfaces illustrate the generality of these very non linear interaction between light and matter

  5. Signal improvement in multiphoton microscopy by reflection with simple mirrors near the sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehberg, Markus; Krombach, Fritz; Pohl, Ulrich; Dietzel, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    In conventional fluorescence or confocal microscopy, emitted light is generated not only in the focal plane but also above and below. The situation is different in multiphoton-induced fluorescence and multiphoton-induced higher harmonic generation. Here, restriction of signal generation to a single focal point permits that all emitted photons can contribute to image formation if collected, regardless of their path through the specimen. Often, the intensity of the emitted light is rather low in biological specimens. We present a method to significantly increase the fraction of photons collected by an epi (backward) detector by placing a simple mirror, an aluminum-coated coverslip, directly under the sample. Samples investigated include fluorescent test slides, collagen gels, and thin-layered, intact mouse skeletal muscles. Quantitative analysis revealed an intensity increase of second- and third-harmonic generated signal in skeletal muscle of nine- and sevenfold respectively, and of fluorescent signal in test slides of up to twofold. Our approach thus allows significant signal improvement also for situations were a forward detection is impossible, e.g., due to the anatomy of animals in intravital microscopy.

  6. Continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: a review for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    This review introduces, defines and critically reviews a number of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters with specific reference to those derived from continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence. A number of common issues and criticisms are addressed. The parameters fluorescence origin (F0) and the performance indices (PI) are discussed as examples. This review attempts to unify definitions for the wide range of parameters available for measuring plant vitality, facilitating their calculation and use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Combined Raman and continuous-wave-excited two-photon fluorescence cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uzunbajakava, N.; Otto, Cornelis

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a confocal optical microscope that combines cw two-photon-excited fluorescence microscopy with confocal Raman microscopy. With this microscope fast image acquisition with fluorescence imaging can be used to select areas of interest for subsequent chemical analysis with spontaneous

  8. Applications of multiphoton microscopy in the field of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu; Li, Lianhuang; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zheng, Liqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is a powerful tool for visualizing cellular and subcellular details within living tissue by its unique advantages of being label-free, its intrinsic optical sectioning ability, near-infrared excitation for deep penetration depth into tissue, reduced photobleaching and phototoxicity in the out-of-focus regions, and being capable of providing quantitative information. In this review, we focus on applications of MPM in the field of colorectal cancer, including monitoring cancer progression, detecting tumor metastasis and microenvironment, evaluating the cancer therapy response, and visualizing and ablating pre-invasive cancer cells. We also present one of the major challenges and the future research direction to exploit a colorectal multiphoton endoscope.

  9. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies

  10. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gredel, R.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination

  11. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  12. Multiphoton tomography of the human eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Batista, Ana; Hager, Tobias; Seitz, Berthold

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography (MPT) is a novel label-free clinical imaging method for non-invasive tissue imaging with high spatial (300 nm) and temporal (100 ps) resolutions. In vivo optical histology can be realized due to the nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) of collagen. Furthermore, optical metabolic imaging (OMI) is performed by two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). So far, applications of the multiphoton tomographs DermaInspect and MPTflex were limited to dermatology. Novel applications include intraoperative brain tumor imaging as well as cornea imaging. In this work we describe two-photon imaging of ex vivo human corneas unsuitable for transplantation. Furthermore, the cross-linking (CXL) process of corneal collagen based on UVA exposure and 0.1 % riboflavin was studied. The pharmacokinetics of the photosensitizer could be detected with high spatial resolution. Interestingly, an increase in the stromal autofluorescence intensity and modifications of the autofluorescence lifetimes were observed in the human corneal samples within a few days following CXL.

  13. Multiphoton microscopy based cryo-imaging of inflated frozen human lung sections at -60°C in healthy and COPD lungs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Thomas; Kayra, Damian; Zhang, Angela; Suzuki, Masaru; McDonough, John; Elliott, W. M.; Cooper, Joel D.; Hogg, James C.

    2013-02-01

    Lung is a complex gas exchanger with interfacial area (where the gas exchange takes place) is about the size of a tennis court. Respiratory function is linked to the biomechanical stability of the gas exchange or alveolar regions which directly depends on the spatial distributions of the extracellular matrix fibers such fibrillar collagens and elastin fibers. It is very important to visualize and quantify these fibers at their native and inflated conditions to have correct morphometric information on differences between control and diseased states. This can be only achieved in the ex vivo states by imaging directly frozen lung specimens inflated to total lung capacity. Multiphoton microscopy, which uses ultra-short infrared laser pulses as the excitation source, produces multiphoton excitation fluorescence (MPEF) signals from endogenously fluorescent proteins (e.g. elastin) and induces specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from non-centrosymmetric proteins such as fibrillar collagens in fresh human lung tissues [J. Struct. Biol. (2010)171,189-196]. Here we report for the first time 3D image data obtained directly from thick frozen inflated lung specimens (~0.7- 1.0 millimeter thick) visualized at -60°C without prior fixation or staining in healthy and diseased states. Lung specimens donated for transplantation and released for research when no appropriate recipient was identified served as controls, and diseased lung specimens donated for research by patients receiving lung transplantation for very severe COPD (n=4) were prepared as previously described [N. Engl. J. Med. (2011) 201, 1567]. Lung slices evenly spaced between apex and base were examined using multiphoton microscopy while maintained at -60°C using a temperature controlled cold stage with a temperature resolution of 0.1°C. Infrared femto-second laser pulses tuned to 880nm, dry microscopic objectives, and non-de-scanned detectors/spectrophotometer located in the reflection geometry were

  14. Excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+:KY3F10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, C.; Doualan, J. L.; Moncorgé, R.; Braud, A.; Camy, P.

    2018-05-01

    We report here on a complete investigation of the excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+ doped KY3F10 single crystals versus dopant concentrations and optical excitation conditions. Radiative and effective (including non-radiative relaxations) emission lifetimes and branching ratios are determined from a Judd-Ofelt analysis of the absorption spectra and via specific fluorescence experiments using wavelength selective laser excitations. Excited-state absorption and emission spectra are registered within seven spectral domains, i.e. 560 nm, 650 nm, 710 nm, 810 nm, 970 nm, 1550 nm and 2750 nm. A maximum gain cross-section of 0.93 × 10-21 cm2 is determined at the potential laser wavelength of 2.801 μm for a population ratio of 0.48. Saturation of fluorescence intensities and variations of population ratios versus pumping rates are registered and confronted with a rate equation model to derive the rates of the most important up-conversion and cross-relaxation energy transfers occurring at high dopant concentrations.

  15. Kinetic studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We have made measurements of state-to-state deactivation cross sections and radiative lifetimes for Xe*(6p,6p',7p) and Kr*(5p) states in xenon and krypton buffer gases. These results are relevant to kinetic models and both excimer lasers and the infrared xenon laser; and they are a significant improvement in the precision of the known radiative lifetimes. This type of experiment can now be compared with recent calculations of state-to-state collisional relaxation in rare-gases by Hickman, Huestis, and Saxon. We have also made significant progress in the study of the electronic spectra of small molecules of the rare gases. Spectra have been obtained for Xe 2 , Xe 3 , Xe 4 , and larger clusters. As guidance for the larger clusters of the rare gases we have obtained the first multiphoton spectra for excitons in condensed xenon. In collaboration with research on the multiphoton spectra of the rare gases, we have continued experiments using synchrotron radiation in collaboration with the University of Hamburg. In experiments there we have observed excitation and fluorescence spectra for single xenon atoms at the surface, within the second layer, and within the bulk of large argon clusters

  16. Laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing was applied to investigate the local fields and interactions of paramagnetic ions in oxide glasses. Studies included the site dependence of energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transition probabilities, homogeneous line broadening, and ion--ion energy transfer of rare earth ions. These results and the experimental techniques are reviewed briefly; the use of paramagnetic ions other than the rare earths is also considered. Recently, laser-excited fluorescence spectroscopy was used to investigate modifications in the local structure of lithium borate glass caused by compositional changes and phase separation and the site dependence of nonradiative relaxation of paramagnetic ions by multiphonon processes. These results and their implications are discussed. 6 figures

  17. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er3+ singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er3+ induced by 980 nm excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo; Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi

    2013-01-01

    Under 980 nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the 2 H 11/2 / 4 S 3/2 (green) and 4 F 9/2 (red) levels of Er 3+ ions were observed from Er 3+ singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er 3+ ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er 3+ ions doping

  18. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  19. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaks down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.

  20. IR and visible luminescence studies in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, K. K.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Vatsa, R. K.; Naik, P. D.; Annaji Rao, K.; Mittal, J. P.; Parthasarathy, V.; Sarkar, S. K.

    1995-07-01

    The infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dibromo-1,1-difluoroethane gives rise to IR and visible luminescence. Vibrationally excited parent molecules dissociate via two primary channels yielding bromine and vibrationally excited HBr. The strong visible emission observed between 350 to 750 nm has been assigned to electronically excited carbene CF 2Br CH.

  1. Study on excitation and fluorescence spectrums of Japanese citruses to construct machine vision systems for acquiring fluorescent images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Shigi, Tomoo

    2011-06-01

    Research was conducted to acquire knowledge of the ultraviolet and visible spectrums from 300 -800 nm of some common varieties of Japanese citrus, to investigate the best wave-lengths for fluorescence excitation and the resulting fluorescence wave-lengths and to provide a scientific background for the best quality fluorescent imaging technique for detecting surface defects of citrus. A Hitachi U-4000 PC-based microprocessor controlled spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorption spectrum and a Hitachi F-4500 spectrophotometer was used for the fluorescence and excitation spectrums. We analyzed the spectrums and the selected varieties of citrus were categorized into four groups of known fluorescence level, namely strong, medium, weak and no fluorescence.The level of fluorescence of each variety was also examined by using machine vision system. We found that around 340-380 nm LEDs or UV lamps are appropriate as lighting devices for acquiring the best quality fluorescent image of the citrus varieties to examine their fluorescence intensity. Therefore an image acquisition device was constructed with three different lighting panels with UV LED at peak 365 nm, Blacklight blue lamps (BLB) peak at 350 nm and UV-B lamps at peak 306 nm. The results from fluorescent images also revealed that the findings of the measured spectrums worked properly and can be used for practical applications such as for detecting rotten, injured or damaged parts of a wide variety of citrus.

  2. Multiphoton ionization processes in strong laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krstic, P.

    1982-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization of hydrogen in ultrastrong laser fields is studied. The previous calculations of this process yield differing result for the transition rate. We show the relations between them and difficulties with each of them. One difficulty is that the finite spatial and time extent of the laser field has been omitted. It is also found that a laser field, which is sufficiently intense to be labeled ultrastrong, makes the electron move relativistically so that it becomes necessary to use Volkov states to describe the electron in the laser field. The transition rate is obtained, using a CO laser as an example, and it is found that the transition rate rises as the laser intensity rises. This is a consequence of the use of relativistic kinematics and is not true nonrelativistically. We also discuss the multiple peaks observed in the energy spectrum of electrons resulting from multiphoton ionization of atoms by lasers. When the laser intensity is large enough for the ponderomotive force to result in appreciable broading of the peaks we show the shape of the broadened peaks contains useful information. We show that the multiphoton ionization probability as a function of laser intensity can be obtained but that the free-free cross sections, which are in principle also obtainable, are probably not obtainable in practice. Finally, we describe the theory of the absorption of more than minimum numbers of photons needed to ionize an atom by an intense laser. The basic approximation used is that the atom is adiabatically deformed by the laser and an impulsive interaction then results in multiphoton absorption. In our first calculation we allow only one resonant excited state to be included in the adiabatic deformation. In our second we also allow the lowest energy continuum to be included. The two results are then compared

  3. In vivo 3D measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distributions in the mouse cornea using multiphoton microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seunghun; Lee, Jun Ho; Park, Jin Hyoung; Yoon, Yeoreum; Chung, Wan Kyun; Tchah, Hungwon; Kim, Myoung Joon; Kim, Ki Hean

    2016-01-01

    Moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin are fourth-generation fluoroquinolone antibiotics used in the clinic to prevent or treat ocular infections. Their pharmacokinetics in the cornea is usually measured from extracted ocular fluids or tissues, and in vivo direct measurement is difficult. In this study multiphoton microscopy (MPM), which is a 3D optical microscopic technique based on multiphoton fluorescence, was applied to the measurement of moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin distribution in the cornea. I...

  4. Resonance Enhanced Multi-photon Spectroscopy of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Marshall Robert

    For over 50 years DNA has been studied to better understand its connection to life and evolution. These past experiments have led to our understanding of its structure and function in the biological environment but the interaction of DNA with UV radiation at the molecular level is still not very well understood. Unique mechanisms in nucleobase chromaphores protect us from adverse chemical reactions after UV absorption. Studying these processes can help develop theories for prebiotic chemistry and the possibility of alternative forms of DNA. Using resonance enhanced multi-photon spectroscopic techniques in the gas phase allow for the structure and dynamics of individual nucleobases to be studied in detail. Experiments studying different levels of structure/complexity with relation to their biological function are presented. Resonant IR multiphoton dissociation spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular mechanics and DFT calculations are used to determine gas phase structures of anionic nucleotide clusters. A comparison of the identified structures with known biological function shows how the hydrogen bonding of the nucleotides and their clusters free of solvent create favorable structures for quick incorporation into enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy techniques such as resonant two photon ionization (R2PI) and IR-UV double resonance are used to further elucidate the structure and excited state dynamics of the bare nucleobases thymine and uracil. Both exhibit long lived excited electronic states that have been implicated in DNA photolesions which can ultimately lead to melanoma and carcinoma. Our experimental data in comparison with many quantum chemical calculations suggest a new picture for the dynamics of thymine and uracil in the gas phase. A high probability of UV absorption from a vibrationally hot ground state to the excited electronic state shows that the stability of thymine and uracil comes from

  5. Identifying Two Common Types of Breast Benign Diseases Based on Multiphoton Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiphoton microscopy has attracted increasing attention and investigations in the field of breast cancer, based on two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF and second-harmonic generation (SHG. However, the incidence of breast benign diseases is about 5 to 10 times higher than breast cancer; up to 30% of women suffer from breast benign diseases and require treatment at some time in their lives. Thus, in this study, MPM was applied to image fibroadenoma and fibrocystic lesion, which are two of the most common breast benign diseases. The results show that MPM has the capability to identify the microstructure of lobule and stroma in normal breast tissue, the interaction of compressed ducts with surrounding collagen fiber in fibroadenoma, and the architecture of cysts filled with cystic fluid in fibrocystic disease. These findings indicate that, with integration of MPM into currently accepted clinical imaging system, it has the potential to make a real-time diagnosis of breast benign diseases in vivo, as well as breast cancer.

  6. Fluorescence study of some xanthine dyes under stepped laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirkova, L.V.; Ketsle, G.A.; Ermagambetov, K.T.

    1996-01-01

    Paper is devoted to definition of triplet state in molecules of xanthine dyes and study of intramolecular energy circulation. Stepped two-quanta excitation of dyes has been carried out with help of experimental unit. Intensive luminescence activated by excitation of triplet molecules of dyes within triplet-triplet band with wave length of 1060 nm was registered for eosin. Given luminescence spectrally coincides with fast fluorescence. 5 refs., 6 figs

  7. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, A.

    1964-01-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, β and α emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K α lines of 3. period elements excited by 55 Fe, 3 H/Zr and 210 Po sources; for the 2. period the K α spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the α particles of 210 Po. (author) [fr

  8. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  9. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-01-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup

  10. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar; Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo; Pasquardini, Laura; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Daldosso, Nicola; Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Quercioli, Franco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  11. Two photon versus one photon fluorescence excitation in whispering gallery mode microresonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastells, Carme; Marco, M.-Pilar [Nanobiotechnology for Diagnostics Group (Nb4Dg), IQAC-CSIC, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Merino, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo [ICFO-Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Castelldefels, 08860 Barcelona (Spain); Pasquardini, Laura [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Lunelli, Lorenzo [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); IBF-CNR, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Pederzolli, Cecilia [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, 38123 Povo, TN (Italy); Daldosso, Nicola [Department of Computer Science, University of Verona, Strada le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Farnesi, Daniele [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Berneschi, Simone [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Righini, Giancarlo C. [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, 00184 Roma (Italy); Quercioli, Franco [CNR-INO National Institute of Optics, Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy); Soria, Silvia, E-mail: s.soria@ifac.cnr.it [CNR-IFAC “Nello Carrara” Institute of Applied Physics, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, FI (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the feasibility of both one photon and two photon fluorescence excitation using whispering gallery mode microresonators. We report the linear and non linear fluorescence real-time detection of labeled IgG covalently bonded to the surface of a silica whispering gallery mode resonator (WGMR). The immunoreagents have been immobilized onto the surface of the WGMR sensor after being activated with an epoxy silane and an orienting layer. The developed immunosensor presents great potential as a robust sensing device for fast and early detection of immunoreactions. We also investigate the potential of microbubbles as nonlinear enhancement platform. The dyes used in these studies are dylight800, tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate, rhodamine 6G and fluorescein. All measurements were performed in a modified confocal microscope. - Highlights: • One photon fluorescence overlaps with the semiconductor pump laser gain bandwidth. • We report on the feasibility to excite two photon fluorescence in microbubble resonators. • Our functionalization process maintains a good quality factor of the microresonator.

  12. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated ......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals.......Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated...

  13. High-resolution multiphoton microscopy with a low-power continuous wave laser pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang-Dong; Li, Shen; Du, Bo; Dong, Yang; Wang, Ze-Hao; Guo, Guang-Can; Sun, Fang-Wen

    2018-02-15

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has been widely used for three-dimensional biological imaging. Here, based on the photon-induced charge state conversion process, we demonstrated a low-power high-resolution MPM with a nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond. Continuous wave green and orange lasers were used to pump and detect the two-photon charge state conversion, respectively. The power of the laser for multiphoton excitation was 40 μW. Both the axial and lateral resolutions were improved approximately 1.5 times compared with confocal microscopy. The results can be used to improve the resolution of the NV center-based quantum sensing and biological imaging.

  14. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  15. Multi-Photon Absorption Spectra: A Comparison Between Transmittance Change and Fluorescence Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0134 multi-photon absorption spectra Cleber Mendonca INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 05/21/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos - Universidade de Sao Paulo Av

  16. Photochemical and Spectroscopic Effects Resulting from Excimer Laser Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan Xiao

    I. Photochemical production of ozone from pure oxygen using excimer lasers. Production of ozone was observed from experiments when oxygen was under a broadband pulsed KrF laser radiation. The production process was found to be autocatalytic. Mechanisms for the ozone formation were proposed. Experimental results over a range of oxygen pressure and laser pulse energy (irradiance) provided evidences in favor of the proposed mechanisms. Experiments were also numerically modeled. Good agreement between the experimental and the numerical results were observed, which provided further evidence to support the proposed mechanisms. Cross sections for some photochemical processes in the mechanisms were estimated. Production of ozone from pure oxygen under a ArF excimer laser radiation (193 nm) was also studied and numerically modeled. Effects of ambient water vapor on ozone production were investigated. Experimental results showed a fast ozone destruction when water vapor was present in the cell. However, numerical results obtained from the well-known OH and HO _2 chain ozone destruction mechanism predicted a slower ozone destruction. Possible reasons for the discrepancy are discussed. II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of N_2 at 193 and 248 nm detected by N_sp{2}{+} fluorescence. Using a broadband excimer laser operating at 193 and 248 nm multiphoton ionization at high pressures in air and pure nitrogen has been detected by fluorescence from N_sp{2}{+} in the B-X firstnegative system. Measurements of the fluorescence intensity as a function of beam irradiance indicate resonance in N_2 at the energy of two 193 nm photons (2 + 1 REMPI) and three 248 nm photons (3 + 1 REMPI). Possible intermediate states are discussed. III. Excimer laser-induced fluorescence from some organic solvents. Fluorescence was observed from vapor phase benzene, toluene, p-xylene, benzyl chloride, methyl benzoate, acetic anhydride, ether, methanol, ethyl acetone, acetone, and 2-butanone using

  17. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwonski, Hubert Marek; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  18. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  19. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively.

  20. Lettuce flavonoids screening and phenotyping by chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivcak, Marek; Brückova, Klaudia; Sytar, Oksana; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2017-06-01

    Environmentally induced variation and the genotypic differences in flavonoid and phenolic content in lettuce can be reliably detected using the appropriate parameters derived from the records of rapid non-invasive fluorescence technique. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio method was designed as a rapid and non-invasive tool to estimate the content of UV-absorbing phenolic compounds in plants. Using this technique, we have assessed the dynamics of accumulation of flavonoids related to developmental changes and environmental effects. Moreover, we have tested appropriateness of the method to identify the genotypic differences and fluctuations in total phenolics and flavonoid content in lettuce. Six green and two red genotypes of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in pots were exposed to two different environments for 50 days: direct sunlight (UV-exposed) and greenhouse conditions (low UV). The indices based on the measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence after red, green and UV excitation indicated increase of the content of UV-absorbing compounds and anthocyanins in the epidermis of lettuce leaves. In similar, the biochemical analyses performed at the end of the experiment confirmed significantly higher total phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants exposed to direct sun compared to greenhouse conditions and in red compared to green genotypes. As the correlation between the standard fluorescence indices and the biochemical records was negatively influenced by the presence of red genotypes, we proposed the use of a new parameter named Modified Flavonoid Index (MFI) taking into an account both absorbance changes due to flavonol and anthocyanin content, for which the correlation with flavonoid and phenolic content was relatively good. Thus, our results confirmed that the fluorescence excitation ratio method is useful for identifying the major differences in phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants and it can be used for high-throughput pre

  1. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base

  2. Multiphoton processes: conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambropoulos, P.; Smith, S.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The chapters of this volume represent the invited papers delivered at the conference. They are arranged according to thermatic proximity beginning with atoms and continuing with molecules and surfaces. Section headings include multiphoton processes in atoms, field fluctuations and collisions in multiphoton process, and multiphoton processes in molecules and surfaces. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

  3. Excited state hydrogen bonding fluorescent probe: Role of structure and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, Debarati, E-mail: debaratidey07@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Vidyasagar College, 39 Sankar Ghosh Lane, Kolkata 700006 (India); Sarangi, Manas Kumar [Chemical Sciences Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Ray, Angana; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay [Computational Science Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Maity, Dilip Kumar [Department of Chemistry, University College of Science and Technology, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India)

    2016-05-15

    An environment sensitive fluorescent probe, 11-benzoyl-dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (BDBPZ), has been synthesized and characterized that acts via excited state hydrogen bonding (ESHB). On interaction with hydrogen bond donating solvents the fluorescence intensity of BDBPZ increases abruptly with a concomitant bathochromic shift. The extent of fluorescence increment and the red-shift of λ{sub max} depend on hydrogen bond donating ability of the solvent associated. ESHB restricts the free rotation of the benzoyl group and hence blocks the non-radiative deactivation pathway. BDBPZ forms an exciplex with organic amine in nonpolar medium that readily disappears on increasing the polarity of the solvent. In polar environment the fluorescence of both the free molecule and excited state hydrogen bonded species are quenched on addition of amine unlike its parent dibenzo[a,c]phenazine (DBPZ), that remains very much inaccessible towards the solvent as well as quencher molecules due to its structure. This newly synthesized derivative BDBPZ is much more interactive due to the benzoyl group that is flanked outside the skeletal aromatic rings of DBPZ, which helps to sense the environment properly and thus shows better ESHB capacity than DBPZ.

  4. Hotspot related plasmon assisted multiphoton photocurrents in metal-insulator-metal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Differt, Dominik; Pfeiffer, Walter [Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Diesing, Detlef [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstr. 5, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Scanning photocurrent microscopy of metal-insulator-metal junctions (MIM) is used to investigate the mechanisms of femtosecond multiphoton photocurrent injection at liquid nitrogen temperature. The locally induced multiphoton photocurrent in a Ag-TaO-Ta MIM junction is measured in a scanning microscope cryostat under focused illumination (5{mu}m focus diameter, 800 nm, 30 fs, 80 MHz repetition rate). The intensity dependence reveals a mixture of two-photon and three-photon processes that are responsible for the photocurrent. Its lateral variation shows hotspot-like behaviour with significant magnitude variations on a 100 to 200 nm length scale. Assuming an injection current duration of 40fs the peak injection current density of about 10{sup 4} A cm{sup -2} is estimated - 10{sup 6} times higher than that for 400 nm continuous wave illumination slightly below the damage threshold. The simultaneously measured extinction of the incident radiation reveals a 20 to 30% increased absorption at the hotspots. We attribute the local photocurrent enhancement to the defect-assisted excitation of surface plasmon polaritons at the silver electrode leading to an enhanced local excitation.

  5. Dual fluorescence excitation spectra of methyl salicylate in a free jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbrook, Lou Ann; Kenny, Jonathan E.; Kohler, Bryan E.; Scott, Gary W.

    1981-11-01

    Separate fluorescence excitation spectra of the blue- and UV-emitting forms of methyl salicylate cooled in a free-jet expansion are reported. This study represents the first observation of the detailed vibrational structure of these transitions. The two excitation spectra have no features in common, and their intensity patterns are very different. Many individual lines are ˜2 cm-1 wide (nearly laser limited), although in the excitation spectrum of the UV emission, spectral congestion persists at high energies despite the high degree of cooling. (AIP)

  6. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  7. Usefulness of Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy in Visualizing Study of Mouse Cochlea and Volume Changes in the Scala Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyun Mi; Lee, Sun Hee; Kong, Tae Hoon; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Choi, Jin Sil; Seo, Young Joon

    2017-01-01

    Conventional microscopy has limitations in viewing the cochlear microstructures due to three-dimensional spiral structure and the overlying bone. But these issues can be overcome by imaging the cochlea in vitro with intravital multiphoton microscopy (MPM). By using near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation, intravital MPM can detect endogenous fluorescence and second harmonic generation of tissues. In this study, we used intravital MPM to visualize various cochlear microstructures without any staining and non-invasively analyze the volume changes of the scala media (SM) without removing the overlying cochlear bone. The intravital MPM images revealed various tissue types, ranging from thin membranes to dense bone, as well as the spiral ganglion beneath the cochlear bone. The two-dimensional, cross-sectional, and serial z-stack intravital MPM images also revealed the spatial dilation of the SM in the temporal bone of pendrin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that intravital MPM might serve as a new method for obtaining microanatomical information regarding the cochlea, similar to standard histopathological analyses in the animal study for the cochlea. Given the capability of intravital MPM for detecting an increase in the volume of the SM in pendrin-deficient mice, it might be a promising new tool for assessing the pathophysiology of hearing loss in the future.

  8. Usefulness of Intravital Multiphoton Microscopy in Visualizing Study of Mouse Cochlea and Volume Changes in the Scala Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Mi Ju

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional microscopy has limitations in viewing the cochlear microstructures due to three-dimensional spiral structure and the overlying bone. But these issues can be overcome by imaging the cochlea in vitro with intravital multiphoton microscopy (MPM. By using near-infrared lasers for multiphoton excitation, intravital MPM can detect endogenous fluorescence and second harmonic generation of tissues. In this study, we used intravital MPM to visualize various cochlear microstructures without any staining and non-invasively analyze the volume changes of the scala media (SM without removing the overlying cochlear bone. The intravital MPM images revealed various tissue types, ranging from thin membranes to dense bone, as well as the spiral ganglion beneath the cochlear bone. The two-dimensional, cross-sectional, and serial z-stack intravital MPM images also revealed the spatial dilation of the SM in the temporal bone of pendrin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that intravital MPM might serve as a new method for obtaining microanatomical information regarding the cochlea, similar to standard histopathological analyses in the animal study for the cochlea. Given the capability of intravital MPM for detecting an increase in the volume of the SM in pendrin-deficient mice, it might be a promising new tool for assessing the pathophysiology of hearing loss in the future.

  9. Photo-induced processes in collagen-hypericin system revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy and multiphoton microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hovhannisyan, V.; Guo, H. W.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ghukasyan, V.; Buryakina, T.; Chen, Y. F.; Dong, C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen is the main structural protein and the key determinant of mechanical and functional properties of tissues and organs. Proper balance between synthesis and degradation of collagen molecules is critical for maintaining normal physiological functions. In addition, collagen influences tumor development and drug delivery, which makes it a potential cancer therapy target. Using second harmonic generation, two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we show that the ...

  10. Investigation of the multiphotonic excitation processes of the 4f2 5d configuration in LiYF4, LiLuF4 and BaY2F8 crystals doped with trivalent neodymium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Librantz, Andre Felipe Henriques

    2004-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence of Nd 3+ ions induced by multistep laser excitation was investigated in Nd-doped LiYF 4 (YLF), LiLuF 4 (LLF) and BaY 2 F 8 (BaYF) crystals using a technique of time-resolved spectroscopy. The observed UV luminescence was due to transitions between the bottom of 4f 2 5d configuration and the 4f 3 states of Nd 3+ ions. The lower excited state 4f 2 ( 3 H)5d [ 4 K 11/2 ] was reached by three stepwise absorptions of photons at 521 nm (green) and 478 nm (blue) of a short pulse laser excitation. The three sequential absorptions at 478 nm constitutes a new multiphoton excitation process of Nd 3+ in these crystals with the following excitation sequence: 4 I 9/2 + hv(480 nm)→ 2 G(1) 9/2 + hv(480 nm)→ 2 F(2) 7/2 + hv(480 nm)→ 4f 2 ( 3 H)5d [ 4 K 9/2 ] (excited state at ∼ 63000 cm -1 ). The observed UV emissions from [ 4 K 11/2 ] state have a lifetime of 35 ns (parity allowed) and are: broadband in contrast to UV emissions from 4f 3 configuration, which are also present in the luminescence investigation but having longer lifetime (8 μs) and structures composed of narrow lines. The excitation spectrum of fast UV luminescence exhibited different structure depending on the excitation geometry (σ or π) with respect to the c-axis of the crystal. It was seen two new emissions from [ 4 K 11/2 ] and 2 F(2) 5/2 states near 528 nm, which modified the branching ratio of the bottom of the 4f 2 5d configuration (∼ 55500 cm -1 for the YLF and LLF crystals and ∼-53700 cm -1 for the BaYF crystal). The equivalent cross-section of three and two excitation process was estimated at 521 nm by solving the rate equations of the system under short laser excitation, which leads us to infer that is possible to have laser action under pulsed laser pumping with intensity below the crystal damage threshold. (author)

  11. Diamond-like-carbon nanoparticle production and agglomeration following UV multi-photon excitation of static naphthalene/helium gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, A. J.; Ruth, A. A., E-mail: a.ruth@ucc.ie [Physics Department and Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333-CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-07-14

    We report the formation of nanoparticles with significant diamond character after UV multi-photon laser excitation of gaseous naphthalene, buffered in static helium gas, at room temperature. The nanoparticles are identified in situ by their absorption and scattering spectra between 400 and 850 nm, which are modeled using Mie theory. Comparisons of the particles’ spectroscopic and optical properties with those of carbonaceous materials indicate a sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} hybridization ratio of 8:1 of the particles formed. The particle extinction in the closed static (unstirred) gas-phase system exhibits a complex and quasi-oscillatory time dependence for the duration of up to several hours with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes. The extinction dynamics of the system is based on a combination of transport features and particle interaction, predominantly agglomeration. The relatively long period of agglomeration allows for a unique analysis of the agglomeration process of diamond-like carbon nanoparticles in situ.

  12. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  13. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.; Elshenawy, M. M.; Takahashi, Masateru; Whitman, B. H.; Walter, N. G.; Hamdan, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation

  14. Investigation of the vacuum ultraviolet fluorescence of gaseous xenon under optical excitation in an extended wavelength region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodmann, R.; Zimmerer, G.; Hamburg Univ.; Hahn, U.

    1976-02-01

    The fluorescence of Xe at a pressure of 10 Torr has been excited by monochromatic light in the wavelength region from 1,040 A to 1,500 A. Besides the well known first and second continuum additional emission bands appear at 1,192 A and 1,300 A. They are ascribed to an atomic transition 5d(3/2) 1 → 1 S 0 and a molecular transition O + sub(u)(6s'(1/2) + 1 S 0 ) → O + sub(g)( 1 S 0 + 1 S 0 ). The excitation spectra of the first and second continuum yield high fluorescence efficiency if higher Rydberg states are excited. Excitation of the first resonance line of Xe results in a low fluorescence intensity. Obviously the formation of highly excited molecules Xe** and intramolecular relaxation play an important role for the population of the vibrationally relaxed excited states (O + sub(u), 1sub(u)) of the Xe* 2 molecule. (orig.) [de

  15. Multiphoton microscopic imaging of histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin staining differentiates carcinoma in situ lesion from normal oesophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianxin; Xu, Jian; Kang, Deyong; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2013-10-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become a powerful, important tool for tissues imaging at the molecular level. In this paper, this technique was extended to histological investigations, differentiating carcinoma in situ (CIS) lesion from normal oesophagus by imaging histological sections without hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The results show that the histology procedures of dehydration, paraffin embedding, and de-paraffinizing highlighted two photon excited fluorescence of cytoplasm and nucleolus of epithelial cell and collagen in stroma. MPM has the ability to identify the characteristics of CIS lesion including changes of squamous cells and full epithelium, identification of basement membrane, especially prominent nucleolus. The studies described here show that MPM has the potential for future retrospective studies of tumor staging by employing on histological section specimens without H&E staining.

  16. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: Excitation and Suppression of the Brain Waves by the Multi-photon Pulsed-operated Fiber Lasers in the Ultraviolet Range of Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander; IAPS-team Team

    2017-10-01

    The novel study of the laser excitation-suppression of the brain waves is proposed. It is based on the pulsed-operated multi-photon fiber-laser interaction with the brain parvalbumin (PV) neurons. The repetition frequency matches the low frequency brain waves (5-100 Hz); enabling the resonance-scanning of the wide range of the PV neurons (the generators of the brain wave activity). The tunable fiber laser frequencies are in the ultraviolet frequency range, thus enabling the monitoring of the PV neuron-DNA, within the 10s of milliseconds. In medicine, the method can be used as an ``instantaneous-on-off anesthetic.'' Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  17. High multi-photon visible upconversion emissions of Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals: A photon avalanche of Er{sup 3+} induced by 980 nm excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongjin; Song, Zhiguo, E-mail: songzg@kmust.edu.cn; Li, Chen; Wan, Ronghua; Qiu, Jianbei; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2013-12-02

    Under 980 nm excitation, high multi-photon upconversion (UC) emission from the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}/{sup 4}S{sub 3/2} (green) and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} (red) levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were observed from Er{sup 3+} singly doped BiOCl microcrystals. These high-energy excited states were populated by a three to ten photon UC process conditionally, which depended on the pump power density and the Er{sup 3+} ion doping concentration, characterizing as a hetero-looping enhanced energy transfer avalanche UC process. UC emission lifetime and Raman analysis suggest that the unusual UC phenomena are initiated by the new and intense phonon vibration modes of BiOCl lattices due to Er{sup 3+} ions doping.

  18. Fluorescence enhancing under UV-NIR simultaneous-excitation in ZnS:Cu,Mn phosphors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Xie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence properties of a long-lasting phosphor, ZnS:Cu,Mn was studied for the first time under simultaneously excitation of both UV and NIR light. Up to 20% fluorescence enhancement of the phosphor was observed. In the present simultaneously-excitation process, broad-band NIR light was absorbed and converted to visible photons via a single-photon upconversion path. We propose that a novel kind of spectral-conversion material with the unique ability to simultaneously convert both UV and NIR photons can be developed and is promising in the application of enhancing the EQE of solar cells.

  19. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  20. Fluorescence of Bacteria, Pollens, and Naturally Occurring Airborne Particles: Excitation/Emission Spectra

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hill, Steven C; Mayo, Michael W; Chang, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation and emission wavelengths (EEM spectra) was measured for different species of bacteria, biochemical constituents of cells, pollens, and vegetation...

  1. Laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal tube atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, J A; Leong, M B; Stevenson, C L; Petrucci, G; Winefordner, J D

    1989-12-01

    The performance of graphite-tube electrothermal atomizers is evaluated for laser-excited atomic-fluorescence spectrometry for several elements. Three pulsed laser systems are used to pump tunable dye lasers which subsequently are used to excite Pb, Ga, In, Fe, Ir, and Tl atoms in the hot graphite tube. The dye laser systems used are pumped by nitrogen, copper vapour and Nd:YAG lasers. Detection limits in the femtogram and subfemtogram range are typically obtained for all elements. A commercial graphite-tube furnace is important for the successful utilization of the laser-based method when the determination of trace elements is intended, especially when complicated matrices may be present.

  2. Simulation of Far-Field Superresolution Fluorescence Imaging with Two-Color One-Photon Excitation of Reversible Photoactivatable Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chen; Qiao Ling-Ling; Mao Zheng-Le

    2011-01-01

    We propose to achieve far-field super-resolution imaging by using offset two-color one-photon (2C1P) excitation of reversible photoactivatable fluorescence proteins. Due to the distinctive photoswitching performance of the proteins, such as dronpa, the fluorescence emission will only come from the overlapped region of activation beam and excitation beam. The analysis solution of rate equation shows that the resolution of offset 2C1P microscope is 'engineered' by laser power of excitation and activation beams and the power ratio between them. Superior lateral and transverse resolution is theoretically demonstrated compared with conventional fluorescence scanning microscopy. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  3. Comparison of conventional and total reflection excitation geometry for fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy on droplet samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falkenberg, G.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.

    2003-01-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments in fluorescence mode have been performed in total reflection excitation geometry and conventional 45 deg. /45 deg. excitation/detection geometry for comparison. The experimental results have shown that XAFS measurements are feasible under normal total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) conditions, i.e. on droplet samples, with excitation in grazing incidence and using a TXRF experimental chamber. The application of the total reflection excitation geometry for XAFS measurements increases the sensitivity compared to the conventional geometry leading to lower accessible concentration ranges. However, XAFS under total reflection excitation condition fails for highly concentrated samples because of the self-absorption effect

  4. Effects of fluorescence excitation geometry on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing by flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, James H. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Larson, Erica J. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Goodwin, Peter M. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Ambrose, W. Patrick [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States); Keller, Richard A. [Division of Bioscience, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545-0001 (United States)

    2000-06-01

    We report on various excitation geometries used in ultrasensitive flow cytometry that yield a linear relation between the fluorescence intensity measured from individual strained DNA fragments and the lengths of the fragments (in base pairs). This linearity holds for DNA samples that exhibit a wide range of conformations. The variety of DNA conformations leads to a distribution of dipole moment orientations for the dye molecules intercalated into the DNA. It is consequently important to use an excitation geometry such that all dye molecules are detected with similar efficiency. To estimate the conformation and the extent of elongation of the strained fragments in the flow, fluorescence polarization anisotropy and autocorrelation measurements were performed. Significant extension was observed for DNA fragments under the flow conditions frequently used for DNA fragment sizing. Classical calculations of the fluorescence emission collected over a finite solid angle are in agreement with the experimental measurements and have confirmed the relative insensitivity to DNA conformation of an orthogonal excitation geometry. Furthermore, the calculations suggested a modified excitation geometry that has increased our sizing resolution. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  5. Effects of fluorescence excitation geometry on the accuracy of DNA fragment sizing by flow cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, James H.; Larson, Erica J.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Keller, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    We report on various excitation geometries used in ultrasensitive flow cytometry that yield a linear relation between the fluorescence intensity measured from individual strained DNA fragments and the lengths of the fragments (in base pairs). This linearity holds for DNA samples that exhibit a wide range of conformations. The variety of DNA conformations leads to a distribution of dipole moment orientations for the dye molecules intercalated into the DNA. It is consequently important to use an excitation geometry such that all dye molecules are detected with similar efficiency. To estimate the conformation and the extent of elongation of the strained fragments in the flow, fluorescence polarization anisotropy and autocorrelation measurements were performed. Significant extension was observed for DNA fragments under the flow conditions frequently used for DNA fragment sizing. Classical calculations of the fluorescence emission collected over a finite solid angle are in agreement with the experimental measurements and have confirmed the relative insensitivity to DNA conformation of an orthogonal excitation geometry. Furthermore, the calculations suggested a modified excitation geometry that has increased our sizing resolution. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America

  6. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  7. Potential of ultraviolet widefield imaging and multiphoton microscopy for analysis of dehydroergosterol in cellular membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Dehydroergosterol (DHE) is an intrinsically fluorescent sterol with absorption/emission in the ultraviolet (UV) region and biophysical properties similar to those of cholesterol. We compared the potential of UV-sensitive low-light-level wide-field (UV-WF) imaging with that of multiphoton (MP) exc...

  8. Fluorescence fluctuation of Rhodamine 6G dye for high repetition rate laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nageshwar; Patel, Hemant K.; Dixit, S.K.; Vora, H.S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, fluorescence from Rhodamine 6G dye for stationary and flowing liquid medium, excited by copper vapor laser, operating at 6 kHz pulse repetition frequency, was investigated. Large fluctuations in spectral width (about 5 nm) and spectral intensity in the fluorescence from stationary dye solution were observed, while fluctuations in the spectral width diminish in a flowing dye medium. However, this increases spectral intensity and slightly red shifts the fluorescence peak emission wavelength. Theoretical analysis was carried out to explain the observed results by incorporating the temperature induced refractive index, beam deflection and spectral variation in stationary dye solution. Numerical analysis of thermal load and contour of temperature in the optical pumped region inside the dye cell in stationary, 0.2 and 1.5 m/s flow velocity was also investigated to support our analysis. - Highlights: ► High repetition rate excitation generates inhomogeneity in the gain medium. ► Fluorescence of Rhodamine 6G in stationary and flowing medium was carried out. ► Fluorescence fluctuations lessen in flowing medium in contrast to stationary medium. ► Our theoretical and numerical analysis enlightens the experimented outcome trend.

  9. Identification of tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in esophageal cancer by multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Jiang, Liwei; Kang, Deyong; Wu, Xuejing; Xu, Meifang; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Lin, Jiangbo; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-10-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the gastrointestinal cancers and carries poorer prognosis than other gastrointestinal cancers. In general practice, the depth of tumor infiltration in esophageal wall is crucial to establishing appropriate treatment plan which is established by detecting the tumor infiltration depth. Connective tissue is one of the main structures that form the esophageal wall. So, identification of tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue is helping for detecting the tumor infiltration depth. Our aim is to evaluate whether multiphoton microscopy (MPM) can be used to detect tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in the esophageal cancer. MPM is well-suited for real-time detecting morphologic and cellular changes in fresh tissues since many endogenous fluorophores of fresh tissues are excited through two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second harmonic generation (SHG). In this work, microstructure of tumor cells and connective tissue are first studied. Then, morphological changes of collagen fibers after the infiltration of tumor cells are shown. These results show that MPM has the ability to detect tumor cells infiltrating into connective tissue in the esophageal cancer. In the future, MPM may be a promising imaging technique for detecting tumor cells in esophageal cancer.

  10. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  11. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gredel, R.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles. 70 references

  12. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  13. Comment on ’Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a P-Terphenyl Crystal’

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-12-10

    8217 NO 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Comment on "Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a p-Terphenyl Crystal" 12...8217 {Continue on reverse it necessary and identify by block numboer) Using h--,Ihly efficient Fluorescence excitation spectroscov of individual pentacene ...molecular impurities in p-terphenvl crystals, we have observed that some pentacene defects exhibit spcntaneous spectral jumps in their resonance frequency at

  14. Diagnostics of MCF plasmas using Lyman-α fluorescence excited by one or two photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voslamber, D.

    1998-11-01

    Laser-induced Lyman-α fluorescence of the hydrogen isotopes is investigated with regard to diagnostic applications in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. A formal analysis is presented for two excitation schemes: one-photon and Doppler-free two-photon excitation. The analysis includes estimates of the expected experimental errors arising from the photon noise and from the sensitivity of the observed fluorescence signals to variations of the plasma and laser parameters. Both excitation schemes are suitable primarily for application in the plasma edge, but even in the plasma bulk of large machines they can still be applied in combination with a diagnostic neutral beam. The two-photon excitation scheme is particularly attractive because it involves absorption spectra that are resolved within the Doppler width. This implies a large diagnostic potential and in particular offers a way to measure the deuterium-tritium fuel mix in fusion reactors. (author)

  15. Determination of uranium in geologic materials by laser-excited fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHugh, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    A laser-excited fluorescence method is described for the determination of trace amounts of uranium in rocks and soils. The limit of detection is less than 1 ppm, and the relative standard deviation ranges from 2.6 to 12.5%. The method was evaluated by using known geological reference samples

  16. Bulky Counterions: Enhancing the Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence of Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertorelle, Franck; Moulin, Christophe; Soleilhac, Antonin; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Dugourd, Philippe; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-01-19

    Increasing fluorescence quantum yields of ligand-protected gold nanoclusters has attracted wide research interest. The strategy consisting in using bulky counterions has been found to dramatically enhance the fluorescence. In this Communication, we push forward this concept to the nonlinear optical regime. We show that by an appropriate choice of bulky counterions and of solvent, a 30-fold increase in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal at ≈600 nm for gold nanoclusters can be obtained. This would correspond to a TPEF cross-section in the range of 0.1 to 1 GM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Multiphoton Rabi oscillations between highly excited Stark states of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yonglin

    2011-01-01

    We have applied a nonperturbative resonant theory to study the Rabi frequency of microwave multiphoton transitions between two Rydberg states of potassium in a static electric field. The Stark electric dipole moments used to calculate the Rabi frequency are determined by the Stark states' wave functions, which are obtained by the diagonalization method. The frequencies of the Rabi oscillations are in good agreement with either experimental ones or ones calculated by the time-dependent close-coupling method and the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we are able to show that the size of avoided crossings between the (n+2)s and (n,3) states can be predicted from the Stark electric dipole moment and the difference of the two Stark states' energy at a given resonance.

  18. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  19. Theory of the effect of odd-photon destructive interference on optical shifts in resonantly enhanced multiphoton excitation and ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Deng, L.; Garrett, W.R.

    1998-01-01

    We present a theory for two- and three-photon excitation, optical shifting, and four-wave mixing when a first laser is tuned onto, or near, a two-photon resonance and a second much more intense laser is tuned near or on resonance between the two-photon resonance and a second excited state. When the second excited state has a dipole-allowed transition back to the ground state and the concentration is sufficiently high, a destructive interference is produced between three-photon coupling of the ground state and the second excited state and one-photon coupling between the same states by the internally generated four-wave mixing field. This interference leads to several striking effects. For instance, as the onset of the interference occurs, the optical shifts in the two-photon resonance excitation line shape become smaller in copropagating geometry so that the line shapes for multiphoton ionization enhanced by the two-photon resonance eventually become unaffected by the second laser. In the same range of concentrations the four-wave mixing field evolves to a concentration-independent intensity. With counterpropagating laser beams the line shape exhibits normal optical shifts like those observed for both copropagating and counterpropagating laser beams at very low concentrations. The theoretical work presented here extends our earlier works by including the effect of laser bandwidth and by removing the restriction of having the second laser be tuned far from three-photon resonance. In this way we have now included, as a special case, the effect of both laser bandwidth and interference on laser-induced transparency. Unlike other effects related to odd-photon destructive interference, the effect of a broad bandwidth is to bring about the predicted effects at much lower concentrations. Studies in rubidium show good agreement between theory and experiment for both ionization line shapes and four-wave mixing intensity as a function of concentration. copyright 1998 The

  20. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  1. Advances in polarization sensitive multiphoton nano-bio-imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zyss J.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this talk, we shall shortly review four main directions of ongoing research in our laboratories, directed at the conception and demonstration of a variety of innovative configurations in nanoscale multiphoton imaging. A common feature to all of these directions appears to be the central role played by the involvement of polarization features, both in- and outgoing, moreover so in view of the tensorial aspects inherent to nonlinear schemes such second-harmonic generation, electro-optic modulation or two-photon fluorescence which will ne emphasized. These advances relate to the new domain of nonlinear ellipsometry in multiphoton imaging [1], of high relevance to fundamental aspects of nanophotonics and nanomaterial engineering as well as towards basic life science issues. The four domains to be shortly reported are: a polarization resolved second-harmonic generation in semiconductor QD’s with record small sizes in the 10-12 nm range [2] b original use of two-photon confocal polarization resolved microscopy in DNA stained by two photon fluorescent dyes in different LC phases arrangements so as to characterize these as well as ascertain the respective DNA-dye orientation (intercalant or groves [3] c elaboration and demonstration of an electrooptic confocal microscope in a highly sensitive interferometric and homodyne detection configuration allowing to map weak electric potentials such as in artificial functionalized membranes, the dynamical investigation of firing and propagation aspects of action potentials in neurones being currently the next step [4] d original plasmon based enhanced nanoscale confocal imaging involving a dual detection scheme (fluorescence imaging and ATR plasmon coupling in reflection whereby adequate preparation and switching of the incoming polarization state between radial, linear and azimuthal configurations, entail different images and plasmon enhancement levels [5].

  2. Colorectal cancer detection by hyperspectral imaging using fluorescence excitation scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Deal, Joshua; Hill, Shante; Martin, Will A.; Lall, Malvika; Lopez, Carmen; Rider, Paul F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technologies have shown great promise for biomedical applications. These techniques have been especially useful for detection of molecular events and characterization of cell, tissue, and biomaterial composition. Unfortunately, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been slow to translate to clinical devices - likely due to increased cost and complexity of the technology as well as long acquisition times often required to sample a spectral image. We have demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging approaches which scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum can provide increased signal strength and faster imaging, compared to traditional emission-scanning approaches. We have also demonstrated that excitation-scanning approaches may be able to detect spectral differences between colonic adenomas and adenocarcinomas and normal mucosa in flash-frozen tissues. Here, we report feasibility results from using excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to screen pairs of fresh tumoral and nontumoral colorectal tissues. Tissues were imaged using a novel hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning microscope, sampling a wavelength range of 360-550 nm, at 5 nm increments. Image data were corrected to achieve a NIST-traceable flat spectral response. Image data were then analyzed using a range of supervised and unsupervised classification approaches within ENVI software (Harris Geospatial Solutions). Supervised classification resulted in >99% accuracy for single-patient image data, but only 64% accuracy for multi-patient classification (n=9 to date), with the drop in accuracy due to increased false-positive detection rates. Hence, initial data indicate that this approach may be a viable detection approach, but that larger patient sample sizes need to be evaluated and the effects of inter-patient variability studied.

  3. Visible luminescence studies in the infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushpa, K. K.; Kumar, Awadesh; Naik, P. D.; Annaji Rao, K.; Parthasarathy, V.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mittal, J. P.

    1997-11-01

    A strong visible luminescence was observed in the CO 2 laser induced infrared multiphoton dissociation of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane. The emission observed between 350-750 nm is attributed to electronically excited carbene CF 2ClCH. The temporal profile of this luminescence was studied as a function of laser pulse duration, pulse energy, excitation frequency and substrate pressure. A suitable dissociation mechanism is presented considering various channels of IRMPD of this molecule.

  4. Multiphoton photodegradation of indocyanine green: Solvent protolysis effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuyuki, Masanori, E-mail: mn.fuyuki@kio.ac.jp

    2016-02-15

    The multiphoton photodegradation mechanism of indocyanine green (ICG) was investigated by using femtosecond near-infrared (NIR) pump and probe pulses. In the pump fluence region from 2 mJ/cm{sup 2} to 4 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the photodegradation rate was higher in acetic acid than in ethanol, and the rate was proportional to pump fluence to the 2.3th power in acetic acid and the 3.9th in ethanol. Considering that the degree of auto-protolysis of acetic acid is much higher than that of ethanol, the experimental results indicate that self-ionized solvent molecules played an essential role in the degradation of ICG molecules excited by NIR multiphoton process. - Highlights: • Photodegradation of ICG by femtosecond near-infrared pulses. • Photodegradation rate of ICG was higher in acetic acid than in ethanol. • Photodegradation rate was proportional to pump fluence to 2.3th power in acetic acid. • Photodegradation rate was proportional to pump fluence to 3.9th power in ethanol. • Self-ionized solvent molecules promoted ICG photodegradation in acetic acid.

  5. Fluorescence detection of single molecules using pulsed near-field optical excitation and time correlated photon counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrose, W.P.; Goodwin, P.M.; Martin, J.C.; Keller, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    Pulsed excitation, time correlated single photon counting and time gated detection are used in near-field optical microscopy to enhance fluorescence images and measure the fluorescence lifetimes of single molecules of Rhodamine 6G on silica surfaces. Time gated detection is used to reject prompt scattered background and to improve the image signal to noise ratio. The excited state lifetime of a single Rhodamine 6G molecule is found to depend on the position of the near-field probe. We attribute the lifetime variations to spontaneous emission rate alterations by the fluorescence reflected from and quenching by the aluminum coated probe

  6. Multi-color imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in living HeLa cells using direct electron-beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-03-17

    Multi-color, high spatial resolution imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in living HeLa cells has been performed with a direct electron-beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this technique, fluorescent materials are directly excited with a focused electron beam and the resulting cathodoluminescence (CL) is detected with nanoscale resolution. Green- and red-light-emitting FNDs were employed for two-color imaging, which were observed simultaneously in the cells with high spatial resolution. This technique could be applied generally for multi-color immunostaining to reveal various cell functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Excited-state molecular photoionization dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratt, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    This review presents a survey of work using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and double-resonance techniques to study excited-state photoionization dynamics in molecules. These techniques routinely provide detail and precision that are difficult to achieve in single-photon ionization from the ground state. The review not only emphasizes new aspects of photoionization revealed in the excited-state experiments but also shows how the excited-state techniques can provide textbook illustrations of some fundamental mechanisms in molecular photoionization dynamics. Most of the examples are confined to diatomic molecules. (author)

  8. Microwave ionization and excitation of Ba Rydberg atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichmann, U.; Dexter, J.L.; Xu, E.Y.; Gallagher, T.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have investigated ionization and excitation of the Ba 6sn s 1 S 0 and 6snd 1,3 D 2 series in strong microwave fields. The observed microwave ionization threshold fields, scaling as 0.28 n -5 , and the state mixing fields cannot be completely explained in terms of a single cycle Landau-Zener model. However, by taking into account multiphoton resonant transitions driven by many cycles of the microwave field we have been able to interpret the data. In particular multi-photon transitions have been found to be responsible for apparent resonance structures and for the unexpectedly low mixing fields. Not surprisingly, doubly excited valence states introduce irregularities into both the microwave ionization and the state mixing field values. (orig.)

  9. Multi-photon excitation microscopy for advanced biomedical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadella, B.M.; Haeften, T.W. van; Bavel, Kees van; Valentijn, Jack A.

    Fluorescence microscopy (FM) is a technique traditionally used for determining biological structures [33]; its basic concept is summarised in Figure 1a. The biological specimen under examination is labelled with one or more fluorescent probes before being placed in the microscope. A single photon

  10. Exact results for emission from one and two atoms in an ideal cavity at multiphoton resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fam Le Kien; Shumovskij, A.S.; Tran Quang.

    1987-01-01

    The emission from the system of one or two two-level atoms in an ideal cavity with one mode at mutiphoton resonance is examined. Exact results for the two-time dipole correlation function and the time-dependent spectra of multiphoton-induced fluorescence are presented

  11. Optical chromatography using a photonic crystal fiber with on-chip fluorescence excitation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ashok, AC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the realization of integrated optical chromatography, in conjunction with on-chip fluorescence excitation, in a monolithically fabricated poly-dimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip. The unique endlessly-single-mode guiding...

  12. Fluorescence spectra of Rhodamine 6G for high fluence excitation laser radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, J; Olaizola, A M

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence spectral changes of Rhodamine 6G in ethanol and glycerol solutions and deposited as a film on a silica surface have been studied using a wide range of pumping field fluence at 532 nm at room temperature. Blue shift of the fluorescence spectra and fluorescence quenching of the dye molecule in solution are observed at high excitation fluence values. Such effects are not reported for the film sample. The effects are interpreted as the result of population redistribution in the solute-solvent molecular system induced by the high fluence field and the fluence dependence of the radiationless decay mechanism.

  13. Real-time visualization of melanin granules in normal human skin using combined multiphoton and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdzadeh, Ali; Lee, Anthony M D; Wang, Hequn; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I; Crawford, Richard I; Zloty, David; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in biomedical optics have enabled dermal and epidermal components to be visualized at subcellular resolution and assessed noninvasively. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) are noninvasive imaging modalities that have demonstrated promising results in imaging skin micromorphology, and which provide complementary information regarding skin components. This study assesses whether combined MPM/RCM can visualize intracellular and extracellular melanin granules in the epidermis and dermis of normal human skin. We perform MPM and RCM imaging of in vivo and ex vivo skin in the infrared domain. The inherent three-dimensional optical sectioning capability of MPM/RCM is used to image high-contrast granular features across skin depths ranging from 50 to 90 μm. The optical images thus obtained were correlated with conventional histologic examination including melanin-specific staining of ex vivo specimens. MPM revealed highly fluorescent granular structures below the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) region. Histochemical staining also demonstrated melanin-containing granules that correlate well in size and location with the granular fluorescent structures observed in MPM. Furthermore, the MPM fluorescence excitation wavelength and RCM reflectance of cell culture-derived melanin were equivalent to those of the granules. This study suggests that MPM can noninvasively visualize and quantify subepidermal melanin in situ. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Multiphoton quantum optics and quantum state engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2006-01-01

    We present a review of theoretical and experimental aspects of multiphoton quantum optics. Multiphoton processes occur and are important for many aspects of matter-radiation interactions that include the efficient ionization of atoms and molecules, and, more generally, atomic transition mechanisms; system-environment couplings and dissipative quantum dynamics; laser physics, optical parametric processes, and interferometry. A single review cannot account for all aspects of such an enormously vast subject. Here we choose to concentrate our attention on parametric processes in nonlinear media, with special emphasis on the engineering of nonclassical states of photons and atoms that are relevant for the conceptual investigations as well as for the practical applications of forefront aspects of modern quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of the methods and techniques for the production of genuinely quantum multiphoton processes in nonlinear media, and the corresponding models of multiphoton effective interactions. We review existing proposals for the classification, engineering, and manipulation of nonclassical states, including Fock states, macroscopic superposition states, and multiphoton generalized coherent states. We introduce and discuss the structure of canonical multiphoton quantum optics and the associated one- and two-mode canonical multiphoton squeezed states. This framework provides a consistent multiphoton generalization of two-photon quantum optics and a consistent Hamiltonian description of multiphoton processes associated to higher-order nonlinearities. Finally, we discuss very recent advances that by combining linear and nonlinear optical devices allow to realize multiphoton entangled states of the electromagnetic field, either in discrete or in continuous variables, that are relevant for applications to efficient quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and related problems in quantum communication and information

  15. Multiphoton quantum optics and quantum state engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Anno, Fabio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (Saudi Arabia) (Italy)]. E-mail: dellanno@sa.infn.it; De Siena, Silvio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy)]. E-mail: desiena@sa.infn.it; Illuminati, Fabrizio [Dipartimento di Fisica ' E. R. Caianiello' , Universita degli Studi di Salerno, CNISM and CNR-INFM Coherentia, and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Via S. Allende, I-84081 Baronissi (SA) (Italy)]. E-mail: illuminati@sa.infn.it

    2006-05-15

    We present a review of theoretical and experimental aspects of multiphoton quantum optics. Multiphoton processes occur and are important for many aspects of matter-radiation interactions that include the efficient ionization of atoms and molecules, and, more generally, atomic transition mechanisms; system-environment couplings and dissipative quantum dynamics; laser physics, optical parametric processes, and interferometry. A single review cannot account for all aspects of such an enormously vast subject. Here we choose to concentrate our attention on parametric processes in nonlinear media, with special emphasis on the engineering of nonclassical states of photons and atoms that are relevant for the conceptual investigations as well as for the practical applications of forefront aspects of modern quantum mechanics. We present a detailed analysis of the methods and techniques for the production of genuinely quantum multiphoton processes in nonlinear media, and the corresponding models of multiphoton effective interactions. We review existing proposals for the classification, engineering, and manipulation of nonclassical states, including Fock states, macroscopic superposition states, and multiphoton generalized coherent states. We introduce and discuss the structure of canonical multiphoton quantum optics and the associated one- and two-mode canonical multiphoton squeezed states. This framework provides a consistent multiphoton generalization of two-photon quantum optics and a consistent Hamiltonian description of multiphoton processes associated to higher-order nonlinearities. Finally, we discuss very recent advances that by combining linear and nonlinear optical devices allow to realize multiphoton entangled states of the electromagnetic field, either in discrete or in continuous variables, that are relevant for applications to efficient quantum computation, quantum teleportation, and related problems in quantum communication and information.

  16. Excited state fluorescence quenching of the U O2++ ion by monovalent anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santarine, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The reactions of the Uranyl ion U O 2 ++ in the excited state with the monovalent inorganic ions N O 3 - and I O 3 - in aqueous solutions at normal temperature were studied, using three techniques: Fluorescence in the steady state - Flash photolysis - Fluorescence decay after excitation. With increasing concentration of these ions it was observed a decrease in the normalized intensity and a decrease in the decay time of the fluorescence of the Uranyl ion in the solution and a corresponding appearance of the radicals N O 3 . or I O 3 . . In each case the radical was identified by its optical absorption spectrum. These results suggest that the quenching of fluorescence of the Uranyl ion in each case is owing to an electron transfer reaction. In the case of the Nitrate ion the transfer may occur after the formation of an ionic par (U O 2 + ...N O 3 ) in the ground state. Evidence for static quenching in the system Uranyl iodate was not forthcoming. A mechanism for the determination of the velocity constant (probability per ion pair per unit time) is proposed for each of the systems. (author)

  17. Studies of the fluorescent excited state of impurities in ionic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romestain, Robert

    1972-01-01

    The author of this research thesis first presents experimental methods used in this research: principles (recall on the optical spectrum of an impurity in a solid, use of fluorescence polarization) and techniques (sample preparation, liquid helium cryostat, application of a disturbance, optical detection). Then, he reports the study of the Mn ++ ion in a tetrahedron crystalline field, the study of the Jahn Teller effect on the excited state of the F + centre in CaO, and the study by double resonance of a specific excited state of this same centre in CaO

  18. Polymer filters for ultraviolet-excited integrated fluorescence sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandin, Marc; Abshire, Pamela; Smela, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Optical filters for blocking ultraviolet (UV) light were fabricated by doping various polymer hosts with a UV absorbing chromophore. The polymers were polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), a silicone elastomer frequently used in microfluidics, SU-8, a photopatternable epoxy, and Humiseal 1B66, an acrylic coating used for moisture protection of integrated circuits. The chromophore was 2-(2′-hydroxy-5′-methylphenyl) benzotriazole (BTA), which has a high extinction coefficient between 300 nm and 400 nm. We demonstrate filters 5 µm thick that exhibit high ultraviolet rejection (nearly −40 dB at 342 nm) yet pass visible light (near 0 dB above 400 nm), making them ideal for ultraviolet-excited fluorescence sensing within microsystems. The absorbance of the BTA depended on the host polymer. These filters are promising for integrated fluorescence spectroscopy in bioanalytical platforms because they can be patterned by dry etching, molding or exposure to ultraviolet light. (paper)

  19. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene, E-mail: i.mueller-harvey@reading.ac.uk [Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory, Food Production and Quality Research Division, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, P O Box 236, Reading RG6 6AT (United Kingdom); Feucht, Walter, E-mail: walter.feucht@gmail.com [Department of Plant Sciences, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Polster, Juergen, E-mail: j.polster@wzw.tum.de [Department of Physical Biochemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Trnkova, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.trnkova@uhk.cz [University of Hradec Kralove, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Rokitanskeho 62, 50003 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Burgos, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burgos@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Anthony W., E-mail: tony.parker@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Botchway, Stanley W., E-mail: stan.botchway@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique for flavanols overcomes autofluorescence interference in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant flavanols differed in their lifetimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolved and bound flavanols revealed contrasting lifetime changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique will allow studying of flavanol trafficking in live cells. - Abstract: Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were {approx}1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime ({tau}{sub 2} = 1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there

  20. Visible-to-visible four-photon ultrahigh resolution microscopic imaging with 730-nm diode laser excited nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoju; Zhan, Qiuqiang; Zhao, Yuxiang; Wu, Ruitao; Liu, Jing; He, Sailing

    2016-01-25

    Further development of multiphoton microscopic imaging is confronted with a number of limitations, including high-cost, high complexity and relatively low spatial resolution due to the long excitation wavelength. To overcome these problems, for the first time, we propose visible-to-visible four-photon ultrahigh resolution microscopic imaging by using a common cost-effective 730-nm laser diode to excite the prepared Nd(3+)-sensitized upconversion nanoparticles (Nd(3+)-UCNPs). An ordinary multiphoton scanning microscope system was built using a visible CW diode laser and the lateral imaging resolution as high as 161-nm was achieved via the four-photon upconversion process. The demonstrated large saturation excitation power for Nd(3+)-UCNPs would be more practical and facilitate the four-photon imaging in the application. A sample with fine structure was imaged to demonstrate the advantages of visible-to-visible four-photon ultrahigh resolution microscopic imaging with 730-nm diode laser excited nanocrystals. Combining the uniqueness of UCNPs, the proposed visible-to-visible four-photon imaging would be highly promising and attractive in the field of multiphoton imaging.

  1. Dynamic multiphoton imaging of acellular dermal matrix scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Jing; Shi, Panpan; Deng, Xiaoyuan; Jin, Ying; Liu, Hao; Chen, Maosheng; Han, Xue; Liu, Hanping

    2018-03-25

    Significantly effective therapies need to be developed for chronic nonhealing diabetic wounds. In this work, the topical transplantation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded on an acellular dermal matrix (ADM) scaffold is proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for diabetic cutaneous wound healing. GFP-labeled MSCs were cocultured with an ADM scaffold that was decellularized from normal mouse skin. These cultures were subsequently transplanted as a whole into the full-thickness cutaneous wound site in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice. Wounds treated with MSC-ADM demonstrated an increased percentage of wound closure. The treatment of MSC-ADM also greatly increased angiogenesis and rapidly completed the reepithelialization of newly formed skin on diabetic mice. More importantly, multiphoton microscopy was used for the intravital and dynamic monitoring of collagen type I (Col-I) fibers synthesis via second harmonic generation imaging. The synthesis of Col-I fibers during diabetic wound healing is of great significance for revealing wound repair mechanisms. In addition, the activity of GFP-labeled MSCs during wound healing was simultaneously traced via two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging. Our research offers a novel advanced nonlinear optical imaging method for monitoring the diabetic wound healing process while the ADM and MSCs interact in situ. Schematic of dynamic imaging of ADM scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal stem cells in diabetic wound healing using multiphoton microscopy. PMT, photo-multiplier tube. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Design and synthesis of hyperstructured molecules based on cyclophosphazene core for multiphoton absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naik, K. Praveen Kumar; Sreeramulu, V.; Ramya, E.; Muralidharan, K.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphazene based hyperstructured molecules were synthesized through simple nucleophilic substitution reactions. All these molecules were characterized by multinuclear NMR, MALDI and HRMS spectral data. Third order nonlinear optical properties of the hyperstructured molecules were measured using Z-scan technique with 532 nm, picosecond (ps) laser and 800 nm, femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. The molecules showed reverse saturable absorption on excitation at both 532 nm and 800 nm, which could be attributed to the two-photon absorption (2 PA) and three-photon absorption (3 PA), respectively. The 2 PA and 3 PA cross section values exhibited by the molecules based on cyclophosphazene are as high as 527 GM and 1.86 × 10"−"7"6 cm"−"6 s"2 photon"−"1, respectively. The 2PA, 3PA coefficients and optical limiting properties make them suitable candidates for nonlinear optical devices in the visible and near IR range. - Graphical abstract: The hyperstructured molecules based on cyclophosphazene core were synthesized and used for multiphoton absorption. Open aperture Z-scan curves of hyper structured molecules at the excitation of (a) picosecond laser and (b) femtosecond laser representing multiphoton absorption properties are reported. - Highlights: • Two hyperstructured molecules based on cyclophosphazene core are designed for multiphoton absorption. • NLO properties are measured using Z-scan technique at 532 nm and 800 nm wavelengths. • The molecules were tested for the optical limiting applications at 532 nm and 800 nm laser pulses.

  3. Design and synthesis of hyperstructured molecules based on cyclophosphazene core for multiphoton absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, K. Praveen Kumar [School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 India (India); Sreeramulu, V. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 India (India); CNR-IFN CSMFO Laboratory, Via alla Cascata, 56/C Povo, Trento (Italy); Ramya, E. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 India (India); Muralidharan, K., E-mail: murali@uohyd.ac.in [School of Chemistry, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 India (India); Rao, D. Narayana [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 India (India)

    2016-09-01

    Cyclophosphazene based hyperstructured molecules were synthesized through simple nucleophilic substitution reactions. All these molecules were characterized by multinuclear NMR, MALDI and HRMS spectral data. Third order nonlinear optical properties of the hyperstructured molecules were measured using Z-scan technique with 532 nm, picosecond (ps) laser and 800 nm, femtosecond (fs) laser pulses. The molecules showed reverse saturable absorption on excitation at both 532 nm and 800 nm, which could be attributed to the two-photon absorption (2 PA) and three-photon absorption (3 PA), respectively. The 2 PA and 3 PA cross section values exhibited by the molecules based on cyclophosphazene are as high as 527 GM and 1.86 × 10{sup −76} cm{sup −6} s{sup 2} photon{sup −1}, respectively. The 2PA, 3PA coefficients and optical limiting properties make them suitable candidates for nonlinear optical devices in the visible and near IR range. - Graphical abstract: The hyperstructured molecules based on cyclophosphazene core were synthesized and used for multiphoton absorption. Open aperture Z-scan curves of hyper structured molecules at the excitation of (a) picosecond laser and (b) femtosecond laser representing multiphoton absorption properties are reported. - Highlights: • Two hyperstructured molecules based on cyclophosphazene core are designed for multiphoton absorption. • NLO properties are measured using Z-scan technique at 532 nm and 800 nm wavelengths. • The molecules were tested for the optical limiting applications at 532 nm and 800 nm laser pulses.

  4. Sub-threshold excited Cl Kβ (K-V) x-ray fluorescence from CF3Cl molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    With the availability of tunable synchrotron radiation sources, unoccupied molecular orbits (below vacuum level) can be selectively populated producing highly excited neutral molecules. X-ray fluorescence spectra from molecules were obtained with excitation below the ionization threshold and were observed to have significant intensity changes, absolute and relative energy position shifts and line width changes as compared to fluorescence spectra excited above the threshold. As an example, the Cl Kβ (K-V) emission spectra from CF 3 Cl vapor are presented. The energy shifts and intensity changes are explained in terms of perturbation effects due to the presence of an electron in an unoccupied molecular orbital. The narrow line widths obtained in the spectra excited below threshold are explained in terms of the ''effective'' hole production region in a core state limited by the broadening of the unoccupied level. The change in line widths as a function of below-threshold excitation energy is proposed as a novel technique to study the localized properties and reorganization effects of a hole in a core level. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Influence of different environments on the excited-state proton transfer and dual fluorescence of fisetin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guharay, Jayanti; Dennison, S. Moses; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    1999-05-01

    The influence of different protic and aprotic solvent environments on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leading to a dual fluorescence behaviour of a biologically important, naturally occurring, polyhydroxyflavone, fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), has been investigated. The normal fluorescence band, in particular, is extremely sensitive to solvent polarity with νmax shifting from 24 510 cm -1 in dioxane ( ET(30)=36.0) to 20 790 cm -1 in methanol ( ET(30)=55.5). This is rationalized in terms of solvent dipolar relaxation process, which also accounts for the red edge excitation shifts (REES) observed in viscous environments such as glycerol at low temperatures. Significant solvent dependence of the tautomer fluorescence properties ( νmax, yield and decay kinetics) reveals the influence of external hydrogen bonding perturbation on the internal hydrogen bond of the molecule. These excited-state relaxation phenomena and their relevant parameters have been used to probe the microenvironment of fisetin in a membrane mimetic system, namely AOT reverse micelles in n-heptane at different water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0).

  6. Advanced multiphoton methods for in vitro and in vivo functional imaging of mouse retinal neurons (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noam; Schejter, Adi; Farah, Nairouz; Shoham, Shy

    2016-03-01

    Studying the responses of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) populations has major significance in vision research. Multiphoton imaging of optogenetic probes has recently become the leading approach for visualizing neural populations and has specific advantages for imaging retinal activity during visual stimulation, because it leads to reduced direct photoreceptor excitation. However, multiphoton retinal activity imaging is not straightforward: point-by-point scanning leads to repeated neural excitation while optical access through the rodent eye in vivo has proven highly challenging. Here, we present two enabling optical designs for multiphoton imaging of responses to visual stimuli in mouse retinas expressing calcium indicators. First, we present an imaging solution based on Scanning Line Temporal Focusing (SLITE) for rapidly imaging neuronal activity in vitro. In this design, we scan a temporally focused line rather than a point, increasing the scan speed and reducing the impact of repeated excitation, while maintaining high optical sectioning. Second, we present the first in vivo demonstration of two-photon imaging of RGC activity in the mouse retina. To obtain these cellular resolution recordings we integrated an illumination path into a correction-free imaging system designed using an optical model of the mouse eye. This system can image at multiple depths using an electronically tunable lens integrated into its optical path. The new optical designs presented here overcome a number of outstanding obstacles, allowing the study of rapid calcium- and potentially even voltage-indicator signals both in vitro and in vivo, thereby bringing us a step closer toward distributed monitoring of action potentials.

  7. Microwave multiphoton excitation of helium Rydberg atoms: The analogy with atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van de Water, W.; van Leeuwen, K.A.H.; Yoakum, S.; Galvez, E.J.; Moorman, L.; Bergeman, T.; Sauer, B.E.; Koch, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    We study multiphoton transitions in helium Rydberg atoms subjected to a microwave electric field of fixed frequency but varying intensity. For each principal quantum number in the range n=25--32, the n 3 S to n 3 (L>2), n=25--32, transition probability exhibits very sharp structures as a function of the field amplitude. Their positions could be reproduced precisely using a Floquet Hamiltonian for the interaction between atom and field. Their shapes are determined by the transients of field turn-on and turn-off in a way that makes a close analogy with the theory of slow atomic collisions

  8. A phasor approach analysis of multiphoton FLIM measurements of three-dimensional cell culture models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakner, P. H.; Möller, Y.; Olayioye, M. A.; Brucker, S. Y.; Schenke-Layland, K.; Monaghan, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a useful approach to obtain information regarding the endogenous fluorophores present in biological samples. The concise evaluation of FLIM data requires the use of robust mathematical algorithms. In this study, we developed a user-friendly phasor approach for analyzing FLIM data and applied this method on three-dimensional (3D) Caco-2 models of polarized epithelial luminal cysts in a supporting extracellular matrix environment. These Caco-2 based models were treated with epidermal growth factor (EGF), to stimulate proliferation in order to determine if FLIM could detect such a change in cell behavior. Autofluorescence from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) in luminal Caco-2 cysts was stimulated by 2-photon laser excitation. Using a phasor approach, the lifetimes of involved fluorophores and their contribution were calculated with fewer initial assumptions when compared to multiexponential decay fitting. The phasor approach simplified FLIM data analysis, making it an interesting tool for non-experts in numerical data analysis. We observed that an increased proliferation stimulated by EGF led to a significant shift in fluorescence lifetime and a significant alteration of the phasor data shape. Our data demonstrates that multiphoton FLIM analysis with the phasor approach is a suitable method for the non-invasive analysis of 3D in vitro cell culture models qualifying this method for monitoring basic cellular features and the effect of external factors.

  9. Luminescence from ZnSe excited by picosecond mid-infrared FEL pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsuyu, T.; Suzuki, T.; Tomimasu, T.

    1998-01-01

    We have observed blue band-edge emission from a ZnSe crystal under irradiation of mid-infrared picosecond free electron laser (FEL) pulses. The emission characteristics including spectrum, excitation power dependence, excitation wavelength dependence, and decay time have been investigated. The experimental results have indicated that it is difficult to understand the excitation process by multiphoton excitation, thermal excitation, or excitation through mid-gap levels. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  10. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection pour un rendement de detection maximal

  11. Ultratrace determination of lead in whole blood using electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E P; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1996-09-15

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence has been used to detect lead that was electrothermally atomized from whole blood in a graphite furnace. A 9 kHz repetition rate copper vapor laser pumped dye laser was used to excite the lead at 283.3 nm, and the resulting atomic fluorescence was detected at 405.8 nm. No matrix modification was used other than a 1:21 dilution of the whole blood with high-purity water. Using the atomic fluorescence peak area as the analytical measure and a background correction technique based upon a simultaneous measurement of the transmitted laser intensity, excellent agreement for NIST and CDC certified whole blood reference samples was obtained with aqueous standards. A limit of detection in blood of 10 fg/mL (100 ag absolute) was achieved.

  12. Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shih, Yanhua

    1999-01-01

    The project 'Multi-Photon Entanglement and Quantum Teleportation' concerns a series of experimental and theoretical investigations on multi-photon entangled states and the applications, for example...

  13. Fluorescence excited in a thunderstorm atmosphere by relativistic runaway electron avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum and spatiotemporal evolution of the fluorescence of an atmospheric discharge developing in the regime of relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) generation have been calculated without involving the relativistic feedback. The discharges generating narrow bipolar pulses, along with the discharges responsible for terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, are shown to be relatively dark. Nevertheless, the fluorescence excited by a discharge involving RREAs can be recorded with cameras used to record high-altitude optical phenomena. A possible connection between a certain class of optical phenomena observed at the tops of thunderclouds and RREA emission is pointed out.

  14. Characterizing germania concentration and structure in fiber soot using multiphoton microscopy and spectroscopy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Ming-Jun; Liu, Anping

    2015-02-01

    Germania doping is commonly used in the core of optical fiber due to its advantages compared to other materials such as superior transparency in near-infrared telecommunication wavelength region. During fiber preform manufacturing using the outside vapor deposition (OVD) process, Ge is doped into a silica soot preform by chemical vapor deposition. Since the Ge doping concentration profile is directly correlated with the fiber refractive index profile, its characterization is critical for the fiber industry. Electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) is a conventional analysis method for characterizing the Ge concentration profile. However, it requires extensive sample preparation and lengthy measurement. In this paper, a multiphoton microscopy technique is utilized to measure the Ge doping profile based on the multiphoton fluorescence intensity of the soot layers. Two samples, one with ramped and another with stepped Ge doping profiles were prepared for measurements. Measured results show that the technique is capable of distinguishing ramped and stepped Ge doping profiles with good accuracy. In the ramped soot sample, a sharp increment of doping level was observed in about 2 mm range from soot edge followed by a relative slow gradient doping accretion. As for the stepped doping sample, step sizes ranging from around 1 mm (at soot edge) to 3 mm (at soot center) were observed. All the measured profiles are in close agreement with that of the EPMA measurements. In addition, both multiphoton fluorescence (around 420 nm) and sharp second harmonic generations (at 532 nm) were observed, which indicates the co-existence of crystal and amorphous GeO2.

  15. Nanostructures based on quantum dots for application in promising methods of single- and multiphoton imaging and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabiev, I. R.

    2017-01-01

    Molecules recognizing biomarkers of diseases (monoclonal antibodies (monoABs)) are often too large for biomedical applications, and the conditions that are used to bind them with nanolabels lead to disordered orientation of monoABs with respect to the nanoparticle surface. Extremely small nanoprobes, designed via oriented conjugation of quantum dots (QDs) with single-domain antibodies (sdABs) derived from the immunoglobulin of llama and produced in the E. coli culture, have a hydrodynamic diameter less than 12 nm and contain equally oriented sdAB molecules on the surface of each QD. These nanoprobes exhibit excellent specificity and sensitivity in quantitative determination of a small number of cells expressing biomarkers. In addition, the higher diffusion coefficient of sdABs makes it possible to perform immunohistochemical analysis in bulk tissue, inaccessible for conventional monoABs. The necessary conditions for implementing high-quality immunofluorescence diagnostics are a high specificity of labeling and clear differences between the fluorescence of nanoprobes and the autofluorescence of tissues. Multiphoton micros-copy with excitation in the near-IR spectral range, which is remote from the range of tissue autofluorescence excitation, makes it possible to solve this problem and image deep layers in biological tissues. The two-photon absorption cross sections of CdSe/ZnS QDs conjugated with sdABs exceed the corresponding values for organic fluorophores by several orders of magnitude. These nanoprobes provide clear discrimination between the regions of tumor and normal tissues with a ratio of the sdAB fluorescence to the tissue autofluorescence upon two-photon excitation exceeding that in the case of single-photon excitation by a factor of more than 40. The data obtained indicate that the sdAB-QD conjugates used as labels provide the same, or even better, quality as the "gold standard" of immunohistochemical diagnostics. The developed nanoprobes are expected to

  16. A multiphoton objective design with incorporated beam splitter for enhanced fluorescence collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Jesse D; Zipfel, Warren R

    2010-03-15

    We present a de novo design of an objective for use in multi-photon (MPM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. This objective was designed to have a large field of view (FOV), while maintaining a moderate numerical aperture (NA) and relative straight forward construction. A dichroic beam splitter was incorporated within the objective itself allowing for an increase in the front aperture of the objective and corresponding enhancement of the solid angle of collected emission by an order of magnitude over existing designs.

  17. A Compact Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation-Emission Spectrometer (FLEXEMS) for Detecting Trace Organics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) proposes to design and build the Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation...

  18. A Compact Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation-Emission Spectrometer (FLEXEMS) for Detecting Trace Organics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) effort, Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) proposes to design and build the Fluorescence Lifetime Excitation...

  19. Multiphoton ionization of atomic cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, R.N.; Klots, C.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.; Cooper, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of resonantly enhanced multi-photon ionization (MPI) of cesium atoms in the presence and absence of an external electric field. In the zero-field studies, photo-electron angular distributions for one- and two-photon resonantly enhanced MPI are compared with the theory of Tang and Lambropoulos. Deviations of experiment from theory are attributed to hyperfine coupling effects in the resonant intermediate state. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. In the absence of an external electric field, signal due to two-photon resonant three-photon ionization of cesium via np states is undetectable. Application of an electric field mixes nearby nd and ns levels, thereby inducing excitation and subsequent ionization. Signal due to two-photon excitation of ns levels in field-free experiments is weak due to their small photoionization cross section. An electric field mixes nearby np levels which again allows detectable photo-ionization signal. For both ns and np states the ''field induced'' MPI signal increases as the square of the electric field for a given principal quantum number and increases rapidly with n for a given field strength

  20. Label-free detection of breast masses using multiphoton microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiufeng Wu

    Full Text Available Histopathology forms the gold standard for the diagnosis of breast cancer. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM has been proposed to be a potentially powerful adjunct to current histopathological techniques. A label-free imaging based on two- photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation is developed for differentiating normal breast tissues, benign, as well as breast cancer tissues. Human breast biopsies (including human normal breast tissues, benign as well as breast cancer tissues that are first imaged (fresh, unfixed, and unstained with MPM and are then processed for routine H-E histopathology. Our results suggest that the MPM images, obtained from these unprocessed biopsies, can readily distinguish between benign lesions and breast cancers. In the tissues of breast cancers, MPM showed that the tumor cells displayed marked cellular and nuclear pleomorphism. The tumor cells, characterized by irregular size and shape, enlarged nuclei, and increased nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio, infiltrated into disrupted connective tissue, leading to the loss of second-harmonic generation signals. For breast cancer, MPM diagnosis was 100% correct because the tissues of breast cancers did not have second-harmonic generation signals in MPM imaging. On the contrary, in benign breast masses, second-harmonic generation signals could be seen easily in MPM imaging. These observations indicate that MPM could be an important potential tool to provide label-free noninvasive diagnostic impressions that can guide surgeon in biopsy and patient management.

  1. Contribution to the analysis of light elements using x fluorescence excited by radio-elements; Contribution a l'analyse des elements legers par fluorescence x excitee au moyen de radioelements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In order to study the possibilities of using radioactive sources for the X-fluorescence analysis of light elements, the principle is given, after a brief description of X-fluorescence, of the excitation of this phenomenon by X, {beta} and {alpha} emission from radio-elements. The operation and use of the proportional gas counter for X-ray detection is described. A device has been studied for analysing the elements of the 2. and 3. periods of the Mendeleev table. It makes it possible to excite the fluorescence with a radioactive source emitting X-rays or a particles; the X-ray fluorescence penetrates into a window-less proportional counter, this being made possible by the use of an auxiliary electric field in the neighbourhood of the sample. The gas detection pressure leading to the maximum detection yield is given. The spectra are given for the K{sub {alpha}} lines of 3. period elements excited by {sup 55}Fe, {sup 3}H/Zr and {sup 210}Po sources; for the 2. period the K{sub {alpha}} spectra of carbon and of fluorine excited by the {alpha} particles of {sup 210}Po. (author) [French] Afin d'etudier les possibilites d'emploi de sources radioactives a l'analyse par fluorescence X des elements legers, on presente apres rappel de notions generales sur la fluorescence X, le principe de l'excitation de ce phenomene par emission X, {beta}, {alpha} de radioelements. Le fonctionnement et l'utilisation du compteur proportionnel a gaz a la detection du rayonnement X est developpe. Un dispositif permettant l'analyse des elements des 2eme et 3eme periodes de la classification de Mendeleev est etudie. Il permet l'excitation de la fluorescence par source radioactive emettrice de rayons X ou de particules {alpha}; le rayonnement X de fluorescence penetre dans un compteur proportionnel depourvu de fenetre, ceci est rendu possible en creant un champ electrique auxiliaire au voisinage de l'echantillon. On definit une pression du gaz de detection

  2. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  3. Some secrets of fluorescent proteins: distinct bleaching in various mounting fluids and photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at YFP-excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkani, Naila; Schmid, Johannes A

    2011-04-07

    The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively) is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique--the increase in donor (CFP)-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP), we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10-15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength--a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins under these conditions.

  4. Effects of multi-photon interferences from internally generated fields in strongly resonant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Lu; Payne, Marvin G.; Garrett, William R.

    2006-01-01

    In studies of various nonlinear optical phenomena, strong resonant features in the atomic or molecular response to multi-photon driven processes have been used to greatly enhance the visibility of otherwise weak higher-order processes. However, there are well defined circumstances where a multi-photon-resonant response of a target system leads to the generation of one or more new electromagnetic fields that can drastically change the overall system response from what would be expected from the imposed laser fields alone. New effects can occur and dominate some aspects of the nonlinear optical response because of the constructive or destructive interference between transition amplitudes along multiple excitation pathways between a given set of optically coupled states, where one of the pathways involve internally generated field(s). Under destructive interference some resonant enhancements can become completely canceled (suppressed). This review focuses on the class of optical interference effects associated with internally generated fields, that have been found to be capable of influencing a very significant number of basic physical phenomena in gas or vapor phase systems. It provides a historical overview of experimental and theoretical developments and a modern understanding of the underlying physics and its various manifestations that include: suppression of multi-photon excitation processes, suppression of stimulated emissions (Raman, hyper-Raman, and optically pumped stimulated emissions), saturation of parametric wave-mixing, pressure and beam-geometry dependent shifting of multi-photon-resonant absorption lines, and the suppression of Autler-Townes splitting and ac-stark shifts. Additionally, optical interference effects in some modern contexts, such as achieving multi-photon induced transparency, establishing single-photon self-interference based induced transparency, and generating entangled single photon states, are reviewed

  5. Photo-induced processes in collagen-hypericin system revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy and multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovhannisyan, V; Guo, H W; Hovhannisyan, A; Ghukasyan, V; Buryakina, T; Chen, Y F; Dong, C Y

    2014-05-01

    Collagen is the main structural protein and the key determinant of mechanical and functional properties of tissues and organs. Proper balance between synthesis and degradation of collagen molecules is critical for maintaining normal physiological functions. In addition, collagen influences tumor development and drug delivery, which makes it a potential cancer therapy target. Using second harmonic generation, two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we show that the natural pigment hypericin induces photosensitized destruction of collagen-based tissues. We demonstrate that hypericin-mediated processes in collagen fibers are irreversible and may be used for the treatment of cancer and collagen-related disorders.

  6. Fluorescence detection of glutathione and oxidized glutathione in blood with a NIR-excitable cyanine probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-hui; Qi, Feng-pei; Wen, Fu-bin; Long, Li-ping; Liu, Ai-juan; Yang, Rong-hua

    2018-04-01

    Cyanine has been widely utilized as a near infrared (NIR) fluorophore for detection of glutathione (GSH). However, the excitation of most of the reported cyanine-based probes was less than 800 nm, which inevitably induce biological background absorption and lower the sensitivity, limiting their use for detection of GSH in blood samples. To address this issue, here, a heptamethine cyanine probe (DNIR), with a NIR excitation wavelength at 804 nm and a NIR emission wavelength at 832 nm, is employed for the detection of GSH and its oxidized form (GSSG) in blood. The probe displays excellent selectivity for GSH over GSSG and other amino acids, and rapid response to GSH, in particular a good property for indirect detection of GSSG in the presence of enzyme glutathione reductase and the reducing agent nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide phosphate, without further separation prior to fluorescent measurement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore NIR fluorescent approach for the simultaneous assay of GSH and GSSG in blood. As such, we expect that our fluorescence sensors with both NIR excitation and NIR emission make this strategy suitable for the application in complex physiological systems.

  7. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichard, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when ℎω > I p : it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with ℎω p : new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  8. Electron detachment dissociation of fluorescently labeled sialylated oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2011-12-01

    We explored the application of electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) tandem mass spectrometry to fluorescently labeled sialylated oligosaccharides. Standard sialylated oligosaccharides and a sialylated N-linked glycan released from human transferrin were investigated. EDD yielded extensive glycosidic cleavages and cross-ring cleavages in all cases studied, consistently providing complementary structural information compared with infrared multiphoton dissociation. Neutral losses and satellite ions such as C-2H ions were also observed following EDD. In addition, we examined the influence of different fluorescent labels. The acidic label 2-aminobenzoic acid (2-AA) enhanced signal abundance in negative-ion mode. However, few cross-ring fragments were observed for 2-AA-labeled oligosaccharides. The neutral label 2-aminobenzamide (2-AB) resulted in more cross-ring cleavages compared with 2-AA-labeled species, but not as extensive fragmentation as for native oligosaccharides, likely resulting from altered negative charge locations from introduction of the fluorescent tag. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Plastic lab-on-a-chip for fluorescence excitation with integrated organic semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Lemmer, Uli; Mappes, Timo

    2011-04-25

    Laser light excitation of fluorescent markers offers highly sensitive and specific analysis for bio-medical or chemical analysis. To profit from these advantages for applications in the field or at the point-of-care, a plastic lab-on-a-chip with integrated organic semiconductor lasers is presented here. First order distributed feedback lasers based on the organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyril)-4H-pyrane (DCM), deep ultraviolet induced waveguides, and a nanostructured microfluidic channel are integrated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. A simple and parallel fabrication process is used comprising thermal imprint, DUV exposure, evaporation of the laser material, and sealing by thermal bonding. The excitation of two fluorescent marker model systems including labeled antibodies with light emitted by integrated lasers is demonstrated.

  10. Measurement of absorption spectrum of deuterium oxide (D2O) and its application to signal enhancement in multiphoton microscopy at the 1700-nm window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yuxin; Wen, Wenhui; Wang, Kai; Wang, Ke; Zhai, Peng; Qiu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    1700-nm window has been demonstrated to be a promising excitation window for deep-tissue multiphoton microscopy (MPM). Long working-distance water immersion objective lenses are typically used for deep-tissue imaging. However, absorption due to immersion water at 1700 nm is still high and leads to dramatic decrease in signals. In this paper, we demonstrate measurement of absorption spectrum of deuterium oxide (D 2 O) from 1200 nm to 2600 nm, covering the three low water-absorption windows potentially applicable for deep-tissue imaging (1300 nm, 1700 nm, and 2200 nm). We apply this measured result to signal enhancement in MPM at the 1700-nm window. Compared with water immersion, D 2 O immersion enhances signal levels in second-harmonic generation imaging, 3-photon fluorescence imaging, and third-harmonic generation imaging by 8.1, 24.8, and 24.7 times with 1662-nm excitation, in good agreement with theoretical calculation based on our absorption measurement. This suggests D 2 O a promising immersion medium for deep-tissue imaging

  11. Demonstration of the lack of cytotoxicity of unmodified and folic acid modified graphene oxide quantum dots, and their application to fluorescence lifetime imaging of HaCaT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goreham, Renee V; Schroeder, Kathryn L; Holmes, Amy; Bradley, Siobhan J; Nann, Thomas

    2018-01-24

    The authors describe the synthesis of water-soluble and fluorescent graphene oxide quantum dots via acid exfoliation of graphite nanoparticles. The resultant graphene oxide quantum dots (GoQDs) were then modified with folic acid. Folic acid receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells and hence can bind to functionalized graphene oxide quantum dots. On excitation at 305 nm, the GoQDs display green fluorescence with a peak wavelength at ~520 nm. The modified GoQDs are non-toxic to macrophage cells even after prolonged exposure and high concentrations. Fluorescence lifetime imaging and multiphoton microscopy was used (in combination) to image HeCaT cells exposed to GoQDs, resulting in a superior method for bioimaging. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of graphene oxide quantum dots, folic acid modified graphene oxide quantum dots (red), and the use of fluorescence lifetime to discriminate against green auto-fluorescence of HeCaT cells.

  12. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, P.J.W.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Döbele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has

  13. Induction of the 'in vivo' chlorophyll fluorescence excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhidov, Eh.A.; Zakhidov, M.A.; Kasymdzhanov, M.A.; Khabibullaev, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    Inductional changes of fluorescence of the native chlorophyll molecules in plant leaves excited by CW and pulse-periodical laser radiation are studied. The opportunity of controlling of the photosynthesis efficiency through fluorescence response at different rates of the electron flow in charge transfer chain of the photosynthetic apparatus of plant is shown. (author). 13 refs.; 4 refs

  14. System and method for controlling depth of imaging in tissues using fluorescence microscopy under ultraviolet excitation following staining with fluorescing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard; Demos, Stavros

    2018-05-08

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a thin tissue sample and adapted to be supported on a slide. The tissue sample may be placed on a slide and exposed to one or more different exogenous fluorophores excitable in a range of about 300 nm-200 nm, and having a useful emission band from about 350 nm-900 nm, and including one or more fluorescent dyes or fluorescently labeled molecular probes that accumulate in tissue or cellular components. The fluorophores may be excited with a first wavelength of UV light between about 200 nm-290 nm. An optical system collects emissions from the fluorophores at a second wavelength, different from the first wavelength, which are generated in response to the first wavelength of UV light, to produce an image for analysis.

  15. Excitation and ionization of hydrogen and helium atoms by femtosecond laser pulses: theoretical approach by Coulomb-Volkov states; Excitation et ionisation des atomes d'hydrogene et d'helium par des impulsions laser femtosecondes: approche theorique par des etats de Coulomb-Volkov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guichard, R

    2007-12-15

    We present a theoretical approach using Coulomb-Volkov states that appears useful for the study of atomic multi-photonic processes induced by intense XUV femtosecond laser pulses. It predicts hydrogen ionization spectra when it is irradiated by laser pulses in perturbations conditions. Three ways have been investigated. Extension to strong fields when {Dirac_h}{omega} > I{sub p}: it requires to include the hydrogen ground state population, introducing it in standard Coulomb-Volkov amplitude leads to saturated multi-photonic ionization. Extension to multi-photonic transitions with {Dirac_h}{omega} < I{sub p}: new quantum paths are open by the possibility to excite the lower hydrogen bound states. Multiphoton excitation of these states is investigated using a Coulomb-Volkov approach. Extension to helium: two-photon double ionization study shows the influence of electronic correlations in both ground and final state. Huge quantity of information such as angular and energetic distributions as well as total cross sections is available. (author)

  16. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  17. Coherent Control of Multiphoton Transitions in the Gas and Condensed Phases with Shaped Ultrashort Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantus, Marcos

    2008-01-01

    Controlling laser-molecule interactions has become an integral part of developing devices and applications in spectroscopy, microscopy, optical switching, micromachining and photochemistry. Coherent control of multiphoton transitions could bring a significant improvement of these methods. In microscopy, multi-photon transitions are used to activate different contrast agents and suppress background fluorescence; coherent control could generate selective probe excitation. In photochemistry, different dissociative states are accessed through two, three, or more photon transitions; coherent control could be used to select the reaction pathway and therefore the yield-specific products. For micromachining and processing a wide variety of materials, femtosecond lasers are now used routinely. Understanding the interactions between the intense femtosecond pulse and the material could lead to technologically important advances. Pulse shaping could then be used to optimize the desired outcome. The scope of our research program is to develop robust and efficient strategies to control nonlinear laser-matter interactions using ultrashort shaped pulses in gas and condensed phases. Our systematic research has led to significant developments in a number of areas relevant to the AMO Physics group at DOE, among them: generation of ultrashort phase shaped pulses, coherent control and manipulation of quantum mechanical states in gas and condensed phases, behavior of isolated molecules under intense laser fields, behavior of condensed phase matter under intense laser field and implications on micromachining with ultrashort pulses, coherent control of nanoparticles their surface plasmon waves and their nonlinear optical behavior, and observation of coherent Coulomb explosion processes at 10 16 W/cm 2 . In all, the research has resulted in 36 publications (five journal covers) and nine invention disclosures, five of which have continued on to patenting

  18. Fluorescence excitation studies of molecular photoionization in external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Leroi, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Using molecular nitrogen as an example, we show that fluorescence excitation spectroscopy can be used to measure partial photoionization cross sections of free molecules in external electric fields. The production of the N 2 + (B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ) state was studied and the threshold for this process was found to shift linearly with the square root of the applied field. This behavior is compared with the hydrogenic case and with previously studied systems

  19. A microwave-assisted solution combustion synthesis to produce europium-doped calcium phosphate nanowhiskers for bioimaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Darcy E; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Nestor-Kalinoski, Andrea L; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2013-09-01

    Biocompatible nanoparticles possessing fluorescent properties offer attractive possibilities for multifunctional bioimaging and/or drug and gene delivery applications. Many of the limitations with current imaging systems center on the properties of the optical probes in relation to equipment technical capabilities. Here we introduce a novel high aspect ratio and highly crystalline europium-doped calcium phosphate nanowhisker produced using a simple microwave-assisted solution combustion synthesis method for use as a multifunctional bioimaging probe. X-ray diffraction confirmed the material phase as europium-doped hydroxyapatite. Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra and their corresponding peaks were identified using spectrofluorimetry and validated with fluorescence, confocal and multiphoton microscopy. The nanowhiskers were found to exhibit red and far red wavelength fluorescence under ultraviolet excitation with an optimal peak emission of 696 nm achieved with a 350 nm excitation. Relatively narrow emission bands were observed, which may permit their use in multicolor imaging applications. Confocal and multiphoton microscopy confirmed that the nanoparticles provide sufficient intensity to be utilized in imaging applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Determination of rare-earth elements in rocks by isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunzendorf, Helmar; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1970-01-01

    Isotope-excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry furnishes a rapid determination of rare-earth elements in unprepared rock samples. The samples are excited by 241Am γ-rays, generating X-ray spectra on a multichannel pulse-height analyser. Gaussian peaks of the Kα and Kβ X-ray energies are treated......-ray spectrometric scan of a longitudinally sliced drill core showed a close correlation between rare-earth abundances and appropriate minerals....

  1. Spatially Resolved Two-Color Diffusion Measurements in Human Skin Applied to Transdermal Liposome Penetration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bloksgaard, Maria; Kubiak, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    A multiphoton excitation-based fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy method, Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), was used to measure the local diffusion coefficients of distinct model fluorescent substances in excised human skin. In combination with structural information obtained by mu......; doi:10.1038/jid.2012.461....

  2. Infrared multiphoton dissociation of acrolein. Time-resolved observation of CO ( v = 1) IR emission at 4.7 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. K.; Rama Rao, K. V. S.; Mittal, J. P.

    1994-02-01

    In contrast to the photochemistry of electronically excited acrolein producing vinyl and formyl radicals via CC bond rupture, multiphoton vibrationally excited molecules undergo concerted dissociation generating CO and ethylene. Vibrational excitation in the CO product is detected immediately following the CO 2 laser pulse by observing IR emission at 4.7 μm. The decay of the IR emission was studied as a function of acrolein pressure. A vibrational-vibrational relaxation rate constant of CO ( v=1) by acrolein is found to be 1240 ± 200 Torr -1 s -1.

  3. Laser-induced multiphoton transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenholm, S.

    1978-06-01

    Laser induced multiphoton processes are reviewed. The effects of strong fields on atoms are discussed. The perturbation treatment is presented and also its generalization to treat intermediate resonances. The influence of atomic coherence is discussed heuristically and the relation between quantal and classical descriptions of the field is elucidated by reference to the dressed atom description. Atomic ionization experiments are reviewed and the present understanding of multiphoton dissociation of molecules is explained. Finally some prospects for the future are discussed. (author)

  4. Multiphoton states and amplitude k-th power squeezing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzek, V.; Jex, I.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the work of d'Ariano and coworkers a new type of multiphoton states is introduced. Amplitude k-th power squeezing of the multiphoton states are analysed. In particular, it is shown that even if the multiphoton states do not exhibit ordinary squeezing they can be amplitude k-th power squeezed

  5. Test and Control System for Chlorophyll Fluorescence Parameters Using LED as Excitation Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Qiuying

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme on test and control system for chlorophyll fluorescence is presented in this work, which uses light-emitting diode (LED excitation by means of measuring the fluorescence parameter fpsII. The system takes programmable power supply as LEDs illumination drive power with high sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. MINIPAM is used to measure fluorescence parameter fpsII and keeps communication with upper PC by serial port. The upper PC can control the power supply and process the data received from MINIPAM by software which is programmed in VB6. The results show that the system has a lot of advantages such as high accuracy and convenience. The effect of environmental factors on fluorescence parameters is analyzed comprehensively. It will be a practical measurement and control system for photosynthetic ability and have wide application foreground.

  6. Increased fluorescence of PbS quantum dots in photonic crystals by excitation enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Carlo; Roder, Sebastian; Brodoceanu, Daniel; Kraus, Tobias; Hammerschmidt, Martin; Burger, Sven; Becker, Christiane

    2017-07-01

    We report on the enhanced fluorescence of lead sulfide quantum dots interacting with leaky modes of slab-type silicon photonic crystals. The photonic crystal slabs were fabricated, supporting leaky modes in the near infrared wavelength range. Lead sulfite quantum dots which are resonant in the same spectral range were prepared in a thin layer above the slab. We selectively excited the leaky modes by tuning the wavelength and angle of incidence of the laser source and measured distinct resonances of enhanced fluorescence. By an appropriate experiment design, we ruled out directional light extraction effects and determined the impact of enhanced excitation. Three-dimensional numerical simulations consistently explain the experimental findings by strong near-field enhancements in the vicinity of the photonic crystal surface. Our study provides a basis for systematic tailoring of photonic crystals used in biological applications such as biosensing and single molecule detection, as well as quantum dot solar cells and spectral conversion applications.

  7. PScan 1.0: flexible software framework for polygon based multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxiao; Lee, Woei Ming

    2016-12-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopes exhibit highly localized nonlinear optical excitation and are powerful instruments for in-vivo deep tissue imaging. Customized multiphoton microscopy has a significantly superior performance for in-vivo imaging because of precise control over the scanning and detection system. To date, there have been several flexible software platforms catered to custom built microscopy systems i.e. ScanImage, HelioScan, MicroManager, that perform at imaging speeds of 30-100fps. In this paper, we describe a flexible software framework for high speed imaging systems capable of operating from 5 fps to 1600 fps. The software is based on the MATLAB image processing toolbox. It has the capability to communicate directly with a high performing imaging card (Matrox Solios eA/XA), thus retaining high speed acquisition. The program is also designed to communicate with LabVIEW and Fiji for instrument control and image processing. Pscan 1.0 can handle high imaging rates and contains sufficient flexibility for users to adapt to their high speed imaging systems.

  8. Intramolecular evolution from a locally excited state to an excimer-like state in a multichromophoric dendrimer evidenced by a femtosecond fluorescence upconversion study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karni, Y.; Jordens, S.; Belder, G. De; Schweitzer, G.; Hofkens, J.; Gensch, T.; Maus, M.; Schryver, F.C. De; Herrmann, A.; Müllen, K.

    1999-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence upconversion study on a polyphenylene dendrimer with eight peryleneimide chromophores on the surface and on a monochromophoric model compound is reported. The time-dependent fluorescence spectra of the dendrimer show that the initial excitation is into a locally excited

  9. Multiphoton Processes and Attosecond Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Midorikawa, Katsumi; 12th International Conference on Multiphoton Processes; 3rd International Conference on Attosecond Physics

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in ultrashort pulsed laser technology have opened new frontiers in atomic, molecular and optical sciences. The 12th International Conference on Multiphoton Processes (ICOMP12) and the 3rd International Conference on Attosecond Physics (ATTO3), held jointly in Sapporo, Japan, during July 3-8, showcased studies at the forefront of research on multiphoton processes and attosecond physics. This book summarizes presentations and discussions from these two conferences.

  10. Visualizing liver anatomy, physiology and pharmacology using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haolu; Liang, Xiaowen; Gravot, Germain; Thorling, Camilla A; Crawford, Darrell H G; Xu, Zhi Ping; Liu, Xin; Roberts, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has become increasingly popular and widely used in both basic and clinical liver studies over the past few years. This technology provides insights into deep live tissues with less photobleaching and phototoxicity, which helps us to better understand the cellular morphology, microenvironment, immune responses and spatiotemporal dynamics of drugs and therapeutic cells in the healthy and diseased liver. This review summarizes the principles, opportunities, applications and limitations of MPM in hepatology. A key emphasis is on the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to add additional quantification and specificity to the detection of endogenous fluorescent species in the liver as well as exogenous molecules and nanoparticles that are applied to the liver in vivo. We anticipate that in the near future MPM-FLIM will advance our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver diseases, and will be evaluated from bench to bedside, leading to real-time histology of human liver diseases. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Fluorescence-based calculus detection using a 405-nm excitation wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brede, O.; Schelle, F.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the difference of fluorescence signals of cement and calculus using a 405 nm excitation wavelength. A total number of 20 freshly extracted teeth was used. The light source used for this study was a blue LED with a wavelength of 405nm. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were measured separately. Fluorescence light was collimated into an optical fibre and spectrally analyzed using an echelle spectrometer (aryelle 200, Lasertechnik Berlin, Germany) with an additionally bandpass (fgb 67, Edmund Industrial Optics, Karlsruhe, Germany). From these 40 measurements the median values were calculated over the whole spectrum, leading to two different median spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis we defined 8 areas of interest (AOI) in wavelength regions, showing remarkable differences in signal strength. In 7 AOIs the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p calculus and cement between 600nm and 700nm. Thus, we can conclude that fluorescence of calculus shows a significant difference to the fluorescence of cement. A differentiation over the intensity is possible as well as over the spectrum. Using a wavelength of 405nm, it is possible to distinguish between calculus and cement. These results could be used for further devices to develop a method for feedback controlled calculus removal.

  12. Adapting a compact confocal microscope system to a two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaspro, A; Corosu, M; Ramoino, P; Robello, M

    1999-11-01

    Within the framework of a national National Institute of Physics of Matter (INFM) project, we have realised a two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope based on a new generation commercial confocal scanning head. The core of the architecture is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser (Tsunami 3960, Spectra Physics Inc., Mountain View, CA) pumped by a high-power (5 W, 532 nm) laser (Millennia V, Spectra Physics Inc.) and an ultracompact confocal scanning head, Nikon PCM2000 (Nikon Instruments, Florence, Italy) using a single-pinhole design. Three-dimensional point-spread function has been measured to define spatial resolution performances. The TPE microscope has been used with a wide range of excitable fluorescent molecules (DAPI, Fura-2, Indo-1, DiOC(6)(3), fluoresceine, Texas red) covering a single photon spectral range from UV to green. An example is reported on 3D imaging of the helical structure of the sperm head of the Octopus Eledone cirrhosa labelled with an UV excitable dye, i.e., DAPI. The system can be easily switched for operating both in conventional and two-photon mode. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Visible to near-IR fluorescence from single-digit detonation nanodiamonds: excitation wavelength and pH dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, Philipp; Lau, Desmond W M; Wilson, Emma R; Nunn, Nicholas; Shenderova, Olga A; Gibson, Brant C

    2018-02-06

    Detonation nanodiamonds are of vital significance to many areas of science and technology. However, their fluorescence properties have rarely been explored for applications and remain poorly understood. We demonstrate significant fluorescence from the visible to near-infrared spectral regions from deaggregated, single-digit detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water produced via post-synthesis oxidation. The excitation wavelength dependence of this fluorescence is analyzed in the spectral region from 400 nm to 700 nm as well as the particles' absorption characteristics. We report a strong pH dependence of the fluorescence and compare our results to the pH dependent fluorescence of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results significantly contribute to the current understanding of the fluorescence of carbon-based nanomaterials in general and detonation nanodiamonds in particular.

  14. Clinical optical coherence tomography combined with multiphoton tomography for evaluation of several skin disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Speicher, Marco; Bückle, Rainer; Reckfort, Julia; McKenzie, Gordon; Welzel, Julia; Koehler, Martin J.; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The first clinical trial of optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with multiphoton tomography (MPT) and dermoscopy is reported. State-of-the-art (i) OCT systems for dermatology (e.g. multibeam swept source OCT), (ii) the femtosecond laser multiphoton tomograph DermaInspectTM, and (iii) digital dermoscopes were applied to 47 patients with a diversity of skin diseases and disorders such as skin cancer, psoriasis, hemangioma, connective tissue diseases, pigmented lesions, and autoimmune bullous skin diseases. Dermoscopy, also called 'epiluminescent microscopy', provides two-dimensional color images of the skin surface. OCT imaging is based on the detection of optical reflections within the tissue measured interferometrically whereas nonlinear excitation of endogenous fluorophores and the second harmonic generation are the bases of MPT images. OCT cross sectional "wide field" image provides a typical field of view of 5 x 2 mm2 and offers fast information on the depth and the volume of the investigated lesion. In comparison, multiphoton tomography presents 0.36 x 0.36 mm2 horizontal or diagonal sections of the region of interest within seconds with submicron resolution and down to a tissue depth of 200 μm. The combination of OCT and MPT provides a synergistic optical imaging modality for early detection of skin cancer and other skin diseases.

  15. Excitation of fluorescent nanoparticles by channel plasmon polaritons propagating in V-grooves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuesta, Irene Fernandez; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has been proven that light can be squeezed into metallic channels with subwavelength lateral dimensions. Here, we present the study of the propagation of channel plasmon polaritons confined in gold V-grooves, filled with fluorescent particles. In this way, channel plasmon polaritons......-diameter beads, we show the possibility of individual excitation, what may have applications to develop very sensitive biosensors....

  16. Study on discrimination of oral cancer from normal using blood plasma based on fluorescence steady and excited state at excitation wavelength 280 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekha, Pachaiappan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Many research works based on fluorescence spectroscopy have proven its potential in the diagnosis of various diseases using the spectral signatures of the native key fluorophores such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen, NADH, FAD and porphyrin. These fluorophores distribution, concentration and their conformation may be changed depending upon the pathological and metabolic conditions of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt to characterize the blood plasma of normal subject and oral cancer patients by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed by employing the multivariate statistical method - linear discriminant analyses (LDA) using leaves one out cross validation method. The results illustrate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy technique in the diagnosis of oral cancer using blood plasma.

  17. Imaging photoelectron circular dichroism of chiral molecules by femtosecond multiphoton coincidence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, C. Stefan; Ram, N. Bhargava; Janssen, Maurice H. M., E-mail: m.h.m.janssen@vu.nl [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Powis, Ivan [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-21

    Here, we provide a detailed account of novel experiments employing electron-ion coincidence imaging to discriminate chiral molecules. The full three-dimensional angular scattering distribution of electrons is measured after photoexcitation with either left or right circular polarized light. The experiment is performed using a simplified photoelectron-photoion coincidence imaging setup employing only a single particle imaging detector. Results are reported applying this technique to enantiomers of the chiral molecule camphor after three-photon ionization by circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulses at 400 nm and 380 nm. The electron-ion coincidence imaging provides the photoelectron spectrum of mass-selected ions that are observed in the time-of-flight mass spectra. The coincident photoelectron spectra of the parent camphor ion and the various fragment ions are the same, so it can be concluded that fragmentation of camphor happens after ionization. We discuss the forward-backward asymmetry in the photoelectron angular distribution which is expressed in Legendre polynomials with moments up to order six. Furthermore, we present a method, similar to one-photon electron circular dichroism, to quantify the strength of the chiral electron asymmetry in a single parameter. The circular dichroism in the photoelectron angular distribution of camphor is measured to be 8% at 400 nm. The electron circular dichroism using femtosecond multiphoton excitation is of opposite sign and about 60% larger than the electron dichroism observed before in near-threshold one-photon ionization with synchrotron excitation. We interpret our multiphoton ionization as being resonant at the two-photon level with the 3s and 3p Rydberg states of camphor. Theoretical calculations are presented that model the photoelectron angular distribution from a prealigned camphor molecule using density functional theory and continuum multiple scattering X alpha photoelectron scattering calculations

  18. X-ray fluorescence in some medium-Z elements excited by 59.5 keV photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, I.; Shahin, M.; Demir, L.; Narmanli, E.

    2010-01-01

    K X-ray fluorescence parameters cross sections and average shell fluorescence yields) for selected ten elements in the atomic range 42 ≤ Z ≤ 66 have been experimentally determined at photon excitation energy of 59.5 keV. K X-rays emitted from the samples have been counted by a Si (Li) detector. The K spectra for investigated elements have been derived from the measured K shell X-ray spectra by peak fitting process. Experimental results of K X-ray fluorescence parameters have been compared with theory. In general there is an agreement within the standard uncertainties of the experimental and theoretical values

  19. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requate, A.

    2007-03-01

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  20. S-matrix analysis of vibrational and alignment effects in intense-field multiphoton ionization of molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Requate, A

    2007-03-15

    Theoretical analysis of the vibrational excitation of small molecules during multiphoton ionization in intense laser fields of optical and infrared frequencies. Analysis of the alignment dependence of the electron impact ionization of diatomic molecules in the presence of an intense laser field as the final step in the process of Nonsequential Double Ionization. Quantum mechanical description using S-matrix theory in Strong Field Approximation (SFA), i.e. beyond perturbation theory. (orig.)

  1. Clinical studies of pigmented lesions in human skin by using a multiphoton tomograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Mihaela; Kelly, Kristen M.; Zachary, Christopher B.; Harris, Ronald M.; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; König, Karsten; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-02-01

    In vivo imaging of pigmented lesions in human skin was performed with a clinical multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based tomograph (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany). Two-photon excited fluorescence was used for visualizing endogenous fluorophores such as NADH/FAD, keratin, melanin in the epidermal cells and elastin fibers in the dermis. Collagen fibers were imaged by second harmonic generation. Our study involved in vivo imaging of benign melanocytic nevi, atypical nevi and melanoma. The goal of this preliminary study was to identify in vivo the characteristic features and their frequency in pigmented lesions at different stages (benign, atypical and malignant) and to evaluate the ability of in vivo MPM to distinguish atypical nevi from melanoma. Comparison with histopathology was performed for the biopsied lesions. Benign melanocytic nevi were characterized by the presence of nevus cell nests at the epidermal-dermal junction. In atypical nevi, features such as lentiginous hyperplasia, acanthosis and architectural disorder were imaged. Cytological atypia was present in all the melanoma lesions imaged, showing the strongest correlation with malignancy. The MPM images demonstrated very good correlation with corresponding histological images, suggesting that MPM could be a promising tool for in vivo non-invasive pigmented lesion diagnosis, particularly distinguishing atypical nevi from melanoma.

  2. Theoretical study on X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis: Contribution of the self-excitation phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RAKOTONDRAJAONA, H.N.J.L.

    1999-01-01

    This work consist in setting up, firstly, fluorescence intensities due to the contribution of secondary and tertiary excitation phenomena which settle among the elements of the same sample during the analysis through X fluorescence, inspired by Sherman calculations. Secondly, we have experimentally checked these expression from the analysis of twelve samples; containing all the following elements: Iron, Copper and Zinc. The difference between the theoretical results and the experimental results has been valued from the formula of the test of χ 2 . We consider that this difference is noticeable compared to other errors due to analysis method. [fr

  3. Multiphoton bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, J.H.; Gallagher, J.W.

    1981-12-01

    A bibliography is presented of approximately 275 references from literature published since 1980 on multiphoton research. A subject list is provided which divides the references into four subdivisions, i.e., ionization, bound-bound transitions, dissociation, and free-free transitions. An author index is included

  4. Multiphoton ionization of atomic cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, R.N.; Klots, C.E.; Stockdale, J.A.D.; Cooper, C.D.

    1984-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (MPI) of cesium atoms in the presence and absence of an external electric field. In the zero-field studies, photoelectron angular distributions for one- and two-photon resonantly enhanced MPI are compared with the theory of Tang and Lambropoulos. Deviations of experiment from theory are attributed to hyperfine coupling effects in the resonant intermediate state. The agreement between theory and experiment is excellent. In the absence of an external electric field, signal due to two-photon resonant three-photon ionization of cesium via np states is undetectable. Application of an electric field mixes nearby nd and ns levels, thereby inducing excitation and subsequent ionization. Signal due to two-photon excitation of ns levels in field-free experiments is weak due to their small photoionization cross section. An electric field mixes nearby np levels which again allows detectable photoionization signal. For both ns and np states the field induced MPI signal increases as the square of the electric field for a given principal quantum number and increases rapidly with n for a given field strength. Finally, we note that the classical two-photon field-ionization threshold is lower for the case in which the laser polarization and the electric field are parallel than it is when they are perpendicular. 22 references, 11 figures

  5. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  6. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  7. Athermal electron distribution probed by femtosecond multiphoton photoemission from image potential states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrini, Gabriele; Giannetti, Claudio; Pagliara, Stefania; Banfi, Francesco; Galimberti, Gianluca; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2005-01-01

    Image potential states are populated through indirect, scattering-mediated multiphoton absorption induced by femtosecond laser pulses and revealed by single-photon photoemission. The measured effective mass is significantly different from that obtained with direct, resonant population. These features reveal a strong coupling of the electrons residing in the image potential state, outside the solid, with the underlying hot electron population created by the laser pulse. The coupling is mediated by a many-body scattering interaction between the image potential state electrons and bulk electrons in highly excited states

  8. Kinetics and comparison of δ-aminolevulinic-acid-induced endogenous protoporphyrin-IX in single cell by steady state and multiphoton fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Elangovan, Masilamani; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic Therapy has emerged as a new modality in the treatment of various nonmalignant and malignant diseases. It involves the systemic administration of tumor specific photo-sensitizers with the subsequent application of visible light. This combination causes the generation of cytotoxic species, which damage sensitive targets, producing cell injury and tumor destruction. Although, photofrin is the only photosensitizer currently approved for PDT and tumor detection, its concomitant cutaneous photosensitization poses a significant problem. Hence, δ-aminoleuvulinic acid (δ-ALA) a precursor for the endogenous production of Protoporphyrin IX, through heme biosynthesis pathway, has gained significant importance in the Photodynamic Therapy. Though δ-ALA is present naturally in the cells, exogenous δ-ALA helps to synthesis more of PpIX in the tumor cells, as the fast growing tumor cells take up the administered δ-ALA more than the normal cells. Based on these facts, many invasive studies have been reported on the kinetics of δ-ALA at cellular level by chemical extraction of PpIX from the cells. In the present study we have studied the kinetics of δ-ALA induced PpIX fluorescence from Hela cells by perchloric/Methanol extraction method. However, the amount of PpIX synthesized in the cells at different point of incubation time by noninvasive methods has not been reported. Hence we have also used a noninvasive technique of measuring the kinetics δ-ALA induced PPIX fluorescence from Hela, an epithelial cell derived from human cervical cancer by both single photon (steady state) and multi photon excitation. From the studies it is observed that the δ-ALA induced PpIX is more at 2 hours incubation time for 2 mM of δ-ALA concentration. Further, it is observed that with steady state fluorescence imaging method, the excitation light itself cause the Photodynamic damage, due to the prolonged exposure of the cells than in multi photon excitation, leading to the rounding

  9. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence organic dots for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tingchao; Ren, Can; Li, Zhuohua; Xiao, Shuyu; Li, Junzi; Lin, Xiaodong; Ye, Chuanxiang; Zhang, Junmin; Guo, Lihong; Hu, Wenbo; Chen, Rui

    2018-05-01

    Autofluorescence is a major challenge in complex tissue imaging when molecules present in the biological tissue compete with the fluorophore. This issue may be resolved by designing organic molecules with long fluorescence lifetimes. The present work reports the two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) molecule with carbazole as the electron donor and dicyanobenzene as the electron acceptor (i.e., 4CzIPN). The results indicate that 4CzIPN exhibits a moderate TPA cross-section (˜9 × 10-50 cm4 s photon-1), high fluorescence quantum yield, and a long fluorescence lifetime (˜1.47 μs). 4CzIPN was compactly encapsulated into an amphiphilic copolymer via nanoprecipitation to achieve water-soluble organic dots. Interestingly, 4CzIPN organic dots have been utilized in applications involving two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Our work aptly demonstrates that TADF molecules are promising candidates of nonlinear optical probes for developing next-generation multiphoton FLIM applications.

  10. Multiphoton transitions in semiconductors in the non-perturbative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.Z.; Hassan, A.R.

    1987-09-01

    Transition rates for multiphoton absorption via direct band-to-band excitation have been calculated using a non-perturbative approach due to Jones and Reiss, based on the Volkov type final state wave functions. Both cases of parabolic and non-parabolic energy bands have been included in our calculations. Absorption coefficients have been obtained for the cases of plane polarized and circularly polarized light. In particular, two-photon absorption coefficients are derived for the two cases of polarization for the parabolic band approximation as well as for non-parabolic bands and compared with the results based on perturbation theory. Numerical estimates of the two photon absorption coefficients resulting from our calculations are also provided. (author). 10 refs, 1 tab

  11. Silver content determination in mining and ore dressing using radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerner, B.; George, R.; Ratnikow, W.

    1989-01-01

    A laborsaving method based on radionuclide-excited X-ray fluorescence is described for the determination of silver in mining and ore dressing. Detection limits reached under operation conditions and measuring errors are discussed and compared with results from chemical analyses

  12. Multiphoton microscopy imaging of developing tooth germs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yu Pan

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, a novel multiphoton microscopy database of images from developing tooth germs in mice was set up. We confirmed that multiphoton laser microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating the development of tooth germ and is worthy for further application in the study of tooth regeneration.

  13. Thin coating thickness determination using radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Castillo, Lorena A.; Calix, Virginia S.

    2001-01-01

    Three different approaches on thin coating thickness determination using a radioisotope-excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry were demonstrated and results were compared. A standard of thin layer of gold (Au) on a nickel (Ni) substrate from the US National Bureau of Standards (with a nominal thickness of 0.300505 microns of at least 99.9% Au electrodeposited over 2 nils of Ni) on low carbon steel (1010) was analyzed using a Cd 109-excited XRF system. Au thickness computations were done using the (a) thin standard approach, (b) thick standard approach, and (c) x-ray absorption method (ASTM A754-79 1982). These three methods yielded results within the limit set by the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM), which is +/-3%. Of the three methods, the thick standard yielded the best result with 0.124% error. (Author)

  14. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J [Center of Experimental and Applied Cutaneous Physiology, Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Gonchukov, S A [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Koenig, K [JenLab GmbH, Schillerstr. 1, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  15. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  16. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J; Gonchukov, S A; Koenig, K

    2014-01-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  17. Fluorescence and Auger Decay Properties of the Core-Excited F-Like Ions from Ne to Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiang-Li; Dong Chen-Zhong; Su Mao-Gen; Koike Fumihiro

    2012-01-01

    We systematically study the decay properties of the K-shell excited F-like ions with 10≤Z≤36 based on the multiconfiguration Dirac—Fock method. The Breit interaction, the QED corrections and the nuclear finite mass effects are also considered as perturbation. Auger transition rates, radiative, Auger and natural widths, as well as fluorescence and Auger yields for K-shell excited F-like ions are presented. It is shown by means of concrete figures that the decay properties change significantly with the increase of the atomic number Z; the Auger rate is overtaken at Z = 30 by the radiative decay rate. Several fitting formulae for the radiative and Auger widths and the fluorescence yields have been evaluated which is expected to be useful in plasma analysis and plasma modeling. (atomic and molecular physics)

  18. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  19. Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhijian; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It's proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

  20. In vivo multiphoton imaging of bile duct ligation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Feng-Chieh; Chen, Hsiao-Chin; Chang, Po-shou; Yang, Shu-Mei; Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2008-02-01

    Bile is the exocrine secretion of liver and synthesized by hepatocytes. It is drained into duodenum for the function of digestion or drained into gallbladder for of storage. Bile duct obstruction is a blockage in the tubes that carry bile to the gallbladder and small intestine. However, Bile duct ligation results in the changes of bile acids in serum, liver, urine, and feces1, 2. In this work, we demonstrate a novel technique to image this pathological condition by using a newly developed in vivo imaging system, which includes multiphoton microscopy and intravital hepatic imaging chamber. The images we acquired demonstrate the uptake, processing of 6-CFDA in hepatocytes and excretion of CF in the bile canaliculi. In addition to imaging, we can also measure kinetics of the green fluorescence intensity.

  1. Amplitudes for multiphoton quantum processes in linear optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UrIas, Jesus

    2011-01-01

    The prominent role that linear optical networks have acquired in the engineering of photon states calls for physically intuitive and automatic methods to compute the probability amplitudes for the multiphoton quantum processes occurring in linear optics. A version of Wick's theorem for the expectation value, on any vector state, of products of linear operators, in general, is proved. We use it to extract the combinatorics of any multiphoton quantum processes in linear optics. The result is presented as a concise rule to write down directly explicit formulae for the probability amplitude of any multiphoton process in linear optics. The rule achieves a considerable simplification and provides an intuitive physical insight about quantum multiphoton processes. The methodology is applied to the generation of high-photon-number entangled states by interferometrically mixing coherent light with spontaneously down-converted light.

  2. Amplitudes for multiphoton quantum processes in linear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urías, Jesús

    2011-07-01

    The prominent role that linear optical networks have acquired in the engineering of photon states calls for physically intuitive and automatic methods to compute the probability amplitudes for the multiphoton quantum processes occurring in linear optics. A version of Wick's theorem for the expectation value, on any vector state, of products of linear operators, in general, is proved. We use it to extract the combinatorics of any multiphoton quantum processes in linear optics. The result is presented as a concise rule to write down directly explicit formulae for the probability amplitude of any multiphoton process in linear optics. The rule achieves a considerable simplification and provides an intuitive physical insight about quantum multiphoton processes. The methodology is applied to the generation of high-photon-number entangled states by interferometrically mixing coherent light with spontaneously down-converted light.

  3. Clinical coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton tomography of human skin with a femtosecond laser and photonic crystal fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; König, Karsten; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E; Sterry, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    We report on in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS), two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation imaging on human skin with a novel multimodal clinical CARS/multiphoton tomograph. CARS imaging is realized by a combination of femtosecond pulses with broadband continuum pulses generated by a photonic crystal fiber. The images reveal the microscopic distribution of (i) non-fluorescent lipids, (ii) endogenous fluorophores and (iii) the collagen network inside the human skin in vivo with subcellular resolution. Examples of healthy as well as cancer-affected skin are presented. (letter)

  4. Clinical coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton tomography of human skin with a femtosecond laser and photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Hans Georg; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E.; Sterry, Wolfram; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    We report on in vivo coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy (CARS), two-photon fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation imaging on human skin with a novel multimodal clinical CARS/multiphoton tomograph. CARS imaging is realized by a combination of femtosecond pulses with broadband continuum pulses generated by a photonic crystal fiber. The images reveal the microscopic distribution of (i) non-fluorescent lipids, (ii) endogenous fluorophores and (iii) the collagen network inside the human skin in vivo with subcellular resolution. Examples of healthy as well as cancer-affected skin are presented.

  5. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  6. Portable X-ray fluorescence analyzer of high sensitivity using X-ray tube excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, E.; Ando, L.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the three main methods of X-ray fluorescence analysis and their problems is given. The attainable accuracy and effectiveness of each method are discussed. The main properties of portable X-ray analyzers required by the industry are described. The results and experiences of R and D activities in ATOMKI (Debrecen, Hungary) for developing portable X-ray analyzers are presented. The only way for increasing the accuracy and decreasing the measuring time is the application of X-ray tube excitation instead of radioactive sources. The new ATOMKI equipment presently under construction and patenting uses X-ray tube excitation; it will increase the accuracy of concentration determination by one order of magnitude. (D.Gy.)

  7. Infrared multiphoton absorption and decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.K.; McAlpine, R.D.

    1984-01-01

    The discovery of infrared laser induced multiphoton absorption (IRMPA) and decomposition (IRMPD) by Isenor and Richardson in 1971 generated a great deal of interest in these phenomena. This interest was increased with the discovery by Ambartzumian, Letokhov, Ryadbov and Chekalin that isotopically selective IRMPD was possible. One of the first speculations about these phenomena was that it might be possible to excite a particular mode of a molecule with the intense infrared laser beam and cause decomposition or chemical reaction by channels which do not predominate thermally, thus providing new synthetic routes for complex chemicals. The potential applications to isotope separation and novel chemistry stimulated efforts to understand the underlying physics and chemistry of these processes. At ICOMP I, in 1977 and at ICOMP II in 1980, several authors reviewed the current understandings of IRMPA and IRMPD as well as the particular aspect of isotope separation. There continues to be a great deal of effort into understanding IRMPA and IRMPD and we will briefly review some aspects of these efforts with particular emphasis on progress since ICOMP II. 31 references

  8. Application of multi-step excitation schemes for detection of actinides and lanthanides in solutions by luminescence/chemiluminescence laser spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izosimov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot Curie 6, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-01

    The use of laser radiation with tunable wavelength allows the selective excitation of actinide/lanthanide species with subsequent registration of luminescence/chemiluminescence for their detection. This work is devoted to applications of the time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectroscopy and time-resolved laser-induced chemiluminescence spectroscopy for the detection of lanthanides and actinides. Results of the experiments on U, Eu, and Sm detection by TRLIF (Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence) method in blood plasma and urine are presented. Data on luminol chemiluminescence in solutions containing Sm(III), U(IV), and Pu(IV) are analyzed. It is shown that appropriate selectivity of lanthanide/actinide detection can be reached when chemiluminescence is initiated by transitions within 4f- or 5f-electron shell of lanthanide/actinide ions corresponding to the visible spectral range. In this case chemiluminescence of chemiluminogen (luminol) arises when the ion of f element is excited by multi-quantum absorption of visible light. The multi-photon scheme of chemiluminescence excitation makes chemiluminescence not only a highly sensitive but also a highly selective tool for the detection of lanthanide/actinide species in solutions. (author)

  9. A pragmatic guide to multiphoton microscope design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael D.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Bartels, Randy A.; Squier, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged as a ubiquitous tool for studying microscopic structure and function across a broad range of disciplines. As such, the intent of this paper is to present a comprehensive resource for the construction and performance evaluation of a multiphoton microscope that will be understandable to the broad range of scientific fields that presently exploit, or wish to begin exploiting, this powerful technology. With this in mind, we have developed a guide to aid in the design of a multiphoton microscope. We discuss source selection, optical management of dispersion, image-relay systems with scan optics, objective-lens selection, single-element light-collection theory, photon-counting detection, image rendering, and finally, an illustrated guide for building an example microscope. PMID:27182429

  10. Polarized X-ray excitation for scatter reduction in X-ray fluorescence computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Tzoumas, Stratis; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei

    2018-05-25

    X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT) is a new molecular imaging modality which uses X-ray excitation to stimulate the emission of fluorescent photons in high atomic number contrast agents. Scatter contamination is one of the main challenges in XFCT imaging which limits the molecular sensitivity. When polarized X-rays are used, it is possible to reduce the scatter contamination significantly by placing detectors perpendicular to the polarization direction. This study quantifies scatter contamination for polarized and unpolarized X-ray excitation and determines the advantages of scatter reduction. The amount of scatter in preclinical XFCT is quantified in Monte Carlo simulations. The fluorescent X-rays are emitted isotropically, while scattered X-rays propagate in polarization direction. The magnitude of scatter contamination is studied in XFCT simulations of a mouse phantom. In this study, the contrast agent gold is examined as an example but a scatter reduction from polarized excitation is also expected for other elements. The scatter reduction capability is examined for different polarization intensities with a monoenergetic X-ray excitation energy of 82 keV. The study evaluates two different geometrical shapes of CZT detectors which are modeled with an energy resolution of 1 keV FWHM at an X-ray energy of 80 keV. Benefits of a detector placement perpendicular to the polarization direction are shown in iterative and analytic image reconstruction including scatter correction. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the normalized mean square error (NMSE) are analyzed and compared for the reconstructed images. A substantial scatter reduction for common detector sizes was achieved for 100% and 80% linear polarization while lower polarization intensities provide a decreased scatter reduction. By placing the detector perpendicular to the polarization direction, a scatter reduction by factor up to 5.5 can be achieved for common detector sizes. The image

  11. Application of radionuclide sources for excitation in energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, P.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is in broad application in many fields of science where elemental determinations are necessary. Solid and liquid samples are analyzed by this method. Solids are introduced in thin or thick samples as melted glass, pellets, powders or as original specimen. The excitation of X-ray spectra can be performed by specific and polychromic radiation of X-ray tubes, by protons, deuterons, α-particles, heavy ions and synchrotron radiation from accelerators and by α-particles, X- and γ-rays and by bremsstrahlung generated by β - -particles from radionuclide sources. The radionuclides are devided into groups with respect to their decay mode and the energy of the emitted radiation. The broad application of radionuclides in XRF excitation is shown in examples as semi-quantitative analysis of glasses, as quantitative analysis of coarse ceramics and as quantitative determination of heavy elements (mainly actinides) in solutions. The advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide excitation in XRF analysis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  12. Investigation of Membrane Receptors' Oligomers Using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Multiphoton Microscopy in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashish K.

    Investigating quaternary structure (oligomerization) of macromolecules (such as proteins and nucleic acids) in living systems (in vivo) has been a great challenge in biophysics, due to molecular diffusion, fluctuations in several biochemical parameters such as pH, quenching of fluorescence by oxygen (when fluorescence methods are used), etc. We studied oligomerization of membrane receptors in living cells by means of Fluorescence (Forster) Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using fluorescent markers and two photon excitation fluorescence micro-spectroscopy. Using suitable FRET models, we determined the stoichiometry and quaternary structure of various macromolecular complexes. The proteins of interest for this work are : (1) sigma-1 receptor and (2) rhodopsin, are described as below. (1) Sigma-1 receptors are molecular chaperone proteins, which also regulate ion channels. S1R seems to be involved in substance abuse, as well as several diseases such as Alzheimer's. We studied S1R in the presence and absence of its ligands haloperidol (an antagonist) and pentazocine +/- (an agonist), and found that at low concentration they reside as a mixture of monomers and dimers and that they may form higher order oligomers at higher concentrations. (2) Rhodopsin is a prototypical G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and is directly involved in vision. GPCRs form a large family of receptors that participate in cell signaling by responding to external stimuli such as drugs, thus being a major drug target (more than 40% drugs target GPCRs). Their oligomerization has been largely controversial. Understanding this may help to understand the functional role of GPCRs oligomerization, and may lead to the discovery of more drugs targeting GPCR oligomers. It may also contribute toward finding a cure for Retinitis Pigmentosa, which is caused by a mutation (G188R) in rhodopsin, a disease which causes blindness and has no cure so far. Comparing healthy rhodopsin's oligomeric structure with that

  13. Analysis of Spectral Features of Seawaterbiooptical Components Fluorescence from the Excitation-emission Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyuk, P. A.; Nagorny, I. G.

    The paper presents the method for processing of excitation-emission matrix of sea water and the allocation of the spectral characteristics of different types of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and phytoplankton cells in seawater. The method consists of identification of regularly observed fluorescence peaks of CDOM in marine waters of different type and definition of the spectral ranges, where the predominant influence of these peaks are observed.

  14. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Michael G; Husvogt, Lennart; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E; Hornegger, Joachim; Connolly, James L; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-01-01

    We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems.

  15. Fluorescence Intrinsic Characterization of Excitation-Emission Matrix Using Multi-Dimensional Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chien Hsiao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-emission matrix (EEM fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive method for tissue diagnosis and has become important in clinical use. However, the intrinsic characterization of EEM fluorescence remains unclear. Photobleaching and the complexity of the chemical compounds make it difficult to distinguish individual compounds due to overlapping features. Conventional studies use principal component analysis (PCA for EEM fluorescence analysis, and the relationship between the EEM features extracted by PCA and diseases has been examined. The spectral features of different tissue constituents are not fully separable or clearly defined. Recently, a non-stationary method called multi-dimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD was introduced; this method can extract the intrinsic oscillations on multiple spatial scales without loss of information. The aim of this study was to propose a fluorescence spectroscopy system for EEM measurements and to describe a method for extracting the intrinsic characteristics of EEM by MEEMD. The results indicate that, although PCA provides the principal factor for the spectral features associated with chemical compounds, MEEMD can provide additional intrinsic features with more reliable mapping of the chemical compounds. MEEMD has the potential to extract intrinsic fluorescence features and improve the detection of biochemical changes.

  16. Environment-sensitive quinolone demonstrating long-lived fluorescence and unusually slow excited-state intramolecular proton transfer kinetics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zamotaiev, O. M.; Shvadchak, Volodymyr; Sych, T. P.; Melnychuk, N. A.; Yushchenko, Dmytro A.; Mely, Y.; Pivovarenko, V. G.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 3 (2016), č. článku 034004. ISSN 2050-6120 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : quinolone * fluorescent probes * local polarity * hydration * excited-state intramolecular proton transfer * kinetics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.656, year: 2016

  17. Multiphoton microscopy guides neurotrophin modification with poly(ethylene glycol) to enhance interstitial diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, Mark; Zipfel, Warren R.; Williams, Rebecca M.; Ma, Shu Chin; Webb, Watt W.; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2004-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the limited distribution of this molecule after administration into the brain tissue considerably hampers its efficacy. Here, we show how multiphoton microscopy of fluorescently tagged BDNF in brain-tissue slices provides a useful and rapid screening method for examining the diffusion of large molecules in tissues, and for studying the effects of chemical modifications-for example, conjugating with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-on the diffusion constant. This single variable, obtained by monitoring short-term diffusion in real time, can be effectively used for rational drug design. In this study on fluorescently tagged BDNF and BDNF-PEG, we identify slow diffusion as a major contributing factor to the limited penetration of BDNF, and demonstrate how chemical modification can be used to overcome this barrier.

  18. Radiation damage in nonmetallic solids under dense electronic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Tanimura, Katsumi; Nakai, Yasuo

    1992-01-01

    Basic processes of radiation damage of insulators by dense electronic excitation are reviewed. First it is pointed out that electronic excitation of nonmetallic solids produces the self-trapped excitons and defect-related metastable states having relatively long lifetimes, and that the excitation of these metastable states, produces stable defects. The effects of irradiation with heavy ions, including track registration, are surveyed on the basis of the microscopic studies. It is pointed out also that the excitation of the metastable states plays a role in laser-induced damage at relatively low fluences, while the laser damage has been reported to be governed by heating of free electrons produced by multiphoton excitation. Difference in the contributions of the excitation of metastable defects to laser-induced damage of surfaces, or laser ablation, and laser-induced bulk damage is stressed. (orig.)

  19. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  20. Miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy system using frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Mills, Arthur K; Zhao, Yuan; Jones, David J; Tang, Shuo

    2016-05-01

    We report on a miniature fiber-optic multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system based on a frequency-doubled femtosecond Er-doped fiber laser. The femtosecond pulses from the laser source are delivered to the miniature fiber-optic probe at 1.58 µm wavelength, where a standard single mode fiber is used for delivery without the need of free-space dispersion compensation components. The beam is frequency-doubled inside the probe by a periodically poled MgO:LiNbO3 crystal. Frequency-doubled pulses at 786 nm with a maximum power of 80 mW and a pulsewidth of 150 fs are obtained and applied to excite intrinsic signals from tissues. A MEMS scanner, a miniature objective, and a multimode collection fiber are further used to make the probe compact. The miniature fiber-optic MPM system is highly portable and robust. Ex vivo multiphoton imaging of mammalian skins demonstrates the capability of the system in imaging biological tissues. The results show that the miniature fiber-optic MPM system using frequency-doubled femtosecond fiber laser can potentially bring the MPM imaging for clinical applications.

  1. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morozov, A.; Kruecken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-01-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12 keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250 to 1400 hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations

  2. Evaluation of multiphoton effects in down-conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Koshino, Kazuki

    2010-01-01

    Multiphoton effects in down-conversion are investigated based on the full-quantum multimode formalism by considering a three-level system as a prototype nonlinear system. We analytically derive the three-photon output wave function for two input photons, where one of the two input photons is down-converted and the other one is not. Using this output wave function, we calculate the down-conversion probability, the purity, and the fidelity to evaluate the entanglement between a down-converted photon pair and a non-down-converted photon. It is shown that the saturation effect occurs by multiphoton input and that it affects both the down-conversion probability and the quantum correlation between the down-converted photon pair and the non-down-converted photon. We also reveal the necessary conditions for multiphoton effects to be strong.

  3. Stratum corneum lipid organization as observed by atomic force, confocal and two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlén, Lars; Plasencia Gil, Maria Inés; Bagatolli, Luis

    2008-01-01

    -related biophysical techniques (e.g. atomic force microscopy and confocal/two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy), it was recently shown that reconstituted membranes composed of extracted decontaminated human stratum corneum lipids do not form a fluid phase, but exclusively a single-gel phase that segregates...

  4. Determination of heavy metals in polar snow and ice by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshov, M.A.; Boutron, C.F.

    1994-01-01

    The new laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry technique offers unrivalled sensitivity for the determination of trace metals in a wide variety of samples. This has allowed the direct determination of Pb, Cd and Bi in Antarctic and Greenland snow and ice down to the sub pg/g level. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  5. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for degradation monitoring of machinery lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosnovski, Oleg; Suresh, Pooja; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Green, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Lubrication oil is a vital component of heavy rotating machinery defining the machine's health, operational safety and effectiveness. Recently, the focus has been on developing sensors that provide real-time/online monitoring of oil condition/lubricity. Industrial practices and standards for assessing oil condition involve various analytical methods. Most these techniques are unsuitable for online applications. The paper presents the results of studying degradation of antioxidant additives in machinery lubricants using Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) Spectroscopy and Machine Learning techniques. EEM Spectroscopy is capable of rapid and even standoff sensing; it is potentially applicable to real-time online monitoring.

  6. Slide-free histology via MUSE: UV surface excitation microscopy for imaging unsectioned tissue (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Richard M.; Harmany, Zachary; Demos, Stavros G.; Fereidouni, Farzad

    2016-03-01

    Widely used methods for preparing and viewing tissue specimens at microscopic resolution have not changed for over a century. They provide high-quality images but can involve time-frames of hours or even weeks, depending on logistics. There is increasing interest in slide-free methods for rapid tissue analysis that can both decrease turn-around times and reduce costs. One new approach is MUSE (microscopy with UV surface excitation), which exploits the shallow penetration of UV light to excite fluorescent signals from only the most superficial tissue elements. The method is non-destructive, and eliminates requirement for conventional histology processing, formalin fixation, paraffin embedding, or thin sectioning. It requires no lasers, confocal, multiphoton or optical coherence tomography optics. MUSE generates diagnostic-quality histological images that can be rendered to resemble conventional hematoxylin- and eosin-stained samples, with enhanced topographical information, from fresh or fixed, but unsectioned tissue, rapidly, with high resolution, simply and inexpensively. We anticipate that there could be widespread adoption in research facilities, hospital-based and stand-alone clinical settings, in local or regional pathology labs, as well as in low-resource environments.

  7. Multimodal optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging with interleaved excitation sources for simultaneous endogenous and exogenous fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sebina; Serafino, Michael J; Rico-Jimenez, Jesus; Park, Jesung; Chen, Xi; Zhaorigetu, Siqin; Walton, Brian L; Jo, Javier A; Applegate, Brian E

    2016-09-01

    Multimodal imaging probes a variety of tissue properties in a single image acquisition by merging complimentary imaging technologies. Exploiting synergies amongst the data, algorithms can be developed that lead to better tissue characterization than could be accomplished by the constituent imaging modalities taken alone. The combination of optical coherence tomography (OCT) with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) provides access to detailed tissue morphology and local biochemistry. The optical system described here merges 1310 nm swept-source OCT with time-domain FLIM having excitation at 355 and 532 nm. The pulses from 355 and 532 nm lasers have been interleaved to enable simultaneous acquisition of endogenous and exogenous fluorescence signals, respectively. The multimodal imaging system was validated using tissue phantoms. Nonspecific tagging with Alexa Flour 532 in a Watanbe rabbit aorta and active tagging of the LOX-1 receptor in human coronary artery, demonstrate the capacity of the system for simultaneous acquisition of OCT, endogenous FLIM, and exogenous FLIM in tissues.

  8. Evaluation of an inductively-coupled plasma with an extended-sleeve torch as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosinski, M A; Uchida, H; Winefordner, J D

    1983-05-01

    An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) with an extended-sleeve torch has been evaluated as an atomization cell for laser-excited fluorescence spectrometry. Limits of detection for 20 lines are given. The detection power is almost equivalent to that obtained by excitation with a hollow-cathode lamp. Interelement effects and spectral interferences are discussed.

  9. A reagentless enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose based on upconverting glasses, as excitation source, and chemically modified glucose oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Barrio, Melisa; Cases, Rafael; Cebolla, Vicente; Hirsch, Thomas; de Marcos, Susana; Wilhelm, Stefan; Galbán, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Upon near-infrared excitation Tm(3+)+Yb(3+) doped fluorohafnate glasses present upconversion properties and emit visible light. This property permits to use these glasses (UCG) as excitation sources for fluorescent optical biosensors. Taking this into account, in this work a fluorescent biosensor for glucose determination is designed and evaluated. The biosensor combines the UCG and the fluorescence of the enzyme glucose oxidase chemically modified with a fluorescein derivative (GOx-FS), whose intensity is modified during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. Optical parameters have been optimized and a mathematical model describing the behavior of the analytical signal is suggested. Working in FIA mode, the biosensor responds to glucose concentrations up to, at least, 15mM with a limit of detection of 1.9mM. The biosensor has a minimum lifetime of 9 days and has been applied to glucose determination in drinks. The applicability of the sensor was tested by glucose determination in two fruit juices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The lowest excited singlet state of isolated 1-phenyl-butadiene and 1-phenyl-hexatriene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, B.E.; Shaler, T.A.; Buma, W.J.; Song, K.; Nuss, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    We report vibrationally resolved S0S1 excitation spectra and vibronic level decay times for the phenyl-substituted polyenes 1-phenylbutadiene and 1-phenylhexatriene seeded in supersonic He expansions. This information was obtained using one- and two-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization

  11. In situ detection of atomic and molecular iodine using Resonance and Off-Resonance Fluorescence by Lamp Excitation: ROFLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Gómez Martín

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a new instrument for in situ detection of atmospheric iodine atoms and molecules based on atomic and molecular resonance and off-resonance ultraviolet fluorescence excited by lamp emission. The instrument combines the robustness, light weight, low power consumption and efficient excitation of radio-frequency discharge light sources with the high sensitivity of the photon counting technique. Calibration of I2 fluorescence is achieved via quantitative detection of the molecule by Incoherent Broad Band Cavity-enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy. Atomic iodine fluorescence signal is calibrated by controlled broad band photolysis of known I2 concentrations in the visible spectral range at atmospheric pressure. The instrument has been optimised in laboratory experiments to reach detection limits of 1.2 pptv for I atoms and 13 pptv for I2, for S/N = 1 and 10 min of integration time. The ROFLEX system has been deployed in a field campaign in northern Spain, representing the first concurrent observation of ambient mixing ratios of iodine atoms and molecules in the 1–350 pptv range.

  12. The fluorescence action spectra of some saturated hydrocarbon liquids for excitation energies above and below their ionization thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence action spectra have been obtained for the neat liquids, cis-decalin, trans-decalin, bicyclohexyl, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isobutylcyclohexane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, 3-methylhexane, 3-methylpentane, n-decane, n-dodecane, and n-pentadecane at excitation energies, ε, ranging from their absorption onsets (at ca. 7 eV) to 10.3 eV. For all compounds, with the exception of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield is observed to monotonically decline with increasing ε, reaching a minimum value at an energy, ε m (a few tenths of an eV above the liquid phase ionization threshold, ε l ) followed by a slow increase. In the case of cis-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield remains constant over the entire range of excitation energies studied, permitting its use as a quantum counter replacing the standard sodium salicylate, at least over a spectral range from 185 to 120 nm. The recovery of the fluorescence quantum yield for ε>ε m is attributed to an increasing probability for electron ejection followed by e - +RH + geminate recombination, to produce an excited state of RH with energy less than ε l . From a simple analysis of the action spectrum, a lower bound estimate of the electron ejection probability, φ ± , is obtained as a function of ε. In the case of cyclohexane, where φ ± has been obtained by other techniques at ε congruent 10 eV, the lower bound estimate agrees with the experimental value. From this agreement, arguments are presented to make plausible the conjecture that in all these liquids, the initially produced e - +RH + geminate ion pair first rapidly internally converts to an ion-pair state ca

  13. Analysis of Cholesterol Trafficking with Fluorescent Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wustner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport...... that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy...... and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly....

  14. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Giacomelli

    Full Text Available We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems.

  15. Resonantly enhanced production of excited fragments of gaseous molecules following core-level excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.M.; Lu, K.T.; Lee, J.M.; Ho, S.C.; Chang, H.W.; Lee, Y.Y.

    2005-01-01

    State-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 following Cl 2p and Si 2p core-level excitations have been investigated by resonant photoemission spectroscopy and dispersed UV/optical fluorescence spectroscopy. The main features in the gaseous Si(CH 3 ) 2 Cl 2 fluorescence spectrum are identified as the emission from excited Si*, Si + *, CH* and H*. The core-to-Rydberg excitations at both Si 2p and Cl 2p edges lead to a noteworthy production of not only the excited atomic fragments, neutral and ionic (Si*, Si + *) but also the excited diatomic fragments (CH*). In particular, the excited neutral atomic fragments Si* are significantly reinforced. The experimental results provide deeper insight into the state-selective dissociation dynamics for the excited fragments of molecules via core-level excitation

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence with an OPO system. Part II: direct determination of lead content in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, A; Lijour, Y; Giamarchi, P; Burel-Deschamps, L; Stephan, L

    2003-03-01

    Fluorescence was induced by coupling a laser with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to develop an analytical method for the direct determination of lead content, at ultra-trace level, in seawater by electrothermal atomization-laser-excited atomic fluorescence (ETA-LEAF). The optimization of atomization conditions, laser pulse energy, and mainly temporal parameters allowed us to reach a 3 fg detection limit (0.3 ng L(-1)) despite the low repetition rate of the device. The expected error on predicted concentrations of lead, at trace levels, in seawater was below 15%.

  17. Multiphoton ionization for hydrogen plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnie, J.H.M.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis the processes leading to the formation of negative ions (H - ) in hydrogen discharges are studied. These ions enable efficient production of a beam of fast neutral particles. Such beams are applied in nuclear fusion research. A model has been generally accepted in which H - is formed by means of dissociative attachment (DA) of electrons to vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules [H 2 (υ'')] molecule: when υ'' is low, electron emission is most probable, but when υ'' is high, H - production dominates. A necessary preliminary to the DA process is the presence of sufficient [H 2 (υ'')] molecules with υ'' > 4. By determining the densities of hydrogen molecules in the various vibrational levels as a function of the various discharge parameters (scaling laws), insight can be gained into the extent to which the DA process contributes to H - formation. Since the de-excitation of [H 2 (υ'')] molecules by H atoms is expected to have a large cross section, it is also relevant to determine the scaling laws for atomic hydrogen. This thesis gives an account of the development of an experimental setup for obtaining such measurements, and reports the first results achieved. In view of the anticipated density of the vibrationally excited molecules and the detection limit considered feasible, the diagnostic chosen was resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). The principle is based on state-selective ionization with REMPI of particles effusing from the discharge chamber through an aperture in the wall. The ions produced in the REMPI-process are then detected. The use of both an electric and a magnetic field makes it possible to distinguish the REMPI ions from those originating elsewhere, such as plasma ions or photodesorption ions. 145 refs.; 25 figs.; 6 tabs

  18. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  19. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  20. Electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectroscopy for the determination of indium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucelio, R.Q.; Smith, B.W.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    A dye laser pumped by a high-repetition-rate copper vapor laser was used as the excitation source to determine indium at parts-per-trillion level by electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ETA-LEAFS). A comparison was made between wall atomization, in pyrolytic and nonpyrolytic graphite tubes, and platform atomization. The influence of several chemical modifiers either in solution or precoated in the graphite tube was evaluated. The influence of several acids and NaOH in the analyte solution was also studied. Optimization of the analytical conditions was carried out to achieve the best signal-to-background ratio and consequently an absolute limit of detection of 1 fg. Some possible interferents of the method were evaluated. The method was evaluated by determining indium in blood, urine, soil, and urban dust samples. Recoveries between 99.17 and 109.17% are reported. A precision of 4.1% at the 10 ng g -1 level in water standards was achieved. copyright 1998 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  1. Analysis of River sediments from the Tigre river (Venezuela) by radioisotope excited x-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Rosales, P.A.; Schorin, H.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes qualitative elemental scans by both energy dispersive (radioisotope excited) and conventional wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence of different grain size fractions of river sediments. An internal standard thin-film technique was used. The precision of Rb, Sr, Y and Zr determination for SY-3 standard reference rock and one real sample for five independently prepared samples is demonstrated

  2. Effect of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols on chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in apple fruit: signature analysis, assessment, modelling, and relevance to photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyak, Mark N; Melø, Thor Bernt; Naqvi, K Razi

    2008-01-01

    Whole apple fruit (Malus domestica Borkh.) widely differing in pigment content and composition has been examined by recording its chlorophyll fluorescence excitation and diffuse reflection spectra in the visible and near UV regions. Spectral bands sensitive to the pigment concentration have been identified, and linear models for non-destructive assessment of anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols via chlorophyll fluorescence measurements are put forward. The adaptation of apple fruit to high light stress involves accumulation of these protective pigments, which absorb solar radiation in broad spectral ranges extending from UV to the green and, in anthocyanin-containing cultivars, to the red regions of the spectrum. In ripening apples the protective effect in the blue region could be attributed to extrathylakoid carotenoids. A simple model, which allows the simulation of chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra in the visible range and a quantitative evaluation of competitive absorption by anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols, is described. Evidence is presented to support the view that anthocyanins, carotenoids, and flavonols play, in fruit with low-to-moderate pigment content, the role of internal traps (insofar as they compete with chlorophylls for the absorption of incident light in specific spectral bands), affecting thereby the shape of the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectrum.

  3. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of molecules and molecular fragments. Annual progress report, March 1992 - February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In this report, the author will review the progress made in his studies of ion rotational distributions resulting from resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of excited electronic states and from single-photon ionization of ground electronic states of jet-cooled molecules by coherent VUV and XUV radiation. To do so he will select a few examples from his studies which serve to highlight his progress and to identify the background and significance of the specific spectral features and systems he has chosen to study

  4. Electronic-excitation energy transfer in heterogeneous dye solutions under laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levshin, L.V.; Mukushev, B.T.; Saletskii, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study has been made of electronic-excitation energy transfer (EEET) among dye molecules of different types for different exciting-fight wavelengths and temperatures. Upon selective laser excitation of the donor, the inhomogeneous broadening of molecular levels increases the probability of EEET from the donor to acceptor molecules. The efficiency of this process is directly proportional to the acceptor molecule concentration and is temperature dependent. The EEET is accompanied by the spectral migration of energy among donor molecules, which reduces the fluorescence quantum efficiency of the donor. Increasing the frequency of the exciting light decreases in the donor fluorescence quantum efficiency. An increase in the acceptor molecule concentration results in a decrease of the spectral migration of excitation in the donor molecule system. 5 refs., 5 figs

  5. Fluorescence and picosecond induced absorption from the lowest singlet excited states of quercetin in solutions and polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Raichenok, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant antioxidant quercetin in organic solvents, polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol, and a buffer solution at pH 7.0 are studied by stationary luminescence and femtosecond laser spectroscopy at room temperature and 77 K. The large magnitude of the dipole moment of the quercetin molecule in the excited Franck-Condon state μ e FC = 52.8 C m indicates the dipolar nature of quercetin in this excited state. The transient induced absorption spectra S 1→ S n in all solvents are characterized by a short-wave band at λ abs max = 460 nm with exponential decay times in the range of 10.0-20.0 ps. In the entire spectral range at times of >100 ps, no residual induced absorption was observed that could be attributed to the triplet-triplet transitions T 1 → T k in quercetin. In polar solvents, two-band fluorescence was also recorded at room temperature, which is due to the luminescence of the initial enol form of quercetin ( 415 nm) and its keto form with a transferred proton (550 nm). The short-wave band is absent in nonpolar 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). The spectra of fluorescence and fluorescence excitation exhibit a low dependence on the wavelength of excitation and detection, which may be related to the solvation and conformational changes in the quercetin molecule. Decreasing the temperature of a glassy-like freezing quercetin solution in ethanol and 2-MTHF to 77 K leads to a strong increase in the intensity (by a factor of 100) of both bands. The energy circuits for the proton transfer process are proposed depending on the polarity of the medium. The main channel for the exchange of electronic excitation energy in the quercetin molecule at room temperature is the internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0, induced by the state with a proton transfer.

  6. A novel flexible clinical multiphoton tomograph for early melanoma detection, skin analysis, testing of anti-age products, and in situ nanoparticle tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2010-02-01

    High-resolution 3D microscopy based on multiphoton induced autofluorescence and second harmonic generation have been introduced in 1990. 13 years later, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have first been launched by JenLab company with the tomography DermaInspect®. This year, the second generation of clinical multiphoton tomographs was introduced. The novel multiphoton tomograph MPTflex, equipped with a flexible articulated optical arm, provides an increased flexibility and accessibility especially for clinical and cosmetical examinations. Improved image quality and signal to noise ratio (SNR) are achieved by a very short source-drain spacing, by larger active areas of the detectors and by single photon counting (SPC) technology. Shorter image acquisition time due to improved image quality reduces artifacts and simplifies the operation of the system. The compact folded optical design and the light-weight structure of the optical head eases the handling. Dual channel detectors enable to distinguish between intratissue elastic fibers and collagenous structures simultaneously. Through the use of piezo-driven optics a stack of optical cross-sections (optical sectioning) can be acquired and 3D imaging can be performed. The multiphoton excitation of biomolecules like NAD(P)H, flavins, porphyrins, elastin, and melanin is done by picojoule femtosecond laser pulses from an tunable turn-key femtosescond near infrared laser system. The ability for rapid high-quality image acquisition, the user-friendly operation of the system and the compact and flexible design qualifies this system to be used for melanoma detection, diagnostics of dermatological disorders, cosmetic research and skin aging measurements as well as in situ drug monitoring and animal research.

  7. All-optical bidirectional neural interfacing using hybrid multiphoton holographic optogenetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch-Siegler, Shir; Mayblum, Tom; Dana, Hod; Brosh, Inbar; Gefen, Inna; Shoham, Shy

    2015-07-01

    Our understanding of neural information processing could potentially be advanced by combining flexible three-dimensional (3-D) neuroimaging and stimulation. Recent developments in optogenetics suggest that neurophotonic approaches are in principle highly suited for noncontact stimulation of network activity patterns. In particular, two-photon holographic optical neural stimulation (2P-HONS) has emerged as a leading approach for multisite 3-D excitation, and combining it with temporal focusing (TF) further enables axially confined yet spatially extended light patterns. Here, we study key steps toward bidirectional cell-targeted 3-D interfacing by introducing and testing a hybrid new 2P-TF-HONS stimulation path for accurate parallel optogenetic excitation into a recently developed hybrid multiphoton 3-D imaging system. The system is shown to allow targeted all-optical probing of in vitro cortical networks expressing channelrhodopsin-2 using a regeneratively amplified femtosecond laser source tuned to 905 nm. These developments further advance a prospective new tool for studying and achieving distributed control over 3-D neuronal circuits both in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Multiphoton Absorption Order of CsPbBr3 As Determined by Wavelength-Dependent Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saouma, Felix O; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G; Kim, Yong Soo; Jang, Joon I

    2017-10-05

    CsPbBr 3 is a direct-gap semiconductor where optical absorption takes place across the fundamental bandgap, but this all-inorganic halide perovskite typically exhibits above-bandgap emission when excited over an energy level, lying above the conduction-band minimum. We probe this bandgap anomaly using wavelength-dependent multiphoton absorption spectroscopy and find that the fundamental gap is strictly two-photon forbidden, rendering it three-photon absorption (3PA) active. Instead, two-photon absorption (2PA) commences when the two-photon energy is resonant with the optical gap, associated with the level causing the anomaly. We determine absolute nonlinear optical dispersion over this 3PA-2PA region, which can be explained by two-band models in terms of the optical gap. The polarization dependence of 3PA and 2PA is also measured and explained by the relevant selection rules. CsPbBr 3 is highly luminescent under multiphoton absorption at room temperature with marked polarization and wavelength dependence at the 3PA-2PA crossover and therefore has potential for nonlinear optical applications.

  9. Limiting energy loss distributions for multiphoton channeling radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenco, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Recent results in the theory of multiphoton spectra for coherent radiation sources are overviewed, with the emphasis on channeling radiation. For the latter case, the importance of the order of resummation and averaging is emphasized. Limiting shapes of multiphoton spectra at high intensity are discussed for different channeling regimes. In some spectral regions, there emerges a correspondence between the radiative energy loss and the electron integrals of motion

  10. Beyond the Floquet theorem: generalized Floquet formalisms and quasienergy methods for atomic and molecular multiphoton processes in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, S.-I.; Telnov, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    dephasing mechanisms) and high-order nonlinear optical processes (such as intensity-dependent nonlinear optical susceptibilities and multiphoton resonance fluorescence, etc.); (e) generalized Floquet approaches for the treatment of nonadiabatic and complex geometric phases involving multiphoton transitions; (f) generalized Floquet techniques for the treatment of multiphoton processes in intense laser pulse fields with nonperiodic time-dependent Hamiltonians; (g) Floquet formulations of time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent current DFT for nonperturbative treatment of multiphoton processes of many-electron quantum systems in periodic or polychromatic (quasiperiodic) laser fields. For each generalized Floquet approach, we present also the corresponding development of new computational techniques for facilitating the study of strong-field processes and phenomena. The advancement of these generalized Floquet formalisms and quasienergy methods provides powerful new theoretical frameworks and accurate computational methods for nonperturbative and ab initio treatment of a wide range of interesting and challenging laser-induced chemical and physical processes and insightful exploration of strong-field atomic and molecular physics

  11. Beyond the Floquet theorem: generalized Floquet formalisms and quasienergy methods for atomic and molecular multiphoton processes in intense laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shih-I.; Telnov, Dmitry A.

    2004-02-01

    dephasing mechanisms) and high-order nonlinear optical processes (such as intensity-dependent nonlinear optical susceptibilities and multiphoton resonance fluorescence, etc.); (e) generalized Floquet approaches for the treatment of nonadiabatic and complex geometric phases involving multiphoton transitions; (f) generalized Floquet techniques for the treatment of multiphoton processes in intense laser pulse fields with nonperiodic time-dependent Hamiltonians; (g) Floquet formulations of time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent current DFT for nonperturbative treatment of multiphoton processes of many-electron quantum systems in periodic or polychromatic ( quasiperiodic) laser fields. For each generalized Floquet approach, we present also the corresponding development of new computational techniques for facilitating the study of strong-field processes and phenomena. The advancement of these generalized Floquet formalisms and quasienergy methods provides powerful new theoretical frameworks and accurate computational methods for nonperturbative and ab initio treatment of a wide range of interesting and challenging laser-induced chemical and physical processes and insightful exploration of strong-field atomic and molecular physics.

  12. Electronically tunable femtosecond all-fiber optical parametric oscillator for multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Tim; Brinkmann, Maximilian; Fallnich, Carsten

    2018-02-01

    We present a femtosecond fiber-based optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) for multiphoton microscopy with wavelength tuning by electronic repetition rate tuning in combination with a dispersive filter in the FOPO cavity. The all-spliced, all-fiber FOPO cavity is based on polarization-maintaining fibers and a broadband output coupler, allowing to get access to the resonant signal pulses as well as the idler pulses simultaneously. The system was pumped by a gain-switched fiber-coupled laser diode emitting pulses at a central wavelength of 1030 nm and an electronically tunable repetition frequency of about 2 MHz. The pump pulses were amplified in an Ytterbium fiber amplifier system with a pulse duration after amplification of 13 ps. Tuning of the idler (1140 nm - 1300 nm) and signal wavelengths (850 nm - 940 nm) was achieved by changing the repetition frequency of the pump laser by about 4 kHz. The generated signal pulses reached a pulse energy of up to 9.2 nJ at 920 nm and were spectrally broadened to about 6 nm in the FOPO by a combination of self-phase and cross-phase modulation. We showed external compression of the idler pulses at 920 nm to about 430 fs and appleid them to two-photon excitation microscopy with green fluorescent dyes. The presented system constitutes an important step towards a fully fiber-integrated all-electronically tunable and, thereby, programmable light source and already embodies a versatile and flexible light source for applications, e.g., for smart microscopy.

  13. Application of multiphoton microscopy in dermatological studies: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Yew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance.

  14. Mapping the local organization of cell membranes using excitation-polarization-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-07-02

    Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive to depolarization mechanisms such as those induced by fluorescence energy transfer. A fully excitation-polarization-resolved fluorescence microscopy imaging that relies on the use of a tunable incident polarization and a nonpolarized detection is able to circumvent these limitations. We have developed such a technique in confocal epifluorescence microscopy, giving access to new regions of study in the complex and heterogeneous molecular organization of cell membranes. Using this technique, we demonstrate morphological changes at the subdiffraction scale in labeled COS-7 cell membranes whose cytoskeleton is perturbed. Molecular orientational order is also seen to be affected by cholesterol depletion, reflecting the strong interplay between lipid-packing regions and their nearby cytoskeleton. This noninvasive optical technique can reveal local organization in cell membranes when used as a complement to existing methods such as generalized polarization. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Laser-excited Fluorescence And Electron-spin Resonance Of Er3+ In Polycrystalline Alcl3

    OpenAIRE

    Ceotto G.; Pires M.A.; Sanjurjo J.A.; Rettori C.; Barberis G.E.

    1990-01-01

    The green fluorescence transitions among the levels corresponding to the 4S3/2 and 4I15/2 configurations of Er3+ diluted in AlCl3 have been measured using laser excitation. The data allow us to determine the crystalline-field splittings of these levels and, in turn, the spin-Hamiltonian parameters. The electron-paramagnetic-resonance spectrum observed at low temperatures is in good agreement with that expected from these parameters. © 1990 The American Physical Society.

  16. Multi-photon ionization of atoms in intense short-wavelength radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The unprecedented characteristics of XUV and X-ray Free Electron Lasers (FELs) have stimulated numerous investigations focusing on the detailed understanding of fundamental photon-matter interactions in atoms and molecules. In particular, the high intensities (up to 106 W/cm2) giving rise to non-linear phenomena in the short wavelength regime. The basic phenomenology involves the production of highly charged ions via electron emission to which both sequential and direct multi-photon absorption processes contribute. The detailed investigation of the role and relative weight of these processes under different conditions (wavelength, pulse duration, intensity) is the key element for a comprehensive understanding of the ionization dynamics. Here the results of recent investigations are presented, performed at the FELs in Hamburg (FLASH) and Trieste (FERMI) on atomic systems with electronic structures of increasing complexity (Ar, Ne and Xe). Mainly, electron spectroscopy is used to obtain quantitative information about the relevance of various multi-photon ionization processes. For the case of Ar, a variety of processes including above threshold ionization (ATI) from 3p and 3s valence shells, direct 2p two-photon ionization and resonant 2p-4p two-photon excitations were observed and their role was quantitatively determined comparing the experimental ionization yields to ab-initio calculations of the cross sections for the multi-photon processes. Using Ar as a benchmark to prove the reliability of the combined experimental and theoretical approach, the more complex and intriguing case of Xe was studied. Especially, the analysis of the two-photon ATI from the Xe 4d shell reveals new insight into the character of the 4d giant resonance, which was unresolved in the linear one-photon regime. Finally, the influence of intense XUV radiation to the relaxation dynamics of the Ne 2s-3p resonance was investigated by angle-resolved electron spectroscopy, especially be observing

  17. Transverse correlations in multiphoton entanglement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Jianming; Rubin, Morton H.; Shih Yanhua

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed the transverse correlation in multiphoton entanglement. The generalization of quantum ghost imaging is extended to the N-photon state. The Klyshko's two-photon advanced-wave picture is generalized to the N-photon case

  18. Multiphoton (e,2e) process of hydrogen atom in strong laser field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh Deb, S.; Roy, S.; Sinha, C. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Dept. of Theoretical Physics, Jadavpur, Kolkata (India)

    2009-12-15

    The dynamics of the electron impact multiphoton ionization of a hydrogen atom in the presence of an intense laser field (e, n gamma e) has been studied theoretically for laser polarization parallel and perpendicular to the incident momentum, with a view to comparing (qualitatively) the results with the recent kinematically complete experiments of Hoehr et al. for the He target. Significant laser modifications are noted in the present doubly (DDCS) and the fully differential multiphoton cross sections (TDCS) for both the geometries (parallel and perpendicular). For most of the explored kinematics (chosen in accordance with the experiment), the present binary peak intensity of the laser-assisted multiphoton TDCS is significantly enhanced with respect to the field free ones, in qualitative agreement with the experiment. Importance of the multiphoton effects is also studied. The multiphoton cross sections in the zeroth order approximation of the ejected electron wavefunction (CV) obeys the Kroll Watson sum rule while it does not hold good in the corresponding first order approximation (MCV). (authors)

  19. Multiphoton electronic-spin generation and transmission spectroscopy in n-type GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrish Miah, M., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.a [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2011-01-17

    Multiphoton electronic-spin generation in semiconductors was investigated using differential transmission spectroscopy. The generation of the electronic spins in the semiconductor samples were achieved by multiphoton pumping with circularly polarized light beam and was probed by the spin-resolved transmission of the samples. The electronic spin-polarization of conduction band was estimated and was found to depend on the delay of the probe beam, temperature as well as on the multiphoton pumping energy. The temperature dependence showed a decrease of the spin-polarization with increasing temperature. The electronic spin-polarization was found to depolarize rapidly for multiphoton pumping energy larger than the energy gap of the split-off band to the conduction band. The results were compared with those obtained in one-photon pumping, which shows that an enhancement of the electronic spin-polarization was achieved in multiphoton pumping. The findings resulting from this investigation might have potential applications in opto-spintronics, where the generation of highly polarized electronic spins is required.

  20. Multiphoton electronic-spin generation and transmission spectroscopy in n-type GaAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrish Miah, M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton electronic-spin generation in semiconductors was investigated using differential transmission spectroscopy. The generation of the electronic spins in the semiconductor samples were achieved by multiphoton pumping with circularly polarized light beam and was probed by the spin-resolved transmission of the samples. The electronic spin-polarization of conduction band was estimated and was found to depend on the delay of the probe beam, temperature as well as on the multiphoton pumping energy. The temperature dependence showed a decrease of the spin-polarization with increasing temperature. The electronic spin-polarization was found to depolarize rapidly for multiphoton pumping energy larger than the energy gap of the split-off band to the conduction band. The results were compared with those obtained in one-photon pumping, which shows that an enhancement of the electronic spin-polarization was achieved in multiphoton pumping. The findings resulting from this investigation might have potential applications in opto-spintronics, where the generation of highly polarized electronic spins is required.

  1. Multiphoton imaging with a novel compact diode-pumped Ti:sapphire oscillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    König, Karsten; Andersen, Peter E.; Le, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Multiphoton laser scanning microscopy commonly relies on bulky and expensive femtosecond lasers. We integrated a novel minimal-footprint Ti:sapphire oscillator, pumped by a frequency-doubled distributed Bragg reflector tapered diode laser, into a clinical multiphoton tomograph and evaluated its...... imaging capability using different biological samples, i.e. cell monolayers, corneal tissue, and human skin. With the novel laser, the realization of very compact Ti:sapphire-based systems for high-quality multiphoton imaging at a significantly size and weight compared to current systems will become...

  2. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione studied by ultrafast absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ transient absorption from the deep-UV to the visible region and fluorescence upconversion to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer dynamics in a biologically relevant drug molecule, 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione. The molecule is a ß-diketone which in the electronic ground state exists as exocyclic enol with an intramolecular H-bond. Upon electronic excitation at 300 nm, the first excited state of the exocyclic enol is initially populated, followed by ultrafast proton transfer (≈160 fs to form the vibrationally hot endocyclic enol. Subsequently, solvent-induced vibrational relaxation takes place (≈10 ps followed by decay (≈390 ps to the corresponding ground state.

  3. Fundamentals of fluorescence microscopy exploring life with light

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    This book starts at an introductory level and leads reader to the most advanced developments in fluorescence imaging and super-resolution techniques that have enabled the emergence of new disciplines such as nanobioimaging, multiphoton microscopy, photodynamic therapy, nanometrology and nanosensors. The interdisciplinary subject of fluorescence microscopy and imaging requires complete knowledge of imaging optics and molecular physics. So, this book approaches the subject by introducing optical imaging concepts before going deep into the advanced imaging systems and their applications. Molecular orbital theory forms the basis for understanding fluorescent molecules and thereby facilitates complete explanation of light-matter interaction at the geometrical focus. The two disciplines have some overlap since light controls the states of molecules and conversely, molecular states control the emitted light. These two mechanisms together determine essential fluorescence  factors and phenomena such as, molecular cro...

  4. An Automated System for the Control of, and Data Acquisition from Multiphoton Ionization and Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Quanta- Ray company , which also supplied the laser used for the multiphoton work. The, burner was mounted on a translator stage from Velmex, Inc...and no longer exists as a process in the system. When the user analysis program has completed, the lifetime program is again automatically re-started...KCHAR) RETURN 100 FORMAT(I3) 101 FORMAT(F7.2) END SUBROUTINE LAB4 FODA SE"oteD C This routine puts the label "INTEGRAL FROM DATA SET" on the MDP C screen

  5. Monitoring the Behavior of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater-Impacted Rivers Based on the Use of Fluorescence Excitation Emission Matrixes (EEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-04-18

    This study investigated the applicability of fluorescence indexes based on the interpretation of excitation emission matrices (EEMs) by PARAFAC analysis and by selecting fluorescence intensities at a priori defined excitation/emission pairs as surrogates for monitoring the behavior of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in two catchment basins impacted by wastewater discharges. Relevant EOC and EEM data were obtained for a 90 km stretch of the Simeto River, the main river in Sicily, and the smaller San Leonardo River, which was investigated for a 17 km stretch. The use of fluorescence indexes developed by these two different approaches resulted in similar observations. Changes of the fluorescence indexes that correspond to a group of humic-like fluorescing species were determined to be highly correlated with the concentrations of recalcitrant contaminants such as sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine, which are typical wastewater markers in river water. Changes of the fluorescence indexes related to tyrosine-like substances were well correlated with the concentrations of ibuprofen and caffeine, anthropogenic indicators of untreated wastewater discharges. Chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were correlated with humic-like fluorescence indexes. The observed correlations were site-specific and characterized by different regression parameters for every collection event. Caffeine and carbamazepine showed correlations with florescence indexes in the San Leonardo River and in the alluvial plain stretch of the Simeto River, whereas sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and ibuprofen have always been well correlated in all the investigated river stretches. However, when data of different collection events from river stretches where correlations were observed were combined, good linear correlations were obtained for data sets generated via the normalization of the measured concentrations by the average value for the corresponding collection event

  6. Time-resolved photoion imaging spectroscopy: Determining energy distribution in multiphoton absorption experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, D. B.; Shi, F. D.; Chen, L.; Martin, S.; Bernard, J.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. F.; Chen, Z. Q.; Zhu, X. L.; Ma, X.

    2018-04-01

    We propose an approach to determine the excitation energy distribution due to multiphoton absorption in the case of excited systems following decays to produce different ion species. This approach is based on the measurement of the time-resolved photoion position spectrum by using velocity map imaging spectrometry and an unfocused laser beam with a low fluence and homogeneous profile. Such a measurement allows us to identify the species and the origin of each ion detected and to depict the energy distribution using a pure Poisson's equation involving only one variable which is proportional to the absolute photon absorption cross section. A cascade decay model is used to build direct connections between the energy distribution and the probability to detect each ionic species. Comparison between experiments and simulations permits the energy distribution and accordingly the absolute photon absorption cross section to be determined. This approach is illustrated using C60 as an example. It may therefore be extended to a wide variety of molecules and clusters having decay mechanisms similar to those of fullerene molecules.

  7. Water-Soluble Triarylborane Chromophores for One- and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondria in Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbeck, Stefanie; Zhang, Zuolun; Gutmann, Marcus; Lühmann, Tessa; Edkins, Robert M; Clermont, Guillaume; Lazar, Adina N; Haehnel, Martin; Edkins, Katharina; Eichhorn, Antonius; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Meinel, Lorenz; Marder, Todd B

    2016-10-04

    Three water-soluble tetracationic quadrupolar chromophores comprising two three-coordinate boron π-acceptor groups bridged by thiophene-containing moieties were synthesised for biological imaging applications. Compound 3 containing the bulkier 5-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 )-2,2'-(C4 H2 S)2 -5'-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 ) bridge is stable over a long period of time, exhibits a high fluorescence quantum yield and strong one- and two-photon absorption (TPA), and has a TPA cross section of 268 GM at 800 nm in water. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies in live cells indicated localisation of the chromophore at the mitochondria; moreover, cytotoxicity measurements proved biocompatibility. Thus, chromophore 3 has excellent potential for one- and two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging of mitochondrial function in cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The Application of Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Technique in Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas chromatography resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/REMPI-TOFMS using a nanosecond laser has been applied to analyze the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. The excited-state lifetime, absorption characters, and energy of electronic states of the 16 PAHs were investigated to optimize the ionization yield. A river water sample pretreated by means of solid phase extraction was analyzed to evaluate the performance of the analytical instrument. The results suggested that REMPI is superior to electron impact ionization method for soft ionization and suppresses the background signal due to aliphatic hydrocarbons. Thus, GC/REMPI-TOFMS is a more reliable method for the determination of PAHs present in the environment.

  9. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Jet-Cooled 1,1 '-Diphenylethylene: Electronically Excited and Ionic States of a Prototypical Cross-Conjugated System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C. A.; Zgierski, M. Z.; Buma, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated pi-system, 1,1'-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio

  10. Nonlinear adaptive optics: aberration correction in three photon fluorescence microscopy for mouse brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinefeld, David; Paudel, Hari P.; Wang, Tianyu; Wang, Mengran; Ouzounov, Dimitre G.; Bifano, Thomas G.; Xu, Chris

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy is a well-established technique for deep-tissue imaging with subcellular resolution. Three-photon microscopy (3PM) when combined with long wavelength excitation was shown to allow deeper imaging than two-photon microscopy (2PM) in biological tissues, such as mouse brain, because out-of-focus background light can be further reduced due to the higher order nonlinear excitation. As was demonstrated in 2PM systems, imaging depth and resolution can be improved by aberration correction using adaptive optics (AO) techniques which are based on shaping the scanning beam using a spatial light modulator (SLM). In this way, it is possible to compensate for tissue low order aberration and to some extent, to compensate for tissue scattering. Here, we present a 3PM AO microscopy system for brain imaging. Soliton self-frequency shift is used to create a femtosecond source at 1675 nm and a microelectromechanical (MEMS) SLM serves as the wavefront shaping device. We perturb the 1020 segment SLM using a modified nonlinear version of three-point phase shifting interferometry. The nonlinearity of the fluorescence signal used for feedback ensures that the signal is increasing when the spot size decreases, allowing compensation of phase errors in an iterative optimization process without direct phase measurement. We compare the performance for different orders of nonlinear feedback, showing an exponential growth in signal improvement as the nonlinear order increases. We demonstrate the impact of the method by applying the 3PM AO system for in-vivo mouse brain imaging, showing improvement in signal at 1-mm depth inside the brain.

  11. An enhancement of spin polarization by multiphoton pumping in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} Multiphoton pumping and spin generation in semiconductors. {yields} Optical selection rules for inter-band transitions. {yields} Calculations of spin polarization using band-energy model and the second order perturbation theory. {yields} Enhancement of the electronic spin polarization. - Abstract: A pump-probe spectroscopic study has been carried out in zinc-blende bulk semiconductors. In the semiconductor samples, a spin-polarized carrier population is produced by the absorption of a monochromatic circularly polarized light beam with two-photon energy above the direct band gap in bulk semiconductors. The production of a carrier population with a net spin is a consequence of the optical selection rules for the heavy-hole and light-hole valence-to-conduction band transitions. This production is probed by the spin-dependent transmission of the samples in the time domain. The spin polarization of the conduction-band-electrons in dependences of delay of the probe beam as well as of pumping photon energy is estimated. The spin polarization is found to depolarize rapidly for pumping energy larger than the energy gap of the split-off band to the conduction band. From the polarization decays, the spin relaxation times are also estimated. Compared to one-photon pumping, the results, however, show that an enhancement of the spin-polarization is achieved by multiphoton excitation of the samples. The experimental results are compared with those obtained in calculations using second order perturbation theory of the spin transport model. A good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. The observed results are discussed in details.

  12. An enhancement of spin polarization by multiphoton pumping in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Multiphoton pumping and spin generation in semiconductors. → Optical selection rules for inter-band transitions. → Calculations of spin polarization using band-energy model and the second order perturbation theory. → Enhancement of the electronic spin polarization. - Abstract: A pump-probe spectroscopic study has been carried out in zinc-blende bulk semiconductors. In the semiconductor samples, a spin-polarized carrier population is produced by the absorption of a monochromatic circularly polarized light beam with two-photon energy above the direct band gap in bulk semiconductors. The production of a carrier population with a net spin is a consequence of the optical selection rules for the heavy-hole and light-hole valence-to-conduction band transitions. This production is probed by the spin-dependent transmission of the samples in the time domain. The spin polarization of the conduction-band-electrons in dependences of delay of the probe beam as well as of pumping photon energy is estimated. The spin polarization is found to depolarize rapidly for pumping energy larger than the energy gap of the split-off band to the conduction band. From the polarization decays, the spin relaxation times are also estimated. Compared to one-photon pumping, the results, however, show that an enhancement of the spin-polarization is achieved by multiphoton excitation of the samples. The experimental results are compared with those obtained in calculations using second order perturbation theory of the spin transport model. A good agreement between experiment and theory is obtained. The observed results are discussed in details.

  13. Electron spectroscopy of He and NO using electron impact and multiphoton ionisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimman, J.T.N.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis describes two experimental studies which are intended to contribute to our knowledge of the structure of molecules and the decay dynamics of excited molecular states. The two studies have in common that they are both concerned with ionisation processes, in which an accurately known amount of energy is transferred to the target, and energy analysis of the ejected electrons is made. Ionisation is caused either by scattering electrons off the molecules (chapter 2: electron impact ionisation) or by a simultaneous absorption of several photons (chapter 3: multiphoton ionisation). In chapter 2 an electron impact ionisation experiment on Helium is described in which the kinematics of both the scattered and the ejected electrons is fully determined ((e,2e) experiment). (Auth.)

  14. Improvement of detection limits in the annular 241Am radioisotope-excited X-ray fluorescence analysis for minor elements of environmental sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai My Phe; Ngo Quang Huy; Nguyen Van Suc; Tran Van Luyen; Nguyen Van Mai; Dao Van Hoang; Trinh Thi Bich

    2003-01-01

    The improvement of limit detection to elements Pb, Sr, Zr, Nd, and Ba in mud samples is presented. Two ways for reducing background radiation are: 1/ choosing the optimum γ-ray-excited X-ray assembly such as scattering angle (θ), filter for primary beam, excited holder, collimator for fluorescent lines, etc; 2/ using the chemical separation method to remove major composition for matrix reduction. (NHA)

  15. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  16. Compact 3D printed module for fluorescence and label-free imaging using evanescent excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikas; Gupta, Shalini; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is widely used for selective excitation and high-resolution imaging of fluorophores, and more recently label-free nanosized objects, with high vertical confinement near a liquid-solid interface. Traditionally, high numerical aperture objectives (>1.4) are used to simultaneously generate evanescent waves and collect fluorescence emission signals which limits their use to small area imaging (filters to prevent specular reflection within the objective lenses. We have developed a compact 3D module called cTIRF that can generate evanescent waves in microscope glass slides via a planar waveguide illumination. The module can be attached as a fixture to any existing optical microscope, converting it into a TIRF and enabling high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fluorescence imaging using any magnification objective. As the incidence optics is perpendicular to the detector, label-free evanescent scattering-based imaging of submicron objects can also be performed without using emission filters. SNR is significantly enhanced in this case as compared to cTIRF alone, as seen through our model experiments performed on latex beads and mammalian cells. Extreme flexibility and the low cost of our approach makes it scalable for limited resource settings.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  18. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  19. Multiphoton above threshold effects in strong-field fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    B Madsen, C; Anis, F; B Madsen, L

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of multiphoton dissociative ionization from molecules. By solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for H2+ and projecting the solution onto double continuum scattering states, we observe the correlated electron-nuclear ionization dynamics in detail. We show—for the first...... time—how multiphoton structure prevails as long as one accounts for the energies of all the fragments. Our current work provides a new avenue to analyze strong-field fragmentation that leads to a deeper understanding of the correlated molecular dynamics....

  20. Quantification of aortic and cutaneous elastin and collagen morphology in Marfan syndrome by multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jason Z; Tehrani, Arash Y; Jett, Kimberly A; Bernatchez, Pascal; van Breemen, Cornelis; Esfandiarei, Mitra

    2014-09-01

    In a mouse model of Marfan syndrome, conventional Verhoeff-Van Gieson staining displays severe fragmentation, disorganization and loss of the aortic elastic fiber integrity. However, this method involves chemical fixatives and staining, which may alter the native morphology of elastin and collagen. Thus far, quantitative analysis of fiber damage in aorta and skin in Marfan syndrome has not yet been explored. In this study, we have used an advanced noninvasive and label-free imaging technique, multiphoton microscopy to quantify fiber fragmentation, disorganization, and total volumetric density of aortic and cutaneous elastin and collagen in a mouse model of Marfan syndrome. Aorta and skin samples were harvested from Marfan and control mice aged 3-, 6- and 9-month. Elastin and collagen were identified based on two-photon excitation fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation signals, respectively, without exogenous label. Measurement of fiber length indicated significant fragmentation in Marfan vs. control. Fast Fourier transform algorithm analysis demonstrated markedly lower fiber organization in Marfan mice. Significantly reduced volumetric density of elastin and collagen and thinner skin dermis were observed in Marfan mice. Cutaneous content of elastic fibers and thickness of dermis in 3-month Marfan resembled those in the oldest control mice. Our findings of early signs of fiber degradation and thinning of skin dermis support the potential development of a novel non-invasive approach for early diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an unus......Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  2. Single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF) for determination of cetane improver in diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, Matías; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2015-04-05

    A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate in diesel fuel. Usually, this compound is used as an additive in order to improve cetane number. The analytical method consists in building the chemometric model as a first step. Then, it is possible to quantify the analyte with only recording a single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF), whose data are introduced in the chemometric model above mentioned. Another important characteristic of this method is that the fuel sample was used without any pre-treatment for EEF. This work provides an interest improvement to fluorescence techniques using the rapid and easily applicable EEF approach to analyze such complex matrices. Exploding EEF was the key to a successful determination, obtaining a detection limit of 0.00434% (v/v) and a limit of quantification of 0.01446% (v/v). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    OpenAIRE

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on ...

  4. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled 1,1 '-diphenylethylene: electronically excited and ionic states of a prototypical cross-conjugated system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolarek, S.; Vdovin, A.; Rijs, A.; van Walree, C.A.; Zgierski, M.Z.; Buma, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    The photophysics of a prototypical cross-conjugated π-system, 1,1′-diphenylethylene, have been studied using high-resolution resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization excitation spectroscopy and zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy, in combination with advanced ab initio calculations. We

  5. Simple fibre based dispersion management for two-photon excited fluorescence imaging through an endoscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marti, Dominik; Andersen, Peter E.

    2018-01-01

    We want to implement two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) into endoscopes, since TPEFM can provide relevant biomarkers for cancer staging and grading in hollow organs, endoscopically accessible through natural orifices. However, many obstacles must be overcome, among others...... the delivery of short laser pulses to the distal end of the endoscope. To this avail, we present imaging results using an all-fibre dispersion management scheme in a TPEFM setup. The scheme has been conceived by Jespersen et al. in 20101 and relies on the combination of a single mode fibre with normal...

  6. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S.; Kim, Daekeun; Subramanian, Jaichandar; Nedivi, Elly; So, Peter T. C.

    2015-01-01

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice

  7. Non-descanned multifocal multiphoton microscopy with a multianode photomultiplier tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jae Won; Yew, Elijah Y. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, Daekeun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Dankook University (Korea, Republic of); Subramanian, Jaichandar [Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Nedivi, Elly [Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Departments of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, and Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); So, Peter T. C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM) improves imaging speed over a point scanning approach by parallelizing the excitation process. Early versions of MMM relied on imaging detectors to record emission signals from multiple foci simultaneously. For many turbid biological specimens, the scattering of emission photons results in blurred images and degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). We have recently demonstrated that a multianode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) placed in a descanned configuration can effectively collect scattered emission photons from each focus into their corresponding anodes significantly improving image SNR for highly scattering specimens. Unfortunately, a descanned MMM has a longer detection path resulting in substantial emission photon loss. Optical design constraints in a descanned geometry further results in significant optical aberrations especially for large field-of-view (FOV), high NA objectives. Here, we introduce a non-descanned MMM based on MAPMT that substantially overcomes most of these drawbacks. We show that we improve signal efficiency up to fourfold with limited image SNR degradation due to scattered emission photons. The excitation foci can also be spaced wider to cover the full FOV of the objective with minimal aberrations. The performance of this system is demonstrated by imaging interneuron morphological structures deep in the brains of living mice.

  8. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  9. A new method using multiphoton imaging and morphometric analysis for differentiating chromophobe renal cell carcinoma and oncocytoma kidney tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Mukherjee, Sushmita; Jain, Manu

    2016-03-01

    Distinguishing chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (chRCC) from oncocytoma on hematoxylin and eosin images may be difficult and require time-consuming ancillary procedures. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM), an optical imaging modality, was used to rapidly generate sub-cellular histological resolution images from formalin-fixed unstained tissue sections from chRCC and oncocytoma.Tissues were excited using 780nm wavelength and emission signals (including second harmonic generation and autofluorescence) were collected in different channels between 390 nm and 650 nm. Granular structure in the cell cytoplasm was observed in both chRCC and oncocytoma. Quantitative morphometric analysis was conducted to distinguish chRCC and oncocytoma. To perform the analysis, cytoplasm and granules in tumor cells were segmented from the images. Their area and fluorescence intensity were found in different channels. Multiple features were measured to quantify the morphological and fluorescence properties. Linear support vector machine (SVM) was used for classification. Re-substitution validation, cross validation and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were implemented to evaluate the efficacy of the SVM classifier. A wrapper feature algorithm was used to select the optimal features which provided the best predictive performance in separating the two tissue types (classes). Statistical measures such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and area under curve (AUC) of ROC were calculated to evaluate the efficacy of the classification. Over 80% accuracy was achieved as the predictive performance. This method, if validated on a larger and more diverse sample set, may serve as an automated rapid diagnostic tool to differentiate between chRCC and oncocytoma. An advantage of such automated methods are that they are free from investigator bias and variability.

  10. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E.; Redding, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  11. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chuji [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, 39759 (United States); Pan, Yong-Le, E-mail: yongle.pan.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD 20783 (United States); Redding, Brandon [Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • A dual wavelength UV-LIF spectra-rotating drum impactor (RDI) technique was developed. • The technique was demonstrated by direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles. • More than 2000 LIF spectra of atmospheric aerosol particles collected over three weeks in Djibouti were obtained and assigned to various fluorescence clusters. • The LIF spectra showed size- and time-sensitivity behavior with a time resolution of 3.6 h. - Abstract: We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2 mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and

  12. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  13. Temporal focusing-based widefield multiphoton microscopy with spatially modulated illumination for biotissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Yuan; Lin, Cheng-Han; Lin, Chun-Yu; Sie, Yong-Da; Hu, Yvonne Yuling; Tsai, Sheng-Feng; Chen, Shean-Jen

    2018-01-01

    A developed temporal focusing-based multiphoton excitation microscope (TFMPEM) has a digital micromirror device (DMD) which is adopted not only as a blazed grating for light spatial dispersion but also for patterned illumination simultaneously. Herein, the TFMPEM has been extended to implement spatially modulated illumination at structured frequency and orientation to increase the beam coverage at the back-focal aperture of the objective lens. The axial excitation confinement (AEC) of TFMPEM can be condensed from 3.0 μm to 1.5 μm for a 50 % improvement. By using the TFMPEM with HiLo technique as two structured illuminations at the same spatial frequency but different orientation, reconstructed biotissue images according to the condensed AEC structured illumination are shown obviously superior in contrast and better scattering suppression. Picture: TPEF images of the eosin-stained mouse cerebellar cortex by conventional TFMPEM (left), and the TFMPEM with HiLo technique as 1.09 μm -1 spatially modulated illumination at 90° (center) and 0° (right) orientations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Semiclassical analysis of long-wavelength multiphoton processes: The Rydberg atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vela-Arevalo, Luz V.; Fox, Ronald F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the problem of multiphoton processes for intense, long-wavelength irradiation of atomic and molecular electrons. An exact, nonperturbative approach is applied to the standard vector potential coupling Hamiltonian for a three-dimensional hydrogenlike atom in a microwave field treated semiclassically. Multiphoton probability exchange is calculated in both the velocity and the length gauges, by applying the Goeppert-Mayer gauge transformation. The expansion of the time-dependent solution in terms of Floquet states delineates the mechanism of multiphoton transitions. A detailed analysis of the Floquet states and quasienergies as functions of the field parameters allows us to describe the relation between avoided quasienergy crossings and multiphoton probability exchange. We formulate analytical expressions for the variation of quasienergies and Floquet states with respect to the field parameters, and demonstrate that avoided quasienergy crossings are accompanied by dramatic changes in the Floquet states. Analysis of the Floquet states, for small values of the field strength, yields selection rules for the avoided quasienergy crossings. In the case of strong fields, the simultaneous choice of frequency and strength of the field producing an avoided crossing results in improved ionization probability

  15. Determination of mercury in microwave-digested soil by laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, S T; Smith, B W; Winefordner, J D

    1994-12-01

    A sample digestion procedure was developed which employs microwave heating of soil and sediment in concentrated nitric acid in a high-pressure closed vessel. Complete dissolution of mercury into the sample solution occurs within 5 min at 59 W/vessel without loss of analyte through overpressurization. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with electrothermal atomization (LEAFS-ETA) was used as the detection method. The scheme uses a two-step excitation, with lambda(1) = 253.7 nm and lambda(2) = 435.8 nm. Direct line fluorescence was measured at 546.2 nm. The absolute instrumental limit of detection was 14 fg; 1.4 pg/ml with a 10 mul sample injection. The recoveries of mercury in two spiked samples were 94 and 98%. The SRM 8406 (Mercury in River Sediment) was digested and analyzed for mercury, and the results (58.4 +/- 1.8 ng/g) agreed well with the reference value of 60 ng/g. The results obtained by LEAFS-ETA with microwave sample digestion are in good agreement with those found by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry with EPA Series Method 245.5 sample digestion, which is one of the most commonly used methods for the determination of mercury in soil.

  16. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  17. Stimulated emission depletion following two photon excitation

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R. J.; Armoogum, D. A.; Bain, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The technique of stimulated emission depletion of fluorescence (STED) from a two photon excited molecular population is demonstrated in the S, excited state of fluorescein in ethylene glycol and methanol. Two photon excitation (pump) is achieved using the partial output of a regeneratively amplified Ti:Sapphire laser in conjunction with an optical parametric amplifier whose tuneable output provides a synchronous depletion (dump) pulse. Time resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy measu...

  18. Characteristics of the fluorescent substances in the Yodo River system by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy; Sanjigen reiki/keiko kodoho ni yoru yodogawa suikeichu no keiko busshitsu no tokucho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Nakaguchi, Y.; Hiraki, K.; Kudo, M.; Kimura, M.; Nagao, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    Organic substances in the river water in Yodo River system were analyzed by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy. Fluorescent substances were taken as an index of organic substances. The amount of fluorescent substances varied widely depending on the environment of river basin. It is suggested that the fluorescent substances are composed of organic substances which is not directly originated from biological activity. It is suggested that the fluorescent substances were produced by leaching of river bottom sediment. The fluorescent substances in Yodo River system consists of fulvic acid-like substances and protein. The analysis of fluorescent substances in river water by three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectroscopy can be useful means for estimation of variation and origin of fluorescent substances. For better understanding of features of fluorescent substances in the surface water into which various kinds of substances enter, it is necessary to determine the exact sampling points based on the consideration of different sources and to make a database of peak positions for identification of fluorescent substances from fluorescence intensity peak. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.P.

    1992-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy studies of UF 6 have been conducted using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF x + fragment ions even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. The laser power dependence of U n+ ions signals indicates that saturation can occur for many of the steps required for their ionization. In general, the doubly-charged uranium ion (U 2+ ) intensity is much greater than that of the singly-charged uranium ion (U + ). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the U n+ (n = 1- 4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The dominance of the U 2+ ion and the absence or very small intensities of UF x + fragments, along with the unsaturated wavelength dependence, indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms after the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule

  20. High-resolution imaging of basal cell carcinoma: a comparison between multiphoton microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging and reflectance confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredini, Marco; Arginelli, Federica; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul; Talbot, Clifford; König, Karsten; Pellacani, Giovanni; Ponti, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare morphological aspects of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) as assessed by two different imaging methods: in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging implementation (MPT-FLIM). The study comprised 16 BCCs for which a complete set of RCM and MPT-FLIM images were available. The presence of seven MPT-FLIM descriptors was evaluated. The presence of seven RCM equivalent parameters was scored in accordance to their extension. Chi-squared test with Fisher's exact test and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient were determined between MPT-FLIM scores and adjusted-RCM scores. MPT-FLIM and RCM descriptors of BCC were coupled to match the descriptors that define the same pathological structures. The comparison included: Streaming and Aligned elongated cells, Streaming with multiple directions and Double alignment, Palisading (RCM) and Palisading (MPT-FLIM), Typical tumor islands, and Cell islands surrounded by fibers, Dark silhouettes and Phantom islands, Plump bright cells and Melanophages, Vessels (RCM), and Vessels (MPT-FLIM). The parameters that were significantly correlated were Melanophages/Plump Bright Cells, Aligned elongated cells/Streaming, Double alignment/Streaming with multiple directions, and Palisading (MPT-FLIM)/Palisading (RCM). According to our data, both methods are suitable to image BCC's features. The concordance between MPT-FLIM and RCM is high, with some limitations due to the technical differences between the two devices. The hardest difficulty when comparing the images generated by the two imaging modalities is represented by their different field of view. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. Excited State s-cis Rotamers Produced by Extreme Red Edge Excitation of all-trans-1,4-Diphenyl-1,3-butadiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallace-Williams, Stacie E.; Møller, Søren; Goldbeck, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    with the wavelength independence observed for the excited singlet-state absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of 1,5-diphenyl-2,3,4,6,7,8- hexahydronaphthalene and for the fluorescence emission spectra of 1,4diphenyl-1,3-cyclopentadiene, s-trans and s-cis structural analogs of DPB, respectively. The spectral...... changes in DPB can be explained in terms of an excitation wavelength-dependent production of s-cis and s-trans rotamer populations in the excited state. The DPB fluorescence emission spectrum was resolved into s-cis and s-trans components. The vibronic structure of the s-cis fluorescence spectrum...... is similar to that of s-trans, but the band origin is red-shifted and there is a slightly larger amplitude on the red edge. The excited-state absorption spectrum of s-cis DPB appears to be red-shifted relative to that of s-trans DPB as well....

  2. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  3. Video-rate resonant scanning multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Nathaniel D.; Chung, Euiheon; Cook, Daniel C.; Han, Xiaoxing; Gruionu, Gabriel; Liao, Shan; Munn, Lance L.; Padera, Timothy P.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The abnormal tumor microenvironment fuels tumor progression, metastasis, immune suppression, and treatment resistance. Over last several decades, developments in and applications of intravital microscopy have provided unprecedented insights into the dynamics of the tumor microenvironment. In particular, intravital multiphoton microscopy has revealed the abnormal structure and function of tumor-associated blood and lymphatic vessels, the role of aberrant tumor matrix in drug delivery, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells, the dynamics of immune cell trafficking to and within tumors, and gene expression in tumors. However, traditional multiphoton microscopy suffers from inherently slow imaging rates—only a few frames per second, thus unable to capture more rapid events such as blood flow, lymphatic flow, and cell movement within vessels. Here, we report the development and implementation of a video-rate multiphoton microscope (VR-MPLSM) based on resonant galvanometer mirror scanning that is capable of recording at 30 frames per second and acquiring intravital multispectral images. We show that the design of the system can be readily implemented and is adaptable to various experimental models. As examples, we demonstrate the utility of the system to directly measure flow within tumors, capture metastatic cancer cells moving within the brain vasculature and cells in lymphatic vessels, and image acute responses to changes in a vascular network. VR-MPLSM thus has the potential to further advance intravital imaging and provide new insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24353926

  4. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    dell'Anno, Fabio; de Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n -mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [ F. Dell’Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004) ], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization.

  5. Structure of multiphoton quantum optics. I. Canonical formalism and homodyne squeezed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Anno, Fabio; De Siena, Silvio; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a formalism of nonlinear canonical transformations for general systems of multiphoton quantum optics. For single-mode systems the transformations depend on a tunable free parameter, the homodyne local-oscillator angle; for n-mode systems they depend on n heterodyne mixing angles. The canonical formalism realizes nontrivial mixing of pairs of conjugate quadratures of the electromagnetic field in terms of homodyne variables for single-mode systems, and in terms of heterodyne variables for multimode systems. In the first instance the transformations yield nonquadratic model Hamiltonians of degenerate multiphoton processes and define a class of non-Gaussian, nonclassical multiphoton states that exhibit properties of coherence and squeezing. We show that such homodyne multiphoton squeezed states are generated by unitary operators with a nonlinear time evolution that realizes the homodyne mixing of a pair of conjugate quadratures. Tuning of the local-oscillator angle allows us to vary at will the statistical properties of such states. We discuss the relevance of the formalism for the study of degenerate (up-)down-conversion processes. In a companion paper [F. Dell'Anno, S. De Siena, and F. Illuminati, 69, 033813 (2004)], we provide the extension of the nonlinear canonical formalism to multimode systems, we introduce the associated heterodyne multiphoton squeezed states, and we discuss their possible experimental realization

  6. Fluorescence excitation analysis by two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy: a new method to identify fluorescent nanoparticles on histological tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahn E

    2012-10-01

    spectra unmixing to localize fluorescent nanoparticles in tissue samples.Keywords: FAMIS, spectral excitation sequences, Texas Red, tunable excitation, unmixing

  7. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum......, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based...... on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved...

  8. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF MULTIFOCAL STOCHASTIC SCANNING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIXIN LIU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifocal multiphoton microscopy (MMM has greatly improved the utilization of excitation light and imaging speed due to parallel multiphoton excitation of the samples and simultaneous detection of the signals, which allows it to perform three-dimensional fast fluorescence imaging. Stochastic scanning can provide continuous, uniform and high-speed excitation of the sample, which makes it a suitable scanning scheme for MMM. In this paper, the graphical programming language — LabVIEW is used to achieve stochastic scanning of the two-dimensional galvo scanners by using white noise signals to control the x and y mirrors independently. Moreover, the stochastic scanning process is simulated by using Monte Carlo method. Our results show that MMM can avoid oversampling or subsampling in the scanning area and meet the requirements of uniform sampling by stochastically scanning the individual units of the N × N foci array. Therefore, continuous and uniform scanning in the whole field of view is implemented.

  9. Effect of detergents on the physico-chemical properties of skin stratum corneum: A two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Pashkovski, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Understanding the structural and dynamical features of skin is critical for advancing innovation in personal care and drug discovery. Synthetic detergent mixtures used in commercially available body wash products are thought to be less aggressive towards the skin barrier when compared...... to conventional detergents. The aim of this work is to comparatively characterize the effect of a mild synthetic cleanser mixture (SCM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) on the hydration state of the intercellular lipid matrix and on proton activity of excised skin stratum corneum (SC). METHOD: Experiments were...... performed using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images of fluorescence reporters sensitive to proton activity and hydration of SC were obtained in excised skin and examined in presence and absence of SCM and SDS detergents. RESULTS: Hydration of the intercellular lipid matrix...

  10. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime selectivity in excitation-emission matrices for qualitative analysis of a two-component system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millican, D.W.; McGown, L.B.

    1989-01-01

    Steady-state fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs), and phase-resolved EEMs (PREEMs) collected at modulation frequencies of 6, 18, and 30 MHz, were used for qualitative analysis of mixtures of benzo[k]fluoranthene (τ = 8 ns) and benzo[b]fluoranthene (τ = 29 ns) in ethanol. The EEMs of the individual components were extracted from mixture EEMs by means of wavelength component vector-gram (WCV) analysis. Phase resolution was found to be superior to steady-state measurements for extraction of the component spectra, for mixtures in which the intensity contributions from the two components are unequal

  12. Multiphoton control of the 1,3-cyclohexadiene ring-opening reaction in the presence of competing solvent reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; White, James L; Florean, Andrei C; Bucksbaum, Philip H; Sension, Roseanne J

    2008-07-31

    Although physical chemistry has often concentrated on the observation and understanding of chemical systems, the defining characteristic of chemistry remains the direction and control of chemical reactivity. Optical control of molecular dynamics, and thus of chemical reactivity provides a path to use photon energy as a smart reagent in a chemical system. In this paper, we discuss recent research in this field in the context of our studies of the multiphoton optical control of the photo-initiated ring-opening reaction of 1,3-cyclohexadiene (CHD) to form 1,3,5- cis-hexatriene (Z-HT). Closed-loop feedback and learning algorithms are able to identify pulses that increase the desired target state by as much as a factor of two. Mechanisms for control are discussed through the influence of the intensity dependence, the nonlinear power spectrum, and the projection of the pulses onto low orders of polynomial phase. Control measurements in neat solvents demonstrate that competing solvent fragmentation reactions must also be considered. In particular, multiphoton excitation of cyclohexane alone is capable of producing hexatriene. Statistical analyses of data sets obtained in learning algorithm searches in neat cyclohexane and for CHD in hexane and cyclohexane highlight the importance of linear and quadratic chirp, while demonstrating that the control features are not so easily defined. Higher order phase components are also important. On the basis of these results the involvement of low-frequency ground-state vibrational modes is proposed. When the population is transferred to the excited state, momentum along the torsional coordinate may keep the wave packet localized as it moves toward the conical intersections controlling the yield of Z-HT.

  13. Uncovering of melanin fluorescence in human skin tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Matthias; Stankovic, Goran; Seewald, Gunter; Leupold, Dieter

    2007-07-01

    Due to its extremely low fluorescence quantum yield, in the conventionally (one-photon) excited autofluorescence of skin tissue, melanin fluorescence is masked by several other endogenous and possibly also exogenous fluorophores (e.g. NADH, FAD, Porphyrins). A first step to enhance the melanin contribution had been realized by two-photon fs-pulse excitation in the red/near IR, based on the fact that melanin can be excited by stepwise two-photon absorption, whereas all other fluorophores in this spectral region allow only simultaneous two-photon excitation. Now, the next and decisive step has been realized: Using an extremely sensitive detection system, for the first time twophoton fluorescence of skin tissue excited with pulses in the ns-range could be measured. The motivation for this step was based on the fact that the population density of the fluorescent level resulting from a stepwise excitation has a different dependence of the pulse duration than that from a simultaneous excitation (Δt2 vs. Δt). Due to this strong discrimination between the fluorophores, practically pure melanin fluorescence can be obtained. Examples for in-vivo, ex-vivo as well as paraffin embedded skin tissue will be shown. The content of information with respect to early diagnosis of skin deseases will be discussed.

  14. Study the multi-photon absorption process in two types of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-azawi, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the multi-photon absorption process in two types of molecules; spherical top such as SF 6 molecules and assymetric top such as CHOOH and C 2 H 4 molecules. This work also aimed to study the effect of buffer gas pressure (Ar), which is transparent to the infrared (IR) laser on the multiphoton absorption of both types of molecules. A pulsed (TEA) CO 2 laser was used as a source which generates multi-lines in the IR-region of the spectrum and an optoacoustic detector was used to detect the energy absorbed by the molecules. In this study, the relaxation process was found to be faster in the heavy molecules than that in the light ones. A limit in the Ar pressure was observed. Below this limit, the gas acted as an active buffer gas and above it, the multi-photon absorption process was quenched. This work also aimed to study the multi-photon absorption spectrum for the CHOOH molecules in the range (1067-1090 cm -1 ). This spectrum was found to be consistent with the linear absorption spectrum obtained for the same range. The density of the vibrational states as a function of the vibrational energy was studied for the molecules SF 6 , CHOOH and C 2 H 4 . The results were used to interpret (i) the difference in the energy absorbed by difference molecules at the same energy density and (ii) the non-linearity in the multi-photon absorption for CHOOH molecules. 1 tab.; 40 figs.; 70 refs

  15. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  16. Fluorescence from gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a near-UV dye laser. [Decay time,quenching rate,room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benetti, P [Pavia Univ. (Italy); Cubeddu, R; Sacchi, C A; Svelto, O; Zaraga, F [Politecnico di Milano (Italy)

    1976-06-01

    Preliminary data are reported on the visible fluorescence of gaseous UF/sub 6/ excited by a dye laser at 374 nm. A decay time of 500 ns at p = 0 and a quenching rate of 5.7 x 10/sup -12/cm/sup 3/molec/sup -1/s/sup -1/ have been measured at room temperature.

  17. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence...... this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder....

  18. Measurement of fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield in tissue-simulating phantoms using three diffusion models of steady-state spatially resolved fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Kevin R; Farrell, Thomas J; Patterson, Michael S [Department of Medical Physics, Juravinski Cancer Centre and McMaster University, 699 Concession Street, Hamilton, Ontario L8V 5C2 (Canada)

    2003-12-21

    Steady-state diffusion theory models of fluorescence in tissue have been investigated for recovering fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield. Spatially resolved fluorescence, excitation and emission reflectance were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo simulations, and measured using a multi-fibre probe on tissue-simulating phantoms containing either aluminium phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS{sub 4}), Photofrin or meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphine dihydrochloride (TPPS{sub 4}). The accuracy of the fluorophore concentration and fluorescence quantum yield recovered by three different models of spatially resolved fluorescence were compared. The models were based on: (a) weighted difference of the excitation and emission reflectance, (b) fluorescence due to a point excitation source or (c) fluorescence due to a pencil beam excitation source. When literature values for the fluorescence quantum yield were used for each of the fluorophores, the fluorophore absorption coefficient (and hence concentration) at the excitation wavelengthwas recovered with a root-mean-square accuracy of 11.4% using the point source model of fluorescence and 8.0% using the more complicated pencil beam excitation model. The accuracy was calculated over a broad range of optical properties and fluorophore concentrations. The weighted difference of reflectance model performed poorly, with a root-mean-square error in concentration of about 50%. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that there are some situations where the weighted difference of reflectance is as accurate as the other two models, although this was not confirmed experimentally. Estimates of the fluorescence quantum yield in multiple scattering media were also made by determining independently from the fitted absorption spectrum and applying the various diffusion theory models. The fluorescence quantum yields for AlPcS{sub 4} and TPPS{sub 4} were calculated to be 0.59 {+-} 0.03 and 0.121 {+-} 0

  19. Measurement of fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield in tissue-simulating phantoms using three diffusion models of steady-state spatially resolved fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Kevin R; Farrell, Thomas J; Patterson, Michael S

    2003-01-01

    Steady-state diffusion theory models of fluorescence in tissue have been investigated for recovering fluorophore concentrations and fluorescence quantum yield. Spatially resolved fluorescence, excitation and emission reflectance were calculated by diffusion theory and Monte Carlo simulations, and measured using a multi-fibre probe on tissue-simulating phantoms containing either aluminium phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS 4 ), Photofrin or meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphine dihydrochloride (TPPS 4 ). The accuracy of the fluorophore concentration and fluorescence quantum yield recovered by three different models of spatially resolved fluorescence were compared. The models were based on: (a) weighted difference of the excitation and emission reflectance, (b) fluorescence due to a point excitation source or (c) fluorescence due to a pencil beam excitation source. When literature values for the fluorescence quantum yield were used for each of the fluorophores, the fluorophore absorption coefficient (and hence concentration) at the excitation wavelengthwas recovered with a root-mean-square accuracy of 11.4% using the point source model of fluorescence and 8.0% using the more complicated pencil beam excitation model. The accuracy was calculated over a broad range of optical properties and fluorophore concentrations. The weighted difference of reflectance model performed poorly, with a root-mean-square error in concentration of about 50%. Monte Carlo simulations suggest that there are some situations where the weighted difference of reflectance is as accurate as the other two models, although this was not confirmed experimentally. Estimates of the fluorescence quantum yield in multiple scattering media were also made by determining independently from the fitted absorption spectrum and applying the various diffusion theory models. The fluorescence quantum yields for AlPcS 4 and TPPS 4 were calculated to be 0.59 ± 0.03 and 0.121 ± 0.001 respectively using the point

  20. Effects of laser radiation parameters of the infrared multiphoton dissociation of protonated trichloroethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungureanu, C.; Almasan, V.

    1994-01-01

    The favorable properties of the infrared multiphoton absorption and dissociation of trichloroethylene-H, (C 2 HCl 3 ), by TEA-CO 2 laser radiation and rapid isotopic exchange between this molecule and water, indicate that it can be a promising further candidate for the final enrichment of heavy water (> 98% D 2 O), by laser method. We present the results obtained in the isotopic selectivity of multiphoton absorption measurements and in the study of the pulse energy and frequency laser radiation influence on the infrared multiphoton dissociation of C 2 HCl 3 in isotopic mixture with C 2 DCl 3 . (Author)

  1. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  2. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence from urine. As this green fluorescence confounds the desired red fluorescence of the PDD, methods for avoiding this situation particularly in cystoscopy using flexible cystoscopes are desirable. In this paper we demonstrate how a tailor made high power LED light source at 525 nm can be used for fluorescence assisted tumour detection using both a flexible and rigid cystoscope used in the outpatient department (OPD) and operating room (OR) respectively. It is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo how this light source can significantly reduce the green fluorescence problem with urine. At the same time this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder.

  3. Hyperspectral small animal fluorescence imaging: spectral selection imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas; Jiang, Yanan; Patsekin, Valery; Hall, Heidi; Vizard, Douglas; Robinson, J. Paul

    2008-02-01

    Molecular imaging is a rapidly growing area of research, fueled by needs in pharmaceutical drug-development for methods for high-throughput screening, pre-clinical and clinical screening for visualizing tumor growth and drug targeting, and a growing number of applications in the molecular biology fields. Small animal fluorescence imaging employs fluorescent probes to target molecular events in vivo, with a large number of molecular targeting probes readily available. The ease at which new targeting compounds can be developed, the short acquisition times, and the low cost (compared to microCT, MRI, or PET) makes fluorescence imaging attractive. However, small animal fluorescence imaging suffers from high optical scattering, absorption, and autofluorescence. Much of these problems can be overcome through multispectral imaging techniques, which collect images at different fluorescence emission wavelengths, followed by analysis, classification, and spectral deconvolution methods to isolate signals from fluorescence emission. We present an alternative to the current method, using hyperspectral excitation scanning (spectral selection imaging), a technique that allows excitation at any wavelength in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. In many cases, excitation imaging may be more effective at identifying specific fluorescence signals because of the higher complexity of the fluorophore excitation spectrum. Because the excitation is filtered and not the emission, the resolution limit and image shift imposed by acousto-optic tunable filters have no effect on imager performance. We will discuss design of the imager, optimizing the imager for use in small animal fluorescence imaging, and application of spectral analysis and classification methods for identifying specific fluorescence signals.

  4. Study on germ toxicity of exciting energy resource 147Pm of fluorescent paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shoupeng; Lun Minyue; Tao Feng

    1993-02-01

    The germ toxicity of exciting energy resource 147 Pm of fluorescent paint was studied. It was shown that the placenta was a barrier for 147 Pm entering into the fetus. The retention T 1/2 was 105 days in testes. The retention value of 147 Pm in testis was high and hardly to excrete. The results showed that 147 Pm can induce abnormal sperms, most of them were non-hock sperms. The chromosome aberrations in germ cells also can be induced. Among the type of chromosome aberrations of spermatogonia, chromatid breakage was predominant. The 147 Pm can cause the chromosome fragment and translocations of primary spermatocytes, and increasing of lethality. The dominant skeletal aberrations in offspring is proportional to the accumulated radioactivity of 147 Pm in tests

  5. Solid phase excitation-emission fluorescence method for the classification of complex substances: Cortex Phellodendri and other traditional Chinese medicines as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2012-09-13

    A novel, simple and direct fluorescence method for analysis of complex substances and their potential substitutes has been researched and developed. Measurements involved excitation and emission (EEM) fluorescence spectra of powdered, complex, medicinal herbs, Cortex Phellodendri Chinensis (CPC) and the similar Cortex Phellodendri Amurensis (CPA); these substances were compared and discriminated from each other and the potentially adulterated samples (Caulis mahoniae (CM) and David poplar bark (DPB)). Different chemometrics methods were applied for resolution of the complex spectra, and the excitation spectra were found to be the most informative; only the rank-ordering PROMETHEE method was able to classify the samples with single ingredients (CPA, CPC, CM) or those with binary mixtures (CPA/CPC, CPA/CM, CPC/CM). Interestingly, it was essential to use the geometrical analysis for interactive aid (GAIA) display for a full understanding of the classification results. However, these two methods, like the other chemometrics models, were unable to classify composite spectral matrices consisting of data from samples of single ingredients and binary mixtures; this suggested that the excitation spectra of the different samples were very similar. However, the method is useful for classification of single-ingredient samples and, separately, their binary mixtures; it may also be applied for similar classification work with other complex substances.

  6. Long-lived visible luminescence of UV LEDs and impact on LED excited time-resolved fluorescence applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, D; Connally, R; Piper, J

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of a detailed study of the spectral and temporal properties of visible emission from three different GaN-based ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (UV LEDs). The primary UV emission in the 360-380 nm band decays rapidly (less than 1 μs) following switch-off; however, visible luminescence (470-750 nm) with a decay lifetime of tens of microseconds was observed at approximately 10 -4 of the UV intensity. For applications of UV LEDs in time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) employing lanthanide chelates, the visible luminescence from the LEDs competes with the target Eu 3+ or Tb 3+ fluorescence in both spectral and temporal domains. A UV band-pass filter (Schott UG11 glass) was therefore used to reduce the visible luminescence of the UV LEDs by three orders of magnitude relative to UV output to yield a practical excitation source for TRF

  7. Imaging rat esophagus using combination of reflectance confocal and multiphoton microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuo, S M; Chen, J X; Jiang, X S; Lu, K C; Xie, S S

    2008-01-01

    We combine reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) with multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to image rat esophagus. The two imaging modalities allow detection of layered–resolved complementary information from esophagus. In the keratinizing layer, the keratinocytes boundaries can be characterized by RCM, while the keratinocytes cytoplasm (keratin) can be further imaged by multiphoton autofluorescence signal. In the epithelium, the epithelial cellular boundaries and nucleus can be detected by RCM, and MPM can be used for imaging epithelial cell cytoplasm and monitoring metabolic state of epithelium. In the stroma, multiphoton autofluorescence signal is used to image elastin and second harmonic generation signal is utilized to detect collagen, while RCM is used to determine the optical property of stroma. Overall, these results suggest that the combination of RCM and MPM has potential to provide more important and comprehensive information for early diagnosis of esophageal cancer

  8. Following Intracellular Cholesterol Transport by Linear and Non-Linear Optical Microscopy of Intrinsically Fluorescent Sterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wustner, D.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of intracellular cholesterol transport is important for understanding the molecular basis of several metabolic and neuronal diseases, like atheroclerosis or lysosomal storage disorders. Progress in this field depends crucially on the development of new technical approaches to follow...... is on recent developments in imaging technology to follow the intracellular fate of intrinsically fluorescent sterols as faithful cholesterol markers. In particular, UV-sensitive wide field and multiphoton microscopy of the sterol dehydroergosterol, DHE, is explained and new methods of quantitative image...... analysis like pixel-wise bleach rate fitting and multiphoton image correlation spectroscopy are introduced. Several applications of the new technology including observation of vectorial sterol trafficking in polarized human hepatoma cells for investigation of reverse cholesterol transport are presented....

  9. Spectral reconstruction for shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuxia; Chernavskaia, Olga; Popp, Jürgen; Bocklitz, Thomas

    2018-08-15

    Fluorescence emission is one of the major obstacles to apply Raman spectroscopy in biological investigations. It is usually several orders more intense than Raman scattering and hampers further analysis. In cases where the fluorescence emission is too intense to be efficiently removed via routine mathematical baseline correction algorithms, an alternative approach is needed. One alternative approach is shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS), where two Raman spectra are recorded with two slightly different excitation wavelengths. Ideally, the fluorescence emission at the two excitations does not change while the Raman spectrum shifts according to the excitation wavelength. Hence the fluorescence is removed in the difference of the two recorded Raman spectra. For better interpretability a spectral reconstruction procedure is necessary to recover the fluorescence-free Raman spectrum. This is challenging due to the intensity variations between the two recorded Raman spectra caused by unavoidable experimental changes as well as the presence of noise. Existent approaches suffer from drawbacks like spectral resolution loss, fluorescence residual, and artefacts. In this contribution, we proposed a reconstruction method based on non-negative least squares (NNLS), where the intensity variations between the two measurements are utilized in the reconstruction model. The method achieved fluorescence-free reconstruction on three real-world SERDS datasets without significant information loss. Thereafter, we quantified the performance of the reconstruction based on artificial datasets from four aspects: reconstructed spectral resolution, precision of reconstruction, signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), and fluorescence residual. The artificial datasets were constructed with varied Raman to fluorescence intensity ratio (RFIR), SNR, full-width at half-maximum (FWHM), excitation wavelength shift, and fluorescence variation between the two spectra. It was demonstrated that

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  11. A study on the determination of Ca/P molar ratio in calcium-hydroxyapatite by alpha excited x-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Iwata, Shiro.

    1979-01-01

    Nondestructive powdery calcium-hydroxyapatite (HAp) target was prepared by electrodeposition method. The powdery HAp was deposited on the copper electrode plate of cathode in the electrodeposition solution such as ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, etc. The experiments were carried out as functions of different electrodeposition solution, ethyl alcohol concentration, distance between anode and cathode, electrodeposition time and HAp amount added in bath, and distribution of HAp on the copper electrode plate obtained from each experiment was investigated by alpha excited X-ray fluorescence analysis. Ca/P molar ratio of thin HAp target prepared with this method was determined by alpha excited X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. The nondestructive HAp targets of thickness in the range of 5 mu g/cm 2 to 10 mg/cm 2 were easily prepared with comparatively simple apparatus. The HAp on the copper electrode plate was uniform thickness over 15 x 20 mm copper plate within 5%. The Ca/P molar ratio of HAp was 1.64 +- 0.05, which agreed well with stoichiometric value of 1.67 in HAp within standard deviation. (author)

  12. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  13. Highly selective population of two excited states in nonresonant two-photon absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hui; Zhang Shi-An; Sun Zhen-Rong

    2011-01-01

    A nonresonant two-photon absorption process can be manipulated by tailoring the ultra-short laser pulse. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate a highly selective population of two excited states in the nonresonant two-photon absorption process by rationally designing a spectral phase distribution. Our results show that one excited state is maximally populated while the other state population is widely tunable from zero to the maximum value. We believe that the theoretical results may play an important role in the selective population of a more complex nonlinear process comprising nonresonant two-photon absorption, such as resonance-mediated (2+1)-three-photon absorption and (2+1)-resonant multiphoton ionization. (atomic and molecular physics)

  14. Multi-photon transitions and Rabi resonance in continuous wave EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiko, Alexander P; Fedaruk, Ryhor; Markevich, Siarhei A

    2015-10-01

    The study of microwave-radiofrequency multi-photon transitions in continuous wave (CW) EPR spectroscopy is extended to a Rabi resonance condition, when the radio frequency of the magnetic-field modulation matches the Rabi frequency of a spin system in the microwave field. Using the non-secular perturbation theory based on the Bogoliubov averaging method, the analytical description of the response of the spin system is derived for all modulation frequency harmonics. When the modulation frequency exceeds the EPR linewidth, multi-photon transitions result in sidebands in absorption EPR spectra measured with phase-sensitive detection at any harmonic. The saturation of different-order multi-photon transitions is shown to be significantly different and to be sensitive to the Rabi resonance. The noticeable frequency shifts of sidebands are found to be the signatures of this resonance. The inversion of two-photon lines in some spectral intervals of the out-of-phase first-harmonic signal is predicted under passage through the Rabi resonance. The inversion indicates the transition from absorption to stimulated emission or vice versa, depending on the sideband. The manifestation of the primary and secondary Rabi resonance is also demonstrated in the time evolution of steady-state EPR signals formed by all harmonics of the modulation frequency. Our results provide a theoretical framework for future developments in multi-photon CW EPR spectroscopy, which can be useful for samples with long spin relaxation times and extremely narrow EPR lines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Excited-state relaxation of some aminoquinolines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The absorption and fluorescence spectra, fluorescence quantum yields and lifetimes, and fluorescence rate constants ( k f of 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzoxazolylquinoline (I, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylquinoline (II, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -methoxybenzothiazolyl-quinoline (III, 2-amino-3-( 2 ′ -benzothiazolylbenzoquinoline (IV at different temperatures have been measured. The shortwavelength shift of fluorescence spectra of compounds studied (23–49 nm in ethanol as the temperature decreases (the solvent viscosity increases points out that the excited-state relaxation process takes place. The rate of this process depends essentially on the solvent viscosity, but not the solvent polarity. The essential increasing of fluorescence rate constant k f (up to about 7 times as the solvent viscosity increases proves the existence of excited-state structural relaxation consisting in the mutual internal rotation of molecular fragments of aminoquinolines studied, followed by the solvent orientational relaxation.

  16. Dynamic in vivo imaging and cell tracking using a histone fluorescent protein fusion in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Virginia E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in optical imaging modalities and the continued evolution of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins are coming together to facilitate the study of cell behavior at high resolution in living organisms. As a result, imaging using autofluorescent protein reporters is gaining popularity in mouse transgenic and targeted mutagenesis applications. Results We have used embryonic stem cell-mediated transgenesis to label cells at sub-cellular resolution in vivo, and to evaluate fusion of a human histone protein to green fluorescent protein for ubiquitous fluorescent labeling of nucleosomes in mice. To this end we have generated embryonic stem cells and a corresponding strain of mice that is viable and fertile and exhibits widespread chromatin-localized reporter expression. High levels of transgene expression are maintained in a constitutive manner. Viability and fertility of homozygous transgenic animals demonstrates that this reporter is developmentally neutral and does not interfere with mitosis or meiosis. Conclusions Using various optical imaging modalities including wide-field, spinning disc confocal, and laser scanning confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy, we can identify cells in various stages of the cell cycle. We can identify cells in interphase, cells undergoing mitosis or cell death. We demonstrate that this histone fusion reporter allows the direct visualization of active chromatin in situ. Since this reporter segments three-dimensional space, it permits the visualization of individual cells within a population, and so facilitates tracking cell position over time. It is therefore attractive for use in multidimensional studies of in vivo cell behavior and cell fate.

  17. Three-dimensional spatial imaging in multiphoton ionization rate measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredy, Richard; Camp, Howard A.; Nguyen, Hai; Awata, Takaaki; Shan Bing; Chang Zhenghu; DePaola, B.D.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment is described in which an apparatus is used to demonstrate the feasibility of measuring multiphoton photoionization rates in the interaction of short pulsed lasers with atoms or molecules. With this methodology, the ionization rate is measured as a function of the spatial position in the beam-waist region of the laser through the direct three-dimensional spatial imaging of the ionization events. Thus, if the spatial dependence of the laser beam intensity were known, a series of experiments could yield the intensity dependence of multiphoton ionization without the assumptions or errors that are generally inherent in the integration over one or more dimensions in the laser focal volume

  18. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  20. Label-free in vivo in situ diagnostic imaging by cellular metabolism quantification with a flexible multiphoton endomicroscope (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Pierre; Hage, Charles-Henri; Fabert, Marc; Brevier, Julien; O'Connor, Rodney P.; Bardet-Coste, Sylvia M.; Habert, Rémi; Braud, Flavie; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Louradour, Frederic

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy is a cutting edge imaging modality leading to increasing advances in biology and also in the clinical field. To use it at its full potential and at the very heart of clinical practice, there have been several developments of fiber-based multiphoton microendoscopes. The application for those probes is now limited by few major restrictions, such as the difficulty to collect autofluorescence signals from tissues and cells theses being inherently weak (e.g. the ones from intracellular NADH or FAD metabolites). This limitation reduces the usefulness of microendoscopy in general, effectively restraining it to morphological imaging modality requiring staining of the tissues. Our aim is to go beyond this limitation, showing for the first time label-free cellular metabolism monitoring, in vivo in situ in real time. The experimental setup is an upgrade of a recently published one (Ducourthial et.al, Scientific Reports, 2016) where femtosecond pulse fiber delivery is further optimized thank's to a new transmissive-GRISM-based pulse stretcher permitting high energy throughput and wide bandwidth. This device allows fast sequential operation with two different excitation wavelengths for efficient two-photon excited NADH and FAD autofluorescence endoscopic detection (i.e. 860 nm for FAD and 760 nm for NADH), enabling cellular optical redox ratio quantification at 8 frames/s. The obtained results on cell models in vitro and also on animal models in vivo (e.g. neurons of a living mouse) prove that we accurately assess the level of NADH and FAD at subcellular resolution through a 3-meters-long fiber with our miniaturized probe (O.D. =2.2 mm).

  1. Doubly resonant multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crance, M.

    1978-01-01

    A particular case of doubly resonant multiphoton ionization is theoretically investigated. More precisely, two levels quasi-resonant with two successive harmonics of the field frequency are considered. The method used is based on the effective operator formalism first introduced for this problem by Armstrong, Beers and Feneuille. The main result is to show the possibility of observing large interference effects on the width of the resonances. Moreover this treatment allows us to make more precise the connection between effective operator formalism and standard perturbation theory

  2. The exploration of the characteristics of the hyperglycemia serum fluorescence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lexin; Zhao, Zhimin; Chen, Hui; Li, Peng; Xin, Yujun

    2008-12-01

    Now, spectra technology is widely used in the biomedicine research,so this study investigates variation of the fluorescence spectra in different excitation wavelength, and the spectra of serum with different glucose concentration is tested in the excitation wavelength of 240nm to 280nm. The experimental result shows that the correlation between the serum fluorescence intensity and the excitation light is very close, when the excitation light is in the ultraviolet wave band, the fluorescence of serum is intensive. There is a violent fluorescence emission wavelength, which is 300nm to 410nm, while the excitation wavelength ranges from 220nm to 290nm, and the peaks wavelength are 330nm and 370nm. From 240nm to 280nm, the serum fluorescence intensity increases synchronously with the glucose concentration, and the relationship between the fluorescence peak wavelength and the glucose concentration is almost in line. In this way the blood sugar concentration can be estimated by the fluorescence spectra peak wavelength when the excitation wavelength is from 240nm to 280nm, which is effective. It provides experimental foundation for the wide use of spectra technology in medical diagnose, and the effectiv method to test the blood sugar concentration.

  3. Picosecond excitation transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.E.

    1987-11-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay profiles are used to study excitation transport in 2- and 3-dimensional disordered systems. Time-correlated single photon counting detection is used to collect the fluorescence depolarization data. The high signal-to-noise ratios afforded by this technique makes it possible to critically examine current theories of excitation transport. Care has been taken to eliminate or account for the experimental artifacts common to this type of study. Solutions of 3,3'-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide (DODCI) in glycerol serve as a radomly distributed array of energy donors in 3-dimensions. A very thin sample cell (/approximately/ 2 μm) is used to minimize the effects of fluorescence self-absorption on the decay kinetics. Evidence of a dynamic shift of the fluorescence spectrum of DODCI in glycerol due to solvent reorganization is presented. The effects of excitation trapping on the decay profiles is minimized in the data analysis procedure. The 3-body theory of Gochanour, Andersen, and Fayer (GAF) and the far less complex 2-particle analytic theory of Huber, Hamilton, and Barnett yield indistinguishable fits to the data over the wide dynamic range of concentrations and decay times studied

  4. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  5. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp-europium atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Z; Liang, F; Yang, P; Jin, Q; Huang, B

    1999-06-01

    Eu atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL-MPT AFS/IFS) was studied. Operating conditions were optimized. The best detection limits for AFS and IFS obtained with a desolvated ultrasonic nebulization system were 42.0 ng/mL for Eu I 462.7 nm and 21.8 ng/mL for Eu II 381.97 nm, respectively, both were better than those given by the instruction manual of a Baird ICP AFS-2000 spectrometer using pneumatic concentric nebulizer with desolvation for AFS, but were significantly higher than those obtained by using the Baird spectrometer with a mini-monochromator and a ultrasonic nebulzer system.

  6. High-order multiphoton ionization photoelectron spectroscopy of NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carman, H.S. Jr.; Compton, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    Photoelectron energy angular distributions of NO following three different high-order multiphoton ionization (MPI) schemes have been measured. The 3 + 3 resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the A 2 Σ + (v=O) level yielded a distribution of electron energies corresponding to all accessible vibrational levels (v + =O-6) of the nascent ion. Angular distributions of electrons corresponding to v + =O and v + =3 were significantly different. The 3 + 2 REMPI via the A 2 Σ + (v=1) level produced only one low-energy electron peak (v + =1). Nonresonant MPI at 532 nm yielded a distribution of electron energies corresponding to both four- and five-photon ionization. Prominent peaks in the five-photon photoelectron spectrum (PES) suggest contributions from near-resonant states at the three-photon level. 4 refs., 3 figs

  7. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  8. Fluorescence image excited by a scanning UV-LED light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    An optical scanning system using UV-LED light to induced fluorescence technology can enhance a fluorescence image significantly in a short period. It has several advantages such as lower power consumption, no scattering effect in skins, and multilayer images can be obtained to analyze skin disease. From the experiment results, the light intensity increases with increase spot size and decrease scanning speed, but the image resolution is oppositely. Moreover, the system could be widely used in clinical diagnosis and photodynamic therapy for skin disease because even the irradiated time of fluorescence substance is short but it will provide accurately positioning of fluorescence object.

  9. Correlating two-photon excited fluorescence imaging of breast cancer cellular redox state with seahorse flux analysis of normalized cellular oxygen consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jue; Wright, Heather J.; Chan, Nicole; Tran, Richard; Razorenova, Olga V.; Potma, Eric O.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2016-06-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of the cellular cofactors nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide is widely used to measure cellular metabolism, both in normal and pathological cells and tissues. When dual-wavelength excitation is used, ratiometric TPEF imaging of the intrinsic cofactor fluorescence provides a metabolic index of cells-the "optical redox ratio" (ORR). With increased interest in understanding and controlling cellular metabolism in cancer, there is a need to evaluate the performance of ORR in malignant cells. We compare TPEF metabolic imaging with seahorse flux analysis of cellular oxygen consumption in two different breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231). We monitor metabolic index in living cells under both normal culture conditions and, for MCF-7, in response to cell respiration inhibitors and uncouplers. We observe a significant correlation between the TPEF-derived ORR and the flux analyzer measurements (R=0.7901, p<0.001). Our results confirm that the ORR is a valid dynamic index of cell metabolism under a range of oxygen consumption conditions relevant for cancer imaging.

  10. Identification of the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma during breast-conserving surgery using multiphoton microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tongxin; Nie, Yuting; Lian, Yuane; Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Wang, Chuan; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-11-01

    Breast-conserving surgery has become an important way of surgical treatment for breast cancer worldwide nowadays. Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) has the ability to noninvasively visualize tissue architectures at the cellular level using intrinsic fluorescent molecules in biological tissues without the need for fluorescent dye. In this study, MPM is used to image the microstructures of terminal duct lobular unit (TDLU), invasive ductal carcinoma and the boundary region between normal and cancerous breast tissues. Our study demonstrates that MPM has the ability to not only reveal the morphological changes of the cuboidal epithelium, basement membrane and interlobular stroma but also identify the boundary between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma, which correspond well to the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) images. Predictably, MPM can monitor surgical margins in real time and provide considerable accuracy for resection of breast cancerous tissues intraoperatively. With the development of miniature, real-time MPM imaging technology, MPM should have great application prospects during breast-conserving surgery.

  11. Spatial discrimination against background with different optical systems for collection of fluorescence in laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry with a graphite tube electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzefovsky, A I; Lonardo, R F; Michel, R G

    1995-07-01

    A single 90 degrees off-axis ellipsoidal mirror fragment was used in a dispersive detection system for electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The performance of the new optical arrangement was compared with those of optical arrangements that employed a plane mirror in combination with biconvex or plano-convex lenses. All the optical arrangements collected fluorescence in a scheme called front surface illustration. BEAM-4, an optical ray tracing program, was used for calculations of spatial ray distributions and optical collection efficiency for the various optical configurations. Experimentally, the best collection efficiency was obtained by use of the ellipsoidal mirror, in qualitative agreement with simulations done by use of the BEAM-4 software. The best detection limit for cobalt with the new optical arrangement was 20 fg, which was a factor of 5 better than that obtained with conventional optical arrangements with otherwise the same instrumentation. The signal-to-background ratio and the fluorescence collection efficiency were also studied as a function of position of the optical components for the various optical arrangements. For both cobalt and phosphorus, the signal-to-background ratio with the new optical arrangement remained stable within 10-20% during +/- 8 mm shifts in the position of the detection system from the focal plane of the optics. Overall, the new optical arrangement offered high collection efficiency, excellent sensitivity, and facile optical alignment due to efficient spatial separation between the fluorescence signal and the background radiation. The advantages of the new optical arrangement were particularly important during measurements in the presence of high levels of blackbody radiation.

  12. Multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence imaging for bacterial differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Babayants, Margarita V.; Korotkov, Oleg V.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Rimskaya, Elena N.; Shikunova, Irina A.; Kurlov, Vladimir N.; Cherkasova, Olga P.; Komandin, Gennady A.; Reshetov, Igor V.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence imaging was implemented for bacterial differentiation. The fluorescence imaging was performed using a digital camera equipped with a set of visual bandpass filters. Narrowband 365 nm ultraviolet radiation passed through a beam homogenizer was used to excite the sample fluorescence. In order to increase a signal-to-noise ratio and suppress a non-fluorescence background in images, the intensity of the UV excitation was modulated using a mechanical chopper. The principal components were introduced for differentiating the samples of bacteria based on the multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence images.

  13. Processing multiphoton states through operation on a single photon: Methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Qing; He Bing; Bergou, Janos A.; Ren, Yuhang

    2009-01-01

    Multiphoton states are widely applied in quantum information technology. By the methods presented in this paper, the structure of a multiphoton state in the form of multiple single-photon qubit products can be mapped to a single-photon qudit, which could also be in a separable product with other photons. This makes possible the manipulation of such multiphoton states by processing single-photon states. The optical realization of unknown qubit discrimination [B. He, J. A. Bergou, and Y.-H. Ren, Phys. Rev. A 76, 032301 (2007)] is simplified with the transformation methods. Another application is the construction of quantum logic gates, where the inverse transformations back to the input state spaces are also necessary. We especially show that the modified setups to implement the transformations can realize the deterministic multicontrol gates (including Toffoli gate) operating directly on the products of single-photon qubits.

  14. Adaptive optics improves multiphoton super-resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Wu, Yicong; Winter, Peter; Shroff, Hari

    2018-02-01

    Three dimensional (3D) fluorescence microscopy has been essential for biological studies. It allows interrogation of structure and function at spatial scales spanning the macromolecular, cellular, and tissue levels. Critical factors to consider in 3D microscopy include spatial resolution, signal-to-noise (SNR), signal-to-background (SBR), and temporal resolution. Maintaining high quality imaging becomes progressively more difficult at increasing depth (where optical aberrations, induced by inhomogeneities of refractive index in the sample, degrade resolution and SNR), and in thick or densely labeled samples (where out-of-focus background can swamp the valuable, in-focus-signal from each plane). In this report, we introduce our new instrumentation to address these problems. A multiphoton structured illumination microscope was simply modified to integrate an adpative optics system for optical aberrations correction. Firstly, the optical aberrations are determined using direct wavefront sensing with a nonlinear guide star and subsequently corrected using a deformable mirror, restoring super-resolution information. We demonstrate the flexibility of our adaptive optics approach on a variety of semi-transparent samples, including bead phantoms, cultured cells in collagen gels and biological tissues. The performance of our super-resolution microscope is improved in all of these samples, as peak intensity is increased (up to 40-fold) and resolution recovered (up to 176+/-10 nm laterally and 729+/-39 nm axially) at depths up to 250 μm from the coverslip surface.

  15. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Abuelela, Ayman F.; Mohammad, Amal Jehad

    2017-01-01

    scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least

  16. Multiphoton processes in the field of two-frequency circularly polarized plane electromagnetic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, An

    1997-01-01

    The authors solve Dirac's equation for an electron in the field of a two-frequency plane electromagnetic wave, deriving general formulae for the probabilities of radiation of a photon by the electron, and for the probabilities for pair production by a photon when the two-frequency wave is circularly polarized. In contrast to the case of a monochromatic-plane electromagnetic wave, when an electron is in the field of a two-frequency circularly polarized wave, besides the absorption of multiphotons and emission of simple harmonics of the individual waves, stimulated multiphoton emission processes and various composite harmonic-photon emission processes are occurred: when a high-energy photon is in a such a field, multiphoton processes also follow the pair production processes

  17. Electron Detachment Dissociation (EDD) of Fluorescently Labeled Sialylated Oligosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    We explored the application of electron detachment dissociation (EDD) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) tandem mass spectrometry to fluorescently labeled sialylated oligosaccharides. Standard sialylated oligosaccharides and a sialylated N-linked glycan released from human transferrin were investigated. EDD yielded extensive glycosidic cleavages and cross-ring cleavages in all cases studied, consistently providing complementary structural information compared to IRMPD. Neutral losses and satellite ions such as C – 2H ions were also observed following EDD. In addition, we examined the influence of different fluorescent labels. The acidic label 2-aminobenzoic acid (2-AA) enhanced signal abundance in negative-ion mode. However, few cross-ring fragments were observed for 2-AA labeled oligosaccharides. The neutral label 2-aminobenzamide (2-AB) resulted in more cross-ring cleavages compared to 2-AA labeled species, but not as extensive fragmentation as for native oligosaccharides, likely resulting from altered negative charge locations from introduction of the fluorescent tag. PMID:22120881

  18. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposi's sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual

  19. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  20. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  1. Simultaneous recording of fluorescence and electrical signals by photometric patch electrode in deep brain regions in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Yasuharu; Nishino, Eri; Ohmori, Harunori

    2015-06-01

    Despite its widespread use, high-resolution imaging with multiphoton microscopy to record neuronal signals in vivo is limited to the surface of brain tissue because of limited light penetration. Moreover, most imaging studies do not simultaneously record electrical neural activity, which is, however, crucial to understanding brain function. Accordingly, we developed a photometric patch electrode (PME) to overcome the depth limitation of optical measurements and also enable the simultaneous recording of neural electrical responses in deep brain regions. The PME recoding system uses a patch electrode to excite a fluorescent dye and to measure the fluorescence signal as a light guide, to record electrical signal, and to apply chemicals to the recorded cells locally. The optical signal was analyzed by either a spectrometer of high light sensitivity or a photomultiplier tube depending on the kinetics of the responses. We used the PME in Oregon Green BAPTA-1 AM-loaded avian auditory nuclei in vivo to monitor calcium signals and electrical responses. We demonstrated distinct response patterns in three different nuclei of the ascending auditory pathway. On acoustic stimulation, a robust calcium fluorescence response occurred in auditory cortex (field L) neurons that outlasted the electrical response. In the auditory midbrain (inferior colliculus), both responses were transient. In the brain-stem cochlear nucleus magnocellularis, calcium response seemed to be effectively suppressed by the activity of metabotropic glutamate receptors. In conclusion, the PME provides a powerful tool to study brain function in vivo at a tissue depth inaccessible to conventional imaging devices. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Endogenous Fluorescence Signatures in Living Pluripotent Stem Cells Change with Loss of Potency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squirrell, Jayne M.; Fong, Jimmy J.; Ariza, Carlos A.; Mael, Amber; Meyer, Kassondra; Shevde, Nirupama K.; Roopra, Avtar; Lyons, Gary E.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Ogle, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of stem cells is limited by the non-uniformity of their phenotypic state. Thus it would be advantageous to noninvasively monitor stem cell status. Driven by this challenge, we employed multidimensional multiphoton microscopy to quantify changes in endogenous fluorescence occurring with pluripotent stem cell differentiation. We found that global and cellular-scale fluorescence lifetime of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and murine embryonic stem cells (mESC) consistently decreased with differentiation. Less consistent were trends in endogenous fluorescence intensity with differentiation, suggesting intensity is more readily impacted by nuances of species and scale of analysis. What emerges is a practical and accessible approach to evaluate, and ultimately enrich, living stem cell populations based on changes in metabolism that could be exploited for both research and clinical applications. PMID:22952742

  3. Additive Manufacture of Three Dimensional Nanocomposite Based Objects through Multiphoton Fabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaan Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional structures prepared from a gold-polymer composite formulation have been fabricated using multiphoton lithography. In this process, gold nanoparticles were simultaneously formed through photoreduction whilst polymerisation of two possible monomers was promoted. The monomers, trimethylopropane triacrylate (TMPTA and pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA were mixed with a gold salt, but it was found that the addition of a ruthenium(II complex enhanced both the geometrical uniformity and integrity of the polymerised/reduced material, enabling the first production of 3D gold-polymer structures by single step multiphoton lithography.

  4. Energetics of the rearrangement of neutral and ionized perfluorocyclopropane to perfluoropropylene. Use of infrared multiphoton dissociation spectra to identify structural isomers of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomse, D.S.; Berman, D.W.; Beauchamp, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy is used to compare the structure of gas-phase C 3 F 6 + ions obtained by electron-impact ionization of two isomeric precursors: perfluoropropylene and perfluorocyclopropane. Photodissociation spectra are obtained by observing the extent of multiphoton dissociation as the CO 2 laser is tuned across the 925 to 1080 cm -1 wavelength range. Ions are formed, stored, and detected with the use of techniques of ion cyclotron resonance spectroscopy. Infrared multiphoton excitation is effected by using low-power, continuous-wave laser radiation. The fingerprint spectrum of the molecular ion of perfluorocyclopropane is identical with that obtained from perfluoropropylene, indicating rearrangement of the former to the latter. Photodissociation kinetics indicate that the entire perfluorocyclopropane molecular ion population isomerizes to the more stable perfluoropropylene structure. Thermochemistry of C 3 F 6 and C 3 F 6 + isomers is discussed. Comparisons are made with the analogous C 3 H 6 system. Photoionization mass spectroscopy results yield ΔH/sub f/(c-C 3 F 6 ) = -233.8 kcal/mol. 4 figures

  5. Correlation between the number of quantum-statistical modes of the exciting field and the number of lines in the resonance fluorescence spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryzhanovskii, Boris V; Sokolov, G B

    2000-01-01

    The quasi-energy wave functions of a two-level atom in an electromagnetic field, the state of which represents a superposition of coherent states, were found. The fluorescence spectrum of an atom excited by such a field was investigated. It was shown that a spectral fluorescence mode corresponds to each mode of the quantum-statistical distribution of the field incident on the atom. This means that the number of statistical modes of the incident field may be recorded as the number of data bits of the information carried by the light pulse. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. of Nd3+ions in YLiF4 and LuLiF4 crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Felipe Henriques Librantz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Nd3+ ultraviolet (UV fluorescence induced by multiphotonic laser excitations was studied in doped Nd:YLiF4 (YLF and Nd:LuLiF4 (LLF crystals by using the time resolved spectroscopy technique. The UV luminescences are due to transitions between the 4f25d and the 4f3 electronic configurations of Nd3+ ions. The 4f25d configuration can be reached by direct pumping or by multiphotonic excitation, both processes give rise to the UV band emission with structure due to the strong phonon coupling expected for 5d orbital involvement in the transition. The multiphotonic excitation process is due to three photons (532 nanometers [nm] sequential absorptions by metastable levels of the 4f3 configuration split by crystalline local field. The sequential excitation of Nd by the laser excitation is attributed to the 4I9/2 + 532 nm t 4G7/2 ground state absorption followed by the 4G7/2 + 532 nm t 2F5/2 and 2F5/2 + 532 nm t 4f25d excited state absorptions. The UV emissions due to 4f25d configuration are parity allowed, having lifetime of 35 nanoseconds (ns in contrast to UV emissions from 4f3 configuration which are induced by two absorption steps and are parity forbidden showing longer lifetime of 8 microseconds (ms and narrow lines. The polarization effects of the UV emissions were studied and their behaviors are dependent on the excited state configuration involving or not involving the 5d orbital. The allowed UV emission positions were affected by the host variation more than the ones originated from the 4f3 configuration as expected. The electronic energy of the 4f25d configuration shifts to lower energy for increasing the crystal field.

  7. In vivo multiphoton imaging of human skin: assessment of topical corticosteroid-induced epidermis atrophy and depigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait El Madani, Hassan; Tancrède-Bohin, Emmanuelle; Bensussan, Armand; Colonna, Anne; Dupuy, Alain; Bagot, Martine; Pena, Ana-Maria

    2012-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged in the past decade as a promising tool for noninvasive skin imaging. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of multiphoton microscopy to detect topical corticosteroids side effects within the epidermis and to provide new insights into their dynamics. Healthy volunteers were topically treated with clobetasol propionate on a small region of their forearms under overnight occlusion for three weeks. The treated region of each patient was investigated at D0, D7, D15, D22 (end of the treatment), and D60. Our study shows that multiphoton microscopy allows for the detection of corticoid-induced epidermis modifications: thinning of stratum corneum compactum and epidermis, decrease of keratinocytes size, and changes in their morphology from D7 to D22. We also show that multiphoton microscopy enables in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative assessment of melanin content. We observe that melanin density decreases during treatment and almost completely disappears at D22. Moreover, these alterations are reversible as they are no longer present at D60. Our study demonstrates that multiphoton microscopy is a convenient and powerful tool for noninvasive 3-D dynamical studies of skin integrity and pigmentation.

  8. Plasma characterization using terahertz-wave-enhanced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jingle; Zhang, X.-C.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that the terahertz-wave-enhanced fluorescence emission from excited atoms or molecules can be employed in the characterization of laser-induced gas plasmas. The electron relaxation time and plasma density were deduced through applying the electron impact excitation/ionization and electron-ion recombination processes to the measured time-dependent enhanced fluorescence. The electron collision dynamics of nitrogen plasma excited at different gas pressures and laser pulse energies have been systematically investigated. This plasma characterization method provides picosecond temporal resolution and enables omnidirectional optical signal collection.

  9. Modelling of infrared multiphoton absorption and dissociation for design of reactors for isotope separation by lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Kazuo; Nakane, Ryohei; Inoue, Cihiro

    1981-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed on infrared laser beam absorption (multiphoton absorption) and subsequent dissociation (multiphoton dissociation) of CF 3 Cl to propose models for the design of reactors for isotope separation by lasers. A parallel beam geometry was utilized in batch irradiation experiments to make direct compilation of lumped-parameter data possible. Multiphoton absorption is found to be expressed by a power-law extension of the law of Lambert and by an addition of a new term for buffer gas effect to the law of Beer. For reaction analysis, a method to evaluate the effect of incomplete mixing on apparent reaction rates is first presented. Secondly, multiphoton dissociation of Cf 3 Cl is found to occur in pseudo-first order fashion and the specific reaction rates for different beam fluence are shown to be correlated to the absorbed energy. (author)

  10. Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Laser (COIL), Electric Oxygen Iodine Laser (EOIL), Diode-Pumped Alkali Laser (DPAL), and Exciplex Alkali Laser (XPAL). The papers at this Symposium... exciplex -assisted absorption and laser-induced fluorescence, and multi-photon excitation of infrared atomic alkali transitions.11,12 In this paper... EXCIPLEX LASER SYSTEMS Proper review and discussion of the DPAL and XPAL laser systems can be found elsewhere,11,12 and in the paper by Carroll and

  11. Exciplex formation accompanied with excitation quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, Stanislav G; Burshtein, Anatoly I

    2010-04-08

    The competence of the reversible exciplex formation and parallel quenching of excitation (by electron or energy transfer) was considered using a non-Markovian pi-forms approach, identical to integral encounter theory (IET). General equations accounting for the reversible quenching and exciplex formation are derived in the contact approximation. Their general solution was obtained and adopted to the most common case when the ground state particles are in great excess. Particular cases of only photoionization or just exciplex formation separately studied earlier by means of IET are reproduced. In the case of the irreversible excitation quenching, the theory allows specifying the yields of the fluorescence and exciplex luminescence, as well as the long time kinetics of excitation and exciplex decays, in the absence of quenching. The theory distinguishes between the alternative regimes of (a) fast equilibration between excitations and exciplexes followed by their decay with a common average rate and (b) the fastest and deep excitation decay followed by the weaker and slower delayed fluorescence, backed by exciplex dissociation.

  12. Influence of excitation light on the frequency upconversion of trivalent lanthanide ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhenxing; Zheng Hairong; Tian Yu; Zhang Zhenglong; Cui Min

    2010-01-01

    The upconversion mechanisms of the 1 D 2 level of Tm 3+ ion under different excitation lights were analyzed. The influences of the excitation lights on the upconversion process, nonradiative relaxation from level 3 F 2 to 3 H 4 and fluorescence properties were investigated. It was shown that the one-color cw excitation could affect the profile of fluorescence, while information of the nonradiative relaxation could not be extracted. The nonradiative relaxation rate measured with the one-color pulsed excitation in crystal phase was in agreement with what was obtained in the free-standing nanometer crystal particles through the two-color pulsed excitation. The characteristics of the fluorescent emissions of Tm 3+ ions doped in various host materials were also discussed under different excitation lights. As a result of the discussion, a possible way to obtain nonradiative relaxation rate directly from a spectroscopic method in frequency domain was proposed. The study can be extended to other trivalent lanthanide ions that have upconversion through excited state absorption.

  13. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  14. A study of the fluorescence of the rare gases excited by nuclear particles. Use of the principle for the detection of nuclear radiation by scintillation; Etude de la fluorescence des gaz rares excites par des particules nucleaires. Utilisation pour la detection des rayonnements nucleaires par scintillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-12-15

    In the first part is studied the properties of atoms excited by the passage of {alpha} particles through the various rare gases at atmospheric pressure. A spectral analysis of the emitted light showed that certain impurities play an important part in producing the fluorescence, and it has led to the conclusion that the light emission contains at least two components - one very short - lived due to the direct deexcitation of the rare gas, the other relatively slower due to the energy transfers to the impurity. The measurement of the life-time of the excited states has confirmed this foregoing hypothesis, the rapid part of the impulse is extremely short: less than 2,25.10{sup -9} s in the case of xenon; the slower part has a life-time depending directly on the nitrogen concentration, nitrogen being the impurity giving the largest effect in all cases. The study of rare gases under the influence of an electric field has made it possible to show that the amount of light produced by an {alpha} particle can be multiplied (by 60, for example, in a field of 600 V:cm) so that the luminescent efficiency is greater than in the case of INaTI. In the second part the characteristics of the rare gases acting as scintillators is examined, the most important property being the absence of fluorescence saturation when the intensity of the excitation incident on the gas is very large. This, together with the very short time of scintillation has made it possible to study a certain number of nuclear physical applications (heavy particle energy-measurements, kinetic studies on nuclear reactors, neutron spectroscopy). (author) [French] On etudie dans la premiere partie les proprietes des atomes excites par le passage de particules {alpha} dans les differents gaz rares a la pression atmospherique. L'etude spectrale de la lumiere emise a montre que certaines impuretes jouent un role considerable dans la fluorescence et on a ete amene a penser que l'emission de lumiere comporte au moins deux

  15. Kinetics studies following state-selective laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keto, J.W.

    1994-04-01

    The objective of this contract was the study of state-to-state, electronic energy transfer reactions relevant to the excited state chemistry observed in discharges. We studied deactivation reactions and excitation transfer in collisions of excited states of xenon and krypton atoms with Ar, Kr, Xe and chlorine. The reactant states were excited selectively in two-photon transitions using tunable u.v. and v.u.v. lasers. Excited states produced by the collision were observed by their fluorescence. Reaction rates were measured by observing the time dependent decay of signals from reactant and product channels. In addition we measured interaction potentials of the reactants by laser spectroscopy where the laser induced fluorescence or ionization is measured as a function of laser wavelength (excitation spectra) or by measuring fluorescence spectra at fixed laser frequencies with monochromators. The spectra were obtained in the form of either lineshapes or individual lines from rovibrational transitions of bound states. Our research then required several categories of experiments in order to fully understand a reaction process: 1. High resolution laser spectroscopy of bound molecules or lineshapes of colliding pairs is used to determine potential curves for reactants. 2. Direct measurements of state-to-state reaction rates were measured by studying the time dependent loss of excited reactants and the time dependent formation of products. 3. The energy selectivity of a laser can be used to excite reactants on an excited surface with controlled internuclear configurations. For free states of reactants (as exist in a gas cell) this has been termed laser assisted reactions, while for initially bound states (as chemically bound reactants or dimers formed in supersonic beams) the experiments have been termed photo-fragmentation spectroscopy

  16. Brain morphology imaging by 3D microscopy and fluorescent Nissl staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazutkin, A A; Komissarova, N V; Toptunov, D M; Anokhin, K V

    2013-07-01

    Modern optical methods (multiphoton and light-sheet fluorescent microscopy) allow 3D imaging of large specimens of the brain with cell resolution. It is therefore essential to refer the resultant 3D pictures of expression of transgene, protein, and other markers in the brain to the corresponding structures in the atlas. This implies counterstaining of specimens with morphological dyes. However, there are no methods for contrasting large samples of the brain without their preliminary slicing. We have developed a method for fluorescent Nissl staining of whole brain samples. 3D reconstructions of specimens of the hippocampus, olfactory bulbs, and cortex were created. The method can be used for morphological control and evaluation of the effects of various factors on the brain using 3D microscopy technique.

  17. Dressing effect in multiphoton unimolecular dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Diaz, P.F.; Garcia-Fernandez, P.

    1986-03-01

    On the basis of a quantum-statistical model recently discussed, we deal in this paper with the perturbations induced by the intense field of a CO/sub 2/ laser on the levels of the vibrational pattern of a molecule undergoing multiphoton unimolecular dissociation. This perturbational correction is investigated by using a displacement operator technique and the results are interpreted according to the statistical model.

  18. Visualizing radiofrequency-skin interaction using multiphoton microscopy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hua; Lin, Sung-Jan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Wang, Chun-Chin; Hsu, Chih-Ting; Chu, Thomas; Dong, Chen-Yuan

    2012-02-01

    Redundant skin laxity is a major feature of aging. Recently, radiofrequency has been introduced for nonablative tissue tightening by volumetric heating of the deep dermis. Despite the wide range of application based on this therapy, the effect of this technique on tissue and the subsequent tissue remodeling have not been investigated in detail. Our objective is to evaluate the potential of non-linear optics, including multiphoton autofluorescence and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, as a non-invasive imaging modality for the real-time study of radiofrequency-tissue interaction. Electro-optical synergy device (ELOS) was used as the radiofrequency source in this study. The back skin of nude mouse was irradiated with radiofrequency at different passes. We evaluated the effect on skin immediately and 1 month after treatment with multiphoton microscopy. Corresponding histology was performed for comparison. We found that SHG is negatively correlated to radiofrequency passes, which means that collagen structural disruption happens immediately after thermal damage. After 1 month of collagen remodeling, SHG signals increased above baseline, indicating that collagen regeneration has occurred. Our findings may explain mechanism of nonablative skin tightening and were supported by histological examinations. Our work showed that monitoring the dermal heating status of RF and following up the detailed process of tissue reaction can be imaged and quantified with multiphoton microscopy non-invasively in vivo. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  20. [Study on optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorbance spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-yue; Guo, Wei-dong; Long, Ai-min; Chen, Shao-yong

    2010-09-01

    The optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were determined in rain samples collected in Xiamen Island, during a rainy season in 2007, using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy associated with UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Results showed that the absorbance spectra of CDOM in rain samples decreased exponentially with wavelength. The absorbance coefficient at 300 nm [a(300)] ranged from 0.27 to 3.45 m(-1), which would be used as an index of CDOM abundance, and the mean value was 1.08 m(-1). The content of earlier stage of precipitation events was higher than that of later stage of precipitation events, which implied that anthropogenic sources or atmospheric pollution or air mass types were important contributors to CDOM levels in precipitation. EEMs spectra showed 4 types of fluorescence signals (2 humic-like fluorescence peaks and 2 protein-like fluorescence peaks) in rainwater samples, and there were significant positive correlations of peak A with C and peak B with S, showing their same sources or some relationship of the two humic-like substance and the two protein-like substance. The strong positive correlations of the two humic-like fluorescence peaks with a(300), suggested that the chromophores responsible for absorbance might be the same as fluorophores responsible for fluorescence. Results showed that the presence of highly absorbing and fluorescing CDOM in rainwater is of significant importance in atmospheric chemistry and might play a previously unrecognized role in the wavelength dependent spectral attenuation of solar radiation by atmospheric waters.

  1. Optical skin biopsies by clinical CARS and multiphoton fluorescence/SHG tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    König, K; Breunig, H G; Bückle, R; Kellner-Höfer, M; Weinigel, M; Büttner, E; Sterry, W; Lademann, J

    2011-01-01

    The ultimate challenge for early diagnostics is label-free high-resolution intratissue imaging without taking physical biopsies. A novel hybrid femtosecond laser tomograph provides in vivo optical biopsies of human skin based on non-linear excitation of autofluorescence and the detection of lipids and water by CARS. Applications include skin cancer detection, biosafety tests of intradermal nanoparticles, and the testing of anti-aging products

  2. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  3. Application of laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation into atomic hydrogen density measurement in reactive plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajiwara, Toshinori; Takeda, Kazuyuki; Kim, Hee Je; Park, Won Zoo; Muraoka, Katsunori; Akazaki, Masanori; Okada, Tatsuo; Maeda, Mitsuo.

    1990-01-01

    Density profiles of hydrogen atoms in reactive plasmas of hydrogen and methane gases were measured, for the first time, using the laser fluorescence spectroscopy by two-photon excitation of Lyman beta transition and observation at the Balmer alpha radiation. Absolute density determinations showed atomic densities of around 3 x 10 17 m -3 , or the degree of dissociation to be 10 -4 . Densities along the axis perpendicular to the RF electrode showed peaked profiles, which were due to the balance of atomic hydrogen production by electron impact on molecules against diffusion loss to the walls. (author)

  4. Scattered and Fluorescent Photon Track Reconstruction in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria N. Kholodtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate analysis of biological tissue deep regions is important for tumor targeting. This paper is concentrated on photons’ paths analysis in such biotissue as brain, because optical probing depth of fluorescent and excitation radiation differs. A method for photon track reconstruction was developed. Images were captured focusing on the transparent wall close and parallel to the source fibres, placed in brain tissue phantoms. The images were processed to reconstruct the photons most probable paths between two fibres. Results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation. It was shown that the excitation radiation optical probing depth is twice more than for the fluorescent photons. The way of fluorescent radiation spreading was discussed. Because of fluorescent and excitation radiation spreads in different ways, and the effective anisotropy factor, geff, was proposed for fluorescent radiation. For the brain tissue phantoms it were found to be 0.62±0.05 and 0.66±0.05 for the irradiation wavelengths 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. These calculations give more accurate information about the tumor location in biotissue. Reconstruction of photon paths allows fluorescent and excitation probing depths determination. The geff can be used as simplified parameter for calculations of fluorescence probing depth.

  5. Composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassem, A.E.; Hickman, R.S.

    1975-01-01

    Based on recent studies, the effect of re-excited ions in the emission of electron beam induced fluorescence in nitrogen has been estimated. These effects are included in the formulation of a composite model describing the excitation and de-excitation of nitrogen by an electron beam. The shortcomings of previous models, namely the dependence of the measured temperature on true gas temperature as well as the gas density, are almost completely eliminated in the range of temperatures and densities covered by the available data. (auth)

  6. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination...... concentrations of the fluorophore calcein suitable for measurement of changes in cell water volume by self-quenching. The relationship between calcein fluorescence intensity, when excited at 490 nm (its excitation maximum), and calcein concentration was investigated in vitro and in various cultured cell types...... to a decrease in calcein fluorescence with high signal-to-noise ratio (>15). Similar results were obtained with the fluorophore BCECF when excited at its isosbestic wavelength (436 nm). The present results demonstrate the usefulness of fluorescence self-quenching to measure rapid changes in cell water volume....

  7. Preparatory studies for the on-line determination of zinc content in zinc ore slurries by radioisotope excited X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donhoffer, D.K.

    1977-01-01

    Laboratory tests were carried out to prove the feasibility of determination of Zn-content in zinc ore slurries by isotope excited x-ray fluorescence. Matrix effects were investigated on dry samples. A slurry testloop was built and measurements on slurries were made. The results indicated that the measurement on Zn in ore slurries can be made with a precision of 0,05% Zn. A working equation for interpretation of the measurements is derived. (author)

  8. Dual fluorescence and laser emissions from fluorescein-Na and eosin-B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Math, N.N.; Naik, L.R.; Suresh, H.M.; Inamdar, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    Dual laser emissions were observed from fluorescein-Na and eosin-B in ethanolic solutions individually in the concentration range from 10 -2 to 10 -3 mol dm -3 under N 2 laser excitation. The first compound was found to lase at two distinct regions with wavelength maxima around 540, 550 nm, while the second one around 558, 574 nm. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence excitation, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence emission and decays of the dyes in various solvents under varying conditions of excitation and detection systems were carried out to identify the nature of the emitting species responsible for laser emissions in two distinct regions. Both the dyes exhibited concentration and excitation wavelength dependence of fluorescence and the effects were found to be more pronounced in binary solution. The fluorescence decays of dyes were monoexponential in ethanol, while in some other solvents used, the decays showed biexponential behavior. The absorption and excitation studies using thin layers of solutions revealed the formation of dimers with the dye concentration around 1x10 -3 mol dm -3 . Fluorescence polarization and decay studies confirmed the presence of dimers. The two laser bands observed in the shorter and longer wavelengths were respectively ascribed to monomeric and dimeric species

  9. Dual fluorescence and laser emissions from fluorescein-Na and eosin-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Math, N.N. [Laser Spectroscopy (DRDO/KU) Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India)]. E-mail: nnm31@rediffmail.com; Naik, L.R. [Laser Spectroscopy (DRDO/KU) Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India); Suresh, H.M. [Laser Spectroscopy (DRDO/KU) Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India); Inamdar, S.R. [Laser Spectroscopy (DRDO/KU) Programme, Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad 580 003 (India)

    2006-12-15

    Dual laser emissions were observed from fluorescein-Na and eosin-B in ethanolic solutions individually in the concentration range from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3} mol dm{sup -3} under N{sub 2} laser excitation. The first compound was found to lase at two distinct regions with wavelength maxima around 540, 550 nm, while the second one around 558, 574 nm. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence excitation, fluorescence polarization, fluorescence emission and decays of the dyes in various solvents under varying conditions of excitation and detection systems were carried out to identify the nature of the emitting species responsible for laser emissions in two distinct regions. Both the dyes exhibited concentration and excitation wavelength dependence of fluorescence and the effects were found to be more pronounced in binary solution. The fluorescence decays of dyes were monoexponential in ethanol, while in some other solvents used, the decays showed biexponential behavior. The absorption and excitation studies using thin layers of solutions revealed the formation of dimers with the dye concentration around 1x10{sup -3} mol dm{sup -3}. Fluorescence polarization and decay studies confirmed the presence of dimers. The two laser bands observed in the shorter and longer wavelengths were respectively ascribed to monomeric and dimeric species.

  10. Interference between radiative emission and autoionization in the decay of excited states of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, L. Jr.; Theodosiou, C.E.; Wall, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    An excited state of an atom which can autoionize can also undergo radiative decay. We consider the interaction between the final states resulting from these two modes of decay, and its effects on such quantities as the fluorescence yield of the excited state, excitation profile of the excited state, and the spectra of the emitted photons and electrons. It is shown that the fraction of decays of the excited state resulting in a photon (fluorescence yield) is particularly sensitive to the details of the final-state interaction. In lowest order in the final-state interaction, the fluorescence yield is increased by a factor (1 + 1/q 2 ) from the traditional value, where q is the Fano q parameter relating to the excited state and the final atomic state

  11. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  12. Details of the Collagen and Elastin Architecture in the Human Limbal Conjunctiva, Tenon's Capsule and Sclera Revealed by Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Marando, Catherine M; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Kwon, Jiwon; Chuck, Roy S

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the architecture and distribution of collagen and elastin in human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera. The limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera of human donor corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted two-photon excited fluorescence microscope. No fixation process was necessary. The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned at 850 nm for two-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation (SHG) and autofluorescence (AF) were collected through a 425/30-nm and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping (z-stack) images were acquired. Collagen signals were collected with SHG, whereas elastin signals were collected with AF. The size and density of collagen bundles varied widely depending on depth: increasing from conjunctiva to sclera. In superficial image planes, collagen bundles were image planes (episclera and superficial sclera), collagen bundles were thicker (near 100 μm in width) and densely packed. Comparatively, elastin fibers were thinner and sparse. The orientation of elastin fibers was independent of collagen fibers in superficial layers; but in deep sclera, elastin fibers wove through collagen interbundle gaps. At the limbus, both collagen and elastin fibers were relatively compact and were distributed perpendicular to the limbal annulus. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to understand in greater detail the collagen and elastin architecture of the human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera.

  13. Open-ended response theory with polarizable embedding: multiphoton absorption in biomolecular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ringholm, Magnus; List, Nanna Holmgaard; Ruud, Kenneth; Kongsted, Jacob; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2016-10-12

    We present the theory and implementation of an open-ended framework for electric response properties at the level of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional theory that includes effects from the molecular environment modeled by the polarizable embedding (PE) model. With this new state-of-the-art multiscale functionality, electric response properties to any order can be calculated for molecules embedded in polarizable atomistic molecular environments ranging from solvents to complex heterogeneous macromolecules such as proteins. In addition, environmental effects on multiphoton absorption (MPA) properties can be studied by evaluating single residues of the response functions. The PE approach includes mutual polarization effects between the quantum and classical parts of the system through induced dipoles that are determined self-consistently with respect to the electronic density. The applicability of our approach is demonstrated by calculating MPA strengths up to four-photon absorption for the green fluorescent protein. We show how the size of the quantum region, as well as the treatment of the border between the quantum and classical regions, is crucial in order to obtain reliable MPA predictions.

  14. Development of Instrumental ORAM System for Radiation Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, J.S.; Cullum, B.M.; Mobley, J.; Moscovitch, M.; Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-01-01

    The development of an optical-based dosimeter for neutrons and heavy charged particles is described. It is based on the use of three dimensional (3-D) optical memory materials, used in optical computing applications, and multiphoton fluorescence of photochromic dyes. Development and characterization of various types of dosimeter materials are described as well as the optical readout system. In addition, various excitation geometries for ''reading'' and ''writing'' to the optical memories are also discussed

  15. Generalized Multiphoton Quantum Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Tillmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonclassical interference of photons lies at the heart of optical quantum information processing. Here, we exploit tunable distinguishability to reveal the full spectrum of multiphoton nonclassical interference. We investigate this in theory and experiment by controlling the delay times of three photons injected into an integrated interferometric network. We derive the entire coincidence landscape and identify transition matrix immanants as ideally suited functions to describe the generalized case of input photons with arbitrary distinguishability. We introduce a compact description by utilizing a natural basis that decouples the input state from the interferometric network, thereby providing a useful tool for even larger photon numbers.

  16. Rapid in vivo vertical tissue sectioning by multiphoton tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2018-02-01

    A conventional tool in the pathological field is histology which involves the analysis of thin sections of tissue in which specific cellular structures are stained with different dyes. The process to obtain these stained tissue sections is time consuming and invasive as it requires tissue removal, fixation, sectioning, and staining. Moreover, imaging of live tissue is not possible. We demonstrate that multiphoton tomography can provide within seconds, non-invasive, label-free, vertical images of live tissue which are in quality similar to conventional light micrographs of histologic stained specimen. In contrast to conventional setups based on laser scanning which image horizontally sections, the vertical in vivo images are directly recorded by combined line scanning and timed adjustments of the height of the focusing optics. In addition, multiphoton tomography provides autofluorescence lifetimes which can be used to determine the metabolic states of cells.

  17. Evaluation of endogenous species involved in brain tumors using multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Sudhir; Cullum, Brian M.

    2013-05-01

    It has been shown that using non-resonant multiphoton photoacoustic spectroscopy (NMPPAS), excised brain tumor (grade III astrocytoma) and healthy tissue can be differentiated from each other, even in neighboring biopsy samples[1, 2]. Because of this, this powerful technique offers a great deal of potential for use as a surgical guidance technique for tumor margining with up to cellular level spatial resolution[3]. NMPPAS spectra are obtained by monitoring the non-radiative relaxation pathways via ultrasonic detection, following two-photon excitation with light in the optical diagnostic window (740nm-1100nm). Based upon significant differences in the ratiometric absorption of the tissues following 970nm and 1100nm excitation, a clear classification of the tissue can be made. These differences are the result of variations in composition and oxidation state of certain endogenous biochemical species between healthy and malignant tissues. In this work, NADH, NAD+ and ATP were measured using NMPPAS in model gelatin tissue phantoms to begin to understand which species might be responsible for the observed spectral differences in the tissue. Each species was placed in specific pH environments to provide control over the ratio of oxidized to reduced forms of the species. Ratiometric analyses were then conducted to account for variability caused due to instrumental parameters. This paper will discuss the potential roles of each of the species for tumor determination and their contribution to the spectral signature.

  18. Non-invasive in vivo characterization of skin wound healing using label-free multiphoton microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jake D.; Majid, Fariah; Ramser, Hallie; Quinn, Kyle P.

    2017-02-01

    Non-healing ulcerative wounds, such as diabetic foot ulcers, are challenging to diagnose and treat due to their numerous possible etiologies and the variable efficacy of advanced wound care products. Thus, there is a critical need to develop new quantitative biomarkers and diagnostic technologies that are sensitive to wound status in order to guide care. The objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of label-free multiphoton microscopy for characterizing wound healing dynamics in vivo and identifying potential differences in diabetic wounds. We isolated and measured an optical redox ratio of FAD/(NADH+FAD) autofluorescence to provide three-dimensional maps of local cellular metabolism. Using a mouse model of wound healing, in vivo imaging at the wound edge identified a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio of the epidermis (p≤0.0103) between Days 3 through 14 compared to Day 1. This decrease in redox ratio coincided with a decrease in NADH fluorescence lifetime and thickening of the epithelium, collectively suggesting a sensitivity to keratinocyte hyperproliferation. In contrast to normal wounds, we have found that keratinocytes from diabetic wounds remain in a proliferative state at later time points with a lower redox ratio at the wound edge. Microstructural organization and composition was also measured from second harmonic generation imaging of collagen and revealed differences between diabetic and non-diabetic wounds. Our work demonstrates label-free multiphoton microscopy offers potential to provide non-invasive structural and functional biomarkers associated with different stages of skin wound healing, which may be used to detect delayed healing and guide treatment.

  19. Characterization of CDOM from urban waters in Northern-Northeastern China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Li, Sijia; Ma, Jianhang; Wen, Zhidan

    2016-08-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) plays an important role in aquatic systems, but high concentrations of organic materials are considered pollutants. The fluorescent component characteristics of CDOM in urban waters sampled from Northern and Northeastern China were examined by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) to investigate the source and compositional changes of CDOM on both space and pollution levels. One humic-like (C1), one tryptophan-like component (C2), and one tyrosine-like component (C3) were identified by PARAFAC. Mean fluorescence intensities of the three CDOM components varied spatially and by pollution level in cities of Northern and Northeastern China during July-August, 2013 and 2014. Principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted to identify the relative distribution of all water samples. Cluster analysis (CA) was also used to categorize the samples into groups of similar pollution levels within a study area. Strong positive linear relationships were revealed between the CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R (2) = 0.89, p CDOM components can be applied to monitor water quality in real time compared to that of traditional approaches. These results demonstrate that EEM-PARAFAC is useful to evaluate the dynamics of CDOM fluorescent components in urban waters from Northern and Northeastern China and this method has potential applications for monitoring urban water quality in different regions with various hydrological conditions and pollution levels.

  20. Determination of uranium in seawater by fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Toshi; Kawakubo, Senkichi; Minegishi, Hisako.

    1984-01-01

    A Fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of uranium in seawater has been developed. Anion exchange separation of uranium from seawater followed by preparation of NaF-carbonate cake and by spectrometry for ultraviolet ray excited fluorescence of uranium on the fluoride host provide the trace determinaton of uranium at the subnano gram level. Anion exchange behavior, excitation-emission behavior of the uranium on the host and effects of foreign ions to the fluorescence have been presented. Appling the method to 1 ml of seawater 3 ppb of uranium has been determined. (author)